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Sample records for adverse clinical consequences

  1. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences and clinical risk management

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zeng, Su; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zhou, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background Omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), is widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and functional dyspepsia. Polypharmacy is common in patients receiving omeprazole. Drug toxicity and treatment failure resulting from inappropriate combination therapy with omeprazole have been reported sporadically. Systematic review has not been available to address the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences, the factors determining the degree of DDI between omeprazole and comedication, and the corresponding clinical risk management. Methods Literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1988 to March 2013. The full text of each article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Results Omeprazole has actual adverse influences on the pharmacokinetics of medications such as diazepam, carbamazepine, clozapine, indinavir, nelfinavir, atazanavir, rilpivirine, methotrexate, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, clopidogrel, digoxin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and oral iron supplementation. Meanwhile, low efficacy of omeprazole treatment would be anticipated, as omeprazole elimination could be significantly induced by comedicated efavirenz and herb medicines such as St John’s wort, Ginkgo biloba, and yin zhi huang. The mechanism for DDI involves induction or inhibition of cytochrome P450, inhibition of P-glycoprotein or breast cancer resistance protein-mediated drug transport, and inhibition of oral absorption by gastric acid suppression. Sometimes, DDIs of omeprazole do not exhibit a PPI class effect. Other suitable PPIs or histamine 2 antagonists may be therapeutic alternatives that can be used to avoid adverse consequences. The degree of DDIs associated with omeprazole and clinical outcomes depend on factors such as genotype status of CYP2C19 and CYP1A2, ethnicity, dose and treatment course of precipitant

  2. Guideline-based peer-to-peer consultation optimizes pegfilgrastim use with no adverse clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Marc L; Kumar, Akhil; Davis, Sharon; Shimp, William; Hrushesky, William J M

    2012-05-01

    Practice guidelines do not recommend the routine use of colony-stimulating factors when there is a low risk (<10%) of febrile neutropenia (FN). We prospectively determined whether expert peer-to-peer consultation with prescribing oncologists would improve adherence to guidelines and whether there would be any adverse events associated with that adherence. Commencing in March 2010, we reviewed requests for pegfilgrastim from 22 community oncology practices comprising 78 physicians providing service to approximately 97,000 Medicare members. Paid claims data on all chemotherapy and supportive care medications were reviewed from fourth quarter (Q4) 2009 through third quarter (Q3) 2010. In total, 82 patients received pegfilgrastim. If the prescribed chemotherapy was associated with a low risk (<10%) for FN, then a peer review was initiated. The treating physician made the final decision to use, or not use, pegfilgrastim, and no denials were issued. A total of 245 units (1 unit = 6 mg) of pegfilgrastim were administered during the 4 quarters analyzed. Use in the low-risk category decreased from 52 units in Q4 2009 to 15 units in Q3 2010. The per member per month (PMPM) cost of pegfilgrastim decreased across quarters, with an average cost of $1.07 PMPM for Q4 2009 and $0.57 PMPM for Q3 2010. No studied patient was admitted for neutropenic fever. Active expert peer-to-peer consultation with prescribing oncologists can promote adherence to guidelines and potentially lead to significant cost reductions without significant risk of neutropenic fever, with or without hospitalization, for patients with cancer.

  3. Adverse consequences of acute inhalant intoxication.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric L; Howard, Matthew O

    2011-04-01

    Inhalants are widely misused by adolescents and are among the most toxic of psychoactive substances. This investigation examined the prevalence and correlates of adverse consequences of acute inhalant intoxication. Adolescent inhalant users (n = 279) in residential care completed structured interviews including assessments of the characteristics of their inhalant use. Multivariate logistic and linear regression and path analyses identified correlates of adverse inhalant intoxication-related experiences. Results of this study indicated that high-risk behaviors and adverse outcomes experienced during episodes of inhalant intoxication were common in this sample. High-frequency inhalant users were significantly more likely than moderate- and low-frequency users to experience adverse consequences of inhalant intoxication. Certain risky behaviors and consequences, such as engaging in unprotected sex or acts of physical violence while high on inhalants, were dramatically more common among high-frequency users than low-frequency users. Prior traumatic experiences, trait impulsivity, self-medication use of inhalants, and polydrug use were significant correlates of adverse inhalant-intoxication-related consequences. Adverse events and high-risk behaviors commonly occurred during episodes of inhalant intoxication in this sample of adolescents. High-frequency inhalant users and youth who used inhalants to medicate negative affective states were at elevated risk for such events.

  4. Adverse health consequences of the Iraq War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2013-03-16

    The adverse health consequences of the Iraq War (2003-11) were profound. We conclude that at least 116,903 Iraqi non-combatants and more than 4800 coalition military personnel died over the 8-year course. Many Iraqi civilians were injured or became ill because of damage to the health-supporting infrastructure of the country, and about 5 million were displaced. More than 31,000 US military personnel were injured and a substantial percentage of those deployed suffered post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other neuropsychological disorders and their concomitant psychosocial problems. Many family members of military personnel had psychological problems. Further review of the adverse health consequences of this war could help to minimise the adverse health consequences of, and help to prevent, future wars.

  5. Adverse consequences of lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Abraham, H D; Aldridge, A M

    1993-10-01

    The continued endemic use of hallucinogenic drugs, and of LSD in particular, raises concern regarding their short and long term adverse consequences. The epidemiology of LSD abuse is reviewed suggesting an increase in LSD use among the young as the prevalence rates for other substances continues to fall. Evidence supports the association of LSD use with panic reactions, prolonged schizoaffective psychoses and post-hallucinogen perceptual disorder, the latter being present continually for as long as 5 years. Evidence does not support claims of genetic disorders arising from hallucinogens. In light of the foregoing, current data confirm earlier findings of long lasting psychopathology arising in vulnerable individuals from the use of LSD. A hypothetical long term molecular mechanism of adverse effects is proposed.

  6. Adverse health consequences of the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2015-01-01

    The 40th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War is a useful time to review the adverse health consequences of that war and to identify and address serious problems related to armed conflict, such as the protection of noncombatant civilians. More than 58,000 U.S. servicemembers died during the war and more than 150,000 were wounded. Many suffered from posttraumatic stress disorders and other mental disorders and from the long-term consequences of physical injuries. However, morbidity and mortality, although difficult to determine precisely, was substantially higher among the Vietnamese people, with at least two million of them dying during the course of the war. In addition, more than one million Vietnamese were forced to migrate during the war and its aftermath, including many "boat people" who died at sea during attempts to flee. Wars continue to kill and injure large numbers of noncombatant civilians and continue to damage the health-supporting infrastructure of society, expose civilians to toxic chemicals, forcibly displace many people, and divert resources away from services to benefit noncombatant civilians. Health professionals can play important roles in promoting the protection of noncombatant civilians during war and helping to prevent war and create a culture of peace.

  7. Adverse consequences of neonatal antibiotic exposure.

    PubMed

    Cotten, Charles M

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics have not only saved lives and improved outcomes, but they also influence the evolving microbiome. This review summarizes reports on neonatal infections and variation in antibiotic utilization, discusses the emergence of resistant organisms, and presents data from human neonates and animal models demonstrating the impact of antibiotics on the microbiome, and how microbiome alterations impact health. The importance of antibiotic stewardship is also discussed. Infections increase neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the clinical presentation of infections can be subtle, prompting clinicians to empirically start antibiotics when infection is a possibility. Antibiotic-resistant infections are a growing problem. Cohort studies have identified extensive center variations in antibiotic usage and associations between antibiotic exposures and outcomes. Studies of antibiotic-induced microbiome alterations and downstream effects on the developing immune system have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the associations between antibiotics and adverse outcomes. The emergence of resistant microorganisms and recent evidence linking antibiotic practice variations with health outcomes has led to the initiation of antibiotic stewardship programs. The review encourages practitioners to assess local antibiotic use with regard to local microbiology, and to adopt steps to reduce infections and use antibiotics wisely.

  8. Adverse Consequences of Neonatal Antibiotic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, C. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Antibiotics have saved lives and improved outcomes, but they also influence the evolving microbiome. This review 1) summarizes reports on neonatal infections and variation in antibiotic utilization, 2) discusses the emergence of resistant organisms, and 3) presents data from human neonates and animal models demonstrating impact of antibiotics on the microbiome, and how microbiome alterations impact health. The importance of antibiotic stewardship is also discussed. Recent findings Infections increase neonatal morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the clinical presentation of infections can be subtle, prompting clinicians to empirically start antibiotics when infection is a possibility. Antibiotic-resistant infections are a growing problem. Cohort studies have identified extensive center variations in antibiotic usage and associations between antibiotic exposures and outcomes. Studies of antibiotic-induced microbiome alterations and downstream effects on the developing immune system have increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the associations between antibiotics and adverse outcomes. The emergence of resistant microorganisms and recent evidence linking antibiotic practice variations with health outcomes has led to initiation of antibiotic stewardship programs. Summary This review encourages practitioners to assess local antibiotic use with regard to local microbiology, and to adopt steps to reduce infections and use antibiotics wisely. PMID:26886785

  9. Workplace Bullying: A Tale of Adverse Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Workplace bullying is defined as the repetitive and systematic engagement of interpersonally abusive behaviors that negatively affect both the targeted individual and the work organization. According to the findings of 12 studies, being bullied in the workplace affects approximately 11 percent of workers. Victims are frequently blue-collar and unskilled workers. However, there also appear to be gender and milieu/management factors. Emotional/psychological consequences of workplace bullying may include increased mental distress, sleep disturbances, fatigue in women and lack of vigor in men, depression and anxiety, adjustment disorders, and even work-related suicide. Medical consequences of workplace bullying may include an increase in health complaints such as neck pain, musculoskeletal complaints, acute pain, fibromyalgia, and cardiovascular symptoms. Finally, socioeconomic consequences of workplace bullying may include absenteeism due to sick days and unemployment. Clinicians in both mental health and primary care settings need to be alert to the associations between bullying in the workplace and these potential negative consequences, as patients may not disclose workplace maltreatment due to embarrassment or fears of retribution. PMID:25852978

  10. New Unintended Adverse Consequences of Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Sittig, D F; Wright, A; Ash, J; Singh, H

    2016-11-10

    Although the health information technology industry has made considerable progress in the design, development, implementation, and use of electronic health records (EHRs), the lofty expectations of the early pioneers have not been met. In 2006, the Provider Order Entry Team at Oregon Health & Science University described a set of unintended adverse consequences (UACs), or unpredictable, emergent problems associated with computer-based provider order entry implementation, use, and maintenance. Many of these originally identified UACs have not been completely addressed or alleviated, some have evolved over time, and some new ones have emerged as EHRs became more widely available. The rapid increase in the adoption of EHRs, coupled with the changes in the types and attitudes of clinical users, has led to several new UACs, specifically: complete clinical information unavailable at the point of care; lack of innovations to improve system usability leading to frustrating user experiences; inadvertent disclosure of large amounts of patient-specific information; increased focus on computer-based quality measurement negatively affecting clinical workflows and patient-provider interactions; information overload from marginally useful computer-generated data; and a decline in the development and use of internally-developed EHRs. While each of these new UACs poses significant challenges to EHR developers and users alike, they also offer many opportunities. The challenge for clinical informatics researchers is to continue to refine our current systems while exploring new methods of overcoming these challenges and developing innovations to improve EHR interoperability, usability, security, functionality, clinical quality measurement, and information summarization and display.

  11. Mechanisms and Clinical Consequences of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongxing; Mackenzie, Neil C. W.; Farquharson, Colin; MacRae, Vicky E.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification has severe clinical consequences and is considered an accurate predictor of future adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Previously vascular calcification was thought to be a passive process which involved the deposition of calcium and phosphate in arteries and cardiac valves. However, recent studies have shown that vascular calcification is a highly regulated, cell-mediated process similar to bone formation. In this article, we outline the current understanding of key mechanisms governing vascular calcification and highlight the clinical consequences. By understanding better the molecular pathways and genetic circuitry responsible for the pathological mineralization process novel drug targets may be identified and exploited to combat and reduce the detrimental effects of vascular calcification on human health. PMID:22888324

  12. Adverse event management during clinical investigations.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2002-11-01

    The requirements are changing for documentation and evaluation of adverse events that occur during clinical investigations of medical devices. This article discusses important amendments to adverse event definitions contained in a draft international standard and methods for improving the process of managing these types of events.

  13. Amphotericin B nephrotoxicity: the adverse consequences of altered membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, B P; Briggs, J P; Schnermann, J

    1995-08-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) has been in clinical use for more than 30 yr but has remained the most effective drug for treatment of serious fungal infections. Its use has increased in recent years, as the result of increases in aggressive intensive care support and increased numbers of immunocompromised patients. Nephrotoxic manifestations are common, and this is the major factor limiting the clinical use of the drug. A number of recent studies have contributed to a better understanding of the mechanism by which AmB exerts its nephrotoxic effect. AmB alters cell membrane permeability and probably as a consequence alters tubular and vascular smooth muscle cell function, leading to various tubular transport defects and vasoconstriction. Decreased RBF appears to play a major role in AmB-induced reduction GFR, and recurrent ischemia may be the basis of permanent structural nephrotoxic effects. Salt loading is the only measure proven by controlled prospective study to ameliorate AmB nephrotoxicity in humans. Liposomal AmB and the formulation of an emulsion of AmB in lipid may provide a protective effect based on altering the affinity of AmB for mammalian cell membranes, while preserving high efficacy against fungal cells. However, further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these new AmB formulations.

  14. Overdependence on Technology: An Unintended Adverse Consequence of Computerized Provider Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Emily M.; Sittig, Dean F.; Guappone, Kenneth P.; Dykstra, Richard H.; Ash, Joan S.

    Computerized provider order entry(CPOE) and other clinical information systems can help reduce medical errors, promote practice standardization, and improve the quality of patient care. However, implementing these systems can result in unintended adverse consequences. Our multidisciplinary team used qualitative methods to gather and analyze data describing unintended adverse consequences related to CPOE adoption and use. Overdependence on technology emerged as one of nine major types we identified. Careful analysis of these data revealed three themes: 1) system downtime can create chaos when there are insufficient backup systems in place, 2) users have false expectations regarding data accuracy and processing, and 3) some clinicians cannot work efficiently without computerized systems. We provide recommendations for mitigating these important issues. PMID:18693805

  15. Overdependence on technology: an unintended adverse consequence of computerized provider order entry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Emily M; Sittig, Dean F; Guappone, Kenneth P; Dykstra, Richard H; Ash, Joan S

    2007-10-11

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) and other clinical information systems can help reduce medical errors, promote practice standardization, and improve the quality of patient care. However, implementing these systems can result in unintended adverse consequences. Our multidisciplinary team used qualitative methods to gather and analyze data describing unintended adverse consequences related to CPOE adoption and use. Overdependence on technology emerged as one of nine major types we identified. Careful analysis of these data revealed three themes: 1) system downtime can create chaos when there are insufficient backup systems in place, 2) users have false expectations regarding data accuracy and processing, and 3) some clinicians cannot work efficiently without computerized systems. We provide recommendations for mitigating these important issues.

  16. Phentermine/topiramate for weight reduction and treatment of adverse metabolic consequences in obesity.

    PubMed

    Bays, H E; Gadde, K M

    2011-12-01

    Phentermine hydrochloride is a noradrenergic sympathetic amine approved for decades by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at doses as high as 37.5 mg/day for the short-term treatment of obesity. Topiramate is a sulfamate-substituted monosaccharide marketed since 1996, and approved by the FDA for seizure disorders at doses up to 400 mg/day and for the prevention of migraine headaches at doses up to 100 mg/day. Clinical trial data suggest topiramate promotes weight loss. The prescribing information of neither agent describes adverse drug interactions with the other. The controlled-release formulation of phentermine and topiramate at low, medium and full doses (with full dose containing 15 mg of phentermine hydrochloride and 92 mg of topiramate) promotes weight reduction, with clinical trial data supporting improvement in adiposopathic consequences leading to metabolic diseases. Reported adverse events with this combination agent are as expected, based upon knowledge of the individual components.

  17. Early life adversity: Lasting consequences for emotional learning.

    PubMed

    Krugers, Harm J; Arp, J Marit; Xiong, Hui; Kanatsou, Sofia; Lesuis, Sylvie L; Korosi, Aniko; Joels, Marian; Lucassen, Paul J

    2017-02-01

    The early postnatal period is a highly sensitive time period for the developing brain, both in humans and rodents. During this time window, exposure to adverse experiences can lastingly impact cognitive and emotional development. In this review, we briefly discuss human and rodent studies investigating how exposure to adverse early life conditions - mainly related to quality of parental care - affects brain activity, brain structure, cognition and emotional responses later in life. We discuss the evidence that early life adversity hampers later hippocampal and prefrontal cortex functions, while increasing amygdala activity, and the sensitivity to stressors and emotional behavior later in life. Exposure to early life stress may thus on the one hand promote behavioral adaptation to potentially threatening conditions later in life -at the cost of contextual memory formation in less threatening situations- but may on the other hand also increase the sensitivity to develop stress-related and anxiety disorders in vulnerable individuals.

  18. Long Term Physical Health Consequences of Adverse Childhood Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Monnat, Shannon M.; Chandler, Raeven Faye

    2015-01-01

    This study examined associations between adverse childhood family experiences and adult physical health using data from 52,250 US adults aged 18–64 from the 2009–2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). We found that experiencing childhood physical, verbal, or sexual abuse, witnessing parental domestic violence, experiencing parental divorce, and living with someone who was depressed, abused drugs or alcohol, or who had been incarcerated were associated with one or more of the following health outcomes: self-rated health, functional limitations, diabetes, and heart attack. Adult socioeconomic status and poor mental health and health behaviors significantly mediated several of these associations. The results of this study highlight the importance of family-based adverse childhood experiences on adult health outcomes and suggest that adult SES and stress-related coping behaviors may be crucial links between trauma in the childhood home and adult health. PMID:26500379

  19. Hypogonadism secondary to hyperprolactinaemia: successful treatment but adverse consequences.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, R P; Bujawansa, S; Qureshi, Z; Rimmer, M; Heald, A

    2012-05-01

    It is accepted that care must be taken in initiating testosterone replacement in hypogonadal individuals with historically low androgen levels. However less is reported about the influence of restoration of normal endogenous testosterone production on behaviour.Here we report how the adverse sequelae of successful treatment of hypogonadism secondary to hyperprolactinaemia, manifesting as irritability and low threshold to aggression, were managed through a joint approach between psychiatrist and physician.

  20. Surgeons' Disclosures of Clinical Adverse Events.

    PubMed

    Elwy, A Rani; Itani, Kamal M F; Bokhour, Barbara G; Mueller, Nora M; Glickman, Mark E; Zhao, Shibei; Rosen, Amy K; Lynge, Dana; Perkal, Melissa; Brotschi, Erica A; Sanchez, Vivian M; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2016-11-01

    Surgeons are frequently faced with clinical adverse events owing to the nature of their specialty, yet not all surgeons disclose these events to patients. To sustain open disclosure programs, it is essential to understand how surgeons are disclosing adverse events, factors that are associated with reporting such events, and the effect of disclosure on surgeons. To quantitatively assess surgeons' reports of disclosure of adverse events and aspects of their experiences with the disclosure process. An observational study was conducted from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2013, involving a 21-item baseline questionnaire administered to 67 of 75 surgeons (89%) representing 12 specialties at 3 Veterans Affairs medical centers. Sixty-two surveys of their communication about adverse events and experiences with disclosing such events were completed by 35 of these 67 surgeons (52%). Data were analyzed using mixed linear random-effects and logistic regression models. Self-reports of disclosure assessed by 8 items from guidelines and pilot research, surgeons' perceptions of the adverse event, reported personal effects from disclosure, and baseline attitudes toward disclosure. Most of the surgeons completing the web-based surveys (41 responses from men and 21 responses from women) used 5 of the 8 recommended disclosure items: explained why the event happened (55 of 60 surveys [92%]), expressed regret for what happened (52 of 60 [87%]), expressed concern for the patient's welfare (57 of 60 [95%]), disclosed the adverse event within 24 hours (58 of 60 [97%]), and discussed steps taken to treat any subsequent problems (59 of 60 [98%]). Fewer surgeons apologized to patients (33 of 60 [55%]), discussed whether the event was preventable (33 of 60 [55%]), or how recurrences could be prevented (19 of 59 [32%]). Surgeons who were less likely to have discussed prevention (33 of 60 [55%]), those who stated the event was very or extremely serious (40 of 61 surveys [66%]), or reported very

  1. Needle phobia: etiology, adverse consequences, and patient management.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Chester J; Giovannitti, Joseph A; Boynes, Sean G

    2010-10-01

    Needle phobia has profound health, dental, societal, and legal implications, and severe psychological, social, and physiologic consequences. There is genetic evidence for the physiologic response to needle puncture, and a significant familial psychological component, showing evidence of inheritance. Needle phobia is also a learned behavior. The dental practitioner must recognize patients with needle phobia before the administration of local anesthetics to identify patients who are potentially reactive and to prevent untoward sequelae. Needle phobia is highly associated with avoidance behavior, and the dentist must exhibit compassion and respect. To avoid bradycardia, hypotension, unconsciousness, convulsions, and possibly asystole, oral premedication with benzodiazepines or other antianxiety agents must be considered for patients who are needle phobic. Management of needle phobiaeinduced syncope includes perioperative monitoring, oxygen administration, positioning, atropine, and vasopressors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Are renal adverse effects of hydroxyethyl starches merely a consequence of their incorrect use?

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane S; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Engel, Christoph; Meier-Hellmann, Andreas; Ragaller, Maximilian; Welte, Tobias; Kuhnt, Evelyn; Reinhart, Konrad

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies such as VISEP-study, which show a negative outcome after the administration of hydroxyethyl starch (HES), are often criticized for an "incorrect" use of HES. It is argued that HES used in these studies differed from usual practice and that recommendations for maximal dosage, duration, and creatinine values were ignored, not enough "free water" was provided and more modern HES solutions should have been used. These comments imply that renal adverse events in clinical studies are the consequence of an inappropriate use of HES. We therefore searched for evidence whether these suggested measures are beneficial. Narrative review; post hoc statistical analysis of epidemiologic data from a representative nationwide survey. It is evident from published clinical studies that the renal risk of HES increases with cumulative dose and rising serum creatinine values, but no safe upper dose limit or creatinine threshold is known. Suggested safety measures were not able to prevent HES-induced renal failure in clinical studies. Published clinical trials with modern HES solutions are not suited to prove its assumed increased safety because of small sample sizes, low cumulative doses, short observation periods, and inadequate control fluids. Use of HES in a clinical study with negative outcomes conformed to clinical practice, indicating the generalizability of study results. There is no evidence for the assumption that HES-associated renal impairment may be avoided by accompanying measures. Because HES use does not improve clinical outcome, the question arises whether it should be used at all in patients at risk.

  3. Adverse consequences of student drinking: the role of sex, social anxiety, drinking motives.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Melissa M; Olivier, Jake; Alperstein, Dion M; Zvolensky, Michael J; Norton, Alice R

    2011-08-01

    This study examined whether biological sex, social anxiety, and drinking motives relate differently to distinct types of alcohol-related consequences using Poisson regression. One hundred eighteen college students completed self-report measures assessing drinking motives and social anxiety and an interview assessing alcohol consumption and consequences. Highly socially anxious women were particularly apt to experience adverse role functioning consequences, while men were particularly apt to experience physical consequences. Although highly socially anxious women reported more personal consequences than did women with low to moderate social anxiety, men with low to moderate social anxiety reported experiencing more social and personal consequences than did women with low to moderate social anxiety. When taking into consideration the above associations, coping motives were statistically associated with social consequences and marginally related to personal consequences, while enhancement motives were significantly associated with physical consequences. Targeting these factors may lead to effective interventions for individuals with co-occurring social anxiety and drinking problems.

  4. Obesity and pregnancy: mechanisms of short term and long term adverse consequences for mother and child.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Patrick M; Shankar, Kartik

    2017-02-08

    Obesity is the most common medical condition in women of reproductive age. Obesity during pregnancy has short term and long term adverse consequences for both mother and child. Obesity causes problems with infertility, and in early gestation it causes spontaneous pregnancy loss and congenital anomalies. Metabolically, obese women have increased insulin resistance in early pregnancy, which becomes manifest clinically in late gestation as glucose intolerance and fetal overgrowth. At term, the risk of cesarean delivery and wound complications is increased. Postpartum, obese women have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, depression, and difficulty with breast feeding. Because 50-60% of overweight or obese women gain more than recommended by Institute of Medicine gestational weight guidelines, postpartum weight retention increases future cardiometabolic risks and prepregnancy obesity in subsequent pregnancies. Neonates of obese women have increased body fat at birth, which increases the risk of childhood obesity. Although there is no unifying mechanism responsible for the adverse perinatal outcomes associated with maternal obesity, on the basis of the available data, increased prepregnancy maternal insulin resistance and accompanying hyperinsulinemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress seem to contribute to early placental and fetal dysfunction. We will review the pathophysiology underlying these data and try to shed light on the specific underlying mechanisms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Obesity and pregnancy: Mechanisms of short term and long term adverse consequences for mother and child

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Obesity is the most common medical condition in women of reproductive age. Obesity during pregnancy has short term and long term adverse consequences for both mother and child. Obesity causes problems with infertility, and in early gestation it causes spontaneous pregnancy loss and congenital anomal...

  6. Clinical spectrum of adverse reactions to tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Collins-Williams, C

    1985-01-01

    Tartrazine, a common additive in foods and drugs, often causes adverse reactions such as recurrent urticaria, angioedema, and asthma and is frequently implicated in hyperkinesis. This paper summarizes the recent literature on the subject and outlines a practical approach for the practicing physician to diagnose and treat these patients in an optimal manner.

  7. Increases in Wheelchair Breakdowns, Repairs, and Adverse Consequences for People with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Worobey, Lynn; Oyster, Michelle; Nemunaitis, Gregory; Cooper, Rory; Boninger, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to report the current incidence of wheelchair breakdowns, repairs, and consequences and to compare current data with historical data. Design A convenience sample survey of 723 participants with spinal cord injury who use a wheelchair for more than 40 hrs/wk treated at a Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems center was conducted. Results Significant increases were found in the number of participants reporting repairs (7.8%) and adverse consequences (23.5%) in a 6-mo period (2006Y2011) compared with historical data (2004Y2006) (P G 0.001). When examining current data, minorities experienced a greater frequency and higher number of reported consequences (P = 0.03). Power wheelchair users reported a higher number of repairs and consequences than did manual wheelchair users (P G 0.001). Wheelchairs equipped with seat functions were associated with a greater frequency of adverse consequences (P = 0.01). Repairs did not vary across funding source, but individuals with wheelchairs provided by Medicare and Medicaid reported a higher frequency of consequences than did the combined group of the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, Worker’s Compensation, and the Veterans Administration (P = 0.034 and P = 0.013, respectively). Conclusions The incidence and consequences of repairs are increasing from what was already a very high statistic in this United States population. Further investigation into causality is required, and intervention is needed to reverse this potential trend. PMID:22549473

  8. Clinical Consequences of Polypharmacy in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Robert L.; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Hajjar, Emily R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Polypharmacy, defined as the use of multiple drugs or more than are medically necessary, is a growing concern for older adults. Areas Covered We present information about; 1.) Prevalence of polypharmacy and unnecessary medication use. ; 2.) Negative Consequences of Polypharmacy; 3.) Interventions to improve polypharmacy. Expert Opinion International research shows that polypharmacy is common in older adults with the highest number of drugs taken by those residing in nursing homes. Nearly 50% of older adults take one or more medications that are not medically necessary. Research has clearly established a strong relationship between polypharmacy and negative clinical consequences. Moreover, well designed inter-professional (often incuding clinical pharmacist) intervention studies that focus on enrolling high risk older patients with polypharmacy have shown that they can be effective in improving the overall quality of prescribing with mixed results on distal health outcomes. PMID:24073682

  9. Adverse Childhood Experiences of Referred Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: Consequences for their Wellbeing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamers-Winkelman, Francien; Willemen, Agnes M.; Visser, Margreet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the relationships among Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in a high risk clinical sample of Dutch children whose mothers were abused by an intimate partner, and the severity of behavioral and emotional problems and trauma symptoms. Methods: The study population comprised 208 children (M = 7.81 years, SD =…

  10. Adverse Childhood Experiences of Referred Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: Consequences for their Wellbeing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamers-Winkelman, Francien; Willemen, Agnes M.; Visser, Margreet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the relationships among Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in a high risk clinical sample of Dutch children whose mothers were abused by an intimate partner, and the severity of behavioral and emotional problems and trauma symptoms. Methods: The study population comprised 208 children (M = 7.81 years, SD =…

  11. Clinical consequences of diet-induced dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee Kwan; Estaki, Mehrbod; Gibson, Deanna L

    2013-01-01

    Various disease states are associated with an imbalance of protective and pathogenic bacteria in the gut, termed dysbiosis. Current evidence reveals that dietary factors affect the microbial ecosystem in the gut. Changes to community structure of the intestinal microbiota are not without consequence considering the wide effects that the microbes have on both local and systemic immunity. The goal of this review is to give insight into the importance of gut microbiota in disease development and the possible therapeutic interventions in clinical settings. We introduce the complex tripartite relationship between diet, microbes and the gut epithelium. This is followed by a summary of clinical evidence of diet-induced dysbiosis as a contributing factor in the development of gastrointestinal diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and colorectal cancer, as well as systemic diseases like obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Finally, the current dietary and microbial interventions to promote a healthy microbial profile will be reviewed.

  12. The duty to disclose adverse clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Liao, S Matthew; Sheehan, Mark; Clarke, Steve

    2009-08-01

    Participants in some clinical trials are at risk of being harmed and sometimes are seriously harmed as a result of not being provided with available, relevant risk information. We argue that this situation is unacceptable and that there is a moral duty to disclose all adverse clinical trial results to participants in clinical trials. This duty is grounded in the human right not to be placed at risk of harm without informed consent. We consider objections to disclosure grounded in considerations of commercial interest, and we argue that these concerns are insufficient to override the moral duty to disclose adverse clinical trial results. However, we also develop a proposal that enables commercial interests to be protected, while promoting the duty to disclose adverse clinical trial results.

  13. Epigenetics and life-long consequences of an adverse nutritional and diabetic intrauterine environment.

    PubMed

    El Hajj, Nady; Schneider, Eberhard; Lehnen, Harald; Haaf, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenon that adverse environmental exposures in early life are associated with increased susceptibilities for many adult, particularly metabolic diseases, is now referred to as 'developmental origins of health and disease (DOHAD)' or 'Barker' hypothesis. Fetal overnutrition and undernutrition have similar long-lasting effects on the setting of the neuroendocrine control systems, energy homeostasis, and metabolism, leading to life-long increased morbidity. There are sensitive time windows during early development, where environmental cues can program persistent epigenetic modifications which are generally assumed to mediate these gene-environment interactions. Most of our current knowledge on fetal programing comes from animal models and epidemiological studies in humans, in particular the Dutch famine birth cohort. In industrialized countries, there is more concern about adverse long-term consequences of fetal overnutrition, i.e. by exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus and/or maternal obesity which affect 10-20% of pregnancies. Epigenetic changes due to maternal diabetes/obesity may predispose the offspring to develop metabolic disease later in life and, thus, transmit the adverse environmental exposure to the next generation. This vicious cycle could contribute significantly to the worldwide metabolic disease epidemics. In this review article, we focus on the epigenetics of an adverse intrauterine environment, in particular gestational diabetes, and its implications for the prevention of complex disease. © 2014 The authors.

  14. Effects of Alcohol-Induced Working Memory Decline on Alcohol Consumption and Adverse Consequences of Use

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, William V.; Day, Anne M.; Metrik, Jane; Leventhal, Adam M.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Alcohol use appears to decrease executive function acutely in a dose dependent manner, and lower baseline executive function appears to contribute to problematic alcohol use. However, no studies, to our knowledge, have examined the relationship between individual differences in working memory (a subcomponent of executive function) after alcohol consumption and drinking behaviors and consequences. Objectives The current study assessed the relationship between drinking behavior, alcohol-related consequences, and alcohol-induced changes in working memory (as assessed by Trails Making Test-B). Method Participants recruited from the community (n = 41), 57.3% male, mean age 39.2, took part in a three-session, within-subjects, repeated-measures design. Participants were administered a placebo, 0.4 g/kg, or 0.8 g/kg dose of alcohol. Working memory, past 30 day alcohol consumption, and consequences of alcohol use were measured at baseline; working memory was measured again after each beverage administration. Results Poorer working memory after alcohol administration (controlling for baseline working memory) was significantly associated with a greater number of drinks consumed per drinking day. Additionally, we observed a significant indirect relationship between the degree of alcohol-induced working memory decline and adverse consequences of alcohol use, which was mediated through greater average drinks per drinking day. Conclusions It is possible that greater individual susceptibility to alcohol-induced working memory decline may limit one’s ability to moderate alcohol consumption as evidenced by greater drinks per drinking day, and that this results in more adverse consequences of alcohol use. PMID:26407604

  15. Effects of alcohol-induced working memory decline on alcohol consumption and adverse consequences of use.

    PubMed

    Lechner, William V; Day, Anne M; Metrik, Jane; Leventhal, Adam M; Kahler, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use appears to decrease executive function acutely in a dose-dependent manner, and lower baseline executive function appears to contribute to problematic alcohol use. However, no studies, to our knowledge, have examined the relationship between individual differences in working memory (a subcomponent of executive function) after alcohol consumption and drinking behaviors and consequences. The current study assessed the relationship between drinking behavior, alcohol-related consequences, and alcohol-induced changes in working memory (as assessed by Trail Making Test-B). Participants recruited from the community (n = 41), 57.3 % male, mean age 39.2, took part in a three-session, within-subjects, repeated-measures design. Participants were administered a placebo, 0.4 g/kg, or 0.8 g/kg dose of alcohol. Working memory, past 30-day alcohol consumption, and consequences of alcohol use were measured at baseline; working memory was measured again after each beverage administration. Poorer working memory after alcohol administration (controlling for baseline working memory) was significantly associated with a greater number of drinks consumed per drinking day. Additionally, we observed a significant indirect relationship between the degree of alcohol-induced working memory decline and adverse consequences of alcohol use, which was mediated through greater average drinks per drinking day. It is possible that greater individual susceptibility to alcohol-induced working memory decline may limit one's ability to moderate alcohol consumption as evidenced by greater drinks per drinking day and that this results in more adverse consequences of alcohol use.

  16. Adverse Health Consequences of Performance-Enhancing Drugs: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Harrison G.; Wood, Ruth I.; Rogol, Alan; Nyberg, Fred; Bowers, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, media attention has focused almost entirely on PED use by elite athletes to illicitly gain a competitive advantage in sports, and not on the health risks of PEDs. There is a widespread misperception that PED use is safe or that adverse effects are manageable. In reality, the vast majority of PED users are not athletes but rather nonathlete weightlifters, and the adverse health effects of PED use are greatly underappreciated. This scientific statement synthesizes available information on the medical consequences of PED use, identifies gaps in knowledge, and aims to focus the attention of the medical community and policymakers on PED use as an important public health problem. PED users frequently consume highly supraphysiologic doses of PEDs, combine them with other PEDs and/or other classical drugs of abuse, and display additional associated risk factors. PED use has been linked to an increased risk of death and a wide variety of cardiovascular, psychiatric, metabolic, endocrine, neurologic, infectious, hepatic, renal, and musculoskeletal disorders. Because randomized trials cannot ethically duplicate the large doses of PEDs and the many factors associated with PED use, we need observational studies to collect valid outcome data on the health risks associated with PEDs. In addition, we need studies regarding the prevalence of PED use, the mechanisms by which PEDs exert their adverse health effects, and the interactive effects of PEDs with sports injuries and other high-risk behaviors. We also need randomized trials to assess therapeutic interventions for treating the adverse effects of PEDs, such as the anabolic-androgen steroid withdrawal syndrome. Finally, we need to raise public awareness of the serious health consequences of PEDs. PMID:24423981

  17. Adverse health consequences of performance-enhancing drugs: an Endocrine Society scientific statement.

    PubMed

    Pope, Harrison G; Wood, Ruth I; Rogol, Alan; Nyberg, Fred; Bowers, Larry; Bhasin, Shalender

    2014-06-01

    Despite the high prevalence of performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, media attention has focused almost entirely on PED use by elite athletes to illicitly gain a competitive advantage in sports, and not on the health risks of PEDs. There is a widespread misperception that PED use is safe or that adverse effects are manageable. In reality, the vast majority of PED users are not athletes but rather nonathlete weightlifters, and the adverse health effects of PED use are greatly underappreciated. This scientific statement synthesizes available information on the medical consequences of PED use, identifies gaps in knowledge, and aims to focus the attention of the medical community and policymakers on PED use as an important public health problem. PED users frequently consume highly supraphysiologic doses of PEDs, combine them with other PEDs and/or other classical drugs of abuse, and display additional associated risk factors. PED use has been linked to an increased risk of death and a wide variety of cardiovascular, psychiatric, metabolic, endocrine, neurologic, infectious, hepatic, renal, and musculoskeletal disorders. Because randomized trials cannot ethically duplicate the large doses of PEDs and the many factors associated with PED use, we need observational studies to collect valid outcome data on the health risks associated with PEDs. In addition, we need studies regarding the prevalence of PED use, the mechanisms by which PEDs exert their adverse health effects, and the interactive effects of PEDs with sports injuries and other high-risk behaviors. We also need randomized trials to assess therapeutic interventions for treating the adverse effects of PEDs, such as the anabolic-androgen steroid withdrawal syndrome. Finally, we need to raise public awareness of the serious health consequences of PEDs.

  18. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Clinical Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Keusch, Gerald T.; Denno, Donna M.; Black, Robert E.; Duggan, Christopher; Guerrant, Richard L.; Lavery, James V.; Nataro, James P.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Ryan, Edward T.; Tarr, Phillip I.; Ward, Honorine; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Coovadia, Hoosen; Lima, Aldo; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Hay Burgess, Deborah C.; Brewer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Stunting is common in young children in developing countries, and is associated with increased morbidity, developmental delays, and mortality. Its complex pathogenesis likely involves poor intrauterine and postnatal nutrition, exposure to microbes, and the metabolic consequences of repeated infections. Acquired enteropathy affecting both gut structure and function likely plays a significant role in this outcome, especially in the first few months of life, and serve as a precursor to later interactions of infection and malnutrition. However, the lack of validated clinical diagnostic criteria has limited the ability to study its role, identify causative factors, and determine cost-effective interventions. This review addresses these issues through a historical approach, and provides recommendations to define and validate a working clinical diagnosis and to guide critical research in this area to effectively proceed. Prevention of early gut functional changes and inflammation may preclude or mitigate the later adverse vicious cycle of malnutrition and infection. PMID:25305288

  19. Adverse event reporting in cancer clinical trial publications.

    PubMed

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Latif, Asma; McBride, Russell B; Stensland, Kristian D; Wisnivesky, Juan; Haines, Lindsay; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-01-10

    Reporting adverse events is a critical element of a clinical trial publication. In 2003, the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) group generated recommendations regarding the appropriate reporting of adverse events. The degree to which these recommendations are followed in oncology publications has not been comprehensively evaluated. A review of citations from PubMed, Medline, and Embase published between Jan 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011, identified eligible randomized, controlled phase III trials in metastatic solid malignancies. Publications were assessed for 14 adverse event-reporting elements derived from the CONSORT harms extension statement; a completeness score (range, 0 to 14) was calculated by adding the number of elements reported. Linear regression analysis identified which publication characteristics associated with reporting completeness. A total of 175 publications, with data for 96,125 patients, were included in the analysis. The median completeness score was eight (range, three to 12). Most publications (96%) reported only adverse events occurring above a threshold rate or severity, 37% did not specify the criteria used to select which adverse events were reported, and 88% grouped together adverse events of varying severity. Regression analysis revealed that trials without a stated funding source and with an earlier year of publication had significantly lower completeness scores. Reporting of adverse events in oncology publications of randomized trials is suboptimal and characterized by substantial selectivity and heterogeneity. The development of oncology-specific standards for adverse event reporting should be established to ensure consistency and provide critical information required for medical decision-making.

  20. Childhood adversities and clinical symptomatology in first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Maija; Mäntylä, Teemu; Rikandi, Eva; Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Morales-Muñoz, Isabel; Kieseppä, Tuula; Mantere, Outi; Suvisaari, Jaana

    2017-08-26

    In addition to severe traumatic experiences, milder, more common childhood adversities reflecting psychosocial burden may also be common in people with psychotic disorders and have an effect on symptomatology and functioning. We explored eleven negative childhood experiences and their influence on clinical symptoms among young adults with first-episode psychosis (FEP, n = 75) and matched population controls (n = 51). Individuals with FEP reported more adversities than controls. Specifically serious conflicts within the family, bullying at school, maternal mental health problems, and one's own and parents' serious illness during childhood were experienced by the patients more often than by controls. In the FEP group, the severity of adversity was associated with increased anxiety, manic, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, but not with the severity of positive psychotic symptoms. Adversity produced a more pronounced effect on symptoms in male patients than in female patients. To conclude, in line with earlier studies of more chronic psychosis, a majority of the participants with FEP reported exposure to childhood adversities, with the FEP group reporting more adversities than controls. High levels of mood and anxiety symptoms in patients with FEP may be related to cumulative exposure to childhood adversities. This should be taken into account in the treatment for FEP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sporadic hypercalcitoninemia: clinical and therapeutic consequences.

    PubMed

    Scheuba, C; Kaserer, K; Moritz, A; Drosten, R; Vierhapper, H; Bieglmayer, C; Haas, O A; Niederle, B

    2009-03-01

    'Calcitonin screening' is not accepted as the standard of care in daily practice. The clinical and surgical consequences of 'calcitonin screening' in a series of patients with mildly elevated basal calcitonin and pentagastrin stimulated calcitonin levels are presented. 260 patients with elevated basal (>10 pg/ml) and stimulated calcitonin levels (>100 pg/ml) were enrolled in this prospective study. None of the patients was member of a known medullary thyroid carcinoma family. Thyroidectomy and bilateral central and lateral neck dissections were performed. Testing for the presence of germ-line mutations was performed in all patients. Histological and immunohistochemical findings were compared with basal and stimulated calcitonin levels. All patients were subsequently followed biochemically. C-cell hyperplasia (CCH) was found in 126 (49%) and medullary thyroid cancer was found in 134 (51%) patients. RET proto-oncogen mutations were documented in 22 (8%) patients (medullary thyroid cancer:18, CCH:4). In 56 (46%) of 122 patients, sporadic CCH was classified neoplastic ('carcinoma in situ'). Of 97 (72%; 10 with hereditary medullary thyroid cancer) had pT1 (International Union against Cancer recommendations 2002) and 33 (25%) had pT2 or pT3 and 4 (3%) pT4 tumors. Of 39 (29.1%) had lymph node metastases. 106 (79.1%; 15 (38.5%) with lymph node metastases) patients were cured. Evaluation of basal and stimulated calcitonin levels enables the prediction of medullary thyroid cancer. All patients with basal calcitonin >64 pg/ml and stimulated calcitonin >560 pg/ml have medullary thyroid cancer. Medullary thyroid cancer was documented in 20% of patients with basal calcitonin >10 pg/ml but <64 pg/ml and stimulated calcitonin >100 pg/ml but <560 pg/ml.

  2. The automation of clinical trial serious adverse event reporting workflow

    PubMed Central

    London, Jack W; Smalley, Karl J; Conner, Kyle; Smith, J Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Background The reporting of serious adverse events (SAEs) is a requirement when conducting a clinical trial involving human subjects, necessary for the protection of the participants. The reporting process is a multi-step procedure, involving a number of individuals from initiation to final review, and must be completed in a timely fashion. Purpose The purpose of this project was to automate the adverse event reporting process, replacing paper-based processes with computer-based processes, so that personnel effort and time required for serious adverse event reporting was reduced, and the monitoring of reporting performance and adverse event characteristics was facilitated. Methods Use case analysis was employed to understand the reporting workflow and generate software requirements. The automation of the workflow was then implemented, employing computer databases, web-based forms, electronic signatures, and email communication. Results In the initial year (2007) of full deployment, 588 SAE reports were processed by the automated system, eSAEy™. The median time from initiation to Principal Investigator electronic signature was less than 2 days (mean 7 ± 0.7 days). This was a significant reduction from the prior paper-based system, which had a median time for signature of 24 days (mean of 45 ± 5.7 days). With eSAEy™, reports on adverse event characteristics (type, grade, etc.) were easily obtained and had consistent values based on standard terminologies. Limitation The automated system described was designed specifically for the work flow at Thomas Jefferson University. While the methodology for system design, and the system requirements derived from common clinical trials adverse reporting procedures are applicable in general, specific work flow details may not relevant at other institutions. Conclusion The system facilitated analysis of individual investigator reporting performance, as well as the aggregation and analysis of the nature of reported adverse

  3. The consequences of early-life adversity: neurobiological, behavioural and epigenetic adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Krugers, H J; Morley-Fletcher, S; Szyf, M; Brunton, P J

    2014-10-01

    During the perinatal period, the brain is particularly sensitive to remodelling by environmental factors. Adverse early-life experiences, such as stress exposure or suboptimal maternal care, can have long-lasting detrimental consequences for an individual. This phenomenon is often referred to as 'early-life programming' and is associated with an increased risk of disease. Typically, rodents exposed to prenatal stress or postnatal maternal deprivation display enhanced neuroendocrine responses to stress, increased levels of anxiety and depressive-like behaviours, and cognitive impairments. Some of the phenotypes observed in these models of early-life adversity are likely to share common neurobiological mechanisms. For example, there is evidence for impaired glucocorticoid negative-feedback control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, altered glutamate neurotransmission and reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in both prenatally stressed rats and rats that experienced deficient maternal care. The possible mechanisms through which maternal stress during pregnancy may be transmitted to the offspring are reviewed, with special consideration given to altered maternal behaviour postpartum. We also discuss what is known about the neurobiological and epigenetic mechanisms that underpin early-life programming of the neonatal brain in the first generation and subsequent generations, with a view to abrogating programming effects and potentially identifying new therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders and cognitive impairment.

  4. Incidence, causes, and consequences of preventable adverse drug events: protocol for an overview of reviews.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Brian; Kanji, Salmaan; McDonald, Erika; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Wolfe, Dianna; Thavorn, Kednapa; Pepper, Sally; Chapman, Laurie; Skidmore, Becky; Moher, David

    2016-12-05

    Medication errors represent a noteworthy source of harm to patients. In recent years, several systematic reviews have assessed the frequency and causes of these events, as well as other factors such as commonly associated drugs, their incidence in different specialties, and their consequences to patients. Despite this past literature, there remains a need to study discrepancies between these reviews and establish the current state of the evidence. The planned review will bring together, compare, and contract existing evidence related to the occurrence of medication errors in acute and continuing/long-term care settings. A systematic review of reviews will be performed. A literature search designed by an experienced information specialist will be carried out in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. We will seek systematic reviews and meta-analyses of primary research studies that evaluate one or more of the following aspects of the occurrence of preventable adverse drug events in hospitals and long-term care centers: the incidence of preventable adverse drug events, either overall or within subgroups of interest related to setting; drug or patient characteristics; cited consequences of these events to patients, including death, emergency room visits, or other outcomes; and established causes of the preventable adverse drug events. Two researchers will independently screen all abstracts and full texts for study selection and subsequently perform data extraction from all included studies. Quality of the reviews will be assessed using the assessing the methodological quality of systematic reviews (AMSTAR) tool. Where objectives from two or more reviews overlap, we will employ the Jadad framework to assess the causes of any noted discrepancies between reviews. An overall summary of results will be performed using tabular and graphical approaches and will be supplemented by narrative description. This overview will help synthesize the broad degree of information

  5. Prolactin and schizophrenia: clinical consequences of hyperprolactinaemia.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Anna Maria; O'Keane, Veronica

    2002-07-19

    Prolactin is a polypeptide hormone that is synthesized and secreted from specialised cells of the anterior pituitary gland, known as lactotrophs. The hormone was given it's name because extracts from the bovine pituitary gland caused growth of the crop sac and stimulated the elaboration of crop milk in pigeons, and promoted lactation in rabbits. Although prolactin is best known for the multiple effects it exerts on the mammary gland, it has over 300 separate biological activities not represented by its name. It sub serves multiple roles in reproduction other than lactation and is an important modulator of homeostasis in the mammalian organism. Hence Bern and Nicoll suggested renaming it "omnipotin or versatilin". Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder that affects approximately one percent of the population worldwide. It is well established that traditional typical anti-psychotics elevate prolactin levels. It is also agreed that the serum prolactin concentration is not elevated in patients with schizophrenia who are not receiving anti-psychotic medication. Hyperprolactinaemia has direct effects on the brain and on other organs. Direct consequences include galactorrhoea. Indirect consequences of hyperprolactinaemia include oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea, erratic or absent ovulation, sexual dysfunction, reduced bone mineral density and cardiovascular disease. With the advent of prolactin sparing anti-psychotics, ample consideration needs to be given to the physiological consequences of hyperprolactinaemia in schizophrenic patients. In this paper we will examine molecular biology, secretion and physiology of prolactin. The consequences of hyperprolactinaemia in humans including effects on fertility, sexual dysfunction, bone mineral density, cardiovascular disease, changes in psychopathology and movement disorders will be reviewed. The literature on the association between schizophrenia, anti-psychotic medication and hyperprolactinaemia and more specifically

  6. For neonates undergoing cardiac surgery does thymectomy as opposed to thymic preservation have any adverse immunological consequences?

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed; Raja, Shahzad G; Pennington, Daniel J; Tsang, Victor T

    2010-09-01

    A best evidence topic in congenital cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether neonatal thymectomy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery has any adverse immunological consequences. Altogether 164 papers were found using the reported search, of which nine papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. The thymus is the major production site of T cells, whose stocks are built-up during foetal and early postnatal life. However, its function diminishes after the first years of life, and although thymic output is maintained into adulthood, the thymus mostly degenerates into fatty tissue in elderly adults. To date, there has been no general consensus with regard to the importance of this organ during childhood and adulthood. As a consequence, during cardiac surgery in neonates, partial or total thymectomy is routinely performed to enable better access to the heart and great vessels to correct congenital heart defects, suggesting that it may be dispensable during childhood and adulthood. Interestingly, current best available evidence from nine case-control studies suggests that neonatal thymectomy affects peripheral T-cell populations both in the short- as well as long-term and results in premature immunosenescence. However, the impact of these changes on the risk of infectious diseases or malignancy has not been thoroughly evaluated by any of these studies. Maintenance of a registry of patients undergoing neonatal thymectomy and further studies to assess the functional or clinical consequences of this practice would be valuable.

  7. Adverse consequences of unintended pregnancy for maternal and child health in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Singh, Ashish; Thapa, Shyam

    2015-03-01

    In Nepal, 26%-38% of recent births are estimated to be from unintended pregnancies, but little is known whether these pregnancies have adverse consequences for the health of the mother and child. Data from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey are used to examine the hypothesis that unintended pregnancies are associated with negative health outcomes for both mothers and children. When the pregnancy was unintended (compared with when it was intended) mothers were more likely to receive inadequate prenatal care (odds ratio OR = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.28-1.77). They were also more likely to opt for home births (OR = 1.30; 95% CI = 1.11-1.52). Likewise, the resultant newborns of unintended pregnancies were more likely to receive inadequate immunization (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.00-1.40) and to remain stunted (OR = 1.25; 95% CI = 1.00-1.56). Findings suggest significant associations between unintended pregnancy and negative health outcomes for both mothers and children in Nepal.

  8. The association between adverse childhood experiences and adolescent pregnancy, long-term psychosocial consequences, and fetal death.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Susan D; Anda, Robert F; Dube, Shanta R; Felitti, Vincent J; Marchbanks, Polly A; Marks, James S

    2004-02-01

    Few reports address the impact of cumulative exposure to childhood abuse and family dysfunction on teen pregnancy and consequences commonly attributed to teen pregnancy. Therefore, we examined whether adolescent pregnancy increased as types of adverse childhood experiences (ACE score) increased and whether ACEs or adolescent pregnancy was the principal source of elevated risk for long-term psychosocial consequences and fetal death. A retrospective cohort study of 9159 women aged > or = 18 years (mean 56 years) who attended a primary care clinic in San Diego, California in 1995-1997. Adolescent pregnancy, psychosocial consequences, and fetal death, compared by ACE score (emotional, physical, or sexual abuse; exposure to domestic violence, substance abusing, mentally ill, or criminal household member; or separated/divorced parent). Sixty-six percent (n = 6015) of women reported > or = 1 ACE. Teen pregnancy occurred in 16%, 21%, 26%, 29%, 32%, 40%, 43%, and 53% of those with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 to 8 ACEs. As the ACE score rose from zero to 1 to 2, 3 to 4, and > or = 5, odds ratios for each adult consequence increased (family problems: 1.0, 1.5, 2.2, 3.3; financial problems: 1.0, 1.6, 2.3, 2.4; job problems: 1.0, 1.4, 2.3, 2.9; high stress: 1.0, 1.4, 1.9, 2.2; and uncontrollable anger: 1.0, 1.6, 2.8, 4.5, respectively). Adolescent pregnancy was not associated with any of these adult outcomes in the absence of childhood adversity (ACEs: 0). The ACE score was associated with increased fetal death after first pregnancy (odds ratios for 0, 1-2, 3-4, and 5-8 ACEs: 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.8, respectively); teen pregnancy was not related to fetal death. The relationship between ACEs and adolescent pregnancy is strong and graded. Moreover, the negative psychosocial sequelae and fetal deaths commonly attributed to adolescent pregnancy seem to result from underlying ACEs rather than adolescent pregnancy per se.

  9. The Intended and Unintended Consequences of Clinical Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Lisa D.; Link, Carol L.; McKinlay, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives First, we examine whether clinical guidelines, designed to improve health care and reduce disparities in clinical practice, are achieving their intended consequences. Second, we contemplate potential unintended consequences of clinical guidelines. Method As part of a factorial experiment we presented primary care doctors (n=192) with clinically authentic vignettes of a “patient” with already diagnosed diabetes with an emerging foot neuropathy. Their proposed clinical actions were compared with established practice guidelines for this clinical situation. Results After establishing the existence of consistent socioeconomic disparities in the proposed management of the case presented, we found that reported use of practice guidelines had no measurable effect towards their reduction (one intended consequence). However, the reported use of practice guidelines appeared to precipitate more clinical actions, without eliminating documented disparities. Conclusions Consistent with other research we find clinical practice guidelines are not producing a principal intended result, and may even produce unintended consequences. PMID:20367703

  10. Prediction of clinical risks by analysis of preclinical and clinical adverse events.

    PubMed

    Clark, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the ability of nonclinical adverse event observations to predict human clinical adverse events observed in drug development programs. In addition it examines the relationship between nonclinical and clinical adverse event observations to drug withdrawal and proposes a model to predict drug withdrawal based on these observations. These analyses provide risk assessments useful for both planning patient safety programs, as well as a statistical framework for assessing the future success of drug programs based on nonclinical and clinical observations. Bayesian analyses were undertaken to investigate the connection between nonclinical adverse event observations and observations of that same event in clinical trial for a large set of approved drugs. We employed the same statistical methods used to evaluate the efficacy of diagnostic tests to evaluate the ability of nonclinical studies to predict adverse events in clinical studies, and adverse events in both to predict drug withdrawal. We find that some nonclinical observations suggest higher risk for observing the same adverse event in clinical studies, particularly arrhythmias, QT prolongation, and abnormal hepatic function. However the lack of these events in nonclinical studies is found to not be a good predictor of safety in humans. Some nonclinical and clinical observations appear to be associated with high risk of drug withdrawal from market, especially arrhythmia and hepatic necrosis. We use the method to estimate the overall risk of drug withdrawal from market using the product of the risks from each nonclinical and clinical observation to create a risk profile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical consequences of a miscalibrated digoxin immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lim, Aaron E; Tate, Jillian R; Clarke, David; Norris, Ross L; Morris, Raymond G; Martin, Jennifer H

    2015-02-01

    A routine audit revealed that the analytical method used to measure digoxin concentrations by our statewide pathology provider in 2009 was underestimating digoxin concentrations by 10%. The assay was recalibrated by the manufacturer in 2010, but clinical outcomes of the underestimation were never measured. This is a pilot study to describe the prescribing behavior around out-of-range digoxin concentrations and to assess whether miscalibrated digoxin immunoassays contribute to clinically relevant effects, as measured by inappropriate alterations in digoxin doses. About 30,000 digoxin concentrations across the State Hospital system were obtained in 2 periods before and after recalibration of the digoxin assay. Digoxin concentration means were calculated and compared and were statistically significantly different. Subsequently, a single-centered retrospective review of 50 randomly chosen charts was undertaken to study the clinical implications of the underestimated concentrations. Mean digoxin concentrations for 2009 and 2011 were significantly different by 8.8% (confidence interval, 7.0%-10.6%). After recalculating the 2009 concentrations to their "corrected" values, there was a 16% increase in the number of concentrations within the range when compared with the 2011 concentrations (41.48% versus 48.04%). However, overall, this did not cause unnecessary dose changes in patients who were "borderline" or outside the therapeutic range when compared with controls (P = 0.10). The majority of decisions were based on the clinical impression rather than concentration alone (85.1% versus 14.9%), even when the concentration was outside the "therapeutic range." Although recalculating digoxin concentrations measured during 2009 to their corrected values produced a significant change in concentration and values inside and outside the range, this does not seem to have had an influence on patient treatment. Rather, clinicians tended to use the clinical impression to dose digoxin.

  12. Disclosing clinical adverse events to patients: can practice inform policy?

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick; Piper, Donella; Manias, Elizabeth; Williams, Allison; Tuckett, Anthony

    2010-06-01

    To understand patients' and health professionals' experience of Open Disclosure and how practice can inform policy. Open Disclosure procedures are being implemented in health services worldwide yet empirical evidence on which to base models of patient-clinician communication and policy development is scant. A qualitative method was employed using semi-structured open-ended interviews with 154 respondents (20 nursing, 49 medical, 59 clinical/administrative managerial, 3 policy coordinators, 15 patients and 8 family members) in 21 hospitals and health services in four Australian states. Both patients and health professionals were positive about Open Disclosure, although each differed in their assessments of practice effectiveness. We found that five major elements influenced patients' and professionals' experience of openly disclosing adverse events namely: initiating the disclosure, apologizing for the adverse event, taking the patient's perspective, communicating the adverse event and being culturally aware. Evaluating the impact of Open Disclosure refines policy implementation because it provides an evidence base to inform policy. Health services can use specific properties relating to each of the five Open Disclosure elements identified in this study as training standards and to assess the progress of policy implementation. However, health services must surmount their sensitivity to revealing the extent of error so that research into patient experiences can inform practice and policy development.

  13. 20 CFR 1002.194 - Can the application of the escalator principle result in adverse consequences when the employee...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS UNDER THE UNIFORMED SERVICES EMPLOYMENT AND REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS ACT OF 1994... lawful adverse job consequences that result from the employee's restoration on the seniority ladder... or lower position, laid off, or even terminated. For example, if an employee's seniority or...

  14. 20 CFR 1002.194 - Can the application of the escalator principle result in adverse consequences when the employee...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS UNDER THE UNIFORMED SERVICES EMPLOYMENT AND REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS ACT OF 1994... lawful adverse job consequences that result from the employee's restoration on the seniority ladder... or lower position, laid off, or even terminated. For example, if an employee's seniority or...

  15. Types, Mechanisms, and Clinical Cardiovascular Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, Shahrokh; Barbe, Ferran; Campos-Rodriguez, Francisco; Dempsey, Jerome A.; Khayat, Rami; Javaheri, Sogol; Malhotra, Atul; Martinez-Garcia, Miguel A.; Mehra, Reena; Pack, Allan I.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; Redline, Susan; Somers, Virend K.

    2017-01-01

    Sleep apnea is highly prevalent in patients with cardiovascular disease. These disordered breathing events are associated with a profile of perturbations that include intermittent hypoxia, oxidative stress, sympathetic activation, and endothelial dysfunction, all of which are critical mediators of cardiovascular disease. Evidence supports a causal association of sleep apnea with the incidence and morbidity of hypertension, coronary heart disease, arrhythmia, heart failure, and stroke. Several discoveries in the pathogenesis, along with developments in the treatment of sleep apnea, have accumulated in recent years. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of sleep apnea, the evidence that addresses the links between sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease, and research that has addressed the effect of sleep apnea treatment on cardiovascular disease and clinical endpoints. Finally, we review the recent development in sleep apnea treatment options, with special consideration of treating patients with heart disease. Future directions for selective areas are suggested. PMID:28209226

  16. Type and Frequency of Reported Wheelchair Repairs and Related Adverse Consequences Among People With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Toro, Maria Luisa; Worobey, Lynn; Boninger, Michael L; Cooper, Rory A; Pearlman, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the frequency and types of wheelchair repairs and associated adverse consequences. Convenience cross-sectional sample survey. Nine Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems Centers. People with spinal cord injury who use a wheelchair >40h/wk (N=591). Not applicable. Number of repairs needed and resulting adverse consequences, number and types of repairs completed, and location where main repair was completed in the previous 6 months. There were 591 participants responded to the survey, 63.8% (377/591) of them needed ≥1 repair; of these, 27.6% (104/377) experienced ≥1 adverse consequence, including 18.2% (69/377) individuals who were stranded. Of those who needed repairs, 6.9% did not have them completed (26/377). Repairs completed on the wheels and casters were the most frequent repair to manual wheelchairs, whereas repairs to the electrical and power and control systems were the most frequent type of repair on power wheelchairs. Forty percent (79/201) of manual wheelchair users reported completing repairs at home themselves compared with 14% (21/150) of power wheelchair users. Twelve percent of the variance in the odds of facing an adverse consequence because of a wheelchair breakdown can be described as a function of occupation, funding source, and type of wheelchair. Wheelchair repairs are highly prevalent. There are differences in types of repairs and who completes the repairs based on the type of wheelchair. Wheelchair breakdowns result in adverse consequences for users, and there is a deficit between repairs needed and those completed, highlighting the need for interventions that address these problems. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. EMBRYONIC VASCULAR DISRUPTION ADVERSE OUTCOMES: LINKING HIGH THROUGHPUT SIGNALING SIGNATURES WITH FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryonic vascular disruption is an important adverse outcome pathway (AOP) given the knowledge that chemical disruption of early cardiovascular system development leads to broad prenatal defects. High throughput screening (HTS) assays provide potential building blocks for AOP d...

  18. Challenges in Coding Adverse Events in Clinical Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schroll, Jeppe Bennekou; Maund, Emma; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Misclassification of adverse events in clinical trials can sometimes have serious consequences. Therefore, each of the many steps involved, from a patient's adverse experience to presentation in tables in publications, should be as standardised as possible, minimising the scope for interpretation. Adverse events are categorised by a predefined dictionary, e.g. MedDRA, which is updated biannually with many new categories. The objective of this paper is to study interobserver variation and other challenges of coding. Methods Systematic review using PRISMA. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library. All studies were screened for eligibility by two authors. Results Our search returned 520 unique studies of which 12 were included. Only one study investigated interobserver variation. It reported that 12% of the codes were evaluated differently by two coders. Independent physicians found that 8% of all the codes deviated from the original description. Other studies found that product summaries could be greatly affected by the choice of dictionary. With the introduction of MedDRA, it seems to have become harder to identify adverse events statistically because each code is divided in subgroups. To account for this, lumping techniques have been developed but are rarely used, and guidance on when to use them is vague. An additional challenge is that adverse events are censored if they already occurred in the run-in period of a trial. As there are more than 26 ways of determining whether an event has already occurred, this can lead to bias, particularly because data analysis is rarely performed blindly. Conclusion There is a lack of evidence that coding of adverse events is a reliable, unbiased and reproducible process. The increase in categories has made detecting adverse events harder, potentially compromising safety. It is crucial that readers of medical publications are aware of these challenges. Comprehensive interobserver studies are needed. PMID

  19. Clinical association between pharmacogenomics and adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Sneed, Kevin B; Yang, Yin-Xue; Zhang, Xueji; He, Zhi-Xu; Chow, Kevin; Yang, Tianxin; Duan, Wei; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern and cause significant patient morbidity and mortality. Pharmacogenomics is the study of how genetic polymorphisms affect an individual's response to pharmacotherapy at the level of a whole genome. This article updates our knowledge on how genetic polymorphisms of important genes alter the risk of ADR occurrence after an extensive literature search. To date, at least 244 pharmacogenes identified have been associated with ADRs of 176 clinically used drugs based on PharmGKB. At least 28 genes associated with the risk of ADRs have been listed by the Food and Drug Administration as pharmacogenomic biomarkers. With the availability of affordable and reliable testing tools, pharmacogenomics looks promising to predict, reduce, and minimize ADRs in selected populations.

  20. Aloe vera: A review of toxicity and adverse clinical effects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mei, Nan

    2016-04-02

    The Aloe plant is employed as a dietary supplement in a variety of foods and as an ingredient in cosmetic products. The widespread human exposure and its potential toxic and carcinogenic activities raise safety concerns. Chemical analysis reveals that the Aloe plant contains various polysaccharides and phenolic chemicals, notably anthraquinones. Ingestion of Aloe preparations is associated with diarrhea, hypokalemia, pseudomelanosis coli, kidney failure, as well as phototoxicity and hypersensitive reactions. Recently, Aloe vera whole leaf extract showed clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in rats, and was classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a possible human carcinogen (Group 2B). This review presents updated information on the toxicological effects, including the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and adverse clinical effects of Aloe vera whole leaf extract, gel, and latex.

  1. Linezolid-related adverse effects in clinical practice in children.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Nuri; Düzgöl, Mine; Kara, Ahu; Özdemir, Fatih M; Devrim, İlker

    2017-10-01

    Linezolid may cause adverse effects such as thrombocytopenia, which were found to be dependent on receiving linezolid for longer than 2 weeks. There are limited studies concerning the safety and timing of linezolid-related adverse effects in children. Objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of adverse effects associated with linezolid, with especially focusing on the time of occurrence. All children (<18 years of age) who received >3 days of linezolid therapy were included in this study. Adverse effects attributed to linezolid and time of occurrence of side effects was evaluated. A total of 179 children were enrolled to the study. The patients' median age was 4 years (6 days to 17 years). During linezolid treatment, 36 (20.1%) patients experienced adverse effects. The most common adverse effect was thrombocytopenia that was detected in 26 patients (14.5%). Other adverse effects were as following; elevated liver enzymes in 4 patients, leucopenia and anemia in 2 patients, renal function impairment in one patient, and serious skin reactions in 3 patients. Adverse effects were detected within median 7.5 days of therapy (ranging from 4 to 18 days). Among 36 patients, 26 (72.2%) patients had adverse effect on the first 10 days of therapy. Transient adverse effects were detected in 20.1% of the patients during linezolid therapy. These adverse effects may be detected earlier than ten days of treatment. Linezolid should be prescribed safely in children with monitoring adverse effects especially platelet count and level of liver enzymes.

  2. Adverse reactions triggered by dental local anesthetics: a clinical survey.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, E.; Goharian, S.; Katz, Y.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine patients completed a questionnaire focusing on adverse reactions to dental local anesthetics as manifested by 16 signs and symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the participants reported having at least 1 adverse reaction. It was found that most of the adverse reactions occurred within the first 2 hours following the injection of local anesthetics. Pallor, palpitations, diaphoresis, and dizziness were the most common adverse reactions reported in the study. The results pointed to a significant relationship between anxiety, gender, injection technique, and procedure with a higher incidence of adverse reactions. PMID:11432179

  3. The adverse health consequences of the use of multiple performance-enhancing substances--a deadly cocktail.

    PubMed

    Perera, Nimalie J; Steinbeck, Katherine S; Shackel, Nicholas

    2013-12-01

    The harmful consequences of abuse of performance-enhancing substances (PESs), stimulants, and masking agents among athletes, recreational weight lifters, and physical trainers are common. However, the adverse health outcomes with severe unexpected and dramatic consequences are unrecognized or under-reported at the expense of short-term glory or body-image effects, especially in elite sports. We report the case of a recreational weight lifter/physical trainer to help summarize the adverse health consequences and outcomes of polypharmacy among athletes and growing subsets in our population engaged in physical/fitness training. We show that in addition to the risk inherent to "stacking" of PESs, the users are predisposed to harmful consequences, including risk of exposure to toxic contaminants. A previously healthy man with chronic use of multiple PESs, stimulants, and masking agents presented to a tertiary-care hospital with jaundice and mild hepatitis with rapid progression into liver and multisystem organ failure. This is followed by a brief overview of the specific toxicity (arsenic) and PESs that contributed to the poor outcome in this case. Surreptitiously or self-administered cocktails of potential PESs including anabolic agents, emerging classes of GH-releasing peptides, androgen precursors, stimulants, and masking agents could lead to adverse consequences including early mortality, multisystem pathology, unmask/accelerate malignancy, and expose or predispose users to extreme danger from contaminants. This cautionary case reinforces the need to increase awareness and highlights the challenges that testing agencies, regulators, and clinicians face in the fast-developing licit/illicit trade of these products.

