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Sample records for adverse drug effects

  1. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  2. Immunomodulatory drugs: Oral and systemic adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The main objectives are to present the different adverses effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosupressed patients and study the impact of immunomodualtion on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. Study Design: We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. Results: These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren´s syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. Conclusions: In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic. Key words:Immunomodulatory drugs, oral diseases, adverse effects, therapeutic action. PMID:23986016

  3. [Adverse drug effects in the community pharmacy].

    PubMed

    Arnet, Isabelle; Seidling, Hanna M; Hersberger, Kurt E

    2015-12-01

    Community pharmacists represent an important pillar for the identification and the reporting of adverse drug effects (ADE}. Thanks to their broad view on the pharmacotherapy, over-the-counter medication included, they contribute greatly to the improvement of drug safety. In principle, the community pharmacy will face three groups of ADE which require specific attention. This article deals with these specific ADE groups and presents some illustrative examples from daily practice. Furthermore, we suggest some solutions to identify potential relevant interactions - including herbal-drug interactions - and give tips for daily practice, along with some often overseen cutaneous ADE.

  4. Immunomodulatory drugs: oral and systemic adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martinez, Antonio; Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives are to present the different adverse effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosuppressed patients and study the impact of immunomodulation on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren's syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic.

  5. [Adverse effects and interactions of phytotherapeutic drugs].

    PubMed

    Iten, F; Reichling, J; Saller, R

    2002-06-01

    The significantly increased sales figures many phytopharmaceuticals have achieved during the last years prove the confidence that a great part of the population has in herbal remedies. This is primarily due to the wide-spread opinion that herbal remedies are free from side-effects. The long tradition and presumed 'natural' origin are no guarantee for safety in the treatment with herbal remedies. Even if a large proportion of the undesirable events is traceable to falsifications, impurities and lacking quality controls, herbal drugs with controlled quality should not be generally classified as harmless. In the meantime it has been possible to prove the presence of active substances with toxic and cancerogenic properties in various phytopharmaceuticals. Interactions with other drugs have been documented in a number of notes, where phytopharmaceuticals could influence the blood plasma level of various drugs, presumably by activating or inhibiting the cytochrom-P450-system. At present, especially data about adverse effects during long-term administration of herbal remedies are under-represented. Particularly because of their presumed harmlessness they often are prescribed in the case of chronic diseases and then taken over a longer period of time. The frequency of undesirable effects of phytopharmaceuticals is remarkably low, even if the present lack of data about side-effects is considered.

  6. Adverse immunologic effects of antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S S; Fantus, I G

    1987-01-01

    Propylthiouracil and methimazole are frequently used in the management of hyperthyroidism. Two patients in whom adverse immunologic effects other than isolated agranulocytosis developed during treatment with propylthiouracil are described. A review of the literature revealed 53 similar cases over a 35-year period. Rash, fever, arthralgias and granulocytopenia were the most common manifestations. Vasculitis, particularly with cutaneous manifestations, occurs and may be fatal. The clinical evidence suggests that an immunologic mechanism is involved. A number of different autoantibodies were reported, but antinuclear antibodies were infrequent, and none of the cases met the criteria for a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thus, the reactions do not represent a true drug-induced lupus syndrome. Current hypotheses and experimental data regarding the cause of the reactions are reviewed. No specific clinical subgroup at high risk can be identified, and manifestations may occur at any dosage and at any time during therapy. Cross-reactivity between the two antithyroid drugs can be expected. Except for minor symptoms (e.g., mild arthralgias or transient rash), such reactions are an indication for withdrawal of the drug and the use of alternative methods to control the hyperthyroidism. In rare cases of severe vasculitis a short course of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy may be helpful. PMID:3539299

  7. Using Literature-Based Discovery to Explain Adverse Drug Effects.

    PubMed

    Hristovski, Dimitar; Kastrin, Andrej; Dinevski, Dejan; Burgun, Anita; Žiberna, Lovro; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2016-08-01

    We report on our research in using literature-based discovery (LBD) to provide pharmacological and/or pharmacogenomic explanations for reported adverse drug effects. The goal of LBD is to generate novel and potentially useful hypotheses by analyzing the scientific literature and optionally some additional resources. Our assumption is that drugs have effects on some genes or proteins and that these genes or proteins are associated with the observed adverse effects. Therefore, by using LBD we try to find genes or proteins that link the drugs with the reported adverse effects. These genes or proteins can be used to provide insight into the processes causing the adverse effects. Initial results show that our method has the potential to assist in explaining reported adverse drug effects.

  8. Effectiveness of adverse effects search filters: drugs versus medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, Kelly; Mierzwinski-Urban, Monika; Cimon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study tested the performance of adverse effects search filters when searching for safety information on medical devices, procedures, and diagnostic tests in MEDLINE and Embase. Methods The sensitivity of 3 filters was determined using a sample of 631 references from 131 rapid reviews related to the safety of health technologies. The references were divided into 2 sets by type of intervention: drugs and nondrug health technologies. Keyword and indexing analysis were performed on references from the nondrug testing set that 1 or more of the filters did not retrieve. Results For all 3 filters, sensitivity was lower for nondrug health technologies (ranging from 53%–87%) than for drugs (88%–93%) in both databases. When tested on the nondrug health technologies set, sensitivity was lower in Embase (ranging from 53%–81%) than in MEDLINE (67%–87%) for all filters. Of the nondrug records that 1 or more of the filters missed, 39% of the missed MEDLINE records and 18% of the missed Embase records did not contain any indexing terms related to adverse events. Analyzing the titles and abstracts of nondrug records that were missed by any 1 filter, the most commonly used keywords related to adverse effects were: risk, complications, mortality, contamination, hemorrhage, and failure. Conclusions In this study, adverse effects filters were less effective at finding information about the safety of medical devices, procedures, and tests compared to information about the safety of drugs. PMID:27366123