  4. Investigating epigenetic consequences of early-life adversity: some methodological considerations

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Laura M.; Turecki, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Stressful and traumatic events occurring during early childhood have been consistently associated with the development of psychiatric disorders later in life. This relationship may be mediated in part by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, which are influenced by the early-life environment. Epigenetic patterns can have lifelong effects on gene expression and on the functioning of biological processes relevant to stress reactivity and psychopathology. Optimization of epigenetic research activity necessitates a discussion surrounding the methodologies used for DNA methylation analysis, selection of tissue sources, and timing of psychological and biological assessments. Recent studies related to early-life adversity and methylation, including both candidate gene and epigenome-wide association studies, have drawn from the variety of available techniques to generate interesting data in the field. Further discussion is warranted to address the limitations inherent to this field of research, along with future directions for epigenetic studies of adversity-related psychopathology. Highlights of the article We identified issues regarding sample characteristics in epigenetic studies of early life adversity. We compared methods and technologies used for candidate gene analysis and whole epigenome studies. We discussed future perspectives, including combining multiple forms of large-scale data and newer technologies. PMID:27837582

  5. Capitalizing on Advances in Science to Reduce the Health Consequences of Early Childhood Adversity.

    PubMed

    Shonkoff, Jack P

    2016-10-01

    Advances in biology are providing deeper insights into how early experiences are built into the body with lasting effects on learning, behavior, and health. Numerous evaluations of interventions for young children facing adversity have demonstrated multiple, positive effects but they have been highly variable and difficult to sustain or scale. New research on plasticity and critical periods in development, increasing understanding of how gene-environment interaction affects variation in stress susceptibility and resilience, and the emerging availability of measures of toxic stress effects that are sensitive to intervention provide much-needed fuel for science-informed innovation in the early childhood arena. This growing knowledge base suggests 4 shifts in thinking about policy and practice: (1) early experiences affect lifelong health, not just learning; (2) healthy brain development requires protection from toxic stress, not just enrichment; (3) achieving breakthrough outcomes for young children facing adversity requires supporting the adults who care for them to transform their own lives; and (4) more effective interventions are needed in the prenatal period and first 3 years after birth for the most disadvantaged children and families. The time has come to leverage 21st-century science to catalyze the design, testing, and scaling of more powerful approaches for reducing lifelong disease by mitigating the effects of early adversity.

  6. CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF LOCALIZED BCG ADVERSE EVENTS IN CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Thais das Neves Fraga; Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel de; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Weckx, Lily Yin

    2016-11-03

    BCG adverse events (BCG-AE) are rare conditions with no well-established treatment. This study aims to describe clinical characteristics and outcome of localized BCG-AE. Children with BCG-AEs who were treated at the Reference Center for Special Immunobiologicals of the Federal University of São Paulo from 2009 to 2011 were included. Patients were followed monthly until 3 months after healing. One hundred and twenty-seven patients with localized BCG-AE were followed: 67 (52.7%) had suppurative lymphadenitis; 30 (23.6%) injection-site abscess; five (3.9%) had enlarged lymph node > 3 cm; four (3.1%) had ulcer > 1 cm; and one (0.8%) had a local bacterial infection. Five patients (3.9%) had more than one BCG-AE simultaneously. Fifteen patients (11.8%) had atypical manifestations: seven wart-like lesions; five BCG reactivations; two other dermatologic lesions and one with vasomotor phenomenon. Isoniazid was used in 96 patients with typical BCG-AE (85.7%) until lesion resolution which took place 3.1 months later (in median); the healing rate was 90.6%. Patients with atypical manifestations had an individual approach. Regarding the outcome, 105/112 patients with typical AE and 13/15 patients with atypical AE had resolution of BCG-AE. Localized BCG-AE caused by BCG Moreau RJ had positive outcome when treated with a short course of isoniazid. Atypical BCG-AE are not infrequent.

  7. Clinical applications of pharmacogenomics to adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Issa, Amalia M

    2008-03-01

    The problem of adverse drug reactions is a well-documented global public health problem. Recent withdrawals of several widely used prescription medications in the USA and other countries have raised concerns among patients, clinicians, scientists and policy makers. The increasing interest and concern regarding withdrawal of previously approved prescription medications and drug safety has prompted renewed research efforts aimed at improving surveillance of approved drugs and reducing adverse drug reactions. Pharmacogenomics research is increasingly directed at developing genomic diagnostics and tests with predictive ability for adverse drug reactions. This paper focuses on the problem of adverse drug reactions and reviews the evidence and the state of the science for the application of pharmacogenomics to adverse drug reactions.

  8. Statin non-adherence: clinical consequences and proposed solutions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenson, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Large controlled clinical trials have demonstrated reductions with statin therapy in cardiovascular events in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease and individuals at high risk of a cardiovascular event. In trials of acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease, high-intensity statin therapy is more effective in the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events than low-intensity statin therapy. Thus, evidence-based guidelines recommend in-hospital initiation of high-intensity statin therapy for all acute coronary syndrome patients. Clinical trials report high adherence to and low discontinuation of high-intensity statin therapy; however, in clinical practice, high-intensity statins are prescribed to far fewer patients, who often discontinue their statin after the first refill. A coordinated effort among the patient, provider, pharmacist, health system, and insurer is necessary to improve utilization and persistence of prescribed medications. The major cause for statin discontinuations reported by patients is perceived adverse events. Evaluation of potential adverse events requires validated tools to distinguish between statin-associated adverse events versus non-specific complaints. Treatment options for statin-intolerant patients include the use of a different statin, often at a lower dose or frequency. In order to lower LDL cholesterol, lower doses of statins may be combined with ezetimibe or bile acid sequestrants. Newer treatment options for patients with statin-associated muscle symptoms may include proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors. PMID:27134737

  9. Poor medication adherence in clinical trials: consequences and solutions.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, Alasdair; Aronson, Jeffrey K; Blaschke, Terrence F; Hartman, Dan; Peck, Carl C; Vrijens, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Poor adherence to medicines in clinical trials can undermine the value of the trials; for example, by compromising estimates of the benefits and risks of a medicine. In this article, we highlight such consequences and also discuss approaches to tackle this problem.

  10. CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF LOCALIZED BCG ADVERSE EVENTS IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    MOREIRA, Thais das Neves Fraga; de MORAES-PINTO, Maria Isabel; COSTA-CARVALHO, Beatriz Tavares; GRUMACH, Anete Sevciovic; WECKX, Lily Yin

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BCG adverse events (BCG-AE) are rare conditions with no well-established treatment. This study aims to describe clinical characteristics and outcome of localized BCG-AE. Children with BCG-AEs who were treated at the Reference Center for Special Immunobiologicals of the Federal University of São Paulo from 2009 to 2011 were included. Patients were followed monthly until 3 months after healing. One hundred and twenty-seven patients with localized BCG-AE were followed: 67 (52.7%) had suppurative lymphadenitis; 30 (23.6%) injection-site abscess; five (3.9%) had enlarged lymph node > 3 cm; four (3.1%) had ulcer > 1 cm; and one (0.8%) had a local bacterial infection. Five patients (3.9%) had more than one BCG-AE simultaneously. Fifteen patients (11.8%) had atypical manifestations: seven wart-like lesions; five BCG reactivations; two other dermatologic lesions and one with vasomotor phenomenon. Isoniazid was used in 96 patients with typical BCG-AE (85.7%) until lesion resolution which took place 3.1 months later (in median); the healing rate was 90.6%. Patients with atypical manifestations had an individual approach. Regarding the outcome, 105/112 patients with typical AE and 13/15 patients with atypical AE had resolution of BCG-AE. Localized BCG-AE caused by BCG Moreau RJ had positive outcome when treated with a short course of isoniazid. Atypical BCG-AE are not infrequent. PMID:27828625

  11. Distinguishing hazards and harms, adverse drug effects and adverse drug reactions : implications for drug development, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance, biomarkers, and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2013-03-01

    The terms 'adverse drug effects' and 'adverse drug reactions' are commonly used interchangeably, but they have different implications. Adverse drug reactions arise when a compound (e.g. a drug or metabolite, a contaminant or adulterant) is distributed in the same place as a body tissue (e.g. a receptor, enzyme, or ion channel), and the encounter results in an adverse effect (a physiological or pathological change), which results in a clinically appreciable adverse reaction. Both the adverse effect and the adverse reaction have manifestations by which they can be recognized: adverse effects are usually detected by laboratory tests (e.g. biochemical, haematological, immunological, radiological, pathological) or by clinical investigations (e.g. endoscopy, cardiac catheterization), and adverse reactions by their clinical manifestations (symptoms and/or signs). This distinction suggests five scenarios: (i) adverse reactions can result directly from adverse effects; (ii) adverse effects may not lead to appreciable adverse reactions; (iii) adverse reactions can occur without preceding adverse effects; (iv) adverse effects and reactions may be dissociated; and (v) adverse effects and reactions can together constitute syndromes. Defining an adverse drug reaction as "an appreciably harmful or unpleasant reaction, resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product" suggests a definition of an adverse drug effect: "a potentially harmful effect resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product, which constitutes a hazard and may or may not be associated with a clinically appreciable adverse reaction and/or an abnormal laboratory test or clinical investigation, as a marker of an adverse reaction."

  12. Consequences of early adverse rearing experience (EARE) on development: insights from non-human primate studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Early rearing experiences are important in one's whole life, whereas early adverse rearing experience (EARE) is usually related to various physical and mental disorders in later life. Although there were many studies on human and animals, regarding the effect of EARE on brain development, neuroendocrine systems, as well as the consequential mental disorders and behavioral abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Due to the close genetic relationship and similarity in social organizations with humans, non-human primate (NHP) studies were performed for over 60 years. Various EARE models were developed to disrupt the early normal interactions between infants and mothers or peers. Those studies provided important insights of EARE induced effects on the physiological and behavioral systems of NHPs across life span, such as social behaviors (including disturbance behavior, social deficiency, sexual behavior, etc), learning and memory ability, brain structural and functional developments (including influences on neurons and glia cells, neuroendocrine systems, e.g., hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, etc). In this review, the effects of EARE and the underlying epigenetic mechanisms were comprehensively summarized and the possibility of rehabilitation was discussed. PMID:28271667

  13. Metabolic consequences of antipsychotic therapy: preclinical and clinical perspectives on diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Heal, David J; Gosden, Jane; Jackson, Helen C; Cheetham, Sharon C; Smith, Sharon L

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs, particularly second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), have reduced the burden to society of schizophrenia, but many still produce excessive weight gain. A significant number of SGAs also act directly to impair glycemic control causing insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes, and also rarely diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Schizophrenia itself is almost certainly causal in many endocrine and metabolic disturbances, making this population especially vulnerable to the adverse metabolic consequences of treatment with SGAs. Hence, there is an urgent need for a new generation of antipsychotic drugs that provide efficacy equal to the best of the SGAs without their liability to cause weight gain or type 2 diabetes. In the absence of such safe and effective alternatives to the SGAs, there is a substantial clinical need for the introduction of new antipsychotics without adverse metabolic effects and new antiobesity drugs to combat these metabolic side effects. We discuss the adverse metabolic consequences of schizophrenia, its exacerbation by a lack of social care, and the additional burden placed on patients by their medication. A critical evaluation of the animal models of antipsychotic-induced metabolic disturbances is provided with observations on their strengths and limitations. Finally, we discuss novel antipsychotic drugs with a lower propensity to increase metabolic risk and adjunctive medications to mitigate the adverse metabolic actions of the current generation of antipsychotics.

  14. Antisense inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase gene expression predicts adverse hematopoietic consequences to cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patinkin, D; Lev-Lehman, E; Zakut, H; Eckstein, F; Soreq, H

    1994-10-01

    1. To investigate the possibility that cholinesterase inhibitors may cause adverse hematopoietic effects, we employed antisense oligodeoxynucleotides selectively inhibiting butyrylcholinesterase gene expression (AS-BCHE). Complementary sense (S) oligonucleotides served as controls. 2. In primary bone marrow cell cultures grown with interleukin 3 (IL-3), AS-BCHE but not S-BCHE reduced growth of megakaryocyte colony-forming units (CFU-MK) in a dose-dependent manner at the micromolar range. 3. In cultures grown with IL-3, transferrin, and erythropoietin (Epo), cell counts increased up to twofold, yet colony counts (CFU-GEMM) remained unchanged under AS-BCHE treatment. 4. Electrophoretic measurements of DNA ladder as an apoptotic index revealed that the above oligonucleotide effects were not due to nonspecific induction of programmed cell death. 5. Differential cell counts demonstrated increased myeloidogenesis and reduced levels of early megakaryocytes in CFU-GEMM under AS-BCHE, suggesting requirement of the BuChE protein for megakaryopoiesis. 6. In vivo injection of AS-BCHE reduced BCHE mRNA levels in both young and mature megakaryocytes for as long as 20 days, as shown by in situ hybridization. 7. Ex vivo growth of primary bone marrow cells revealed a twofold reduction in CFU-MK colonies grown from the AS-BCHE- but not the S-BCHE-injected mice, 15 days posttreatment. 8. These findings demonstrate that deficient butyrylcholinesterase expression, and hence interference with this enzyme's activity through treatment with or exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors, may cause hematopoietic differences in treated patients.

  15. Misuse of topical corticosteroids: A clinical study of adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Vivek Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Misuse of topical corticosteroids is a widespread phenomenon among young people in India, especially women. The practice is associated with significant adverse effects and poor awareness of these effects among the general public. Aim: This study was conducted to examine the misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids among the people in Bastar region in Chhattisgarh state of India. Materials and Methods: Data collected from patients presenting with at least one of the adverse effects of topical corticosteroids as the chief complaint, from November 2010 to October 2011. Results: Out of the 6723 new patients, 379 (5.63%) had presented with misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids, of whom 78.89% were females. More than 65% of the patients were in the age group 10-29 years. The main reason for using the topical corticosteroids was to lighten skin colour and treat melasma and suntan. Acne (37.99%) and telangiectasia (18.99%) were the most common adverse effects noted. Conclusions: Misuse of topical corticosteroids has a huge impact on dermatological practice, leading to a significant proportion of visits to the dermatologist. This hydra-headed problem needs multi-dimensional interventions, involving educational, legal and managerial approaches with cooperation from different sectors of society. PMID:25396124

  16. Presence of Atrazine in the Biological Samples of Cattle and Its Consequence Adversity in Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Peighambarzadeh, SZ; Safi, S; Shahtaheri, SJ; Javanbakht, M; Rahimi Forushani, A

    2011-01-01

    Background Cattle can be considered as an important source for herbicides through nutrition. Therefore, herbicide residue in animal products is a potential human exposure to herbicides causing public health problems in human life. Triazines are a group of herbicides primarily used to control broadleaf weeds in corn and other feed ingredients and are considered as possible human carcinogens. To evaluate trace residue of these pollutants molecular imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) method has been developed, using biological samples. Methods: Blood samples were taken from the jugular vein of 45 Holstein cows in 3 commercial dairy farms in Khuzestan Province, Iran. Urine samples were also taken from the cows. Results: The mean ± SD concentrations of atrazine in serum and urine samples of the study group (0.739 ± 0.567 ppm and 1.389 ± 0.633 ppm, respectively) were higher (P < 0.05) than the concentrations in serum and urine samples of the control group (0.002 ± 0.005 ppm and 0.012 ± 0.026 ppm, respectively). Conclusion: Atrazine in the feed ingredients ingested by cattle could be transferred into the biological samples and consequently can be considered as a potential hazard for the public health. PMID:23113110

  17. Adverse selection and moral hazard in the provision of clinical trial ancillary care.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael R; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2013-04-01

    As more and more clinical trials are conducted in developing countries, concerns arise about non-trial medical care available to study participants. Recent work argues for ancillary care - medical care not part of the clinical trial per se - to be formally incorporated into these studies. Although the provision of ancillary care is often justified on ethical grounds, a number of crucial implementation issues remain unresolved, including its scope, duration and financing. Drawing on lessons from health insurance benefit design, we highlight two overlooked challenges for ancillary care adoption - adverse selection and moral hazard - and offer recommendations that could attenuate their consequences. Specifically, adverse selection and moral hazard could be reduced by offering a choice between ancillary medical care and monetary compensation or rewarding low ancillary care utilization. Alternatively, researchers' financial risk due to ancillary care could be shifted to a third-party insurer. Recognizing participants' behavioral responses to prospective offers of ancillary medical care would allow funders and research teams to forecast the demand for ancillary care more accurately and to prepare for its provision more adequately.

  18. Serotonin deficiency alters susceptibility to the long-term consequences of adverse early life experience.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Benjamin D; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Tran, Ha L; Iyer, Akshita; Wetsel, William C; Caron, Marc G

    2015-03-01

    Brain 5-HT deficiency has long been implicated in psychiatric disease, but the effects of 5-HT deficiency on stress susceptibility remain largely unknown. Early life stress (ELS) has been suggested to contribute to adult psychopathology, but efforts to study the long-term consequences of ELS have been limited by a lack of appropriate preclinical models. Here, we evaluated the effects of 5-HT deficiency on several long-term cellular, molecular, and behavioral responses of mice to a new model of ELS that combines early-life maternal separation (MS) of pups and postpartum learned helplessness (LH) training in dams. Our data demonstrate that this paradigm (LH/MS) induces depressive-like behavior and impairs pup retrieval in dams. In addition, we show that brain 5-HT deficiency exacerbates anxiety-like behavior induced by LH/MS and blunts the effects of LH/MS on acoustic startle responses in adult offspring. Although the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear, following LH/MS, 5-HT-deficient animals had significantly less mRNA expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor in the amygdala than wild-type animals. In addition, 5-HT-deficient mice exhibited reduced mRNA levels of the 5-HT2a receptor and p11 in the hippocampus regardless of stress. LH/MS decreased the number of doublecortin+ immature neurons in the hippocampus in both wild-type (WT) and 5-HT-deficient animals. Our data emphasize the importance of complex interactions between genetic factors and early life experience in mediating long-term changes in emotional behavior. These findings may have important implications for our understanding of the combinatorial roles of 5-HT deficiency, ELS, and postpartum depression in the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Belatacept and Sirolimus Prolong Nonhuman Primate Islet Allograft Survival: adverse consequences of concomitant alefacept therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, MC; Badell, IR; Turner, AP; Thompson, PW; Leopardi, FV; Strobert, EA; Larsen, CP; Kirk, AD

    2012-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) and steroids are known to promote insulin resistance, and their avoidance after islet transplantation is preferred from a metabolic standpoint. Belatacept, a B7-specific mediator of costimulation blockade (CoB), is clinically indicated as a CNI alternative in renal transplantation, and we have endeavored to develop a clinically translatable, belatacept-based regimen that could obviate the need for both CNIs and steroids. Based on the known synergy between CoB and mTOR inhibition, we studied rhesus monkeys undergoing MHC-mismatched islet allotransplants treated with belatacept and the mTOR inhibitor, sirolimus. To extend prior work on CoB-resistant rejection, some animals also received CD2 blockade with alefacept (LFA3-Ig). Nine rhesus macaques were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin and underwent islet allotransplantation. All received belatacept and sirolimus; six also received alefacept. Belatacept and sirolimus significantly prolonged rejection-free graft survival (median 225 days compared to 8 days in controls receiving basiliximab and sirolimus; p=0.022). The addition of alefacept provided no additional survival benefit, but was associated with Cytomegalovirus reactivation in 4/6 animals. No recipients produced donor-specific alloantibodies. The combination of belatacept and sirolimus successfully prevents islet allograft survival in rhesus monkeys, but induction with alefacept provides no survival benefit and increases the risk of viral reactivation. PMID:23279640

  20. Adverse effects of orthodontic treatment: A clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Talic, Nabeel F.

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment is associated with a number of adverse effects, such as root resorption, pain, pulpal changes, periodontal disease, and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Orthodontists should be aware of these effects and associated risk factors. Risk factors linked to root resorption include the duration of treatment, length, and shape of the root, trauma history, habits, and genetic predisposition. PMID:24151415

  1. Modifiable Resilience Factors to Childhood Adversity for Clinical Pediatric Practice.

    PubMed

    Traub, Flora; Boynton-Jarrett, Renée

    2017-05-01

    Childhood adversity is highly prevalent and associated with risk for poor health outcomes in childhood and throughout the life course. Empirical literature on resilience over the past 40 years has identified protective factors for traumatized children that improve health outcomes. Despite these empirical investigations of resilience, there is limited integration of these findings into proactive strategies to mitigate the impact of adverse childhood experiences. We review the state of resilience research, with a focus on recent work, as it pertains to protecting children from the health impacts of early adversity. We identify and document evidence for 5 modifiable resilience factors to improve children's long- and short-term health outcomes, including fostering positive appraisal styles in children and bolstering executive function, improving parenting, supporting maternal mental health, teaching parents the importance of good self-care skills and consistent household routines, and offering anticipatory guidance about the impact of trauma on children. We conclude with 10 recommendations for pediatric practitioners to leverage the identified modifiable resilience factors to help children withstand, adapt to, and recover from adversity. Taken together, these recommendations constitute a blueprint for a trauma-informed medical home. Building resilience in pediatric patients offers an opportunity to improve the health and well-being of the next generation, enhance national productivity, and reduce spending on health care for chronic diseases. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Metabolic and Clinical Consequences of Hyperthyroidism on Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Gorka, Jagoda; Taylor-Gjevre, Regina M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1891, Von Recklinghausen first established the association between the development of osteoporosis in the presence of overt hyperthyroidism. Subsequent reports have demonstrated that BMD loss is common in frank hyperthyroidism, and, to a lesser extent, in subclinical presentations. With the introduction of antithyroid medication in the 1940s to control biochemical hyperthyroidism, the accompanying bone disease became less clinically apparent as hyperthyroidism was more successfully treated medically. Consequently, the impact of the above normal thyroid hormones in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis may be presently underrecognized due to the widespread effective treatments. This review aims to present the current knowledge of the consequences of hyperthyroidism on bone metabolism. The vast number of recent papers touching on this topic highlights the recognized impact of this common medical condition on bone health. Our focus in this review was to search for answers to the following questions. What is the mechanisms of action of thyroid hormones on bone metabolism? What are the clinical consequences of hyperthyroidism on BMD and fracture risk? What differences are there between men and women with thyroid disease and how does menopause change the clinical outcomes? Lastly, we report how different treatments for hyperthyroidism benefit thyroid hormone-induced osteoporosis. PMID:23970897

  3. Consequences of contextual factors on clinical reasoning in resident physicians.

    PubMed

    McBee, Elexis; Ratcliffe, Temple; Picho, Katherine; Artino, Anthony R; Schuwirth, Lambert; Kelly, William; Masel, Jennifer; van der Vleuten, Cees; Durning, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Context specificity and the impact that contextual factors have on the complex process of clinical reasoning is poorly understood. Using situated cognition as the theoretical framework, our aim was to evaluate the verbalized clinical reasoning processes of resident physicians in order to describe what impact the presence of contextual factors have on their clinical reasoning. Participants viewed three video recorded clinical encounters portraying straightforward diagnoses in internal medicine with select patient contextual factors modified. After watching each video recording, participants completed a think-aloud protocol. Transcripts from the think-aloud protocols were analyzed using a constant comparative approach. After iterative coding, utterances were analyzed for emergent themes with utterances grouped into categories, themes and subthemes. Ten residents participated in the study with saturation reached during analysis. Participants universally acknowledged the presence of contextual factors in the video recordings. Four categories emerged as a consequence of the contextual factors: (1) emotional reactions (2) behavioral inferences (3) optimizing the doctor patient relationship and (4) difficulty with closure of the clinical encounter. The presence of contextual factors may impact clinical reasoning performance in resident physicians. When confronted with the presence of contextual factors in a clinical scenario, residents experienced difficulty with closure of the encounter, exhibited as diagnostic uncertainty. This finding raises important questions about the relationship between contextual factors and clinical reasoning activities and how this relationship might influence the cost effectiveness of care. This study also provides insight into how the phenomena of context specificity may be explained using situated cognition theory.

  4. Clinical consequences of new diagnostic tools for intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, L; Roestenberg, M

    2015-06-01

    Following the success of nucleic acid-based detection in virology and bacteriology, multiplex real-time PCRs are increasingly used as first-line diagnostics in clinical parasitology, replacing microscopy. The detection and quantification of parasite-specific DNA in faeces is highly sensitive and specific and allows for cost-effective high-throughput screening. In this paper we discuss the clinical consequences of this radical change in diagnostic approach, as well as its potential drawbacks. In the Netherlands, routine diagnostic laboratories have been pioneering the implementation of multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of pathogenic intestinal protozoa and this has resulted in increased detection rates of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. As a consequence of this new diagnostic approach, expertise in the field of parasite morphology by conventional light microscopy seems to be disappearing in most of the high-throughput microbiological laboratories. As a result, to maintain a high standard of care, a formalized exchange of critical information between clinicians and laboratory staff is necessary to determine the most appropriate testing either in local laboratories or in reference centres, based on clinical signs and symptoms, exposure and immune status. If such a diagnostic algorithm is lacking, important infections in travellers, immigrants and immunocompromised patients may be missed. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biochemical consequences of bariatric surgery for extreme clinical obesity.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Anita; Meek, Claire L; Park, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index over 30 kg/m(2) for adults, poses a major healthcare challenge with important economic, personal and social consequences. Although public health measures, lifestyle change and pharmacological therapies have an important role in the management of obesity, patients with established morbid obesity (body mass index over 40 kg/m(2)) may also require bariatric surgery. Bariatric or metabolic surgery is associated with effective and enduring weight loss but is also known to improve glucose homeostasis, blood pressure and dyslipidaemia. Patients who have bariatric surgery need lifelong clinical follow-up to identify and prevent nutritional deficiencies and other complications. Clinical biochemistry laboratories have an important role in the nutritional assessment of obese patients and in the identification of complications following bariatric surgery. The aim of this article is to review the different bariatric procedures available and to summarize their complications, especially nutrient deficiencies and those of particular relevance to clinical biochemistry laboratories.

  6. How Usability of a Web-Based Clinical Decision Support System Has the Potential to Contribute to Adverse Medical Events

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Timothy A.D.; Kushniruk, Andre W.; Bullard, Michael J.; Holroyd, Brian R.; Meurer, David P.; Rowe, Brian H.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have the potential to reduce adverse medical events, but improper design can introduce new forms of error. CDSS pertaining to community acquired pneumonia and neutropenic fever were studied to determine whether usability of the graphical user interface might contribute to potential adverse medical events. Methods Automated screen capture of 4 CDSS being used by volunteer emergency physicians was analyzed using structured methods. Results 422 events were recorded over 56 sessions. In total, 169 negative comments, 55 positive comments, 130 neutral comments, 21 application events, 34 problems, 6 slips, and 5 mistakes were identified. Three mistakes could have had life-threatening consequences. Conclusion Evaluation of CDSS will be of utmost importance in the future with increasing use of electronic health records. Usability engineering principles can identify interface problems that may lead to potential medical adverse events, and should be incorporated early in the software design phase. PMID:18998968

  7. Factors associated with adverse clinical outcomes among obstetrics trainees.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Catherine E; Aiken, Abigail R; Park, Hannah; Brockelsby, Jeremy C; Prentice, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether UK obstetrics trainees transitioning from directly to indirectly supervised practice have a higher likelihood of recording adverse patient outcomes in operative deliveries compared with other indirectly supervised trainees, and to examine whether performing more procedures under direct supervision is associated with fewer adverse outcomes in initial practice under indirect supervision. We examined all deliveries (13 856) conducted by obstetricians at a single centre over 6 years (2008-2013). Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to compare estimated blood loss (EBL), maternal trauma, umbilical arterial pH, delayed neonatal respiration, failed instrumental delivery, and critical incidents for trainees in their first indirectly supervised year with those for trainees in all other years of indirect supervision. Outcomes for trainees in their first indirectly supervised 3 months were compared with their outcomes for the remainder of the year. Linear regression was used to examine the relationship between number of procedures performed under direct supervision and initial outcomes under indirect supervision. Trainees in their first indirectly supervised year had a higher likelihood of recording EBL of > 2 L at any delivery (odds ratio [OR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.64; p < 0.05) and of failed instrumental delivery (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.37-3.29; p < 0.05) compared with other indirectly supervised trainees. Other measured outcomes showed no significant differences. In the first 3 months of indirect supervision, the likelihood of operative vaginal deliveries with EBL of > 1 L (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.88-3.20; p < 0.05) was higher than in the remainder of the first year. Performing more deliveries under direct supervision prior to beginning indirectly supervised training was associated with decreased risk for recording EBL of > 1 L (p < 0.05). Obstetrics trainees in their first year of

  8. Factors associated with post-intensive care unit adverse events: a clinical validation study.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Malcolm; Page, Karen; Worrall-Carter, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Many patients discharged from intensive care units (ICU) have complex care needs, placing them at risk of an adverse event in a ward environment. Currently, there is limited understanding of factors associated with these events in the post-intensive care population. A recent study explored intensive care liaison nurses' opinions on factors associated with these events; 25 factors were identified, highlighting the multifaceted nature of post-intensive care adverse events. This study aimed to clinically validate 25 factors intensive care liaison nurses believe are associated with post-intensive care adverse events, to determine the factors' relevance and importance to clinical practice. Prospective, clinical validation study. Data were prospectively collected on a convenience sample of 52 patients at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in an Australian capital city. All patients had experienced an adverse event after intensive care discharge. Each of the 25 factors contributed to adverse events in at least 6 patients. The factors associated with the most adverse events were those that related to the patient such as illness severity and co-morbidities. Clinical care and research should focus on modifiable factors in care processes to reduce the risk of future adverse events in post-intensive care patients. Many patients are at risk of post-ICU adverse events due to the contribution of non-modifiable factors. However, by focusing on modifiable factors in care processes, the risk of post-ICU adverse events may be reduced. © 2014 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  9. Adverse consequences of immunostimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The therapeutic uses of immunostimulatory agents are generally in the treatments of infections or cancer. The traditional example of vaccination is one form of immunostimulation used in the prevention of pathogenic infections or cancer (e.g., human papillomavirus vaccine). Recombinant cytokines are increasingly used to stimulate immune system function. For example, interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) and interleukin (IL)-2 have been used to treat chronic hepatitis C virus infection and metastatic melanoma, respectively. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies are used to target malignant cells for elimination via antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mechanisms or apoptosis, including the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-CD56 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, and the anti-erb2 receptor antibody trastuzumab used in the treatment of breast cancer. Finally, immunostimulation may develop via modulation of pathways involved in immune system regulation. For example, the anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody TGN1412 was developed as an agonist of regulatory T-cells for treatment of T-cell-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases or leukemias. A panel was convened to discuss potential toxicities associated with immunostimulation. At the Immunotoxicology IV meeting in 2006, a panel, moderated by Dr. Robert House (Dynport Vaccine Co., Frederick, MD), included Drs. Gary Burleson (Burleson Research Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, NC), Kenneth Hastings (US FDA, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research [CDER], Rockville, MD), Barbara Mounho (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA), Rafael Ponce (ZymoGenetics, Inc., Seattle, WA), Mark Wing (Huntington Life Sciences, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom), Lauren Black (Navigators Consulting, Sparks, NV) and Anne Pilaro (US FDA, CDER, Rockville, MD). This paper reviews the major identified toxicities associated with immunostimulation, including the acute phase response, cell and tissue abnormalities/injury, cytokine release/cytokine storm, tumor lysis syndrome, vascular leak, and autoimmunity that were discussed by this panel.

  10. Food avoidance in children with adverse food reactions: influence of anxiety and clinical parameters.

    PubMed

    Le, Thuy-My; Zijlstra, Wieneke T; van Opstal, Eveline Y; Knol, Mirjam J; L'Hoir, Monique P; Knulst, André C; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A

    2013-11-01

    Many children in the general population avoid food because of self-reported adverse food reactions (AFR). Food avoidance can have negative consequences for well-being and nutritional status. This study aimed to investigate which factors are related to avoidance behavior in children (10-13 yr old) from the general population. Questionnaires for both mother and child were sent to participants from the Europrevall study: 164 children with self-reported AFR and 170 children without AFRs. Spielberger state anxiety and trait anxiety and clinical parameters, such as severity of the adverse reaction, specific IgE and doctor's diagnosis, were compared between those who have (had) AFR and avoid food (i.e., avoiders) and those who have (had) AFR(s) and do not avoid food (anymore; i.e., non-avoiders). In total, 59% of the children with AFRs avoided food, of whom 26% had positive specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE). Child's state anxiety about an AFR was higher in avoiders than in non-avoiders, (p < 0.001), whereas child's trait anxiety and maternal state anxiety and trait anxiety were comparable in both groups. Avoiders reported more often severe symptoms (i.e., generalized urticaria, respiratory or cardiovascular symptoms) than non-avoiders, (p = 0.03). Food avoidance was not associated with doctor's diagnosis of food allergy or doctor's advice to avoid food (p = 1.00). Food avoidance is related to child's state anxiety about an adverse food reaction. Food avoidance seems to be independent of a doctor's diagnosis of food allergy and advice on food avoidance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Drug adverse events and drop-out risk: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Scoyni, R M; Aiello, L; Trani, I; Felli, B; Masin, A M R; Camponi, V; Dignazio, L; Cortese, M; Pacitti, M T; Carratelli, D; Morocutti, C

    2007-01-01

    We report a brief discussion on a clinical case of a female patient, 85 years old, affected by severe cognitive impairment and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The patient was not taking drugs at home (apart from promazine: 10 drops when necessary to control her behavioral diseases). A previous neuropsychological evaluation had shown a severe cognitive impairment MMSE=16/30; ADL=3/6; IADL=0/8) due to multiple brain ischemic areas (confirmed in 2003 by MRI neuroimaging). When the patient was admitted to our center she was able to perform some basic activities of daily living such as eating and walking and was not too confused. She was included in cognitive rehabilitation groups. Since she showed signs of Parkinsonism, a therapy based on omeprazol 20mg, acetylsalicylic acid, donepezil 10mg, pramipexol 0.18 mg, nimodipine 10 drops, levodopa+carbidopa 100/25mg was started. A few days later she became sleepy during daytime and, once, she lost her balance and fell. She was not self-sufficient any more. At first this was attributed to a lung infection that the patient had, but her state continue after the infection was completely cured with appropriate antibiotics therapy. At that point an adverse drug reaction was suspected and therapy with pramipexol 0.18 mg was interrupted. In a few days the patient regained her previous level of consciousness and self-sufficiency. We consider this a typical case of complex management in a patient with dementia and comorbidity in which adverse drug reactions can play an important role in lowering the level of cognitive functions. In this case the relationship with the family of the patient was made difficult by the attitude of the patient's daughter who decided, after the onset of the adverse drug reaction, to interrupt her mother's stay in our center even at risk of the worst consequences.

  12. Estimating the scale of adverse animal welfare consequences of movement restriction and mitigation strategies in a classical swine fever outbreak.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shankar; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2017-04-04

    The study aim was to quantify the impact of movement restriction on the well-being of pigs and the associated mitigation responses during a classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak. We developed a stochastic risk assessment model and incorporated Indiana swine industry statistics to estimate the timing and number of swine premises that would encounter overcrowding or feed interruption resulting from movement restriction. Our model also quantified the amount of on-farm euthanasia and movement of pigs to slaughter plants required to alleviate those conditions. We simulated various single-site (i.e., an outbreak initiated from one location) and multiple-site (i.e., an outbreak initiated from more than one location) outbreak scenarios in Indiana to estimate outputs. The study estimated that 14% of the swine premises in Indiana would encounter overcrowding or feed interruption due to movement restriction implemented during a CSF outbreak. The number of premises that would experience animal welfare conditions was about 2.5 fold of the number of infected premises. On-farm euthanasia needed to be performed on 33% of those swine premises to alleviate adverse animal welfare conditions, and more than 90% of on-farm euthanasia had to be carried out within 2 weeks after the implementation of movement restriction. Conversely, movement of pigs to slaughter plants could alleviate 67% of adverse animal welfare conditions due to movement restriction, and only less than 1% of movement of pigs to slaughter plants had to be initiated in the first 2 weeks of movement restrictions. The risk of secondary outbreaks due to movement of pigs from movement restriction areas to slaughter plants was low and only seven pigs from each shipment needed to be tested for CSF infection to prevent a secondary outbreak. We found that the scale of adverse animal welfare consequences of movement restriction during a CSF outbreak in Indiana was substantial, and controlled movement of pigs to slaughter plants

  13. The role of the Immunisation Adverse Events Clinic at The Children's Hospital at Westmead.

    PubMed

    Wood, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    Specialist immunisation clinics review and manage children who have experienced an adverse event following immunisation and provide advice to parents and health care providers regarding the revaccination of these children. Information collected by these clinics supplement passive surveillance data and allow the investigation of suspected safety signals associated with the delivery of immunisation programs. This paper reviews the role and experience of the Immunisation Adverse Events Clinic at The Children's Hospital at Westmead and identifies areas for development.

  14. Do adverse effects of dental materials exist? What are the consequences, and how can they be diagnosed and treated?

    PubMed

    Schedle, Andreas; Ortengren, Ulf; Eidler, Nicole; Gabauer, Michael; Hensten, Arne

    2007-06-01

    All dental biomaterials release substances into the oral environment to a varying degree. Various preclinical biocompatibility test systems have been introduced, aiming at an evaluation of the potential risks of dental materials. Potential pathogenic effects of released substances from dental materials have been demonstrated. For the biocompatibility of a biomaterial, it is not only important that minimal diffusable substances are released when it is in body contact--the material must also fulfill the function for which it has been designed. This is also very much dependent on the material properties and its handling properties. The aim of this review was to generate an overview of the present status concerning adverse reactions among patients and personnel. A systematic review was performed using a defined search strategy in order to evaluate all MEDLINE-literature published between 1996 and 2006. The compilation of the literature available has revealed that the majority of studies have been carried out on patients compared with personnel. Adverse reactions towards dental materials do occur, but the prevalence and incidence are difficult to obtain. The results were essentially based on cohort studies. Clinical trials, especially randomized-controlled trials, are in the minority of all studies investigated, with the exception of composite and bonding studies, where clinical trials, but not randomized-controlled trials, represent the majority of studies. Patients and personnel were treated separately in the manuscript. Amalgam studies show the lowest degree of verified material-related diagnosis. Even if objective symptoms related to adverse reactions with polymer resin-based materials have been reported, postoperative sensitivity dominates reports concerning composites/bondings. Verified occupational effects among dental personnel show a low frequency of allergy/toxic reactions. Irritative hand eczema seemed to be more common than in the general population. Patient

  15. Adverse interactions between herbal and dietary substances and prescription medications: a clinical survey.

    PubMed

    Bush, Thomas M; Rayburn, Keith S; Holloway, Sandra W; Sanchez-Yamamoto, Deanna S; Allen, Blaine L; Lam, Tiffany; So, Brian K; Tran, De H; Greyber, Elizabeth R; Kantor, Sophia; Roth, Larry W

    2007-01-01

    Patients often combine prescription medications with herbal and dietary substances (herein referred to as herbal medicines). A variety of potential adverse herb-drug interactions exist based on the pharmacological properties of herbal and prescription medications. To determine the incidence of potential and observed adverse herb-drug interactions in patients using herbal medicines with prescription medications. Consecutive patients were questioned about their use of herbal medicines in 6 outpatient clinics. Patients reporting use of these products provided a list of their prescription medications, which were reviewed for any potential adverse herb-drug interactions using a comprehensive natural medicine database. Any potential adverse herb-drug interactions prompted a review of the patient's chart for evidence of an observed adverse herb-drug interaction. The rate of potential and observed adverse herb-drug interactions. Eight hundred four patients were surveyed, and 122 (15%) used herbal medicines. Eighty-five potential adverse herb-drug interactions were found in 49 patients (40% of herbal medicine users). Twelve possible adverse herb-drug interactions in 8 patients (7% of herbal medicine users) were observed. In all 12 cases, the severity scores were rated as mild, including 8 cases of hypoglycemia in diabetics taking nopal (prickly pear cactus). A substantial number of potential adverse herb-drug interactions were detected and a small number of adverse herb-drug interactions observed, particularly in diabetics taking nopal. Screening for herbal medicine usage in 804 patients did not uncover any serious adverse interactions with prescription medications.

  16. Oxprenolol hydrochloride: pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Russo, M E; Covinsky, J O

    1983-01-01

    Oxprenolol is a nonselective beta-adrenergic blocking agent that also possesses intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) and membrane stabilizing effects. Oxprenolol undergoes first pass metabolism with only 30% of an oral dose reaching the systemic circulation. The drug is approximately 80% protein bound and is eliminated primarily by glucuronidation in the liver. Less than 4% of oxprenolol is excreted unchanged in the urine. Oxprenolol may reduce the heart rate and prolong the effective and functional atrioventricular nodal refractory period. Oxprenolol has less negative inotropic and chronotropic effects than propranolol. Plasma renin activity is reduced; however, changes in plasma aldosterone level are not significant. Long term metabolic effects require further study. Oxprenolol appears to be comparable to other beta blockers in the treatment of hypertension and angina pectoris with no additional adverse reactions. If its partial agonist effect proves useful, it may have an advantage over other agents in treating patients with borderline cardiac reserve. Because of limited data, the use of oxprenolol for the treatment of arrhythmias, migraine, thyrotoxicosis, anxiety, and glaucoma cannot be recommended at this time.

  17. Adverse Clinical Effects of Botulinum Toxin Intramuscular Injections for Spasticity.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Chetan P; Balasubramanian, Chitra K; Holz, Alanna; Davidson, Caitlin; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2016-03-01

    The adverse events (AEs) with botulinum toxin type-A (BoNTA), used for indications other than spasticity, are widely reported in the literature. However, the site, dose, and frequency of injections are different for spasticity when compared to the treatment for other conditions and hence the AEs may be different as well. The objective of this study was to summarize the AEs reported in Canada and systematically review the AEs with intramuscular botulinum toxin injections to treat focal spasticity. Data were gathered from Health Canada (2009-2013) and major electronic databases. In a 4 year period, 285 AEs were reported. OnabotulinumtoxinA (n=272 events): 68% females, 53% serious, 18% hospitalization, and 8% fatalities. The type of AEs reported were - muscle weakness (19%), oropharyngeal (14%), respiratory (14%), eye related (8%), bowel/bladder related (8%), and infection (5%). IncobotulinumtoxinA (n=13): 38% females, 62% serious, and 54% hospitalization. The type of AEs reported were - muscle weakness (15%), oropharyngeal (15%), respiratory (38%), eye related (23%), bowel/bladder related (15%), and infection (15%). Commonly reported AEs in the literature were muscle weakness, pain, oropharyngeal, bowel/bladder, blood circulation, neurological, gait, and respiratory problems. While BoNTA is useful in managing spasticity, future studies need to investigate the factors that can minimize AEs. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the AEs can also improve guidelines for BoNTA administration and enhance outcomes.

  18. Nature, occurrence and consequences of medication-related adverse events during hospitalization: a retrospective chart review in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Hoonhout, Lilian H F; de Bruijne, Martine C; Wagner, Cordula; Asscheman, Henk; van der Wal, Gerrit; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2010-10-01

    Medication-related adverse events (MRAEs) form a large proportion of all adverse events in hospitalized patients and are associated with considerable preventable harm. Detailed information on harm related to drugs administered during hospitalization is scarce. Knowledge of the nature and preventability of MRAEs is needed to prioritize and improve medication-related patient safety. To provide information on the nature, consequences and preventability of MRAEs occurring during hospitalization in the Netherlands. Analysis of MRAEs identified in a retrospective chart review of patients hospitalized during 2004. The records of 7889 patients admitted to 21 hospitals in 2004 were reviewed by trained nurses and physicians using a three-stage process. For each hospital, patient records of 200 discharged and 200 deceased patients were randomly selected and reviewed. For each patient record, characteristics of the patient and the admission were collected. After identification of an MRAE the physician reviewers determined the type, severity, preventability, drug category and excess length of stay associated with the MRAE. Data on additional interventions or procedures related to MRAEs were obtained by linking our data to the national hospital registration database. The excess length of stay and the additional medical procedures were multiplied by unit costs to estimate the total excess direct medical costs associated with the MRAE. In total, 148 MRAEs occurred in 140 hospital admissions. The incidence of MRAEs was 0.9% (95% CI 0.7, 1.2) and the incidence of preventable MRAEs was 0.2% (95% CI 0.1, 0.4) per hospital admission. The majority of non-preventable MRAEs were adverse drug reactions caused by cancer chemotherapy. Preventable MRAEs were most often found in relation to anticoagulant treatment administered in combination with NSAIDs. Both non-preventable and preventable MRAEs resulted in considerable excess length of hospital stay and costs. On average, MRAEs resulted in

  19. Candida Virulence Properties and Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Neonatal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Joseph M.; Wong, Angela Y.; Bhak, Grace; Laforce-Nesbitt, Sonia S.; Taylor, Sarah; Tan, Sylvia; Stoll, Barbara J.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Shankaran, Seetha; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if premature infants with invasive Candida infection caused by strains with increased virulence properties have worse clinical outcomes than those infected with less virulent strains. Study design Clinical isolates were studied from 2 populations; premature infants colonized with Candida (commensal, n=27), and those with invasive candidiasis (n=81). Individual isolates of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis were tested for virulence in each of 3 assays: phenotypic switching, adhesion, and cytotoxicity. Invasive isolates were considered to have enhanced virulence if they measured more than 1 SD above the mean for the commensal isolates in at least 1 assay. Outcomes of patients with invasive isolates with enhanced virulence were compared with those with invasive isolates lacking enhanced virulence characteristics. Results 61% of invasive isolates of C. albicans and 42% of invasive isolates of C. parapsilosis had enhanced virulence. All C. albicans cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolates (n=6) and 90% of urine isolates (n=10) had enhanced virulence, compared with 48% of blood isolates (n=40). Infants with more virulent isolates were younger at the time of positive culture and had higher serum creatinine. Conclusions Individual isolates of Candida species vary in their virulence properties. Strains with higher virulence are associated with certain clinical outcomes. PMID:22504098

  20. Consequences of clinical case management for caregivers: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Aline; Dreier, Adina; Prudhomm, Joachim; Thyrian, Jochen René; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Somme, Dominique

    2017-05-01

    Informal caregivers are deeply involved in the case management process. However, little is known about the consequences of such programs for informal caregivers. This systematic literature review, reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement, addressed the consequences of clinical case management programs, whether positive or negative, for caregivers of frail older persons or persons with dementia. We systematically identified and analyzed published randomized trials and quasi-experimental studies comparing case management programs to usual care, which discussed outcomes concerning caregivers. Sixteen studies were identified, and 12 were included after quality assessment. Seven identified at least one positive result for caregivers, and no negative effect of case management has been found. Characteristics associated with positive results for caregivers were a high intensity of case management and programs specifically addressed to dementia patients. Despite the numerous methodological challenges in the assessment of such complex social interventions, our results show that case management programs can be beneficial for caregivers of dementia patients and that positive results for patients are achieved without increasing caregivers' burden. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. From adverse drug event detection to prevention. A novel clinical decision support framework for medication safety.

    PubMed

    Koutkias, V G; McNair, P; Kilintzis, V; Skovhus Andersen, K; Niès, J; Sarfati, J-C; Ammenwerth, E; Chazard, E; Jensen, S; Beuscart, R; Maglaveras, N

    2014-01-01

    Errors related to medication seriously affect patient safety and the quality of healthcare. It has been widely argued that various types of such errors may be prevented by introducing Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSSs) at the point of care. Although significant research has been conducted in the field, still medication safety is a crucial issue, while few research outcomes are mature enough to be considered for use in actual clinical settings. In this paper, we present a clinical decision support framework targeting medication safety with major focus on adverse drug event (ADE) prevention. The novelty of the framework lies in its design that approaches the problem holistically, i.e., starting from knowledge discovery to provide reliable numbers about ADEs per hospital or medical unit to describe their consequences and probable causes, and next employing the acquired knowledge for decision support services development and deployment. Major design features of the framework's services are: a) their adaptation to the context of care (i.e. patient characteristics, place of care, and significance of ADEs), and b) their straightforward integration in the healthcare information technologies (IT) infrastructure thanks to the adoption of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) and relevant standards. Our results illustrate the successful interoperability of the framework with two commercially available IT products, i.e., a Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) and an Electronic Health Record (EHR) system, respectively, along with a Web prototype that is independent of existing healthcare IT products. The conducted clinical validation with domain experts and test cases illustrates that the impact of the framework is expected to be major, with respect to patient safety, and towards introducing the CDSS functionality in practical use. This study illustrates an important potential for the applicability of the presented framework in delivering contextualized decision

  2. Bisphosphonates: Clinical Applications and Adverse Events in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Polymeri, Angeliki A; Kodovazenitis, George J; Polymeris, Antonios D; Komboli, Mado

    2015-01-01

    To review the mechanisms of action and clinical applications of bisphosphonate drugs, which are widely used in the management of metastatic bone cancer and systemic metabolic bone diseases, as well as the complications related to bisphosphonate treatment, emphasising the occurrence and management of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ). A search of the medical and dental literature was conducted in Medline and Embase using a combination of the key words bisphosphonates, jaw, complications, osteonecrosis, osteoporosis and periodontal disease. A manual search of the references of the retrieved articles was also performed. BRONJ predominantly affects cancer patients being treated with high-dose intravenous bisphosphonates and is characterised by the appearance of necrotic bone in the oral cavity either spontaneously or following an invasive surgical procedure such as dental extraction. The severity of this condition warrants a thorough medical and dental history in every patient in order to identify high risk patients. It is important that dental practitioners be aware of the association between bisphosphonate treatment and osteonecrosis of the jaws. Clinicians should perform a thorough oral examination in cancer patients before they begin intravenous bisphosphonate treatment. Optimal oral hygiene and regular dental care can lower BRONJ risk. Further clinical research is necessary to unveil the full therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates, their mechanisms of action and the factors that induce unwanted side-effects.

  3. Clinical and economic consequences of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2009-08-15

    Increasing drug resistance rates among gram-negative pathogens that frequently cause ventilator-associated pneumonia have resulted in increased hospital mortality, longer hospital stays, and higher inpatient health care costs. There is an urgent need for effective therapies that lessen the clinical and economic consequences of this nosocomial infection. In a randomized, multicenter, prospective, phase 3 trial, medical resource use associated with doripenem was compared with that associated with imipenem for the treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Analysis of medical resource use revealed that patients who received doripenem had a significantly shorter duration of hospital stay (22 vs. 27 days; P = .01)and duration of mechanical ventilation use (7 vs. 10 days; P = .03) than did patients who received imipenem. In addition, the duration of intensive care unit stay tended to be shorter for patients who received doripenem. The reduced medical resource use achieved with use of doripenem for treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia may provide not only clinical benefits to patients but also economic benefits to hospitals and health care systems.

  4. Population Analysis of Adverse Events in Different Age Groups Using Big Clinical Trials Data.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jake; Eldredge, Christina; Cho, Chi C; Cisler, Ron A

    2016-10-17

    Understanding adverse event patterns in clinical studies across populations is important for patient safety and protection in clinical trials as well as for developing appropriate drug therapies, procedures, and treatment plans. The objective of our study was to conduct a data-driven population-based analysis to estimate the incidence, diversity, and association patterns of adverse events by age of the clinical trials patients and participants. Two aspects of adverse event patterns were measured: (1) the adverse event incidence rate in each of the patient age groups and (2) the diversity of adverse events defined as distinct types of adverse events categorized by organ system. Statistical analysis was done on the summarized clinical trial data. The incident rate and diversity level in each of the age groups were compared with the lowest group (reference group) using t tests. Cohort data was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov, and 186,339 clinical studies were analyzed; data were extracted from the 17,853 clinical trials that reported clinical outcomes. The total number of clinical trial participants was 6,808,619, and total number of participants affected by adverse events in these trials was 1,840,432. The trial participants were divided into eight different age groups to support cross-age group comparison. In general, children and older patients are more susceptible to adverse events in clinical trial studies. Using the lowest incidence age group as the reference group (20-29 years), the incidence rate of the 0-9 years-old group was 31.41%, approximately 1.51 times higher (P=.04) than the young adult group (20-29 years) at 20.76%. The second-highest group is the 50-59 years-old group with an incidence rate of 30.09%, significantly higher (P<.001) when compared with the lowest incidence in the 20-29 years-old group. The adverse event diversity also increased with increase in patient age. Clinical studies that recruited older patients (older than 40 years) were more

  5. Population Analysis of Adverse Events in Different Age Groups Using Big Clinical Trials Data

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Christina; Cho, Chi C; Cisler, Ron A

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding adverse event patterns in clinical studies across populations is important for patient safety and protection in clinical trials as well as for developing appropriate drug therapies, procedures, and treatment plans. Objectives The objective of our study was to conduct a data-driven population-based analysis to estimate the incidence, diversity, and association patterns of adverse events by age of the clinical trials patients and participants. Methods Two aspects of adverse event patterns were measured: (1) the adverse event incidence rate in each of the patient age groups and (2) the diversity of adverse events defined as distinct types of adverse events categorized by organ system. Statistical analysis was done on the summarized clinical trial data. The incident rate and diversity level in each of the age groups were compared with the lowest group (reference group) using t tests. Cohort data was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov, and 186,339 clinical studies were analyzed; data were extracted from the 17,853 clinical trials that reported clinical outcomes. The total number of clinical trial participants was 6,808,619, and total number of participants affected by adverse events in these trials was 1,840,432. The trial participants were divided into eight different age groups to support cross-age group comparison. Results In general, children and older patients are more susceptible to adverse events in clinical trial studies. Using the lowest incidence age group as the reference group (20-29 years), the incidence rate of the 0-9 years-old group was 31.41%, approximately 1.51 times higher (P=.04) than the young adult group (20-29 years) at 20.76%. The second-highest group is the 50-59 years-old group with an incidence rate of 30.09%, significantly higher (P<.001) when compared with the lowest incidence in the 20-29 years-old group. The adverse event diversity also increased with increase in patient age. Clinical studies that recruited older

  6. Health-care-related adverse events leading to admission in older individuals: incidence, predictive factors and consequences.

    PubMed

    Magdelijns, Fabienne J H; van Avesaath, R E M; Pijpers, E; Stehouwer, C D A; Stassen, P M

    2016-10-01

    Older individuals are particularly prone to suffer health-care-related adverse events (AEs); they often have more comorbidity and, thus, require more health-care. Since our society is ageing, insight into AEs leading to hospital admissions is necessary. We aimed to assess the incidence, predictive factors and consequences of AEs leading to admission in older individuals. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all older patients (≥65 years) who were admitted through the emergency department (ED) to the department of internal medicine in the last week of every month in 2011. We retrieved the incidence and possible predictive factors for AEs leading to admission and mortality (both in-hospital and within 28 days after discharge). The control group consisted of older patients admitted because of other reasons. In the study period, there were 262 admissions, of which 106 (40.5%) were because of an AE. The most common AE was medication-related (55.7%). Predictive factors of admission because of an AE were the number of medications used [odds ratio (OR) 1.16 per medication, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.08-1.25] and dependency in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.14-0.91). Both in-hospital mortality and mortality within 28 days after discharge were lower in the AE group (5.7% vs. 16.0%, P = 0.01, and 0 vs. 6.9%, P < 0.05, respectively). Admissions through the ED to the department of internal medicine of older patients are often because of AEs (40.5%), with medication use being the greatest culprit. Surprisingly, mortality was lower in the AE group. The number of medications used (positive) and IADL dependency (negative) were predictive factors for being admitted because of an AE. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  7. The reporting of adverse events following spinal manipulation in randomized clinical trials-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gorrell, Lindsay M; Engel, Roger M; Brown, Benjamin; Lystad, Reidar P

    2016-09-01

    Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is commonly used to treat spinal disorders. Although clinical practice guidelines recommend the use of SMT in the treatment of neck and back disorders, concerns exist about the nature and incidence of adverse events associated with the intervention. Comprehensive reporting of adverse events in clinical trials could allow for accurate incidence estimates through meta-analysis. However, it is not clear if randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that involve SMT are currently reporting adverse events adequately. This study aimed to describe the extent of adverse events reporting in published RCTs involving SMT, and to determine whether the quality of reporting has improved since publication of the 2010 Consolidated Standards Of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. This is a systematic literature review. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched for RCTs involving SMT. Domains of interest included classifications of adverse events, completeness of adverse events reporting, nomenclature used to describe the events, methodological quality of the study, and details of the publishing journal. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Frequencies and proportions of trials reporting on each of the specified domains above were calculated. Differences in proportions between pre- and post-CONSORT trials were calculated with 95% confidence intervals using standard methods, and statistical comparisons were analyzed using tests for equality of proportions with continuity correction. There was no funding obtained for this study. The authors declare no conflict of interest. Of 7,398 records identified in the electronic searches, 368 articles were eligible for inclusion in this review. Adverse events were reported in 140 (38.0%) articles. There was a significant increase in the reporting of adverse events post-CONSORT (p=.001). There were two major adverse events

  8. Fusion oncogenes in salivary gland tumors: molecular and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Göran

    2013-07-01

    Salivary gland tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of uncommon diseases that pose significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. However, the recent discovery of a translocation-generated gene fusion network in salivary gland carcinomas as well in benign salivary gland tumors opens up new avenues for improved diagnosis, prognostication, and development of specific targeted therapies. The gene fusions encode novel fusion oncoproteins or ectopically expressed normal or truncated oncoproteins. The major targets of the translocations are transcriptional coactivators, tyrosine kinase receptors, and transcription factors involved in growth factor signaling and cell cycle regulation. Notably, several of these targets or pathways activated by these targets are druggable. Examples of clinically significant gene fusions in salivary gland cancers are the MYB-NFIB fusion specific for adenoid cystic carcinoma, the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion typical of low/intermediate-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and the recently identified ETV6-NTRK3 fusion in mammary analogue secretory carcinoma. Similarly, gene fusions involving the PLAG1 and HMGA2 oncogenes are specific for benign pleomorphic adenomas. Continued studies of the molecular consequences of these fusion oncoproteins and their down-stream targets will ultimately lead to the identification of novel driver genes in salivary gland neoplasms and will also form the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies for salivary gland cancers and, perhaps, other neoplasms.

  9. The health and social consequences of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) across the lifespan: an introduction to prevention and intervention in the community.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Heather; Shields, Joseph J; Anda, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    This introduction to the themed issue overviews of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study and discusses prevention and intervention with ACE and their consequences in communities. A commentary by Dr. Robert Anda, an ACE Study Co-Principal Investigator, is incorporated within this introduction. Implications of articles within the issue are addressed, and next steps are explored.

  10. Clinical review: insulin pump-associated adverse events in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Ross, P L; Milburn, J; Reith, D M; Wiltshire, E; Wheeler, B J

    2015-12-01

    Insulin pumps are a vital and rapidly developing tool in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus in both adults and children. Many studies have highlighted outcomes and assessed their potential advantages, but much of the data on adverse outcomes are limited and often based on outdated technology. We aimed to review and summarize the available literature on insulin pump-associated adverse events in adults and children. A literature search was undertaken using PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane library. Articles were then screened by title, followed by abstract, and full text as needed. A by-hand search of reference lists in identified papers was also utilised. All searches were limited to English language material, but no time limits were used. Current and past literature regarding insulin pump-associated adverse events is discussed, including potential metabolic and non-metabolic adverse events, in particular: pump malfunction; infusion set/site issues; and cutaneous problems. We show that even with modern technology, adverse events are common, occurring in over 40 % of users per year, with a minority, particularly in children, requiring hospital management. Hyperglycaemia and ketosis are now the most common consequences of adverse events and are usually associated with infusion set failure. This differs from older technology where infected infusion sites predominated. This timely review covers all potential insulin pump-associated adverse events, including their incidence, features, impacts, and contributory factors such as the pump user. The importance of ongoing anticipatory education and support for patients and families using this intensive insulin technology is highlighted, which if done well should improve the overall experience of pump therapy for users, and hopefully reduce the incidence and impact of severe adverse events.

  11. GHB and synthetic cathinones: clinical effects and potential consequences.

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Reynaud, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Designer drugs belong to a group of legally or illegally produced substances that are structurally and pharmacologically very similar to illicit drugs. In the past, designer drugs were often used during all-night dance parties, but they are now consumed in multiple settings from college bars to parks to private house parties. Most of these club drugs can be bought on legal websites and home-delivered for private parties. Recently, legal highs have once again become a burning media issue across the world. Our review will focus on GHB and synthetic cathinones. Literature searches were conducted for the period from 1975 to July 2010 using PubMed, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Internet underground and governmental websites using the following keywords alone or in combination: designer drugs, club drugs, party drugs, GHB, synthetic cathinones, mephedrone, methylone, flephedrone, MDAI, and MDVP. Available epidemiological, neurobiological, and clinical data for each compound are described. There is evidence that negative health and social consequences may occur in recreational and chronic users. The addictive potential of designer drugs is not weak. Non-fatal overdoses and deaths related to GHB/GBL or synthetic cathinones have been reported. Clinicians must be careful with GBL or synthetic cathinones, which are being sold and used as substitutes for GHB and MDMA, respectively. Interventions for drug prevention and harm reduction in response to the use of these drugs should be implemented on the Internet and in recreational settings. Prevention, Information, Action, and Treatment are the main goals that must be addressed for this new potentially addictive problem. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Understanding the role of human variation in vaccine adverse events: the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment Network.

    PubMed

    LaRussa, Philip S; Edwards, Kathryn M; Dekker, Cornelia L; Klein, Nicola P; Halsey, Neal A; Marchant, Colin; Baxter, Roger; Engler, Renata J M; Kissner, Jennifer; Slade, Barbara A

    2011-05-01

    The Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) Network is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 6 academic medical centers to provide support for immunization safety assessment and research. The CISA Network was established by the CDC in 2001 with 4 primary goals: (1) develop research protocols for clinical evaluation, diagnosis, and management of adverse events following immunization (AEFI); (2) improve the understanding of AEFI at the individual level, including determining possible genetic and other risk factors for predisposed people and subpopulations at high risk; (3) develop evidence-based algorithms for vaccination of people at risk of serious AEFI; and (4) serve as subject-matter experts for clinical vaccine-safety inquiries. CISA Network investigators bring in-depth clinical, pathophysiologic, and epidemiologic expertise to assessing causal relationships between vaccines and adverse events and to understanding the pathogenesis of AEFI. CISA Network researchers conduct expert reviews of clinically significant adverse events and determine the validity of the recorded diagnoses on the basis of clinical and laboratory criteria. They also conduct special studies to investigate the possible pathogenesis of adverse events, assess relationships between vaccines and adverse events, and maintain a centralized repository for clinical specimens. The CISA Network provides specific clinical guidance to both health care providers who administer vaccines and those who evaluate and treat patients with possible AEFI. The CISA Network plays an important role in providing critical immunization-safety data and expertise to inform vaccine policy-makers. The CISA Network serves as a unique resource for vaccine-safety monitoring efforts conducted at the CDC.

  13. Better Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Could Mitigate the Adverse Consequences of Obesity on Cardiovascular Disease: The SUN Prospective Cohort.

    PubMed

    Eguaras, Sonia; Toledo, Estefanía; Hernández-Hernández, Aitor; Cervantes, Sebastián; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2015-11-05

    Strong observational evidence supports the association between obesity and cardiovascular events. In elderly high-risk subjects, the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) was reported to counteract the adverse cardiovascular effects of adiposity. Whether this same attenuation is also present in younger subjects is not known. We prospectively examined the association between obesity and cardiovascular clinical events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) after 10.9 years follow-up in 19,065 middle-aged men and women (average age 38 year) according to their adherence to the MedDiet (<6 points or ≥6 points in the Trichopoulou's Mediterranean Diet Score). We observed 152 incident cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD). An increased risk of CVD across categories of body mass index (BMI) was apparent if adherence to the MedDiet was low, with multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs): 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.93-2.25) for ≥25 - <30 kg/m² of BMI and 2.00 (1.04-3.83) for ≥30 kg/m² of BMI, compared to a BMI < 25 kg/m². In contrast, these estimates were 0.77 (0.35-1.67) and 1.15 (0.39-3.43) with good adherence to MedDiet. Better adherence to the MedDiet was associated with reduced CVD events (p for trend = 0.029). Our results suggest that the MedDiet could mitigate the harmful cardiovascular effect of overweight/obesity.

  14. Better Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Could Mitigate the Adverse Consequences of Obesity on Cardiovascular Disease: The SUN Prospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Eguaras, Sonia; Toledo, Estefanía; Hernández-Hernández, Aitor; Cervantes, Sebastián; Martínez-González, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Strong observational evidence supports the association between obesity and cardiovascular events. In elderly high-risk subjects, the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) was reported to counteract the adverse cardiovascular effects of adiposity. Whether this same attenuation is also present in younger subjects is not known. We prospectively examined the association between obesity and cardiovascular clinical events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) after 10.9 years follow-up in 19,065 middle-aged men and women (average age 38 year) according to their adherence to the MedDiet (<6 points or ≥6 points in the Trichopoulou’s Mediterranean Diet Score). We observed 152 incident cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD). An increased risk of CVD across categories of body mass index (BMI) was apparent if adherence to the MedDiet was low, with multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs): 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.93–2.25) for ≥25 – <30 kg/m2 of BMI and 2.00 (1.04–3.83) for ≥30 kg/m2 of BMI, compared to a BMI < 25 kg/m2. In contrast, these estimates were 0.77 (0.35–1.67) and 1.15 (0.39–3.43) with good adherence to MedDiet. Better adherence to the MedDiet was associated with reduced CVD events (p for trend = 0.029). Our results suggest that the MedDiet could mitigate the harmful cardiovascular effect of overweight/obesity. PMID:26556370

  15. Use of the adverse outcome pathway framework to represent cross-species consequences of specific pathway perturbations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework has been developed as a means for assembling scientifically defensible descriptions of how particular molecular perturbations, termed molecular initiating events (MIEs), can evoke a set of predictable responses at different levels of bi...

  16. Use of the adverse outcome pathway framework to represent cross-species consequences of specific pathway perturbations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework has been developed as a means for assembling scientifically defensible descriptions of how particular molecular perturbations, termed molecular initiating events (MIEs), can evoke a set of predictable responses at different levels of bi...

  17. Clinical features, proximate causes, and consequences of active convulsive epilepsy in Africa.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, Symon M; Matuja, William; Akpalu, Albert; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Chabi, Martin; Wagner, Ryan G; Connor, Myles; Chengo, Eddie; Ngugi, Anthony K; Odhiambo, Rachael; Bottomley, Christian; White, Steven; Sander, Josemir W; Neville, Brian G R; Newton, Charles R J C; Twine, Rhian; Gómez Olivé, F Xavier; Collinson, Mark; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen; Masanja, Honratio; Mathew, Alexander; Pariyo, George; Peterson, Stefan; Ndyomughenyi, Donald; Bauni, Evasius; Kamuyu, Gathoni; Odera, Victor Mung'ala; Mageto, James O; Ae-Ngibise, Ken; Akpalu, Bright; Agbokey, Francis; Adjei, Patrick; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Doku, Victor C K; Odermatt, Peter; Nutman, Thomas; Wilkins, Patricia; Noh, John

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the clinical features and consequences are poorly characterized. Most studies are hospital-based, and few studies have compared different ecological sites in SSA. We described active convulsive epilepsy (ACE) identified in cross-sectional community-based surveys in SSA, to understand the proximate causes, features, and consequences. We performed a detailed clinical and neurophysiologic description of ACE cases identified from a community survey of 584,586 people using medical history, neurologic examination, and electroencephalography (EEG) data from five sites in Africa: South Africa; Tanzania; Uganda; Kenya; and Ghana. The cases were examined by clinicians to discover risk factors, clinical features, and consequences of epilepsy. We used logistic regression to determine the epilepsy factors associated with medical comorbidities. Half (51%) of the 2,170 people with ACE were children and 69% of seizures began in childhood. Focal features (EEG, seizure types, and neurologic deficits) were present in 58% of ACE cases, and these varied significantly with site. Status epilepticus occurred in 25% of people with ACE. Only 36% received antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital was the most common drug [95%]), and the proportion varied significantly with the site. Proximate causes of ACE were adverse perinatal events (11%) for onset of seizures before 18 years; and acute encephalopathy (10%) and head injury prior to seizure onset (3%). Important comorbidities were malnutrition (15%), cognitive impairment (23%), and neurologic deficits (15%). The consequences of ACE were burns (16%), head injuries (postseizure) (1%), lack of education (43%), and being unmarried (67%) or unemployed (57%) in adults, all significantly more common than in those without epilepsy. There were significant differences in the comorbidities across sites. Focal features are common in ACE, suggesting identifiable and preventable causes. Malnutrition and

  18. Clinical features, proximate causes, and consequences of active convulsive epilepsy in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Symon M; Matuja, William; Akpalu, Albert; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Chabi, Martin; Wagner, Ryan G; Connor, Myles; Chengo, Eddie; Ngugi, Anthony K; Odhiambo, Rachael; Bottomley, Christian; White, Steven; Sander, Josemir W; Neville, Brian G R; Newton, Charles R J C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Epilepsy is common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the clinical features and consequences are poorly characterized. Most studies are hospital-based, and few studies have compared different ecological sites in SSA. We described active convulsive epilepsy (ACE) identified in cross-sectional community-based surveys in SSA, to understand the proximate causes, features, and consequences. Methods We performed a detailed clinical and neurophysiologic description of ACE cases identified from a community survey of 584,586 people using medical history, neurologic examination, and electroencephalography (EEG) data from five sites in Africa: South Africa; Tanzania; Uganda; Kenya; and Ghana. The cases were examined by clinicians to discover risk factors, clinical features, and consequences of epilepsy. We used logistic regression to determine the epilepsy factors associated with medical comorbidities. Key Findings Half (51%) of the 2,170 people with ACE were children and 69% of seizures began in childhood. Focal features (EEG, seizure types, and neurologic deficits) were present in 58% of ACE cases, and these varied significantly with site. Status epilepticus occurred in 25% of people with ACE. Only 36% received antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital was the most common drug [95%]), and the proportion varied significantly with the site. Proximate causes of ACE were adverse perinatal events (11%) for onset of seizures before 18 years; and acute encephalopathy (10%) and head injury prior to seizure onset (3%). Important comorbidities were malnutrition (15%), cognitive impairment (23%), and neurologic deficits (15%). The consequences of ACE were burns (16%), head injuries (postseizure) (1%), lack of education (43%), and being unmarried (67%) or unemployed (57%) in adults, all significantly more common than in those without epilepsy. Significance There were significant differences in the comorbidities across sites. Focal features are common in ACE, suggesting identifiable and

  19. Assessing residents' disclosure of adverse events: traditional objective structured clinical examinations versus mixed reality.