  9. Effectiveness of adverse effects search filters: drugs versus medical devices.

    PubMed

    Farrah, Kelly; Mierzwinski-Urban, Monika; Cimon, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The study tested the performance of adverse effects search filters when searching for safety information on medical devices, procedures, and diagnostic tests in MEDLINE and Embase. The sensitivity of 3 filters was determined using a sample of 631 references from 131 rapid reviews related to the safety of health technologies. The references were divided into 2 sets by type of intervention: drugs and nondrug health technologies. Keyword and indexing analysis were performed on references from the nondrug testing set that 1 or more of the filters did not retrieve. For all 3 filters, sensitivity was lower for nondrug health technologies (ranging from 53%-87%) than for drugs (88%-93%) in both databases. When tested on the nondrug health technologies set, sensitivity was lower in Embase (ranging from 53%-81%) than in MEDLINE (67%-87%) for all filters. Of the nondrug records that 1 or more of the filters missed, 39% of the missed MEDLINE records and 18% of the missed Embase records did not contain any indexing terms related to adverse events. Analyzing the titles and abstracts of nondrug records that were missed by any 1 filter, the most commonly used keywords related to adverse effects were: risk, complications, mortality, contamination, hemorrhage, and failure. In this study, adverse effects filters were less effective at finding information about the safety of medical devices, procedures, and tests compared to information about the safety of drugs.

  10. Distinguishing hazards and harms, adverse drug effects and adverse drug reactions : implications for drug development, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance, biomarkers, and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2013-03-01

    The terms 'adverse drug effects' and 'adverse drug reactions' are commonly used interchangeably, but they have different implications. Adverse drug reactions arise when a compound (e.g. a drug or metabolite, a contaminant or adulterant) is distributed in the same place as a body tissue (e.g. a receptor, enzyme, or ion channel), and the encounter results in an adverse effect (a physiological or pathological change), which results in a clinically appreciable adverse reaction. Both the adverse effect and the adverse reaction have manifestations by which they can be recognized: adverse effects are usually detected by laboratory tests (e.g. biochemical, haematological, immunological, radiological, pathological) or by clinical investigations (e.g. endoscopy, cardiac catheterization), and adverse reactions by their clinical manifestations (symptoms and/or signs). This distinction suggests five scenarios: (i) adverse reactions can result directly from adverse effects; (ii) adverse effects may not lead to appreciable adverse reactions; (iii) adverse reactions can occur without preceding adverse effects; (iv) adverse effects and reactions may be dissociated; and (v) adverse effects and reactions can together constitute syndromes. Defining an adverse drug reaction as "an appreciably harmful or unpleasant reaction, resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product" suggests a definition of an adverse drug effect: "a potentially harmful effect resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product, which constitutes a hazard and may or may not be associated with a clinically appreciable adverse reaction and/or an abnormal laboratory test or clinical investigation, as a marker of an adverse reaction."

  11. Adverse effects of thyroid hormone preparations and antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed

    Bartalena, L; Bogazzi, F; Martino, E

    1996-07-01

    Thyroid hormone preparations, especially thyroxine, are widely used either at replacement doses to correct hypothyroidism or at suppressive doses to abolish thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) secretion in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy or with diffuse/ nodular nontoxic goitre. In order to suppress thyrotropin secretion, it is necessary to administer slightly supraphysiological doses of thyroxine. Possible adverse effects of this therapy include cardiovascular changes (shortening of systolic time intervals, increased frequency of atrial premature beats and, possibly, left ventricular hypertrophy) and bone changes (reduced bone density and bone mass), but the risk of these adverse effects can be minimised by carefully monitoring serum free thyroxine and free liothyronine (triiodothyronine) measurements and adjusting the dosage accordingly. Thionamides [thiamazole (methimazole), carbimazole, propylthiouracil] are the most widely used antithyroid drugs. They are given for long periods of time and cause adverse effects in 3 to 5% of patients. In most cases, adverse effects are minor and transient (e.g. skin rash, itching, mild leucopenia). The most dangerous effect is agranulocytosis, which occurs in 0.1 to 0.5% of patients. This life-threatening condition can now be effectively treated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration. Other major adverse effects (aplastic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, lupus erythematosus-like syndrome, vasculitis) are exceedingly rare.

  12. Adverse cognitive effects of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy: Each additional drug matters.

    PubMed

    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Elger, Christian E; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    The study was set up to evaluate the impact of the total drug load of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy on cognition. Retrospective analyses were based on 834 patients with epilepsy who underwent a brief routine assessment of executive function and verbal memory (EpiTrack Plus) at our department. The total drug load was quantified in two ways: (1) number of concurrent antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and (2) total drug load according to the defined daily dose (DDD) provided by the World Health Organization. The cognitive measures showed higher inverse correlations with the number of AEDs (executive function: r=-0.35, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.22, p<0.001) than with the total DDD (executive function: r=-0.27, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.17, p<0.001). Reanalysis with statistical control for disease severity hardly changed the aforementioned results. With each additional drug in polytherapy, we observed a significantly lower performance in executive function. In this regard an additional explorative approach revealed that regimens combining AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles were associated with higher cognitive performance. Correlations between indicators of disease severity and drug load indices were low: altogether explaining only up to 9% of the observed variance in drug load. The findings demonstrate a considerable adverse effect of a higher drug load on cognition, especially on executive functions. Simply counting the number of drugs may be sufficient as a rough estimate of the risk of side effects. However, the combination of AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles may attenuate the negative effect of the total drug load.

  13. Adverse effects of stimulant drugs in a community sample of drug users.

    PubMed

    Williamson, S; Gossop, M; Powis, B; Griffiths, P; Fountain, J; Strang, J

    1997-03-14

    A sample of drug users (n = 158) were contacted and interviewed in non-clinical community settings about their use of Ecstasy, cocaine powder, and amphetamines and the adverse effects of these drugs. Subjects reported a wide range of adverse effects including anxiety problems, depression, mood swings, feelings of paranoia, and panic attacks. Sleep and appetite disturbances were the most commonly reported problems. About half of all subjects reported depression and paranoid feelings associated with their stimulant use. Many of those reporting problems stated that these were mild. However, for all drugs, a substantial minority of users reported adverse effects which they rated as 'severe'. Between 30 and 55% of the sample reported having had at least one 'severe' adverse effect (30% cocaine, 35% Ecstasy and 55% amphetamine). There were clear differences between the different drugs in the likelihood and reported severity of adverse effects. Amphetamine use was associated with significantly more adverse effects and with more severe adverse effects than Ecstasy or cocaine. Cocaine powder was associated with the least severe adverse effects. A common pattern of drug use involved the use of depressant drugs such as opiates and benzodiazepines in addition to stimulants. The stimulant and depressant users were more likely than the stimulants-only users to use stimulants by injection and more likely to report adverse effects associated with stimulant use. The stimulant and depressant users were also more likely to have been treated for a drug problem. Approximately a quarter of the sample stated that they had stopped using stimulants up to the point of interview as a result of their bad experiences.

  14. The multinational drug companies in Zaire: their adverse effect on cost and availability of essential drugs.

    PubMed

    Glucksberg, H; Singer, J

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of the types and costs of drugs imported by seven multinational pharmaceutical companies in Zaire, an underdeveloped country in Africa, reveals that three-fourths of the drugs consisted of expensive and nonessential items. The prices of essential drugs (24 percent of their total imports) were much higher than those of available generic sources (average difference of 300 percent). The importation of nonessential drugs and high prices paid for essential drugs exacerbate the scarcity of needed items because of Zaire's limited supply of hard currency. In addition, two drug firms imported and promoted the sale of aminopyrone-dipyrone analgesic-antipyretics, drugs now rarely used in Western industrialized countries because of potentially fatal complications. Thus, in Zaire, the multinational pharmaceutical industry has an adverse effect on the availability and cost of drugs, as well as on the pattern of drug usage.

  15. Ziconotide: new drug. Limited analgesic efficacy, too many adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    (1) When oral morphine does not relieve severe pain and when there is no specific treatment for the underlying cause, the first option is to try subcutaneous or intravenous administration. If this standard treatment fails or is poorly tolerated, intrathecal injection is usually preferred as the direct route to the central nervous system. However, one-quarter to one-half of patients still do not achieve adequate pain relief, and adverse effects are relatively frequent; (2) Ziconotide is not an opiate and is not related to the usual classes of drugs that interfere with nervous transmission in the posterior horn of the spinal cord. Marketing authorization has been granted for "severe, chronic pain in patients who require intrathecal analgesia". The Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) recommends continuous infusion via an intrathecal catheter connected to a pump; (3) Clinical evaluation of ziconotide does not include any trials versus morphine in patients with nociceptive pain, or any trials versus tricyclic or antiepileptic drugs in patients with neurogenic pain; (4) In a trial in 220 patients in whom systemic morphine had failed, the mean pain score on a 100-mm visual analogue scale was 69.8 mm after three weeks on ziconotide, compared to 75.8 mm with placebo. This difference, although statistically significant, is clinically irrelevant. The proportion of "responders" (reduction of at least 30% in the initial pain score) was respectively 16.1% and 12.0% (no statistically significant difference); (5) The two other placebo-controlled trials included 112 patients with pain linked to cancer or HIV infection, and 257 patients with non-cancer pain. After a titration phase lasting 5 to 6 days, a combined analysis of the two trials showed that the mean pain score was 48.8 mm with ziconotide and 68.4 mm with placebo (statistically significant difference). However, many patients did not complete the titration phase. Efficacy also appeared to differ according to the type

  16. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  17. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  18. Evaluation of the Effects of Pharmacist Intervention for Adverse Drug Reaction Detection and Exacerbation Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Imaura, Masaharu; Yamaya, Takeshi; Uehara, Nozomi; Mano, Narutoshi; Nagase, Satoshi; Kimura, Koji; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2017-01-01

     We evaluated the effects of pharmacist intervention for adverse drug reaction detection and exacerbation avoidance, as well as the severity and outcome of reactions based on analyses of pharmacist involvement in a collaborative approach to medicine. Of 5436 cases with pharmacist involvement, adverse drug reaction prevention was seen in 440, accounting for 8.1%, and exacerbation avoidance in 213, accounting for 3.9%. We concluded that pharmacist involvement contributes to detect adverse drug reactions and avoid exacerbation, and improves pharmacotherapy safety. We also analyzed 131 cases in which the course after intervention was followed. When categorized by adverse drug reaction severity, Grade 1 and 2 were the same at 45.8%, Grade 3 at 8.4%, respectively. Those findings suggested that pharmacist intervention contributes to early detection of an adverse drug reaction. Also, the relationship between clues for detecting adverse drug reactions by a pharmacist and their severity showed that objective evaluations such as clinical laboratory test results, physical assessments and medication history were important for detecting reactions that became more serious. Patients recovered or recovering from an adverse reaction comprised 76.4%, indicating that pharmacist intervention contributed to exacerbation avoidance and improvement. Our findings revealed the effects of pharmacist intervention for adverse drug reaction detection and exacerbation avoidance, and for safety improvement of pharmacotherapy. Additionally, we considered it necessary for the future pharmacist intervention to improve skills of assessing an adverse drug reaction objectively.