    PubMed

    Posner, Glenn; Naik, Viren; Bidlake, Erin; Nakajima, Amy; Sohmer, Benjamin; Arab, Abeer; Varpio, Lara

    2012-04-01

    The skill of disclosing adverse events is difficult to assess. Assessment of this competency in medical trainees is commonly achieved via the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) using a standardized patient (SP). We hypothesized that the addition of a simulated clinical adverse event prior to the SP encounter could increase trainees' engagement and empathy, thereby improving performance. The objective of this study was to explore whether experiencing a simulated adverse event prior to an SP encounter alters resident performance on a disclosure OSCE. Sixteen obstetrics and gynaecology residents participated in this mixed methods study. Prior to disclosing the complication in an SP encounter, residents were randomized either to receive a written description of an adverse event, or to experience a mannequin simulation of an adverse event. Mean OSCE scores from blinded examiners were compared in each group. Focus group discussions elicited residents' reflections on the experience of disclosing the adverse event. The mean score was 16.6/23 ± 2.9 (range 10 to 20) for the traditional OSCE group and 16.9/23 ± 1.7 (range 15 to 20) for the simulation group. Analysis of the focus group data revealed several themes, such as the type of context the residents desired, the emotional involvement they felt, and their insights about their experience of the simulation scenario or with the SP. The assessment of adverse event disclosure was not enhanced by the addition of a simulated experience. Study participants reported that the simulation did not provide the contextual information required to elicit empathy and a sense of being emotionally invested in the adverse event.

  20. The role of the clinical pharmacologist in the management of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Moore, N

    2001-01-01

    The classical definition of clinical pharmacology is the study or the knowledge of the effects of drugs in humans. The activities of a clinical pharmacologist can vary from country to country, usually ranging from involvement in clinical trials, especially fundamental pharmacodynamic studies, to studies of pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism, to pharmacogenetics. Most clinical pharmacologists outside industry are in hospitals or university hospitals and research centres. In addition to research, this implies teaching of clinical pharmacology, and interacting with other medical staff: in the field of research, giving advice on clinical trials methodology and often managing a therapeutic drug monitoring centre. Some clinical pharmacologists have clinical departments with beds or consulting offices. Can there be another role for the clinical pharmacologist that would increase his or her usefulness for the medical community? Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are remarkably complex events, related to drug effects, patient characteristics (background diseases, genetics), and drug/disease interactions. Evaluation of ADRs requires understanding of drug mechanisms and interactions, and of disease diagnostics, especially in the discussion of alternative diagnoses. This implies expertise as a pharmacologist and a clinician. In addition, because not all adverse reactions or interactions are in the Summary of Product Characteristics, and because problems arise long before they report in the literature, it is necessary for the clinical pharmacologist to have knowledge of ongoing regulatory processes, in addition to having access to the published literature. Helping clinicians cope with individual patient problems will also improve the clinical pharmacologist's integration into the healthcare process.

  1. Correlating eligibility criteria generalizability and adverse events using Big Data for patients and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sen, Anando; Ryan, Patrick B; Goldstein, Andrew; Chakrabarti, Shreya; Wang, Shuang; Koski, Eileen; Weng, Chunhua

    2017-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials can benefit from proactive assessment of how well their participant selection strategies during the design of eligibility criteria can influence the study generalizability. In this paper, we present a quantitative metric called generalizability index for study traits 2.0 (GIST 2.0) to assess the a priori generalizability (based on population representativeness) of a clinical trial by accounting for the dependencies among multiple eligibility criteria. The metric was evaluated on 16 sepsis trials identified from ClinicalTrials.gov, with their adverse event reports extracted from the trial results sections. The correlation between GIST scores and adverse events was analyzed. We found that the GIST 2.0 score was significantly correlated with total adverse events and serious adverse events (weighted correlation coefficients of 0.825 and 0.709, respectively, with P < 0.01). This study exemplifies the promising use of Big Data in electronic health records and ClinicalTrials.gov for optimizing eligibility criteria design for clinical studies. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Clinical picture and outcome of Serious Adverse Events in the treatment of Onchocerciasis

    PubMed Central

    Awadzi, Kwablah

    2003-01-01

    Ivermectin (Mectizan®) is the only drug currently recommended for the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Serious adverse events rarely occur during treatment, except in subjects heavily infected with Loa Loa. This review of drug-related serious adverse events in the treatment of onchocerciasis therefore revisited the pre-Mectizan® reference drugs, DEC and suramin, and other candidate drugs studied extensively for the treatment of human onchocerciasis. The benzimidazole carbamate derivatives and the antibiotic doxycycline were excluded, since no serious adverse events have been reported regarding their use. Using recommended definitions, serious adverse events reported or observed after the use of each drug were summarised, the level of attribution determined, and the results tabulated. Prominence was given to treatment-related deaths. The clinical picture of severe symptomatic postural hypotension is described and used to illustrate the difference between the severity and the seriousness of an adverse event. The epidemiology, management and outcome of serious adverse events are presented. The role of future research is discussed. PMID:14975063

  3. Attitudes and beliefs of staff to feedback following the review of adverse events in clinical care.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Sharyn; Buckley, David; Reyment, Jill

    2013-09-01

    To undertake a pilot project to determine how clinical and non-clinical staff perceive feedback given to them following clinical incident reviews. An online survey was devised and sent as a link to staff across the Murrumbidgee Local Health District who would be likely to submit patient-related adverse incidents into the NSW Health Incident Information Management System. Two hundred and twenty-eight responses were received. Feedback was viewed as constructive and helpful. Medical staff were less enthusiastic about feedback and preferred formal feedback processes. Feedback from clinical incident reviews closes the loop of the review process and creates a platform for necessary changes to be undertaken.

  4. [Clinical consequences of dioxins exposure during tooth development].

    PubMed

    Maurin, J C; Bleicher, F; Magloire, H

    2005-11-01

    Commonly designed by the term "dioxins", polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons are environmental pollutants leading to several toxic effects during development and growth in embryo and child. The general consequences of dioxin exposure are particularly well-documented whereas only few data are mentioned by the experts concerning tooth development. However, studies performed in rodents have shown many disruptions during odontogenesis and enamel mineralisation. Moreover, recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated in human the incidence of dioxin exposure on enamel hypomineralisation and hypodontia. The aim of this review is to report recent data about consequences of dioxin exposure on tooth development, tooth being considered as a biological marker of potential dioxin poisoning.

  5. Significance of frailty for predicting adverse clinical outcomes in different patient groups with specific medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Martin; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter; Sieber, Cornel Christian

    2016-10-01

    Frailty is a major health burden in an aging society. It constitutes a clinical state of reduced physiological reserves that is associated with a diminished ability to withstand internal and external stressors. Frail patients have an increased risk for adverse clinical outcomes, such as mortality, readmission to hospital, institutionalization and falls. Of further clinical interest, frailty might be at least in part reversible in some patients and subject to preventive strategies. In daily clinical practice older patients with a complex health status, who are mostly frail or at least at risk of developing frailty, are frequently cared for by geriatricians. Recently, clinicians and scientists from other medical disciplines, such as cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, nephrology, endocrinology, rheumatology, surgery and critical care medicine also discovered frailty to be an interesting instrument for risk stratification of patients, including younger patients. In this review we highlight the results of recent studies that demonstrated the significance of frailty to predict adverse clinical outcomes in patients with specific medical conditions, such as cardiac, lung, liver and kidney diseases as well as diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, trauma patients, patients undergoing surgery and critically ill patients. Multiple studies in patients with the aforementioned specific medical conditions could be identified demonstrating a predictive role of frailty for several adverse clinical outcomes. The association between frailty and adverse clinical outcomes reported in these studies was in part independent of several major potential confounder factors, such as age, sex, race, comorbidities and disabilities and were also detected in younger patients.

  6. Clinical and Molecular Consequences of NF1 Microdeletion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    in cells, and an important type is centrosome abnormality, which leads to abnormal mitoses and consequent losses and gains of chromosomes. We...whether other neurofibromas (from NF1 deletion and/or intragenic mutation patients) also show abnormal and multipolar mitoses and in particular...multipolar mitoses . This suggests a possible role for centrosome dysregulation in neurofibromagenesis. This discovery also poses the new and exicting

  7. Consequences of Contextual Factors on Clinical Reasoning in Resident Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBee, Elexis; Ratcliffe, Temple; Picho, Katherine; Artino, Anthony R., Jr.; Schuwirth, Lambert; Kelly, William; Masel, Jennifer; van der Vleuten, Cees; Durning, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Context specificity and the impact that contextual factors have on the complex process of clinical reasoning is poorly understood. Using situated cognition as the theoretical framework, our aim was to evaluate the verbalized clinical reasoning processes of resident physicians in order to describe what impact the presence of contextual factors have…

  8. Consequences of Contextual Factors on Clinical Reasoning in Resident Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBee, Elexis; Ratcliffe, Temple; Picho, Katherine; Artino, Anthony R., Jr.; Schuwirth, Lambert; Kelly, William; Masel, Jennifer; van der Vleuten, Cees; Durning, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Context specificity and the impact that contextual factors have on the complex process of clinical reasoning is poorly understood. Using situated cognition as the theoretical framework, our aim was to evaluate the verbalized clinical reasoning processes of resident physicians in order to describe what impact the presence of contextual factors have…

  9. Clinical roundtable monograph. New alternatives in CLL therapy: managing adverse events.

    PubMed

    Chanan-Khan, Asher; Kipps, Thomas; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2010-08-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a B-cell leukemia mainly affecting older adults. Historically, CLL has been regarded as an incurable disease, and treatment has been confined to cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. However, prognosis for patients treated with these agents remained poor, prompting the development of new, targeted agents. The introduction of rituximab, a CD20-targeted monoclonal antibody, revolutionized the treatment for this disease. Rituximab in combination with fludarabine improved response rates and length of progression-free survival. The success of rituximab in this setting has prompted the development of many more investigational agents for CLL, including other antibody agents. However, as with any medication, the potential benefit achieved with CLL therapies is mitigated by the safety risk for the patient. These agents have been associated with adverse events such as immunosuppression, reactivation of cytomegalovirus, and infusion-related reactions that can occur with antibody administration. Adverse events can greatly affect the patient’s quality of life and ability to tolerate therapy. Management of adverse events is a critical component of the overall treatment strategy for CLL, particularly in elderly patients. In this clinical roundtable monograph, 3 expert physicians discuss the latest clinical studies evaluating the treatment of CLL, focusing on the adverse events associated with each agent and the potential interventions that can be used to manage their occurrence.

  10. Using a clinical data repository to estimate the frequency and costs of adverse drug events.

    PubMed Central

    Einbinder, J. S.; Scully, K.

    2001-01-01

    As a result of increased attention to medical errors, many institutions are contemplating increased use of information technology and clinical decision support. We conducted a retrospective analysis to estimate the frequency and cost of adverse drug events (ADEs) for inpatients at the University of Virginia. Applying published criteria for the detection of potential adverse events, we used a clinical data warehouse to identify patients and cases with potential ADEs. Again using published criteria, we then estimated the actual number of adverse drug events and preventable adverse drug events, as well as their attributable costs and excess length of stay. Our results showed a higher estimate (10.4-11.5 events per 100 admissions) for ADEs than seen in the ADE Prevention Study, highlighting the importance of considering the generalizability of published ADE studies to other settings. Our analysis demonstrates that retrospective analysis can be an efficient and powerful technique to evaluate rules and criteria used to detect ADEs and to assess their impact. PMID:11833476

  11. The clinical consequences of sucrase-isomaltase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stanley A

    2016-12-01

    Primary sucrase-isomaltase deficiency, originally thought to be a homozygous recessive disorder, has been found to have numerous genetic variants that alone or in combination (compound heterozygosity) express varying degrees of clinical illness, most commonly causing chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, and bloating. These symptoms are also present with secondary sucrase-isomaltase deficiency. Recent investigations are providing evidence that sucrase-isomaltase deficiency is more prevalent and of greater clinical significance than previously suspected. Further research is required to correlate the specific genotypes and phenotypes with their clinical expressions and to determine the most appropriate treatment algorithm for these patients.

  12. 236 children with developmental hydrocephalus: causes and clinical consequences

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Hannah M; Ishak, Gisele E; Rue, Tessa C; Dempsey, Jennifer C; Browd, Samuel R; Millen, Kathleen J; Doherty, Dan; Dobyns, William B

    2016-01-01

    Few systematic assessments of developmental forms of hydrocephalus exist. We reviewed MRIs and clinical records of patients with infancy-onset hydrocephalus. Among 411 infants, 236 had hydrocephalus with no recognizable extrinsic cause. These children were assigned to one of five subtypes and compared on the basis of clinical characteristics, developmental and surgical outcomes. At an average age of 5.3 years, 72% of children were walking independently and 87% could eat by mouth. 18% had epilepsy. Distinct patterns of associated malformations and syndromes were observed within each subtype. On average, children with aqueductal obstruction, cysts and encephaloceles had worse clinical outcomes than those with other forms of developmental hydrocephalus. 53% of surgically-treated patients experienced at least one shunt failure, but hydrocephalus associated with posterior fossa crowding required fewer shunt revisions. We conclude that each subtype of developmental hydrocephalus is associated with distinct clinical characteristics, syndromology, and outcomes, suggesting differences in underlying mechanisms. PMID:26184484

  13. Severe public humiliation: its nature, consequences, and clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Torres, Walter J; Bergner, Raymond M

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we present an analysis of what is involved when our clients undergo severe public humiliation at the hands of another person or persons. We describe (a) the structure of such humiliation; that is, the factors that, taken collectively, render certain interpersonal events and circumstances humiliating ones for people; (b) the most common damaging consequences of being subjected to these, up to and including suicide and homicide; and (c) a number of therapeutic interventions that have proven effective in our own work with humiliated clients, as well as certain obstacles we have encountered in this work. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. [Clinical features and adverse pregnancy outcomes of new onset systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Z P; Yang, Y; Zhan, Y F; Chen, D Y; Liang, L Q; Yang, X Y

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics and adverse pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with new onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during pregnancy. Methods: The clinical data of 263 pregnancies with SLE in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhongshan University from 2001 to 2015 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: Of all the 263 pregnancies, 188 were diagnosed before pregnancy and 75 were newly diagnosed during pregnancy. Among the 75 new onset SLE, 27, 31, 14 and 3 cases were diagnosed during first trimester, second trimester, third trimester and puerperium, respectively. Active lupus was noted in 81.3% of the patients with new onset SLE. The main clinical manifestations of new onset SLE were lupus nephritis (57.3%) and thrombocytopenia (38.7%). SLEPDAI scores as well as the prevalence of lupus nephritis, and thrombocytopenia in patients with new onset SLE was higher than those in the previously diagnosed ones (P<0.05). Among the 75 new onset SLE pregnancies, adverse pregnancy outcomesoccurred in 53 patients, including 34 with pregnancy loss, 15with premature, 8with intrauterine growth restriction, 5with fetal distress and5 with neonatal lupus. Compared with patients withnon-newonset SLE, patients with newonset SLEhad a higher prevalence of adverse pregnancy outcomes (56.4% vs 70.7%, P<0.05), and pregnancy loss (21.8% vs 45.3%, P<0.01) but less live birth (78.2% vs 54.7%, P<0.05). Conclusion: Most of the patients with new onset SLE occurred during the first and second trimester. The most common clinical features of new onset SLE were lupus nephritis and thrombocytopenia. Patients with new onset SLE were more prone to active lupus, lupus nephritis and thrombocytopenia, as well as more adverse pregnancy outcomes and pregnancy loss.

  15. Low socioeconomic status, adverse gene expression profiles, and clinical outcomes in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jennifer M.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Logan, Brent R.; Wang, Tao; Arevalo, Jesusa M.G.; Ma, Jeffrey; Cole, Steve W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Low socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with adverse outcomes among unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients, but the biological mechanisms contributing to this health disparity are poorly understood. Therefore, we examined whether social environment affects expression of a stress-related gene expression profile known as the conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA), which involves up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes and down-regulation of genes involved in type I IFN response and antibody synthesis. Experimental Design We compared pre-transplant leukocyte CTRA gene expression between a group of 78 high vs. low SES recipients of unrelated donor HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia in first remission. Post hoc exploratory analyses also evaluated whether CTRA gene expression was associated with poor clinical outcomes. Results Peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected pre-HCT from low SES individuals demonstrated significant CTRA up-regulation compared to matched HCT recipients of high SES. Promoter-based bioinformatics implicated distinct patterns of transcription factor activity including increased CREB signaling and decreased IRF and GR signaling. High expression of the CTRA gene profile was also associated with increased relapse risk and decreased leukemia-free survival. Conclusions Low SES is associated with increased expression of the CTRA gene profile, and CTRA gene expression is associated with adverse HCT clinical outcomes. These findings provide a biologic framework within which to understand how social environmental conditions may influence immune function and clinical outcomes in allogeneic HCT. PMID:26286914

  16. Adverse Event Reporting in Clinical Trials of Finasteride for Androgenic Alopecia: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Belknap, Steven M; Aslam, Imran; Kiguradze, Tina; Temps, William H; Yarnold, Paul R; Cashy, John; Brannigan, Robert E; Micali, Giuseppe; Nardone, Beatrice; West, Dennis P

    2015-06-01

    Two meta-analyses conclude that finasteride treatment of androgenic alopecia (AGA) is safe but do not assess quality of safety reporting. To assess safety reporting for clinical trial reports of finasteride for AGA. MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and a clinical data repository for an academic medical center. Published clinical trial reports for finasteride treatment of AGA. For each trial, we assessed quality of adverse event reporting, extracted the number and type of adverse events in treatment and placebo groups, and assessed duration of safety evaluation and adequacy of blinding. Two observers independently extracted the data; differences were resolved by consensus. We assessed generalizability in a large cohort of men prescribed finasteride, 1.25 mg/d or less, by assessing for eligibility in the finasteride-AGA pivotal trials. Quality was assessed as adequate, partially adequate, inadequate, or no events reported. We used funnel plots of the hazard ratio to assess bias. Of 34 clinical trials, none had adequate safety reporting, 19 were partially adequate, 12 were inadequate, and 3 reported no adverse events. Funnel plots were asymmetric with a bias toward lower odds ratio for sexual adverse effects, suggesting systematic underdetection. No reports assessed adequacy of blinding, 18 (53%) disclosed conflicts of interest, and 19 (56%) received funding from the manufacturer. Duration of drug safety evaluation was 1 year or less for 26 of 34 trials (76%). Of 5704 men in the clinical data repository who were treated for AGA with finasteride, 1.25 mg/d or less, for AGA, only 31% met inclusion criteria for the pivotal trials referenced in the manufacturer's full prescribing information and 33% took finasteride for more than 1 year. Available toxicity information from clinical trials of finasteride in men with AGA is very limited, is of poor quality, and seems to be systematically biased. In a cohort of men prescribed finasteride for routine treatment of AGA, most would

  17. Mining clinical text for signals of adverse drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Srinivasan V; Harpaz, Rave; LePendu, Paea; Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Electronic health records (EHRs) are increasingly being used to complement the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and to enable active pharmacovigilance. Over 30% of all adverse drug reactions are caused by drug–drug interactions (DDIs) and result in significant morbidity every year, making their early identification vital. We present an approach for identifying DDI signals directly from the textual portion of EHRs. Methods We recognize mentions of drug and event concepts from over 50 million clinical notes from two sites to create a timeline of concept mentions for each patient. We then use adjusted disproportionality ratios to identify significant drug–drug–event associations among 1165 drugs and 14 adverse events. To validate our results, we evaluate our performance on a gold standard of 1698 DDIs curated from existing knowledge bases, as well as with signaling DDI associations directly from FAERS using established methods. Results Our method achieves good performance, as measured by our gold standard (area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve >80%), on two independent EHR datasets and the performance is comparable to that of signaling DDIs from FAERS. We demonstrate the utility of our method for early detection of DDIs and for identifying alternatives for risky drug combinations. Finally, we publish a first of its kind database of population event rates among patients on drug combinations based on an EHR corpus. Conclusions It is feasible to identify DDI signals and estimate the rate of adverse events among patients on drug combinations, directly from clinical text; this could have utility in prioritizing drug interaction surveillance as well as in clinical decision support. PMID:24158091

  18. Pathophysiology of endotoxin tolerance: mechanisms and clinical consequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Endotoxin tolerance was first described in a study that exposed animals to a sublethal dose of bacterial endotoxin. The animals subsequently survived a lethal injection of endotoxin. This refractory state is associated with the innate immune system and, in particular, with monocytes and macrophages, which act as the main participants. Several mechanisms are involved in the control of endotoxin tolerance; however, a full understanding of this phenomenon remains elusive. A number of recent reports indicate that clinical examples of endotoxin tolerance include not only sepsis but also diseases such as cystic fibrosis and acute coronary syndrome. In these pathologies, the risk of new infections correlates with a refractory state. This review integrates the molecular basis and clinical implications of endotoxin tolerance in various pathologies. PMID:24229432

  19. Clinical consequences of spider bites: recent advances in our understanding.

    PubMed

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; White, Julian

    2004-04-01

    Spider bite continues to be a controversial subject worldwide and attribution of clinical effects to different spiders is problematic because of poor case definition and paucity of clinical evidence. The effects of medically important spiders are sometimes underestimated and simultaneously there is misattribution of effects to harmless spider groups. The majority of suspected spider bites present as skin lesions or necrotic ulcers where the history of a spider bite must be confirmed. To be a definite spider bite, the patient must immediately observe the spider and there be evidence of the bite, such as pain. Important groups of spiders worldwide include the widow spiders (latrodectism), recluse spiders (loxoscelism) and some mygalomorph spiders including the Australian Funnel web spider. Most spiders only cause minor effects, including a large number of groups that have been implicated in necrotic arachnidism.

  20. [Clinical consequences of muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Sauleda Roig, J

    2006-05-01

    The function of respiratory muscles, and mainly inspiratory muscles, is impaired in COPD patients. Most of these impairments are essentially due to pulmonary hyperinflation that puts these muscles in a disadvantageous situation. The main consequence of this dysfunction is respiratory muscle fatigue that may cause shortness of breath, exertion intolerance, and hypoventilation with onset of hypercapnic respiratory failure. This function may be measured at the pulmonary function laboratory by means of unspecific (spirometry, pulmonary volumes) or specific tests (maxim respiratory pressures [MIP - M], transdiaphragmatic pressure, tension-time index of the diaphragm, electromyography, or endura tests). Therapy should aim at improving hyperinflation with bronchodilator therapy, improving muscular strength with rehabilitation, and in severe cases muscle rest with mechanical ventilation. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is a common complication in moderate-severe COPD, and it may be the result of chronic inactivity, hypoxemia, electrolytic impairments, under nutrition, steroids, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Besides, it may contribute to patients' quality of life worsening, disability, and even an increase in morbimortality. It may tested by impedanciometry, muscle strength tests (dynamometry), imaging tests, and even muscle biopsy in research studies. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is potentially manageable with rehabilitation, nutritional supplementation, and anabolic drugs. However, therapeutic success is often incomplete, so that further studies with new therapeutic strategies are needed.

  1. Aggression on inpatient units: Clinical characteristics and consequences.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Laoise; Stewart, Duncan; Richardson, Michelle; Lavelle, Mary; James, Karen; Hardy, Claire; Price, Owen; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    Aggression and violence are widespread in UK Mental Health Trusts, and are accompanied by negative psychological and physiological consequences for both staff and other patients. Patients who are younger, male, and have a history of substance use and psychosis diagnoses are more likely to display aggression; however, patient factors are not solely responsible for violence, and there are complex circumstances that lead to aggression. Indeed, patient-staff interactions lead to a sizeable portion of aggression and violence on inpatient units, thus they cannot be viewed without considering other forms of conflict and containment that occur before, during, and after the aggressive incident. For this reason, we examined sequences of aggressive incidents in conjunction with other conflict and containment methods used to explore whether there were particular profiles to aggressive incidents. In the present study, 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards were recruited, and there were 1422 incidents of aggression (verbal, physical against objects, and physical). Cluster analysis revealed that aggressive incident sequences could be classified into four separate groups: solo aggression, aggression-rule breaking, aggression-medication, and aggression-containment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find physical aggression dominant in the aggression-containment cluster, and while verbal aggression occurred primarily in solo aggression, physical aggression also occurred here. This indicates that the management of aggression is variable, and although some patient factors are linked with different clusters, these do not entirely explain the variation.

  2. [Mental health of children, adolescents and young adults--part 1: prevalence, illness persistence, adversities, service use, treatment delay and consequences].

    PubMed

    Lambert, M; Bock, T; Naber, D; Löwe, B; Schulte-Markwort, M; Schäfer, I; Gumz, A; Degkwitz, P; Schulte, B; König, H H; Konnopka, A; Bauer, M; Bechdolf, A; Correll, C; Juckel, G; Klosterkötter, J; Leopold, K; Pfennig, A; Karow, A

    2013-11-01

    Numerous birth-control studies, epidemiological studies, and observational studies have investigated mental health and health care in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, including prevalence, age at onset, adversities, illness persistence, service use, treatment delay and course of illness. Moreover, the impact of the burden of illness, of deficits of present health care systems, and the efficacy and effectiveness of early intervention services on mental health were evaluated. According to these data, most mental disorders start during childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Many children, adolescents and young adults are exposed to single or multiple adversities, which increase the risk for (early) manifestations of mental diseases as well as for their chronicity. Early-onset mental disorders often persist into adulthood. Service use by children, adolescents and young adults is low, even lower than for adult patients. Moreover, there is often a long delay between onset of illness and first adequate treatment with a variety of linked consequences for a poorer psychosocial prognosis. This leads to a large burden of illness with respect to disability and costs. As a consequence several countries have implemented so-called "early intervention services" at the interface of child and adolescent and adult psychiatry. Emerging studies show that these health-care structures are effective and efficient. Part 1 of the present review summarises the current state of mental health in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, including prevalence, age at onset, adversities, illness persistence, service use, and treatment delay with consequences. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Identifying adverse drug event information in clinical notes with distributional semantic representations of context.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Aron; Kvist, Maria; Dalianis, Hercules; Duneld, Martin

    2015-10-01

    For the purpose of post-marketing drug safety surveillance, which has traditionally relied on the voluntary reporting of individual cases of adverse drug events (ADEs), other sources of information are now being explored, including electronic health records (EHRs), which give us access to enormous amounts of longitudinal observations of the treatment of patients and their drug use. Adverse drug events, which can be encoded in EHRs with certain diagnosis codes, are, however, heavily underreported. It is therefore important to develop capabilities to process, by means of computational methods, the more unstructured EHR data in the form of clinical notes, where clinicians may describe and reason around suspected ADEs. In this study, we report on the creation of an annotated corpus of Swedish health records for the purpose of learning to identify information pertaining to ADEs present in clinical notes. To this end, three key tasks are tackled: recognizing relevant named entities (disorders, symptoms, drugs), labeling attributes of the recognized entities (negation, speculation, temporality), and relationships between them (indication, adverse drug event). For each of the three tasks, leveraging models of distributional semantics - i.e., unsupervised methods that exploit co-occurrence information to model, typically in vector space, the meaning of words - and, in particular, combinations of such models, is shown to improve the predictive performance. The ability to make use of such unsupervised methods is critical when faced with large amounts of sparse and high-dimensional data, especially in domains where annotated resources are scarce.

  4. Pathogenesis, developmental consequences, and clinical correlations of human embryo fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Victor Y; Browne, Richard W; Bloom, Michael S; Sakkas, Denny; Alikani, Mina

    2011-03-15

    This narrative review summarizes the current state of knowledge about human embryo fragmentation during IVF. The clinical relevance of fragmentation is discussed and evidence supporting a central role for the oocyte in the pathogenesis of fragmentation is presented. A mechanism of fragmentation as aberrant cell division involving the cytoskeleton is described along with the novel concept of membrane instability in relation to follicular high-density lipoprotein metabolism and cholesterol transport. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes of a Fully Hydroxyapatite-Coated Femoral Revision Stem: Excessive Stress Shielding Incidence and its Consequences.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Ilknur; Arts, Jacobus Johannes Christiaan; Geurts, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Stress shielding remains a concern in total hip arthroplasty. The consequences of stress shielding in hydroxyapatite-coated femoral component revisions were evaluated in a prospective cohort study. A total of 106 patients operated on by revision total hip arthroplasty were identified. Sixty-three patients were eligible for clinical and radiologic assessment of osseointegration, bone remodeling, and stress shielding. Five patients showed evidence of excessive stress shielding. One patient experienced a periprosthetic fracture. No adverse events occurred in the remaining patients with a low rate of thigh pain and reliable osseointegration. This is the only available study concerning mid- to long-term consequences of excessive stress shielding in hydroxyapatite-coated revision stems. We advocate surgeons using these stems to remain vigilant and be aware of possible stress shielding side effects.

  6. Hydrodynamic consequences of glycolysis: thermodynamic basis and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Hans Peter

    2004-09-01

    Since Warburg's original description of aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis in 1924, the biochemical and molecular bases of glucose metabolism in cells have been characterized. However, its thermodynamic implications have found little attention. Van't Hoff's law of thermodynamics was applied here to describe how glucose metabolism affects intracellular osmotic pressure, hence revealing how glucose metabolism provides cells with osmotic energy as well as chemical energy. Ensuing osmosis-driven movement of free water across membranes affects cell volume and shape, hydration of intracellular components, and interactions of cells with their environment. Comparative analysis of extant data revealed strong evidence for clinically relevant glycolysis-driven effects under hypoxic conditions known to occur in cancer, vascular disease as well as intensive care, including critical and preventable ones affecting treatment effectiveness and thus, clinical outcome. These findings provide the first evidence confirming the existence of glycolysis-driven hydrodynamic effects and suggest that high levels of aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis provide a common biophysical basis in seemingly unrelated medical conditions.

  7. [Sex differences in infectious diseases and their clinical consequences].

    PubMed

    Beisel, Claudia; van Lunzen, Jan; Lohse, Ansgar W; Addo, Marylyn M; Altfeld, Marcus

    2015-09-01

    Differences between women and men range from their anatomy, their natural social behavior to their susceptibility and response to different pathologies, including infectious diseases. The underlying mechanisms of sex differences in infectious diseases are manifold, including differences in exposure to common pathogens, genetic factors that modulate immune responses against pathogens and hormonal factors that may alter susceptibility or disease progression, and responsiveness to treatment. On one hand, these mechanisms lead to higher innate and adaptive immune responses in females, which result in faster clearance of acute infections and higher antibody responses to several vaccines, on the other hand this contributes to an increased susceptibility to chronic inflammatory diseases. In this review we summarize the underlying causes of sex differences in prevalence, clinical course of disease and treatment outcome of infectious diseases. In order to develop individualized treatment concepts, a fair balance between the sexes should be maintained in basic science, preclinical and clinical studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Possible pathogenic pathways in the adverse clinical events seen following ivermectin administration to onchocerciasis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Charles D; Geary, Timothy G; Gerlach, John A

    2003-01-01

    Background Reactions are commonly associated with the chemotherapy of onchocerciasis. However unmanageable reactions are uncommon when ivermectin (Mectizan®) is used for the treatment of this infection, and this drug has proved to be a great improvement over previously used agents. Serious adverse events (SAE) nevertheless have occurred, and there is considerable concern about the negative effect such events may have on mass drug administration programs. This paper reviews the basic pathogenic mechanisms that can be involved in the destruction of microfilaria by chemotherapeutic agents. A central challenge to filarial chemotherapy is the need to remove parasites from biologically sensitive tissues, a more difficult medical challenge than eliminating nematodes from the gastrointestinal tract. Explanations for the etiology of the serious adverse reactions occurring with ivermectin treatment in specific geographic areas where there is coincident heavy Loa loa infections are hampered by a lack of specific pathological case material. Ways to investigate these possibilities are reviewed. Possible pathogenic mechanisms include embolic vascular pathology accompanied by local inflammation, blood brain barrier mdr1 abnormalities, and genetic predisposition to excessive inflammatory responses. Conclusion It is important to keep ivermectin, and all its associated adverse clinical events, in perspective with the many other chemotherapeutic agents in general use – many of which produce serious adverse events even more frequently than does ivermectin. Currently available evidence indicates that the pathogenesis of the Loa-associated adverse reactions are probably related to inflammatory responses to microfilariae in specific tissues. However, the possibility of genetic predispositions to pathology should also be considered. PMID:14975062

  9. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy decreases the rate of adverse pregnancy outcome: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    SANT’ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi; de CAMPOS, Marinele R.; PASSANEZI, Selma Campos; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; PASSANEZI, Euloir

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease during the second trimester of gestation on adverse pregnancy outcomes. Material and Methods Pregnant patients during the 1st and 2nd trimesters at antenatal care in a Public Health Center were divided into 2 groups: NIG – "no intervention" (n=17) or IG- "intervention" (n=16). IG patients were submitted to a non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by a single periodontist consisting of scaling and root planning (SRP), professional prophylaxis (PROPH) and oral hygiene instruction (OHI). NIG received PROPH and OHI during pregnancy and were referred for treatment after delivery. Periodontal evaluation was performed by a single trained examiner, blinded to periodontal treatment, according to probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI) and sulcular bleeding index (SBI) at baseline and 35 gestational weeks-28 days post-partum. Primary adverse pregnancy outcomes were preterm birth (<37 weeks), low birth weight (<2.5 kg), late abortion (14-24 weeks) or abortion (<14 weeks). The results obtained were statistically evaluated according to OR, unpaired t test and paired t test at 5% significance level. Results No significant differences were observed between groups at baseline examination. Periodontal treatment resulted in stabilization of CAL and PI (p>0.05) at IG and worsening of all periodontal parameters at NIG (p<0.0001), except for PI. Significant differences in periodontal conditions of IG and NIG were observed at 2nd examination (p<0.001). The rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes was 47.05% in NIG and 6.25% in IG. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy was associated to a decreased risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes [OR=13.50; CI: 1.47-123.45; p=0.02]. Conclusions Periodontal treatment during the second trimester of gestation contributes to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21552714

  10. Effect of RAAS blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high CVD risk subjects with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chaugai, Sandip; Sherpa, Lhamo Yanchang; Sepehry, Amir A.; Arima, Hisatomi; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that atrial fibrillation significantly increases the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects. Application of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers for prevention of recurrence of atrial fibrillation and adverse clinical outcomes in subjects with atrial fibrillation is a theoretically appealing concept. However, results of clinical trials evaluating the effect of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation remain inconclusive. A pooled study of 6 randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on subjects with atrial fibrillation was performed. A total of 6 randomized controlled trials enrolled a total of 53,510 patients followed for 1 to 5 years. RAAS blockade therapy was associated with 14% reduction in the incidence of heart failure (OR: 0.86, [95%CI: 0.76– 0.97], P=0.018) and 17% reduction in the incidence of CVE (OR: 0.83, [95%CI: 0.70–0.99], P = 0.038). The corresponding decline in absolute risk against heart failure (ARR: 1.4%, [95%CI: 0.2–2.6%], P = 0.018) and CVE (ARR: 3.5%, [95%CI: 0.0–6.9%], P = 0.045) in the AF group was much higher than the non-AF group for heart failure (ARR: 0.4%, [95%CI: 0.0–0.7%], P = 0.057) and CVE (ARR: 1.6%, [95%CI: –0.1% to 3.3%], P = 0.071). No significant effect was noted on all-cause or cardiovascular mortality, stroke, or myocardial infarction. This study suggests that RAAS blockade offers protection against heart failure and cardiovascular events in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation. PMID:27368043

  11. Variants of RhD--current testing and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Geoff

    2013-05-01

    Anti-D (-RH1) of the Rh blood group system is clinically important as it causes haemolytic transfusion reactions and haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although most people are either D+ or D-, there is a plethora of D variants, often categorized as either weak D or partial D. These two types are inadequately defined and the dichotomy is potentially misleading. DVI is the D variant most commonly associated with anti-D production and UK guidelines recommend that patients are tested with anti-D reagents that do not react with DVI. Weak D types 1, 2, and 3 are seldom, if ever, associated with alloanti-D production, so a policy recommendation would be to treat patients with those D variants as D+, to preserve D- stocks, whereas patients with all other D variants would be treated as D-. All donors with D variant red cells, including DVI, should be treated as D+.

  12. Scabies: important clinical consequences explained by new molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Katja; Holt, Deborah; Currie, Bart; Kemp, David

    2012-01-01

    In 2004, we reviewed the status of disease caused by the scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei at the time and pointed out that very little basic research had ever been done. The reason for this was largely the lack of availability of mites for experimental purposes and, to a degree, a consequent lack of understanding of its importance, resulting in the trivial name 'itch mite'. Scabies is responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immunocompromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by bacterial pathogens such as Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus via skin lesions, resulting in severe downstream disease such as in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. We now have further evidence that in disadvantaged populations living in tropical climates, scabies rather than 'Strep throat' is an important source of S. pyogenes causing rheumatic fever and eventually rheumatic heart disease. In addition, our work has resulted in two fundamental research tools that facilitate much of the current biomedical research efforts on scabies, namely a public database containing ~45,000 scabies mite expressed sequence tags and a porcine in vivo model. Here we will discuss novel and unexpected proteins encountered in the database that appear crucial to mite survival with regard to digestion and evasion of host defence. The mode(s) of action of some of these have been at least partially revealed. Further, newly discovered molecules that may well have a similar role, such as a family of inactivated cysteine proteases, are yet to be investigated. Hence, there are now whole families of potential targets for chemical inhibitors of S. scabiei. These efforts put today's scabies research in a unique position to design and test small molecules that may specifically interfere with mite-derived molecules, such as digestive proteases and mite

  13. [Pharmacological properties of vortioxetine and its pre-clinical consequences].

    PubMed

    David, D J; Tritschler, L; Guilloux, J-P; Gardier, A M; Sanchez, C; Gaillard, R

    2016-02-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are extensively used for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). SSRIs are defined as indirect receptor agonists since the activation of postsynaptic receptors is a consequence of an increase in extracellular concentrations of serotonin (5-HT) mediated by the blockade of serotonin transporter. The activation of some serotoninergic receptors (5-HT1A, post-synaptic, 5-HT1B post-synaptic, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT4), but not all (5-HT1A, pre-synaptic, 5-HT1B pre-synaptic, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT3, and probably 5-HT6), induces anxiolytic/antidepressive - like effects. Targetting specifically some of them could potentially improve the onset of action and/or efficacy and/or prevent MD relapse. Vortioxetine (Brintellix, 1- [2-(2,4-dimethylphenyl-sulfanyl)-phenyl]-piperazine) is a novel multi-target antidepressant drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and by European Medicines Agency. Its properties are markedly different from the extensively prescribed SSRIs. Compared to the SSRIs, vortioxetine is defined as a multimodal antidepressant drug since it is not only a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, but also a 5-HT1D, 5-HT3, 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist and 5-HT1A receptor agonist. This specific pharmacological profile enables vortioxetine to affect not only the serotoninergic and noradrenergic systems, but also the histaminergic, cholinergic, gamma-butyric acid (GABA) ergic and glutamatergic ones. Thus, vortioxetine not only induces antidepressant-like or anxiolytic-like activity but also improves cognitive parameters in several animal models. Indeed, vortioxetine was shown to improve working memory, episodic memory, cognitive flexibility and spatial memory in young adult rodents and also in old animal models. These specific effects of the vortioxetine are of interest considering that cognitive dysfunction is a common comorbidity to MDD. Altogether, even though this molecule still

  14. Magnitude of the inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass and its relation to adverse clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Holmes, J H; Connolly, N C; Paull, D L; Hill, M E; Guyton, S W; Ziegler, S F; Hall, R A

    2002-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induces an inflammatory response believed to contribute to postoperative morbidity. We hypothesized that the magnitude of the inflammatory response following CPB would be associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Twenty-nine patients had plasma TNF, IL-6, IL-8, elastase, histamine, complement C5a, and complement C3a measured by ELISA before, during, and after cardiac operations employing CPB. Inflammatory mediator levels were analyzed with respect to outcomes. Mediator levels peaked at 4 h post-CPB and either returned to baseline or substantially decreased by 24 h. Patients with peak mediator levels above the median for the group as a whole were classified as 'hyper-responders'; those with levels below the median were classified as 'normal responders'. While IL-8, C3a, and IL-6 levels were independently associated with adverse outcomes, TNF, histamine, and C5a levels were not. Elastase levels trended towards adverse outcomes. IL-8 'hyper-responders' experienced significantly greater postoperative weight gain and had higher IL-8 levels at 24 h (p<0.05), with trends towards renal impairment and protracted supplemental oxygen requirements. C3a 'hyper-responders' strongly trended towards increased bleeding, delayed extubation, greater postoperative weight gain, and decreased levels of independent functioning at discharge (p < or = 0.10). IL-6 'hyper-responders' experienced significantly more postoperative bleeding, delayed extubation, and higher IL-6 levels at 24 h compared to 'normal responders' (p < 0.05). They strongly trended towards greater postoperative weight gain and decreased levels of independent functioning at discharge (p < or = 0.10). Patients who have an exaggerated inflammatory response to CPB tend to bleed more, require more respiratory support, demonstrate greater capillary leak via weight gain, and display a decline in independent functioning relative to normal responders. Thus, it appears that the magnitude of the

  15. Consequences of early adverse rearing experience(EARE) on development: insights from non-human primate studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo

    2017-01-18

    Early rearing experiences are important in one's whole life, whereas early adverse rearing experience(EARE) is usually related to various physical and mental disorders in later life. Although there were many studies on human and animals, regarding the effect of EARE on brain development, neuroendocrine systems, as well as the consequential mental disorders and behavioral abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Due to the close genetic relationship and similarity in social organizations with humans, non-human primate(NHP) studies were performed for over 60 years. Various EARE models were developed to disrupt the early normal interactions between infants and mothers or peers. Those studies provided important insights of EARE induced effects on the physiological and behavioral systems of NHPs across life span, such as social behaviors(including disturbance behavior, social deficiency, sexual behavior, etc), learning and memory ability, brain structural and functional developments(including influences on neurons and glia cells, neuroendocrine systems, e.g., hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal(HPA) axis, etc). In this review, the effects of EARE and the underlying epigenetic mechanisms were comprehensively summarized and the possibility of rehabilitation was discussed.

  16. Complications and Adverse Events of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing 3 Graft Types for ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mohtadi, Nicholas; Barber, Rhamona; Chan, Denise; Paolucci, Elizabeth Oddone

    2016-05-01

    Complications/adverse events of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery are underreported, despite pooled level 1 data in systematic reviews. All adverse events/complications occurring within a 2-year postoperative period after primary ACL reconstruction, as part of a large randomized clinical trial (RCT), were identified and described. Prospective, double-blind randomized clinical trial. Patients and the independent trained examiner were blinded to treatment allocation. University-based orthopedic referral practice. Three hundred thirty patients (14-50 years; 183 males) with isolated ACL deficiency were intraoperatively randomized to ACL reconstruction with 1 autograft type. Graft harvest and arthroscopic portal incisions were identical. Patients were equally distributed to patellar tendon (PT), quadruple-stranded hamstring tendon (HT), and double-bundle (DB) hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction. Adverse events/complications were patient reported, documented, and diagnoses confirmed. Two major complications occurred: pulmonary embolism and septic arthritis. Twenty-four patients (7.3%) required repeat surgery, including 25 separate operations: PT = 7 (6.4%), HT = 9 (8.2%), and DB = 8 (7.3%). Repeat surgery was performed for meniscal tears (3.6%; n = 12), intra-articular scarring (2.7%; n = 9), chondral pathology (0.6%; n = 2), and wound dehiscence (0.3%; n = 1). Other complications included wound problems, sensory nerve damage, muscle tendon injury, tibial periostitis, and suspected meniscal tears and chondral lesions. Overall, more complications occurred in the HT/DB groups (PT = 24; HT = 31; DB = 45), but more PT patients complained of moderate or severe kneeling pain (PT = 17; HT = 9; DB = 4) at 2 years. Overall, ACL reconstructive surgery is safe. Major complications were uncommon. Secondary surgery was necessary 7.3% of the time for complications/adverse events (excluding graft reinjury or revisions) within the first 2 years. Level 1 (therapeutic studies

  17. Natural History and Clinical Consequences of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Despite the existence of Hepatitis B vaccination, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still prevalent worldwide and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality. It is encouraging that majority of patients do recover from the acute infection, however, those that progress to chronic disease state is at great risk of developing complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma, cirrhosis and liver failure. Hepatitis B virus infection can be influenced by many factors such as host immune status, age at infection, and level of viral replication. The discovery about the existence of various genotypes and its association with different geographic distribution as well as the knowledge regarding mutant species has aid us in better understanding the nature of HBV infection and in delivering better care for patients. It is especially important to recognize those individuals with HBeAg-negative chronic HBV as they have a poorer prognosis compare with their counterparts, HBeAg-positive. Tremendous progress has been made over the years in understanding the behavior and clinical course of the disease; however, the natural history of HBV is complex and we still have much to explore and learn. PMID:15968338

  18. Natural History and Clinical Consequences of Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Pan, Calvin Q; Zhang, Jin X

    2005-01-01

    Despite the existence of Hepatitis B vaccination, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still prevalent worldwide and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality. It is encouraging that majority of patients do recover from the acute infection, however, those that progress to chronic disease state is at great risk of developing complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma, cirrhosis and liver failure. Hepatitis B virus infection can be influenced by many factors such as host immune status, age at infection, and level of viral replication. The discovery about the existence of various genotypes and its association with different geographic distribution as well as the knowledge regarding mutant species has aid us in better understanding the nature of HBV infection and in delivering better care for patients. It is especially important to recognize those individuals with HBeAg-negative chronic HBV as they have a poorer prognosis compare with their counterparts, HBeAg-positive. Tremendous progress has been made over the years in understanding the behavior and clinical course of the disease; however, the natural history of HBV is complex and we still have much to explore and learn.

  19. Endometriosis: hormone regulation and clinical consequences of chemotaxis and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Fernando M.; Petraglia, Felice; Taylor, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The recruitment of immune cells by chemokines and the regulation of endometrial cell apoptosis are critical aspects of endometriosis biology. Here, we review the local (paracrine) and systemic hormone (endocrine) modulation of these two specific, but highly related phenomena. METHODS We searched Pubmed for items published in English between September 1991 and September 2011 and selected the studies evaluating the effects of hormones on chemokines or apoptosis in normal human endometrium and endometriosis. RESULTS Estradiol has proinflammatory and antiapoptotic effects in endometrial cells, and these effects appear to be exacerbated in women with endometriosis. In these women, physiological estradiol concentrations are able to induce an enhanced inflammatory response mediated by local chemokine production and to reinforce mechanisms of cell survival mediated by extracellular signal-regulated kinases and Bcl-2. The main effect of progestogens is to inhibit interleukin-8 and other chemokines in stromal cells from both eutopic and ectopic endometrium. Progesterone is also effective in inducing apoptosis in endometrial and endometriotic cells through the inhibition of Bcl-2 and nuclear factor-κB. CONCLUSIONS Estrogens and progestogens modulate chemotaxis and apoptosis in human endometrium and endometriotic cells and tissues. These endocrine and paracrine pathways are perturbed in women with endometriosis, contributing to inflammatory responses, abnormal tissue remodeling, therapeutic refractoriness and disease persistence. Ultimately, they promote adhesion formation and the clinical symptoms of pelvic pain and infertility. A more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved will offer new opportunities for novel pharmacological strategies to diagnose and treat endometriosis. PMID:23539633

  20. Mechanisms of Cryoablation: Clinical Consequences on Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Baust, J.G.; Gage, A.A.; Johansen, T.E. Bjerklund; Baust, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    While the destructive actions of a cryoablative freeze cycle are long recognized, more recent evidence has revealed a complex set of molecular responses that provides a path for optimization. The importance of optimization relates to the observation that the cryosurgical treatment of tumors yields success only equivalent to alternative therapies. This is also true of all existing therapies of cancer that, while applied with curative intent; provide only disease suppression for periods ranging from months to years. Recent research has led to an important new understanding of the nature of cancer, which has implications for primary therapies, including cryosurgical treatment. We now recognize that a cancer is a highly organized tissue dependent on other supporting cells for its establishment, growth and invasion. Further, cancer stem cells are now recognized as an origin of disease and prove resistant to many treatment modalities. Growth is dependent on endothelial cells essential to blood vessel formation, fibroblasts production of growth factors, and protective functions of cells of the immune system. This review discusses the biology of cancer, which has profound implications for the diverse therapies of the disease, including cryosurgery. We also describe the cryosurgical treatment of diverse cancers, citing results, types of adjunctive therapy intended to improve clinical outcomes, and comment briefly on other energy-based ablative therapies. With an expanded view of tumor complexity, we identify those elements key to effective cryoablation and strategies designed to optimize cancer cell mortality with a consideration of the now recognized hallmarks of cancer. PMID:24239684

  1. GI Consequences of Cancer Treatment: A Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Andreyev, H Jervoise N

    2016-04-01

    In an era when extensive research is being funded to mitigate the radiation risks of a human traveling to Mars or the potential effects of a nuclear detonation in an urban environment, it is difficult to understand why the medical and research community remains largely uninterested in pelvic radiation disease (PRD), a condition that afflicts half a million patients every year after radiotherapy for pelvic cancer. There has been significant progress in understanding the nature of normal tissue injury, especially as it affects the GI tract. Clear clinical data exist on how best to assess and improve symptoms and there are a number of options for how to modulate the underlying progressive pathophysiology of PRD. Annually, there are more patients who develop PRD than inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Despite the similarity in PRD and IBD symptoms, the same expertise that promotes assessment, treatment and disease-modifying approaches as standard of care in IBD is almost nonexistent for those suffering from PRD, and as a result the unmet need is enormous. Curing or controlling cancer without addressing quality of life is no longer acceptable when half of all patients diagnosed with cancer live for 10 years after treatment. For those patients afflicted with PRD it can cause significant misery, and this situation is unacceptable; investment in training and research cannot be delayed any longer.

  2. Systematic drug repositioning through mining adverse event data in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Su, Eric Wen; Sanger, Todd M

    2017-01-01

    Drug repositioning (i.e., drug repurposing) is the process of discovering new uses for marketed drugs. Historically, such discoveries were serendipitous. However, the rapid growth in electronic clinical data and text mining tools makes it feasible to systematically identify drugs with the potential to be repurposed. Described here is a novel method of drug repositioning by mining ClinicalTrials.gov. The text mining tools I2E (Linguamatics) and PolyAnalyst (Megaputer) were utilized. An I2E query extracts "Serious Adverse Events" (SAE) data from randomized trials in ClinicalTrials.gov. Through a statistical algorithm, a PolyAnalyst workflow ranks the drugs where the treatment arm has fewer predefined SAEs than the control arm, indicating that potentially the drug is reducing the level of SAE. Hypotheses could then be generated for the new use of these drugs based on the predefined SAE that is indicative of disease (for example, cancer).

  3. Systematic drug repositioning through mining adverse event data in ClinicalTrials.gov

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Todd M.

    2017-01-01

    Drug repositioning (i.e., drug repurposing) is the process of discovering new uses for marketed drugs. Historically, such discoveries were serendipitous. However, the rapid growth in electronic clinical data and text mining tools makes it feasible to systematically identify drugs with the potential to be repurposed. Described here is a novel method of drug repositioning by mining ClinicalTrials.gov. The text mining tools I2E (Linguamatics) and PolyAnalyst (Megaputer) were utilized. An I2E query extracts “Serious Adverse Events” (SAE) data from randomized trials in ClinicalTrials.gov. Through a statistical algorithm, a PolyAnalyst workflow ranks the drugs where the treatment arm has fewer predefined SAEs than the control arm, indicating that potentially the drug is reducing the level of SAE. Hypotheses could then be generated for the new use of these drugs based on the predefined SAE that is indicative of disease (for example, cancer). PMID:28348935

  4. Clinical consequences of using PNA-FISH in Staphylococcal bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Laub, R R; Knudsen, J D

    2014-04-01

    To optimize patient treatment and rational use of antimicrobials, it is important to provide fast information on findings in blood-cultures (BCs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) on positive BCs containing Gram-positive cocci in clusters to differentiate between Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) on the prescribed antimicrobial therapy and on the number of contacts between microbiologist and clinician. All cases of positive BCs in our laboratory with SA or CoNS in the year 2011 were identified and the charts were reviewed retrospectively. The group of patients with BCs tested with PNA-FISH was compared to the group of patients with untested BCs. A total of 200 patients with SA and 725 patients with CoNS were included. The mean number of contacts was 0.82 when PNA-FISH showed CoNS and 1.39 when PNA-FISH was not done (p < 0.0001). More patients were recommended appropriate antimicrobial therapy for SA bacteraemia in the PNA-FISH group (98.0%) than in the non-PNA-FISH group (89.4 %) (p = 0.025). The percentage treated with dicloxacillin was 29.6 in the PNA-FISH group, and 8.2 in the non-PNA-FISH group (p = 0.0003). The use of PNA-FISH on BCs in this study was associated with more appropriate and narrow spectrum antimicrobial therapy for patients with SA in an area with low prevalence of methicillin-resistant SA, and a lower number of contacts between clinical microbiologist and clinician about BCs with CoNS as contaminants.

  5. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials.

    PubMed

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae; Tan, Aik Choon

    2016-12-01

    Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ ), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov . Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs.

  6. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov/), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov. Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs. PMID:27631620

  7. Clinical predictors of thiopurine-related adverse events in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Gordon W; Dubeau, Marie-France; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Yang, Hong; Eksteen, Bertus; Ghosh, Subrata; Panaccione, Remo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence and predictors of thiopurine-related adverse events. METHODS: Subjects with Crohn’s disease who were followed in the Alberta Inflammatory Bowel Disease Consortium patient database registry were identified. Retrospective chart review was conducted between August 5th, 2010 and June 1st, 2012. We collected data on: age at diagnosis; sex; disease location and behaviour at time of prescribing thiopurine; perianal fistulising disease at or prior to thiopurine prescription; smoking status at time of thiopurine prescription, use of corticosteroid within 6 mo of diagnosis; dosage, age at onset, and cessation of 5-aminosalicyclic acid (5-ASA); anti-tumour necrosis factor medication exposure and intestinal resection before thiopurine prescription. The primary outcome of interest was the first adverse event that led to discontinuation of the first thiopurine medication used. Logistic regression models were used to associate clinical characteristics with outcomes after adjusting for potential confounders. Risk estimates were presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% CI. Effect modification by age and sex were explored. RESULTS: Our cohort had a median follow-up duration of 5.8 years [interquartile range (IQR 25th-75th) 2.7-9.1]. Thiopurine therapy was discontinued in 31.3% of patients because of: hypersensitivity reactions (7.1%), acute pancreatitis (6.2%), gastrointestinal intolerance (5.4%), leucopenia (3.7%), hepatotoxicity (3.4%), infection (1.1%) and other reasons (4.3%). A higher incidence of thiopurine withdrawal was observed in patients over the age of 40 (39.4%, P = 0.007). A sex-by-age interaction (P = 0.04) was observed. Females older than 40 years of age had an increased risk of thiopurine discontinuation due to an adverse event (age above 40 vs age below 40, adjusted OR = 2.8; 95%CI: 1.4-5.6). In contrast, age did not influence thiopurine withdrawal in males (age above 40 vs below 40, adjusted OR = 0.9; 95%CI: 0.4-2.1). Other clinical

  8. Clinical predictors of thiopurine-related adverse events in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Gordon W; Dubeau, Marie-France; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Yang, Hong; Eksteen, Bertus; Ghosh, Subrata; Panaccione, Remo

    2015-07-07

    To determine the incidence and predictors of thiopurine-related adverse events. Subjects with Crohn's disease who were followed in the Alberta Inflammatory Bowel Disease Consortium patient database registry were identified. Retrospective chart review was conducted between August 5th, 2010 and June 1st, 2012. We collected data on: age at diagnosis; sex; disease location and behaviour at time of prescribing thiopurine; perianal fistulising disease at or prior to thiopurine prescription; smoking status at time of thiopurine prescription, use of corticosteroid within 6 mo of diagnosis; dosage, age at onset, and cessation of 5-aminosalicyclic acid (5-ASA); anti-tumour necrosis factor medication exposure and intestinal resection before thiopurine prescription. The primary outcome of interest was the first adverse event that led to discontinuation of the first thiopurine medication used. Logistic regression models were used to associate clinical characteristics with outcomes after adjusting for potential confounders. Risk estimates were presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% CI. Effect modification by age and sex were explored. Our cohort had a median follow-up duration of 5.8 years [interquartile range (IQR 25th-75th) 2.7-9.1]. Thiopurine therapy was discontinued in 31.3% of patients because of: hypersensitivity reactions (7.1%), acute pancreatitis (6.2%), gastrointestinal intolerance (5.4%), leucopenia (3.7%), hepatotoxicity (3.4%), infection (1.1%) and other reasons (4.3%). A higher incidence of thiopurine withdrawal was observed in patients over the age of 40 (39.4%, P = 0.007). A sex-by-age interaction (P = 0.04) was observed. Females older than 40 years of age had an increased risk of thiopurine discontinuation due to an adverse event (age above 40 vs age below 40, adjusted OR = 2.8; 95%CI: 1.4-5.6). In contrast, age did not influence thiopurine withdrawal in males (age above 40 vs below 40, adjusted OR = 0.9; 95%CI: 0.4-2.1). Other clinical variables (disease

  9. [Disclosing harmful adverse event: Assessment of medical practices from clinical vignettes].

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, Stéphanie; Dufresne, Mélanie; Abbey, Hélène; Paillé, Cécile; Leclère, Brice; Moret, Leila

    2016-04-01

    The French National Authority for Health has made serious adverse event disclosure one of its priority areas of work. The objective of the study was to explore clinicians' perceived practices of disclosing such events. Between June and July 2012, a structured questionnaire was emailed to all clinicians and residents working at the Nantes Teaching Hospital. The questionnaire consisted of 3 parts first, clinical vignettes-with medical and surgical cases exploring five areas of practices (initial disclosure, disclosure of details, disclosure of the cause, apologies, and patient information about preventive actions); second, questions about the reasons for disclosure or non-disclosure; third, an evaluation of the training needs. The overall response rate was 18.8% (n=322/1709). Clinicians did not realize initial disclosure in 13.4%, disclosure of details in 24.5%, disclosure of the cause in 44.1%. Of the respondants, 4% of them would not apologize and 11.2% of them would not discuss detailed plans for preventing recurrences. Results were significantly different between medical and surgical specialities concerning disclosure of details and the cause of adverse events: surgeons were significantly less inclined than physicians to volunteer any details unless asked by the patient (72.9% vs 16.1%; P<0.001); to disclose the cause of the events (54.2% vs 42.3%, P<0.001); and to apologize or to offer an expression of regret (16.7% vs 1.8%; P<0.001). The main reason that led respondents to disclose as well as not disclose was to maintain trust in their relationship with the patient. Younger clinicians expressed more difficulties with adverse event disclosure and had more important training needs. Based on these results, an improvement program for the disclosure of serious adverse events is currently being implemented in the hospital, consisting of training sessions, documentation and support for the clinicians. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Drinking motives moderate the impact of pre-drinking on heavy drinking on a given evening and related adverse consequences--an event-level study.

    PubMed

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Labhart, Florian

    2013-10-01

    To test whether (i) drinking motives predict the frequency of pre-drinking (i.e. alcohol consumption before going out); (ii) drinking motives predict HDGE (heavy drinking on a given evening: 4+ for women, 5+ for men) and related adverse consequences (hangover, injuries, blackouts, etc.), even when pre-drinking is accounted for, and (iii) drinking motives moderate the impact of pre-drinking on HDGE and consequences. Using the internet-based cellphone-optimized assessment technique (ICAT), participants completed a series of cellphone questionnaires every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening over 5 weeks. French-speaking Switzerland. A total of 183 young adults [53% female, mean age (standard deviation) = 23.1 (3.1)] who completed 7828 questionnaires on 1441 evenings. Drinking motives assessed at baseline, alcohol consumption assessed at 8 p.m., 9 p.m., 10 p.m., 11 p.m. and midnight and consequences assessed at 11 a.m. the next day. Gender-separate multi-level models revealed that pre-drinking predicted HDGE (men: B = 2.17, P < 0.001; women: B = 2.12, P < 0.001) and alcohol-related consequences (men: B = 0.24, P < 0.01; women: B = 0.29, P < 0.001). Enhancement motives were found to predict HDGE (B = 0.48, P < 0.05) and related consequences (B = 0.09, P < 0.05) among men, while among women coping motives had the same effect (HDGE: B = 0.73, P < 0.001; consequences: B = 0.13, P < 0.01). With the exception of conformity motives among women (B = 0.54, P < 0.05), however, no drinking motive dimension predicted the frequency of pre-drinking, while coping and conformity motives moderated the impact of pre-drinking on HDGE (men, conformity: B = -1.57, P < 0.05) and its consequences (men, coping: B = -0.46, P < 0.01; women, coping: B = 0.76, P < 0.05). Among young adults in Switzerland, heavy weekend drinking and the related consequences seem to result from the combination of pre-drinking, level of negative reinforcement drinking for women and positive reinforcement

  11. Usefulness of clinical and electrocardiographic data for predicting adverse cardiac events in patients with myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Robert; Mathieu, Jean

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) has been associated with an increased risk of sudden death, either by heart block or malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Identifying patients at risk remains difficult and no consensus has been reached regarding the best approach for follow-up and prevention of sudden death. OBJECTIVES: To identify noninvasive clinical and electrocardiographic predictors of adverse cardiac events in patients with DM1. METHODS: Clinical and serial electrocardiographic data on 428 patients with a DNA-proven diagnosis of DM1, followed during a mean period of 11.7 years, were reviewed. Variables associated with adverse cardiac events were identified. RESULTS: Eleven patients (2.6%) experienced sudden death and 13 (3.0%) required implantation of a pacemaker. On univariate analysis, adverse events were associated with advancing age, prolongation of the PR, QRS and corrected QT (QTc) intervals, as well as the degree of neuromuscular impairment. No such relationship was found with the extent of genetic anomaly (number of cytosine-thymine-guanine repeats). However, multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards models showed that only baseline PR and QTc intervals were significantly linked to the end points of sudden death or pacemaker implantation; the age-adjusted RR was 3.7 (95% CI 1.5 to 8.6) if baseline PR was 200 ms or longer (P=0.003), and 3.0 (95% CI 1.0 to 8.8) if the baseline QTc was 450 ms or longer (P=0.047). CONCLUSIONS: In a large unselected cohort of 428 patients with DM1, the cumulative incidence of sudden death was relatively low, and the delayed conduction on surface electrocardiogram was found to be potentially helpful for identifying patients at risk for sudden death or pacemaker implantation. PMID:19214296

  12. Evidence behind FDA alerts for drugs with adverse cardiovascular effects: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Daniel M; C Herink, Megan; Stevens, Ian G; Cardoza, Natalie M; Singh, Harleen

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) periodically publishes Drug Safety Communications and Drug Alerts notifying health care practitioners and the general public of important information regarding drug therapies following FDA approval. These alerts can result in both positive and negative effects on patient care. Most clinical trials are not designed to detect long-term safety end points, and postmarketing surveillance along with patient reported events are often instrumental in signaling the potential harmful effect of a drug. Recently, many cardiovascular (CV) safety announcements have been released for FDA-approved drugs. Because a premature warning could discourage a much needed treatment or prompt a sudden discontinuation, it is essential to evaluate the evidence supporting these FDA alerts to provide effective patient care and to avoid unwarranted changes in therapy. Conversely, paying attention to these warnings in cases involving high-risk patients can prevent adverse effects and litigation. This article reviews the evidence behind recent FDA alerts for drugs with adverse CV effects and discusses the clinical practice implications.

  13. Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions: The Pharmacogenomics from Research to Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shih-Chi; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Fan, Wen-Lang; Dao, Ro-Lan; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), previously thought to be idiosyncratic or unpredictable, are a deadly form of adverse drug reactions with skin manifestations. Current pharmacogenomic studies of SCARs have made important strides, as the prevention of SCARs, to some extent, appears attainable with the identification of genetic variants for genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Despite the improvement of incidence, a treatment guideline for this devastating condition is still unavailable, highlighting the inadequacy of contemporary accepted therapeutic interventions. As such, prompt withdrawal of causative drugs is believed to be a priority of patient management. In this review, we discuss recent cutting-edge findings concerning the discovery of biomarkers for SCARs and their clinical utilities in the better prediction and early diagnosis of this disease. The knowledge compiled herein provides clues for future investigations on deciphering additional genetic markers for SCARs and the design of clinical trials for the prospective identification of subjects at genetic risk for this condition, ultimately personalizing the medicine. PMID:27854302

  14. Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions: The Pharmacogenomics from Research to Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Chi; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Fan, Wen-Lang; Dao, Ro-Lan; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2016-11-15

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), previously thought to be idiosyncratic or unpredictable, are a deadly form of adverse drug reactions with skin manifestations. Current pharmacogenomic studies of SCARs have made important strides, as the prevention of SCARs, to some extent, appears attainable with the identification of genetic variants for genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Despite the improvement of incidence, a treatment guideline for this devastating condition is still unavailable, highlighting the inadequacy of contemporary accepted therapeutic interventions. As such, prompt withdrawal of causative drugs is believed to be a priority of patient management. In this review, we discuss recent cutting-edge findings concerning the discovery of biomarkers for SCARs and their clinical utilities in the better prediction and early diagnosis of this disease. The knowledge compiled herein provides clues for future investigations on deciphering additional genetic markers for SCARs and the design of clinical trials for the prospective identification of subjects at genetic risk for this condition, ultimately personalizing the medicine.

  15. Morbid Obesity Is Associated With Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Acute Pancreatitis: A Propensity-Matched Study.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Somashekar G; Hinton, Alice; Oza, Veeral; Hart, Phil A; Swei, Eric; El-Dika, Samer; Stanich, Peter P; Hussan, Hisham; Zhang, Cheng; Conwell, Darwin L

    2015-11-01

    Morbid obesity may adversely affect the clinical course of acute pancreatitis (AP); however, there are no inpatient, population-based studies assessing the impact of morbid obesity on AP-related outcomes. We sought to evaluate the impact of morbid obesity on AP-related clinical outcomes and health-care utilization. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2007-2011) was reviewed to identify all adult inpatients (≥18 years) with a principal diagnosis of AP. The primary clinical outcomes (mortality, renal failure, and respiratory failure) and secondary resource outcomes (length of stay and hospital charges) were analyzed using univariate and multivariate comparisons. Propensity score-matched analysis was performed to compare the outcomes in patients with and without morbid obesity. Morbid obesity was associated with 3.9% (52,297/1,330,302) of all AP admissions. Whereas the mortality rate decreased overall (0.97%→0.83%, P<0.001), it remained unchanged in those with morbid obesity (1.02%→1.07%, P=1.0). Multivariate analysis revealed that morbid obesity was associated with increased mortality (odds ratio (OR) 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3, 1.9), prolonged hospitalization (0.4 days; P<0.001), and higher hospitalization charges ($5,067; P<0.001). A propensity score-matched cohort analysis demonstrated that the primary outcomes, acute kidney failure (10.8 vs. 8.2%; P<0.001), respiratory failure (7.9 vs. 6.4%; P<0.001), and mortality (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2, 2.1) were more frequent in morbid obesity. Morbid obesity negatively influences inpatient hospitalization and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, including mortality, organ failure, and health-care resource utilization. These observations and the increasing global prevalence of obesity justify ongoing efforts to understand the role of obesity-induced inflammation in the pathogenesis and management of AP.

  16. Ocular Adverse Events Associated with Antibody–Drug Conjugates in Human Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul E.; Mannis, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article reviews ocular adverse events (AEs) reported in association with administration of antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) in human clinical trials. References reporting ocular toxicity or AEs associated with ADCs were collected using online publication searches. Articles, abstracts, or citations were included if they cited ocular toxicities or vision-impairing AEs with a confirmed or suspected association with ADC administration. Twenty-two references were found citing ocular or vision-impairing AEs in association with ADC administration. All references reported use of ADCs in human clinical trials for treatment of various malignancies. The molecular target and cytotoxic agent varied depending on the ADC used. Ocular AEs affected a diversity of ocular tissues. The most commonly reported AEs involved the ocular surface and included blurred vision, dry eye, and corneal abnormalities (including microcystic corneal disease). Most ocular AEs were not severe (≤ grade 2) or dose limiting. Clinical outcomes were not consistently reported, but when specified, most AEs improved or resolved with cessation of treatment or with ameliorative therapy. A diverse range of ocular AEs are reported in association with administration of ADCs for the treatment of cancer. The toxicologic mechanism(s) and pathogenesis of such events are not well understood, but most are mild in severity and reversible. Drug development and medical professionals should be aware of the clinical features of these events to facilitate early recognition and intervention in the assessment of preclinical development programs and in human clinical trials. PMID:26539624

  17. Interactive associations of depression and sleep apnea with adverse clinical outcomes after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Junichiro; Carney, Robert M.; Watanabe, Eiichi; Kawai, Kiyohiro; Kodama, Itsuo; Stein, Phyllis K.; Watkins, Lana L.; Freedland, Kenneth E.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression and sleep apnea (SA) are common among patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and both are associated with increased risk for adverse outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that there is an interaction between depression and SA in relation to prognosis in post-AMI patients. Methods Participants were 337 depressed and 379 nondepressed post-AMI patients who participated in a substudy of the Enhancing Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease (ENRICHD) clinical trial. SA was identified from Holter ECG at the entry by an algorithm that detects cyclic variation of heart rate. Results During a median follow-up of 25 months, 43 (6.0%) of patients died and 83 (11.6%) either died or experienced a recurrent AMI. Among 94 patients with both depression and SA, these endpoints occurred in 20 (21.3%) and 25 (26.6%), the prevalence that was 6.9 and 3.9 times higher than predicted probabilities by ENRICHD clinical risk scores (P <.001 for both). In the patients with depression alone, SA alone, or neither, the frequencies did not differ significantly from the predicted probability. Although both depression and SA predicted death and the combined endpoint, we observed depression by SA interactions (P = .03 and .02). SA independently predicted these endpoints in depressed (P <.001 and P = .001), but not in nondepressed patients (P = .73 and .84). Similarly, depression independently predicted these endpoints in SA (P <.001 for both), but not in non-SA patients (P = .61 and .12). Conclusion The combination of depression and SA estimated by CVHR is associated with long-term adverse clinical outcomes after AMI. PMID:23023681

  18. A qualitative study evaluating causality attribution for serious adverse events during early phase oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Som D; Coombes, Megan E; Levine, Mitch; Cosby, Jarold; Kowaleski, Brenda; Arnold, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    In early phase oncology trials, novel targeted therapies are increasingly being tested in combination with traditional agents creating greater potential for enhanced and new toxicities. When a patient experiences a serious adverse event (SAE), investigators must determine whether the event is attributable to the investigational drug or not. This study seeks to understand the clinical reasoning, tools used and challenges faced by the researchers who assign causality to SAE's. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical oncologists and trial coordinators at six Canadian academic cancer centres. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Individual interview content analysis was followed by thematic analysis across the interview set. Our study found that causality assessment tends to be a rather complex process, often without complete clinical and investigational data at hand. Researchers described using a common processing strategy whereby they gather pertinent information, eliminate alternative explanations, and consider whether or not the study drug resulted in the SAE. Many of the interviewed participants voiced concern that causality assessments are often conducted quickly and tend to be highly subjective. Many participants were unable to identify any useful tools to help in assigning causality and welcomed more objectivity in the overall process. Attributing causality to SAE's is a complex process. Clinical trial researchers apply a logical system of reasoning, but feel that the current method of assigning causality could be improved. Based on these findings, future research involving the development of a new causality assessment tool specifically for use in early phase oncology clinical trials may be useful.

  19. The perceived threat of SARS and its impact on precautionary actions and adverse consequences: a qualitative study among Chinese communities in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyi; Elam, Gillian; Yuen, Cicely; Voeten, Helene; de Zwart, Onno; Veldhuijzen, Irene; Brug, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Although the SARS outbreak involved few probable cases of infection in Europe, swift international spread of infections raised the possibility of outbreaks. In particular, SARS presented a sociopsychological and economic threat to European Chinese communities because of their close links with the outbreak's origins. A qualitative study was conducted among Chinese residents in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands to identify the origins of SARS risk perceptions and their impact on precautionary actions and adverse consequences from the perspective of vulnerable communities living in unaffected regions. Analysis was informed by protection motivation theory. Results revealed that information from affected Asia influenced risk perceptions and protective behavior among the Chinese in Europe when more relevant local information was absent. When high risk perceptions were combined with low efficacy regarding precautionary measures, avoidance-based precautionary action appeared to dominate responses to SARS. These actions may have contributed to the adverse impacts of SARS on the communities. Experiences of European Chinese communities suggest that practical and timely information, and consistent implementation of protective measures from central governments are essential to protect vulnerable populations in unaffected regions from unnecessary alarm and harm during outbreaks of emerging infections.

  20. Cyproheptadine for prevention of neuropsychiatric adverse effects of efavirenz: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dabaghzadeh, Fatemeh; Ghaeli, Padideh; Khalili, Hossein; Alimadadi, Abbas; Jafari, Sirous; Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Khazaeipour, Zahra

    2013-03-01

    Cyproheptadine prevention of the neuropsychiatric adverse effects of an antiretroviral regimen including efavirenz has been evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. Twenty-five patients (16 males and 9 females with mean±SD ages of 36±9 years) in a cyproheptadine group, and 26 patients (17 males and 9 females with mean±SD ages of 34±7 years) in a control group completed the trial. Sexual contact and injection drug use were the main routs of HIV infection in both groups. The patients' neuropsychiatric adverse effects were evaluated based on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Beck Depression Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory, Positive and Negative Suicide Ideation, and Somatization Subscale of Symptom Checklist 90 at baseline and 4 weeks after treatment. Cyproheptadine significantly decreased the scores of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Beck Depression Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory, Positive and Negative Suicide Ideation of the patients after 4 weeks in comparison with control group. All of the scores increased in control group following antiretroviral therapy. Although short duration of the patients' follow-up was a major limitation of the study, the results of the study showed that cyprohepradine is effective in prevention of depression, anxiety, hallucination, aggressive behaviors, emotional withdrawal, poor rapport, poor impulse control, active social avoidance, suicidal ideation, and improved sleep quality of HIV-positive patients after initiation of antiretroviral therapy including efavirenz.

  1. On the creation of a clinical gold standard corpus in Spanish: Mining adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Oronoz, Maite; Gojenola, Koldo; Pérez, Alicia; de Ilarraza, Arantza Díaz; Casillas, Arantza

    2015-08-01

    The advances achieved in Natural Language Processing make it possible to automatically mine information from electronically created documents. Many Natural Language Processing methods that extract information from texts make use of annotated corpora, but these are scarce in the clinical domain due to legal and ethical issues. In this paper we present the creation of the IxaMed-GS gold standard composed of real electronic health records written in Spanish and manually annotated by experts in pharmacology and pharmacovigilance. The experts mainly annotated entities related to diseases and drugs, but also relationships between entities indicating adverse drug reaction events. To help the experts in the annotation task, we adapted a general corpus linguistic analyzer to the medical domain. The quality of the annotation process in the IxaMed-GS corpus has been assessed by measuring the inter-annotator agreement, which was 90.53% for entities and 82.86% for events. In addition, the corpus has been used for the automatic extraction of adverse drug reaction events using machine learning.

  2. Adverse reactions to sunscreen agents: epidemiology, responsible irritants and allergens, clinical characteristics, and management.

    PubMed

    Heurung, Ashley R; Raju, Srihari I; Warshaw, Erin M

    2014-01-01

    Sunscreen is a key component in the preventive measures recommended by dermatologists and public health campaigns aimed at reducing sunburn, early skin aging, and skin cancer. To maximize compliance, adverse reactions to sunscreens should be minimized. Although inactive ingredients cause many of these reactions, it is important for dermatologists to be aware of reactions to active ultraviolet filters. There are approximately 120 chemicals that can function as ultraviolet (UV) filters. This review focuses on the 36 most common filters in commercial and historical use. Of these, 16 are approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration. The benzophenones and dibenzoylmethanes are the most commonly implicated UV filters causing allergic and photoallergic contact dermatitis (PACD) reactions; benzophenone-3 is the leading allergen and photoallergen within this class. When clinically indicated, patch and photopatch testing should be performed to common UV filters.

  3. Air pollution and adverse cardiac remodeling: clinical effects and basic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yonggang; Goodson, Jamie M.; Zhang, Bo; Chin, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has long been known to trigger cardiovascular events, primarily through activation of local and systemic inflammatory pathways that affect the vasculature. Detrimental effects of air pollution exposure on heart failure and cardiac remodeling have also been described in human populations. Recent studies in both human subjects and animal models have provided insights into the basic physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a role in adverse cardiac remodeling. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between air pollution and cardiovascular disease, describe the clinical effects of air pollution exposure on cardiac remodeling, describe the basic mechanisms that affect remodeling as described in human and animal systems and will discuss future areas of investigation. PMID:26042051

  4. Advanced Clinical Decision Support for Vaccine Adverse Event Detection and Reporting.

    PubMed

    Baker, Meghan A; Kaelber, David C; Bar-Shain, David S; Moro, Pedro L; Zambarano, Bob; Mazza, Megan; Garcia, Crystal; Henry, Adam; Platt, Richard; Klompas, Michael

    2015-09-15

    Reporting of adverse events (AEs) following vaccination can help identify rare or unexpected complications of immunizations and aid in characterizing potential vaccine safety signals. We developed an open-source, generalizable clinical decision support system called Electronic Support for Public Health-Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (ESP-VAERS) to assist clinicians with AE detection and reporting. ESP-VAERS monitors patients' electronic health records for new diagnoses, changes in laboratory values, and new allergies following vaccinations. When suggestive events are found, ESP-VAERS sends the patient's clinician a secure electronic message with an invitation to affirm or refute the message, add comments, and submit an automated, prepopulated electronic report to VAERS. High-probability AEs are reported automatically if the clinician does not respond. We implemented ESP-VAERS in December 2012 throughout the MetroHealth System, an integrated healthcare system in Ohio. We queried the VAERS database to determine MetroHealth's baseline reporting rates from January 2009 to March 2012 and then assessed changes in reporting rates with ESP-VAERS. In the 8 months following implementation, 91 622 vaccinations were given. ESP-VAERS sent 1385 messages to responsible clinicians describing potential AEs. Clinicians opened 1304 (94.2%) messages, responded to 209 (15.1%), and confirmed 16 for transmission to VAERS. An additional 16 high-probability AEs were sent automatically. Reported events included seizure, pleural effusion, and lymphocytopenia. The odds of a VAERS report submission during the implementation period were 30.2 (95% confidence interval, 9.52-95.5) times greater than the odds during the comparable preimplementation period. An open-source, electronic health record-based clinical decision support system can increase AE detection and reporting rates in VAERS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society

  5. Dictionary construction and identification of possible adverse drug events in Danish clinical narrative text

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Robert; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Objective Drugs have tremendous potential to cure and relieve disease, but the risk of unintended effects is always present. Healthcare providers increasingly record data in electronic patient records (EPRs), in which we aim to identify possible adverse events (AEs) and, specifically, possible adverse drug events (ADEs). Materials and methods Based on the undesirable effects section from the summary of product characteristics (SPC) of 7446 drugs, we have built a Danish ADE dictionary. Starting from this dictionary we have developed a pipeline for identifying possible ADEs in unstructured clinical narrative text. We use a named entity recognition (NER) tagger to identify dictionary matches in the text and post-coordination rules to construct ADE compound terms. Finally, we apply post-processing rules and filters to handle, for example, negations and sentences about subjects other than the patient. Moreover, this method allows synonyms to be identified and anatomical location descriptions can be merged to allow appropriate grouping of effects in the same location. Results The method identified 1 970 731 (35 477 unique) possible ADEs in a large corpus of 6011 psychiatric hospital patient records. Validation was performed through manual inspection of possible ADEs, resulting in precision of 89% and recall of 75%. Discussion The presented dictionary-building method could be used to construct other ADE dictionaries. The complication of compound words in Germanic languages was addressed. Additionally, the synonym and anatomical location collapse improve the method. Conclusions The developed dictionary and method can be used to identify possible ADEs in Danish clinical narratives. PMID:23703825

  6. The Effect of Adverse Childhood Experience on Clinical Diagnosis of a Substance Use Disorder: Results of a Nationally Representative Study.

    PubMed

    LeTendre, McKenzie Lynn; Reed, Mark B

    2017-05-12

    Substance abuse is one of the most common health outcomes associated with adverse childhood experience, and poses a significant public health threat. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a relationship between adverse childhood experience and a substance use disorder using nationally representative data as well as to test whether religion moderates this relationship. We conducted a secondary analysis using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (n = 11,279). Three types of adverse childhood experiences were considered; physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Logistic regression was used to determine whether risk for developing an alcohol use, cannabis use, or other drug use disorder in adulthood increased as exposure to multiple types of adverse childhood experiences increased while controlling for prior substance use and other demographic variables that have shown associations with substance use. In addition, religiosity was investigated as a possible moderator of the relationship between adverse childhood experience and substance abuse. The likelihood of developing a substance use disorder later in life increased as the score on the adverse childhood experience index increased. While religiosity did significantly reduce the likelihood of developing a substance use disorder, no moderating effects were observed. Conclusions/importance: This study underscores the long-term consequences of exposure to childhood adversity.

  7. Adverse event reporting in nonpharmacologic, noninterventional pain clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hunsinger, Matthew; Smith, Shannon M; Rothstein, Daniel; McKeown, Andrew; Parkhurst, Melissa; Hertz, Sharon; Katz, Nathaniel P; Lin, Allison H; McDermott, Michael P; Rappaport, Bob A; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of treatment safety is 1 of the primary goals of clinical trials. Organizations and working groups have created reporting guidelines for adverse events (AEs). Previous research examining AE reporting for pharmacologic clinical trials of analgesics in major pain journals found many reporting inadequacies, suggesting that analgesic trials are not adhering to existing AE reporting guidelines. The present systematic review documented AE reporting in 3 main pain journals for nonpharmacologic, noninterventional (NP/NI) trials examining pain treatments. To broaden our pool of nonpharmacologic trials, we also included trials examining acupuncture, leech therapy, and noninvasive stimulation techniques (eg, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). We documented AE reporting at 2 levels of specificity using coding manuals based on the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) harms reporting standards and Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) AE reporting checklist. We identified a number of inadequacies in AE reporting across the 3 journals. For example, using the ACTTION coding manual, we found that less than one-half of the trials reported specific AE assessment methods; approximately one-third of the trials reported withdrawals due to AEs for each study arm; and about one-fourth of the trials reported all specific AEs. We also examined differences in AE reporting across several trial characteristics, finding that AE reporting was generally more detailed in trials with patients versus those using healthy volunteers undergoing experimentally evoked pain. These results suggest that investigators conducting and reporting NP/NI clinical trials are not adequately describing the assessment and occurrence of AEs.

  8. The Japanese Postmarketing Adverse Event Relief System: A Confluence of Regulatory Science, the Legal System, and Clinical Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, T; Miyazaki, S; Oniyama, Y; Weber, A D; Kondo, T

    2016-10-13

    The Japanese Postmarketing Relief System provides for compensation to patients with adverse reactions, based on the acknowledgment that unpredicted adverse events occur inevitably once a drug is marketed. The system also provides new knowledge about the benefit-risk profile of a drug that may be incorporated into product labeling. The system relies on causality assessments that are based on sound clinical pharmacology principles. The system may serve as a model for other countries' healthcare systems.

  9. A clinical risk score of myocardial fibrosis predicts adverse outcomes in aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Calvin W.L.; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Shah, Anoop S.V.; Lefevre, Guillaume; Bailleul, Sophie; Yeung, Emily N.W.; Koo, Maria; Mirsadraee, Saeed; Mathieu, Tiffany; Semple, Scott I.; Mills, Nicholas L.; Vahanian, Alec; Newby, David E.; Dweck, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Midwall myocardial fibrosis on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a marker of early ventricular decompensation and adverse outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS). We aimed to develop and validate a novel clinical score using variables associated with midwall fibrosis. Methods and results One hundred forty-seven patients (peak aortic velocity (Vmax) 3.9 [3.2,4.4] m/s) underwent CMR to determine midwall fibrosis (CMR cohort). Routine clinical variables that demonstrated significant association with midwall fibrosis were included in a multivariate logistic score. We validated the prognostic value of the score in two separate outcome cohorts of asymptomatic patients (internal: n = 127, follow-up 10.3 [5.7,11.2] years; external: n = 289, follow-up 2.6 [1.6,4.5] years). Primary outcome was a composite of AS-related events (cardiovascular death, heart failure, and new angina, dyspnoea, or syncope). The final score consisted of age, sex, Vmax, high-sensitivity troponin I concentration, and electrocardiographic strain pattern [c-statistic 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.78–0.91), P < 0.001; Hosmer–Lemeshow χ2 = 7.33, P = 0.50]. Patients in the outcome cohorts were classified according to the sensitivity and specificity of this score (both at 98%): low risk (probability score <7%), intermediate risk (7–57%), and high risk (>57%). In the internal outcome cohort, AS-related event rates were >10-fold higher in high-risk patients compared with those at low risk (23.9 vs. 2.1 events/100 patient-years, respectively; log rank P < 0.001). Similar findings were observed in the external outcome cohort (31.6 vs. 4.6 events/100 patient-years, respectively; log rank P < 0.001). Conclusion We propose a clinical score that predicts adverse outcomes in asymptomatic AS patients and potentially identifies high-risk patients who may benefit from early valve replacement. PMID:26491110

  10. Flagging clinical adverse experiences: reducing false discoveries without materially compromising power for detecting true signals.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Devan V; Adewale, Adeniyi J

    2012-08-15

    Comparative analyses of safety/tolerability data from a typical phase III randomized clinical trial generate multiple p-values associated with adverse experiences (AEs) across several body systems. A common approach is to 'flag' any AE with a p-value less than or equal to 0.05, ignoring the multiplicity problem. Despite the fact that this approach can result in excessive false discoveries (false positives), many researchers avoid a multiplicity adjustment to curtail the risk of missing true safety signals. We propose a new flagging mechanism that significantly lowers the false discovery rate (FDR) without materially compromising the power for detecting true signals, relative to the common no-adjustment approach. Our simple two-step procedure is an enhancement of the Mehrotra-Heyse-Tukey approach that leverages the natural grouping of AEs by body systems. We use simulations to show that, on the basis of FDR and power, our procedure is an attractive alternative to the following: (i) the no-adjustment approach; (ii) a one-step FDR approach that ignores the grouping of AEs by body systems; and (iii) a recently proposed two-step FDR approach for much larger-scale settings such as genome-wide association studies. We use three clinical trial examples for illustration. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Kamath, Sunil; Wong, Kenneth; Malvar, Jemily; Sposto, Richard; Goodarzian, Fariba; Freyer, David R.; Keens, Thomas G.; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ≥22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ≥30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed

  12. Clinical features associated with adverse events in patients with post-pericardiotomy syndrome following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Alraies, M Chadi; Al Jaroudi, Wael; Shabrang, Cyrus; Yarmohammadi, Hirad; Klein, Allan L; Tamarappoo, Balaji K

    2014-11-01

    Postpericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) may be associated with tamponade and pericardial constriction that may require procedural intervention. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features associated with adverse events requiring procedural intervention in patients with PPS. A total of 239 patients who developed PPS after cardiac surgery were monitored for 12 months. PPS was diagnosed if 2 of the 5 following findings were present: fever without infection, pleuritic pain, friction rub, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion (<60 days after surgery). The primary end point was the development of pericardial effusion or pericardial constriction requiring procedural intervention. Among 239 patients with PPS, 75 (31%) required procedural intervention. In a univariate analysis, the odds of a procedural intervention were decreased with older age (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96 to 0.99) and with colchicine used in combination with anti-inflammatory agents (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.79). However, the odds were increased in patients with preoperative heart failure (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1 to 3.39) and early postoperative constrictive physiology (OR 5.77, 95% CI 2.62 to 12.7). After multivariate adjustment, treatment with colchicine along with anti-inflammatory agents was associated with lower odds of requiring intervention (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99). Independent positive predictors of procedural intervention included age (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99), time to PPS (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99), and early postoperative constrictive physiology (OR 6.23, 95% CI 2.04 to 19.07). In conclusion, younger age, early-onset PPS, and postoperative constrictive physiology were associated with the need for procedural intervention in patients with PPS, whereas colchicine was associated with reduced odds of adverse events and procedural intervention.

  13. Are clinical symptoms more predictive than laboratory parameters for adverse maternal outcome in HELLP syndrome?

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, Sabri; Ugurlu, Evin Nil; Karaer, Abdullah; Tapisiz, Omer Lutfi; Danisman, Nuri

    2007-01-01

    To determine the risk factors for adverse maternal outcome among women with HELLP syndrome. Sixty-one pregnancies with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome diagnosed antenatally were reviewed between 2003 and 2005. Maternal outcomes analyzed included eclampsia, abruptio placentae, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), acute renal failure, need for transfusion of blood products, cesarean delivery and maternal death. Risk factors included maternal age, parity, gestational age at diagnosis, mean arterial blood pressure, headache, visual changes, nausea-vomiting, epigastric pain, blood platelet count (50,000 cells/mm3), and peak serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase. Eclampsia was present in 52%, abruptio placentae in 11%, and DIC in 8% of 61 women with HELLP syndrome. 23% women required transfusion of blood products, 15% had acute renal failure, and 73% had cesarean section. Women with eclampsia had significantly more headache, nausea-vomiting, visual changes and epigastric pain (p<0.05). Transfusion was significantly more frequent among women with blood platelet counts 50,000 cells/mm3 (33.3 versus 3.8%; p<0.05). In women with acute renal failure and abruptio placentae, there were no significant differences in all the variables studied between those with and without these complications. Clinical symptoms, such as headache, visual changes, epigastric pain and nausea-vomiting, are more predictive than laboratory parameters for adverse maternal outcomes.

  14. Seven basic dimensions of personality pathology and their clinical consequences: Are all personalities equally harmful?

    PubMed

    Vall, Gemma; Gutiérrez, Fernando; Peri, Josep M; Gárriz, Miguel; Ferraz, Liliana; Baillés, Eva; Obiols, Jordi E

    2015-11-01

    Dimensional pathology models are increasingly being accepted for the assessment of disordered personalities, but their ability to predict negative outcomes is yet to be studied. We examine the relative clinical impact of seven basic dimensions of personality pathology through their associations with a wide range of clinical outcomes. A sample of 960 outpatients was assessed through a 7-factor model integrating the Cloninger, the Livesley, and the DSM taxonomies. Thirty-six indicators of clinical outcome covering three areas - dissatisfaction, functional difficulties, and clinical severity - were also assessed. The unique contribution of each personality dimension to clinical outcome was estimated through multiple regressions. Overall, personality dimensions explained 17.6% of the variance of clinical outcome, but varied substantially in terms of their unique contributions. Negative Emotionality had the greatest impact in all areas, contributing 43.9% of the explained variance. The remaining dimensions led to idiosyncratic patterns of clinical outcomes but had a comparatively minor clinical impact. A certain effect was also found for combinations of dimensions such as Negative Emotionality × Impulsive Sensation Seeking, but most interactions were clinically irrelevant. Our findings suggest that the most relevant dimensions of personality pathology are associated with very different clinical consequences and levels of harmfulness. The relative clinical impact of seven basic dimensions of personality pathology is examined. Negative Emotionality (Neuroticism) is 6-14 times as harmful as other pathological dimensions. The remaining dimensions and their interactions have very specific and comparatively minor clinical consequences. We examine only a handful of clinical outcomes. Our results may not be generalizable to other clinical or life outcomes. Our variables are self-reported and hence susceptible to bias. Our design does not allow us to establish causal

  15. Assessment of Adverse Events in Protocols, Clinical Study Reports, and Published Papers of Trials of Orlistat: A Document Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schroll, Jeppe Bennekou; Penninga, Elisabeth I; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about how adverse events are summarised and reported in trials, as detailed information is usually considered confidential. We have acquired clinical study reports (CSRs) from the European Medicines Agency through the Freedom of Information Act. The CSRs describe the results of studies conducted as part of the application for marketing authorisation for the slimming pill orlistat. The purpose of this study was to study how adverse events were summarised and reported in study protocols, CSRs, and published papers of orlistat trials. We received the CSRs from seven randomised placebo controlled orlistat trials (4,225 participants) submitted by Roche. The CSRs consisted of 8,716 pages and included protocols. Two researchers independently extracted data on adverse events from protocols and CSRs. Corresponding published papers were identified on PubMed and adverse event data were extracted from this source as well. All three sources were compared. Individual adverse events from one trial were summed and compared to the totals in the summary report. None of the protocols or CSRs contained instructions for investigators on how to question participants about adverse events. In CSRs, gastrointestinal adverse events were only coded if the participant reported that they were "bothersome," a condition that was not specified in the protocol for two of the trials. Serious adverse events were assessed for relationship to the drug by the sponsor, and all adverse events were coded by the sponsor using a glossary that could be updated by the sponsor. The criteria for withdrawal due to adverse events were in one case related to efficacy (high fasting glucose led to withdrawal), which meant that one trial had more withdrawals due to adverse events in the placebo group. Finally, only between 3% and 33% of the total number of investigator-reported adverse events from the trials were reported in the publications because of post hoc filters, though six of seven papers

  16. Assessment of Adverse Events in Protocols, Clinical Study Reports, and Published Papers of Trials of Orlistat: A Document Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schroll, Jeppe Bennekou; Penninga, Elisabeth I.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about how adverse events are summarised and reported in trials, as detailed information is usually considered confidential. We have acquired clinical study reports (CSRs) from the European Medicines Agency through the Freedom of Information Act. The CSRs describe the results of studies conducted as part of the application for marketing authorisation for the slimming pill orlistat. The purpose of this study was to study how adverse events were summarised and reported in study protocols, CSRs, and published papers of orlistat trials. Methods and Findings We received the CSRs from seven randomised placebo controlled orlistat trials (4,225 participants) submitted by Roche. The CSRs consisted of 8,716 pages and included protocols. Two researchers independently extracted data on adverse events from protocols and CSRs. Corresponding published papers were identified on PubMed and adverse event data were extracted from this source as well. All three sources were compared. Individual adverse events from one trial were summed and compared to the totals in the summary report. None of the protocols or CSRs contained instructions for investigators on how to question participants about adverse events. In CSRs, gastrointestinal adverse events were only coded if the participant reported that they were “bothersome,” a condition that was not specified in the protocol for two of the trials. Serious adverse events were assessed for relationship to the drug by the sponsor, and all adverse events were coded by the sponsor using a glossary that could be updated by the sponsor. The criteria for withdrawal due to adverse events were in one case related to efficacy (high fasting glucose led to withdrawal), which meant that one trial had more withdrawals due to adverse events in the placebo group. Finally, only between 3% and 33% of the total number of investigator-reported adverse events from the trials were reported in the publications because of post hoc

  17. Atrial flutter – clinical risk factors and adverse outcomes in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Faisal; Wang, Na; Yin, Xiaoyan; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Lubitz, Steven A.; LeLorier, Paul A.; McManus, David D.; Sullivan, Lisa M.; Seshadri, Sudha; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Magnani, Jared W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Few epidemiological cohort studies have evaluated atrial flutter (flutter) as an arrhythmia distinct from atrial fibrillation (AF). Objective To examine the clinical correlates of flutter and its associated outcomes to distinguish them from those associated with AF in the Framingham Heart Study. Methods We reviewed and adjudicated electrocardiograms previously classified as flutter or AF/flutter and another 100 electrocardiograms randomly selected from AF cases. We examined the clinical correlates of flutter by matching up to 5 AF and 5 referents to each flutter case using a nested case-referent design. We determined the 10-year outcomes associated with flutter with Cox models. Results During mean follow-up of 33.0±12.2 years, 112 participants (mean age 72±10 years, 30% women) developed flutter. In multivariable analyses, smoking (odds ratio [OR] 2.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54 to 5.23), increased PR interval (OR 1.28 per SD; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.60), myocardial infarction (OR 2.25; 95% CI, 1.05 to 4.80) and heart failure (OR 5.22; 95% CI, 1.26 to 21.64) were associated with incident flutter. In age- and sex-adjusted models, flutter (vs. referents) was associated with 10-year increased risk of AF (hazard ratio [HR] 5.01; 95% CI, 3.14 to 7.99), myocardial infarction (HR 3.05; 95% CI, 1.42 to 6.59), heart failure (HR 4.14; 95% CI, 1.90 to 8.99), stroke (HR 2.17; 95% CI, 1.13 to 4.17), and mortality (HR 2.00; 95% CI, 1.44 to 2.79). Conclusions We identified the clinical correlates associated with flutter and observed that flutter was associated with multiple adverse outcomes. PMID:26226213

  18. Atrial flutter: Clinical risk factors and adverse outcomes in the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Faisal; Wang, Na; Yin, Xiaoyan; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A; LeLorier, Paul A; McManus, David D; Sullivan, Lisa M; Seshadri, Sudha; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Benjamin, Emelia J; Magnani, Jared W

    2016-01-01

    Few epidemiologic cohort studies have evaluated atrial flutter (flutter) as an arrhythmia distinct from atrial fibrillation (AF). The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical correlates of flutter and its associated outcomes to distinguish them from those associated with AF in the Framingham Heart Study. We reviewed and adjudicated electrocardiograms (ECGs) previously classified as flutter or AF/flutter and another 100 ECGs randomly selected from AF cases. We examined the clinical correlates of flutter by matching up to 5 AF and 5 referents to each flutter case using a nested case referent design. We determined the 10-year outcomes associated with flutter with Cox models. During mean follow-up of 33.0 ± 12.2 years, 112 participants (mean age 72 ± 10 years, 30% women) developed flutter. In multivariable analyses, smoking (odds ratio [OR] 2.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.54-5.23), increased PR interval (OR 1.28 per SD, 95% CI 1.03-1.60), myocardial infarction (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.05-4.80) and heart failure (OR 5.22, 95% CI 1.26-21.64) were associated with incident flutter. In age- and sex-adjusted models, flutter (vs referents) was associated with 10-year increased risk of AF (hazard ratio [HR] 5.01, 95% CI 3.14-7.99), myocardial infarction (HR 3.05, 95% CI 1.42-6.59), heart failure (HR 4.14, 95% CI 1.90-8.99), stroke (HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.13-4.17), and mortality (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.44-2.79). We identified the clinical correlates associated with flutter and observed that flutter was associated with multiple adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  20. Patterns of childhood adverse events are associated with clinical characteristics of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies in bipolar disorder investigating childhood trauma and clinical presentations of the illness have mainly focused on physical and sexual abuse. Our aim was to explore further the relationship between childhood trauma and disease characteristics in bipolar disorder to determine which clinical characteristics were most strongly associated with childhood trauma total score, as well as subtypes of adverse childhood events, including physical, sexual, emotional abuse and neglect. Methods 141 Patients with bipolar disorder were consecutively recruited, and disease history and clinical characteristics were assessed. History of childhood abuse was obtained using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Statistical methods used were factor analysis, Poisson and linear regression, and generalized additive modeling (GAM). Results The factor analysis of CTQ identified three factors: emotional abuse/neglect, sexual abuse and physical abuse. There were significant associations between CTQ total score and earlier onset of illness, reduced level of psychosocial functioning (GAF; Global Assessment of Functioning) and decreased number of hospitalization, which mainly were due to the factor emotional abuse/neglect. Physical abuse was significantly associated with lower GAF scores, and increased number of mood episodes, as well as self-harm. Sexual abuse was significantly associated with increased number of mood episodes. For mood episodes and self-harm the associations were characterized by great variance and fluctuations. Conclusions Our results suggest that childhood trauma is associated with a more severe course of bipolar illness. Further, childhood abuse (physical and sexual), as well as emotional abuse and neglect were significantly associated with accelerating staging process of bipolar disorder. By using specific trauma factors (physical abuse, sexual abuse and emotional abuse/neglect) the associations become both more precise, and diverse. PMID

  1. Accuracy of Adverse Event Ascertainment in Clinical Trials for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimei; Kavcic, Marko; Troxel, Andrea B.; Huang, Yuan-Shun V.; Sung, Lillian; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert; Hall, Matt; Daves, Marla H.; Horton, Terzah M.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Pollard, Jessica A.; Bagatell, Rochelle; Seif, Alix E.; Fisher, Brian T.; Luger, Selina; Gamis, Alan S.; Adamson, Peter C.; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Reporting of adverse events (AEs) in clinical trials is critical to understanding treatment safety, but data on AE accuracy are limited. This study sought to determine the accuracy of AE reporting for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia clinical trials and to test whether an external electronic data source can improve reporting. Methods Reported AEs were evaluated on two trials, Children’s Oncology Group AAML03P1 and AAML0531 arm B, with identical chemotherapy regimens but with different toxicity reporting requirements. Chart review for 12 AEs for patients enrolled in AAML0531 at 14 hospitals was the gold standard. The sensitivity and positive predictive values (PPV) of the AAML0531 AE report and AEs detected by review of Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) billing and microbiology data were compared with chart data. Results Select AE rates from AAML03P1 and AAML0531 arm B differed significantly and correlated with the targeted toxicities of each trial. Chart abstraction was performed on 204 patients (758 courses) on AAML0531. AE report sensitivity was < 50% for eight AEs, but PPV was > 75% for six AEs. AE reports for viridans group streptococcal bacteremia, a targeted toxicity on AAML0531, had a sensitivity of 78.3% and PPV of 98.1%. PHIS billing data had higher sensitivity (> 50% for nine AEs), but lower PPV (< 75% for 10 AEs). Viridans group streptococcal detection using PHIS microbiology data had high sensitivity (92.3%) and PPV (97.3%). Conclusion The current system of AE reporting for cooperative oncology group clinical trials in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia underestimates AE rates. The high sensitivity and PPV of PHIS microbiology data suggest that using external data sources may improve the accuracy of AE reporting. PMID:26884558

  2. Adverse endocrine and metabolic effects of psychotropic drugs: selective clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswar, Chaya G; Baldessarini, Ross J; Harsh, Veronica L; Alpert, Jonathan E

    2009-12-01

    The article critically reviews selected, clinically significant, adverse endocrine and metabolic effects associated with psychotropic drug treatments, including hyperprolactinaemia, hyponatraemia, diabetes insipidus, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, sexual dysfunction and virilization, weight loss, weight gain and metabolic syndrome (type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and hypertension). Such effects are prevalent and complex, but can be managed clinically when recognized. They encourage continued critical assessment of benefits versus risks of psychotropic drugs and underscore the importance of close coordination of psychiatric and general medical care to improve long-term health of psychiatric patients. Options for management of hyperprolactinaemia include lowering doses, switching to agents such as aripiprazole, clozapine or quetiapine, managing associated osteoporosis, carefully considering the use of dopamine receptor agonists and ruling out stress, oral contraceptive use and hypothyroidism as contributing factors. Disorders of water homeostasis may include syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), managed by water restriction or slow replacement by hypertonic saline along with drug discontinuation. Safe management of diabetes insipidus, commonly associated with lithium, involves switching mood stabilizer and consideration of potassium-sparing diuretics. Clinical hypothyroidism may be a more useful marker than absolute cut-offs of hormone values, and may be associated with quetiapine, antidepressant and lithium use, and managed by thyroxine replacement. Hyper-parathyroidism requires comprehensive medical evaluation for occult tumours. Hypocalcaemia, along with multiple other psychiatric and medical causes, may result in decreased bone density and require evaluation and management. Strategies for reducing sexual dysfunction with psychotropics remain largely unsatisfactory. Finally, management strategies for obesity and metabolic syndrome

  3. Assessing the detection, reporting and investigation of adverse events in clinical trial protocols implemented in Cameroon: a documentary review of clinical trial protocols.

    PubMed

    Ebile, Akoh Walter; Ateudjieu, Jerome; Yakum, Martin Ndinakie; Djuidje, Marceline Ngounoue; Watcho, Pierre

    2015-09-29

    International guidelines recommend ethical and scientific quality standards for managing and reporting adverse events occurring during clinical trials to competent research ethics committees and regulatory authorities. The purpose of this study was to determine whether clinical trial protocols in Cameroon are developed in line with national requirements and international guidelines as far as detecting, reporting and investigating of adverse events is concerned. It was a documentary review of all approved clinical trial protocols that were submitted at the Cameroon National Ethics Committee for evaluation from 1997 through 2012. Data were extracted using a preconceived and validated grid. Protocol review process targeted the title, abstract, objectives, methodology, resources, and the chapter on safety. In total, 106 (4.9 %) clinical trial protocols were identified from 2173 protocols seen in the archive and 104 (4.8 %) included for review. Seventy six (73.1 %) trials did not include the surveillance of adverse events as part of their objective. A total of 91 (87.5 %) protocols did not budget for adverse event surveillance, 76 (73.1 %) did not have a data safety management board (DSMB), 11(10.6 %) included insurance for participants, 47 (45.2 %) did not include a case definition for serious adverse events, 33 (31.7 %) described procedures to detect adverse events, 33 (31.7 %) described procedure for reporting and 22 (21.2 %) described procedure for investigating adverse events. Most clinical trial protocols in Cameroon are developed to focus on benefits and pay little attention to harms. The development of national guidelines can improve the surveillance of adverse events in clinical trial research conducted in Cameroon. Adverse events surveillance tools and a budget are critical for an adequate planning for adverse event surveillance when developing trial protocols. Clinical trial protocols submitted in the Cameroon National Ethics Committee do not adequately plan

  4. Application of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in Human Health and Ecotoxicology Capturing Divergent Consequences of Conserved Molecular Initiating Events via AOP Networks (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework was developed to help organize and disseminate existing knowledge concerning the means through which specific perturbations of biological pathways can lead to adverse outcomes considered relevant to risk-based regulatory decision-making...

  5. Application of adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) in human health and ecotoxicology capturing divergent consequences of conserved molecular initiating events via AOP networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework was developed to help organize and disseminate existing knowledge concerning the means through which specific perturbations of biological pathways can lead to adverse outcomes considered relevant to risk-based regulatory decision-making...

  6. Pharmacology, toxicology, clinical efficacy, and adverse effects of calcium polycarbophil, an enteral hydrosorptive agent.

    PubMed

    Danhof, I E

    1982-01-01

    Calcium polycarbophil is the calcium salt of polyacrylic acid crosslinked with divinyl glycol. It is chemically and physiologically inert. In dilute alkali it possesses marked hydrophilic capacity (60 to 100 times its weight), which is the basis for its therapeutic use. In daily dosages of 4 to 5 g in adults, it appears to be quite safe, is non-toxic, does not interfere with digestion or absorption, and does not cause gastrointestinal irritation. It appears to be effective in the treatment of both constipation and diarrhea due to functional or organic causes. Several days of continuous use are necessary before effectiveness becomes apparent. Clinical studies, of which there are relatively few, range from uncontrolled, unblinded evaluations of an almost anecdotal nature to well controlled, double-blind, crossover studies. Additional carefully controlled studies on dietary influences, exercise, and patient compliance would be helpful. Adverse effects, which are minimal, include epigastric fullness or heaviness, abdominal distention and bloating, and flatulence. As with all bulk-forming agents, calcium polycarbophil should not be used by persons who have stenotic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Clinical Symptoms and Adverse Effects Associated With Energy Drink Consumption in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Dalia; Reed-Schrader, Essie; Olympia, Robert P; Brady, Jodi; Rivera, Ruby; Serra, Theresa; Weber, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence of energy drink consumption by adolescents, to identify associated clinical symptoms and adverse effects, and to gain an understanding to the motivation behind its consumption. A prospective, questionnaire-based study was conducted at 2 emergency departments from June 2011 to June 2013. The questionnaire was distributed to a convenience sample of adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. Stratification was performed on the basis of frequency of consumption: frequent consumption (at least once a month) and infrequent consumption (less frequent than once a month). Data analysis was performed on 612 completed questionnaires. Two hundred two responders (33%) were considered frequent energy drink consumers. Frequent consumers were more likely to be involved in high-risk behaviors and more likely to consume other caffeinated drinks. In the previous 6 months, frequent energy drink consumers were more likely to report headache (76%), anger (47%), and increased urination (24%) and were more likely to require medical evaluation for headache (41%) and difficulty breathing (22%). Frequent energy drink consumers were more likely to believe that energy drinks "help me do better in school" (12%), "help me do better in sports" (35%), "are just for fun" (46%), "help me stay up at night" (67%), and "make me concentrate/focus better" (34%). Clarifying common misconceptions associated with energy drink consumption, especially in high-risk adolescents and frequent energy drink consumers, may decrease the frequency of symptoms experienced by adolescents, such as headache and difficulty breathing, requiring medical evaluation.

  8. Online Tool to Improve Stratification of Adverse Events in Stroke Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Kerrick; MacIsaac, Rachael L; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Lyden, Patrick D; Bluhmki, Erich; Lees, Kennedy R

    2016-03-01

    Knowing characteristic adverse events (AEs) and their incidence among patients participating in acute stroke trials may assist interpretation of future studies. We aimed to develop an online tool to inform stroke trial safety. We identified relevant AEs from patients within the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA), using receiver operating characteristic principles. We modeled their incidence on patient age, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and comorbidities using binary logistic regression. Models with an R(2) >5% were deemed powerful enough to predict expected AE incidences and were included. The calculator was developed using programs R and Visual Studios. Forty-eight of the most common AEs were identified and incorporated into the IschAEmic Stroke Calculator. The calculator, publicly available at http://www.vistacollaboration.org calculates the expected incidence of AEs or groups of AEs in a trial cohort and where possible compares them with the observed incidence. The IschAEmic Stroke Calculator is an open access resource to support safety interpretation within acute stroke trials. Prediction of AEs with higher likelihood of occurrence may direct preventive clinical measures. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Accounting for interim safety monitoring of an adverse event upon termination of a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Upon termination of a clinical trial that uses interim evaluations to determine whether the trial can be stopped, a proper statistical analysis must account for the interim evaluations. For example, in a group-sequential design where the efficacy of a treatment regimen is evaluated at interim stages, and the opportunity to stop the trial based on positive efficacy findings exists, the terminal p-value, point estimate, and confidence limits of the outcome of interest must be adjusted to eliminate bias. While it is standard practice to adjust terminal statistical analyses due to opportunities to stop for "positive" findings, adjusting due to opportunities to stop for "negative" findings is also important. Stopping rules for negative findings are particularly useful when monitoring a specific rare serious adverse event in trials designed to show safety with respect to the event. In these settings, establishing conservative stopping rules are appropriate, and therefore accounting for the interim monitoring can have a substantial effect on the final results. Here I present a method to account for interim safety monitoring and illustrate its usefulness. The method is demonstrated to have advantages over methodology that does not account for interim monitoring.

  10. Potential consequences of clinical application of artificial gametes: a systematic review of stakeholder views.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Saskia; Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Hamer, Geert; Repping, Sjoerd; Dancet, Eline A F

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the formation of artificial gametes, i.e. gametes generated from progenitors or somatic cells, has led to scientific and societal discussion about their use in medically assisted reproduction. In animals, live births have already been achieved using artificial gametes of varying (cell type) sources and biological research seems to be progressing steadily toward clinical application in humans. Artificial gametes could potentially help not only infertile heterosexual couples of reproductive age of which one or both partners lacks functional gametes, but also post-menopausal women and same-sex couples, to conceive a child who will be genetically related to them. But as clinical application of these new technologies may have wider societal consequences, a proactive consideration of the possible impact seems timely and important. This review aims to contribute to this by providing a systematic overview of the potential consequences of clinical application of artificial gametes anticipated by different stakeholders. The electronic database 'Medline/Pubmed' was systematically searched with medical subject heading terms (MesH) for articles published in English between January 1970 and December 2013. Articles were selected based on eligibility and reference lists of eligible studies were hand searched. The reported potential consequences of clinical application of artificial gametes were extracted from the articles and were grouped into categories by content analysis. Per category, we noted which stakeholders referred to which potential consequences, based on author affiliations and, if applicable, study participants. The systematic search yielded 2424 articles, and 84 studies were included after screening. Nine positive consequences, 21 specific consequences requiring consideration and 22 recommendations referring to clinical application of artificial gametes were documented. All positive consequences, consequences requiring consideration and

  11. Update on raloxifene: mechanism of action, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, and contraindications.

    PubMed

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Saccardi, Carlo; Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Berretta, Roberto; Capobianco, Giampiero; Di Gangi, Stefania; Vacilotto, Antonio; Bertocco, Anna; Noventa, Marco; Ancona, Emanuele; D'Antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2013-06-01

    Raloxifene is the only selective estrogen receptor modulator approved for long-term treatment in the prevention of osteoporotic fractures and for the reduction of invasive breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. The demonstrated beneficial effects on bone and mammalian tissue led clinical and molecular research to focus mainly on these organs, giving less attention to all other systemic effects. The aim of this review was to evaluate all described systemic effects of raloxifene, investigating its molecular and tissutal mechanism of action. A literature research was carried out in electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, and the Cochrane Library in interval time between 2000 and 2012. Outcomes were considered in relation to positive/adverse effects concerning bone metabolism, lipid metabolism, coagulation pattern, menopausal symptoms, breast cancer onset, and endometrial cancer onset. Raloxifene acts as an estrogen agonist or antagonist depending on the tissue. This feature is related to specific actions on at least 2 distinct estrogen receptors, whose proportions vary according to tissue type. Raloxifene is a drug for the treatment of osteoporosis and for the prevention of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer because it guarantees a safety profile on the endometrium. Raloxifene is furthermore an effective therapy in women with increased levels of plasma cholesterol. Raloxifene treatment shifts the coagulation pattern toward prothrombosis, and the patients should be exhaustively informed about the risks associated with therapy. Raloxifene does not show to affect memory and cognition. Finally, it is noteworthy that quality-of-life studies demonstrated some favorable effects of raloxifene.

  12. Electrocardiographic Abnormalities Predict Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Qi, Sihua

    2016-11-01

    We conducted a retrospective cohort study of a large sample to assess whether electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are independently associated with the occurrence of neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE), delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), and in-hospital death after nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this retrospective observational study, patients who were admitted within 72 hours of SAH symptom onset between 2013 and 2015 were enrolled. Twelve-lead ECG findings obtained within 72 hours after SAH and the presence of NPE, DCI, and in-hospital death were collected based on the results reported in the medical records. We included 834 patients. NPE occurred in 192 patients (23%). The median delay from SAH onset to NPE was 3 days (interquartile range [IQR]: 5 days). DCI occurred in 223 patients (27%; median delay to DCI, 4 days; IQR: 5 days). In total, 141 patients (17%) died in the hospital (median time to death, 12 days; IQR: 18 days). The frequency of ECG abnormalities for all enrolled patients was 65%. Corrected QT prolongation had an adjusted risk ratio (RR) of 1.5 (1.1-2.2) for NPE and 1.8 (1.3-2.4) for DCI. ST depression had an adjusted RR of 3.0 (1.2-7.5) for in-hospital death. NSSTTCs (nonspecific ST- or T-wave changes) had an adjusted RR of 2.7 (1.8-4.2) for NPE, 2.8 (1.9-4.3) for DCI, and 2.2 (1.3-3.5) for in-hospital death. All RRs were adjusted for age and Hunt-Hess scores. ECG abnormalities assessed within 72 hours after SAH using a standard 12-lead ECG are independently associated with an increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes in patients with nontraumatic SAH. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A method for systematic discovery of adverse drug events from clinical notes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adverse drug events (ADEs) are undesired harmful effects resulting from use of a medication, and occur in 30% of hospitalized patients. The authors have developed a data-mining method for systematic, automated detection of ADEs from electronic medical records. Materials and Methods This method uses the text from 9.5 million clinical notes, along with prior knowledge of drug usages and known ADEs, as inputs. These inputs are further processed into statistics used by a discriminative classifier which outputs the probability that a given drug–disorder pair represents a valid ADE association. Putative ADEs identified by the classifier are further filtered for positive support in 2 independent, complementary data sources. The authors evaluate this method by assessing support for the predictions in other curated data sources, including a manually curated, time-indexed reference standard of label change events. Results This method uses a classifier that achieves an area under the curve of 0.94 on a held out test set. The classifier is used on 2 362 950 possible drug–disorder pairs comprised of 1602 unique drugs and 1475 unique disorders for which we had data, resulting in 240 high-confidence, well-supported drug-AE associations. Eighty-seven of them (36%) are supported in at least one of the resources that have information that was not available to the classifier. Conclusion This method demonstrates the feasibility of systematic post-marketing surveillance for ADEs using electronic medical records, a key component of the learning healthcare system. PMID:26232442

  14. A method for systematic discovery of adverse drug events from clinical notes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan; Jung, Kenneth; Winnenburg, Rainer; Shah, Nigam H

    2015-11-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are undesired harmful effects resulting from use of a medication, and occur in 30% of hospitalized patients. The authors have developed a data-mining method for systematic, automated detection of ADEs from electronic medical records. This method uses the text from 9.5 million clinical notes, along with prior knowledge of drug usages and known ADEs, as inputs. These inputs are further processed into statistics used by a discriminative classifier which outputs the probability that a given drug-disorder pair represents a valid ADE association. Putative ADEs identified by the classifier are further filtered for positive support in 2 independent, complementary data sources. The authors evaluate this method by assessing support for the predictions in other curated data sources, including a manually curated, time-indexed reference standard of label change events. This method uses a classifier that achieves an area under the curve of 0.94 on a held out test set. The classifier is used on 2,362,950 possible drug-disorder pairs comprised of 1602 unique drugs and 1475 unique disorders for which we had data, resulting in 240 high-confidence, well-supported drug-AE associations. Eighty-seven of them (36%) are supported in at least one of the resources that have information that was not available to the classifier. This method demonstrates the feasibility of systematic post-marketing surveillance for ADEs using electronic medical records, a key component of the learning healthcare system. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Improving drug safety: From adverse drug reaction knowledge discovery to clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuxiang; Hu, Yong; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yin, Zhinan; Chen, Xue-Wen; Liu, Mei

    2016-11-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern, causing over 100,000 fatalities in the United States every year with an annual cost of $136 billion. Early detection and accurate prediction of ADRs is thus vital for drug development and patient safety. Multiple scientific disciplines, namely pharmacology, pharmacovigilance, and pharmacoinformatics, have been addressing the ADR problem from different perspectives. With the same goal of improving drug safety, this article summarizes and links the research efforts in the multiple disciplines into a single framework from comprehensive understanding of the interactions between drugs and biological system and the identification of genetic and phenotypic predispositions of patients susceptible to higher ADR risks and finally to the current state of implementation of medication-related decision support systems. We start by describing available computational resources for building drug-target interaction networks with biological annotations, which provides a fundamental knowledge for ADR prediction. Databases are classified by functions to help users in selection. Post-marketing surveillance is then introduced where data-driven approach can not only enhance the prediction accuracy of ADRs but also enables the discovery of genetic and phenotypic risk factors of ADRs. Understanding genetic risk factors for ADR requires well organized patient genetics information and analysis by pharmacogenomic approaches. Finally, current state of clinical decision support systems is presented and described how clinicians can be assisted with the integrated knowledgebase to minimize the risk of ADR. This review ends with a discussion of existing challenges in each of disciplines with potential solutions and future directions.

  16. Clinical pharmacy services, pharmacy staffing, and adverse drug reactions in United States hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bond, C A; Raehl, Cynthia L

    2006-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were examined in 1,960,059 hospitalized Medicare patients in 584 United States hospitals in 1998. A database was constructed from the MedPAR database and the National Clinical Pharmacy Services survey. The 584 hospitals were selected because they provided specific information on 14 clinical pharmacy services and on pharmacy staffing; they also had functional ADR reporting systems. The study population consisted of 35,193 Medicare patients who experienced an ADR (rate of 1.8%). Of the 14 clinical pharmacy services, 12 were associated with reduced ADR rates. The most significant reductions occurred in hospitals offering pharmacist-provided admission drug histories (odds ratio [OR] 1.864, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.765-1.968), drug protocol management (OR 1.365, 95% CI 1.335-1.395), and ADR management (OR 1.360, 95% CI 1.328-1.392). Multivariate analysis, performed to further evaluate these findings, showed that nine variables were associated with ADR rate: pharmacist-provided in-service education (slope -0.469, p=0.018), drug information (slope -0.488, p=0.005), ADR management (slope -0.424, p=0.021), drug protocol management (slope -0.732, p=0.002), participation on the total parenteral nutrition team (slope 0.384, p=0.04), participation on the cardiopulmonary resuscitation team (slope -0.506, p=0.008), medical round participation (slope -0.422, p=0.037), admission drug histories (slope -0.712, p=0.008), and increased clinical pharmacist staffing (slope -4.345, p=0.009). As clinical pharmacist staffing increased from the 20th to the 100th percentile (from 0.93+/-0.77/100 to 5.16+/-4.11/100 occupied beds), ADRs decreased by 47.88%. In hospitals without pharmacist-provided ADR management, the following increases were noted: mean number of ADRs/100 admissions by 34.90% (OR 1.360, 95% CI 1.328-1.392), length of stay 13.64% (Mann-Whitney U test [U]=11047367, p=0.017), death rate 53.64% (OR 1.574, 95% CI 1.423-1.731), total Medicare

  17. International consensus (ICON) on: clinical consequences of mite hypersensitivity, a global problem.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Fernandez-Caldas, Enrique; Thomas, Wayne R; Chapman, Martin D; Lee, Bee Wah; Caraballo, Luis; Acevedo, Nathalie; Chew, Fook Tim; Ansotegui, Ignacio J; Behrooz, Leili; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Pascal, Demoly; Rosario, Nelson; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Geller, Mario; Quirce, Santiago; Vrtala, Susanne; Valenta, Rudolf; Ollert, Markus; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Calderón, Moises A; Barnes, Charles S; Custovic, Adnan; Benjaponpitak, Suwat; Capriles-Hulett, Arnaldo

    2017-01-01

    Since mite allergens are the most relevant inducers of allergic diseases worldwide, resulting in significant morbidity and increased burden on health services, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), formed by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), and the World Allergy Organization (WAO), has proposed to issue an International Consensus (ICON) on the clinical consequences of mite hypersensitivity. The objectives of this document are to highlight aspects of mite biology that are clinically relevant, to update the current knowledge on mite allergens, routes of sensitization, the genetics of IgE responses to mites, the epidemiologic aspects of mite hypersensitivity, the clinical pictures induced by mites, the diagnosis, specific immunotherapeutic approaches, and prevention.

  18. Acute clinical adverse radiation effects after Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Tuleasca, Constantin; George, Mercy; Faouzi, Mohamed; Schiappacasse, Luis; Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Zeverino, Michele; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Maire, Raphael; Levivier, Marc

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) represent a common indication of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). While most studies focus on the long-term morbidity and adverse radiation effects (AREs), none describe the acute clinical AREs that might appear on a short-term basis. These types of events are investigated, and their incidence, type, and outcomes are reported in the present paper. METHODS The included patients were treated between July 2010 and March 2016, underwent at least 6 months of follow-up, and presented with a disabling symptom during the first 6 months after GKS that affected their quality of life. The timing of appearance, as well as the type of main symptom and outcome, were noted. The prescribed dose was 12 Gy at the margin. RESULTS Thirty-five (22%) of 159 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria had acute clinical AREs. The mean followup period was 30 months (range 6-49.2 months). The mean time of appearance was 37.9 days (median 31 days; range 3-110 days). In patients with de novo symptoms, the more frequent symptoms were vertigo (n = 4; 11.4%) and gait disturbance (n = 3; 8.6%). The exacerbation of a preexisting symptom was more frequently related to hearing loss (n = 10; 28.6%), followed by gait disturbance (n = 7; 20%) and vertigo (n = 3, 8.6%). In the univariate logistic regression analysis, the following factors were statistically significant: age (p = 0.002; odds ratio [OR] 0.96), hearing at baseline by Gardner-Robertson (GR) class (p = 0.006; OR 0.21), pure tone average at baseline (p = 0.006; OR 0.97), and Koos grade at baseline (with Koos Grade I used as a reference) (for Koos Grade II, OR 0.17 and p = 0.002; for Koos Grade III, OR 0.42 and p = 0.05). The following were not statistically significant but showed a tendency toward significance: the number of isocenters (p = 0.06; OR 0.94) and the maximal dose received by the cochlea (p = 0.07; OR 0.74). Fractional polynomial regression analysis showed a nonlinear relationship between the

  19. Kinase Inhibition-Related Adverse Events Predicted from in vitro Kinome and Clinical Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinan; Huang, Yong; Crowson, Matthew; Li, Jianrong; Maitland, Michael L.; Lussier, Yves A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Kinase inhibition is an increasingly popular strategy for pharmacotherapy of human diseases. Although many of these agents have been described as “targeted therapy”, they will typically inhibit multiple kinases with varying potency. Pre-clinical model testing has not predicted the numerous significant toxicities identified during clinical development. The purpose of this study was to develop a bioinformatics-based method to predict specific adverse events (AEs) in humans associated with the inhibition of particular kinase targets (KTs). Methods The AE frequencies of protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) were curated from three sources (PubMed, Thompson Physician Desk Reference and PharmGKB), and affinities of 38 PKIs for 317 kinases, representing > 50% of the predicted human kinome, were collected from published in vitro assay results. A novel quantitative computational method was developed to predict associations between KTs and AEs that included a whole panel of 71 AEs and 20 PKIs targeting 266 distinct kinases with Kd < 10uM. The method calculated an unbiased, kinome-wide association score via linear algebra on (i) the normalized frequencies of AEs associated with 20 PKIs and (ii) the negative log-transformed dissociation constant of kinases targeted by these PKIs. Finally, a reference standard was calculated by applying Fisher’s exact test to the co-occurrence of indexed Pubmed terms (p≤0.05, and manually verified) for AE and associated kinase targets (AE-KT) pairs from standard literature search techniques. We also evaluated the enrichment of predictions between the quantitative method and the literature search by Fisher’s Exact testing. Results We identified significant associations among already empirically well established pairs of AEs (e.g. diarrhea and rash) and KTs (e.g. EGFR). The following less well recognized AE-KT pairs had similar association scores: diarrhea-(DDR1; ERBB4), rash-ERBB4, and fatigue-(CSF1R; KIT). With no filtering, the

  20. An approach to 'dynamic--DDD (defined daily dose) monitoring' to reduce adverse clinical outcomes and increase patient safety: information repositories and event triggers in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Eryilmaz, Esat N

    2011-01-01

    The goal of every effort and actions/interventions in almost all healthcare settings throughout the world's health systems -primary care, inpatient, outpatient encounters, diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, peri-operative settings- is and has been to achieve a well defined outcome (a kind of improvement in health status of the patient under consideration, an observable and significant change(s) in selected set(s) of clinical parameters confirmed by laboratory results and pathology findings, improvements in clinical outcomes). Clinical inefficiencies, in this context, should be addressed very systematically and scientifically. This is achieved through a continuously monitoring approach to adverse drug events based on information repositories and evidence-based rule sets. For monitoring drug-related outcomes and clinical outcomes in general, the concept of DDD (Defined Daily Dose) compliance is explained in this article to eliminate and avoid adverse clinical outcomes.

  1. The nature, patterns, clinical outcomes, and financial impact of intraoperative adverse events in emergency surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramly, Elie P; Bohnen, Jordan D; Farhat, Maha R; Razmdjou, Shadi; Mavros, Michael N; Yeh, Daniel D; Lee, Jarone; Butler, Kathryn; De Moya, Marc; Velmahos, George C; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about intraoperative adverse events (iAEs) in emergency surgery (ES). We sought to describe iAEs in ES and to investigate their clinical and financial impact. The 2007 to 2012 administrative and American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases at our tertiary academic center were: (1) linked, (2) queried for all ES procedures, and then (3) screened for iAEs using the ICD-9-CM-based Patient Safety Indicator "accidental puncture/laceration". Flagged cases were systematically reviewed to: (1) confirm or exclude the occurrence of iAEs (defined as inadvertent injuries during the operation) and (2) extract additional variables such as procedure type, approach, complexity (measured by relative value units), need for adhesiolysis, and extent of repair. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the independent impact of iAEs on 30-day morbidity, mortality, and hospital charges. Of a total of 9,288 patients, 1,284 (13.8%) patients underwent ES, of which 23 had iAEs (1.8%); 18 of 23 (78.3%) of the iAEs involved the small bowel or spleen, 10 of 23 (43.5%) required suture repair, and 8 of 23 (34.8%) required tissue or organ resection. Compared with those without iAEs, patients with iAEs were older (median age 62 vs 50; P = .04); their procedures were more complex (total relative value unit 46.7, interquartile range [27.5 to 52.6] vs 14.5 [.5 to 30.2]; P < .001), longer in duration (>3 hours: 52% vs 8%; P < .001), and more often required adhesiolysis (39.1% vs 13.5% P = .001). Patients with iAEs had increased total charges ($31,080 vs $11,330, P < .001), direct charges ($20,030 vs $7,387, P < .001), and indirect charges ($11,460 vs $4,088, P < .001). On multivariable analyses, iAEs were independently associated with increased 30-day morbidity (odds ratio, 3.56 [CI, 1.10 to 11.54]; P = .03) and prolonged postoperative length of stay (LOS; LOS >7 days; odds ratio, 5.60 [1.54 to 20.35]; P = .01]. A trend

  2. Fear of violent consequences and condom use among women attending an STD clinic.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Mona; Senn, Theresa E; Carey, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been associated with risk for HIV infection. This cross-sectional study tested the hypothesis that fear of violent consequences when negotiating condom use mediated the relation between IPV and condom use. Participants (n = 478) were recruited between March 1, 2004 and June 30, 2006 from a public clinic that treats sexually transmitted diseases in upstate New York as part of a randomized controlled trial. They completed an audio, computer-assisted, self-administered questionnaire with items on risky sexual behavior, intimate relationships, and related covariates and confounding variables. Seventeen percent of the sample reported IPV in the past three months. Recent IPV was associated with fear of violent consequences to requests for condom use, and such fear was associated with inconsistent condom use. Women who reported IPV also reported greater difficulties in negotiating safer sex behaviors with their abusers. So fear of violent consequences appeared to hinder their ability to protect themselves against HIV infection. The results were consistent with fear of violent consequences mediating the relationship between IPV and condom use. Health care providers involved in HIV prevention and sexual risk reduction interventions need to address IPV and, more specifically, fear of IPV when negotiating safer sex as part of their services for providing more comprehensive care to the women they serve.

  3. Male Hypogonadism and Osteoporosis: The Effects, Clinical Consequences, and Treatment of Testosterone Deficiency in Bone Health

    PubMed Central

    Houdek, Devon

    2017-01-01

    It is well recognized that bone loss accelerates in hypogonadal states, with female menopause being the classic example of sex hormones affecting the regulation of bone metabolism. Underrepresented is our knowledge of the clinical and metabolic consequences of overt male hypogonadism, as well as the more subtle age-related decline in testosterone on bone quality. While menopause and estrogen deficiency are well-known risk factors for osteoporosis in women, the effects of age-related testosterone decline in men on bone health are less well known. Much of our knowledge comes from observational studies and retrospective analysis on small groups of men with variable causes of primary or secondary hypogonadism and mild to overt testosterone deficiencies. This review aims to present the current knowledge of the consequences of adult male hypogonadism on bone metabolism. The direct and indirect effects of testosterone on bone cells will be explored as well as the important differences in male osteoporosis and assessment as compared to that in females. The clinical consequence of both primary and secondary hypogonadism, as well as testosterone decline in older males, on bone density and fracture risk in men will be summarized. Finally, the therapeutic options and their efficacy in male osteoporosis and hypogonadism will be discussed. PMID:28408926

  4. Canadian paediatricians’ approaches to managing patients with adverse events following immunization: The role of the Special Immunization Clinic network

    PubMed Central

    Top, Karina A; Zafack, Joseline; De Serres, Gaston; Halperin, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When moderate or severe adverse events occur after vaccination, physicians and patients may have concerns about future immunizations. Similar concerns arise in patients with underlying conditions whose risk for adverse events may differ from the general population. The Special Immunization Clinic (SIC) network was established in 2013 at 13 sites in Canada to provide expertise in the clinical evaluation and vaccination of these patients. OBJECTIVES: To assess referral patterns for patients with vaccine adverse events or potential vaccine contraindications among paediatricians and to assess the anticipated utilization of an SIC. METHODS: A 12-item questionnaire was distributed to paediatricians and subspecialists participating in the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program through monthly e-mail and mail contacts. RESULTS: The response rate was 24% (586 of 2490). Fifty-three percent of respondents practiced general paediatrics exclusively and 52% reported that they administer vaccines. In the previous 12 months, 26% of respondents had encountered children with challenging adverse events or potential vaccine contraindications in their practice and 29% had received referrals for such patients, including 27% of subspecialists. Overall, 69% of respondents indicated that they would be likely or very likely to refer patients to an SIC, and 34% indicated that they would have referred at least one patient to an SIC in the previous 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who experience challenging adverse events following immunization or potential vaccine contraindications are encountered by paediatricians and subspecialists in all practice settings. The SIC network will be able to respond to a clinical need and support paediatricians in managing these patients. PMID:25332661

  5. Effectiveness of coerced addiction treatment (alternative consequences): a review of the clinical research.

    PubMed

    Miller, N S; Flaherty, J A

    2000-01-01

    Of central importance is that our clinical experience and treatment outcome studies to date strongly suggest that coercion is fundamental to addiction treatment and favorable outcomes from therapeutic interventions. Often the alcoholic/drug abuser must be given an opportunity to feel, face, or experience the "consequences" of their alcohol and drug addiction before the denial of their illness can be penetrated and motivation for treatment to recover from addictive illness can be developed. Continued use of alcohol and drugs is an unhealthy and dangerous state for those who are addicted and for others who are affected by their addictive illnesses. Effective therapeutic interventions and long-term recovery are more likely to succeed if avoiding "alternative consequences" are contingent on continued compliance with addiction treatment by those who suffer from addictive illnesses.

  6. From ultrasocial to antisocial: a role for oxytocin in the acute reinforcing effects and long-term adverse consequences of drug use?

    PubMed

    McGregor, I S; Callaghan, P D; Hunt, G E

    2008-05-01

    Addictive drugs can profoundly affect social behaviour both acutely and in the long-term. Effects range from the artificial sociability imbued by various intoxicating agents to the depressed and socially withdrawn state frequently observed in chronic drug users. Understanding such effects is of great potential significance in addiction neurobiology. In this review we focus on the 'social neuropeptide' oxytocin and its possible role in acute and long-term effects of commonly used drugs. Oxytocin regulates social affiliation and social recognition in many species and modulates anxiety, mood and aggression. Recent evidence suggests that popular party drugs such as MDMA and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) may preferentially activate brain oxytocin systems to produce their characteristic prosocial and prosexual effects. Oxytocin interacts with the mesolimbic dopamine system to facilitate sexual and social behaviour, and this oxytocin-dopamine interaction may also influence the acquisition and expression of drug-seeking behaviour. An increasing body of evidence from animal models suggests that even brief exposure to drugs such as MDMA, cannabinoids, methamphetamine and phencyclidine can cause long lasting deficits in social behaviour. We discuss preliminary evidence that these adverse effects may reflect long-term neuroadaptations in brain oxytocin systems. Laboratory studies and preliminary clinical studies also indicate that raising brain oxytocin levels may ameliorate acute drug withdrawal symptoms. It is concluded that oxytocin may play an important, yet largely unexplored, role in drug addiction. Greater understanding of this role may ultimately lead to novel therapeutics for addiction that can improve mood and facilitate the recovery of persons with drug use disorders.

  7. Common data elements for secondary use of electronic health record data for clinical trial execution and serious adverse event reporting.

    PubMed

    Bruland, Philipp; McGilchrist, Mark; Zapletal, Eric; Acosta, Dionisio; Proeve, Johann; Askin, Scott; Ganslandt, Thomas; Doods, Justin; Dugas, Martin

    2016-11-22

    Data capture is one of the most expensive phases during the conduct of a clinical trial and the increasing use of electronic health records (EHR) offers significant savings to clinical research. To facilitate these secondary uses of routinely collected patient data, it is beneficial to know what data elements are captured in clinical trials. Therefore our aim here is to determine the most commonly used data elements in clinical trials and their availability in hospital EHR systems. Case report forms for 23 clinical trials in differing disease areas were analyzed. Through an iterative and consensus-based process of medical informatics professionals from academia and trial experts from the European pharmaceutical industry, data elements were compiled for all disease areas and with special focus on the reporting of adverse events. Afterwards, data elements were identified and statistics acquired from hospital sites providing data to the EHR4CR project. The analysis identified 133 unique data elements. Fifty elements were congruent with a published data inventory for patient recruitment and 83 new elements were identified for clinical trial execution, including adverse event reporting. Demographic and laboratory elements lead the list of available elements in hospitals EHR systems. For the reporting of serious adverse events only very few elements could be identified in the patient records. Common data elements in clinical trials have been identified and their availability in hospital systems elucidated. Several elements, often those related to reimbursement, are frequently available whereas more specialized elements are ranked at the bottom of the data inventory list. Hospitals that want to obtain the benefits of reusing data for research from their EHR are now able to prioritize their efforts based on this common data element list.