  19. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  20. Adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs in North Indian pediatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Dipika; Azad, Chandrika; Kaur, Manpreet; Rudroju, Neelima; Vepa, Pravallika; Guglani, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the pattern and predictors of treatment-emergent adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children diagnosed with epilepsy. We conducted prospective observational study in a tertiary care teaching hospital on 277 epileptic children. Antiepileptic drug (AED)-associated ADRs, demographic and clinical characteristics, AED regimen, and so on were recorded. Causality, severity, and preventability were performed by World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Center scale, Hartwig's severity scale, and Schumock and Thornton questionnaire, respectively. Of the enrolled population, 53% children had symptomatic epilepsy, and 51% were in 5- to 10-year age group. More than two-thirds of children were on monotherapy, with phenytoin (n = 176, 63.5%) being the most common AED. Three hundred fifty-three AED-related ADRs were recorded in 175 children (63.2%). Poor scholastic performance (19%) was the most common ADR, followed by gum hypertrophy (13.3%), headache (10.2%), behavioral problems (5.7%), drowsiness (5.7%), and others. Two hundred sixteen ADRs were probable, and 126 ADRs were possible. Severe ADRs were noted in 6 children. Girls (odds ratio [OR], 1.93; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.07-3.45; P = 0.03), children with secondary epilepsy (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 1.76-6.23; P ≤ 0.001), children older than 5 years (5-10 years; OR, 6.28; 95% CI, 2.79-14.12; P ≤ 0.001), and those older than 10 years (OR, 9.04; 95% CI, 3.69-22.17; P ≤ 0.001) were found to be at higher risk of experiencing ADRs. Monotherapy was the preferred treatment. Phenytoin was the most common ADR causative agent. Female sex, symptomatic epilepsy, and older age (> 5 years) were found to be associated with higher probability of ADR development.

  1. mTOR inhibitors in pancreas transplant: adverse effects and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Silva, Gabriel; Ivani de Paula, Mayara; Rangel, Érika B

    2017-04-01

    Patient and pancreas allograft survival improved following reductions in surgical complications, tighter donor selection and optimization in immunosuppressive protocols. However, long-term survival of pancreas allografts is adversely affected by rejection and immunosuppressive regimen toxicity. Areas covered: This article reviews the existing literature and knowledge of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi). Some clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are highlighted. We summarize the nephrotoxic and diabetogenic mechanisms of mTORi after pancreas transplant, the alternatives to minimize these effects, and report on other adverse events. Expert opinion: Calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based regimens remain the mainstay treatment after pancreas-kidney transplant. However, long-term use of CNIs may be associated with nephrotoxicity. Switching from CNIs to mTORi (sirolimus/SRL and everolimus/EVR) may preserve kidney function, mainly EVR conversion. However, mTORi promote an imbalance of mTOR signaling during long-term follow-up and may ultimately contribute to proteinuria and hyperglycemia. These drugs disrupt autophagy, inhibit cell proliferation, and downregulate VEGF. Therefore, it is important to comprehend and interpret the experimental data. It is equally important to critically analyze clinical studies. Of importance, minimization of side effects, based on safe approaches, can prolong kidney allograft survival. Additional randomized-controlled studies are required to assess the impact of mTORi on pancreas allograft survival.

  2. [Do some drugs have adverse effects on cartilage?].

    PubMed

    Bertin, P; Gillet, P; Treves, R; Netter, P

    1998-01-01

    The potential chondrotoxicity of drugs is very difficult to appreciate because of the difficulties involved in evaluating the evolution of cartilage in human beings. This article attempts to summarize the data from the literature concerning the hypothetical chondrotoxicity of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, intra-articular injections of corticosteroids, and other drugs.

  3. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  4. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  5. Comprehensive evaluations of the adverse effects of drugs: importance of appropriate study selection and data sources.

    PubMed

    Loke, Yoon K; Golder, Su P; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2011-04-01

    While systematic reviews and meta-analyses are at the top of the evidence hierarchy, most of the methodology has focused on assessing treatment benefit. Hence, we propose a structured framework for the initial steps of searching and identifying relevant data sources so that adverse effects can be evaluated in a comprehensive, unbiased manner. The unique methodological challenges stem from the difficulties of addressing diverse outcomes encompassing common, mild symptoms to rare, fatal events. Retrieval of the most appropriate studies should be specifically tailored to fit the nature of the adverse effects, according to the primary objective and study question. In our framework, the structure of the review takes different forms depending on whether the main aim is on scoping/hypothesis generation, or evaluating statistically the magnitude of risk (hypothesis testing), or clarifying characteristics and risk factors of the adverse effect. The wide range of data sources covering adverse effects all have distinct strengths and limitations, and selection of appropriate sources depends on characteristics of the adverse effect (e.g. background incidence and effect size of the drug, clinical presentation, time of onset after drug exposure). Reviewers need to retrieve particular study designs that are most likely to yield robust data on the adverse effects of interest, rather than rely on studies that cannot reliably detect adverse effects, and may yield 'false negatives'. Type II errors (a particular problem when evaluating rare adverse effects) can lull us into a false sense of security (e.g. wrongly concluding that there was no significant difference in harm between drug and control, with the drug erroneously judged as safe). Given the rapid rate at which methodological improvements occur, this proposed framework is by no means definitive, but aims to stimulate further debate and discussion amongst the pharmacoepidemiological and systematic review communities to reach a

  6. Adverse drug reactions: part II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must be effectively practiced by all health care providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  7. Adverse drug reactions: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  8. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Ashley M; Herxheimer, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs) may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis. PMID:11914150

  9. Evidence behind FDA alerts for drugs with adverse cardiovascular effects: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Daniel M; C Herink, Megan; Stevens, Ian G; Cardoza, Natalie M; Singh, Harleen

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) periodically publishes Drug Safety Communications and Drug Alerts notifying health care practitioners and the general public of important information regarding drug therapies following FDA approval. These alerts can result in both positive and negative effects on patient care. Most clinical trials are not designed to detect long-term safety end points, and postmarketing surveillance along with patient reported events are often instrumental in signaling the potential harmful effect of a drug. Recently, many cardiovascular (CV) safety announcements have been released for FDA-approved drugs. Because a premature warning could discourage a much needed treatment or prompt a sudden discontinuation, it is essential to evaluate the evidence supporting these FDA alerts to provide effective patient care and to avoid unwarranted changes in therapy. Conversely, paying attention to these warnings in cases involving high-risk patients can prevent adverse effects and litigation. This article reviews the evidence behind recent FDA alerts for drugs with adverse CV effects and discusses the clinical practice implications.