  8. Comparison of serious adverse events posted at ClinicalTrials.gov and published in corresponding journal articles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Eve; Ravaud, Philippe; Riveros, Carolina; Perrodeau, Elodie; Dechartres, Agnes

    2015-08-14

    The reporting of serious adverse events (SAEs) in clinical trials is crucial to assess the balance between benefits and risks. For trials with serious adverse events posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, we assessed the consistency between SAEs posted at ClinicalTrials.gov and those published in corresponding journal articles. All records from ClinicalTrials.gov up to February 2014 were automatically exported in XML format. Among these, we identified all phase III or IV randomized controlled trials with at least one SAE posted. For a random sample of 300 of these trials, we searched for corresponding publications using MEDLINE via PubMed and extracted safety results from the articles. Among the sample of 300 trials with SAEs posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, 78 (26%) did not have a corresponding publication, and 20 (7%) had a publication that did not match the ClinicalTrials.gov record. For the 202 remaining trials, 26 published articles (13%) did not mention SAEs, 4 (2%) reported no SAEs, and 33 (16%) did not report the total number of SAEs per treatment group. Among the remaining 139 trials, for 44 (32%), the number of SAEs per group published did not match those posted at ClinicalTrials.gov. For 31 trials, the number of SAEs was greater at ClinicalTrials.gov than in the published article, with a difference ≥30 % for at least one group for 21. Only 33 trials (11%) had a publication reporting matching numbers of SAE and describing the type of SAE. Many trials with SAEs posted at ClinicalTrials.gov are not yet published, omit the reporting of these SAEs in corresponding publications, or report a discrepant number of SAEs as compared with ClinicalTrials.gov. These results underline the need to consult ClinicalTrials.gov for more information on serious harms.

  9. Long-term oral baclofen treatment in a child with cerebral palsy: electroencephalographic changes and clinical adverse effects.

    PubMed

    De Rinaldis, Marta; Losito, Luciana; Gennaro, Leonarda; Trabacca, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    Baclofen is widely used to control spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. Several publications described clinical adverse effects of baclofen oral treatment, but the effect of baclofen on seizure potentiation is still controversial. We describe a 10-year-old female patient with cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and mental retardation who developed clinical adverse effects (confusion, agitated state, insomnia, diffuse hypotonia, and hyporeflexia) and electroencephalographic (EEG) changes (quasiperiodic, generalized burst of sharp waves that take up >50% of standard EEG) during long-term oral baclofen treatment, after gradually increasing the dosage but still within the therapeutic dose. Our case showed clearly that the EEG changes in our patient, with a history of epilepsy in good control, have been induced by the baclofen increase, and we describe the possible mechanisms that could explain proconvulsive effect of baclofen.

  10. Frequency of changing enteral alimentation bags and tubing, and adverse clinical outcomes in patients in a long term care facility.

    PubMed

    Graham, S; McIntyre, M; Chicoine, J; Gerard, B; Laughren, R; Cowley, G; Morrison, J; Aoki, F Y; Nicolle, L E

    1993-01-01

    Enteral alimentation, given via nasogastric or gastrostomy tubes, is a well established practice to provide nutrition for patients with significant neurological injury. The frequency with which enteral feeding bags and tubes require change and potential adverse effects associated with bacterial contamination of tube feeds remain controversial. The authors studied different times between enteral feeding bag and tube changes, and the effect on adverse clinical outcomes in residents of a long term care facility. In the first study, residents were randomized to 24 h (n = 2), 48 h (n = 3) or 72 h (n = 6) tube feeding and bag changes with clinical status monitored in a standardized fashion for six months. In the second study, patients were randomized to 24 h (n = 6) or 72 h (n = 6) changes. Patient-days of follow-up were 382, 574 and 1000 for the three arms of the first study period and 556 and 496 for the two arms of the second study. No differences in potential clinical adverse events--including fever, gastrointestinal symptoms or pneumonia--were observed with different durations of tubing change. This study suggests it is appropriate to change alimentation tube and feeding bags every 72 h (rather than every 24 h). The less frequent changes will decrease supply costs and free nursing time for other activities.

  11. [Hepatic transit times and liver elasticity compared with meld in predicting a 1 year adverse clinical outcome of a clinically diagnosed cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Koller, Tomáš; Piešťanská, Zuzana; Hlavatý, Tibor; Holomáň, Jozef; Glasa, Jozef; Payer, Juraj

    Hepatic transit times measured by the contrast enhanced ultrasonography and liver elasticity were found to predict a clinically significant portal hypertension. However, these modalities we not yet sufficiently evaluated in predicting adverse clinical outcome in patients with clinically diagnosed cirrhosis (D´Amico stages > 1), having a clinically significant portal hypertension. The aim of our study was to assess the predictive power of the liver transit times and the liver elasticity on an adverse clinical outcome of clinically diagnosed cirrhosis compared with the MELD score. The study group included 48 consecutive outpatients with cirrhosis in the 2., 3. and 4. DAmico stages. Patients with stage 4 could have jaundice, patients with other complications of portal hypertension were excluded. Transit times were measured from the time of intravenous administration of contrast agent (Sonovue) to a signal appearance in a hepatic vein (hepatic vein arrival time, HVAT) or time difference between the contrast signal in the hepatic artery and hepatic vein (hepatic transit time, HTT) in seconds. Elasticity was measured using the transient elastography (Fibroscan). The transit times and elasticity were measured at baseline and patients were followed for up for 1 year. Adverse outcome of cirrhosis was defined as the appearance of clinically apparent ascites and/or hospitalization for liver disease and/or death within 1 year. The mean age was 61 years, with female/male ratio 23/25. At baseline, the median Child-Pugh score was 5 (IQR 5.0-6.0), MELD 9.5 (IQR 7.6 to 12.1), median HVAT was 22 s (IQR 19-25) and HTT 6 (IQR 5-9). HTT and HVAT negatively correlated with Child-Pugh (-0.351 and -0.441, p = 0.002) and MELD (-0.479 and -0.388, p = 0.006) scores. The adverse outcome at 1-year was observed in 11 cases (22.9 %), including 6 deaths and 5 hospitalizations. Median HVAT in those with/without the adverse outcome was 20 seconds (IQR 19.3-23.5) compared with 22 s (IQR 19-26, p

  12. Clinical review: A review of the clinical consequences of variation in thyroid function within the reference range.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter N; Razvi, Salman; Pearce, Simon H; Dayan, Colin M

    2013-09-01

    Overt thyroid disease is associated with profound adverse health outcomes; however, data are conflicting for studies of borderline/subclinical thyroid dysfunction. Many studies of subclinical thyroid disease have had low power and were prone to selection bias. In contrast, large datasets are available from community studies in healthy individuals. Studies of the effects of variation of thyroid function across the reference range on health outcomes in these populations may provide useful information regarding thresholds for treatment of abnormal thyroid function. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Controlled Trials Register were searched for articles studying the effect of variation in thyroid hormone parameters within the reference range on cardiovascular, bone, metabolic, pregnancy, neurological, and psychological outcomes. Higher TSH/lower thyroid hormone levels are associated with more cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular events and worse metabolic parameters and pregnancy outcomes, whereas lower TSH/higher thyroid hormone levels are associated with reduced bone mineral density and increased fracture risk. The evidence base was good for cardiovascular, metabolic, bone, and pregnancy outcomes; however, high-quality data remained lacking for neurological and psychological outcomes. Common variation in persons with thyroid function in the normal range are associated with adverse health outcomes. These data suggest, by extrapolation, that carefully monitored treatment of even modest elevations of TSH may have substantial health benefits. Appropriately powered large-scale clinical trials analyzing the risks vs benefits of treating subclinical thyroid disease are required to determine whether these benefits can be achieved with levothyroxine therapy.

  13. Adverse Effects of Grape Seed Extract Supplement: A Clinical Case and Long-Term Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Berry, Andrew C; Nakshabendi, Rahman; Abidali, Hussein; Atchaneeyasakul, Kunakorn; Dholaria, Kevin; Johnson, Cassandra; Kishore, Varsha A; Baltz, Aaron C

    2016-01-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE) supplement use is becoming more popular today for its potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic role. We report a 49-year-old male who presented with recurrent nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and acute weakness following GSE use. A thorough medical workup ensued and no causes were identified clinically, procedurally, or with imaging. Symptoms resolved after GSE discontinuation and the patient remained symptom-free 5 years later. This case illustrates the paucity of documented detailed clinical cases and lack of controlled trials detailing a thorough and reproducible adverse effect profile of GSE supplement.

  14. Penicillamine revisited: historic overview and review of the clinical uses and cutaneous adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Rim; Abbas, Ossama

    2013-06-01

    Penicillamine is a well-known heavy metal chelator, classically used in the treatment of Wilson disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and cystinuria. From a dermatologic standpoint, penicillamine was found to be useful in the treatment of systemic sclerosis. The successful therapeutic uses of penicillamine have been hindered by its numerous adverse effects, both cutaneous and extra-cutaneous. It is a unique drug since it provokes a diversity of dermatologic manifestations that include (1) acute hypersensitivity reactions, (2) dermopathies characterized by elastic fiber abnormalities including elastosis perforans serpiginosa and pseudo-pseudoxanthoma elasticum, (3) autoimmune disorders such as pemphigus and penicillamine-induced lupus erythematosus-like syndrome, and (4) miscellaneous dermatoses that result from undefined mechanisms. These cutaneous adverse effects may correlate with the dosage and duration of penicillamine therapy as well as the disease being treated.

  15. Hemorheological alterations in sickle cell anemia and their clinical consequences - The role of genetic modulators.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marisa; Vargas, Sofia; Coelho, Andreia; Dias, Alexandra; Ferreira, Teresa; Morais, Anabela; Maia, Raquel; Kjöllerström, Paula; Lavinha, João; Faustino, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by the HBB:c.20A>T mutation that leads to hemoglobin S synthesis. The disease presents with high clinical heterogeneity characterized by chronic hemolysis, recurrent episodes of vaso-oclusion and infection. This work aimed to characterize by in silico studies some genetic modulators of severe hemolysis and stroke risk in children with SCA, and understand their consequences at the hemorheological level.Association studies were performed between hemolysis biomarkers as well as the degree of cerebral vasculopathy and the inheritance of several polymorphic regions in genes related with vascular cell adhesion and vascular tonus in pediatric SCA patients. In silico tools (e.g. MatInspector) were applied to investigate the main variant consequences.Variants in vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM1) gene promoter and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene were significantly associated with higher degree of hemolysis and stroke events. They potentially modify transcription factor binding sites (e.g. VCAM1 rs1409419_T allele may lead to an EVI1 gain) or disturb the corresponding protein structure/function. Our findings emphasize the relevance of genetic variation in modulating the disease severity due to their effect on gene expression or modification of protein biological activities related with sickled erythrocyte/endothelial interactions and consequent hemorheological abnormalities.

  16. Serum brain-derived neurotropic factor level predicts adverse clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Arata; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Homma, Tsuneaki; Masaki, Yoshihiro; Furihata, Takaaki; Yokota, Takashi; Matsushima, Shouji; Takada, Shingo; Kadoguchi, Tomoyasu; Oba, Koji; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is involved in cardiovascular diseases as well as skeletal muscle energy metabolism and depression. We investigated whether serum BDNF level was associated with prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). We measured the serum BDNF level in 58 patients with HF (59.2 ± 13.7 years old, New York Heart Association functional class I-III) at baseline, and adverse events, including all cardiac deaths and HF rehospitalizations, were recorded during the median follow-up of 20.3 months. In a univariate analysis, serum BDNF levels were significantly associated with peak oxygen capacity (β = 0.547; P = .003), anaerobic threshold (β = 0.929; P = .004), and log minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope (β = -10.15; P = .005), but not Patient Health Questionnaire scores (β = -0.099; P = .586). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that serum BDNF level was an independent prognostic factor of adverse events (hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.84; P = .003). The receiver operating characteristic curve demonstrated that low levels of BDNF (<17.4 ng/mL) were associated with higher rates of adverse events compared with high levels of BDNF (≥17.4 ng/mL; log rank test: P < .001). Decreased serum BDNF levels were significantly associated with adverse outcomes in HF patients, suggesting that these levels can be a useful prognostic biomarker. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical undernutrition in 2014; pathogenesis, early diagnosis and consequences; undernutrition and trophopathy.

    PubMed

    de Ulíbarri Pérez, José Ignacio

    2014-01-13

    The last ten years have allowed me to mature some concepts and criteria in relation to malnutrition in the clinical practice. A lot of us have devoted all our efforts in an attempt to take it under control. The results, however, have shown to be insufficient in the clinical practice, because Hospital Undernutrition still persists in our hospitals and in fact, its prevalence is growing due to an ageing population. I think it is necessary to insist in renaming it as Clinical Undernutrition because it not only appears in hospital settings but it is present before and persists even after hospitalization; the latter reinforces the condition by forcing a change in the habits of the patient and the consequences of the treatments. I would also like to sustain that the risk is not caused by the undernutrition in itself but rather in the disruption of the nutritional balance which is a consequence of the aforementioned conditions and which is defined in a term: Trophopathy; that is, a disruption in the trophism or in the normal functioning of the nutritional status. This disruption constitutes the core risk that is associated with clinical undernutrition and the physical consequences of it. The disruption occurs internally and it will play havoc on cellular nutrition, tissues and further. It appears simultaneously in the blood, so it should be searched and detected there as it is the closest possible place to its origin. The new therapeutic procedures make it possible to cure some cases that in the past were impossible to treat. However, this also means increased risks and so requires a strict control to achieve the best results. Both illness and its treatment put homeostasis at risk and they will definitely impact the nutritional balance, being the latter the key objective in order to achieve or restore the healing process and health. Apart from the benefit obtained with the treatment, it is necessary to apply an appropriate nutritional support that will guarantee the least

  18. The metoclopramide black box warning for tardive dyskinesia: effect on clinical practice, adverse event reporting, and prescription drug lawsuits.

    PubMed

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D; Deepak, Parakkal; Sifuentes, Humberto; Devi, Radha; Du, Hongyan; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2013-06-01

    We examined the effects of the black box warning about the risk of tardive dyskinesia (TD) with chronic use of metoclopramide on management of gastroparesis within a single clinical practice, and on reporting of adverse events. Medical records of gastroparesis patients were evaluated for physician management choices. The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) was analyzed for event reports, and for lawyer-initiated reports, with metoclopramide from 2004 to 2010. Google Scholar was searched for court opinions against metoclopramide manufacturers. Before the black box warning, 69.8% of patients received metoclopramide for gastroparesis, compared with 23.7% after the warning. Gastroenterologists prescribed domperidone more often after than before the warning. Metoclopramide prescriptions decreased after 2008. Adverse event reporting increased after the warning. Only 3.6% of all FAERS reports but 70% of TD reports were filed by lawyers, suggesting a distortion in signal. Forty-seven legal opinions were identified, 33 from 2009-2010. The black box warning for metoclopramide has decreased its usage and increased its rate of adverse event reporting. Lawyer-initiated reports of TD hinder pharmacovigilance.

  19. Behavioral and emotional adverse events of drugs frequently used in the treatment of bipolar disorders: clinical and theoretical implications.

    PubMed

    Szmulewicz, Alejandro; Samamé, Cecilia; Caravotta, Pablo; Martino, Diego J; Igoa, Ana; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Colom, Francesc; Strejilevich, Sergio A

    2016-12-01

    Behavioral and emotional adverse events induced by drugs commonly prescribed to patients with bipolar disorders are of paramount importance to clinical practice and research. However, no reviews on the topic have been published so far. An extensive search was performed. Reports were reviewed if they described behavioral side effects related to pharmacological treatments for bipolar disorders in healthy subjects or patients with different neuropsychiatric disorders. For this review, lithium, antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were included. Apathy or emotional blunting, diminished sexual desire, and inability to cry were reported to be associated with exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome/emotional detachment and obsessive-compulsive symptomatology and decision-making modifications. A lithium-related amotivational syndrome was also reported in the literature. Furthermore, hypersexuality and obsessive-compulsive symptoms have been noted in subjects treated with lamotrigine. Primary studies on drug-related adverse events are scant so far and most of the data currently available derive from case reports. Moreover, most of the evidence reviewed is based on studies performed on healthy subjects and patients with neuropsychiatric conditions other than bipolar disorders. There is a remarkable dearth of data on behavioral adverse events of pharmacological treatment for bipolar disorders. However, the pieces of evidence available at present, though scant and scattered, suggest that different behavioral adverse events may be related to pharmacological treatment for these disorders. The implications of these findings for research and management of patients with mood disorders are discussed.

  20. Prevalence and clinical consequences of untreated dental caries using PUFA index in suburban Nigerian school children.

    PubMed

    Oziegbe, E O; Esan, T A

    2013-08-01

    Dental caries is the most common childhood disease and the most frequent non-communicable disease worldwide. In developing countries, a vast majority of the caries remains unrestored. However, the severity and consequences of untreated dental caries among Nigerian children is unknown. To determine the prevalence using the DMFT/dmft index and severity of oral conditions related to dental caries using the PUFA/pufa index in suburban Nigerian children. The study population consisted of 1,266 randomly selected school children in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Dental caries status was assessed using the DMFT/dmft index, described by WHO for epidemiological studies. The PUFA/pufa index was used to assess the clinical consequences of untreated dental caries. The mean dmft was 0.58 for the 4-6 years age group while the mean pufa score was 0.16 for the same age group. The mean DMFT score (0.16) was highest for the 13-16 years age group, while the mean PUFA score was 0.05 for the same age group. The prevalence of dmft > 0 was highest in the 4-6 years age group (16.9 %) while the prevalence of DMFT > 0 was highest in the 13-16 years age group (7.2 %). The mean pufa > 0 was highest in the 4-6 years age group (9.2 %). The overall caries prevalence was highest in the 4-6 years age group (17.4 %). Thirty-three percent of decayed teeth in the permanent dentition and 28.2 % of the primary dentition had signs of odontogenic infections. Despite the increase in the consumption of westernised diets by Nigerian children coupled with limited access to dental care, the prevalence was low but the clinical consequences of untreated dental caries was still high.

  1. OAE: The Ontology of Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A medical intervention is a medical procedure or application intended to relieve or prevent illness or injury. Examples of medical interventions include vaccination and drug administration. After a medical intervention, adverse events (AEs) may occur which lie outside the intended consequences of the intervention. The representation and analysis of AEs are critical to the improvement of public health. Description The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), previously named Adverse Event Ontology (AEO), is a community-driven ontology developed to standardize and integrate data relating to AEs arising subsequent to medical interventions, as well as to support computer-assisted reasoning. OAE has over 3,000 terms with unique identifiers, including terms imported from existing ontologies and more than 1,800 OAE-specific terms. In OAE, the term ‘adverse event’ denotes a pathological bodily process in a patient that occurs after a medical intervention. Causal adverse events are defined by OAE as those events that are causal consequences of a medical intervention. OAE represents various adverse events based on patient anatomic regions and clinical outcomes, including symptoms, signs, and abnormal processes. OAE has been used in the analysis of several different sorts of vaccine and drug adverse event data. For example, using the data extracted from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), OAE was used to analyse vaccine adverse events associated with the administrations of different types of influenza vaccines. OAE has also been used to represent and classify the vaccine adverse events cited in package inserts of FDA-licensed human vaccines in the USA. Conclusion OAE is a biomedical ontology that logically defines and classifies various adverse events occurring after medical interventions. OAE has successfully been applied in several adverse event studies. The OAE ontological framework provides a platform for systematic representation and analysis of

  2. OAE: The Ontology of Adverse Events.

    PubMed

    He, Yongqun; Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Lin, Yu; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Guo, Abra; Zhang, Shelley; Jagannathan, Desikan; Toldo, Luca; Tao, Cui; Smith, Barry

    2014-01-01

    A medical intervention is a medical procedure or application intended to relieve or prevent illness or injury. Examples of medical interventions include vaccination and drug administration. After a medical intervention, adverse events (AEs) may occur which lie outside the intended consequences of the intervention. The representation and analysis of AEs are critical to the improvement of public health. The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), previously named Adverse Event Ontology (AEO), is a community-driven ontology developed to standardize and integrate data relating to AEs arising subsequent to medical interventions, as well as to support computer-assisted reasoning. OAE has over 3,000 terms with unique identifiers, including terms imported from existing ontologies and more than 1,800 OAE-specific terms. In OAE, the term 'adverse event' denotes a pathological bodily process in a patient that occurs after a medical intervention. Causal adverse events are defined by OAE as those events that are causal consequences of a medical intervention. OAE represents various adverse events based on patient anatomic regions and clinical outcomes, including symptoms, signs, and abnormal processes. OAE has been used in the analysis of several different sorts of vaccine and drug adverse event data. For example, using the data extracted from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), OAE was used to analyse vaccine adverse events associated with the administrations of different types of influenza vaccines. OAE has also been used to represent and classify the vaccine adverse events cited in package inserts of FDA-licensed human vaccines in the USA. OAE is a biomedical ontology that logically defines and classifies various adverse events occurring after medical interventions. OAE has successfully been applied in several adverse event studies. The OAE ontological framework provides a platform for systematic representation and analysis of adverse events and of the factors (e

  3. Anti-C1q Autoantibodies, Novel Tests, and Clinical Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael; van Schaarenburg, Rosanne A.; Trouw, Leendert A.

    2013-01-01

    Although anti-C1q autoantibodies have been described more than four decades ago a constant stream of papers describing clinical associations or functional consequences highlights that anti-C1q antibodies are still hot and happening. By far the largest set of studies focus on anti-C1q antibodies is systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE anti-C1q antibodies associate with involvement of lupus nephritis in such a way that in the absence of anti-C1q antibodies it is unlikely that a flare in nephritis will occur. Anti-C1q antibodies occur in several autoimmune conditions but also in healthy individuals. Although considerable progress has been made in the understanding of how anti-C1q antibodies may contribute to tissue injury there is still a lot to learn about the processes involved in the breaking of tolerance to this protein. There has been considerable improvement in the assays employed to test for the presence of anti-C1q antibodies. Hopefully with these new and standardized assays at hand larger clinical association studies will be conducted with independent replication. Such large-scale studies will reveal the true value of clinical testing for anti-C1q autoantibodies in several clinical conditions. PMID:23717311

  4. Coding of adverse events of suicidality in clinical study reports of duloxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder: descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Lundh, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of coding and coding conventions on summaries and tabulations of adverse events data on suicidality within clinical study reports. Design Systematic electronic search for adverse events of suicidality in tables, narratives, and listings of adverse events in individual patients within clinical study reports. Where possible, for each event we extracted the original term reported by the investigator, the term as coded by the medical coding dictionary, medical coding dictionary used, and the patient’s trial identification number. Using the patient’s trial identification number, we attempted to reconcile data on the same event between the different formats for presenting data on adverse events within the clinical study report. Setting 9 randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine for major depressive disorder submitted to the European Medicines Agency for marketing approval. Data sources Clinical study reports obtained from the EMA in 2011. Results Six trials used the medical coding dictionary COSTART (Coding Symbols for a Thesaurus of Adverse Reaction Terms) and three used MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities). Suicides were clearly identifiable in all formats of adverse event data in clinical study reports. Suicide attempts presented in tables included both definitive and provisional diagnoses. Suicidal ideation and preparatory behaviour were obscured in some tables owing to the lack of specificity of the medical coding dictionary, especially COSTART. Furthermore, we found one event of suicidal ideation described in narrative text that was absent from tables and adverse event listings of individual patients. The reason for this is unclear, but may be due to the coding conventions used. Conclusion Data on adverse events in tables in clinical study reports may not accurately represent the underlying patient data because of the medical dictionaries and coding conventions used. In clinical study reports, the

  5. Coding of adverse events of suicidality in clinical study reports of duloxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder: descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Maund, Emma; Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Lundh, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-06-04

    To assess the effects of coding and coding conventions on summaries and tabulations of adverse events data on suicidality within clinical study reports. Systematic electronic search for adverse events of suicidality in tables, narratives, and listings of adverse events in individual patients within clinical study reports. Where possible, for each event we extracted the original term reported by the investigator, the term as coded by the medical coding dictionary, medical coding dictionary used, and the patient's trial identification number. Using the patient's trial identification number, we attempted to reconcile data on the same event between the different formats for presenting data on adverse events within the clinical study report. 9 randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine for major depressive disorder submitted to the European Medicines Agency for marketing approval. Clinical study reports obtained from the EMA in 2011. Six trials used the medical coding dictionary COSTART (Coding Symbols for a Thesaurus of Adverse Reaction Terms) and three used MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities). Suicides were clearly identifiable in all formats of adverse event data in clinical study reports. Suicide attempts presented in tables included both definitive and provisional diagnoses. Suicidal ideation and preparatory behaviour were obscured in some tables owing to the lack of specificity of the medical coding dictionary, especially COSTART. Furthermore, we found one event of suicidal ideation described in narrative text that was absent from tables and adverse event listings of individual patients. The reason for this is unclear, but may be due to the coding conventions used. Data on adverse events in tables in clinical study reports may not accurately represent the underlying patient data because of the medical dictionaries and coding conventions used. In clinical study reports, the listings of adverse events for individual patients and narratives

  6. A practical guide to the sublingual immunotherapy tablet adverse event profile: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Bardelas, Jose A; Svanholm Fogh, Bodil; Kaur, Amarjot; Li, Ziliang; Nolte, Hendrik

    2017-08-01

    Treatment with allergy immunotherapy improves allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, but can also improve comorbidities associated with allergic rhinitis such as asthma. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT)-tablets are a convenient and efficacious method of allergy immunotherapy. They are self-administered after the first tablet has been provided under medical supervision. Therapy may elicit local reactions or, rarely, systemic allergic reactions. The objective of this report is to inform healthcare practitioners about the safety and tolerability profile of SLIT-tablets and use this information to provide practical guidance that may inform patients regarding potential adverse reactions and how to manage them. Pooled analyses of safety data from completed randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 and phase 3 US and EU trials of timothy grass, short ragweed, and SQ house dust mite SLIT-tablets were conducted to characterize safety and tolerability. SLIT-tablets are generally well tolerated. No life-threatening events, serious systemic allergic reactions, or events that compromised the airway have been reported. The most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) are oral site reactions, most of which begin on day 1 of treatment, recur for less than 2 weeks, and resolve after approximately 30-60 minutes. Systemic allergic reactions have been managed with conventional pharmacotherapy. Reactions treated with epinephrine are uncommon, but have been reported. Treatment of AEs, treatment discontinuation considerations, and patient FAQs regarding SLIT-tablet safety/tolerability are discussed. This report gives healthcare providers valuable information to educate patients regarding what to expect in terms of SLIT-tablet safety and tolerability. Practical guidance is also provided to ensure proper treatment of any adverse reactions.

  7. The costs associated with adverse event procedures for an international HIV clinical trial determined by activity-based costing.

    PubMed

    Chou, Victoria B; Omer, Saad B; Hussain, Hamidah; Mugasha, Christine; Musisi, Maria; Mmiro, Francis; Musoke, Philippa; Jackson, J Brooks; Guay, Laura A

    2007-12-01

    To determine costs for adverse event (AE) procedures for a large HIV perinatal trial by analyzing actual resource consumption using activity-based costing (ABC) in an international research setting. The AE system for an ongoing clinical trial in Uganda was evaluated using ABC techniques to determine costs from the perspective of the study. Resources were organized into cost categories (eg, personnel, patient care expenses, laboratory testing, equipment). Cost drivers were quantified, and unit cost per AE was calculated. A subset of time and motion studies was performed prospectively to observe clinic personnel time required for AE identification. In 18 months, there were 9028 AEs, with 970 (11%) reported as serious adverse events. Unit cost per AE was $101.97. Overall, AE-related costs represented 32% ($920,581 of $2,834,692) of all study expenses. Personnel ($79.30) and patient care ($11.96) contributed the greatest proportion of component costs. Reported AEs were predominantly nonserious (mild or moderate severity) and unrelated to study drug(s) delivery. Intensive identification and management of AEs to conduct clinical trials ethically and protect human subjects require expenditure of substantial human and financial resources. Better understanding of these resource requirements should improve planning and funding of international HIV-related clinical trials.

  8. Lost in translation: the unintended consequences of advance directive law on clinical care.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Lesley S; Williams, Brie A; Hooper, Sarah M; Sabatino, Charles P; Weithorn, Lois A; Sudore, Rebecca L

    2011-01-18

    Advance directive law may compromise the clinical effectiveness of advance directives. To identify unintended legal consequences of advance directive law that may prevent patients from communicating end-of-life preferences. Advance directive legal statutes for all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia and English-language searches of LexisNexis, Westlaw, and MEDLINE from 1966 to August 2010. Two independent reviewers selected 51 advance directive statutes and 20 articles. Three independent legal reviewers selected 105 legal proceedings. Two reviewers independently assessed data sources and used critical content analysis to determine legal barriers to the clinical effectiveness of advance directives. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Legal and content-related barriers included poor readability (that is, laws in all states were written above a 12th-grade reading level), health care agent or surrogate restrictions (for example, 40 states did not include same-sex or domestic partners as default surrogates), and execution requirements needed to make forms legally valid (for example, 35 states did not allow oral advance directives, and 48 states required witness signatures, a notary public, or both). Vulnerable populations most likely to be affected by these barriers included patients with limited literacy, limited English proficiency, or both who cannot read or execute advance directives; same-sex or domestic partners who may be without legally valid and trusted surrogates; and unbefriended, institutionalized, or homeless patients who may be without witnesses and suitable surrogates. Only appellate-level legal cases were available, which may have excluded relevant cases. Unintended negative consequences of advance directive legal restrictions may prevent all patients, and particularly vulnerable patients, from making and communicating their end-of-life wishes and having them honored. These restrictions have rendered advance directives less clinically

  9. Failure of impedance monitoring to prevent adverse clinical events caused by fracture of a recalled high-voltage implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead.

    PubMed

    Kallinen, Linda M; Hauser, Robert G; Lee, Ken W; Almquist, Adrian K; Katsiyiannis, William T; Tang, Chuen Y; Melby, Daniel P; Gornick, Charles C

    2008-06-01

    The Medtronic Sprint Fidelis implantable cardioverter-defibrillator high-voltage lead is prone to fracture. The October 2007 safety advisory recommended lead impedance monitoring to aid in identifying lead fractures. The aim of this single-center study was to examine the effectiveness of impedance monitoring for detecting Sprint Fidelis lead failures before they caused adverse clinical events such as inappropriate shocks. Impedance and sensing information were acquired during routine clinic and CareLink follow-up and at the time of lead failure using the Patient Alert, sensing integrity counter, nonsustained episode, and electrogram features in Medtronic pulse generators. Between September 2004 and February 2008, 17 of 514 Sprint Fidelis leads (3.3%) followed up at our center failed between 11 and 35 months after implantation (mean 23.0 +/- 8.0 months). Fifteen of these failures (88%) were caused by pace-sense conductor fractures, and 2 (12%) were caused by high-voltage conductor defects. Twelve of 15 patients (80%) with pace-sense conductor fractures received inappropriate shocks; of these, 4 had no significant increase in lead impedance before they were shocked, 2 were shocked <3 hours after their lead impedances exceeded the 1,000 Omega audible alert threshold, and 2 patients did not hear the alarm. All pace-sense conductor failures whose sensing function could be evaluated (13 of 15) had oversensing based on stored data, and oversensing usually (11 of 13) preceded impedances changes. Impedance monitoring did not prevent inappropriate shocks in two-thirds of our patients. Thus, pace-sense conductor impedance monitoring as currently implemented does not reliably forewarn patients of a lead malfunction. Consequently, patients who have Sprint Fidelis leads remain at risk for adverse clinical events associated with pace-sense conductor fracture.

  10. Diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy: Clinical manifestations, cardiovascular consequences, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Balcıoğlu, Akif Serhat; Müderrisoğlu, Haldun

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a frequent chronic complication of diabetes mellitus with potentially life-threatening outcomes. CAN is caused by the impairment of the autonomic nerve fibers regulating heart rate, cardiac output, myocardial contractility, cardiac electrophysiology and blood vessel constriction and dilatation. It causes a wide range of cardiac disorders, including resting tachycardia, arrhythmias, intraoperative cardiovascular instability, asymptomatic myocardial ischemia and infarction and increased rate of mortality after myocardial infarction. Etiological factors associated with autonomic neuropathy include insufficient glycemic control, a longer period since the onset of diabetes, increased age, female sex and greater body mass index. The most commonly used methods for the diagnosis of CAN are based upon the assessment of heart rate variability (the physiological variation in the time interval between heartbeats), as it is one of the first findings in both clinically asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Clinical symptoms associated with CAN generally occur late in the disease process and include early fatigue and exhaustion during exercise, orthostatic hypotension, dizziness, presyncope and syncope. Treatment is based on early diagnosis, life style changes, optimization of glycemic control and management of cardiovascular risk factors. Medical therapies, including aldose reductase inhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, prostoglandin analogs and alpha-lipoic acid, have been found to be effective in randomized controlled trials. The following article includes the epidemiology, clinical findings and cardiovascular consequences, diagnosis, and approaches to prevention and treatment of CAN. PMID:25685280

  11. Clinical prediction rule to identify high-risk inpatients for adverse drug events: the JADE Study.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Mio; Bates, David W; Morimoto, Takeshi

    2012-11-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are common health problems worldwide. Developing a prediction rule to identify patients at high risk for ADEs to prevent or ameliorate ADEs could be one attractive strategy. The Japan Adverse Drug Events (JADE) study is a prospective cohort study including 3459 participants. We randomly divided the JADE study cohort into the derivation and the validation sets, using an automated random digit generator. We calculated the probabilities of ADE in each patient in the validation set after applying the prediction rule developed in the derivation set. The actual incidence and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) in the validation set were compared with those in the derivation set to evaluate the prognostic ability of our developed prediction rule. The developed prediction rule included eight independent risk factors. Each patient in the validation set was classified into three categories of risk for the ADEs according to the probability of ADEs calculated by the developed prediction rule. Eight percent (137/1730) of patients in the validation set fell into the high-risk group, and 35% of this group (48/137) had at least one ADE. The AUC in the validation set was 0.63 (95%CI 0.60-0.66), and the performance to discriminate the probability of ADE was similar (p = 0.08) compared with that in the derivation set. This prediction rule had the modest predictive ability and could help physicians and other healthcare professionals to make an estimation of patients at high risk for ADEs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Wear of novel ceramic-on-ceramic bearings under adverse and clinically relevant hip simulator conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jennings, Louise M; Begand, Sabine; Oberbach, Thomas; Delfosse, Daniel; Fisher, John

    2013-11-01

    Further development of ceramic materials for total hip replacement aim to increase fracture toughness and further reduce the incidence of bearing fracture. Edge loading due to translational mal positioning (microseparation) has replicated stripe wear, wear rates, and bimodal wear debris observed on retrievals. This method has replicated the fracture of early zirconia ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. This has shown the necessity of introducing microseparation conditions to the gait cycle when assessing the tribological performance of new hip replacement bearings. Two novel ceramic matrix composite materials, zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) and alumina-toughened zirconia (ATZ), were developed by Mathys Orthopädie GmbH. In this study, ATZ-on-ATZ and ZTA-on-ZTA bearing combinations were tested and compared with alumina-on-alumina (Al2O3-on-Al2O3) bearings under adverse microseparation and edge loading conditions using the Leeds II physiological anatomical hip joint simulator. The wear rate (±95% confidence limit) of ZTA-on-ZTA was 0.14 ± 0.10 mm(3)/million cycles and that of ATZ-on-ATZ was 0.06 ± 0.004 mm(3)/million cycles compared with a wear rate of 0.74 ± 1.73 mm(3)/million cycles for Al2O3-on-Al2O3 bearings. Stripe wear was evident on all bearing combinations; however, the stripe formed on the ATZ and ZTA femoral heads was thinner and shallower that that formed on the Al2O3 heads. Posttest phase composition measurements for both ATZ and ZTA materials showed no significant change in the monoclinic zirconia content. ATZ-on-ATZ and ZTA-on-ZTA showed superior wear resistance properties when compared with Al2O3-on-Al2O3 under adverse edge loading conditions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Ageism and its clinical consequences in oncogeriatry: a review of existing data and intervention leads].

    PubMed

    Schroyen, S; Adam, S; Jerusalem, G; Missotten, P

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a risk factor in oncology. Indeed, it is estimated that, in 2030, 70% of diagnosed cancers in the United States will concern subjects older than 65 years. Paradoxically, elderly are often excluded from clinical trials and are undertreated compared to younger patients. An important explanatory factor (and yet still not considered!) for these observations is the age stigma (in other words our stereotypes linked to age, and so ageism), age being actually the main motive for discrimination. In this perspective, our aim is to present ageism manifestations in oncogeriatry and their direct consequences for patients, interlocutors (that is to say health professionals) and interactions between them. Throughout this article, we will enhance our remarks by data from researches in "normal" aging. Before ending, we will give some intervention leads potentially applicable in oncogeriatry, to reduce ageism deleterious effect.

  14. Improving the Capture of Adverse Event Data in Clinical Trials: The Role of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Susan E. Trotti, Andy; Ataman, Ozlem U.; Seong, Jinsil; Lau, Fen Nee; Motta, Neiro W. da; Jeremic, Branislav

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To report meetings of the Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), organized to discuss issues surrounding, and develop initiatives to improve, the recording of adverse events (AE) in clinical trials. Methods and Materials: A first meeting was held in Atlanta, GA (October 2004). A second meeting was held in Denver, CO (October 2005) and focused on AE data capture. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3 (CTCAE) was suggested during the first meeting as the preferred common platform for the collection and reporting of AE data in its clinical trials. The second meeting identified and reviewed the current weaknesses and variations in the capture of AE data, and proposals to improve the quality and consistency of data capture were discussed. Results: There is heterogeneity in the collection of AE data between both institutions and individual clinicians. The use of multiple scoring systems hampers comparisons of treatment outcomes between centers and trials. There is often insufficient detail on normal tissue treatment effects, which leads to an underestimate of toxicity. Implementation of improved data capture was suggested for one of the ongoing IAEA clinical trials. Conclusions: There is a need to compare the quality and completeness of data between institutions and the efficacy of structured/directed vs. traditional passive data collection. Data collection using the CTCAE (with or without a questionnaire) will be investigated in an IAEA multinational trial of radiochemotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy in cervical cancer.

  15. OpenVigil FDA – Inspection of U.S. American Adverse Drug Events Pharmacovigilance Data and Novel Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Ruwen; von Hehn, Leocadie; Herdegen, Thomas; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Bruhn, Oliver; Petri, Holger; Höcker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance contributes to health care. However, direct access to the underlying data for academic institutions and individual physicians or pharmacists is intricate, and easily employable analysis modes for everyday clinical situations are missing. This underlines the need for a tool to bring pharmacovigilance to the clinics. To address these issues, we have developed OpenVigil FDA, a novel web-based pharmacovigilance analysis tool which uses the openFDA online interface of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to access U.S. American and international pharmacovigilance data from the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). OpenVigil FDA provides disproportionality analyses to (i) identify the drug most likely evoking a new adverse event, (ii) compare two drugs concerning their safety profile, (iii) check arbitrary combinations of two drugs for unknown drug-drug interactions and (iv) enhance the relevance of results by identifying confounding factors and eliminating them using background correction. We present examples for these applications and discuss the promises and limits of pharmacovigilance, openFDA and OpenVigil FDA. OpenVigil FDA is the first public available tool to apply pharmacovigilance findings directly to real-life clinical problems. OpenVigil FDA does not require special licenses or statistical programs. PMID:27326858

  16. Clinical consequences of rotavirus acute gastroenteritis in Europe, 2004-2005: the REVEAL study.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, Carlo; Van Damme, Pierre; Huet, Frederic; Gothefors, Leif; Maxwell, Melanie; Todd, Peter; da Dalt, Liviana

    2007-05-01

    The availability of comprehensive, up-to-date epidemiologic data would improve the understanding of the disease burden and clinical consequences of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in Europe. During the 2004-2005 season, a prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted in children <5 years of age in primary care, emergency department, and hospital settings in selected areas of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The clinical consequences of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and RVGE were estimated. The estimated percentage of children with rotavirus-positive AGE admitted to a hospital was 10.4%-36.0%, compared with 2.1%-23.5% of children with rotavirus-negative AGE. In France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom, the relative risk of hospitalization was statistically significantly higher for children with rotavirus-positive AGE than for those with rotavirus-negative AGE. Children with rotavirus-positive AGE were more likely to have lethargy, fever, vomiting, and dehydration, and, therefore, more severe disease than were children with rotavirus-negative AGE. Dehydration was up to 5.5 times more likely in children with rotavirus-positive AGE than in those with rotavirus-negative AGE. Rotavirus-positive AGE is more severe, causes more dehydration, and results in more emergency department consultations and hospitalizations than does rotavirus-negative AGE. Variations in the management of RVGE seen across study areas could be explained by differences in health care systems. Routine rotavirus vaccination of infants could significantly reduce the substantial burden of RVGE and would have major benefits for potential patients, their families, and health care providers.

  17. Clinical Pharmacology, Uses, and Adverse Reactions of Iodinated Contrast Agents: A Primer for the Non-radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Jeffrey J.; Williamson, Eric E.

    2012-01-01

    Iodinated contrast agents have been in use since the 1950s to facilitate radiographic imaging modalities. Physicians in almost all specialties will either administer these agents or care for patients who have received these drugs. Different iodinated contrast agents vary greatly in their properties, uses, and toxic effects. Therefore, clinicians should be at least superficially familiar with the clinical pharmacology, administration, risks, and adverse effects associated with iodinated contrast agents. This primer offers the non-radiologist physician the opportunity to gain insight into the use of this class of drugs. PMID:22469351

  18. A randomized clinical trial on the effects of remote intercessory prayer in the adverse outcomes of pregnancies.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Maria Inês; Silva, Fabio Rosa; Silva, Bruno Rosa; Costa, Luciana Carvalho; Bergamo, Angela Mendes; Silva, Napoleão Chiaramonte; Medeiros, Lidia Rosi de Freitas; Battisti, Iara Denise Endruweit; Azevedo, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    The scope of this article was to investigate whether intercessory prayer (IP) influences the adverse outcomes of pregnancies. A double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted with 564 pregnant women attending a prenatal public health care service. The women were randomly assigned to an IP group or to a control group (n = 289 per group). They were simultaneously and randomly assigned to practice prayer off-site or not. The following parameters were evaluated: Apgar scores, type of delivery and birth weight. The mean age of the women was 25.1 years of age (± 7.4), and the average gestational age was 23.4 weeks (± 8.1). The average number of years of schooling for the women was 8.1 years (± 3.1). The women in the IP and control groups presented a similar number of adverse medical events with non-significant p. No significant differences were detected in the frequency of adverse outcomes in pregnant women who practiced IP and those in the control group.

  19. Clinical review: kinase inhibitors: adverse effects related to the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B

    2013-04-01

    The use of kinase inhibitors (KIs) in the treatment of cancer has become increasingly common, and practitioners must be familiar with endocrine-related side effects associated with these agents. This review provides an update to the clinician regarding the management of potential endocrinological effects of KIs. PubMed was employed to identify relevant manuscripts. A review of the literature was conducted, and data were summarized and incorporated. KIs, including small molecule KIs and monoclonal antibodies directed against kinases, have emerged over the past decade as an important class of anticancer agents. KIs specifically interfere with signaling pathways that are dysregulated in certain types of cancers and also target common mechanisms of growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Currently, at least 20 KIs are approved as cancer therapeutics. However, KIs may affect a broad spectrum of targets and may have additional, unidentified mechanisms of action at the cellular level due to overlap between signaling pathways in the tumor cell and endocrine system. Recent reports in the literature have identified side effects associated with KIs, including alterations in thyroid function, bone metabolism, linear growth, gonadal function, fetal development, adrenal function, and glucose metabolism. Clinicians need to monitor the thyroid functions of patients on KIs. In addition, bone density and vitamin D status should be assessed. Special care should be taken to follow linear growth and development in children taking these agents. Clinicians should counsel patients appropriately on the potential adverse effects of KIs on fetal development.

  20. Association of Chorioamnionitis with Aberrant Neonatal Gut Colonization and Adverse Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Schibler, Kurt R.; Morrow, Ardythe L.; Kallapur, Suhas G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chorioamnionitis (inflammation of the placenta and fetal membranes) and abnormal gastrointestinal colonization have been associated with an increased risk of sepsis and death in preterm infants, but whether chorioamnionitis causes abnormal pioneering gastrointestinal colonization in infants is not known. We determined the relationship between chorioamnionitis, altered infant fecal microbiome indicating abnormal gastrointestinal colonization, and adverse outcomes. Study Design Preterm infants ≤ 28 weeks at birth were enrolled from 3 level III NICUs in Cincinnati, Ohio and Birmingham, Alabama. Sequencing for 16S microbial gene was performed on stool samples in the first 3 weeks of life. Chorioamnionitis was diagnosed by placental histology. Late onset sepsis and death outcomes were analyzed in relation to fecal microbiota and chorioamnionitis with or without funisitis (inflammation of the umbilical cord). Results Of the 106 enrolled infants, 48 infants had no chorioamnionitis, 32 infants had chorioamnionitis but no funisitis (AC), and 26 infants had chorioamnionitis with funisitis (ACF). The fecal samples from ACF infants collected by day of life 7 had higher relative abundance of family Mycoplasmataceae (phylum Tenericutes), genus Prevotella (phylum Bacteroidetes) and genus Sneathia (phylum Fusobacteria). Further, AC and ACF infants had higher incidence of late-onset sepsis/death as a combined outcome. Presence of specific clades in fecal samples, specifically, order Fusobacteria, genus Sneathia or family Mycoplasmataceae, were significantly associated with higher risk of sepsis or death. Conclusion The results support the hypothesis that specific alterations in the pioneering infant gastrointestinal microbiota induced by chorioamnionitis predispose to neonatal sepsis or death. PMID:27658190

  1. Clinical coding of prospectively identified paediatric adverse drug reactions--a retrospective review of patient records.

    PubMed

    Bellis, Jennifer R; Kirkham, Jamie J; Nunn, Anthony J; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2014-12-17

    National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the UK use a system of coding for patient episodes. The coding system used is the International Classification of Disease (ICD-10). There are ICD-10 codes which may be associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and there is a possibility of using these codes for ADR surveillance. This study aimed to determine whether ADRs prospectively identified in children admitted to a paediatric hospital were coded appropriately using ICD-10. The electronic admission abstract for each patient with at least one ADR was reviewed. A record was made of whether the ADR(s) had been coded using ICD-10. Of 241 ADRs, 76 (31.5%) were coded using at least one ICD-10 ADR code. Of the oncology ADRs, 70/115 (61%) were coded using an ICD-10 ADR code compared with 6/126 (4.8%) non-oncology ADRs (difference in proportions 56%, 95% CI 46.2% to 65.8%; p < 0.001). The majority of ADRs detected in a prospective study at a paediatric centre would not have been identified if the study had relied on ICD-10 codes as a single means of detection. Data derived from administrative healthcare databases are not reliable for identifying ADRs by themselves, but may complement other methods of detection.

  2. Adverse Reactions to Foods and Food Allergy: Development and Reproducibility of a Questionnaire for Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lyra, Nilza R. S.; Motta, Maria E. F. A.; Rocha, Luiz A. R.; Solé, Dirceu; Peixoto, Décio M.; Rizzo, José A.; Taborda-Barata, Luis; Sarinho, Emanuel S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To develop a questionnaire as a screening tool for adverse reactions to foods in children and to assess the technical reproducibility by test-retest. Methods. Reproducibility of the questionnaire was performed by the literature review, preparing the preliminary questionnaire, peer review, pretest, and retest analysis. The study of the test-retest reproducibility was cross-sectional and descriptive. Kappa coefficient was used to study the reproducibility of the questionnaire. The sample consisted of 125 2–4 year-old children from 15 daycare centers in Recife, Brazil, and interviews with parents or caregivers were used to collect data. Results. From the total children, sixty-three were boys (50.4%), forty-six were two years old (36.8%), forty-seven were three years old (37.6%), and thirty-two were four years old (25.6%). Forty caregivers reported that their child had health problems with food. Most frequently reported offending foods were milk, peanuts, shrimp, and chocolate. Nine questions showed a good Kappa index (≥0,6). Conclusions. The questionnaire used needs to be resized and reshaped on the basis of the issues with good internal consistency and reproducibility. The use of a validated and reproducible questionnaire in the children represents an important contribution towards assessing an eventual rise in overt food allergy. PMID:24198840

  3. Cost and clinical consequences of smoking cessation in outpatients after cardiovascular disease: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Díaz-Cerezo, Silvia; de Burgoa, Verónica Sanz; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This cohort retrospective study explored the cost and clinical consequences of smoking cessation in outpatients after cardiovascular events (CVEs), in Spain. A total of 2,540 patients (68.1 years; 60.7% male; 8.4% smokers, 52.9% ex-smokers, and 38.7% never smokers) fulfilling the selection criteria and followed up throughout a period of 36 months after the event were considered eligible for analysis. Total costs were higher among current smokers in comparison with ex-smokers and never smokers (€7,981 versus [vs] €7,322 and €5,619, respectively) (P < 0.001). Both health care costs (€6,273 vs €5,673 and €4,823, respectively) (P < 001) and loss of productivity at work costs (€1,708 vs €1,650 and €796, respectively) (P < 001) accounted for such differences. There was also a difference in CVE recurrence rates (18.6% vs 16.5% and 9.6%, respectively) (P < 01). Smoking cessation in CVE outpatients was associated with lower cost and risk of CVE recurrence compared with smokers, and their health status was similar to that of never smokers, in routine clinical practice in Spain. PMID:23983479

  4. Molecular outcomes, clinical consequences, and genetic diagnosis of Oculocutaneous Albinism in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Mohsin; Yousaf, Sairah; Waryah, Yar M.; Gul, Hadia; Kausar, Tasleem; Tariq, Nabeela; Mahmood, Umair; Ali, Muhammad; Khan, Muzammil A.; Waryah, Ali M.; Shaikh, Rehan S.; Riazuddin, Saima; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Marchani Blue, Elizabeth; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McGee, Sean; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Ragan, Seamus; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shankar, Aditi; Slattery, Krystal; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Wright, Amber; Yi, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Nonsyndromic oculocutaneous Albinism (nsOCA) is clinically characterized by the loss of pigmentation in the skin, hair, and iris. OCA is amongst the most common causes of vision impairment in children. To date, pathogenic variants in six genes have been identified in individuals with nsOCA. Here, we determined the identities, frequencies, and clinical consequences of OCA alleles in 94 previously unreported Pakistani families. Combination of Sanger and Exome sequencing revealed 38 alleles, including 22 novel variants, segregating with nsOCA phenotype in 80 families. Variants of TYR and OCA2 genes were the most common cause of nsOCA, occurring in 43 and 30 families, respectively. Twenty-two novel variants include nine missense, four splice site, two non-sense, one insertion and six gross deletions. In vitro studies revealed retention of OCA proteins harboring novel missense alleles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of transfected cells. Exon-trapping assays with constructs containing splice site alleles revealed errors in splicing. As eight alleles account for approximately 56% (95% CI: 46.52–65.24%) of nsOCA cases, primarily enrolled from Punjab province of Pakistan, hierarchical strategies for variant detection would be feasible and cost-efficient genetic tests for OCA in families with similar origin. Thus, we developed Tetra-primer ARMS assays for rapid, reliable, reproducible and economical screening of most of these common alleles. PMID:28266639

  5. Cost and clinical consequences of smoking cessation in outpatients after cardiovascular disease: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Díaz-Cerezo, Silvia; de Burgoa, Verónica Sanz; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This cohort retrospective study explored the cost and clinical consequences of smoking cessation in outpatients after cardiovascular events (CVEs), in Spain. A total of 2,540 patients (68.1 years; 60.7% male; 8.4% smokers, 52.9% ex-smokers, and 38.7% never smokers) fulfilling the selection criteria and followed up throughout a period of 36 months after the event were considered eligible for analysis. Total costs were higher among current smokers in comparison with ex-smokers and never smokers (€7,981 versus [vs] €7,322 and €5,619, respectively) (P < 0.001). Both health care costs (€6,273 vs €5,673 and €4,823, respectively) (P < 001) and loss of productivity at work costs (€1,708 vs €1,650 and €796, respectively) (P < 001) accounted for such differences. There was also a difference in CVE recurrence rates (18.6% vs 16.5% and 9.6%, respectively) (P < 01). Smoking cessation in CVE outpatients was associated with lower cost and risk of CVE recurrence compared with smokers, and their health status was similar to that of never smokers, in routine clinical practice in Spain.

  6. Lost in Translation: The Unintended Consequences of Advance Directive Law on Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Lesley S.; Williams, Brie A.; Hooper, Sarah M.; Sabatino, Charles P.; Weithorn, Lois A.; Sudore, Rebecca L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Advance directive law may compromise the clinical effectiveness of advance directives. Purpose To identify unintended legal consequences of advance directive law that may prevent patients from communicating end-of-life preferences. Data Sources Advance directive legal statutes for all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia and English-language searches of LexisNexis, Westlaw, and MEDLINE from 1966 to August 2010. Study Selection Two independent reviewers selected 51 advance directive statutes and 20 articles. Three independent legal reviewers selected 105 legal proceedings. Data Extraction Two reviewers independently assessed data sources and used critical content analysis to determine legal barriers to the clinical effectiveness of advance directives. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Data Synthesis Legal and content-related barriers included poor readability (that is, laws in all states were written above a 12th-grade reading level), health care agent or surrogate restrictions (for example, 40 states did not include same-sex or domestic partners as default surrogates), and execution requirements needed to make forms legally valid (for example, 35 states did not allow oral advance directives, and 48 states required witness signatures, a notary public, or both). Vulnerable populations most likely to be affected by these barriers included patients with limited literacy, limited English proficiency, or both who cannot read or execute advance directives; same-sex or domestic partners who may be without legally valid and trusted surrogates; and unbefriended, institutionalized, or homeless patients who may be without witnesses and suitable surrogates. Limitation Only appellate-level legal cases were available, which may have excluded relevant cases. Conclusion Unintended negative consequences of advance directive legal restrictions may prevent all patients, and particularly vulnerable patients, from making and communicating their end

  7. Adverse effects of intralesional meglumine antimoniate and its influence on clinical laboratory parameters in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Esfandiarpour, Iraj; Farajzadeh, Saeedeh; Rahnama, Zahra; Fathabadi, Elahe Arabpoor; Heshmatkhah, Amireh

    2012-10-01

    Intralesional injection of pentavalent antimoniate is recommended by the World Health Organization for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). This study aimed to evaluate the adverse effects of intralesional injection of meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime(®) ) and its influence on clinical laboratory parameters. A total of 105 patients with suspected lesions and therapeutic features of CL diagnosed by direct smear or skin biopsy were included in this study. Intralesional injection of Glucantime(®) was administered to treat CL. Fifty-five of the 105 patients were checked for hematological features, liver and kidney function, and fasting blood sugar levels before and after treatment. The observed side effects included pain (89.5%), burning sensation (81.9%), erythema (45.7%), pruritus (28.6%), secondary infection (17.1%), nausea (11.4%), vomiting (7.6%), urticaria (5.7%), necrosis (2.9%), sporotrichoid lesions (2.9%), dizziness (1.9%), dyspnea (1.9%), and anaphylactic shock (0.9%). No statistically significant differences were found in occurrences of adverse effects according to the part of the body affected, patient sex or age group, except for pruritus, which appeared more frequently in extremities than in other parts of the body (P < 0.001), and secondary infection, which was observed more frequently in people aged >45 years (P < 0.042). All clinical parameters remained normal after treatment. The occurrence of severe adverse reactions, particularly of anaphylactic shock, should be considered before treatment with Glucantime(®) is initiated. Thus, it is important that intralesional Glucantime(®) injections are administered in centers that are well equipped with appropriate resuscitation and support apparatus. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  8. An evidence-based laparoscopic simulation curriculum shortens the clinical learning curve and reduces surgical adverse events.

    PubMed

    De Win, Gunter; Van Bruwaene, Siska; Kulkarni, Jyotsna; Van Calster, Ben; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Allen, Christopher; Lissens, Ann; De Ridder, Dirk; Miserez, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Surgical simulation is becoming increasingly important in surgical education. However, the method of simulation to be incorporated into a surgical curriculum is unclear. We compared the effectiveness of a proficiency-based preclinical simulation training in laparoscopy with conventional surgical training and conventional surgical training interspersed with standard simulation sessions. In this prospective single-blinded trial, 30 final-year medical students were randomized into three groups, which differed in the way they were exposed to laparoscopic simulation training. The control group received only clinical training during residency, whereas the interval group received clinical training in combination with simulation training. The Center for Surgical Technologies Preclinical Training Program (CST PTP) group received a proficiency-based preclinical simulation course during the final year of medical school but was not exposed to any extra simulation training during surgical residency. After 6 months of surgical residency, the influence on the learning curve while performing five consecutive human laparoscopic cholecystectomies was evaluated with motion tracking, time, Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills, and number of adverse events (perforation of gall bladder, bleeding, and damage to liver tissue). The odds of adverse events were 4.5 (95% confidence interval 1.3-15.3) and 3.9 (95% confidence interval 1.5-9.7) times lower for the CST PTP group compared with the control and interval groups. For raw time, corrected time, movements, path length, and Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills, the CST PTP trainees nearly always started at a better level and were never outperformed by the other trainees. Proficiency-based preclinical training has a positive impact on the learning curve of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy and diminishes adverse events.

  9. An evidence-based laparoscopic simulation curriculum shortens the clinical learning curve and reduces surgical adverse events

    PubMed Central

    De Win, Gunter; Van Bruwaene, Siska; Kulkarni, Jyotsna; Van Calster, Ben; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Allen, Christopher; Lissens, Ann; De Ridder, Dirk; Miserez, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical simulation is becoming increasingly important in surgical education. However, the method of simulation to be incorporated into a surgical curriculum is unclear. We compared the effectiveness of a proficiency-based preclinical simulation training in laparoscopy with conventional surgical training and conventional surgical training interspersed with standard simulation sessions. Materials and methods In this prospective single-blinded trial, 30 final-year medical students were randomized into three groups, which differed in the way they were exposed to laparoscopic simulation training. The control group received only clinical training during residency, whereas the interval group received clinical training in combination with simulation training. The Center for Surgical Technologies Preclinical Training Program (CST PTP) group received a proficiency-based preclinical simulation course during the final year of medical school but was not exposed to any extra simulation training during surgical residency. After 6 months of surgical residency, the influence on the learning curve while performing five consecutive human laparoscopic cholecystectomies was evaluated with motion tracking, time, Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills, and number of adverse events (perforation of gall bladder, bleeding, and damage to liver tissue). Results The odds of adverse events were 4.5 (95% confidence interval 1.3–15.3) and 3.9 (95% confidence interval 1.5–9.7) times lower for the CST PTP group compared with the control and interval groups. For raw time, corrected time, movements, path length, and Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills, the CST PTP trainees nearly always started at a better level and were never outperformed by the other trainees. Conclusion Proficiency-based preclinical training has a positive impact on the learning curve of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy and diminishes adverse events. PMID:27512343

  10. Associations between adverse childhood experiences and clinical characteristics of eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Guillaume, S.; Jaussent, I.; Maimoun, L.; Ryst, A.; Seneque, M.; Villain, L.; Hamroun, D.; Lefebvre, P.; Renard, E.; Courtet, Ph.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with eating disorders (EDs) frequently report a history of childhood trauma (CT). We investigated whether certain subtypes of CT are associated with more severe features of EDs, independently of psychiatric comorbidity, and whether they act additively. One hundred and ninety-two patients with DSM-V-defined EDs were consecutively recruited. Five clinical characteristics were assessed: restraint, eating, shape and weight concerns on the EDE-Q, and daily functioning. CT was assessed by the childhood traumatism questionnaire. The clinical features were associated with at least one CT subtype (emotional, sexual or physical abuse, emotional neglect). Multivariate analyses adjusted for lifetime comorbid psychiatric disorders revealed that emotional abuse independently predicted higher eating, shape and weight concerns and lower daily functioning, whereas sexual and physical abuse independently predicted higher eating concern. A dose-effect relationship characterised the number of CT subtypes and the severity of the clinical features, suggesting a consistent and partly independent association between CT and more severe clinical and functional characteristics in EDs. Emotional abuse seems to have the most specific impact on ED symptoms. Last, not all CT subtypes have the same impact but they do act additively. PMID:27804994

  11. Adverse event assessment, analysis, and reporting in recent published analgesic clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon M; Wang, Anthony T; Katz, Nathaniel P; McDermott, Michael P; Burke, Laurie B; Coplan, Paul; Gilron, Ian; Hertz, Sharon H; Lin, Allison H; Rappaport, Bob A; Rowbotham, Michael C; Sampaio, Cristina; Sweeney, Michael; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    The development of valid and informative treatment risk-benefit profiles requires consistent and thorough information about adverse event (AE) assessment and participants' AEs during randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Despite a 2004 extension of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement recommending the specific AE information that investigators should report, there is little evidence that analgesic RCTs adequately adhere to these recommendations. This systematic review builds on prior recommendations by describing a comprehensive checklist for AE reporting developed to capture clinically important AE information. Using this checklist, we coded AE assessment methods and reporting in all 80 double-blind RCTs of noninvasive pharmacologic treatments published in the European Journal of Pain, Journal of Pain, and PAIN® from 2006 to 2011. Across all trials, reports of AEs were frequently incomplete, inconsistent across trials, and, in some cases, missing. For example, >40% of trials failed to report any information on serious adverse events. Trials of participants with acute or chronic pain conditions and industry-sponsored trials typically provided more and better-quality AE data than trials involving pain-free volunteers or trials that were not industry sponsored. The results of this review suggest that improved AE reporting is needed in analgesic RCTs. We developed an ACTTION (Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks) AE reporting checklist that is intended to assist investigators in thoroughly and consistently capturing and reporting these critically important data in publications.

  12. Unintended clinical consequences of the implementation of a checklist-based, low-dose oxytocin protocol.

    PubMed

    Rohn, Amanda E; Bastek, Jamie A; Sammel, Mary D; Wang, Eileen; Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2015-03-01

    Standardized oxytocin protocols have been used to improve the safety and quality of obstetric care. We examined rates of chorioamnionitis and labor dystocia requiring cesarean delivery as unintended consequences of the implementation of a low-dose, checklist-based oxytocin protocol. We performed a retrospective cohort study of live singleton deliveries that underwent a trial of labor in two 15-month periods, comparing outcomes in those who delivered before to after protocol implementation. Patients and outcomes were identified using a combination of electronic medical records and International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Time trend analysis was performed to evaluate for secular trends. A total of 8,717 women were included; 5,077 received oxytocin. Despite an unchanged rate of cesarean deliveries from before to after initiation of the protocol (15.15 vs. 14.75%, p = 0.60), deliveries after protocol implementation were generally characterized by higher rates of chorioamnionitis (7.48 vs. 5.97%, p < 0.001), longer median time from admission to delivery (524 vs. 462 minutes, p < 0.001), more cesarean deliveries performed for labor dystocia (50.62 vs. 40.92%, p < 0.001), and fewer cesarean deliveries performed for fetal distress (32.52 vs. 38.67%, p = 0.02). Low-dose oxytocin protocols are intended to increase safety, but they may have unintended consequences related to prolonged labor, and should be studied before widespread use. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Overview of the Clinical Consult Case Review of adverse events following immunization: Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) network 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Williams, S Elizabeth; Klein, Nicola P; Halsey, Neal; Dekker, Cornelia L; Baxter, Roger P; Marchant, Colin D; LaRussa, Philip S; Sparks, Robert C; Tokars, Jerome I; Pahud, Barbara A; Aukes, Laurie; Jakob, Kathleen; Coronel, Silvia; Choi, Howard; Slade, Barbara A; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2011-09-16

    In 2004 the Clinical Consult Case Review (CCCR) working group was formed within the CDC-funded Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) Network to review individual cases of adverse events following immunizations (AEFI). Cases were referred by practitioners, health departments, or CDC employees. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) searches and literature reviews for similar cases were performed prior to review. After CCCR discussion, AEFI were assessed for a causal relationship with vaccination and recommendations regarding future immunizations were relayed back to the referring physicians. In 2010, surveys were sent to referring physicians to determine the utility and effectiveness of the CCCR service. CISA investigators reviewed 76 cases during 68 conference calls between April 2004 and December 2009. Almost half of the cases (35/76) were neurological in nature. Similar AEFI for the specific vaccines received were discovered for 63 cases through VAERS searches and for 38 cases through PubMed searches. Causality assessment using the modified WHO criteria resulted in classifying 3 cases as definitely related to vaccine administration, 12 as probably related, 16 as possibly related, 18 as unlikely related, 10 as unrelated, and 17 had insufficient information to assign causality. The physician satisfaction survey was returned by 30 (57.7%) of those surveyed and a majority of respondents (93.3%) felt that the CCCR service was useful. The CCCR provides advice about AEFI to practitioners, assigns potential causality, and contributes to an improved understanding of adverse health events following immunizations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutropenia as an Adverse Event following Vaccination: Results from Randomized Clinical Trials in Healthy Adults and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Muturi-Kioi, Vincent; Lewis, David; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Anemona, Alessandra; Loulergue, Pierre; Bodinham, Caroline L.; Aerssens, Annelies; Groth, Nicola; Saul, Allan; Podda, Audino

    2016-01-01

    Background In the context of early vaccine trials aimed at evaluating the safety profile of novel vaccines, abnormal haematological values, such as neutropenia, are often reported. It is therefore important to evaluate how these trials should be planned not to miss potentially important safety signals, but also to understand the implications and the clinical relevance. Methodology We report and discuss the results from five clinical trials (two with a new Shigella vaccine in the early stage of clinical development and three with licensed vaccines) where the absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) were evaluated before and after vaccination. Additionally, we have performed a systematic review of the literature on cases of neutropenia reported during vaccine trials to discuss our results in a more general context. Principal Findings Both in our clinical trials and in the literature review, several cases of neutropenia have been reported, in the first two weeks after vaccination. However, neutropenia was generally transient and had a benign clinical outcome, after vaccination with either multiple novel candidates or well-known licensed vaccines. Additionally, the vaccine recipients with neutropenia frequently had lower baseline ANC than non-neutropenic vaccinees. In many instances neutropenia occurred in subjects of African descent, known to have lower ANC compared to western populations. Conclusions It is important to include ANC and other haematological tests in early vaccine trials to identify potential safety signals. Post-vaccination neutropenia is not uncommon, generally transient and clinically benign, but many vaccine trials do not have a sampling schedule that allows its detection. Given ethnic variability in the level of circulating neutrophils, normal ranges taking into account ethnicity should be used for determination of trial inclusion/exclusion criteria and classification of neutropenia related adverse events. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02017899

  15. Neutropenia as an Adverse Event following Vaccination: Results from Randomized Clinical Trials in Healthy Adults and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Muturi-Kioi, Vincent; Lewis, David; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Anemona, Alessandra; Loulergue, Pierre; Bodinham, Caroline L; Aerssens, Annelies; Groth, Nicola; Saul, Allan; Podda, Audino

    2016-01-01

    In the context of early vaccine trials aimed at evaluating the safety profile of novel vaccines, abnormal haematological values, such as neutropenia, are often reported. It is therefore important to evaluate how these trials should be planned not to miss potentially important safety signals, but also to understand the implications and the clinical relevance. We report and discuss the results from five clinical trials (two with a new Shigella vaccine in the early stage of clinical development and three with licensed vaccines) where the absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) were evaluated before and after vaccination. Additionally, we have performed a systematic review of the literature on cases of neutropenia reported during vaccine trials to discuss our results in a more general context. Both in our clinical trials and in the literature review, several cases of neutropenia have been reported, in the first two weeks after vaccination. However, neutropenia was generally transient and had a benign clinical outcome, after vaccination with either multiple novel candidates or well-known licensed vaccines. Additionally, the vaccine recipients with neutropenia frequently had lower baseline ANC than non-neutropenic vaccinees. In many instances neutropenia occurred in subjects of African descent, known to have lower ANC compared to western populations. It is important to include ANC and other haematological tests in early vaccine trials to identify potential safety signals. Post-vaccination neutropenia is not uncommon, generally transient and clinically benign, but many vaccine trials do not have a sampling schedule that allows its detection. Given ethnic variability in the level of circulating neutrophils, normal ranges taking into account ethnicity should be used for determination of trial inclusion/exclusion criteria and classification of neutropenia related adverse events. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02017899, NCT02034500, NCT01771367, NCT01765413, NCT02523287.

  16. How and when does fabrication damage adversely affect the clinical performance of ceramic restorations?

    PubMed

    Denry, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    As compared to factory-processed ceramic parts, one unique trait of all-ceramic dental restorations is that they are custom-fabricated, which implies a greater susceptibility to fabrication defects. A variety of processing techniques is now available for the custom fabrication of all-ceramic single and multi-unit restorations, these include sintering, heat-pressing, slip-casting, hard machining and soft machining, all in combination with a final staining or veneering step. All these fabrication techniques, from shaping to firing, are associated with the production of flaws of various shapes and sizes, in conjunction with thermal residual stresses, all of which are capable of inducing failure. This review will examine the various types of fabrication damage inherent to each technique and attempt to establish a relationship between fabrication defects and clinical performance of all-ceramic dental restorations with particular attention to their longevity in vivo. Failure mechanisms in dental ceramics can be very complex and often involve the combination of physical factors, to which are added patient and clinician-related variables such as restoration design and in vivo conditions. Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the failure mechanisms of all-ceramic dental restorations over the past thirty years. It remains that there is still a need for laboratory tests that usefully simulate clinical conditions. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical and Economic Consequences of Early Cancer After Kidney Transplantation in Contemporary Practice.

    PubMed

    Dharnidharka, Vikas R; Naik, Abhijit S; Axelrod, David; Schnitzler, Mark A; Xiao, Huiling; Brennan, Daniel C; Segev, Dorry L; Randall, Henry; Chen, Jiajing; Kasiske, Bertram; Lentine, Krista L

    2017-04-01

    Current clinical and economic consequences of cancer after kidney transplantation are incompletely defined. We examined United States Renal Data System records of Medicare-insured kidney transplant recipients in 2000 to 2011 to determine clinical and economic impacts of cancer diagnosed within the first 3 years posttransplantation. Cancer diagnoses were identified using Medicare billing codes and categorized as nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), viral-linked and "other" cancers. Associations of cancers with mortality and graft loss were estimated by time-varying Cox regression. Impacts of cancer diagnoses on inpatient and outpatient costs within each year were quantified by multivariate linear regression modeling. Among 67 157 recipients, by 3 years posttransplant, NMSC was diagnosed in 5.7%, viral-linked cancer in 1.9%, and "other" cancers in 6.3%. Viral-linked cancer was associated with more than 3-fold increased risk in subsequent mortality until the third transplant anniversary, and nearly twice the mortality risk after year 3. "Other" cancers had similar associations with death and graft loss, whereas NMSC was associated with 33% higher mortality beyond the third year posttransplant. Viral-linked cancer had the largest inpatient and outpatient cost impacts per case, followed by "other" cancer, whereas NMSC impacted only outpatient costs. Care of new cancer diagnoses was generally more costly than care of previously established diagnoses. Cancer accounted for 3% to 5.5% of total inpatient Medicare expenditures and 1.5% to 3.3% of outpatient expenditures in the first 3 years posttransplant. Early posttransplant malignancy is an expensive and morbid condition that warrants attention in efforts to improve pretransplant screening and management protocols before and after transplant.

  18. European Survey on Adverse Systemic Reactions in Allergen Immunotherapy (EASSI): a real-life clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Calderón, M A; Vidal, C; Rodríguez Del Río, P; Just, J; Pfaar, O; Tabar, A I; Sánchez-Machín, I; Bubel, P; Borja, J; Eberle, P; Reiber, R; Bouvier, M; Lepelliez, A; Klimek, L; Demoly, P

    2017-03-01

    Outside clinical trials, data on systemic reactions (SRs) due to allergen immunotherapy (AIT) are scarce. A prospective, longitudinal, web-based survey of 'real-life' respiratory allergen immunotherapy (AIT) clinical practice was conducted in France, Germany and Spain. SRs were recorded and coded according to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) and risk factors associated with SRs were identified. A total of 4316 patients (corresponding to 4363 ongoing courses of AIT) were included. A total of 109 SRs were recorded, and 90 patients (2.1%) presented at least one SR. Most of the SRs occurred in subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) (89%, n = 97). The most frequently reported symptoms were urticaria, rhinitis, dyspnoea and cough. Respiratory symptoms appeared before skin symptoms. Most SRs occurred during the up-dosing phase (75.8%) and were mild in severity (71.6%). Intramuscular adrenaline was administered in 17 SRs, but only 65% of these were subsequently classified as anaphylaxis. Independent risk factors for SRs during SCIT were as follows: the use of natural extracts (odds ratio, OR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 2.74 [1.61-4.87], P = 0.001), the absence of symptomatic allergy medications (1.707 [1.008-2.892], P = 0.047), asthma diagnosis (1.74 [1.05-2.88], P = 0.03), sensitization to animal dander (1.93 [1.21-3.09], P = 0.006) or pollen (1.16 [1.03-1.30], P = 0.012) and cluster regimens (vs rush) (4.18 [1.21-14.37], P = 0.023). A previous episode of anaphylaxis increased the risk for anaphylaxis in SCIT (OR [95% CI] = 17.35 [1.91-157.28], P = 0.01). AIT for respiratory allergy is safe, with a low number of SRs observed in real-life clinical practice. A personalized analysis of risk factors could be used to minimize SRs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Prevalence, predictors, and clinical consequences of medical adherence in IBD: how to improve it?

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-09-14

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic diseases with a relapsing-remitting disease course necessitating lifelong treatment. However, non-adherence has been reported in over 40% of patients, especially those in remission taking maintenance therapies for IBD. The economical impact of non-adherence to medical therapy including absenteeism, hospitalization risk, and the health care costs in chronic conditions, is enormous. The causes of medication non-adherence are complex, where the patient-doctor relationship, treatment regimen, and other disease-related factors play key roles. Moreover, subjective assessment might underestimate adherence. Poor adherence may result in more frequent relapses, a disabling disease course, in ulcerative colitis, and an increased risk for colorectal cancer. Improving medication adherence in patients is an important challenge for physicians. Understanding the different patient types, the reasons given by patients for non-adherence, simpler and more convenient dosage regimens, dynamic communication within the health care team, a self-management package incorporating enhanced patient education and physician-patient interaction, and identifying the predictors of non-adherence will help devise suitable plans to optimize patient adherence. This editorial summarizes the available literature on frequency, predictors, clinical consequences, and strategies for improving medical adherence in patients with IBD.

  20. Clinical consequences of urea cycle enzyme deficiencies and potential links to arginine and nitric oxide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kleppe, Soledad; Marini, Juan; Carter, Susan; Garlick, Peter; Jahoor, Farook; O'Brien, William; Lee, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are human conditions caused by the dysregulation of nitrogen transfer from ammonia nitrogen into urea. The biochemistry and the genetics of these disorders were well elucidated. Earlier diagnosis and improved treatments led to an emerging, longer-lived cohort of patients. The natural history of some of these disorders began to point to pathophysiological processes that may be unrelated to the primary cause of acute morbidity and mortality, i.e., hyperammonemia. Carbamyl phosphate synthetase I single nucleotide polymorphisms may be associated with altered vascular resistance that becomes clinically relevant when specific environmental stressors are present. Patients with argininosuccinic aciduria due to a deficiency of argininosuccinic acid lyase are uniquely prone to chronic hepatitis, potentially leading to cirrhosis. Moreover, our recent observations suggest that there may be an increased prevalence of essential hypertension. In contrast, hyperargininemia found in patients with arginase 1 deficiency is associated with pyramidal tract findings and spasticity, without significant hyperammonemia. An intriguing potential pathophysiological link is the dysregulation of intracellular arginine availability and its potential effect on nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. By combining detailed natural history studies with the development of tissue-specific null mouse models for urea cycle enzymes and measurement of nitrogen flux through the cycle to urea and NO in UCD patients, we may begin to dissect the contribution of different sources of arginine to NO production and the consequences on both rare genetic and common multifactorial diseases.

  1. Symptoms, diagnoses, and sporting consequences among athletes referred to a Danish sports cardiology clinic.

    PubMed

    Kaiser-Nielsen, L V; Tischer, S G; Prescott, E B; Rasmusen, H K

    2017-01-01

    As the number of recreational athletes performing exercise and participating in competitions at a high-level increases, exercise-induced cardiac symptoms may become a more common problem, not least because recreational athletes often continue high-level exercise programs into advanced ages. We investigated the prevalence of cardiac symptoms and diagnoses among 201 athletes referred for cardiac evaluation at a Sports Cardiology Clinic in Denmark. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic study of athletes referred for suspected cardiac disease. The athletes were all well-trained recreational to elite athletes who participated in various sports with different training loads and a wide age span (13-66 years). All patients were referred by physicians, primarily their general practitioner (38%), and palpitations were the most common cardiac symptom (40%). Cardiac symptoms had a sensitivity of 86% in detecting cardiac disease and a specificity of 13%. Cardiac disease was diagnosed in 44% of the patients, and atrial fibrillation was the most prevalent diagnosis (7.5%). Cardiac diseases with therapeutic- or sports-related consequences for the patients were diagnosed in 28% of the population, but only 1% received a recommendation to avoid high-level sports indefinitely. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Comparison of adverse events with daily disposable hydrogels and spectacle wear: results from a 12-month prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sankaridurg, Padmaja R; Sweeney, Deborah F; Holden, Brien A; Naduvilath, Thomas; Velala, Indira; Gora, Rashmi; Krishnamachary, Murali; Rao, Gullapalli N

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the type and incidence of adverse events seen with daily disposable hydrogel contact lens wear compared with a control (spectacle) group over 12 months. Prospective, randomized, observer-masked, comparative clinical trial. Two hundred eighty-one myopes with no prior contact lens wear experience were enrolled from August to December 1996. Subjects were 16 to 35 years old and had refractive errors ranging from a -0.75-diopter (D) sphere to a -6.00-D sphere with a cylinder less than -1.00 D. Each subject was randomly assigned to wear either bilateral disposable hydrogels on a daily disposable wear schedule or spectacles. Type and incidence of adverse events from each group. Adverse events were categorized as serious, significant, and nonsignificant based on the potential to cause vision impairment, severity at event, and level of clinical concern. At baseline, 1.6% of eyes had asymptomatic infiltrates that were nonsignificant. During the study, asymptomatic infiltrates were seen in both contact lens and spectacle groups at 20.5 events versus 11.3 events per 100 eyes per year of wear. No significant events were seen with the spectacle group. With the contact lens group, the type and incidence of significant events per 100 eyes per year of lens wear were corneal peripheral ulcer, 2.5 events; infiltrative keratitis, 1.5 events; and papillary conjunctivitis, 1 event. The incidence of both significant and nonsignificant events was greater with the contact lens group (P<0.05). No serious events (i.e., microbial keratitis) were seen in either group. A greater number of subjects were lost to follow-up or permanently discontinued from the contact lens group relative to the spectacle group (33% vs. 17%, P = 0.002). Lens-related problems such as dryness, discomfort, and difficulty with insertion and removal accounted for 27% of discontinuations from the contact lens group. Poor compliance (40%) was the greatest reason for discontinuations from the spectacle group. No

  3. The relationship between drinking games and intentions to continue drinking, intentions to drive after drinking, and adverse consequences: results of a field study.

    PubMed

    Clapp, John D; Reed, Mark B; Ruderman, Danielle E

    2014-09-01

    Drinking games have become a nearly universal aspect of excessive drinking on university campuses with 50-62% of college students reporting playing drinking games in the past month. Participation in drinking games has been correlated with numerous negative consequences and increased consumption of alcohol. The present study addresses the influence of drinking games on three drinking-related outcomes: problems experienced the night of the drinking event, the intent to keep drinking, and the intent to drive after drinking. The data collected for the present study were part of a study testing environmental influences of drinking behaviors of young adults. A total of 226 randomly selected parties (representing 1725 partygoers) were selected for study inclusion. Three multilevel logistic regression models tested the relationship between drinking games and the three drinking-related outcomes. Participants who reported playing drinking games were 1.58 times more likely to report continued drinking intentions than participants who did not play drinking games. If drinking games were observed at a party, participants were 2.38 times more likely to plan to drive while intoxicated. Additionally, participants who reported playing drinking games were 1.59 times more likely to report experiencing a drinking-related problem than participants who did not play drinking games. Drinking games have consequences beyond increasing the level of intoxication; they contribute to problematic behavior at individual and environmental levels. Preventing drinking games is warranted.

  4. Clinical Consequences of New Insights in the Pathophysiology of Disorders of Iron and Heme Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brittenham, Gary M.; Weiss, Günter; Brissot, Pierre; Lainé, Fabrice; Guillygomarc'h, Anne; Guyader, Dominique; Moirand, Romain; Deugnier, Yves

    2000-01-01

    This review examines the clinical consequences for the practicing hematologist of remarkable new insights into the pathophysiology of disorders of iron and heme metabolism. The familiar proteins of iron transport and storage-transferrin, transferrin receptor, and ferritin-have recently been joined by a host of newly identified proteins that play critical roles in the molecular management of iron homeostasis. These include the iron-regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and -2), HFE (the product of the HFE gene that is mutated in most patients with hereditary hemochromatosis), the divalent metal transporter (DMT1), transferrin receptor 2, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin, the "Stimulator of Fe Transport" (SFT), frataxin, ferroportin 1 and others. The growing appreciation of the roles of these newly identified proteins has fundamental implications for the clinical understanding and laboratory evaluation of iron metabolism and its alterations with iron deficiency, iron overload, infection, and inflammation. In Section I, Dr. Brittenham summarizes current concepts of body and cellular iron supply and storage and reviews new means of evaluating the full range of body iron stores including genetic testing for mutations in the HFE gene, measurement of serum ferritin iron, transferrin receptor, reticulocyte hemoglobin content and measurement of tissue iron by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic susceptometry using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) instrumentation. In Section II, Dr. Weiss discusses the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying alterations in iron metabolism due to chronic inflammatory disorders. The anemia of chronic disorders remains the most common form of anemia found in hospitalized patients. The network of interactions that link iron metabolism with cellular immune effector functions involving pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, acute phase proteins and oxidative stress is described, with an emphasis on

  5. Dermatologic toxicities to targeted cancer therapy: shared clinical and histologic adverse skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Curry, Jonathan L; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Kim, Kevin B; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Duvic, Madeleine; Tsai, Kenneth Y; Hong, David S; Prieto, Victor G

    2014-03-01

    Dermatologic toxicities (DT) to targeted cancer therapy may present as inflammatory dermatoses, keratoses, and as benign and malignant squamous proliferations. Published reports of DT with cancer therapy with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), tyrosine kinase (TK), MEK, PI3K, AKT, and BRAF inhibitors were reviewed. DT associated with targeted cancer therapy demonstrated similar reactions and may be grouped as (i) DT as cutaneous inflammation, and (ii) DT as cutaneous epithelial proliferation. EGFR inhibitor, cetuximab, and MEK inhibitors, selumetinib and trametinib, demonstrated papulopustular rash with a suppurative folliculitis in 83%, 93%, and 80% of the patients on therapy, respectively. Common DT with EGFR inhibitors erlotinib and tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib were hand-foot skin reactions in 30-60% of patients on therapy. PI3K inhibitor BKM-120 and AKT inhibitor MK2206 produced maculopapular eruptions seen as dermal hypersensitivity reaction on the skin biopsy. RAF inhibitors vemurafenib and sorafenib were associated with a variety of cutaneous epithelial proliferations (keratosis pilaris, seborrheic keratosis, verruca vulgaris, actinic keratosis, keratoacanthoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Various anticancer agents may target similar cellular compounds and/or cell signaling pathways thus share similar clinical and histologic features of DT. The knowledge of the overlap of DT with different types of targeted cancer therapy will assist in evaluation of cutaneous reactions. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  6. Architectural heterogeneity and cribriform pattern predict adverse clinical outcome for Gleason grade 4 prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fei; Yang, Ping; Wang, Chaofu; Wu, Shulin; Xiao, Yu; McDougal, W Scott; Young, Robert H; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2013-12-01

    Gleason grade 4 defines a group of prostatic adenocarcinomas with a variety of architectural patterns, including poorly formed glands, fused glands, and cribriform pattern. To address the relative contribution to clinical prognosis by these distinct patterns, the histology of 241 consecutive radical prostatectomy specimens with the highest Gleason grade of 4 was reviewed. The presence of poorly formed glands, fused glands, and cribriform pattern was recorded for each case, and the types of architectural patterns present were associated with patient outcome. In this population, prostatic adenocarcinomas demonstrated architectural heterogeneity, with 17% of cases exhibiting a single Gleason grade 4 pattern, and 41% of cases exhibiting all 3 morphologic patterns. Patients exhibiting all 3 architectural patterns had lower rates of biochemical disease-free survival (66% vs. 76% at 5 y; log rank P=0.006). Twenty-two of 165 patients (13.3%) with cribriform pattern adenocarcinoma developed metastasis, whereas 2 of 76 patients (2.6%) without cribriform pattern developed metastasis at a median postoperative follow-up of 10.0 years. The presence of a cribriform pattern was an independent predictor for biochemical recurrence (hazard ratio 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-4.32; P=0.003) as well as metastasis after radical prostatectomy (hazard ratio 5.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-24.5; P=0.02). These results suggest that the morphologic subclassification of distinct Gleason grade 4 architectural patterns provides prognostic information beyond the current Gleason classification system.

  7. Skeletal adverse effects with aromatase inhibitors in early breast cancer: evidence to date and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Servitja, Sonia; Martos, Tamara; Rodriguez Sanz, Maria; Garcia-Giralt, Natalia; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Garrigos, Laia; Nogues, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are routinely used in the adjuvant treatment of women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer. Patients who receive AIs have an increased risk of bone loss and arthralgia compared with those treated with tamoxifen. In addition to the effects of AIs, the population of women with early breast cancer has a high prevalence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) insufficiency. In our experience 88% of patients had concentrations lower than 30 ng/ml. Vitamin D supplementation should be adapted to the baseline concentration. Another relevant finding in our research program was the close relationship between 25(OH)D levels and intensity of AI-related arthralgia (AIrA). A target concentration of 40 ng/ml 25(OH)D may prevent development of AIrA. We also demonstrate that AIrA is genetically determined: single nucleotide polymorphisms located in genes encoding key factors for the metabolism of estrogens and vitamin D (CYP17A1, VDR, and CYP27B1) are associated with self-reported arthralgia during AI therapy. We recommend establishing an individualized protocol of bone-health surveillance based on baseline and evolutionary clinical variables. PMID:26327926

  8. Association of Guideline Adherence for Serial Evaluations With Survival and Adverse Clinical Events in Patients With Asymptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aisha; Sorajja, Paul; Garberich, Ross F; Farivar, R Saeid; Harris, Kevin M; Gössl, Mario

    2017-09-06

    For patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis and normal left ventricular function, current practice guidelines empirically recommend serial evaluations every 6 to 12 months. The benefit of this clinical monitoring is unknown. To determine the association of guideline adherence with clinical outcomes in patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis. This retrospective cohort study involved 300 patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis who were seen in the ambulatory Minneapolis Heart Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital. Rates of survival and adverse clinical events, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure hospitalization, were compared between patients who adhered to serial evaluation guidance and those who did not. Medical records were reviewed from July 25, 2007, to December 6, 2012. Data analysis took place from February 4, 2017, to July 10, 2017. All-cause mortality, heart failure hospitalization, and major adverse clinical events during follow-up. The study population of 300 comprised 143 men (47.7%) and had a mean (SD) age of 78.6 (11.5) years. There were no differences in age, race/ethnicity, sex, comorbidities, insurance status, left ventricular function, and aortic stenosis severity between patients with (n = 202) and patients without (n = 98) guideline adherence. Aortic valve replacement (surgical or catheter based) was performed more frequently (54.0% vs 19.4%; P < .001) and the median (interquartile range) time for this performance was earlier (2.2 [1.2-3.6] years vs 3.5 [2.0-5.8] years; P < .001) in patients with guideline adherence. All-cause mortality was higher for nonadherent patients (hazard ratio [HR], 1.57; 95% CI, 1.07-2.30; P < .001), and these patients also had a higher rate of hospital admission for heart failure decompensation in follow-up (HR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.27-2.18; P < .001). Four-year survival that is free from death and heart failure hospitalization was higher for

  9. Clinically Inconsequential Alerts: The Characteristics of Opioid Drug Alerts and Their Utility in Preventing Adverse Drug Events in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Genco, Emma K.; Forster, Jeri E.; Flaten, Hanna; Goss, Foster; Heard, Kennon J.; Hoppe, Jason; Monte, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Study objective We examine the characteristics of clinical decision support alerts triggered when opioids are prescribed, including alert type, override rates, adverse drug events associated with opioids, and preventable adverse drug events. Methods This was a retrospective chart review study assessing adverse drug event occurrences for emergency department (ED) visits in a large urban academic medical center using a commercial electronic health record system with clinical decision support. Participants include those aged 18 to 89 years who arrived to the ED every fifth day between September 2012 and January 2013. The main outcome was characteristics of opioid drug alerts, including alert type, override rates, opioid-related adverse drug events, and adverse drug event preventability by clinical decision support. Results Opioid drug alerts were more likely to be overridden than nonopioid alerts (relative risk 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21 to 1.50). Opioid drug-allergy alerts were twice as likely to be overridden (relative risk 2.24; 95% CI 1.74 to 2.89). Opioid duplicate therapy alerts were 1.57 times as likely to be overridden (95% CI 1.30 to 1.89). Fourteen of 4,581 patients experienced an adverse drug event (0.31%; 95% CI 0.15% to 0.47%), and 8 were due to opioids (57.1%). None of the adverse drug events were preventable by clinical decision support. However, 46 alerts were accepted for 38 patients that averted a potential adverse drug event. Overall, 98.9% of opioid alerts did not result in an actual or averted adverse drug event, and 96.3% of opioid alerts were overridden. Conclusion Overridden opioid alerts did not result in adverse drug events. Clinical decision support successfully prevented adverse drug events at the expense of generating a large volume of inconsequential alerts. To prevent 1 adverse drug event, providers dealt with more than 123 unnecessary alerts. It is essential to refine clinical decision support alerting systems to eliminate

  10. Clinically Inconsequential Alerts: The Characteristics of Opioid Drug Alerts and Their Utility in Preventing Adverse Drug Events in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Genco, Emma K; Forster, Jeri E; Flaten, Hanna; Goss, Foster; Heard, Kennon J; Hoppe, Jason; Monte, Andrew A

    2016-02-01

    We examine the characteristics of clinical decision support alerts triggered when opioids are prescribed, including alert type, override rates, adverse drug events associated with opioids, and preventable adverse drug events. This was a retrospective chart review study assessing adverse drug event occurrences for emergency department (ED) visits in a large urban academic medical center using a commercial electronic health record system with clinical decision support. Participants include those aged 18 to 89 years who arrived to the ED every fifth day between September 2012 and January 2013. The main outcome was characteristics of opioid drug alerts, including alert type, override rates, opioid-related adverse drug events, and adverse drug event preventability by clinical decision support. Opioid drug alerts were more likely to be overridden than nonopioid alerts (relative risk 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21 to 1.50). Opioid drug-allergy alerts were twice as likely to be overridden (relative risk 2.24; 95% CI 1.74 to 2.89). Opioid duplicate therapy alerts were 1.57 times as likely to be overridden (95% CI 1.30 to 1.89). Fourteen of 4,581 patients experienced an adverse drug event (0.31%; 95% CI 0.15% to 0.47%), and 8 were due to opioids (57.1%). None of the adverse drug events were preventable by clinical decision support. However, 46 alerts were accepted for 38 patients that averted a potential adverse drug event. Overall, 98.9% of opioid alerts did not result in an actual or averted adverse drug event, and 96.3% of opioid alerts were overridden. Overridden opioid alerts did not result in adverse drug events. Clinical decision support successfully prevented adverse drug events at the expense of generating a large volume of inconsequential alerts. To prevent 1 adverse drug event, providers dealt with more than 123 unnecessary alerts. It is essential to refine clinical decision support alerting systems to eliminate inconsequential alerts to prevent alert

  11. Bayesian inference on risk differences: an application to multivariate meta-analysis of adverse events in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Luo, Sheng; Chu, Haitao; Wei, Peng

    2013-05-01

    Multivariate meta-analysis is useful in combining evidence from independent studies which involve several comparisons among groups based on a single outcome. For binary outcomes, the commonly used statistical models for multivariate meta-analysis are multivariate generalized linear mixed effects models which assume risks, after some transformation, follow a multivariate normal distribution with possible correlations. In this article, we consider an alternative model for multivariate meta-analysis where the risks are modeled by the multivariate beta distribution proposed by Sarmanov (1966). This model have several attractive features compared to the conventional multivariate generalized linear mixed effects models, including simplicity of likelihood function, no need to specify a link function, and has a closed-form expression of distribution functions for study-specific risk differences. We investigate the finite sample performance of this model by simulation studies and illustrate its use with an application to multivariate meta-analysis of adverse events of tricyclic antidepressants treatment in clinical trials.

  12. Clinical Characteristics and Predictors of Adverse Outcome in Adult and Pediatric Patients With Healthcare-Associated Ventriculitis and Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Srihawan, Chanunya; Castelblanco, Rodrigo Lopez; Salazar, Lucrecia; Wootton, Susan H.; Aguilera, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Sandberg, David I.; Choi, HuiMahn A.; Lee, Kiwon; Kitigawa, Ryan; Tandon, Nitin; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis is a serious and life-threatening complication of invasive neurosurgical procedures or penetrating head trauma. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of adults and children with the diagnosis of healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis, as defined by the 2015 Centers of Disease Control and Prevention case definition, at 2 large tertiary care hospitals in Houston, Texas from July 2003 to November 2014. Patients were identified by infection control practitioners and by screening cerebrospinal fluid samples sent to the central laboratory. We collected data on demographics, clinical presentations, laboratory results, imaging studies, treatments, and outcomes. Results. A total of 215 patients were included (166 adults and 49 children). A positive cerebrospinal fluid culture was seen in 106 (49%) patients, with the majority of the etiologies being Staphylococcus and Gram-negative rods. An adverse clinical outcome was seen in 167 patients (77.7%) and was defined as death in 20 patients (9.3%), persistent vegetative state in 31 patients (14.4%), severe disability in 77 patients (35.8%), or moderate disability in 39 patients (18.1%). On logistic regression analysis, age >45 years (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 6.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.31–18.11; P ≤ .001), abnormal neurological exam (adjusted OR, 3.04; 95% CI, 1.27–7.29; P = .013), and mechanical ventilation (adjusted OR, 5.34; 95% CI, 1.51–18.92; P = .01) were associated with an adverse outcome. Conclusions. Healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:27419154

  13. Clinical Characteristics and Predictors of Adverse Outcome in Adult and Pediatric Patients With Healthcare-Associated Ventriculitis and Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Srihawan, Chanunya; Castelblanco, Rodrigo Lopez; Salazar, Lucrecia; Wootton, Susan H; Aguilera, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Sandberg, David I; Choi, HuiMahn A; Lee, Kiwon; Kitigawa, Ryan; Tandon, Nitin; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-04-01

    Background.  Healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis is a serious and life-threatening complication of invasive neurosurgical procedures or penetrating head trauma. Methods.  We performed a retrospective study of adults and children with the diagnosis of healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis, as defined by the 2015 Centers of Disease Control and Prevention case definition, at 2 large tertiary care hospitals in Houston, Texas from July 2003 to November 2014. Patients were identified by infection control practitioners and by screening cerebrospinal fluid samples sent to the central laboratory. We collected data on demographics, clinical presentations, laboratory results, imaging studies, treatments, and outcomes. Results.  A total of 215 patients were included (166 adults and 49 children). A positive cerebrospinal fluid culture was seen in 106 (49%) patients, with the majority of the etiologies being Staphylococcus and Gram-negative rods. An adverse clinical outcome was seen in 167 patients (77.7%) and was defined as death in 20 patients (9.3%), persistent vegetative state in 31 patients (14.4%), severe disability in 77 patients (35.8%), or moderate disability in 39 patients (18.1%). On logistic regression analysis, age >45 years (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 6.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.31-18.11; P ≤ .001), abnormal neurological exam (adjusted OR, 3.04; 95% CI, 1.27-7.29; P = .013), and mechanical ventilation (adjusted OR, 5.34; 95% CI, 1.51-18.92; P = .01) were associated with an adverse outcome. Conclusions.  Healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality.

  14. Retraumatization Mediates the Effect of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Clinical Training-Related Secondary Traumatic Stress Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Butler, Lisa D; Maguin, Eugene; Carello, Janice

    2017-03-10

    Previous research (Butler, Carello, & Maguin, 2016) has found that exposure to trauma-related material in graduate clinical coursework and field training can put students at risk for reactivations of feelings/memories from negative past experiences (retraumatization) and for secondary traumatic stress (STS) symptoms. The present report sought to examine the role, if any, of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in these outcomes. Using the Butler et al. (2016) sample, we examined: (1) rates of ACEs in 195 graduate social work students, (2) whether the total number of ACEs was associated with training-related retraumatization (TRT) and/or STS symptoms, and (3) if TRT mediated the relationship between ACEs and STS symptoms. The results indicate that more than three quarters of the sample had experienced one or more ACEs before age 18 and almost one third endorsed 4 or more. The most commonly reported ACEs were household mental illness, parental separation/divorce, household alcohol/substance abuse, and emotional abuse or neglect by a parent or household member. Higher ACE scores were associated with increased likelihood of TRT experiences and STS symptoms during training. A mediation analysis confirmed that TRT mediated the effect of ACE scores on STS symptoms; this finding also provides support for the role of proximal emotional reactions in mediating the effects of distal adverse experiences on the development of trauma symptoms. In summary, despite the evident resilience of this graduate student sample, those with ACE histories were at heightened risk for training-related distress. These results underscore the need for a trauma-informed approach to clinical training.

  15. Expanding morphological dimensions in neuropathology, from sequence biology to pathological sequences and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Toshiki

    2011-06-01

    One of the challenges in neuropathology is to clarify how molecules, functional carriers of uni-dimensional sequence of amino acid or nucleic acid, behave to engender disease-specific pathological processes in complex three-dimensional (3D) structures such as the human brain in an ordered chronological sequence (four-dimensional extension as a whole). Along with expanding molecular explanations for brain diseases, parallel and independent hypotheses based on morphological observations are particularly useful and necessary for reasonable understanding of the brain and its dysfunction. For example, with classical methods such as silver impregnations, it is possible to differentiate underlying molecular pathologies (three-repeat tau/Campbell-Switzer vs. four-repeat tau/Gallyas silver impregnation) for improved histological diagnosis. Innovations with 3D reconstruction not only provide more realistic reproduction of the targets but also allow quantitative measurement on a 3D basis (3D volumetry). Contrary to the prevailing impression that pathological deposits are generally toxic to cells, quantification demonstrated possible countertoxic potentials of ubiquitin-positive intranuclear inclusions in CAG-repeat disorders on a two-dimensional basis and of glial cytoplasmic inclusions of multiple system atrophy on 3D volumetry. Furthermore, 3D extension of neurites around target lesions is now traceable in relation to the relevant clinical consequences. This neurite neuropathology may pave the way for early specific diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders, as established through (123) I-metaiodobenzylguanidine cardiac scintigraphy for Parkinson disease, aiming at therapeutic intervention before depletion of mother neurons is feasible. For appropriate translation of sequence biology into the frame of human neuropathology, it is necessary to expand further the morphological dimensions so that comprehensive understanding of these disorders leads to specific diagnosis and

  16. Long-Term Clinical and Electroencephalography (EEG) Consequences of Idiopathic Partial Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Dörtcan, Nimet; Tekin Guveli, Betul; Dervent, Aysin

    2016-05-03

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic partial epilepsies of childhood (IPE) affect a considerable proportion of children. Three main electroclinical syndromes of IPE are the Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centro-temporal Spikes (BECTS), Panayiotopoulos Syndrome (PS), and Childhood Epilepsy with Occipital Paroxysms (CEOP). In this study we investigated the long-term prognosis of patients with IPE and discussed the semiological and electroencephalography (EEG) data in terms of syndromic characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study included a group of consecutive patients with IPE who had been followed since 1990. Demographic and clinical variables were investigated. Patients were divided into 3 groups - A: Cases suitable for a single IPE (BECTS, PS and CEOP); B: cases with intermediate characteristics within IPEs; and C: cases with both IPE and IGE characteristics. Long-term data regarding the individual seizure types and EEG findings were re-evaluated. RESULTS A total of 61 patients were included in the study. Mean follow-up duration was 7.8 ± 4.50 years. The mean age at onset of seizures was 7.7 years. There were 40 patients in group A 40, 14 in group B, and 7 in group C. Seizure and EEG characteristics were also explored independently from the syndromic approach. Incidence of autonomic seizures is considerably high at 2-5 years and incidence of oromotor seizures is high at age 9-11 years. The EEG is most abnormal at 6-8 years. The vast majority (86%) of epileptic activity (EA) with parietooccipital is present at 2-5 years, whereas EA with fronto-temporal or multiple sites become more abundant between ages 6 and 11. CONCLUSIONS Results of the present study provide support for the age-related characteristics of the seizures and EEGs in IPE syndromes. Acknowledgement of those phenomena may improve the management of IPEs and give a better estimate of the future consequences.

  17. A therapeutic substitution policy for proton pump inhibitors: clinical and economic consequences.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Maclure, Malcolm; Dormuth, Colin R; Glynn, Robert J; Canning, Claire; Avorn, Jerry

    2006-04-01

    With the growing need to provide prescription drug benefits to older patients and to contain costs, it will be necessary to direct that coverage so as to make expenditures as efficient as possible. We evaluated the clinical and economic consequences of coverage restriction for 3 leading proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in a large-scale natural experiment. The study design was a time-trend analysis in the setting of a provincial drug benefits program in British Columbia, Canada. We studied all British Columbia residents aged 66 or older (N = 501,104) using linked data on all prescription drug dispensings, physician services, and hospitalizations between January 2002 and June 2004. The new policy restricted coverage to rabeprazole and required treatment failure with a histamine H2 blocker. More widely used PPIs (omeprazole, pantoprazole, and lansoprazole) had to be paid for out of pocket, unless the physician requested an exemption. The main outcome measures were utilization of PPIs, drug discontinuation rates, gastrointestinal hemorrhage rates, and drug expenditures. Utilization of the restricted PPIs declined sharply after the policy change (-14,850 daily doses per month per 10,000 residents, P < .0001), whereas use of the covered PPI increased sharply (+19,300, P < .0001), with 45% of all PPI users switching to the covered agent within 6 months. We found no increased use of H2 blockers or stopping of gastroprotective drugs. There was no increase in the monthly rate of hospitalization for gastrointestinal hemorrhage after the PPI restriction (P = .35) even though the study had the power to detect increases of 24 events per 10,000 residents with 95% confidence. There was a slight increase in physician visits 3 months after the policy change (P = .01) for a 2-month period when 9% of new rabeprazole users were switched back to a restricted PPI. In the first 6 months of the policy change, the provincial health plan saved at least 2.9 million Canadian dollars as a result

  18. Association of Antenatal Depression with Adverse Consequences for the Mother and Newborn in Rural Ghana: Findings from the DON Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Weobong, Benedict; ten Asbroek, Augustinus H. A.; Soremekun, Seyi; Manu, Alexander A.; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Prince, Martin; Kirkwood, Betty R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Whilst there is compelling evidence of an almost 2-fold increased risk of still births, and suggestive evidence of increased mortality among offspring of mothers with psychotic disorders, only three studies have addressed the role of antenatal depression (AND) on survival of the baby. We examined these associations in a large cohort of pregnant women in Ghana. Methods A Cohort study nested within 4-weekly surveillance of all women of reproductive age to identify pregnancies and collect data on births and deaths in the Kintampo Health Research Centre study area of Ghana. Women were screened for AND using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to ascertain DSM-IV major or minor depression. Outcomes were adverse birth outcomes, maternal/infant morbidity, and uptake of key newborn care practices, examined using logistic regression; effect sizes reported as relative risks with 95% confidence intervals. Results 20679 (89.6%) pregnant women completed the PHQ-9. The prevalence of AND was 9.9% (n = 2032) (95% confidence interval 9.4%–10.2%). AND was associated with: prolonged labour (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.02–1.53); peripartum complications (RR 1.11, 95% CI 1.07–1.15);postpartum complications (RR 1.27, 96% CI 1.21–1.34); non-vaginal delivery (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.02–1.40); newborn illness (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.16–1.99); and bed net use during pregnancy (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89–0.98), but not neonatal deaths, still births, low birth weight, immediate breast feeding initiation, or exclusive breastfeeding. AND was marginally associated with preterm births (RR 1.32, 95% CI 0.98–1.76). Conclusion This paper has contributed important evidence on the role of antenatal depression as a potential contributor to maternal and infant morbidity. Non-pharmacological treatments anchored on primary care delivery structures are recommended as an immediate step. We further recommend that trials are designed to assess if treating antenatal depression in conjunction with

  19. The clinical meaning of positive latex sIgE in patients with food/pollen adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Nucera, E; Rizzi, A; Buonomo, A; De Pasquale, T; Pecora, V; Colagiovanni, A; Pascolini, L; Ricci, A G; Sferrazza, A; Patriarca, G; Aruanno, A; Schiavino, D

    2012-01-01

    Natural rubber latex allergy (NRL-A) is an international problem of public health. About 50-60% of NRL-A patients may present adverse reactions after ingestion of cross-reacting vegetable foods. This condition, called "Latex-fruit Syndrome", is a matter of research. The aim of our study is to distinguish between clinical/subclinical latex-fruit syndrome and cross-sensitization to latex and food/pollen allergens on the basis of latex recombinant allergens. We studied 51 patients with food hypersensitivity and serological evidence of NRL sensitization. The subjects underwent an accurate allergological evaluation (skin prick test with latex, food and pollen extracts, specific IgE to latex and recombinant allergens, challenge provocation tests). The patients were divided in two groups: group A) 34 patients with clinical and serological latex and fruit/vegetable allergies; group B) 17 patients allergic to fruits/vegetables and/or pollens, with serological, but not clinical NRL-A. All the latex challenge tests resulted positive in group A patients and only two patients of group B presented positive cutaneous challenge tests. Moreover, specific IgE-antibodies were detected to rHev b 5, to rHev b 6.01, to rHev b 6.02 and to rHev b 8 (and other profilins) of group A patients, while in group B we observed a monosensitization to Hev b8, probably linked to a cross-sensitization to pollens and foods. At the present state of knowledge, we need a multi-parametric approach based on a combination of clinical history, diagnostic tests (CRD) and latex challenge tests to make diagnosis of latex-fruit syndrome.

  20. Factors affecting the causality assessment of adverse events following immunisation in paediatric clinical trials: An online survey.

    PubMed

    Voysey, Merryn; Tavana, Rahele; Farooq, Yama; Heath, Paul T; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Snape, Matthew D

    2015-12-16

    Serious adverse events (SAEs) in clinical trials require reporting within 24h, including a judgment of whether the SAE was related to the investigational product(s). Such assessments are an important component of pharmacovigilance, however classification systems for assigning relatedness vary across study protocols. This on-line survey evaluated the consistency of SAE causality assessment among professionals with vaccine clinical trial experience. Members of the clinical advisory forum of experts (CAFÉ), a Brighton Collaboration online-forum, were emailed a survey containing SAEs from hypothetical vaccine trials which they were asked to classify. Participants were randomised to either two classification options (related/not related to study immunisation) or three options (possibly/probably/unrelated). The clinical scenarios, were (i) leukaemia diagnosed 5 months post-immunisation with a live RSV vaccine, (ii) juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) 3 months post-immunisation with a group A streptococcal vaccine, (iii) developmental delay diagnosed at age 10 months after infant capsular group B meningococcal vaccine, (iv) developmental delay diagnosed at age 10 months after maternal immunisation with a group B streptococcal vaccine. There were 140 respondents (72 two options, 68 three options). Across all respondents, SAEs were considered related to study immunisation by 28% (leukaemia), 74% (JIA), 29% (developmental delay after infant immunisation) and 42% (developmental delay after maternal immunisation). Having only two options made respondents significantly less likely to classify the SAE as immunisation-related for two scenarios (JIA p=0.0075; and maternal immunisation p=0.045). Amongst study investigators (n=43) this phenomenon was observed for three of the four scenarios: (JIA p=0.0236; developmental delay following infant immunisation p=0.0266; and developmental delay after maternal immunisation p=0.0495). SAE causality assessment is inconsistent amongst study

  1. Assessing the predictive value of the rodent neurofunctional assessment for commonly reported adverse events in phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mead, Andy N; Amouzadeh, Hamid R; Chapman, Kathryn; Ewart, Lorna; Giarola, Alessandra; Jackson, Samuel J; Jarvis, Philip; Jordaan, Pierre; Redfern, Will; Traebert, Martin; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Vargas, Hugo M

    2016-10-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS)-related safety concerns are major contributors to delays and failure during the development of new candidate drugs (CDs). CNS-related safety data on 141 small molecule CDs from five pharmaceutical companies were analyzed to identify the concordance between rodent multi-parameter neurofunctional assessments (Functional Observational Battery: FOB, or Irwin test: IT) and the five most common adverse events (AEs) in Phase I clinical trials, namely headache, nausea, dizziness, fatigue/somnolence and pain. In the context of this analysis, the FOB/IT did not predict the occurrence of these particular AEs in man. For AEs such as headache, nausea, dizziness and pain the results are perhaps unsurprising, as the FOB/IT were not originally designed to predict these AEs. More unexpected was that the FOB/IT are not adequate for predicting 'somnolence/fatigue' nonclinically. In drug development, these five most prevalent AEs are rarely responsible for delaying or stopping further progression of CDs. More serious AEs that might stop CD development occurred at too low an incidence rate in our clinical dataset to enable translational analysis.

  2. Information on adverse events in randomised clinical trials assessing drug interventions published in four medical journals with high impact factors.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Cátia Bauer; Griebeler, Isabel Heinzmann; Dal Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the extension of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement, which was published in 2004 and aimed to improve the quality of the safety information presented in clinical trials, remains uncertain. To assess the incorporation of the CONSORT statement extension's recommendations in randomised clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating drug therapies published in high-impact medical journals. Using Medline, 122 RCTs published in 2009 were selected from BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and NEJM. A structured form was used to identify the harms information reported in the RCTs, following the recommendations of the CONSORT statement extension. The most frequently met CONSORT recommendation was the mention of harms in the title or abstract of the paper (72.1% of the papers analysed); the least-met recommendation was the reporting of how the harms information was collected (10.7%). The studies that focused on harms presented better information on safety, but only 10.8% met all recommendations in the CONSORT statement. The adverse event information was insufficient for the RCTs published in four high-impact medical journals five years after the publication of the extension of the CONSORT statement.

  3. Adverse performance effects of acute lorazepam administration in elderly long-term users: pharmacokinetic and clinical predictors

    PubMed Central

    Pomara, Nunzio; Lee, Sang Han; Bruno, Davide; Silber, Timothy; Greenblatt, David J.; Petkova, Eva; Sidtis, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The benzodiazepine lorazepam is widely utilized in the treatment of elderly individuals with anxiety disorders and related conditions. Negative effects of acute lorazepam administration on cognitive performance, especially memory, have been reported in both previously untreated elderly and in individuals who have received short term (up to three weeks) treatment with therapeutic doses. However, it remains unclear if these adverse cognitive effects also persist after long-term use, which is frequently found in clinical practice. Methods Cognitively intact elderly individuals (n=37) on long-term (at least three months) daily treatment with lorazepam were studied using a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study design. Subjects were administered their highest daily unit dose of lorazepam (0.25 – 3.00 mg) orplacebo on different days, approximately 1 week apart in a random order, and were assessed on memory, psychomotor speed, and subjective mood states Results Subjects had significantly poorer recall and slowed psychomotor performance following acute lorazepam administration. There were no significant effects on self-ratings of mood, sedation, or anxiety in the whole group, but secondary analyses suggested a differential response in subjects with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Conclusions The reduced recall and psychomotor slowing that we observed, along with an absence of significant therapeutic benefits, following acute lorazepam administration in elderly long-term users reinforces the importance of cognitive toxicity as a clinical factor in benzodiazepine use, especially in this population. PMID:25195839

  4. Alcohol, drugs, caffeine, tobacco, and environmental contaminant exposure: reproductive health consequences and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sadeu, J C; Hughes, Claude L; Agarwal, Sanjay; Foster, Warren G

    2010-08-01

    Reproductive function and fertility are thought to be compromised by behaviors such as cigarette smoking, substance abuse, and alcohol consumption; however, the strength of these associations are uncertain. Furthermore, the reproductive system is thought to be under attack from exposure to environmental contaminants, particularly those chemicals shown to affect endocrine homeostasis. The relationship between exposure to environmental contaminants and adverse effects on human reproductive health are frequently debated in the scientific literature and these controversies have spread into the lay press drawing increased public and regulatory attention. Therefore, the objective of the present review was to critically evaluate the literature concerning the relationship between lifestyle exposures and adverse effects on fertility as well as examining the evidence for a role of environmental contaminants in the purported decline of semen quality and the pathophysiology of subfertility, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and endometriosis. The authors conclude that whereas cigarette smoking is strongly associated with adverse reproductive outcomes, high-level exposures to other lifestyle factors are only weakly linked with negative fertility impacts. Finally, there is no compelling evidence that environmental contaminants, at concentrations representative of the levels measured in contemporary biomonitoring studies, have any effect, positive or negative, on reproductive health in the general population. Further research using prospective study designs with robust sample sizes are needed to evaluate testable hypotheses that address the relationship between exposure and adverse reproductive health effects.

  5. The usefulness of early ultrasonography, electroencephalography and clinical parameters in predicting adverse outcomes in asphyxiated term infants.

    PubMed

    Ong, L C; Kanaheswari, Y; Chandran, V; Rohana, J; Yong, S C; Boo, N Y

    2009-07-01

    The early identification of asphyxiated infants at high risk of adverse outcomes and the early selection of those who might benefit from neuroprotective therapies are required. A prospective observational study was conducted to determine if there were any early clinical, neuroimaging or neurophysiological parameters that might predict the outcome in term newborns with asphyxia. 44 term newborns with acute asphyxia had a cranial ultrasonography (US), electroencephalography (EEG) and clinical examination performed between three and eight hours of life to determine the parameters that might predict outcome. US findings were classified as normal or abnormal (ventricular dilatation or compression and/or focal/diffuse echogenicities). EEG background activity was classified into two categories: normal/mildly abnormal/intermediate, or severely abnormal (low voltage activity or "suppression-burst"). An intrapartum score (based on graded abnormalities of foetal heart monitoring, umbilical arterial base deficit and five-minute Apgar score) and a hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) score (based on graded abnormalities of the neurological and respiratory status at 3-8 hours of life) was also obtained. At one year of life, eight infants had died, six had defaulted follow-up, five had major impairment, two minor impairment and 23 were normal. On univariate analysis, poor outcome (death or major impairment) was associated with abnormal cranial US, severely abnormal EEG and a high HIE score (greater than or equal to 15). The positive predictive value was 54.5, 100 and 100 percent, respectively, while the negative predictive value was 93.8, 80.6 and 80.6 percent, respectively. Combining these factors did not improve the predictive values. There was no added advantage in combining EEG or US parameters over a clinical neurological scoring system alone in predicting the outcome of asphyxiated term newborns.

  6. An epidemiological and clinical analysis of cutaneous adverse drug reactions seen in a tertiary hospital in Johor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Choon, Siew-Eng; Lai, Nai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence, clinical patterns, and causative drugs of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADR) vary among the different populations previously studied. To determine the prevalence, the clinical patterns of drug eruptions, and the common drugs implicated, particularly in severe cADR such as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) in our population. We analyzed the database established for all cADR seen by the department of Dermatology from January 2001 till December 2010. A total of 362 cADR were seen among 42 170 new clinic attendees, yielding an incidence rate of 0.86%. The most common reaction pattern seen was maculopapular eruption (153 cases) followed by SJS/TEN (110 cases) and DRESS (34 cases). Antibiotics was the most commonly implicated drug group (146 cases) followed by anticonvulsants (81 cases) and antigout drugs (50 cases). The most frequently implicated drug was allopurinol (50 cases). Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN accounting for 21.8%, 20.9%, and 12.7%, respectively, of the 110 cases seen, whereas DRESS was mainly caused by allopurinol (15 cases). Mortality rates for TEN, SJS, and DRESS were 28.6%, 2.2%, and 5.9%, respectively. The low rate of cADR with a high proportion of severe reactions observed in this study was probably due to referral bias. Otherwise, the reaction patterns and drugs causing cADR in our population were similar to those seen in other countries. Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN in our population.

  7. Targeting Carcinoembryonic Antigen with DNA Vaccination: On-Target Adverse Events Link with Immunological and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chudley, Lindsey; Stasakova, Jana; Thirdborough, Stephen; King, Andrew; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Buxton, Emily; Edwards, Ceri; Halford, Sarah; Bateman, Andrew; O’Callaghan, Ann; Clive, Sally; Anthoney, Alan; Jodrell, Duncan I.; Weinschenk, Toni; Simon, Petra; Sahin, Ugur; Thomas, Gareth J.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Ottensmeier, Christian H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We have clinically evaluated a DNA fusion vaccine to target the HLA-A*0201 binding peptide CAP-1 from carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA605–613) linked to an immunostimulatory domain (DOM) from fragment C of tetanus toxin. Experimental Design Twenty-seven patients with CEA-expressing carcinomas were recruited: 15 patients with measurable disease (Arm-I) and 12 patients without radiological evidence of disease (Arm-II). Six intramuscular vaccinations of naked DNA (1mg/dose) were administered up to week 12. Clinical and immunological follow-up was to week 64 or clinical/radiological disease. Results DOM-specific immune responses demonstrated successful vaccine delivery. All patients without measurable disease compared to 60% with advanced disease responded immunologically, while 58% and 20% expanded anti-CAP-1 CD8+ T-cells, respectively. CAP-1-specific T-cells were only detectable in the blood post-vaccination, but could also be identified in previously resected cancer tissue. The gastrointestinal adverse event diarrhea was reported by 48% of patients and linked to more frequent decreases in CEA (p<0.001) and improved global immunological responses (anti-DOM responses of greater magnitude (p<0.001), frequency (p=0.004) and duration) compared to patients without diarrhea. In advanced disease patients, decreases in CEA were associated with better overall survival (HR=0.14, p=0.017). CAP-1 peptide was detectable on MHC class I of normal bowel mucosa and primary colorectal cancer tissue by mass-spectrometry, offering a mechanistic explanation for diarrhea through CD8+ T-cell attack. Conclusions Our data suggest that DNA vaccination is able to overcome peripheral tolerance in normal and tumor tissue and warrants testing in combination studies, for example, by vaccinating in parallel to treatment with an anti-PD1 antibody. PMID:27091407

  8. Comparative optimism among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) is associated with fewer adverse clinical events 12 months later.

    PubMed

    Hevey, David; McGee, Hannah M; Horgan, John H

    2014-04-01

    The current study evaluates the levels of comparative optimism among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and examines its relationship to health outcomes 12 months later. 164 patients completed self-report questionnaires at the end of cardiac rehabilitation and the number of adverse clinical events in the following 12 months were recorded. Comparative optimism was assessed in relation to a typical other who has not had cardiac event, a typical other who has had the same cardiac event as the respondent, and a typical member of the cardiac rehabilitation class. Clinical-demographic details and distress were assessed. Participants were comparatively optimistic in all three ratings. Logistic regression (controlling for age, gender, co-morbidities, and distress) revealed that higher levels of adverse events were associated with older age, being male, and lower levels of overall comparative optimism. Comparative optimism was associated with decreased risk of adverse clinical events in the year following cardiac rehabilitation attendance.

  9. Types of unintended consequences related to computerized provider order entry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Emily M; Sittig, Dean F; Ash, Joan S; Guappone, Kenneth P; Dykstra, Richard H

    2006-01-01

    To identify types of clinical unintended adverse consequences resulting from computerized provider order entry (CPOE) implementation. An expert panel provided initial examples of adverse unintended consequences of CPOE. The authors, using qualitative methods, gathered and analyzed additional examples from five successful CPOE sites. Using a card sort method, the authors developed a categorization scheme for the 79 unintended consequences initially identified and then iteratively modified the scheme to categorize 245 additional adverse consequences resulting from fieldwork. Because the focus centered on consequences requiring prevention or remedial action, the authors did not further analyze reported unintended beneficial (positive) consequences. Unintended adverse consequences (UACs) fell into nine major categories (in order of decreasing frequency): 1) more/new work for clinicians; 2) unfavorable workflow issues; 3) never ending system demands; 4) problems related to paper persistence; 5) untoward changes in communication patterns and practices; 6) negative emotions; 7) generation of new kinds of errors; 8) unexpected changes in the power structure; and 9) overdependence on the technology. Clinical decision support features introduced many of these unintended consequences. Identifying and understanding the types and in some instances the causes of unintended adverse consequences associated with CPOE will enable system developers and implementers to better manage implementation and maintenance of future CPOE projects.

  10. Increasing Number and Proportion of Adverse Obstetrical Outcomes among Women Living with HIV in the Ottawa Area: A 20-Year Clinical Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Sarah; Spaans, Johanna N.; Balfour, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Background. The prevalence and associated risks with adverse obstetrical outcomes among women living with HIV are not well measured. The objective of this study was to longitudinally investigate the prevalence and correlates of adverse obstetrical outcomes among women with HIV. Methods. This 20-year (1990–2010) clinical case series assessed the prevalence of adverse obstetrical outcomes among pregnant women with HIV receiving care at The Ottawa Hospital (TOH). General estimating equation modeling was used to identify factors independently associated with adverse obstetrical outcomes, while controlling for year of childbirth clustering. Results. At TOH, there were 127 deliveries among 94 women (1990–2010): 22 preterm births, 9 births with low birth weight, 12 births small for gestational age, and 4 stillbirths. Per year, the odds of adverse obstetrical outcomes increased by 15% (OR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.03–1.30). Psychiatric illness (AOR: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.12–6.24), teen pregnancy (AOR: 3.35, 95% CI: 1.04–1.46), and recent immigrant status (AOR: 7.24, 95% CI: 1.30–40.28) were the strongest correlates of adverse obstetrical outcomes. Conclusions. The increasing number and proportion of adverse obstetrical outcomes among pregnant women with HIV over the past 20 years highlight the need for social supports and maternal and child health interventions, especially among adolescents, new immigrants, and those with a history of mental illness. PMID:27528877

  11. PANCREATIC TOXICITY AS AN ADVERSE EFFECT INDUCED BY MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE THERAPY IN A CLINICAL TRIAL FOR CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS

    PubMed Central

    LYRA, Marcelo Rosandiski; PASSOS, Sonia Regina Lambert; PIMENTEL, Maria Inês Fernandes; BEDOYA-PACHECO, Sandro Javier; VALETE-ROSALINO, Cláudia Maria; VASCONCELLOS, Erica Camargo Ferreira; ANTONIO, Liliane Fatima; SAHEKI, Mauricio Naoto; SALGUEIRO, Mariza Mattos; SANTOS, Ginelza Peres Lima; RIBEIRO, Madelon Noato; CONCEIÇÃO-SILVA, Fatima; MADEIRA, Maria Fatima; SILVA, Jorge Luiz Nunes; FAGUNDES, Aline; SCHUBACH, Armando Oliveria

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY American tegumentary leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by a protozoan of the genus Leishmania. Pentavalent antimonials are the first choice drugs for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), although doses are controversial. In a clinical trial for CL we investigated the occurrence of pancreatic toxicity with different schedules of treatment with meglumine antimoniate (MA). Seventy-two patients were allocated in two different therapeutic groups: 20 or 5 mg of pentavalent antimony (Sb5+)/kg/day for 20 or 30 days, respectively. Looking for adverse effects, patients were asked about abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or anorexia in each medical visit. We performed physical examinations and collected blood to evaluate serum amylase and lipase in the pre-treatment period, and every 10 days during treatment and one month post-treatment. Hyperlipasemia occurred in 54.8% and hyperamylasemia in 19.4% patients. Patients treated with MA 20 mg Sb5+ presented a higher risk of hyperlipasemia (p = 0.023). Besides, higher MA doses were associated with a 2.05 higher risk ratio (p = 0.003) of developing more serious (moderate to severe) hyperlipasemia. The attributable fraction was 51% in this group. Thirty-six patients presented abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or anorexia but only 47.2% of those had hyperlipasemia and/ or hyperamylasemia. These findings suggest the importance of the search for less toxic therapeutic regimens for the treatment of CL. PMID:27680173

  12. Management of adverse events in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with sunitinib and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Arakawa-Todo, Maki; Yoshizawa, Takahiko; Zennami, Kenji; Nishikawa, Genya; Kato, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Ikuo; Kajikawa, Keishi; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Saito, Hiroko; Hasegawa, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kogenta; Sumitomo, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    Patients with progressive renal cell carcinoma who undergo sunitinib treatment, experience many adverse events (AEs), including thrombopenia and hypertension. Dose reduction or treatment discontinuation due to AEs makes it difficult to control the clinical condition. Therefore, patients' understanding regarding the basics of blood pressure (BP) measurement and how to deal with each AE are particularly important. Here we report whether or not pharmacist instructions help in order to increase patients' awareness of early AE management results in an improvement of treatment outcomes. The present study included 15 patients who were administered sunitinib. From the start of sunitinib treatment, pharmacists continuously provided drug administration guidance to the patients and confirmed their awareness and knowledge regarding AEs, symptom management, and drug adherence. The relative dose intensity (RDI) of 15 patients from week 1 to 24 after sunitinib treatment was calculated. Pharmaceutical interventions significantly improved patients' understanding of BP measurements and reference values, etc. Although the RDI was 67.3%-78.7%, there were no cases of discontinuation of administration or reduction of the dose caused by e.g. hypertension, hand and foot syndrome (HFS) and stomatitis. Pharmaceutical interventions improved patients' awareness of the management of AEs and adherence to sunitinib therapy. As a result, a high RDI was maintained, which may lead to prolonged survival. Therefore, our results suggest that early AE management provided by pharmacists is particularly important to assure the safety and efficacy of sunitinib therapy.

  13. PANCREATIC TOXICITY AS AN ADVERSE EFFECT INDUCED BY MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE THERAPY IN A CLINICAL TRIAL FOR CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Passos, Sonia Regina Lambert; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes; Bedoya-Pacheco, Sandro Javier; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria; Vasconcellos, Erica Camargo Ferreira; Antonio, Liliane Fatima; Saheki, Mauricio Naoto; Salgueiro, Mariza Mattos; Santos, Ginelza Peres Lima; Ribeiro, Madelon Noato; Conceição-Silva, Fatima; Madeira, Maria Fatima; Silva, Jorge Luiz Nunes; Fagundes, Aline; Schubach, Armando Oliveria

    2016-09-22

    American tegumentary leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by a protozoan of the genus Leishmania. Pentavalent antimonials are the first choice drugs for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), although doses are controversial. In a clinical trial for CL we investigated the occurrence of pancreatic toxicity with different schedules of treatment with meglumine antimoniate (MA). Seventy-two patients were allocated in two different therapeutic groups: 20 or 5 mg of pentavalent antimony (Sb5+)/kg/day for 20 or 30 days, respectively. Looking for adverse effects, patients were asked about abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or anorexia in each medical visit. We performed physical examinations and collected blood to evaluate serum amylase and lipase in the pre-treatment period, and every 10 days during treatment and one month post-treatment. Hyperlipasemia occurred in 54.8% and hyperamylasemia in 19.4% patients. Patients treated with MA 20 mg Sb5+ presented a higher risk of hyperlipasemia (p = 0.023). Besides, higher MA doses were associated with a 2.05 higher risk ratio (p = 0.003) of developing more serious (moderate to severe) hyperlipasemia. The attributable fraction was 51% in this group. Thirty-six patients presented abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or anorexia but only 47.2% of those had hyperlipasemia and/ or hyperamylasemia. These findings suggest the importance of the search for less toxic therapeutic regimens for the treatment of CL.

  14. Bayesian inference on risk differences: an application to multivariate meta-analysis of adverse events in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Luo, Sheng; Chu, Haitao; Wei, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate meta-analysis is useful in combining evidence from independent studies which involve several comparisons among groups based on a single outcome. For binary outcomes, the commonly used statistical models for multivariate meta-analysis are multivariate generalized linear mixed effects models which assume risks, after some transformation, follow a multivariate normal distribution with possible correlations. In this article, we consider an alternative model for multivariate meta-analysis where the risks are modeled by the multivariate beta distribution proposed by Sarmanov (1966). This model have several attractive features compared to the conventional multivariate generalized linear mixed effects models, including simplicity of likelihood function, no need to specify a link function, and has a closed-form expression of distribution functions for study-specific risk differences. We investigate the finite sample performance of this model by simulation studies and illustrate its use with an application to multivariate meta-analysis of adverse events of tricyclic antidepressants treatment in clinical trials. PMID:23853700

  15. Adverse Childhood Experiences Among Inpatient Youths with Severe and Early-Onset Psychiatric Disorders: Prevalence and Clinical Correlates.

    PubMed

    Benarous, Xavier; Raffin, Marie; Bodeau, Nicolas; Dhossche, Dirk; Cohen, David; Consoli, Angèle

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence and the clinical correlates of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) among 158 inpatient youths with two types of severe psychiatric disorders. ACEs were retrospectively collected with the ACEs scale and the List of Threatening Experiences Questionnaire in 77 patients hospitalized for a catatonic syndrome (average age 15.2 years) and 81 for a manic or mixed episode (average age 15.7 years). ACEs were frequent in youths suffering from bipolar disorder type I (BD-I) (58 %) and from catatonia (57 %), with around one quarter exposed to severe abuse (i.e., physical/sexual/emotional abuse or physical/emotional neglect). Youths with BD-I were more likely to be exposed to family violence compared to those with catatonia. Youths who had been exposed to ACEs did not exhibit a more severe presentation or a poorer response to treatment compared to others, either in the bipolar group or in the catatonic group.

  16. Indications of clinical and genetic predictors for aromatase inhibitors related musculoskeletal adverse events in Chinese Han women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxuan; Lu, Kangping; Song, Ying; Xie, Li; Zhao, Shu; Wang, Yunxuan; Sun, Wenzhou; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Hong; Tang, Dabei; Ma, Wenjie; Pan, Bo; Xuan, Qijia; Liu, Hang; Zhang, Qingyuan

    2013-01-01

    Women with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs) may experience musculoskeletal symptoms that lead to discontinuation of effective therapy. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the clinical and genetic predictors for AIs-related musculoskeletal adverse events(MS-AEs). We recruited 436 postmenopausal Chinese Han women receiving adjuvant AIs therapy for early-stage hormone-sensitive breast cancer. Patients completed a self-administered questionnaire assessing the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms that started or worsened after initiating AIs. 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of ESR1, ESR2 and PGR were analyzed by Sequenom MassARRAY assays and /or PCR-based TaqMan assays.Of the 436 enrolled women, 206 cases experienced musculoskeletal symptoms.Patients who received taxane chemotherapy were more than two times more likely than other patients to have AIs-related MS-AEs. Genetic assay had showed that only two ESR1 SNPs, rs2234693 and rs9340799 were associated with AIs-related MS-AEs.TT genotype and the T allele in rs2234693 was statistically significantly lower in AIs-Related MS-AEs group than controls (P = 0.001; P = 9.49E-7). The frequency of AA genotype and the A allele in rs9340799 was higher (P = 2.20E-5; P = 3.09E-4). Our results suggested that prior taxane-based chemotherapy was the clinical predictor, while rs2234693 and rs9340799 were the genetic predictors for AIs-related MS-AEs.

  17. Clinical profiles of adverse drug reactions spontaneously reported at a single Korean hospital dedicated to children with complex chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bomi; Kim, Sunwha Zara; Lee, Jin; Jung, Ae Hee; Jung, Sun-Hoi; Hahn, Hyeon-Joo; Kang, Hye Ryun

    2017-01-01

    Children with complex chronic conditions (CCC) are presumed to be vulnerable to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The clinical profiles of ADRs in CCC are not well known. Herein, we aim to describe the ADR profiles in CCC with regard to typical presentations and vulnerable groups. We accessed the ADR yearly reports at a tertiary children's hospital whose practice is mainly dedicated to CCC and descriptively analyzed their clinical profiles according to the presence of a complex chronic condition, ADR severity, and age groups. A total of 1841 cases were analyzed, among which 1258 (68.3%) were mild, 493 (26.8%) moderate, and 90 (4.9%) cases were severe. A total of 1581 (85.9%) cases of complex chronic condition were reported. The proportion of CCC in each severity group increased as the ADR becomes more severe. In CCC, ADRs were most frequently reported by nurses in the adolescent group and in cases where the symptoms involved the gastrointestinal system. The class of antineoplastic and immunomodulating drugs was the most commonly suspected of causing an ADR, followed by one of the antibiotics. When we focus on the trend across the age groups, the ratio of severe-to-total ADRs decreased with older age. Among severe cases, the ratio of off-label prescription-related cases was the highest in the infant/toddler group and decreased as the groups aged. In conclusion, ADRs of CCCs admitted to a tertiary children’s hospital have a unique profile. These groups are vulnerable to ADRs and thus they should be monitored closely, especially when they are infants or toddlers, so that severe ADRs can be identified and treated immediately. PMID:28199420

  18. Evaluation of the clinical indications, adverse drug reactions, and finasteride use in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia in Poland.

    PubMed

    Ząbkowski, Tomasz

    2014-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) is one of the most common urinary disorders in elderly men. The symptoms of the disease include prostate gland enlargement, bladder outlet obstruction, and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs). BPH predisposes patients to bladder infections and bladder stone formation and increases their risk of urinary retention, which in turn causes renal failure. Hence, the disease requires surgical treatment. However, over the recent years, the number of surgical interventions performed in pharmacotherapy has significantly reduced because of the increased efficacy of conservative therapy, including combination treatment mostly with 2 groups of drugs, namely, alpha-1-adrenolitics and other 5-alpha-reductase blockers, with a different pharmacological activity [5]. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical indications, adverse drug reactions, and finasteride use in patients with diagnosed BPH in Poland. We conducted a clinical trial from November 2009 to November 2010 that included 5751 patients who were enrolled in 46 urological centres in Poland. The researchers who conducted the clinical trial were urologists from different regions of Poland. The clinical trial involved 6 follow-up visits. The mean age of the patients was 67 years (range, 45-93 years; median, 67.00; SD, 8.507). The inclusion criteria were as follows: LUTSs, finasteride therapy for at least 2 weeks, age>40 years, and BPH. Patients self-reported data on LUTSs, the symptom frequency, concurrent diseases, and intensification of urinary system symptoms. In addition, additional examinations were performed, including prostate-specific antigen test, urinary tract ultrasonography with evaluation of residual urine and prostate, and uroflowmetry. The study did not exclude data on the combined treatment with finasteride and alpha-1-adrenolitics. Finasteride was demonstrated to be effective, as evidenced by the significant decrease in TPV by 40% even after 12 months. It was

  19. Reporting of adverse events related to dietary supplements to a public health center by medical staff: a survey of clinics and pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Ide, Kazuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Yohei; Noguchi, Marika; Kitagawa, Mamoru; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki; Umegaki, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplements are used by >50% of the adult population in Japan, and adverse events related to these products have been reported with their increased use. Thus, an efficient system to gather and report data on these adverse events is essential. To date, however, reporting has been limited. The aim of this study was to address this deficiency by exploring the routine reporting practices of the medical staff employed at clinics or pharmacies in Japan. We conducted a survey of the procedures used by the medical staff to report adverse events related to dietary supplement intake to public health centers in Japan. The survey was conducted in Japan between November 2015 and January 2016. Based on a sample size calculation, questionnaires were administered to 1,700 potential respondents (850 pharmacists and 850 physicians). The questionnaire inquired about the sociodemographic characteristics and dietary supplement-related adverse event-reporting practices. The response rate was 34.7%, including 286 pharmacists and 304 physicians. Although >30% of the pharmacists and physicians had prior experience dealing with such adverse events, <5% had reported these to a public health center. The survey identified several barriers to reporting, such as "difficulty judging the relationship between an adverse event and the dietary supplement" and "lack of clarity regarding the severity of an adverse event". This is the first study to explore the routine reporting practices of physicians and pharmacists in terms of adverse events related to dietary supplements. Further studies are required to elucidate the severity of these adverse events. Moreover, standard reporting criteria ought to be introduced to improve public health.

  20. Childhood adversity as a moderator of the relationship between emotional reactivity and the occurrence of anxiety and depression in a non-clinical group.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Wojciech Łukasz; Zielińska, Aleksandra; Zagdańska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The research is an attempt to confirm the role of emotional reactivity and childhood adversity in the development of anxiety and depression as well as to determine the scope of interaction between these two factors. 430 participants were included in the study. The intensity of emotional reactivity was determined using the FCZ-KT Questionnaire developed by Zawadzki and Strelau. The occurrence of childhood adversity was measured using the Hardt Childhood Questionnaire. The occurrence of anxiety and depression was measured using the structured interview WHO-CIDI 3.0. The relationship between variables was analysed using the logistic regression model. A moderating role of the level of childhood adversity on the relationship of emotional reactivity and the occurrence of anxiety and depression was observed. In the group with high levels of adversity, no such relationship was observed for either of the two disorders. For low and medium levels of the moderator, different relationships for anxiety and depression were found. The obtained results are only partially explained within the temperamental risk factor model. A different pattern of relationships between the intensity of the temperamental trait and the occurrence of anxiety and depression depending on the amount of reported adversity may result from the cumulative effect of the negative consequences of this type of experience.

  1. [Medical rehabilitation between politics and demographic development--consequences for quality management in rehabilitation clinics].