  10. Assessment of adverse effects of neurotropic drugs in monkeys with the "drug effects on the nervous system" (DENS) scale.

    PubMed

    Uthayathas, Subramaniam; Shaffer, Christopher L; Menniti, Frank S; Schmidt, Christopher J; Papa, Stella M

    2013-04-30

    Research into therapeutics for neuropsychiatric disorders is increasingly focusing on drugs with new mechanisms of action, and such agents are often assessed in preclinical studies using nonhuman primates. However, researchers lack a standardised method to compare different drugs for common adverse effects on the nervous system. We have developed a new scale for this purpose, named "Drug Effects on the Nervous System" (DENS), and tested its utility in an analysis of the second-generation antipsychotic risperidone in monkeys. The behavioural effects of risperidone over a ten-fold clinically relevant exposure range were rated with the DENS scale and compared with a standard motor disability scale for primates. The ratings were correlated with projected D2 and 5-HT2A receptor occupancies over time. The DENS scale detected dose-dependent side effects of risperidone in addition to the motor effects detected with the motor disability scale, including cognitive, sensorimotor and autonomic functions. A consistent temporal association between the DENS scale changes and the projected D2 receptor occupancy was observed, and the DENS scale ratings demonstrated high inter-rater reliability. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the DENS scale as a highly sensitive, reliable and accurate method to identify common adverse effects of risperidone and potentially other neurotropics for translational studies in primates.

  11. The Potential Return on Public Investment in Detecting Adverse Drug Effects.

    PubMed

    Huybrechts, Krista F; Desai, Rishi J; Park, Moa; Gagne, Joshua J; Najafzadeh, Mehdi; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-06-01

    Many countries lack fully functional pharmacovigilance programs, and public budgets allocated to pharmacovigilance in industrialized countries remain low due to resource constraints and competing priorities. Using 3 case examples, we sought to estimate the public health and economic benefits resulting from public investment in active pharmacovigilance programs to detect adverse drug effects. We assessed 3 examples in which early signals of safety hazards were not adequately recognized, resulting in continued exposure of a large number of patients to these drugs when safer and effective alternative treatments were available. The drug examples studied were rofecoxib, cerivastatin, and troglitazone. Using an individual patient simulation model and the health care system perspective, we estimated the potential costs that could have been averted by early systematic detection of safety hazards through the implementation of active surveillance programs. We found that earlier drug withdrawal made possible by active safety surveillance would most likely have resulted in savings in direct medical costs of $773-$884 million for rofecoxib, $3-$10 million for cerivastatin, and $38-$63 million for troglitazone in the United States through the prevention of adverse events. By contrast, the yearly public investment in Food and Drug Administration initiated population-based pharmacovigilance activities in the United States is about $42.5 million at present. These examples illustrate a critical and economically justifiable role for active adverse effect surveillance in protecting the health of the public.

  12. Statistical Mining of Potential Drug Interaction Adverse Effects in FDA's Spontaneous Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Haerian, Krystl; Chase, Herbert S; Friedman, Carol

    2010-11-13

    Many adverse drug effects (ADEs) can be attributed to drug interactions. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) provide a rich opportunity to detect novel post-marketed drug interaction adverse effects (DIAEs), as they include populations not well represented in clinical trials. However, their identification in SRS is nontrivial. Most existing research have addressed the statistical issues used to test or verify DIAEs, but not their identification as part of a systematic large scale database-wide mining process as discussed in this work. This paper examines the application of a highly optimized and tailored implementation of the Apriori algorithm, as well as methods addressing data quality issues, to the identification of DIAEs in FDAs SRS.

  13. The feasibility of a search filter for the adverse effects of non-drug interventions in MEDLINE and Embase.

    PubMed

    Golder, Su; Wright, Kath; Loke, Yoon K

    2017-09-27

    Authors and indexers are increasingly including terms for adverse drug effects in the titles, abstracts or indexing of records in MEDLINE and Embase. However, it is not clear if this is the same for studies with non-drug adverse effects data. We therefore assessed the feasibility of using adverse effects terms when searching MEDLINE or Emabse to retrieve papers of non-drug adverse effects. A collection of papers that reported data on non-drug adverse effects was sought from included studies of systematic reviews. Each included study was analysed to ascertain whether the corresponding record in MEDLINE and Embase included adverse effects terms in the title, abstract or indexing. From 9,129 records screened from DARE (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects), 30 reviews evaluating non-drug adverse effects met our inclusion criteria. From these, 635 unique papers were included in our analysis. Sensitive searches for adverse effects required generic and specific named adverse effects terms using the title, abstract and indexing. Records relating to surgical interventions were more likely to contain adverse effects terms than records relating to non-surgical interventions. Using any adverse effects terms in the title, abstract or indexing in MEDLINE and Embase would have identified an average of 94% of papers on surgical adverse effect interventions per systematic review and 72% of papers on non-surgical adverse effects per systematic review. Hence, while a generic non-drug adverse effect search filter may not yet be feasible, a filter for the adverse effects of surgical interventions may be within reach. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Oral adverse effects of gastrointestinal drugs and considerations for dental management in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karthik, Ramya; Karthik, K. S.; David, Chaya; Ameerunnisa; Keerthi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is associated with alterations in the mouth or influence the course of the dental diseases, and the dental health care workers are expected to recognize, diagnose, and treat oral conditions associated with gastrointestinal diseases and also provide safe and appropriate dental care for afflicted individuals. Drugs used in the management of these diseases result in oral adverse effects and also are known to interact with those prescribed during dental care. Hence, this article has reviewed the drug considerations and guidelines for drug use during dental management of patients with gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:23066260