    PubMed

    Weber, A

    1997-05-01

    Drastic changes are ahead for medical rehabilitation in the wake of austreity measures in the pension insurance domain. This paper presents consequences for rehabilitation hospitals and their current strategies of coping in the German health care system. Quality management now needs long and medium term planning, rather than short-term reactions. Demographic trends and a changing spectrum of morbidity indicate possible survival strategies. These societal developments are already incorporated in Total Quality Management.

  2. Adverse effects associated with the clinical use of 4% TiF₄ on teeth enamel: case report.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Rafael de Lima; Pomarico, Luciana; Villardi, Michele; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2011-05-01

    Titanium tetrafluoride (TiF₄) has been studied in dentistry as a promissory alternative for prevention and treatment of carious lesions. However, there are few in vivo studies concerning the consequences of its use on tooth enamel. The goal of this study was to report the effects of a 4% TiF₄ application on the remineralization of an incipient carious lesion of a permanent tooth. This research found an unexpected clinical outcome. A patient with active white spots had two of these lesions treated with 4% TiF₄ associated with fluoridated dentifrice and another lesion treated with fluoridated dentifrice only, thus the remineralization of the two kinds of treatment administered could be observed and compared. An extrinsic pigment appeared in the regions that received the TiF₄ treatment, which was partially removed by professional prophylaxis. Also, regular recidivists of this pigmentation in the review consultations were noted. The authors concluded that although the use of 4% TiF₄ was effective in treating incipient carious lesions on enamel, it was also responsible for an undesired pigmented layer on the tooth to which it was applied. Beyond the varied fluoridated materials used in dentistry, titanium tetrafluoride (TiF₄) deserves attention. This compound has the common properties of fluorides, and researchers are exploring its role in carious lesion prevention, fissure sealing, and tooth erosion prevention in in vitro and in situ studies. Research is also exploring its use for microinfiltration prevention in tooth restoration and hypersensitivity treatment. However, when compared to other fluoridated products TiF₄ demonstrates additional, specific particularities, such as the formation of a titanium dioxide (TiO₂) layer, which is tough, hydrophobic, and resistant in acidic environments. Nevertheless, there are insufficient in vivo studies concerning the consequences of TiF₄-containing products affecting tooth enamel. Thus, the goals of this study

  3. Financial barriers and adverse clinical outcomes among patients with cardiovascular-related chronic diseases: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Campbell, David J T; Manns, Braden J; Weaver, Robert G; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; King-Shier, Kathryn M; Sanmartin, Claudia

    2017-02-15

    Some patients with cardiovascular-related chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease report financial barriers to achieving optimal health. Previous surveys report that the perception of having a financial barrier is associated with self-reported adverse clinical outcomes. We sought to confirm these findings using linked survey and administrative data to determine, among patients with cardiovascular-related chronic diseases, if there is an association between perceived financial barriers and the outcomes of: (1) disease-related hospitalizations, (2) all-cause mortality and (3) inpatient healthcare costs. We used ten cycles of the nationally representative Canadian Community Health Survey (administered between 2000 and 2011) to identify a cohort of adults aged 45 and older with hypertension, diabetes, heart disease or stroke. Perceived financial barriers to various aspects of chronic disease care and self-management were identified (including medications, healthful food and home care) from the survey questions, using similar questions to those used in previous studies. The cohort was linked to administrative data sources for outcome ascertainment (Discharge Abstract Database, Canadian Mortality Database, Patient Cost Estimator). We utilized Poisson regression techniques, adjusting for potential confounding variables (age, sex, education, multimorbidity, smoking status), to assess for associations between perceived financial barriers and disease-related hospitalization and all-cause mortality. We used gross costing methodology and a variety of modelling approaches to assess the impact of financial barriers on hospital costs. We identified a cohort of 120,752 individuals over the age of 45 years with one or more of the following: hypertension, diabetes, heart disease or stroke. One in ten experienced financial barriers to at least one aspect of their care, with the two most common being financial barriers to accessing medications and healthful food. Even

  4. Prognostic Utility of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio on Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Severe Calcific Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Im; Cho, Sang Hoon; Her, Ae-Young; Singh, Gillian Balbir; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis (AS). We aimed to evaluate the association between an inflammatory marker, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with severe calcific AS. Methods A total of 336 patients with isolated severe calcific AS newly diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 were enrolled in this study. Using Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression models, we investigated the prognostic value of NLR adjusted for baseline covariates including logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score (EuroSCORE-I) and undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). We also evaluated the clinical relevance of NLR risk groups (divided into low, intermediate, high risk) as categorized by NLR cutoff values. MACE was defined as a composite of all-cause mortality, cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction during the follow-up period. Results The inflammatory marker NLR was an independent prognostic factor most significantly associated with MACE [hazard ratio (HR), 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–1.09; p-value <0.001]. The goodness-of-fit and discriminability of the model including EuroSCORE-I and AVR (loglikelihood difference, 15.49; p-value <0.001; c-index difference, 0.035; p-value = 0.03) were significantly improved when NLR was incorporated into the model. The estimated Kaplan-Meier survival rates at 5 years for the NLR risk groups were 84.6% for the low risk group (NLR ≤ 2), 67.7% for the intermediate risk group (2 < NLR ≤ 9), and 42.6% for the high risk group (NLR > 9), respectively. Conclusion The findings of the present study demonstrate the potential utility of NLR in risk stratification of patients with severe calcific AS. PMID:27548384

  5. Two Hundred Thirty-Six Children With Developmental Hydrocephalus: Causes and Clinical Consequences.

    PubMed

    Tully, Hannah M; Ishak, Gisele E; Rue, Tessa C; Dempsey, Jennifer C; Browd, Samuel R; Millen, Kathleen J; Doherty, Dan; Dobyns, William B

    2016-03-01

    Few systematic assessments of developmental forms of hydrocephalus exist. We reviewed magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and clinical records of patients with infancy-onset hydrocephalus. Among 411 infants, 236 had hydrocephalus with no recognizable extrinsic cause. These children were assigned to 1 of 5 subtypes and compared on the basis of clinical characteristics and developmental and surgical outcomes. At an average age of 5.3 years, 72% of children were walking independently and 87% could eat by mouth; in addition, 18% had epilepsy. Distinct patterns of associated malformations and syndromes were observed within each subtype. On average, children with aqueductal obstruction, cysts, and encephaloceles had worse clinical outcomes than those with other forms of developmental hydrocephalus. Overall, 53% of surgically treated patients experienced at least 1 shunt failure, but hydrocephalus associated with posterior fossa crowding required fewer shunt revisions. We conclude that each subtype of developmental hydrocephalus is associated with distinct clinical characteristics, syndromology, and outcomes, suggesting differences in underlying mechanisms.

  6. [Adverse reactions to vaccines].

    PubMed

    Eseverri, J L; Ranea, S; Marin, A

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reactions to vaccines are highly varied, ranging from mild local reactions to fatal outcomes. In the last few years many adverse reactions have been attributed to vaccines, often without justification. In agreement with the World Health Organization, these reactions can be classified as follows, depending on the cause: vaccination-induced reactions (due to an effect of the vaccine itself or to an idiosyncrasy); reactions due to errors in storage, manipulation and/or administration; and coincidental reactions (no causal relationship with the vaccine). Hypersensitivity reactions fall into six categories, depending on the causative agent: reactions due to some component of the infectious agent or one of its products; reactions due to adjuvants: aluminium hydroxide; reactions due to stabilizers: gelatin; reactions due to preservatives: thiomersal; reactions due to antibiotics: neomycin; and reactions due to a biological culture medium: chicken embryo cells. Allergic children should not be excluded from the normal vaccine calendar. Immunologically, allergic individuals are more susceptible to infection and to microbial and viral diseases, which often play an aggravating role. Rubella, whooping cough, and influenza usually exacerbate respiratory allergies. Non-vaccination carries a marked risk of contracting serious diseases such as poliomyelitis, tetanus, and diphtheria, etc. In a not too distant future, the techniques of genetic recombination and monoclonal antibody production will allow the creation of vaccines from organisms that cannot be cultivated in the laboratory or that produce small quantities of antigen. These techniques will also lead to identification of the antigens with the greatest immunogenic power and, consequently, to extremely pure vaccines. The adverse reactions to vaccines referred to our service account for between 0.59 % and 1.27 % of first visits in the last three years. We recorded a total of 48 adverse reactions to vaccines. Of

  7. Influence of Clinical Status on the Association Between Plasma Total and Unbound Bilirubin and Death or Adverse Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Oh, William; Stevenson, David K.; Tyson, Jon E.; Morris, Brenda H.; Ahlfors, Charles E.; Bender, G. Jesse; Wong, Ronald J.; Perritt, Rebecca; Vohr, Betty R.; Van Meurs, Krista P.; Vreman, Hendrik J.; Das, Abhik; Phelps, Dale L.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the influence of clinical status on the association between total plasma bilirubin and unbound bilirubin on death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18–22 months corrected age in extremely low birth weight infants. Method Total plasma biirubin and unbound biirubin were measured in 1,101 extremely low birth weight infants at 5±1 day of age. Clinical criteria were used to classify infants as clinically stable or unstable. Survivors were examined at 18–22 months corrected age by certified examiners. Outcome variables were death or neurodevelopmental impairment, death or cerebral palsy, death or hearing loss, and death prior to follow-up. For all outcomes, the interaction between bilirubin variables and clinical status was assessed in logistic regression analyses adjusted for multiple risk factors. Results Regardless of clinical status, an increasing level of unbound bilirubin was associated with higher rates of death or neurodevelopmental impairment, death or cerebral palsy, death or hearing loss and death before follow-up. Total plasma bilirubin values were directly associated with death or neurodevelopmental impairment, death or cerebral palsy, death or hearing loss, and death before follow-up in unstable infants, but not in stable infants. An inverse association between total plasma bilirubin and death or cerebral palsy was found in stable infants. Conclusions In extremely low birth weight infants, clinical status at 5 days of age affects the association between total plasma and unbound bilirubin and death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18–22 months of corrected age. An increasing level of UB is associated a higher risk of death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes regardless of clinical status. Increasing levels of total plasma bilirubin are directly associated with increasing risk of death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in unstable, but not in stable infants. PMID:20105142

  8. The renal concentrating mechanism and the clinical consequences of its loss

    PubMed Central

    Agaba, Emmanuel I.; Rohrscheib, Mark; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the renal concentrating mechanism is maintained by the anatomical and functional arrangements of the renal transport mechanisms for solute (sodium, potassium, urea, etc) and water and by the function of the regulatory hormone for renal concentration, vasopressin. The discovery of aquaporins (water channels) in the cell membranes of the renal tubular epithelial cells has elucidated the mechanisms of renal actions of vasopressin. Loss of the concentrating mechanism results in uncontrolled polyuria with low urine osmolality and, if the patient is unable to consume (appropriately) large volumes of water, hypernatremia with dire neurological consequences. Loss of concentrating mechanism can be the consequence of defective secretion of vasopressin from the posterior pituitary gland (congenital or acquired central diabetes insipidus) or poor response of the target organ to vasopressin (congenital or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus). The differentiation between the three major states producing polyuria with low urine osmolality (central diabetes insipidus, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and primary polydipsia) is done by a standardized water deprivation test. Proper diagnosis is essential for the management, which differs between these three conditions. PMID:23293407

  9. Thrombocytopenia in MDS: epidemiology, mechanisms, clinical consequences and novel therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Morrone, K; Kambhampati, S; Will, B; Steidl, U; Verma, A

    2016-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is commonly seen in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients, and bleeding complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Thrombocytopenia is an independent factor for decreased survival and has been incorporated in newer prognostic scoring systems. The mechanisms of thrombocytopenia are multifactorial and involve a differentiation block of megakaryocytic progenitor cells, leading to dysplastic, hypolobated and microscopic appearing megakaryocytes or increased apoptosis of megakaryocytes and their precursors. Dysregulated thrombopoietin (TPO) signaling and increased platelet destruction through immune or nonimmune mechanisms are frequently observed in MDS. The clinical management of patients with low platelet counts remains challenging and approved chemotherapeutic agents such as lenalidomide and azacytidine can also lead to a transient worsening of thrombocytopenia. Platelet transfusion is the only supportive treatment option currently available for clinically significant thrombocytopenia. The TPO receptor agonists romiplostim and eltrombopag have shown clinical activity in clinical trials in MDS. In addition to thrombopoietic effects, eltrombopag can inhibit leukemic cell proliferation via TPO receptor-independent effects. Other approaches such as treatment with cytokines, immunomodulating drugs and signal transduction inhibitors have shown limited activity in selected groups of MDS patients. Combination trials of approved agents with TPO agonists are ongoing and hold promise for this important clinical problem.

  10. Childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations.

    PubMed

    Fiddler, Maggie; Jackson, Judy; Kapur, Navneet; Wells, Adrian; Creed, Francis

    2004-01-01

    We assessed possible psychological mediators of the relationship between childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations among new outpatients at neurology, cardiology, and gastroenterology clinics. We assessed whether these differed in patients with and without organic disease that explained their symptoms. At first clinic visit we recorded Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS--anxiety and depression subscale scores), Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ--four subscales: consequences, cure, identity, timeline), Health Anxiety Questionnaire (total score), and Symptom Amplification Scale (total score). Subjects were divided into two groups according to whether they had experienced any type of childhood adversity using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Schedule. Outcome was the (log) number of medical consultations for 12 months before and 6 months after the index clinic visits. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine mediators; this was performed separately for patients with symptoms explained and not explained by organic disease. One-hundred and twenty-nine patients (61% response) were interviewed. Fifty-two (40.3%) had experienced childhood adversity; they made a median of 16 doctor visits compared with 10 for those without adversity (adjusted P=.026). IPQ identity score (number of symptoms attributed to the illness) and HAD depression scores were significantly associated with both childhood adversity and number of medical consultations and these variables acted as mediators between childhood adversity and frequency of consultation in the multiple regression analyses. This association was limited to patients with medically unexplained symptoms and was mediated by IPQ Identity Score (number of symptoms attributed to the patient's illness) and HAD depression score. Sexual abuse and overt neglect were the adversities most closely associated with frequent consultations. In patients with medically unexplained symptoms the association

  11. [Experiences and recommendations of the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) concerning clinical investigation of medical devices and the evaluation of serious adverse events (SAE)].

    PubMed

    Renisch, B; Lauer, W

    2014-12-01

    An integral part of the conformity assessment process for medical devices is a clinical evaluation based on clinical data. Particularly in the case of implantable devices and products of risk class III clinical trials must be performed. Since March 2010 applications for the authorization of clinical trials as well as for the waiver of the authorization requirement must be submitted centrally in Germany to the appropriate federal authority, the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) or the Paul Ehrlich Institute (PEI). In addition to authorization, approval by the responsible ethics committee is also required under law in order to begin clinical testing of medical devices in Germany. In this paper, the legal framework for the clinical testing of medical devices as well as those involved and possible procedures including evaluation criteria for the initial application of a trial and subsequent amendments are presented in detail. In addition, the reporting requirements for serious adverse events (SAEs) are explained and possible consequences of the evaluation are presented. Finally, a summary of application and registration numbers for all areas of extensive experience of the BfArM as well as requests and guidance for applicants are presented.

  12. Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Sub-Clinical Carbon Monoxide Exposure in Newborn Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ying; Thomas, Adia; Mardini, Feras; Bianchi, Shannon L.; Tang, Junxia X.; Peng, Jun; Wei, Huafeng; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Levy, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) exposure at high concentrations results in overt neurotoxicity. Exposure to low CO concentrations occurs commonly yet is usually sub-clinical. Infants are uniquely vulnerable to a variety of toxins, however, the effects of postnatal sub-clinical CO exposure on the developing brain are unknown. Apoptosis occurs normally within the brain during development and is critical for synaptogenesis. Here we demonstrate that brief, postnatal sub-clinical CO exposure inhibits developmental neuroapoptosis resulting in impaired learning, memory, and social behavior. Three hour exposure to 5 ppm or 100 ppm CO impaired cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptosis in neocortex and hippocampus of 10 day old CD-1 mice. CO increased NeuN protein, neuronal numbers, and resulted in megalencephaly. CO-exposed mice demonstrated impaired memory and learning and reduced socialization following exposure. Thus, CO-mediated inhibition of neuroapoptosis might represent an important etiology of acquired neurocognitive impairment and behavioral disorders in children. PMID:22348142

  13. Adverse effects of ACE inhibitors in patients with chronic heart failure and/or ventricular dysfunction : meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Agustí, Antònia; Bonet, Sara; Arnau, Josep Maria; Vidal, Xavier; Laporte, Joan-Ramon

    2003-01-01

    The evidence-based benefit/risk evaluation of therapeutic interventions in randomised clinical trials should include both the assessment of the benefits and of the adverse outcomes. There is ample evidence that ACE inhibitors improve the symptoms and prognosis of chronic heart failure (CHF) and ventricular dysfunction. However, there is little systematic information on the tolerability and adverse effects associated with their use in these conditions. To estimate the adverse events related to ACE inhibitor use in the treatment of CHF and ventricular dysfunction. Description of adverse events in reports of randomised clinical trials of ACE inhibitors in CHF or ventricular dysfunction was examined, and a meta-analysis was performed. Trials were included if they were placebo- or standard treatment-controlled, and if the treatment duration was at least 8 weeks. Relative risks and their 95% CIs were estimated with a random effects model. Only 22 (43%) of 51 original reports contained information on the number of withdrawals and their causes. Missing information from the remaining 29 trials was obtained from the authors. The weighted mean duration of treatment was 100.2 weeks. After excluding administrative reasons, heart failure, myocardial infarction and hypertension, the withdrawal rates attributed to adverse events were 13.8% and 9.4% for the ACE inhibitor and control groups, respectively (RR = 1.54 [95% CI 1.30-1.83]; weighted difference = 3.1 per 100 treated patients [95% CI 1.8-4.4]). Cough, hypotension, renal dysfunction, dizziness, hyperkalaemia, and impotence were all significantly more prevalent among patients treated with ACE inhibitors than among those in the control groups. Among patients with CHF or ventricular dysfunction enrolled in randomised clinical trials, treatment with an ACE inhibitor for an average of 2 years leads to an additional 3% of treatment withdrawals. In a significant proportion of the reports on these randomised clinical trials

  14. [Clinical consequences of the altered function of the epidermal desmosomes in man].

    PubMed

    Robledo Aguilar, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    The epidermic desmosomes are formed in their molecular structure by transmembrane components from the cytoplasmic plaque. These are linked up to the tonofilaments of keratin forming a continuous proteinic web which is crucial to keep the tissue integrity. The functional and structural deterioration of the desmosomes produces in human clinic a series of very typical skin diseases, the most frecuent of which is the penghigus. In them, some molecular parts of the desmosomes become strange and antigenic and trigger to an autoimmune reaction which produces a blistering disease of serious prognosis. Depending on the affected molecules the clinical manifestation are different and as Antholt says there is to make a distinction of the following varieties: phenfigus vulgaris and vegetant, phenfigus foliaceus and its varietie, phenfigus of herpes shape. For is study, it is necessary to bear in mind the clinic, the histopathology and inmunopathology (Inmunofluorescence). Some other stranger diseases are of a hereditary genetic origin because of mutations in the domains of the desmosomal molecules which produce clinical manifestations of keratodermia, hypotricosis, woolly hair, skin frailty and cardiomyopapathy. Finally, there are bacteriological staphylococcal toxins, "exfoliatin A-toxin" which produce a separation of the extracellular domain of the desmoglein 1 causing the "staphylococical scalded skin syndrome".

  15. [Side effects and consequences of frequently used antibiotics in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Cerny, A

    1996-03-30

    Oral antimicrobial substances belonging to the beta-lactams, quinolones, macrolides, tetracyclines and the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination are among the most prescribed classes of drugs in private practice. Knowledge of the potential side effects considered in the light of various patient-associated factors such as genetic makeup, renal and liver function, underlying diseases, drug allergies and coadministered drugs, is important in order to minimize the risk of adverse reactions. This article reviews important side effect patterns and focuses on more recent aspects of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and beta-lactam allergy relevant to the practicing physician. Diarrhea occurring during antibiotic treatment raises the possibility of Clostridium-difficile-associated disease, which may evolve into life-threatening toxic megacolon. Mild cases with resolving symptoms after discontinuation of the antibiotic usually do not require further workup. More severe cases with watery diarrhea, abdominal pain, dehydration and electrolyte abnormalities warrant rapid diagnosis, cessation of antibiotic treatment and specific treatment including oral metronidazole. The use of oral vancomycin as a first line drug is discouraged because of the possibility of selecting vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactams are the most important type of side effects which can often be prevented. Patients with a history of beta-lactam associated IgE-mediated hypersensitivity (hives, wheezing or hypotension) should undergo penicillin skin testing. The frequently observed maculopapular rash associated with aminopenicillins without hives is in most cases not caused by an IgE-mediated mechanism. Patients with previous life-threatening penicillin allergy such as anaphylaxis or Lyell's syndrome should not undergo skin testing. Currently available tests do not reliably predict cephalosporin hypersensitivity. More recent data suggest that crossreactivity between

  16. Minimizing Adverse Events While Maintaining Clinical Improvement in a Pediatric Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Crossover Trial with Dextroamphetamine and Methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    Aabech, Henning S.; Sundet, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the availability of both dextroamphetamine and methylphenidate provides an opportunity to minimize adverse events in a pediatric attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) stimulant trial. Methods: Thirty-six medication-naïve children 9–14 years of age, diagnosed with ADHD, were enrolled for 6 weeks in a crossover trial, with 2 weeks of methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, and a placebo in a randomly assigned, counterbalanced sequence. Barkley's Side-Effect Rating Scale (SERS), rated by parents, was used to assess adverse events. SERS were available for 34 children, and data were analyzed both at the group and the single-subject level. Results: The side-effect profiles of dextroamphetamine and methylphenidate appeared similar at the group level. Overall, insomnia and decreased appetite were the only adverse events associated with the stimulants as compared with placebo. No significant increase from placebo to stimulant conditions was detected on SERS items reflecting emotional symptoms. Furthermore, dextroamphetamine and methylphenidate did not differ from each other on any SERS item, except that dextroamphetamine was associated with higher severity of “insomnia” and a higher prevalence of “unusually happy.” Single-subject analyses showed that one or more adverse events were reported in 14 children (41%), and were evenly distributed between those with dextroamphetamine as the drug that showed the greatest reduction in their ADHD symptoms (“best drug”) and those with methylphenidate as their best drug. Among children in whom both stimulants were associated with a decrease in ADHD symptoms, a clinically valid difference between the two stimulants in total adverse events score was found in 7 (39%) of the 18 cases. In these children, the availability of both stimulants provided an opportunity to minimize adverse events, while maintaining a reduction in ADHD symptoms. Conclusions

  17. The natural history and clinical consequences of aspiration in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Kidd, D; Lawson, J; Nesbitt, R; MacMahon, J

    1995-06-01

    Sixty consecutive patients admitted to a teaching hospital with acute stroke were studied prospectively for 3 months to define the natural history and consequences of lung aspiration. Using videofluoroscopy, aspiration was identified in 25 patients (42%) within 72 h of stroke onset, and had resolved in all but three patients (8%) after 3 months. It was closely related to the presence of dysphagia, which itself resolved within 2 weeks in all but the persistent aspirators. Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) was more common in aspirating patients (68%) than non-aspirators (6%). The use of intravenous fluids without oral intake did not appear to prevent LRTI in aspirating patients who were also dysphagic. Pneumonia occurred after 2 weeks in the three patients subsequently found to aspirate persistently. Aspiration is a transient phenomenon in most cases of acute stroke; it is associated with a high incidence of LRTI, but mortality in this series was not significantly associated either with respiratory tract infection or aspiration itself.

  18. Using clinical symptoms to predict adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in women with preeclampsia: data from the PIERS (Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of RiSk) study.

    PubMed

    Yen, Tin-Wing; Payne, Beth; Qu, Ziguang; Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Lee, Tang; Magee, Laura A; Walters, Barry N; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal morbidity. The clinical challenge lies in predicting which women with preeclampsia will suffer adverse outcomes and would benefit from treatment, while minimizing potentially harmful interventions. Our aim was to determine the ability of maternal symptoms (i.e., severe nausea or vomiting, headache, visual disturbance, right upper quadrant pain or epigastric pain, abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding, and chest pain or dyspnea) to predict adverse maternal or perinatal outcomes. We used data from the PIERS (Pre-eclampsia Integrated Estimate of RiSk) study, a multicentre, prospective cohort study designed to investigate the maternal risks associated with preeclampsia. Relative risks and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed for each preeclampsia symptom and outcome pair. Of 2023 women who underwent assessment, 52% experienced at least one preeclampsia symptom, with 5.2% and 5.3% respectively experiencing an adverse maternal or perinatal outcome. No symptom and outcome pair, in either of the maternal or perinatal groups, achieved an area under the ROC curve value > 0.7, which would be necessary to demonstrate a discriminatory predictive value. Maternal symptoms of preeclampsia are not independently valid predictors of maternal adverse outcome. Caution should be used when making clinical decisions on the basis of symptoms alone in the preeclamptic patient.

  19. Systematic Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring of Patients Under Newer Antiepileptic Drugs Using Routine Clinical Data of Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Hilgers, Annika; Schaefer, Marion

    2016-06-01

    Based on data of clinical trials, new agents are receiving approval to the pharmaceutical market, for which information concerning safety issues under real-life conditions is not yet available. The aim was to evaluate the tolerability of newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), such as topiramate, levetiracetam, zonisamide, pregabalin, extended-release oxcarbazepine, lacosamide and eslicarbazepine, under real-life conditions by means of an assessment of routine clinical data of inpatients. Over 2.75 years data of all inpatients receiving one of the newer AEDs were documented. Occurring adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were classified according to the WHO-UMC Causality Assessment concerning their likely relationship to the prescribed AEDs. For each AED, the total number of patients without and with ADRs, assessed as at least possibly related to the particular drug, was calculated and corresponding incidences compared with reference data provided in the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC). For statistical evaluation Spearman correlation (rs), estimated relative risk and logistic regression analysis were used. In total, the data of 562 patients were assessed, of which 90 % received up to six different AEDs. The proportion of off-label use with regard to dosage varied between 6.4 and 64.7 %. Levetiracetam and oxcarbazepine as an extended-release formulation were most commonly used, and levetiracetam showed the best tolerance. By using logistic regression, the occurrence of ADRs was significantly associated with the number of AEDs (p < 0.001) as well as the defined daily doses (p = 0.003). In total, ADRs of AEDs were documented for 318 patients (56.6 %). The most common referred to electrolyte imbalance, e.g., low sodium (n = 79, 14.1 %) and potassium (n = 25, 4.4 %) levels, the central nervous system, including dizziness (n = 61, 10.9 %), disturbed vision (n = 47, 8.4 %), fatigue (n = 40, 7.1 %), nystagmus (n = 36, 6.4 %) and ataxia (n = 29, 5

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Cancer Clinical Trials: Measuring Symptomatic Adverse Events With the National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes Version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE).

    PubMed

    Kluetz, Paul G; Chingos, Diana T; Basch, Ethan M; Mitchell, Sandra A

    2016-01-01

    Systematic capture of the patient perspective can inform the development of new cancer therapies. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are commonly included in cancer clinical trials; however, there is heterogeneity in the constructs, measures, and analytic approaches that have been used making these endpoints challenging to interpret. There is renewed effort to identify rigorous methods to obtain high-quality and informative PRO data from cancer clinical trials. In this setting, PROs are used to address specific research objectives, and an important objective that spans the product development life cycle is the assessment of safety and tolerability. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Hematology and Oncology Products (OHOP) has identified symptomatic adverse events (AEs) as a central PRO concept, and a systematic assessment of patient-reported symptomatic AEs can provide data to complement clinician reporting. The National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE) is being evaluated by multiple stakeholders, including the FDA, and is considered a promising tool to provide a standard yet flexible method to assess symptomatic AEs from the patient perspective. In this article, we briefly review the FDA OHOP's perspective on PROs in cancer trials submitted to the FDA and focus on the assessment of symptomatic AEs using PRO-CTCAE. We conclude by discussing further work that must be done to broaden the use of PRO-CTCAE as a method to provide patient-centered data that can complement existing safety and tolerability assessments across cancer clinical trials.

  1. Evolving concepts of the clinical and serologic consequences of hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Seeff, L B; Koff, R S

    1986-02-01

    Measurement of conventional markers has provided a general understanding of HBV infection, and conceptual advances in knowledge of the clinical and serologic events associated with persistent HBV infection have resulted from the development and application of new methodologies. These studies suggest that persistent HBV infection is a dynamic process, with replicative and nonreplicative phases, that nonreplicative infection may be the precursor of PHC, and that the natural history of persistent infection can be modified by a variety of factors, including viral reactivation and viral superinfections. Further understanding of these phenomena may lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  2. The Molecular, Cellular and Clinical Consequences of Targeting the Estrogen Receptor Following Estrogen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ping; Maximov, Philipp Y.; Curpan, Ramona F.; Abderrahman, Balkees; Jordan, V. Craig

    2015-01-01

    During the past twenty years our understanding of the control of breast tumor development, growth and survival has changed dramatically. The once long forgotten application of high dose synthetic estrogen therapy as the first chemical therapy to treat any cancer has been resurrected, refined and reinvented as the new biology of estrogen-induced apoptosis. High dose estrogen therapy was cast aside once tamoxifen, from its origins as a failed “morning after pill”, was reinvented as the first targeted therapy to treat any cancer. The current understanding of the mechanism of estrogen-induced apoptosis is described as a consequence of acquired resistance to long term antihormone therapy in estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. The ER signal transduction pathway remains a target for therapy in breast cancer despite “antiestrogen” resistance, but becomes a regulator of resistance. Multiple mechanisms of resistance come into play: Selective ER Modulator (SERM) stimulated growth, growth factor/ER crosstalk, estrogen-induced apoptosis and mutations of ER. But it is with the science of estrogen-induced apoptosis that the next innovation in women’s health will be developed. Recent evidence suggests that the glucocorticoid properties of medroxyprogesterone acetate blunt estrogen-induced apoptosis in estrogen deprived breast cancer cell populations. As a result breast cancer develops during long-term Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). A new synthetic progestin with estrogen-like properties, such as the 19 nortestosterone derivatives used in oral contraceptives, will continue to protect the uterus from unopposed estrogen stimulation but at the same time, reinforce apoptosis in vulnerable populations of nascent breast cancer cells. PMID:26052034

  3. Toward a Case Definition of Adverse Health Effects in the Environs of Industrial Wind Turbines: Facilitating a Clinical Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurtry, Robert Y.

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, there are reports of adverse health effects (AHE) in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWT). There was multidisciplinary confirmation of the key characteristics of the AHE at the first international symposium on AHE/IWT. The symptoms being reported are consistent internationally and are characterized by crossover findings…

  4. Toward a Case Definition of Adverse Health Effects in the Environs of Industrial Wind Turbines: Facilitating a Clinical Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurtry, Robert Y.

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, there are reports of adverse health effects (AHE) in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWT). There was multidisciplinary confirmation of the key characteristics of the AHE at the first international symposium on AHE/IWT. The symptoms being reported are consistent internationally and are characterized by crossover findings…

  5. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Epidemiology and Clinical Consequences of an Emerging Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    David, Michael Z.; Daum, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), endovascular infections, pneumonia, septic arthritis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, foreign-body infections, and sepsis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were once confined largely to hospitals, other health care environments, and patients frequenting these facilities. Since the mid-1990s, however, there has been an explosion in the number of MRSA infections reported in populations lacking risk factors for exposure to the health care system. This increase in the incidence of MRSA infection has been associated with the recognition of new MRSA clones known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). CA-MRSA strains differ from the older, health care-associated MRSA strains; they infect a different group of patients, they cause different clinical syndromes, they differ in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, they spread rapidly among healthy people in the community, and they frequently cause infections in health care environments as well. This review details what is known about the epidemiology of CA-MRSA strains and the clinical spectrum of infectious syndromes associated with them that ranges from a commensal state to severe, overwhelming infection. It also addresses the therapy of these infections and strategies for their prevention. PMID:20610826

  6. Variability of word discrimination scores in clinical practice and consequences on their sensitivity to hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Annie; Bernard, André; Tordella, Laurent; Vergne, Judith; Gisbert, Annie; Martin, Christian; Richard, Céline

    2017-05-01

    Speech perception scores are widely used to assess patient's functional hearing, yet most linguistic material used in these audiometric tests dates to before the availability of large computerized linguistic databases. In an ENT clinic population of 120 patients with median hearing loss of 43-dB HL, we quantified the variability and the sensitivity of speech perception scores to hearing loss, measured using disyllabic word lists, as a function of both the number of ten-word lists and type of scoring used (word, syllables or phonemes). The mean word recognition scores varied significantly across lists from 54 to 68%. The median of the variability of the word recognition score ranged from 30% for one ten-word list down to 20% for three ten-word lists. Syllabic and phonemic scores showed much less variability with standard deviations decreasing by 1.15 with the use of syllabic scores and by 1.45 with phonemic scores. The sensitivity of each list to hearing loss and distortions varied significantly. There was an increase in the minimum effect size that could be seen for syllabic scores compared to word scores, with no significant further improvement with phonemic scores. The use of at least two ten-word lists, quoted in syllables rather than in whole words, contributed to a large decrease in variability and an increase in sensitivity to hearing loss. However, those results emphasize the need of using updated linguistic material for clinical speech score assessments.

  7. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the clinical efficacy and adverse effects of Chinese herbal decoction for the treatment of gout.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Liu, Ling; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Pinyi; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Yanqi; Wu, Yazhou; Pettigrew, Julia Christine; Cheng, Dixiang; Yi, Dong

    2014-01-01

    In East Asia, numerous reports describe the utilization of traditional Chinese herbal decoctions to treat gout. However, the reported clinical effects vary. In this study, we reviewed and analyzed a large number of randomized controlled clinical trials to systematically assess the clinical efficacy and adverse reactions of Chinese herbal decoctions for treating gout. We performed a comprehensive search of databases, such as PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese biomedical literature database, et al. In addition, we manually searched the relevant meeting information in the library of the Third Military Medical University. Finally, 17 randomized controlled trials with a sample size of 1,402 cases met the criteria and were included in the study. The results of the meta-analysis showed that when gout had progressed to the stage of acute arthritis, there was no significant difference in clinical efficacy between Chinese herbal decoctions and traditional Western medicine, as indicated based on the following parameters: serum uric acid (standardized mean difference (SMD):0.35, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03 to 0.67), C reactive protein (SMD: 0.25, 95% CI: -0.18 to 0.69), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (SMD: 0.21, 95% CI: -0.02 to 0.45) and overall clinical response (relative risk (RR): 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.10). However, the Chinese herbal decoction was significantly better than traditional Western medicine in controlling adverse drug reactions (RR: 0.06, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.13). Through a systematic review of the clinical efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal decoctions and traditional Western medicine for the treatment of gout, we found that Chinese herbal decoction and traditional Western medicine led to similar clinical efficacy, but the Chinese herbal decoctions were superior to Western medicine in terms of controlling adverse drug reactions.

  8. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Chinese Herbal Decoction for the Treatment of Gout

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Pinyi; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Yanqi; Wu, Yazhou; Pettigrew, Julia Christine; Cheng, Dixiang; Yi, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Background In East Asia, numerous reports describe the utilization of traditional Chinese herbal decoctions to treat gout. However, the reported clinical effects vary. Objectives In this study, we reviewed and analyzed a large number of randomized controlled clinical trials to systematically assess the clinical efficacy and adverse reactions of Chinese herbal decoctions for treating gout. Methods We performed a comprehensive search of databases, such as PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese biomedical literature database, et al. In addition, we manually searched the relevant meeting information in the library of the Third Military Medical University. Results Finally, 17 randomized controlled trials with a sample size of 1,402 cases met the criteria and were included in the study. The results of the meta-analysis showed that when gout had progressed to the stage of acute arthritis, there was no significant difference in clinical efficacy between Chinese herbal decoctions and traditional Western medicine, as indicated based on the following parameters: serum uric acid (standardized mean difference (SMD):0.35, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03 to 0.67), C reactive protein (SMD: 0.25, 95% CI: −0.18 to 0.69), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (SMD: 0.21, 95% CI: −0.02 to 0.45) and overall clinical response (relative risk (RR): 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.10). However, the Chinese herbal decoction was significantly better than traditional Western medicine in controlling adverse drug reactions (RR: 0.06, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.13). Conclusions Through a systematic review of the clinical efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal decoctions and traditional Western medicine for the treatment of gout, we found that Chinese herbal decoction and traditional Western medicine led to similar clinical efficacy, but the Chinese herbal decoctions were superior to Western medicine in terms of controlling adverse drug reactions. PMID:24465466

  9. Clinical consequences and cost of limiting use of vancomycin for perioperative prophylaxis: example of coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, G.; Goldie, S. J.; Platt, R.

    2001-01-01

    Routine us of vancomycin for perioperative prophylaxis is discouraged, principally to minimize microbial resistance to it. However, outcomes and costs of this recommendation have not been assessed. We used decision-analytic models to compare clinical results and cost-effectiveness of no prophylaxis, cefazolin, and vancomycin, in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. In the base case, vancomycin resulted in 7% fewer surgical site infections and 1% lower all-cause mortality and saved $117 per procedure, compared with cefazolin. Cefazolin, in turn, resulted in substantially fewer infections and deaths and lower costs than no prophylaxis. We conclude that perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis with vancomycin is usually more effective and less expensive than cefazolin. Data on vancomycin's impact on resistance are needed to quantify the trade-off between individual patients' improved clinical outcomes and lower costs and the future long-term consequences to society. PMID:11747694

  10. Mechanisms and Clinical Consequences of Untreated Central Sleep Apnea in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Khayat, Rami; Ponikowski, Piotr; Augostini, Ralph; Stellbrink, Christoph; Mianulli, Marcus; Abraham, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a highly prevalent, though often unrecognized, comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Data from HF population studies suggest that it may present in 30% to 50% of HF patients. CSA is recognized as an important contributor to the progression of HF and to HF-related morbidity and mortality. Over the past 2 decades, an expanding body of research has begun to shed light on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of CSA. Armed with this growing knowledge base, the sleep, respiratory, and cardiovascular research communities have been working to identify ways to treat CSA in HF with the ultimate goal of improving patient quality of life and clinical outcomes. In this paper, we examine the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of CSA in HF and review emerging therapies for this disorder. PMID:25572513

  11. Mechanisms and clinical consequences of untreated central sleep apnea in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Khayat, Rami; Ponikowski, Piotr; Augostini, Ralph; Stellbrink, Christoph; Mianulli, Marcus; Abraham, William T

    2015-01-06

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a highly prevalent, though often unrecognized, comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Data from HF population studies suggest that it may present in 30% to 50% of HF patients. CSA is recognized as an important contributor to the progression of HF and to HF-related morbidity and mortality. Over the past 2 decades, an expanding body of research has begun to shed light on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of CSA. Armed with this growing knowledge base, the sleep, respiratory, and cardiovascular research communities have been working to identify ways to treat CSA in HF with the ultimate goal of improving patient quality of life and clinical outcomes. In this paper, we examine the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of CSA in HF and review emerging therapies for this disorder.

  12. Clinical consequences of road traffic injuries among the elderly in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries among the elderly have recently become a public health issue; therefore, we investigated the clinical characteristics of such injuries among the elderly in Japan. Methods A retrospective study was performed using data from a medium-sized hospital emergency department. Data were extracted from medical records for one year, and patients were categorized into groups ages 18-64, 65-74 and 75+. Variables included demographic characteristics, injury circumstances, and nature of injury. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistical analyses were performed, and multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate injury severity and hospital admission by age groups. Results A total of 1,656 patients were studied. Patients aged 65+ had more chest wall injury, intracranial injury, lower extremity fracture, and intrathoracic injury than patients aged 18-64. Conclusions Injury circumstances and nature of injuries associated with traffic incidents showed different patterns by age groups, particularly among the elderly. PMID:20584283

  13. Arterial blood supply of the infrapatellar fat pad. Anatomy and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Kohn, D; Deiler, S; Rudert, M

    1995-01-01

    The arterial blood supply to the infrapatellar fat pad (Hoffa's fat pad) was investigated in 12 knee joints of human cadavers. The infrapatellar fat pad is supplied by an anastomotic network which displays some striking topographic features. Its vascular blood supply protects it against necrosis, when either reconstructive operations are carried out or extensive surgical exposures of the knee are done. The blood supply to the center of the fat pad is limited. This is of practical importance for the choice of arthroscopic portals. In addition, arthroscopically verified sources of bleeding are described in 57 patients with hemarthrosis without clinically detectable instability. Rupture of the infrapatellar synovial fold can be a cause of posttraumatic hemarthrosis in rare cases. Arteries irregularly found within the fold contribute to the blood supply of the anterior aspect of the synovial membrane covering the cruciate ligaments.

  14. Advances in management of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: Consequences for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Netter, Jeanne; Douard, Richard; Durdux, Catherine; Landi, Bruno; Berger, Anne; Taieb, Julien

    2016-11-01

    More than half the patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal disease at diagnosis with a high risk of recurrence. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and standardized radical surgery with total mesorectal excision have been established as the 'gold standard' for treating these patients. Pathological staging using the ypTNM classification system to decide on adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) is widely used in clinical practice, but the delivery of ACT is still controversial, as many discrepancies persist in the conclusions of different trials, due to heterogeneity of the inclusion criteria between studies, lack of statistical power, and variations in preoperative and adjuvant regimens. In 2014, a meta-analysis of four randomized phase-III trials (EORTC 22921, I-CNR-RT, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, CHRONICLE) failed to demonstrate any statistical efficacy of fluorouracil (5FU)-based ACT. Three recent randomized trials aimed to compare 5FU with 5FU plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Two of them (ADORE, CAO/ARO/AIO-04) appeared to find a disease-free survival benefit for patients treated with the combination therapy. Thus, while awaiting new data, it can be said that, as of 2015, patients with yp stage I tumors or histological complete response derived no benefit from adjuvant therapy. On the other hand, the FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen should be proposed for yp stage III patients, and may be considered for yp stage II tumors in fit patients with high-risk factors. Nevertheless, well-designed and sufficiently powered clinical trials dedicated to adjuvant treatments for rectal cancer remain justified in future to achieve a high level of proof in keeping with evidence-based medical standards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Absence of Intragraft B Cells in Rejection Biopsies After Rituximab Induction Therapy: Consequences for Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    van den Hoogen, Martijn W.F.; Steenbergen, Eric J.; Baas, Marije C.; Florquin, Sandrine; Hilbrands, Luuk B.

    2017-01-01

    Background The pathophysiological role of intragraft B cells during renal allograft rejection is unclear. Methods We studied B-cell infiltration during acute rejection in 53 patients who participated in a clinical trial in which adult renal transplant patients were randomized between a single intraoperative dose of rituximab (375 mg/m2) or placebo as induction therapy. Two independent pathologists scored all biopsies in a blinded fashion according to the Banff classification and scored for the presence of B cells and plasma cells using CD79a and CD138 as markers. Results The majority of acute rejections were T cell–mediated. The proportion of acute rejections with an antibody-mediated component tended to be lower in rituximab-treated patients (4/23, 17.4%) than in placebo-treated patients (11/30, 36.7%; P = 0.14). Biopsies of rituximab-treated patients had significantly lower scores for B cells (0.00; range, 0.00-0.50 vs 1.70; range, 0.60-3.30; P < 0.0001) and plasma cells (0.10; range, 0.00-1.90 vs 0.40; range, 0.00-7.50; P = 0.006). During acute rejection, intragraft clusters of B cells were not observed after rituximab induction therapy. However, the depletion of intragraft B cells during acute rejection did not affect steroid resistance, proteinuria, graft function at 2 years follow-up, or patient and graft survival at a median follow-up of 4.1 years (range, 2.0-6.2 years). Conclusions These data do not support a harmful influence of intragraft B cells present during acute allograft rejection on the clinical course within the first few years after renal transplantation. PMID:28405599

  16. Clinical characteristics of adverse reactions to nonionic low osmolality contrast media in patients transferred from the CT room to the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sang Ook; Kim, Dae Yong; Sohn, You Dong

    2016-01-01

    Nonionic low osmolality contrast media (LOCMs) are used universally in computed tomography (CT) imaging. Although adverse reactions due to nonionic LOCMs are a common cause of emergency room (ER) admissions, few studies have investigated these adverse reactions. In the present study, we evaluated the characteristics of patients who were transferred from the CT room to the ER due to adverse reactions to contrast media, and we determined the risk factors for severe adverse reactions. A single-center retrospective study was conducted over a 41-month period. Baseline and clinical characteristics were evaluated and analyzed according to moderate and severe severity. In particular, risk factors of severe reactions were determined using logistic regression analysis. In total, 70 patients were admitted to the ER with adverse reactions due to nonionic LOCMs. Of these, 33 developed a moderate reaction, and 37 developed a severe reaction. Compared with the moderate reaction group, the severe reaction group was older, had higher blood pressures, showed more symptoms indicating the cardiovascular and central nervous system, and developed faster reactions to LOCMs. According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the age of the patient and time to onset of reaction demonstrated a statistical relationship with severe adverse reactions. In the receiver operating characteristic analysis, the optimal cutoff values for age and time to onset were 60 years and 5 min. In conclusion, clinicians should be attentive to anaphylaxis due to nonionic LOCM, in particular, for elderly patients aged older than 60 years and a time to reaction onset of less than 5 min.

  17. Systematic review and meta-analysis of clinically relevant adverse events from HMG CoA reductase inhibitor trials worldwide from 1982 to present.

    PubMed

    McClure, David L; Valuck, Robert J; Glanz, Morton; Hokanson, John E

    2007-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the association of clinically relevant adverse events from a systematic review and meta-analysis of statin randomized controlled trials (RCT). We performed the meta-analysis in the manner of a Cochrane Collaboration systematic review. Outcomes were discontinuances of therapy or muscle-related symptoms due to adverse events. We searched for articles from 1982 through June 2006 in MEDLINE and other databases. The main inclusion criteria were double blind, placebo controlled RCTs with a monotherapy intervention of any marketed statin and active surveillance of adverse events. We excluded studies of drug interactions, organ transplants, or exercise, or those not meeting all of the study quality criteria. The primary analysis was a statin formulation stratified fixed-effect model using Peto odds-ratios (POR). Secondary analyses explored the stability of the primary results. Over 86,000 study participants from 119 studies were included. Available statins were associated with a lower POR of discontinuance (overall: 0.88 [0.84, 0.93], largest effect with pravastatin: 0.79 [0.74, 0.84]), an elevated POR of rhabdomyolysis (1.59 [0.54, 4.70]) and myositis (2.56 [1.12, 5.85]), and null odds of myalgia (1.09 [0.97, 1.23]). Cerivastatin by comparison demonstrated larger PORs for discontinuances and muscle-related adverse events. Secondary analyses demonstrated the stability of the results. Overall, discontinuation of statin therapy due to adverse events was no worse than placebo. The risks of muscle-related adverse events were in general agreement with the known risks of statins.

  18. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) focused on adverse events (PRO-AEs) in adjuvant and metastatic breast cancer: clinical and translational implications.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Stefan; Wallwiener, Markus; Karic, Uros; Domschke, Christoph; Katic, Luka; Taran, Florin-Andrei; Pesic, Aleksandra; Hartkopf, Andreas; Hadji, Peyman; Teufel, Martin; Schuetz, Florian; Sohn, Christof; Fasching, Peter; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Brucker, Sara

    2017-02-01

    The capture of adequate treatment outcomes and quality of life (QOL) of advanced breast cancer patients in clinical routine represents a great challenge. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are data elements directly reported by patients about experiences with care, including symptoms, functional status, or quality of life. There is growing interest in the medical community for the evaluation and implementation of PROs of adverse events (PRO-AEs). Recent interest in PROs in health care has evolved in the context of patient centeredness. Our primary objective was to identify trials that had implemented PRO-AEs in the breast cancer treatment setting, thereby demonstrating its feasibility. We aimed to identify published studies that used patient reports to assess AEs during and after breast cancer treatment, to identify clinician underreported and modifiable AEs that are important to patients, and to analyze the feasibility and usefulness of PRO instrument implementation in everyday oncological practice with special attention given to electronic-based PRO instruments. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed for studies that used PRO instruments to assess AEs of breast cancer treatment in the metastatic and adjuvant settings. Two authors independently reviewed the search results and decided which studies fully met the predefined inclusion criteria. The search yielded 606 publications. The two reviewers found that 9 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three AEs were identified as important to patients but inadequately reported by health care providers, namely hot flushes, vaginal dryness, and weight gain. PROs and PRO-AEs are the consequence of contemporary concepts of patient-centered medicine and the growing feasibility, utility, and implications of collecting data using modern technology. Furthermore, the willingness of patients to utilize innovative applications for their own health has been increasing in parallel to the enhanced impact of the World Wide Web

  19. Clinical consequences of relative biological effectiveness variations in proton radiotherapy of the prostate, brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Carabe, Alejandro; España, Samuel; Grassberger, Clemens; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-04-07

    Proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is known to depend on the (α/β)x of irradiated tissues, with evidence of ∼60% variation over (α/β)x values from 1-10 Gy. The range of (α/β)x values reported for prostate tumors (1.2-5.0 Gy), brain tumors (10-15 Gy) and liver tumors (13-17 Gy) imply that the proton RBE for these tissues could vary significantly compared to the commonly used generic value of 1.1. Our aim is to evaluate the impact of this uncertainty on the proton dose in Gy(RBE) absorbed in normal and tumor tissues. This evaluation was performed for standard and hypofractionated regimens. RBE-weighted total dose (RWTD) distributions for 15 patients (five prostate tumors, five brain tumors and five liver tumors) were calculated using an in-house developed RBE model as a function of dose, dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and (α/β)x. Variations of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs at risk due to changes of (α/β)x and fractionation regimen were calculated and the RWTD received by 10% and 90% of the organ volume reported. The goodness of the plan, bearing the uncertainties, was then evaluated compared to the delivered plan, which considers a constant RBE of 1.1. For standard fractionated regimens, the prostate tumors, liver tumors and all critical structures in the brain showed typically larger RBE values than 1.1. However, in hypofractionated regimens lower values of RBE than 1.1 were observed in most cases. Based on DVH analysis we found that the RBE variations were clinically significant in particular for the prostate GTV and the critical structures in the brain. Despite the uncertainties in the biological input parameters when estimating RBE values, the results show that the use of a variable RBE with dose, LETd and (α/β)x could help to further optimize the target dose in proton treatment planning. Most importantly, this study shows that the consideration of RBE variations could

  20. Clinical consequences of relative biological effectiveness variations in proton radiotherapy of the prostate, brain and liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabe, Alejandro; España, Samuel; Grassberger, Clemens; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-04-01

    Proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is known to depend on the (α/β)x of irradiated tissues, with evidence of ˜60% variation over (α/β)x values from 1-10 Gy. The range of (α/β)x values reported for prostate tumors (1.2-5.0 Gy), brain tumors (10-15 Gy) and liver tumors (13-17 Gy) imply that the proton RBE for these tissues could vary significantly compared to the commonly used generic value of 1.1. Our aim is to evaluate the impact of this uncertainty on the proton dose in Gy(RBE) absorbed in normal and tumor tissues. This evaluation was performed for standard and hypofractionated regimens. RBE-weighted total dose (RWTD) distributions for 15 patients (five prostate tumors, five brain tumors and five liver tumors) were calculated using an in-house developed RBE model as a function of dose, dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and (α/β)x. Variations of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs at risk due to changes of (α/β)x and fractionation regimen were calculated and the RWTD received by 10% and 90% of the organ volume reported. The goodness of the plan, bearing the uncertainties, was then evaluated compared to the delivered plan, which considers a constant RBE of 1.1. For standard fractionated regimens, the prostate tumors, liver tumors and all critical structures in the brain showed typically larger RBE values than 1.1. However, in hypofractionated regimens lower values of RBE than 1.1 were observed in most cases. Based on DVH analysis we found that the RBE variations were clinically significant in particular for the prostate GTV and the critical structures in the brain. Despite the uncertainties in the biological input parameters when estimating RBE values, the results show that the use of a variable RBE with dose, LETd and (α/β)x could help to further optimize the target dose in proton treatment planning. Most importantly, this study shows that the consideration of RBE variations could

  1. [Liver cirrhosis and encephalopathy: clinical and metabolic consequences and nutritional support].

    PubMed

    Mesejo, A; Juan, M; Serrano, A

    2008-05-01

    Cirrhosis represents the final stage of many chronic liver diseases and is associated to more or less pronounced hyponutrition, independently of the etiology, particularly at advanced stages. Its origin is multifactorial, with three factors contributing to it: a) limitation or decrease of intake; b) impairment in nutrients digestion or absorption; and c) the interference with nutrients metabolism. A poor nutritional status is associated with a poor survival prognosis. Whether caloric-protein malnourishment (CPM) is an independent predictor of mortality or only a marker of the severity of liver failure is subject to controversy. There is no consensus on which are the best diagnostic criteria for CPM in cirrhosis. Assessment of hyponutrition is extremely difficult since both the disease itself and the triggering or etiologic factors affect many of the parameters used. Metabolic impairments mimic a hypercatabolic state. These patients have decreased carbohydrate utilization and storage capacity and increased protein and fat catabolism leading to depletion of protein and lipid reserves. These abnormalities together with decreased nutrients intake and absorption are the bases for CPM. The most important metabolic impairment in patients with advanced liver disease is the change in amino acids metabolism. The plasma levels of branched amino acids (BAA) are decreased and of aromatic amino acids (AAA) are increased, which has therapeutic implications. Among the consequences of the structural impairments taking place in cirrhosis, we may highlight hepatic encephalopathy, defined as impaired central nervous system functioning that manifests as a series of neuropsychiatric, neuromuscular, and behavioral symptoms. These are due to the inability of the diseased liver to metabolize neurotoxins that accumulate in the brain affecting neurotransmitters and are attributed to the toxic effect of ammonium on the brain tissue. Nutritional therapy brings benefits in the different stages

  2. Cytochrome P450 pharmacogenetics in drug development: in vitro studies and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A David; Rushmore, Thomas H

    2002-06-01

    Members of the human cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily play a role in the metabolism of many drugs and several of them, CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19, have been shown to be polymorphic as a result of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), gene deletions, and gene duplications. These polymorphisms can impact the pharmacokinetics (PK), metabolism, safety and efficacy of drugs, and because of the availability of automation, genotyped human tissue, recombinant CYP preparations (rCYPs) and reagents, most pharmaceutical companies have increasingly screened out compounds that are metabolized solely by polymorphic CYPs. In the absence of suitable animal models, it has been widely accepted that such in vitro data are useful because one can obtain information prior to dosing in man and select the most appropriate clinical studies with prospectively genotyped and phenotyped subjects. Overall, current trends in the industry have been fueled by increased managed healthcare, the desire to minimize the need for therapeutic drug monitoring and CYP genotyping in medical practice, and a very competitive market place. In the past, such paradigms have not been as influential and there are numerous examples of marketed drugs that are metabolized by polymorphic CYPs.

  3. Clinical consequences of microdeletions of the Y chromosome: the extended Münster experience.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Manuela; Tüttelmann, Frank; Gromoll, Jörg; Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2008-02-01

    A total of 3179 patients were screened for Y-chromosome microdeletions and 821 patients for partial AZFc deletions. Thirty-nine Y-chromosomal microdeletions were found (2.4% of men with <1 x 10(6)/ml spermatozoa): two AZFa, two AZFb, one AZFbc, one partial AZFb, one partial AZFb+c and 32 AZFc (b2/b4). Partial AZFc deletions were found in 45 patients (5.5%), mostly gr/gr deletions (n = 28). In patients with AZFc deletion, azoospermia was found in 53.1% and sperm concentrations of mostly <0.1 x 10(6)/ml were found in 46.9%. Semen analyses and FSH measurements showed no trend over time. Elongated spermatids were seen in 6/15 AZFc patients and bilateral Sertoli cell-only was found in 4/15. Testicular sperm extraction (TESE) was attempted in 10 patients and spermatozoa were found in six. Compared with infertile men matched by sperm concentration, no differences in hormonal and seminal parameters could be found in patients with AZFc or gr/gr deletions. It is concluded that: (i) frequency of AZF deletions in Germany is much lower than in other countries; (ii) AZFc deletions are associated with severe disturbances of spermatogenesis and TESE is not possible in half of these patients; (iii) AZFc and gr/ gr deletions are not associated with any clinical diagnostic parameter; (iv) and no trend is apparent over time.

  4. Respiratory responses to cold water immersion: neural pathways, interactions, and clinical consequences awake and asleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, Avijit; Tipton, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The ventilatory responses to immersion and changes in temperature are reviewed. A fall in skin temperature elicits a powerful cardiorespiratory response, termed "cold shock," comprising an initial gasp, hypertension, and hyperventilation despite a profound hypocapnia. The physiology and neural pathways of this are examined with data from original studies. The respiratory responses to skin cooling override both conscious and other autonomic respiratory controls and may act as a precursor to drowning. There is emerging evidence that the combination of the reestablishment of respiratory rhythm following apnea, hypoxemia, and coincident sympathetic nervous and cyclic vagal stimulation appears to be an arrhythmogenic trigger. The potential clinical implications of this during wakefulness and sleep are discussed in relation to sudden death during immersion, underwater birth, and sleep apnea. A drop in deep body temperature leads to a slowing of respiration, which is more profound than the reduced metabolic demand seen with hypothermia, leading to hypercapnia and hypoxia. The control of respiration is abnormal during hypothermia, and correction of the hypoxia by inhalation of oxygen may lead to a further depression of ventilation and even respiratory arrest. The immediate care of patients with hypothermia needs to take these factors into account to maximize the chances of a favorable outcome for the rescued casualty.

  5. Impact of postoperative complications on clinical and economic consequences in pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jon, Bohumil; Čermáková, Eva; Šubrt, Zdeněk; Ferko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients who develop complications consume a disproportionately large share of available resources in surgery; therefore the attention of healthcare funders focuses on the economic impact of complications. The main objective of this work was to assess the clinical and economic impact of postoperative complications in pancreatic surgery, and furthermore to assess risk factors for increased costs. Methods In all, 161 consecutive patients underwent pancreatic resection. The costs of the treatment were determined and analyzed. Results The overall morbidity rate was 53.4%, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 3.7%. The median of costs for all patients without complication was 3,963 Euro, whereas the median of costs for patients with at least one complication was significantly increased at 10,670 Euro (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis American Society of Anesthesiologists ≥ 3 (P = 0.006), multivisceral resection (P < 0.001) and any complication (P < 0.001) were independently associated with increased costs. Conclusion Postoperative complications are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay, and hospital costs. The treatment costs increase with the severity of the postoperative complications. Those factors that are known to increase the treatment costs in pancreatic resection should be considered when planning patients for surgery. PMID:26793689

  6. Anatomical variations within the deep posterior compartment of the leg and important clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Hislop, M; Tierney, P

    2004-09-01

    The management of musculoskeletal conditions makes up a large part of a sports medicine practitioner's practice. A thorough knowledge of anatomy is an essential component of the armament necessary to decipher the large number of potential conditions that may confront these practitioners. To cloud the issue further, anatomical variations may be present, such as supernumerary muscles, thickened fascial bands or variant courses of nerves and blood vessels, which can themselves manifest as acute or chronic conditions that lead to significant morbidity or limitation of activity. There are a number of contentious areas within the literature surrounding the anatomy of the leg, particularly involving the deep posterior compartment. Conditions such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome, tibial periostitis (shin splints), peripheral nerve entrapment and tarsal tunnel syndrome may all be affected by subtle anatomical variations. This paper primarily focuses on the deep posterior compartment of the leg and uses the gross dissection of cadaveric specimens to describe definitively the anatomy of the deep posterior compartment. Variant fascial attachments of flexor digitorum longus are documented and potential clinical sequelae such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome and tarsal tunnel syndrome are discussed.

  7. The prevalence of CTNNB1 mutations in primary aldosteronism and consequences for clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vin-Cent; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Chueh, Shih-Chieh Jeff; Yang, Shao-Yu; Huang, Kuo-How; Lin, Yen-Hung; Wang, Jian-Jhong; Connolly, Rory; Hu, Ya-Hui; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Peng, Kang-Yung; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2017-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the Wnt pathway/β-catenin signaling may be important in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the prevalence and clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy in APA patients harboring CTNNB1 mutations. The molecular expression of CYP11B2 and gonadal receptors in adenomas were also explored. Adenomas from 219 APA patients (95 men; 44.2%; aged 50.5 ± 11.9 years) showed a high rate of somatic mutations (n = 128, 58.4%). The majority of them harbored KCNJ5 mutations (n = 116, 52.9%); 8 patients (3.7%, 6 women) had CTNNB1 mutations. Patients with APAs harboring CTNNB1 mutations were older and had shorter duration of hypertension. After adrenalectomy, CTNNB1 mutation carriers had a higher possibility (87.5%) of residual hypertension than other APA patients. APAs harboring CTNNB1 mutations have heterogeneous staining of β-catenin and variable expression of gonadal receptors and both CYP11B1 and CYP11B2. This suggests that CTNNB1 mutations may be more related to tumorigenesis rather than excessive aldosterone production. PMID:28102204

  8. Immune thrombocytopenia nomenclature, consensus reports, and guidelines: what are the consequences for daily practice and clinical research?

    PubMed

    Michel, Marc

    2013-01-01

    New insights into the pathophysiology and the natural history of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and new therapeutical approaches have emerged in the last 10 years that have made necessary the update of previous guidelines. An important step towards the harmonization on both the definition of the disease and the phases of the disease, the objectives of treatment, and the criteria of response to be used in clinical trials has been first made possible throughout the International Working group on ITP. This important step has been followed by an international consensus report and the updated American Society of Hematology (ASH) guidelines focused on the investigation and management of ITP taking into account the data from the most recent clinical trials in the field. In this article, the consequences and translation that these guidelines may have or not on daily practice and on future clinical trials are discussed and the few controversies are pointed out. Whereas these guidelines are helpful for the investigation of ITP and for the harmonization of clinical trials, some area of uncertainties do remain for the best management of ITP and especially the choice of the best second-line strategy in persistent ITP is still far from being consensual.

  9. Compositionally and functionally distinct sinus microbiota in chronic rhinosinusitis patients have immunological and clinically divergent consequences.

    PubMed

    Cope, Emily K; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pletcher, Steven D; Lynch, Susan V

    2017-05-12

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by persistent sinonasal inflammation and sinus microbiome dysbiosis. The basis of this heterogeneity is poorly understood. We sought to address the hypothesis that a limited number of compositionally distinct pathogenic bacterial microbiota exist in CRS patients and invoke discrete immune responses and clinical phenotypes in CRS patients. Sinus brushings from patients with CRS (n = 59) and healthy individuals (n = 10) collected during endoscopic sinus surgery were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, predicted metagenomics, and RNA profiling of the mucosal immune response. We show that CRS patients cluster into distinct sub-groups (DSI-III), each defined by specific pattern of bacterial co-colonization (permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA); p = 0.001, r (2) = 0.318). Each sub-group was typically dominated by a pathogenic family: Streptococcaceae (DSI), Pseudomonadaceae (DSII), Corynebacteriaceae [DSIII(a)], or Staphylococcaceae [DSIII(b)]. Each pathogenic microbiota was predicted to be functionally distinct (PERMANOVA; p = 0.005, r (2) = 0.217) and encode uniquely enriched gene pathways including ansamycin biosynthesis (DSI), tryptophan metabolism (DSII), two-component response [DSIII(b)], and the PPAR-γ signaling pathway [DSIII(a)]. Each is also associated with significantly distinct host immune responses; DSI, II, and III(b) invoked a variety of pro-inflammatory, TH1 responses, while DSIII(a), which exhibited significantly increased incidence of nasal polyps (Fisher's exact; p = 0.034, relative risk = 2.16), primarily induced IL-5 expression (Kruskal Wallis; q = 0.045). A large proportion of CRS patient heterogeneity may be explained by the composition of their sinus bacterial microbiota and related host immune response-features which may inform strategies for tailored therapy in this patient population.

  10. Ginger for Prevention of Antituberculosis-induced Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions Including Hepatotoxicity: A Randomized Pilot Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Emrani, Zahra; Shojaei, Esphandiar; Khalili, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the potential benefits of ginger in preventing antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions including hepatotoxicity have been evaluated in patients with tuberculosis. Patients in the ginger and placebo groups (30 patients in each group) received either 500 mg ginger (Zintoma)(®) or placebo one-half hour before each daily dose of antituberculosis drugs for 4 weeks. Patients' gastrointestinal complaints (nausea, vomiting, dyspepsia, and abdominal pain) and antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity were recorded during the study period. In this cohort, nausea was the most common antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions. Forty eight (80%) patients experienced nausea. Nausea was more common in the placebo than the ginger group [27 (90%) vs 21 (70%), respectively, p = 0.05]. During the study period, 16 (26.7%) patients experienced antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Patients in the ginger group experienced less, but not statistically significant, antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity than the placebo group (16.7% vs 36.7%, respectively, p = 0.07). In conclusion, ginger may be a potential option for prevention of antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions including hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Long-term (2-5 years) adverse clinical outcomes associated with ZES versus SES, PES and EES: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bundhun, Pravesh Kumar; Bhurtu, Akash; Pursun, Manish; Soogund, Mohammad Zafooruddin Sani; Teeluck, Abhishek Rishikesh; Huang, Wei-Qiang

    2017-07-25

    Several previously published trials comparing Zotarolimus Eluting Stents (ZES) with Sirolimus Eluting Stents (SES), Paclitaxel Eluting Stents (PES) or Everolimus Eluting Stents (EES) at a follow up period of 1 year, were continually being followed up in order to assess the long-term outcomes. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to compare the long-term (2-5 years) adverse clinical outcomes which were associated with ZES versus SES, PES and EES following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI). Risk Ratios (RR) with 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) were generated and the analysis was carried out by the RevMan 5.3 software. In this analysis with a total number of 17,606 participants, ZES and EES were associated with similar adverse outcomes including Stent Thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), major adverse cardiac events and repeated revascularization. When ZES were compared with SES and PES during the long-term, MI and definite or probable ST were significantly lower with ZES, with RR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17-1.56; P = 0.0001 and RR: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.33-2.75; P = 0.0004 respectively whereas the other adverse outcomes were similarly manifested. Future research should be able to confirm this hypothesis.

  12. Neuroprotective and consequent neurorehabilitative clinical outcomes, in patients treated with the pleiotropic drug cerebrolysin

    PubMed Central

    Mureşanu, DF; Ciurea, AV; Chendreanu, CD; Mihaescu, AS; Mardare, DC; Andone, I; SpȦnu, A; Popescu, C; Dumitrescu, A; Popescu, M; Grigorean, V; Ungur, B; Marinescu, F; Colibaşeanu, I; Onose, L; Haras, M; Sandu, A; Spircu, T

    2009-01-01

    Background: Discovery of neurotrophic factors–emblematic: the nerve growth factor (NGF)–resulted in better approaching central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Recently, another crucial property has been unveiled: their rather unique pleiotropic effect. Cerebrolysin is a peptide mixture that penetrates the blood–brain barrier in significant amounts and mimics the effects of NGF. Methods: Comparative analysis: Cerebrolysin treated (10 ml x 2/ day, i.v. x 3 weeks) vs. non–treated, in patients (all received aside, a rather equivalent complementary, pharmacological and physical, therapy). Two lots of patients, admitted in our Physical and Rehabilitation (neural–muscular) Medical–PR(n–m)M–Clinic Division, during 2007–2009: 69 treated with Cerebrolysin (22 F, 47 M; Average: 59.333; Mean of age: 61.0 Years old; Standard deviation 16.583) and 70 controls (41 F, 29 M; A: 70.014; M.o.a.: 70.5 Y.o.; S.d.: 6.270) were studied. The total number of assessed items was 13: most contributive in relation with the score of Functional Independence Measure at discharge (d FIM), were: admission (a FIM), number of physical therapy days (PT), number of hospitalization days (H), age (A) and–relatively–days until the first knee functional extension (KE). Concomitantly, the main/ key, focused on neuro–motor rehabilitative outcomes, functional/analytical parameters, have been assessed regarding the speed in achieving their functional recovery. Results: Concerning d FIM, there have not been objectified significant differences between the two lots (p=0.2453) but regarding key, focused on neuro–motor rehabilitative outcomes, functional/analytical parameters: KE (p=0.0007) and days until the first time recovery of the ability to walk between parallel bars (WPB–p=0.0000)–highly significant differences in favor of Cerebrolysin lot resulted. Conclusion: Cerebrolysin administration, as neurorehabilitative outcomes, proved to hasten, statistically significant, especially the

  13. MicroRNA Regulation of Endothelial Junction Proteins and Clinical Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yugang; Peng, Hu; Mastej, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Cellular junctions play a critical role in structural connection and signal communication between cells in various tissues. Although there are structural and functional varieties, cellular junctions include tight junctions, adherens junctions, focal adhesion junctions, and tissue specific junctions such as PECAM-1 junctions in endothelial cells (EC), desmosomes in epithelial cells, and hemidesmosomes in EC. Cellular junction dysfunction and deterioration are indicative of clinical diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are ~20 nucleotide, noncoding RNAs that play an important role in posttranscriptional regulation for almost all genes. Unsurprisingly, miRNAs regulate junction protein gene expression and control junction structure integrity. In contrast, abnormal miRNA regulation of junction protein gene expression results in abnormal junction structure, causing related diseases. The major components of tight junctions include zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), claudin-1, claudin-5, and occludin. The miRNA regulation of ZO-1 has been intensively investigated. ZO-1 and other tight junction proteins such as claudin-5 and occludin were positively regulated by miR-126, miR-107, and miR21 in different models. In contrast, ZO-1, claudin-5, and occludin were negatively regulated by miR-181a, miR-98, and miR150. Abnormal tight junction miRNA regulation accompanies cerebral middle artery ischemia, brain trauma, glioma metastasis, and so forth. The major components of adherens junctions include VE-cadherin, β-catenin, plakoglobin, P120, and vinculin. VE-cadherin and β-catenin were regulated by miR-9, miR-99b, miR-181a, and so forth. These regulations directly affect VE-cadherin-β-catenin complex stability and further affect embryo and tumor angiogenesis, vascular development, and so forth. miR-155 and miR-126 have been shown to regulate PECAM-1 and affect neutrophil rolling and EC junction integrity. In focal adhesion junctions, the major components are integrin β4, paxillin, and focal

  14. Effect of Continued Support of Midwifery Students in Labour on the Childbirth and Labour Consequences: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bolbol-Haghighi, Nahid; Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Childbirth experience is a process throughout women’s life and the most important consequence of labour. Support is the key factor to have a positive experience of childbirth. In order to improve and reduce the stress and anxiety levels in women during labour and cope with the childbirth pain, the emotional, physical and educational support of doulas can be used. Aim This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of continued support of midwifery students in labour on the childbirth and labour consequences. Materials and Methods The present study was conducted using a randomized controlled clinical trial design on 100 pregnant women referred to the maternity ward at Fatemieh Hospital, Shahroud, Iran. The participants were assigned to the supportive or non-supportive group based on allocation sequence using a randomized block design and table of computer-generated random numbers prior to beginning the study. Supportive care was provided by the trained midwifery students. Childbirth and labour consequences were analysed by chi-square test, Fisher-exact test, independent t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test using SPSS-21 software. Results The results showed a significantly lower duration of the first stage of labour in the supportive group, as compared to that in the non-supportive group (p <0.001). Moreover, Apgar scores in the supportive group, compared to those in the non-supportive group, significantly increased at minutes 1 and 5 (p <0.001 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusion The findings of this study showed that the supportive care provided by the midwifery students shortens duration of the first stage of labour and improves the Apgar scores in the first and fifth minutes. PMID:27790526

  15. Study of adverse events following immunisation with universal and newer vaccines in the Serampore IMA Child Clinic over a period of 7 years.