  15. Adverse food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Alie; van Hunsel, Florence; Bast, Aalt

    2015-12-01

    Food supplements and herbal products are increasingly popular amongst consumers. This leads to increased risks of interactions between prescribed drugs and these products containing bioactive ingredients. From 1991 up to 2014, 55 cases of suspected adverse drug reactions due to concomitant intake of health-enhancing products and drugs were reported to Lareb, the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre. An overview of these suspected interactions is presented and their potential mechanisms of action are described. Mainly during the metabolism of xenobiotics and due to the pharmacodynamics effects interactions seem to occur, which may result in adverse drug reactions. Where legislation is seen to distinct food and medicine, legislation concerning these different bioactive products is less clear-cut. This can only be resolved by increasing the molecular knowledge on bioactive substances and their potential interactions. Thereby potential interactions can be better understood and prevented on an individual level. By considering the dietary pattern and use of bioactive substances with prescribed medication, both health professionals and consumers will be increasingly aware of interactions and these interactive adverse effects can be prevented.

  16. Mining multi-item drug adverse effect associations in spontaneous reporting systems

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multi-item adverse drug event (ADE) associations are associations relating multiple drugs to possibly multiple adverse events. The current standard in pharmacovigilance is bivariate association analysis, where each single drug-adverse effect combination is studied separately. The importance and difficulty in the detection of multi-item ADE associations was noted in several prominent pharmacovigilance studies. In this paper we examine the application of a well established data mining method known as association rule mining, which we tailored to the above problem, and demonstrate its value. The method was applied to the FDAs spontaneous adverse event reporting system (AERS) with minimal restrictions and expectations on its output, an experiment that has not been previously done on the scale and generality proposed in this work. Results Based on a set of 162,744 reports of suspected ADEs reported to AERS and published in the year 2008, our method identified 1167 multi-item ADE associations. A taxonomy that characterizes the associations was developed based on a representative sample. A significant number (67% of the total) of potential multi-item ADE associations identified were characterized and clinically validated by a domain expert as previously recognized ADE associations. Several potentially novel ADEs were also identified. A smaller proportion (4%) of associations were characterized and validated as known drug-drug interactions. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that multi-item ADEs are present and can be extracted from the FDA’s adverse effect reporting system using our methodology, suggesting that our method is a valid approach for the initial identification of multi-item ADEs. The study also revealed several limitations and challenges that can be attributed to both the method and quality of data. PMID:21044365

  17. Evaluation of a procedure to assess the adverse effects of illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, J G C; Best, W; Opperhuizen, A; de Wolff, F A

    2004-02-01

    The assessment procedure of new synthetic illicit drugs that are not documented in the UN treaty on psychotropic drugs was evaluated using a modified Electre model. Drugs were evaluated by an expert panel via the open Delphi approach, where the written score was discussed on 16 items, covering medical, health, legal, and criminalistic issues of the drugs. After this face-to-face discussion the drugs were scored again. Taking the assessment of ketamine as an example, it appeared that each expert used its own scale to score, and that policymakers do not score deviant from experts trained in the medical-biological field. Of the five drugs evaluated by the panel, p-methoxy-metamphetamine (PMMA), gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and 4-methylthio-amphetamine (MTA) were assessed as more adverse than ketamine and psilocine and psilocybine-containing mushrooms. Whereas some experts slightly adjusted during the assessment procedure their opinion on ketamine and PMMA, the opinion on mushrooms was not affected by the discussion held between the two scoring rounds. All experts rank the five drugs in a similar way on the adverse effect scale i.e., concordance scale of the Electre model, indicating unanimity in the expert panel with respect to the risk classification of these abused drugs.

  18. Identifying Adverse Effects of HIV Drug Treatment and Associated Sentiments Using Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Adrover, Cosme; Bodnar, Todd; Huang, Zhuojie

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media platforms are increasingly seen as a source of data on a wide range of health issues. Twitter is of particular interest for public health surveillance because of its public nature. However, the very public nature of social media platforms such as Twitter may act as a barrier to public health surveillance, as people may be reluctant to publicly disclose information about their health. This is of particular concern in the context of diseases that are associated with a certain degree of stigma, such as HIV/AIDS. Objective The objective of the study is to assess whether adverse effects of HIV drug treatment and associated sentiments can be determined using publicly available data from social media. Methods We describe a combined approach of machine learning and crowdsourced human assessment to identify adverse effects of HIV drug treatment solely on individual reports posted publicly on Twitter. Starting from a large dataset of 40 million tweets collected over three years, we identify a very small subset (1642; 0.004%) of individual reports describing personal experiences with HIV drug treatment. Results Despite the small size of the extracted final dataset, the summary representation of adverse effects attributed to specific drugs, or drug combinations, accurately captures well-recognized toxicities. In addition, the data allowed us to discriminate across specific drug compounds, to identify preferred drugs over time, and to capture novel events such as the availability of preexposure prophylaxis. Conclusions The effect of limited data sharing due to the public nature of the data can be partially offset by the large number of people sharing data in the first place, an observation that may play a key role in digital epidemiology in general. PMID:27227141

  19. Gender differences in the effects of childhood adversity on alcohol, drug, and polysubstance-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Evans, Elizabeth A; Grella, Christine E; Upchurch, Dawn M