    PubMed

    Das, Pradip Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Immunisation is an important part of childcare practice. It is one of the most beneficial and cost effective measures for the prevention of diseases. From the previous retrospective studies, it was evident that smallpox has been completely eradicated throughout now-a-days with the wholehearted and sincere efforts of healthcare providers by applying efficient and safe vaccine against smallpox, same is true also to polio which is now close to worldwide eradication and measles and rubella are no longer endemic in certain parts of the world. Not only has that with the introduction of safer and more efficient newer vaccines, the incidence of most other vaccine preventable disease of childhood also reduced considerably. The aim of the present study is to estimate the incidence and clinical presentation of adverse events following immunisation with universal and newer vaccines for a period of seven years using prospective active surveillance. Children under the age of 7 years were taken for universal and newer scheduled vaccinations given in the Serampore IMA Child Clinic under the supervision of the clinicians maintaining strictly the guidelines of Expanded Programme of Immunisation (Government of India). This study of adverse events following immunisation in the Serampore IMA Child Clinic confirms that the adverse events such as fever (0.37%), pain and swelling at the site of injection (0.32%0, urticarial rash (0.02%), anaphylactic shock (0.003%) are negligible. There were only two reports of anaphylaxis following preschool and infant schedule vaccines, including measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccines and typhoid vaccines in approximately 52,000 infants received over a period of 7 years starting from 1st April, 2005 to 31st March, 2012 and there were no deaths or longterm effects reported during the post follow-up period in the Serampore IMA Child Clinic.

  16. Effect of Consultation and Educating in Preparation Classes for Delivery on Pregnancy Consequences: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Simin; Kazemi, Farideh; Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra; Shobeiri, Fatemeh; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah

    2016-01-01

    Background Care during pregnancy and performing consultation for delivery preparation play an important role in improving pregnant women’s knowledge. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of consultation and instruction in the preparation classes for delivery on pregnancy consequences, including choosing the type of delivery, the performed type of delivery, and infant’s weight. Methods This study was conducted in 2015 on 170 pregnant women who had been referred to the prenatal clinic in Hamedan. The participants were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. Eight sessions of consultation for delivery preparation were held for the women in 20 to 36 weeks of pregnancy. The control group received only the routine care. After 37 weeks of pregnancy, the participants answered a questionnaire. The infant’s weight was measured after birth. Data were analyzed Using SPSS-21 and McNemar–Bowker Test, independent t-test, chi-square test, and Fisher exact test. Results Results showed a significant statistical difference between the two groups concerning their selective and performed delivery (p<0.001). The weight of infants in the intervention group was significantly higher than that of those in the control group (p<0.001). Conclusion The findings of this study showed that the consultation for delivery preparation had a positive effect on some pregnancy consequences such as selecting the type of delivery performed and infant’s weight. Trial registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCTID: IRCT2015012513405N9. Funding The authors received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. PMID:28070250

  17. Effects of Steroids on Quality of Recovery and Adverse Events after General Anesthesia: Meta-Analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tomoko; Ka, Koui; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality of recovery (QoR) after surgery is a relevant outcome. The early postoperative quality of recovery of a patient can be determined using the QoR-40 questionnaire. The aim of this meta-analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis was to determine if perioperative administration of glucocorticosteroids improved patients’ quality of recovery after general anesthesia and if adverse events occurred. Methods We searched six databases, including trial registration sites. Randomized clinical trials reporting the efficacy of glucocorticosteroids on quality of recovery evaluated using the QoR-40 after general anesthesia were eligible. The QoR-40 data were combined as the mean difference with confidence intervals using a random-effects model. The I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity. The quality of the trials was evaluated using the Cochrane methodology. Moreover, Trial Sequential Analysis was carried out to prevent the inflation of type 1 errors caused by multiple testing and sparse data. We also assessed adverse events. Results Three randomized clinical trials (totaling 301 patients) were analyzed. The results from one published and four unpublished randomized clinical trials were unavailable. Dexamethasone was investigated in all three trials, and the results suggested that it significantly improved QoR-40 at postoperative day one scores compared with placebo (mean difference [95% confidence interval]: 14.2 points [10.4 to 18.1]; P < 0.001; I2 = 0%). We could not conduct sensitivity analysis because of the absence of trials with low risk of bias. The Trial Sequential Analysis-adjusted confidence interval was -1.6 to 30.0, indicating that further trials are required. The reporting of adverse events was insufficient. Conclusions These findings indicate that perioperative dexamethasone administration may improve short-term (i.e., one day) quality of recovery after general anesthesia and surgery. We need more randomized clinical trials with low risk of

  18. [Clinical consequences of modernity].

    PubMed

    Juliot, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    When they receive patients in their treatment centre, clinicians witness symptoms which are sometimes very closely related to the inclusion within hypermodernity of hyperbole and instantaneousness. A study of the question of contemporary violence through an analytical explanation of the relationship between the subject and the object.

  19. Immunological and clinical factors associated with adverse systemic reactions during the build-up phase of honeybee venom immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Korošec, P; Žiberna, K; Šilar, M; Dežman, M; Čelesnik Smodiš, N; Rijavec, M; Kopač, P; Eržen, R; Lalek, N; Bajrović, N; Košnik, M; Zidarn, M

    2015-10-01

    Adverse systemic reactions (SRs) are more common in honeybee venom immunotherapy (VIT) than in wasp VIT. Factors that might be associated with SRs during the honeybee VIT are poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate risk factors for SRs during the build-up phase of honeybee venom immunotherapy. We included 93 patients who underwent ultra-rush honeybee VIT. The adverse SRs and their severity was compared to various immunological (sIgE, tIgE, basophil CD63 response, baseline tryptase, and skin tests), patient-specific (age, sex, cardiovascular conditions and medications, and other allergic diseases), and sting-specific factors (anaphylaxis severity, time interval to onset of symptoms, and absence of cutaneous symptoms). Twenty-three patients (24.7%) experienced mild SRs and 13 patients (14%) severe SRs. In five patients with severe SRs, the build-up was stopped. High basophil allergen sensitivity, evaluated as dose-response curve metrics of EC15, EC50, CD-sens, AUC, or the response to submaximal 0.01 μg/mL of venom concentration, was the most significant risk factor and only independent predictor of severe SRs and/or build-up stop. Time interval of <5 min after sting to onset of symptoms and lower specific IgEs to rApi m1 was also associated with severe SRs. There was no difference in other immunological, patient-specific, or sting-specific factors, including the baseline tryptase. None of the studied factors was associated with mild SRs. High basophil allergen CD63 sensitivity phenotype was a major indicator of severe adverse SRs during the build-up phase of honeybee VIT. Possibly role was also showed for short latency to filed sting reaction and low sIgE to rApi m1. Before honeybee VIT, measurement of basophil allergen sensitivity should be used to identify patients with a high risk for severe side-effects. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Clinical and Immunological Insights on Severe, Adverse Neurotropic and Viscerotropic Disease following 17D Yellow Fever Vaccination▿

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria Luiza; Espírito-Santo, Luçandra Ramos; Martins, Marina Angela; Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Caminha, Ricardo Carvalho; de Andrade Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; de Menezes Martins, Reinaldo; Galler, Ricardo; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Marcovistz, Rugimar; Homma, Akira; Teuwen, Dirk E.; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2010-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccines (17D-204 and 17DD) are well tolerated and cause very low rates of severe adverse events (YEL-SAE), such as serious allergic reactions, neurotropic adverse diseases (YEL-AND), and viscerotropic diseases (YEL-AVD). Viral and host factors have been postulated to explain the basis of YEL-SAE. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of YEL-SAE remain unknown. The present report provides a detailed immunological analysis of a 23-year-old female patient. The patient developed a suspected case of severe YEL-AVD with encephalitis, as well as with pancreatitis and myositis, following receipt of a 17D-204 YF vaccination. The patient exhibited a decreased level of expression of Fc-γR in monocytes (CD16, CD32, and CD64), along with increased levels of NK T cells (an increased CD3+ CD16+/− CD56+/−/CD3+ ratio), activated T cells (CD4+ and CD8+ cells), and B lymphocytes. Enhanced levels of plasmatic cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) as well as an exacerbated ex vivo intracytoplasmic cytokine pattern, mainly observed within NK cells (gamma interferon positive [IFN-γ+], tumor necrosis factor alpha positive [TNF-α+], and IL-4 positive [IL-4+]), CD8+ T cells (IL-4+ and IL-5+), and B lymphocytes (TNF-α+, IL-4+, and IL-10+). The analysis of CD4+ T cells revealed a complex profile that consisted of an increased frequency of IL-12+ and IFN-γ+ cells and a decreased percentage of TNF-α+, IL-4+, and IL-5+ cells. Depressed cytokine synthesis was observed in monocytes (TNF-α+) following the provision of antigenic stimuli in vitro. These results support the hypothesis that a strong adaptive response and abnormalities in the innate immune system may be involved in the establishment of YEL-AND and YEL-AVD. PMID:19906894

  1. Associations of Adverse Clinical Course and Ingested Substances among Patients with Deliberate Drug Poisoning: A Cohort Study from an Intensive Care Unit in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichikura, Kanako; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Some patients with deliberate drug poisoning subsequently have an adverse clinical course. The present study aimed to examine whether the type of drugs ingested and psychiatric diagnoses were related to an adverse clinical course. Methods We conducted a cohort study of patients with deliberate drug poisoning admitted to the intensive care unit of a university hospital located in Tokyo, Japan, between September 2006 and June 2013. Intensive care unit (ICU) stay of ≥4 days was used as a primary outcome measure, while the incidence of aspiration pneumonitis was used as a secondary outcome measure. Ingested substances and psychiatric diagnoses were used as explanatory variables. Results Of the 676 patients with deliberate drug poisoning, 88% had a history of psychiatric treatment and 82% had ingested psychotropic drugs. Chlorpromazine-promethazine-phenobarbital combination drug (Vegetamin®) ranked fifth among the most frequently ingested substances in cases of deliberate drug poisoning and had the highest incidence of prolonged ICU stay (20%) and aspiration pneumonitis (29%). The top three major classes consisted of benzodiazepines (79%), new-generation antidepressants (25%), and barbiturates/non-barbiturates (23%). Barbiturate overdose was independently associated with increased odds of both prolonged ICU stay (8% vs. 17%; odds ratio [OR], 2.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60–5.55) and aspiration pneumonitis (8% vs. 24%; OR, 3.83; 95% CI, 2.18–6.79) relative to those associated with overdose of only other sedative-hypnotics (i.e., benzodiazepines). Conclusion These results suggest that judicious prescribing of barbiturates by psychiatrists could reduce the risk of an adverse clinical course when a patient attempts an overdose. PMID:27560966

  2. Associations of Adverse Clinical Course and Ingested Substances among Patients with Deliberate Drug Poisoning: A Cohort Study from an Intensive Care Unit in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ichikura, Kanako; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some patients with deliberate drug poisoning subsequently have an adverse clinical course. The present study aimed to examine whether the type of drugs ingested and psychiatric diagnoses were related to an adverse clinical course. We conducted a cohort study of patients with deliberate drug poisoning admitted to the intensive care unit of a university hospital located in Tokyo, Japan, between September 2006 and June 2013. Intensive care unit (ICU) stay of ≥4 days was used as a primary outcome measure, while the incidence of aspiration pneumonitis was used as a secondary outcome measure. Ingested substances and psychiatric diagnoses were used as explanatory variables. Of the 676 patients with deliberate drug poisoning, 88% had a history of psychiatric treatment and 82% had ingested psychotropic drugs. Chlorpromazine-promethazine-phenobarbital combination drug (Vegetamin®) ranked fifth among the most frequently ingested substances in cases of deliberate drug poisoning and had the highest incidence of prolonged ICU stay (20%) and aspiration pneumonitis (29%). The top three major classes consisted of benzodiazepines (79%), new-generation antidepressants (25%), and barbiturates/non-barbiturates (23%). Barbiturate overdose was independently associated with increased odds of both prolonged ICU stay (8% vs. 17%; odds ratio [OR], 2.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-5.55) and aspiration pneumonitis (8% vs. 24%; OR, 3.83; 95% CI, 2.18-6.79) relative to those associated with overdose of only other sedative-hypnotics (i.e., benzodiazepines). These results suggest that judicious prescribing of barbiturates by psychiatrists could reduce the risk of an adverse clinical course when a patient attempts an overdose.

  3. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  4. Clinical presentation and metabolic consequences in 40 breastfed infants with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency--what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Honzik, Tomas; Adamovicova, Miriam; Smolka, Vratislav; Magner, Martin; Hruba, Eva; Zeman, Jiri

    2010-11-01

    Maternal vitamin B(12) (Cbl) deficiency causes nutritional Cbl deficiency in breastfed infants. To analyse clinical presentation and metabolic consequences in 40 breastfed infants with Cbl deficiency. Cbl levels in serum and breast milk were determined by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, methylmalonic acid level by GC/MS, plasma homocysteine by HPLC and propionylcarnitine by MS/MS. Profound Cbl deficiency was found in 17 children (69 ± 17 ng/l, controls 200-900), and milder Cbl deficiency in 23 children (167 ± 40 ng/l). Maternal Cbl deficiency was mostly caused by insufficient Cbl absorption. Only six mothers were vegetarian. The average age at diagnosis was 4.4 ± 2.5 months. Clinical symptoms included failure to thrive (48% of children), hypotonia (40%), developmental delay (38%) and microcephaly (23%). 63% of children had anaemia (megaloblastic in 28% of all children). All but one patient had methylmalonic aciduria, 80% of patients had hyperhomocysteinemia and 87% had increased aminotransferases. Propionylcarnitine was elevated in two out of 25 infants. Comparing groups with severe and mild Cbl deficiency, a marked difference was found in severity of clinical and laboratory changes. Maternal Cbl status and diagnostic delay are the major factors influencing severity and progression of Cbl deficiency in breastfed infants. In our cohort, propionylcarnitine was not sufficiently sensitive marker of Cbl deficiency. Although symptoms are reversible on Cbl substitution, permanent neurological damage can result. Selective screening for Cbl deficiency is indicated in all breastfed infants with failure to thrive, hypotonia, developmental delay, microcephaly or megaloblastic anaemia. The best prevention in future could be the screening of all pregnant women. Copyright © 2009 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimation of the clinical and economic consequences of non-compliance with antimicrobial treatment of canine skin infections.

    PubMed

    Van Vlaenderen, Ilse; Nautrup, Barbara Poulsen; Gasper, Sabina M

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this study was to estimate the health and economic consequences of non-compliance with oral antimicrobial treatment in dogs with superficial pyoderma, wounds or abscesses in the US. A mathematical model (Markov model) which simulated treatment with long-term injectable cefovecin versus oral amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was developed and accounted for the effect of non-compliance on clinical outcomes and mean total treatment costs per patient. Efficacy parameters considered in the model were derived from clinical studies. Treatment failure due to oral antimicrobial treatment non-compliance was approximated from published data at 13.6%. US cost data for 2009 were derived from public sources. When non-compliance was considered as a cause of treatment failure with oral medication, the long-term injectable antibiotic was more effective than oral comparator (162 versus 158 days without clinical signs). Mean total treatment costs were lower with cefovecin (USD 376.74) versus amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (USD 382.34) in dogs of 25 kg; and cefovecin remained cost-saving up to a body weight of 31 kg. In large dogs, cefovecin was more costly; however, total therapy costs were less than 6% greater than with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Accordingly the higher drug and administration costs of the long-term injectable antibiotic were totally or substantially offset when non-compliance was considered as reason for treatment failure with oral medication. The model also allowed for the estimation of the impact of various non-compliance scenarios. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Gene transfer as a strategy to achieve permanent cardioprotection II: rAAV-mediated gene therapy with heme oxygenase-1 limits infarct size 1 year later without adverse functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianhong; Guo, Yiru; Ou, Qinghui; Wu, Wen-Jian; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Xiaoping; Tan, Wei; Yuan, Fangping; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Luo, Li; Hunt, Gregory N; Bolli, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts potent cytoprotective effects in response to stress. Previous studies have shown that gene therapy with HO-1 protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury for up to 8 weeks after gene transfer. However, the long-term effects of HO-1 gene therapy on myocardial ischemic injury and function are unknown. To address this issue, we created a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector carrying the HO-1 gene (rAAV/HO-1) that enables long-lasting transgene expression. Mice received injections in the anterior LV wall of rAAV/LacZ (LacZ group) or rAAV/HO-1 (HO-1 group); 1 year later, they were subjected to a 30-min coronary occlusion (O) and 4 h of reperfusion (R). Cardiac HO-1 gene expression was confirmed at 1 month and 1 year after gene transfer by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. In the HO-1 group, infarct size (% of risk region) was dramatically reduced at 1 year after gene transfer (11.2 ± 2.1%, n = 12, vs. 44.7 ± 3.6%, n = 8, in the LacZ group; P < 0.05). The infarct-sparing effects of HO-1 gene therapy at 1 year were as powerful as those observed 24 h after ischemic PC (six 4-min O/4-min R cycles) (15.0 ± 1.7%, n = 10). There were no appreciable changes in LV fractional shortening, LV ejection fraction, or LV end-diastolic or end-systolic diameter at 1 year after HO-1 gene transfer as compared to the age-matched controls or with the LacZ group. Histology showed no inflammation in the myocardium 1 year after rAAV/HO-1-mediated gene transfer. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that rAAV-mediated HO-1 gene transfer confers long-term (1 year), possibly permanent, cardioprotection without adverse functional consequences, providing proof of principle for the concept of achieving prophylactic cardioprotection (i.e., "immunization against infarction").

  7. Association between nutritional risk and routine clinical laboratory measurements and adverse outcomes: a prospective study in hospitalized patients of wuhan tongji hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z Y; Gao, C; Ye, T; Zuo, X Z; Wang, G H; Xu, X S; Yao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Nutritional risk screening (NRS-2002) and routine clinical laboratory measurements (RCLMs) had been shown to have a predictive value in adverse outcomes in some studies, respectively. This study analyzed the association between NRS-2002 and RCLMs and estimated their prospective value in predicting adverse outcomes. Subjects/Methods: A total of 916 hospitalized patients were screened on admission with NRS-2002 and Subjective Global Assessment; RCLMs, which include blood test, kidney and liver function and electrolytes, were recorded. Diagnosis, nutritional support, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, complications, mortality and hospital stay during hospitalization were collected. The X2-test, odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, kappa (k) statistic and regression analyses were conducted. Results: An overall 48.1% of the 916 patients were at nutritional risk on admission. Comparing ‘at risk' with ‘no risk', a significantly higher incidence of abnormality was found not only in nutritional markers but also in other parameters of RCLMs (OR ranged from 1.5 to 3.5). Regression analyses showed that ‘at risk' determined at admission was not a significant predictor of adverse outcomes after adjusting for other confounding factors, although it was a strong predictor in univariate analysis, whereas hypoalbuminemia, low total lymphocyte count, abnormality of hepatic and renal function were predictors after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions: The findings suggest that NRS-2002 might be a global index of ‘sickness' rather than be only a nutritional screening tool. It being rated once at admission is insufficient and should be repeated for using it as a predictor, whereas RCLMs routinely measured at admission may be able to be used to predict adverse outcomes. PMID:25369828

  8. A unified web-based query and notification system (QNS) for subject management, adverse events, regulatory, and IRB components of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rick; Shah, Maitri; Ahmad, Sushma; Rogers, Audrey Smith; Ellenberg, Jonas H

    2005-01-01

    Even after intensive review, interpretative questions, ambiguities, contradictions, or errors, will arise once the protocol is scrutinized by site IRBs and implemented at sites. This will occur despite preparation and implementation of site protocol training, and provision of well crafted case report forms for the reporting of clinical and laboratory evaluations and adverse events. Since many staff are involved in each protocol, site investigators or study coordinators might direct protocol queries, participant management, or IRB queries to different network participants, resulting in inconsistent responses. It is important to establish a response mechanism that ensures consistent responses and their systematic documentation. For reporting of adverse events, and the submission of or documentation of completion of regulatory requirements, an easily accessible and structured communications system is also required. This paper describes the development and implementation of a user-friendly web-based query and notification system (QNS) for subject management, adverse events, regulatory, and IRB components. This system was created in the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN), using existing web based tools with minor modifications and minimal cost. The query and notification system is interactive and allows for free flow of information among the site coordinators and both the protocol teams and the regulatory group. The process of the system is transparent to users at the sites, although its use and maintenance is controlled by Data Operations Center staff, to assure that ATN requirements for review and approval are met. This results in consistency of and timeliness of responses to queries, timeliness and accuracy of adverse event reporting and the ability for the data operations center regulatory staff to provide notification of pending or delinquent regulatory submissions.

  9. The AFFORD Clinical Decision Aid To Identify Emergency Department Patients With Atrial Fibrillation At Low Risk For 30-Day Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tyler W.; Storrow, Alan B.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Abraham, Robert L.; Liu, Dandan; Miller, Karen F.; Moser, Kelly M.; Russ, Stephan; Roden, Dan M.; Harrell, Frank E.; Darbar, Dawood

    2015-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of emergency department (ED) patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to derive and internally validate the first prospective, ED-based clinical decision aid to identify patients with AF at low risk for 30-day adverse events. We performed a prospective cohort study at a university-affiliated, tertiary-care, ED. Patients were enrolled from June 9, 2010 to February 28, 2013 and followed for 30 days. We enrolled a convenience sample of ED patients presenting with symptomatic AF. Candidate predictors were based on ED data available in the first two hours. The decision aid was derived using model approximation (preconditioning) followed by strong bootstrap internal validation. We utilized an ordinal outcome hierarchy defined as the incidence of the most severe adverse event within 30 days of the ED evaluation. Of 497 patients enrolled, stroke and AF-related death occurred in 13 (3%) and 4 (<1%) patients, respectively. The decision aid included the following: age, triage vitals (systolic blood pressure, temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, supplemental oxygen requirement); medical history (heart failure, home sotalol use, prior percutaneous coronary intervention, electrical cardioversion, cardiac ablation, frequency of AF symptoms); ED data (2 hour heart rate, chest radiograph results, hemoglobin, creatinine, and brain natriuretic peptide). The decision aid’s c-statistic in predicting any 30-day adverse event was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.65, 0.76). In conclusion, among ED patients with AF, AFFORD provides the first evidence based decision aid for identifying patients who are at low risk for 30-day adverse events and candidates for safe discharge. PMID:25633190

  10. A Comparative Study of Clinical Presentation and Risk Factors for Adverse Outcome in Patients Hospitalised with Acute Respiratory Disease Due to MERS Coronavirus or Other Causes

    PubMed Central

    Garbati, Musa A.; Fagbo, Shamsudeen F.; Fang, Vicky J.; Skakni, Leila; Joseph, Mercy; Wani, Tariq A.; Cowling, Benjamin J.; Peiris, Malik; Hakawi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory syndrome (MERS) first emerged in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and remains a global health concern. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical features and risk factors for adverse outcome in patients with RT-PCR confirmed MERS and in those with acute respiratory disease who were MERS-CoV negative, presenting to the King Fahad Medical City (KFMC) in Riyadh between October 2012 and May 2014. The demographics, clinical and laboratory characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with RT-PCR confirmed MERS-CoV infection was compared with those testing negative MERS-CoV PCR. Health care workers (HCW) with MERS were compared with MERS patients who were not health care workers. One hundred and fifty nine patients were eligible for inclusion. Forty eight tested positive for MERS CoV, 44 (92%) being hospital acquired infections and 23 were HCW. There were 111 MERS-CoV negative patients with acute respiratory illnesses included in this study as “negative controls”. Patient with confirmed MERS-CoV infection were not clinically distinguishable from those with negative MERS-CoV RT-PCR results although diarrhoea was commoner in MERS patients. A high level of suspicion in initiating laboratory tests for MERS-CoV is therefore indicated. Variables associated with adverse outcome were older age and diabetes as a co-morbid illness. Interestingly, co-morbid illnesses other than diabetes were not significantly associated with poor outcome. Health care workers with MERS had a markedly better clinical outcome compared to non HCW MERS patients. PMID:27812197

  11. p27KIP1 is abnormally expressed in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas and is associated with an adverse clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Al; Sánchez, E; Sánchez-Beato, M; Cruz, M A; Chacón, I; Muñoz, E; Camacho, F I; Martínez-Montero, J C; Mollejo, M; Garcia, J F; Piris, M A

    1999-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by the combined action of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and CDK-inhibitors (CDKi), which are negative cell cycle regulators. p27KIP1 is a CDKi key in cell cycle regulation, whose degradation is required for G1/S transition. In spite of the absence of p27KIP1 expression in proliferating lymphocytes, some aggressive B-cell lymphomas have been reported to show an anomalous p27KIP1 staining. We analysed p27KIP1 expression in a series of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), correlating it with the proliferative index and clinical outcome, to characterize the implications of this anomalous staining in lymphomagenesis in greater depth. For the above mentioned purposes, an immunohistochemical technique in paraffin-embedded tissues was employed, using commercially available antibodies, in a series of 133 patients with known clinical outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed in order to ascertain which clinical and molecular variables may influence outcome, in terms of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The relationships between p27KIP1 and MIB-1 (Ki-67) were also tested. An abnormally high expression of p27KIP1 was found in lymphomas of this type. The overall correlation between p27KIP1 and MIB-1 showed there to be no significant relationship between these two parameters, this differing from observations in reactive lymphoid and other tissues. Analysis of the clinical relevance of these findings showed that a high level of p27KIP1 expression in this type of tumour is an adverse prognostic marker, in both univariate and multivariate analysis. These results show that there is abnormal p27KIP1 expression in DLBCL, with adverse clinical significance, suggesting that this anomalous p27KIP1 protein may be rendered non-functional through interaction with other cell cycle regulator proteins. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10424746

  12. Ketamine for Depression, 1: Clinical Summary of Issues Related to Efficacy, Adverse Effects, and Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2017-04-01

    Ketamine is an anesthetic drug that is also used for off-label indications such as the mediation of analgesia and sedation in various settings. It is additionally recognized as an agent with antidepressant potential. For depression, it is most commonly administered as a slow intravenous infusion in subanesthetic doses (usually 0.5 mg/kg). As an antidepressant, is strikingly different from conventional antidepressant drugs in that it brings about rapid and marked attenuation of depressive symptoms even in patients with refractory depression. The benefits are observed within hours of administration, peak after about a day, and are lost 3-12 days later. Patients who do not benefit after the initial dose may benefit with serial dosing or at higher doses. Benefits can be maintained for weeks to months by the continuation of ketamine sessions at 2- to 4-day intervals. Adverse effects include dissociative and psychotomimetic changes that are almost always mild and transient, if present; transient elevation of heart rate and blood pressure often occur. These changes are usually well tolerated and are very seldom responsible for treatment discontinuation. Whereas ketamine is an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, and whereas much is known about its different biological effects, its actions that mediate the antidepressant response are presently not known for certain. Although big data on ketamine are presently unavailable, the drug holds promise in the treatment of depression, especially refractory depression. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  13. Longitudinal adverse event assessment in oncology clinical trials: the Toxicity over Time (ToxT) analysis of Alliance trials NCCTG N9741 and 979254.

    PubMed

    Thanarajasingam, Gita; Atherton, Pamela J; Novotny, Paul J; Loprinzi, Charles L; Sloan, Jeff A; Grothey, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Traditional methods of reporting adverse events in clinical trials are inadequate for modern cancer treatments with chronic administration. Conventional analysis and display of maximum grade adverse events do not capture toxicity profiles that evolve over time or longer lasting, lower grade toxic effects; we aimed to address this shortcoming in this study. We developed an analytic approach and standardised, comprehensive format, the Toxicity over Time (ToxT) approach, which combines graphs and adverse event tabular displays with multiple longitudinal statistical techniques into a readily applicable method to study toxic effects. Plots visualising summary statistics or individual patient data over discrete timepoints were combined with statistical methods including the following longitudinal techniques: repeated measures models that describe the changes in adverse events across all cycles of treatment; time-to-event analyses of first and worst grade toxicity; and area under the curve (AUC) analyses summarising adverse event profiles over the entire course of a study, including chronic low-grade events. We applied ToxT analysis to adverse event data from two completed North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG/Alliance) trials: N9741 (NCT00003594), in which different combinations of oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and irinotecan were investigated for metastatic colorectal cancer, and 979254, in which survivors of breast cancer were given venlafaxine or placebo for control of hot flashes. In trial NCCTG 979254 there was a higher incidence of late-occurring dry mouth in patients who were given venlafaxine than in those given placebo (week 1 [baseline]: 13% [six incidence in 48 patients, SD 5] vs 22% [11/49, SD 6]; p=0·20; week 5: 49% [24/49, 7] vs 2% [1/46, 2]; p<0·0001). In trial NCCTG N9741 there was an increased incidence of early nausea for patients given irinotecan plus oxaliplatin (IROX) compared with those given 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin (FOLFOX; cycle 1

  14. Meta-analysis of positive effects, side effects and adverse events of holistic mind-body medicine (clinical holistic medicine): experience from Denmark, Sweden, United Kingdom and Germany.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2009-01-01

    About 50% of the general population has a chronic disease not cured by biomedicine. Meta-analysis of holistic clinical medicine for which chronic patients were treated and outcomes were, 1) global quality of life, 2) self-rated physical/mental health, quality of life or ability of functioning, or 3) patients felt cured for a specific disease of dysfunction. MEDLINE and PsycLNFO and specific journals were searched in January 2009. Eleven clinical studies (18,500 participants) were identified. Positive effects: Quality of life Number Needed to Treat (NNT) = 2, physical health problems NNT = 3, mental health problems NNT = 2, sexual dysfunctions NNT = 2, self esteem NNT = 2, working/studying ability NNT = 2, anorgasmia NNT = 1, other specific sexual dysfunctions NNT = 2. Of 791 patients treated was 617, or 78.0% cured (NNT = 1). Side effects and adverse events: re-traumatization Number Needed to Harm (NNH) > 18,500; brief reactive psychosis (if mentally ill) NNH = 4,625; brief reactive psychosis (if not mentally ill) NNH > 9,250; brief reactive psychosis, all patients NNH = 9,250; depression NNH > 18,500; depersonalization and derealization NNH > 18,500; iatrogenic disturbances NNH > 18,500; minor bone fractures (ribs, hand) NNH = 4,625; serious bone fractures (spine, scull, pelvis) NNH > 18,500; suicides during or less than three month after therapy NNH > 18,500; suicide attempts during or less than three month after therapy NNH > 18,500. Suicide was prevented NNT = 1. Therapeutic value TV = NNH/NNT = 9,250. Holistic clinical medicine is an efficient complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment for chronic illnesses and health related problems. Every second patient with physical and mental disorders, sexual dysfunctions, and existential problems were healed. Holistic clinical medicine had no significant side effects or adverse events.

  15. Impact of untreated dental caries and its clinical consequences on the oral health-related quality of life of schoolchildren aged 8-10 years.

    PubMed

    Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Soares, Maria Eliza C; Alencar, Bruna Mota; Marques, Leandro Silva; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia; Ramos-Jorge, Joana

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the impact of untreated dental caries and its clinical consequences on the quality of life of Brazilian schoolchildren aged 8-10 years. A randomly selected sample of 587 children underwent a clinical oral examination for the assessment of untreated dental caries and clinical consequences. The WHO criteria (decayed component of the decayed, missing, and filled teeth--D-DMFT in permanent teeth or d-dfmt in primary teeth) and the PUFA index, which records the presence of severely decayed permanent (upper case) and primary (lower case) teeth with visible pulpal involvement (P/p), as well as ulceration caused by dislocated tooth fragments (U/u), fistula (F/f), and abscesses (A/a), were used for the oral examination. Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) was evaluated using the Child's Perception Questionnaire (CPQ8-10). Poisson regression was employed to test unadjusted and adjusted associations between untreated dental caries/clinical consequences and OHRQoL. The prevalence of untreated dental caries was 64.6% (D/d component of DMFT/dmft > 0) and 17.9% of children exhibited clinical consequences of caries (PUFA/pufa index >0). In the adjusted models, untreated caries was significantly associated with the total CPQ8-10 score and all subscale scores. The clinical consequences of dental caries (PUFA/pufa index >0) were significantly associated with the total CPQ8-10 as well as the oral symptoms and functional limitations' subscales. Untreated dental caries and its clinical consequences exerted a negative impact on the OHRQoL of the schoolchildren analyzed.

  16. Mid-trimester maternal serum HCG and alpha fetal protein levels: clinical significance and prediction of adverse pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Androutsopoulos, Georgios; Gkogkos, Panagiotis; Decavalas, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Maternal serum human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) and Alpha Fetal Protein (AFP) were originally introduced to detect trisomy 21 and neural tube defects. However, in the absence of aneuploidy or neural tube defects, mid-trimester maternal serum hCG and/or maternal serum AFP associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Pregnancies with unexplained mid-trimester elevation in maternal serum hCG and/or maternal serum AFP, are at increased risk for pregnancy complications resulting from placental insufficiency. Mid-trimester maternal serum hCG>2.5 MoM associated with an increased risk for pregnancy complications including: late fetal loss, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), preterm delivery and intrauterine fetal death(IUFD). Mid-trimester maternal serum AFP levels >2.5 MoM are thought to reflect a defect in placentation and associated with an increased risk for pregnancy complications including: late fetal loss, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, IUGR, preterm delivery and IUFD. Combined mid-trimester elevation in maternal serum hCG and AFP levels suggest a more complex type of placental pathology. They have stronger association with pregnancy complications including: late fetal loss, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, IUGR, preterm delivery and IUFD. Mid-trimester maternal serum hCG or AFP levels alone cannot detect all pregnant women with increased risk to develop pregnancy complications. Multiparameter testing of placental function in mid-trimester (maternal serum hCG and AFP screening, uterine artery Doppler and placental morphology) may allow us to identify women with increased risk to develop severe placental insufficiency and pregnancy complications. However, future prospective studies are needed to confirm the prognostic significance of multiparameter testing of placental function in mid-trimester.

  17. Clinical value of maternal bile Acid quantification in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy as an adverse perinatal outcome predictor.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Flores, Jose; Cañamares, Marina; Cruceyra, Mireia; Garicano, Ainhoa; Espada, Mercedes; Lopez, Ana; Tamarit, Ines

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation between perinatal outcome and bile acid levels in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP), and to evaluate variations in the mean bile acid level when stratifying by maternal and perinatal factors. A comparison between mild and severe ICP was made. A prospective observational study was performed in pregnant patients who underwent blood tests for bile acids due to persistent pruritus. Based on bile acid levels, maternal and neonatal data were obtained and were compared between patients presenting with ICP and gestational pruritus (normal bile acid level). A total of 145 patients were included, 47 of whom were diagnosed as ICP (52 newborns) and 98 as gestational pruritus (102 newborns). The ICP group had a higher rate of NICU admission (14/42 vs. 6/98, p < 0.001) and global neonatal morbidity (13/42 vs. 9/98, p = 0.002), but these differences were no longer seen after adjusting for gestational age, singleton pregnancies and induction of labour. Patients presenting with severe ICP (maximum bile acids levels above 40 µmol/l) showed a higher rate of meconium-stained amniotic fluid (0/28 vs. 4/14, p = 0.009), NICU admission (9/34 vs. 11/17, p = 0.01) and neonatal global morbidity (5/32 vs. 8/17, p = 0.02). ICP patients have higher rates of adverse neonatal outcomes when compared to those with gestational pruritus. Some of this neonatal morbidity may be secondary to late spontaneous preterm deliveries, multiple gestation and a policy of elective induction of labour after 37 weeks of gestation. A comparison of outcomes among patients with mild and severe ICP shows that the severely affected group has higher rates of meconium-stained amniotic fluid and neonatal morbidity. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The adverse prognostic hallmarks in identical twins with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a clinical report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chai, Damin; Tao, Yisheng; Bao, Zhengqi; Yang, Li; Feng, Zhenzhong; Ma, Li; Liang, Limei; Zhou, Xinwen

    2013-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of Langerhans cells accompanying eosinophils. It often attacks children under 10 years of age. LCH in identical twins is very rare and its prognosis is different. Here we report identical-twin sisters with LCH. Computed tomography (CT) revealed osteolytic change in each twin's skull, and the elder exhibited poor eyesight. There were massive histiocyte-like cells surrounded by eosinophils in pathologic specimen of the abnormal lesions, which is typical pathologic finding in LCH. These pathologic cells were positive for S-100 and the cell surface protein CD1 antigen (CD1α), the known markers of LCH. After treating them with surgery, no symptoms were seen in the younger until now. While the older was found another soft mass (about 2.0 cm in diameter) in the left temporal area 18 months later. The same treatment was given to the older after admission, and she is healthy to date. To explore the relationship between hallmarks and the prognosis of identical-twin patients with LCH, we retrieved the 16 literatures (16 identical-twin pairs, 31 patients) listed in PubMed during the past 60 years. The data revealed all those patients who have disseminated to the bone marrow, spleen and liver with symptoms of fever and hepatosplenomegaly exhibited worse prognosis (9 out of the 31 patients). The other identical-twin subjects without infiltration of those organs recovered well. In conclusion, this study reveals the adverse hallmarks of prognosis in identical-twin patients with LCH by reviewing relevant literatures.

  19. Multi-physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T CFTR mutation revealed by clinical and cellular investigations.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Raed; El-Seedy, Ayman; El-Moussaoui, Kamal; Pasquet, Marie-Claude; Adolphe, Catherine; Bieth, Eric; Languepin, Jeanne; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Kitzis, Alain; Ladevèze, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    This study combines a clinical approach and multiple level cellular analyses to determine the physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T (p.Lys464Asn) CFTR exon 10 mutation, detected in a CF patient with a frameshift deletion in trans and a TG(11)T(5) in cis. Minigene experiment, with different TG(m)T(n) alleles, and nasal cell mRNA extracts were used to study the impact of c.1392G>T on splicing in both in cellulo and in vivo studies. The processing and localization of p.Lys464Asn protein were evaluated, in cellulo, by western blotting analyses and confocal microscopy. Clinical and channel exploration tests were performed on the patient to determine the exact CF phenotype profile and the CFTR chloride transport activity. c.1392G>T affects exon 10 splicing by inducing its complete deletion and encoding a frameshift transcript. The polymorphism TG(11)T(5) aggravates the effects of this mutation on aberrant splicing. Analysis of mRNA obtained from parental airway epithelial cells confirmed these in cellulo results. At the protein level the p.Lys464Asn protein showed neither maturated form nor membrane localization. Furthermore, the in vivo channel tests confirmed the absence of CFTR activity. Thus, the c.1392G>T mutation alone or in association with the TG repeats and the poly T tract revealed obvious impacts on splicing and CFTR protein processing and functionality. The c.[T(5); 1392G>T] complex allele contributes to the CF phenotype by affecting splicing and inducing a severe misprocessing defect. These results demonstrate that the classical CFTR mutations classification is not sufficient: in vivo and in cellulo studies of a possible complex allele in a patient are required to provide correct CFTR mutation classification, adequate medical counseling, and adapted therapeutic strategies.

  20. Predictors and clinical consequences of non-adherence with antipsychotic medication in the outpatient treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Novick, Diego; Haro, Josep Maria; Suarez, David; Perez, Victor; Dittmann, Ralf W; Haddad, Peter M

    2010-04-30

    To assess baseline predictors and consequences of antipsychotic adherence during the long-term treatment of schizophrenia outpatients, data were taken from the 3-year, prospective, observational, European Schizophrenia Outpatients Health Outcomes (SOHO) study, in which outpatients starting or changing antipsychotics were assessed every 6 months. Physician-rated adherence was dichotomized as adherence/non-adherence. Regression models tested for predictors of adherence during follow-up, and associations between adherence and outcome measures. Of the 6731 patients analysed, 71.2% were adherent and 28.8% were non-adherent over 3 years. The strongest predictor of adherence was adherence in the month before baseline assessment. Other baseline predictors of adherence included initial treatment for schizophrenia and greater social activities. Baseline predictors of non-adherence were alcohol dependence and substance abuse in the previous month, hospitalization in the previous 6 months, independent housing and the presence of hostility. Non-adherence was significantly associated with an increased risk of relapse, hospitalization and suicide attempts. In conclusion, non-adherence is common but can partly be predicted. This may allow strategies to improve adherence to be targeted to high-risk patients. Also, reversal of some risk factors may improve adherence. Non-adherence is associated with a range of poorer long-term outcomes, with clinical and economic implications. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Role of Bacterial Biofilm in Adverse Soft-Tissue Filler Reactions: A Combined Laboratory and Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Saththianathan, Mayuran; Johani, Khalid; Taylor, Alaina; Hu, Hongua; Vickery, Karen; Callan, Peter; Deva, Anand K

    2017-03-01

    The development of chronic nodules and granulomatous inflammation after filler injections has been attributed to bacterial biofilm infection. The authors aimed to investigate the relationship between filler and bacterial biofilm using a combined in vitro and in vivo study. In vitro assays to investigate the ability of filler materials to support the growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm and the effect of multiple needle passes through a biofilm-contaminated surface were designed. Analysis of clinical biopsy specimens from patients presenting with chronic granulomas following filler administration using a number of laboratory tests for biofilm was performed. All fillers (i.e., hyaluronic acid, polyacrylamide gel, and poly-L-lactic acid) supported the growth of S. epidermidis biofilm in vitro. Multiple needle passes through a biofilm-contaminated surface resulted in significantly increased contamination of filler material by a factor of 10,000 (p < 0.001). Six clinical samples from five patients all demonstrated bacterial biofilm. The mean number of bacteria was found to be 2.2 × 10 bacteria/mg tissue (range, 5.6 × 10 to 3.7 × 10 bacteria/mg tissue). Microbiome analysis detected a predominance of Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, and Propionibacterium as present in these samples. Filler material can support the growth of bacterial biofilm in vitro. Multiple needle passes can significantly increase the risk of filler contamination. Biofilm appears to be associated with high numbers in clinical samples of patients presenting with chronic granulomatous inflammation. Strategies to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination need to be further studied and translated into clinical practice. Therapeutic, V.

  2. Linking MedDRA(®)-Coded Clinical Phenotypes to Biological Mechanisms by the Ontology of Adverse Events: A Pilot Study on Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Zhang, Shelley; Jagannathan, Desikan G; Zaman, Shadia; Burkhart, Keith K; Omenn, Gilbert S; He, Yongqun; Athey, Brian D; Abernethy, Darrell R

    2016-07-01

    A translational bioinformatics challenge exists in connecting population and individual clinical phenotypes in various formats to biological mechanisms. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA(®)) is the default dictionary for adverse event (AE) reporting in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). The ontology of adverse events (OAE) represents AEs as pathological processes occurring after drug exposures. The aim of this work was to establish a semantic framework to link biological mechanisms to phenotypes of AEs by combining OAE with MedDRA(®) in FAERS data analysis. We investigated the AEs associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tyrosine kinases. The five selected TKIs/mAbs (i.e., dasatinib, imatinib, lapatinib, cetuximab, and trastuzumab) are known to induce impaired ventricular function (non-QT) cardiotoxicity. Statistical analysis of FAERS data identified 1053 distinct MedDRA(®) terms significantly associated with TKIs/mAbs, where 884 did not have corresponding OAE terms. We manually annotated these terms, added them to OAE by the standard OAE development strategy, and mapped them to MedDRA(®). The data integration to provide insights into molecular mechanisms of drug-associated AEs was performed by including linkages in OAE for all related AE terms to MedDRA(®) and the existing ontologies, including the human phenotype ontology (HP), Uber anatomy ontology (UBERON), and gene ontology (GO). Sixteen AEs were shared by all five TKIs/mAbs, and each of 17 cardiotoxicity AEs was associated with at least one TKI/mAb. As an example, we analyzed "cardiac failure" using the relations established in OAE with other ontologies and demonstrated that one of the biological processes associated with cardiac failure maps to the genes associated with heart contraction. By expanding the existing OAE ontological design, our TKI use case demonstrated that the combination

  3. The feasibility, perceived satisfaction, and value of using synchronous webinars to educate clinical research professionals on reporting adverse events in clinical trials: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Borgerson, Dawn; Dino, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research professionals are faced with decreased funding and increased workloads; innovative methods of professional development programs are necessary to accommodate these factors. This study evaluated the feasibility, perceived satisfaction, and value of using webinars to educate clinical research professionals on reporting adverse events commonly experienced in pediatric oncology clinical trials. The setting incorporated synchronous web-based educational technology. Constructivist learning provides the theoretical framework for this study. Participants evaluated the professional development program at 2 time points: (a) at the conclusion and (b) 4 to 6 weeks afterward, using survey method. Synchronous webinars were both economical and effective in educating clinical research professionals across institutional sites. Participants reported exceptionally high levels of satisfaction with the accessibility, scope, quality, and interactivity of the professional development program. The vast majority of participants reported that the education would assist with reporting adverse events in pediatric oncology clinical trials and this perception persisted into clinical practice. Although the results of this study were intended to guide future educational efforts of the Children's Oncology Group, they may also apply to other cooperative groups.

  4. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G; Norvell, Daniel C; Anderson, Paul A; Hart, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of

  5. Critical thinking about adverse drug effects: lessons from the psychology of risk and medical decision-making for clinical psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Andrew A; Smoller, Jordan W; Eidelman, Polina; Wu, Yelena P; Tilley, Claire A

    2008-01-01

    Systematic biases in decision-making have been well characterized in medical and nonmedical fields but mostly ignored in clinical psychopharmacology. The purpose of this paper is to sensitize clinicians who prescribe psychiatric drugs to the issues of the psychology of risk, especially as they pertain to the risk of side effects. Specifically, the present analysis focuses on heuristic organization and framing effects that create cognitive biases in medical practice. Our purpose is to increase the awareness of how pharmaceutical companies may influence physicians by framing the risk of medication side effects to favor their products.

  6. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  7. Gene transfer as a strategy to achieve permanent cardioprotection I: rAAV-mediated gene therapy with inducible nitric oxide synthase limits infarct size 1 year later without adverse functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianhong; Guo, Yiru; Wu, Wen-Jian; Ou, Qinghui; Zhu, Xiaoping; Tan, Wei; Yuan, Fangping; Chen, Ning; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Luo, Li; O'Brien, Erin; Bolli, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    The ultimate goal of prophylactic gene therapy is to confer permanent protection against ischemia. Although gene therapy with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is known to protect against myocardial infarction at 3 days and up to 2 months, the long-term effects on myocardial ischemic injury and function are unknown. To address this issue, we created a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector carrying the iNOS gene (rAAV/iNOS), which enables long-lasting transgene expression. The ability of rAAV/iNOS to direct the expression of functional iNOS protein was confirmed in COS-7 cells before in vivo gene transfer. Mice received injections in the anterior LV wall of rAAV/LacZ or rAAV/iNOS; 1 year later, they underwent a 30-min coronary occlusion (O) and 4 h of reperfusion (R). iNOS gene transfer resulted in elevated iNOS protein expression (+3-fold vs. the LacZ group, n = 6; P < 0.05) and iNOS activity (+4.4-fold vs. the LacZ group, n = 6; P < 0.05) 1 year later. Infarct size (% of risk region) was dramatically reduced at 1 year after iNOS gene transfer (13.5 ± 2.2%, n = 12, vs. 41.7 ± 2.9%, n = 10, in the LacZ group; P < 0.05). The infarct-sparing effect of iNOS gene therapy at 1 year was as powerful as that observed 24 h after ischemic preconditioning (six 4-min O/4-min R cycles) (19.3 ± 2.3%, n = 11; P < 0.05). Importantly, compared with the LacZ group (n = 11), iNOS gene transfer (n = 10) had no effect on LV dimensions or function for up to 1 year (at 1 year: FS 34.5 ± 2.0 vs. 34.6 ± 2.6%, EF 57.0 ± 2.0 vs. 59.7 ± 2.9%, LVEDD 4.3 ± 0.1 vs. 4.2 ± 0.2 mm, LVESD 2.8 ± 0.1 vs. 2.9 ± 0.2 mm) (echocardiography). These data demonstrate, for the first time, that rAAV-mediated iNOS gene transfer affords long-term, probably permanent (1 year), cardioprotection without adverse functional consequences, providing a strong rationale for further preclinical testing of prophylactic gene therapy.

  8. Glycoprotein 130 is associated with adverse postoperative clinical outcomes of patients with late-stage non-metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yifan; Zhang, Heng; Liu, Hao; Lin, Chao; Li, Ruochen; Wu, Songyang; He, Hongyong; Li, He; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of glycoprotein 130 (gp130) with the cytokines of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) family has proved to play a crucial part in several cancers. Our current study is designed to discover the clinical prognostic significance of gp130 in non-metastatic gastric cancer. We examined intratumoral gp130 expression in retrospectively enrolled 370 gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy with standard D2 lymphadenectomy at Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University during 2007 and 2008 by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of gp130 was significantly correlated with T classification, N classification and TNM stage (P = 0.003, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively; T, N, TNM refers to Tumor Invasion, Regional lymph node metastasis and Tumor Node Metastasis, respectively). Elevated intratumoral gp130 expression implied unfavourable overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.001), respectively. Furthermore, among TNM II and III gp130-high patients, those who were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based adjuvant chemotherapy had better OS (P < 0.001). The generated nomogram performed well in predicting the 3- and 5-year OS of gastric cancer patients. The incorporation of gp130 into contemporary TNM staging system would be of great significance to improve the current individual risk stratification. These findings contribute to better clinical management for those patients who would benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27917904

  9. Evaluation of the use of atropine sulfate, a combination of butylscopolammonium bromide and metamizole sodium, and flunixin meglumine to ameliorate clinical adverse effects of imidocarb dipropionate in horses.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, Sameeh M; Alfaqeeh, Sameh M; Mustafa, Ghazi; Qura'n, Lara; Al-Majali, Ahmad M

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the ability of atropine sulfate, butylscopolammonium bromide combined with metamizole sodium, and flunixin meglumine to ameliorate the clinical adverse effects of imidocarb dipropionate in horses. 28 horses with piroplasmosis. 28 horses were randomly assigned to 4 equal groups according to the pretreatment administered. Fifteen minutes before administration of 2.4 mg of imidocarb dipropionate/kg IM, horses in the first group were pretreated with 0.02 mg of atropine sulfate/kg IV, the second group with a combination of 0.2 mg of butylscopolammonium bromide/kg IV and 25 mg of metamizole sodium/kg IV, the third group with 1.1 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg IV, and the fourth (control) group with 1 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution/50 kg IV. Physical examination, including evaluation of rectal temperature, heart and respiratory rates, capillary refill time, mucous membrane color, hydration status, abdominal sounds, signs of abdominal pain, salivation, diarrhea, and number of defecations, was performed. Imidocarb dipropionate use in the control group was associated with serious adverse effects including signs of abdominal pain (4/7 horses) and diarrhea (2/7). Horses pretreated with atropine had no diarrhea, but 6 had signs of abdominal pain. Only 1 horse that received butylscopolammonium-metamizole pretreatment had signs of abdominal pain and 3 had diarrhea, which was numerically but not significantly different than the control group. Of horses pretreated with flunixin, 3 had signs of abdominal pain and 3 had diarrhea. A combination of butylscopolammonium bromide and metamizole sodium may be useful to ameliorate the adverse effects of imidocarb dipropionate in horses, although group size was small and significant differences from the control group were not found.

  10. Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Zhengqing Fengtongning Combined with Methotrexate in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-min; Huang, Run-yue; Huang, Qing-chun; Chu, Yong-liang; Yan, Jing-yao

    2015-01-01

    Chinese medicines are gaining wider acceptance. They have been used for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for thousands of years, and the need to investigate the interaction between Chinese medicines and western medicines is widely recognized. In this study, a large number of RCTs and CCTs were analyzed to systematically assess the effects and adverse events of Zhengqing Fengtongning (ZQFTN) for RA. Eleven studies that contained 956 participants (508 in the treatment group; 448 in the control group) were included. The results showed that although ZQFTN combined with methotrexate MTX could not decrease the swollen joint count and tender joint count of RA patients better than MTX alone, the combination therapy might relieve the duration of morning stiffness (SMD: −16.06; 95% CI: −28.77 to −3.34), reduce laboratory indexes (RF: SMD: −10.84; 95% CI: −19.39 to −2.29; ESR: SMD: −7.26; 95% CI: −11.54 to −2.99; CRP: SMD: −3.66; 95% CI: −5.94 to −1.38), and improve the overall effect (RR: 1.08; CI: 1.01 to 1.16) better than monotherapy. The combination therapy was significantly better in controlling adverse drug reactions (RR: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.46 to 0.79). Through this systematic review, we found that ZQFTN combined with MTX for the treatment of RA might have better clinical efficacy than MTX only and might be superior in terms of controlling adverse drug reactions. PMID:26379753

  11. Overexpression of the Promigratory and Prometastatic PTK7 Receptor Is Associated with an Adverse Clinical Outcome in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boher, Jean-Marie; Monges, Geneviève; Castellano, Rémy; Goubard, Armelle; Doremus, Marie; Poizat, Flora; Lelong, Bernard; de Chaisemartin, Cécile; Bardin, Florence; Viens, Patrice; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Prebet, Thomas; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Borg, Jean-Paul; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets are urgently needed in colorectal cancer (CRC). The pseudo tyrosine kinase receptor 7 (PTK7) is involved in planar cell polarity and it is deregulated in various malignancies, including CRC. Yet, little is known about its protein expression in human CRC, or about a possible correlation of its expression with clinical endpoints. Using a clinically annotated Tissue MicroArray (TMA) produced from from 192 consecutive CRC patients treated by initial surgery, we examined PTK7 expression by immunohistochemistry in tumoral tissue and matched normal mucosae, and correlated its expression with clinico-pathological features and patient outcome. PTK7 depletion by specific shRNA in HCT116 and HCT15 CRC cell lines was found to affect cell proliferation, resistance to drugs and cell migration. Tumor growth and metastatic phenotype were investigated in vivo using a xenograft mouse model of CRC cells with modulated expression of PTK7 levels. PTK7 was significantly up-regulated in CRC tissue as compared to matched healthy mucosae, and significant overexpression was found in 34% of patients. PTK7 overexpression was significantly associated with a reduced metastasis-free survival in non-metastatic patients. In HCT116 and HCT15 cells, shRNA PTK7 reduced migration but did not affect cell proliferation and resistance to drugs. In a xenograft mouse of HCT15 cells, downregulation of PTK7 led to reduced tumor growth, whereas its overexpression in PTK7-negative cancer cells led to increased metastatic events. PTK7 expression thus represents a potential prognostic biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in CRC. PMID:25962058

  12. PTEN deletion and heme oxygenase-1 overexpression cooperate in prostate cancer progression and are associated with adverse clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunru; Su, Jie; DingZhang, Xiao; Zhang, Jianguo; Yoshimoto, Maisa; Liu, Shuhong; Bijian, Krikor; Gupta, Ajay; Squire, Jeremy A; Alaoui Jamali, Moulay A; Bismar, Tarek A

    2011-05-01

    Overexpression of the pro-survival protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and loss of the pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor PTEN are common events in prostate cancer (PCA). We assessed the occurrence of both HO-1 expression and PTEN deletion in two cohorts of men with localized and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The phenotypic cooperation of these markers was examined in preclinical and clinical models. Overall, there was a statistically significant difference in HO-1 epithelial expression between benign, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), localized PCA, and CRPC (p < 0.0001). The highest epithelial HO-1 expression was noted in CRPC (2.00 ± 0.89), followed by benign prostate tissue (1.49 ± 1.03) (p = 0.0003), localized PCA (1.20 ± 0.95), and HGPIN (1.07 ± 0.87) (p < 0.0001). However, the difference between HGPIN and PCA was not statistically significant (p = 0.21). PTEN deletions were observed in 35/55 (63.6%) versus 68/183 (37.1%) cases of CRPC and localized PCA, respectively. Although neither HO-1 overexpression nor PTEN deletions alone in localized PCA showed a statistically significant association with PSA relapse, the combined status of both markers correlated with disease progression (log-rank test, p = 0.01). In a preclinical model, inhibition of HO-1 by shRNA in PTEN-deficient PC3M cell line and their matched cells where PTEN is restored strongly reduced cell growth and invasion in vitro and inhibited tumour growth and lung metastasis formation in mice compared to cells where only HO-1 is inhibited or PTEN is restored. In summary, we provide clinical and experimental evidence for cooperation between epithelial HO-1 expression and PTEN deletions in relation to the PCA patient's outcome. These findings could potentially lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic modalities for advanced PCA.

  13. A randomized clinical trial comparing contact lens with intraocular lens correction of monocular aphakia during infancy: grating acuity and adverse events at age 1 year.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Scott R; Buckley, Edward G; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn; DuBois, Lindreth; Hartmann, E Eugenie; Lynn, Michael J; Plager, David A; Wilson, M Edward

    2010-07-01

    To compare the visual outcomes and adverse events of contact lens with primary intraocular lens (IOL) correction of monocular aphakia during infancy. In a randomized, multicenter (12 sites) clinical trial, 114 infants with a unilateral congenital cataract were assigned to undergo cataract surgery between 1 to 6 months of age either with or without primary IOL implantation. Contact lenses were used to correct aphakia in patients who did not receive IOLs. Grating visual acuity was tested at 1 year of age by a masked traveling examiner. Grating visual acuity at 1 year of age. The median logMAR visual acuity was not significantly different between the treated eyes in the 2 groups (contact lens group, 0.80; IOL group, 0.97; P = .19). More patients in the IOL group underwent 1 or more additional intraocular operations than patients in the contact lens group (63% vs 12%; P < .001). Most of these additional operations were performed to clear lens reproliferation and pupillary membranes from the visual axis. There was no statistically significant difference in grating visual acuity at age 1 year between the IOL and contact lens groups; however, additional intraocular operations were performed more frequently in the IOL group. Until longer-term follow-up data are available, caution should be exercised when performing IOL implantation in children aged 6 months or younger given the higher incidence of adverse events and the absence of an improved short-term visual outcome compared with contact lens use.

  14. Clinical Evidence of Increase in Hair Growth and Decrease in Hair Loss without Adverse Reactions Promoted by the Commercial Lotion ECOHAIR®.

    PubMed

    Alonso, María Rosario; Anesini, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Hair exerts protection, sensory functions, thermoregulation, and sexual attractiveness. Hair loss (alopecia) is caused by several diseases, drug intake, hormone imbalance, stress, and infections (Malassesia furfur). Drugs usually used in alopecia produce irreversible systemic and local side effects. An association of extracts of Coffea arabica and Larrea divaricata (ECOHAIR®) is successfully being commercialized in Argentina for hair growth. The aim of this study was to provide scientific support for the efficacy and innocuousness of ECOHAIR® in patients with noncicatricial alopecia during a 3-month treatment. The efficacy was determined through the assessment of an increase in hair volume, improvement in hair looks, growth of new hair, and a decrease in hair loss by the test of hair count and hair traction. The capacity to decrease the amount of dandruff was also evaluated as well as the adverse local effects caused by the treatment. ECOHAIR® spray improved the overall hair volume and appearance; it increased its thickness, induced hair growth, and decreased hair loss. Besides, no adverse local reactions were observed upon treatment with the product. This study provides scientific support for the clinical use of ECOHAIR® as a treatment to be used in noncicatricial alopecia. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Clinical and economical consequences of the combination of metformin with dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Sicras Mainar, A; Roldán Suárez, C; Font Ramos, B; Navarro Artieda, R; Ibáñez Nolla, J

    2013-11-01

    There are different second line glucose lowering drugs whose efficacy, safety and economic profile have not been established in our setting. We have analyzed the clinical (diabetic treatment adherence, metabolic control, hypoglycemia and macrovascular complications) and economic (resource use and costs) consequences of the combination of metformin with dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors (DPPIV) in patients with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a multicenter, observational and retrospective study. Patients ≥30 years treated with metformin who initiated a second antidiabetic treatment during 2008-2009 were enrolled in the study. Two groups of patients were established: a) metformin with DPPIV and metformin with other diabetic drugs. The main measurements were comorbidity, compliance/persistence, metabolic control (glycosylated hemoglobin <7%), complications (hypoglycemia, macrovascular) and total costs. Patients were followed-up for 2 years. A total of 2,067 patients were enrolled (mean age: 66.6 years, 53.1% male). Of these, 519 patients (25.1%) were analyzed in the metformin+DPPIV group and 1,548 patients (74.9%) in the group metformin+other antidiabetic drug. The DPPIV group patients showed better compliance (70.3 vs. 59.6%), persistence (63.4 vs. 51.0%) and metabolic control (64.3 vs. 59.6%), respectively (P<.001) compared to the other group. They also showed a lower proportion of hypoglycemia (13.9 vs. 44.3%), cardiovascular events (3.7 vs. 7.6%) and total costs (2,347 vs. € 2,682), P<.05. Despite the limitations of the study, patients treated with metformin associated to DPPIV were more likely to show increased adherence, metabolic control and lower rates of hypoglycemia than those treated with metformin associated to other antidiabetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical consequences of Tityus bahiensis and Tityus serrulatus scorpion stings in the region of Campinas, southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bucaretchi, Fábio; Fernandes, Luciane C R; Fernandes, Carla B; Branco, Maíra M; Prado, Camila C; Vieira, Ronan J; De Capitani, Eduardo M; Hyslop, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Scorpion stings account for most envenomations by venomous animals in Brazil. A retrospective study (1994-2011) of the clinical consequences of Tityus scorpion stings in 1327 patients treated at a university hospital in Campinas, southeastern Brazil, is reported. The clinical classification, based on outcome, was: dry sting (no envenoming), class I (only local manifestations), class II (systemic manifestations), class III (life-threatening manifestations, such as shock and/or cardiac failure requiring inotropic/vasopressor agents, and/or respiratory failure), and fatal. The median patient age was 27 years (interquartile interval = 15-42 years). Scorpions were brought for identification in 47.2% of cases (Tityus bahiensis 27.7%; Tityus serrulatus 19.5%). Sting severity was classified and each accounted for the following percentage of cases: dry stings - 3.4%, class I - 79.6%, class II - 15.1%, class III - 1.8% and fatal - 0.1%. Pain was the primary local manifestation (95.5%). Systemic manifestations such as vomiting, agitation, sweating, dyspnea, bradycardia, tachycardia, tachypnea, somnolence/lethargy, cutaneous paleness, hypothermia and hypotension were detected in class II or class III + fatal groups, but were significantly more frequent in the latter group. Class III and fatal cases occurred only in children <15 years old, with scorpions being identified in 13/25 cases (T. serrulatus, n = 12; T. bahiensis, n = 1). Laboratory blood abnormalities (hyperglycemia, hypokalemia, leukocytosis, elevations in serum total CK, CK-MB and troponin T, bicarbonate consumption and an increase in base deficit and blood lactate), electrocardiographic changes (ST segment) and echocardiographic alterations (ventricular ejected fraction <54%) were frequently detected in class III patients. Seventeen patients developed pulmonary edema, 16 had cardiac failure and seven had cardiogenic shock. These results indicate that most scorpion stings involved only local manifestations

  17. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  18. Adverse effects of combination angiotensin II receptor blockers plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors for left ventricular dysfunction: a quantitative review of data from randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher O; Kashani, Amir; Ko, Dennis K; Francis, Gary; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2007-10-08

    We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to assess ongoing concerns about the safety profile of combination angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) plus angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction. MEDLINE (January 1966-December 2006) and Web sites for the National Institute of Health Clinical Trials and the Food and Drug Administration were searched for eligible RCTs that included 500 or more subjects, had a follow-up of 3 months or longer, and reported adverse effects. We used a random effects model to calculate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the following outcome measures: medication discontinuations because of adverse effects, worsening renal function (an increase in serum creatinine level of > 0.5 mg/dL [to convert to micromoles per liter, multiply by 88.4]), hyperkalemia (serum potassium level > 5.5 mEq/L [to convert to millimoles per liter, multiply by 1]), and symptomatic hypotension. Four studies (N = 17 337; mean follow-up, 25 months [range, 11-41 months]) were selected. Combination ARB plus ACE inhibitor vs control treatment that included ACE inhibitors was associated with significant increases in medication discontinuations because of adverse effects in patients with chronic heart failure (RR, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.22-1.55]) or in patients with acute myocardial infarction with symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (RR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.03-1.34]), and for both conditions there were significant increases in worsening renal function (RR, 2.17 [95% CI, 1.59-2.97] and RR, 1.61 [95% CI, 1.31-1.98], respectively), hyperkalemia (RR, 4.87 [95% CI, 2.39-9.94] and RR, 1.33 [95% CI, 0.90-1.98], respectively; the latter was not significant), and symptomatic hypotension (RR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.09-2.07], and RR, 1.48 [95% CI, 1.33-3.18], respectively). Combination ARB plus ACE inhibitor therapy in subjects with symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction was accompanied by marked

  19. [Visualization and analysis of drug information on adverse reactions using data mining method, and its clinical application].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Junko

    2014-01-01

    Sources of drug information such as package inserts (PIs) and interview forms (IFs) and existing drug information databases provide primarily document-based and numerical information. For this reason, it is not easy to obtain a complete picture of the information concerning many drugs with similar effects or to understand differences among drugs. The visualization of drug information may help provide a large amount of information in a short period, relieve the burden on medical workers, facilitate a comprehensive understanding and comparison of drugs, and contribute to improvements in patients' QOL. At our department, we are developing an approach to convert information on side effects obtained from PIs of many drugs with similar effects into visual maps reflecting the data structure through competitive learning using the self-organizing map (SOM) technique of Kohonen, which is a powerful method for pattern recognition, to facilitate the grasping of all available information and differences among drugs, to anticipate the appearance of side effects; we are also evaluating the possibility of its clinical application. In this paper, this approach is described by taking the examples of antibiotics, antihypertensive drugs, and diabetes drugs.

  20. Overexpression of c-myc is associated with adverse clinical features and worse overall survival in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Agoston Gyula; Gang, Anne Ortved; Pedersen, Mette Ølgod; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Nørgaard, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The role of c-myc in multiple myeloma (MM) is controversial. We conducted a retrospective study of 117 patients with MM diagnosed between 2004 and 2010 at Herlev Hospital. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed on tissue microarrays (TMAs) made from diagnostic bone marrow aspirates. Clinical data were obtained from the Danish Multiple Myeloma Database (DMMD). Overexpression of c-myc was found in 40% of patients. MYC translocation was found in 10% of patients. Overexpression of c-myc was not associated with MYC translocation. Overexpression of c-myc was associated with hypercalcemia (p = 0.02) and extramedullary myeloma (p < 0.01). Overexpression of c-myc was associated with shorter overall survival (OS) by multivariable analysis of the entire patient cohort [HR 1.92 (1.06-3.45), p = 0.03] and univariable analysis of high-dose-therapy (HDT)-ineligible patients [HR 2.01 (1.05-3.86), p = 0.04]. Further studies of c-myc overexpression in larger cohorts of patients with MM are warranted.