    2017-07-01

    To examine gender differences in the associations between childhood adversity and different types of substance use disorders and whether gender moderates these relationships. We analyzed data from 19,209 women and 13,898 men as provided by Wave 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) to examine whether gender moderates the associations between childhood adversity and DSM-IV defined lifetime occurrence of alcohol, drug, and polysubstance-related disorders. We used multinomial logistic regression, weighted to be representative of the US adult civilian, noninstitutionalized population, and we calculated predicted probabilities by gender, controlling for covariates. To test which specific moderation contrasts were statistically significant, we conducted pair-wise comparisons corrected for multiple comparisons using Bonferroni's method. For each type of substance use disorder, risk was increased by more exposure to childhood adversity, and women had a lower risk than men. However, moderation effects revealed that with more experiences of childhood adversity, the gender gap in predicted probability for a disorder narrowed in relation to alcohol, it converged in relation to drugs such that risk among women surpassed that among men, and it widened in relation to polysubstances. Knowledge regarding substance-specific gender differences associated with childhood adversity exposure can inform evidence-based treatments. It may also be useful for shaping other types of gender-sensitive public health initiatives to ameliorate or prevent different types of substance use disorders.

  20. Adverse effects of drugs used in the management of constipation and diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Gattuso, J M; Kamm, M A

    1994-01-01

    Most laxatives, if used intermittently in the absence of contraindications, are relatively safe. Bulking agents may diminish absorption of some minerals and drugs, but this is not usually clinically significant. Ispaghula can cause serious allergic reactions. The chronic ingestion of stimulant laxatives has been blamed for the development of the 'cathartic colon', but there are no definitive studies which have demonstrated this. Dantron (danthron) preparations should only be used in older patients and the terminally ill because of the risk of hepatotoxicity with this drug. Oral oxyphenisatine should no longer be used. Senna would appear to be the stimulant laxative of choice during pregnancy and lactation. Bisacodyl is the polyphenolic derivative of choice. Lactulose, sorbitol and lactilol rarely cause significant adverse effects. Magnesium salt laxatives and phosphate enemas can cause serious metabolic disturbances in babies and young children. Liquid paraffin is contraindicated if there is any risk of aspiration. Interference with the absorption of fat soluble vitamins would not appear to be clinically significant. Docusate sodium may potentiate the hepatotoxicity of other drugs, but reports of this are rare. The role of cisapride in constipation has not been established. Antidiarrhoeal drugs are second line drugs whose use is aimed at minimising inconvenience and discomfort. No antidiarrhoeals can be recommended for children under 4 years of age. Loperamide is the drug of choice in older children and adults. The atropine component of diphenoxylate/atropine combinations can cause significant adverse effects. Bismuth salicylate is an inconvenient treatment for travellers' diarrhoea as large frequent doses of the liquid formulation are needed. Some bismuth can be absorbed and there is the potential to cause encephalopathy. Octreotide, methysergide and cholestyramine have a role for specific causes of diarrhoea only. Octreotide is effective in high output states

  1. Adverse effects in women: implications for drug development and regulatory policies.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Ameeta; Fadiran, Emmanuel O; Uhl, Kathleen; Throckmorton, Douglas C

    2011-07-01

    The requirement to establish safety of drugs prior to marketing has been in place since 1938 by the US Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and is by no means a new concept. The efficacy regulations were enacted in 1962 via the Kefauver-Harris Amendment and the drug approval process has evolved thereafter. The assessment of safety and efficacy of drug products is made by pharmaceutical companies during drug development, which then goes through a regulatory review by the US FDA for the determination of market approval or nonapproval. The drug development and regulatory approval processes have endured close ongoing scrutiny by regulatory bodies, the public, US Congress and academic and private organizations and, as a result, have ensured continual refinement. Over the years, evidence has been emerging on varied drug responses in subgroup populations, and the underlying biology associated with age, race and sex as demographic variables have been examined. The resulting growing knowledge of disease burden, treatment response and disparate outcomes has generated opportunities to streamline and improve treatment outcomes in these populations. This article discusses the historical context of women's participation in clinical drug trials submitted to the FDA for regulatory review and approval purposes. The inadvertent consequences of women's exclusion or inadequate representation in past clinical trials and the evidentiary basis for understanding sex differences are also evaluated. Advances in the US regulatory processes to address treatment outcomes that are tied to the topic of this paper, specifically, adverse drug effects in women, are also discussed.

  2. Epigenetics and transcriptomics to detect adverse drug effects in model systems of human development.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Nina V; Leist, Marcel

    2014-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals or drugs has been associated with functional or structural deficits and the development of diseases in later life. For example, developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) is triggered by lead, and this compound may predispose to neurodegenerative diseases in later life. The molecular memory for such late consequences of early exposure is not known, but epigenetic mechanisms (modification of the chromatin structure) could take this role. Examples and underlying mechanisms have been compiled here for the field of DNT. Moreover, we addressed the question as to what readout is suitable for addressing drug memory effects. We summarize how complex developmental processes can be modelled in vitro by using the differentiation of human stem cells. Although cellular models can never replicate the final human DNT phenotype, they can model the adverse effect that a chemical has on key biological processes essential for organ formation and function. Highly information-rich transcriptomics data may inform on these changes and form the bridge from in vitro models to human prediction. We compiled data showing that transcriptome analysis can indicate toxicity patterns of drugs. A crucial question to be answered in our systems is when and how transcriptome changes indicate adversity (as opposed to transient adaptive responses), and how drug-induced changes are perpetuated over time even after washout of the drug. We present evidence for the hypothesis that changes in the histone methylation pattern could represent the persistence detector of an early insult that is transformed to an adverse effect at later time-points in life.

  3. Adverse Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for interactions with current medications should always be considered when administering or prescribing any drug. Considering the staggering number of drugs patients may be taking, this task can be daunting. Fortunately, drug classes employed in dental practice are relatively few in number and therapy is generally brief in duration. While this reduces the volume of potential interactions, there are still a significant number to be considered. This article will review basic principles of drug interactions and highlight those of greatest concern in dental practice. PMID:21410363

  4. Adverse effects of drug therapies on male and female sexual function.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Th; Bader, M; Uckert, S; Staehler, M; Becker, A; Stief, C G

    2006-12-01

    Sexual dysfunctions (SD) are adverse effects of common drug therapies that have rarely been considered in investigations so far. Possibly it is barely known that many widespread and frequently prescribed medications and drug therapies can have significant impact on vascular and nerval processes as well as on endocrinologic and psychoneuroendocrinologic systems and therefore can influence sexual functions. Impotence and disorders of the erectile function can mainly be caused by antidopaminergic mechanisms, whereas ejaculatory disorders and anorgasmia often can be explained by antiserotoninergic effects. Anticholinergic and adrenoloytic agents can also cause a particular impairment of erectile functions. The following considerations will show that the detection and treatment of SD (also in women!) should be given much more attention since drug-induced SDs occur predominantly in indications where a SD itself can be a symptom of the disease.

  5. Rebound effect of modern drugs: serious adverse event unknown by health professionals.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Marcus Zulian

    2013-01-01

    Supported in the Hippocratic aphorism primum non nocere, the bioethical principle of non-maleficence pray that the medical act cause the least damage or injury to the health of the patient, leaving it to the doctor to assess the risks of a particular therapy through knowledge of possible adverse events of drugs. Among these, the rebound effect represents a common side effect to numerous classes of modern drugs, may cause serious and fatal disorders in patients. This review aims to clarify the health professionals on clinical and epidemiological aspects of rebound phenomenon. A qualitative, exploratory and bibliographic review was held in the PubMed database using the keywords 'rebound', 'withdrawal', 'paradoxical', 'acetylsalicylic acid', 'anti-inflammatory', 'bronchodilator', 'antidepressant', 'statin', 'proton pump inhibitor' and 'bisphosphonate'. The rebound effect occurs after discontinuation of numerous classes of drugs that act contrary to the disease disorders, exacerbating them at levels above those prior to treatment. Regardless of the disease, the drug and duration of treatment, the phenomenon manifests itself in a small proportion of susceptible individuals. However, it may cause serious and fatal adverse events should be considered a public health problem in view of the enormous consumption of drugs by population. Bringing together a growing and unquestionable body of evidence, the physician needs to have knowledge of the consequences of the rebound effect and how to minimize it, increasing safety in the management of modern drugs. On the other hand, this rebound can be used in a curative way, broadening the spectrum of the modern therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Adverse Health Effects Associated with Living in a Former Methamphetamine Drug Laboratory - Victoria, Australia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jackie; Kenneally, Michaela E; Edwards, John W; Walker, G Stewart

    2017-01-06

    The manufacture of methamphetamine in clandestine drug laboratories occurs in various locations, including residential houses and apartments. Unlike the controlled manufacture of chemicals and drugs, clandestine manufacture results in the uncontrolled storage, use, generation, and disposal of a wide range of chemicals and the deposit of methamphetamine drug residues on indoor surfaces (1). These residues have been found at high levels on porous and nonporous surfaces and have been shown to persist for months to years (1). Persons exposed to these environments often have poorly defined exposures and health effects. It is commonly assumed that these levels of exposure are low compared with those related to illicit drug use or therapeutic use of amphetamine-based drugs for managing behavioral issues such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (2). In 2015, a family that was unknowingly exposed to methamphetamine residues in a house in Australia was found to have adverse health effects and elevated methamphetamine levels in hair samples, highlighting the potential for public health risks for persons who might live in methamphetamine-contaminated dwellings. This case study highlights the importance of the identification and effective decontamination of former clandestine drug laboratories.

  7. [Pain as adverse drug reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Schaffarzick, Daniel; Nagano, Marietta; Janowitz, Susanne Melitta; Schweitzer, Ekkehard

    2012-09-01

    We present a multidisciplinary (anaesthesiology--clinical pharmacy--bioinformatics) analysis of pain as possible adverse drug reaction taking different manifestations of pain, indication groups, relevance to the Austrian drug market and possible mechanistic influence of drugs on development and apprehension of pain into consideration.We designed an overview that shows how transmitters that play a part in nociception and antinociception can be influenced by drugs. This allows conclusions to the dolorigene potential of therapeutics.

  8. Adverse Drug Effects and Preoperative Medication Factors Related to Perioperative Low-Dose Ketamine Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Goldberg, Stephen F; Patel, Ronak D; Zhou, Jon; Adams, Douglas R; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    High-dose opioid administration is associated with significant adverse events. Evidence suggests that low-dose ketamine infusions improve perioperative analgesia over conventional opioid management, but usage is highly variable. Ketamine's adverse drug effects (ADEs) are well known, but their prevalence during low-dose infusions in a clinical setting and how often they lead to infusion discontinuation are unknown. The purposes of this study were 3-fold: (1) to identify patient factors associated with initiation of ketamine infusions during spine surgery, (2) to identify specific spine procedures in which ketamine has been used most frequently, and (3) to identify ADEs associated with postoperative ketamine infusions and which ADEs most frequently led to discontinuation. Spine surgery was chosen because of its association with moderate to severe pain and a relatively high use of ketamine infusions in this population at our hospital.

  9. Leveraging 3D chemical similarity, target and phenotypic data in the identification of drug-protein and drug-adverse effect associations.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    Drug-target identification is crucial to discover novel applications for existing drugs and provide more insights about mechanisms of biological actions, such as adverse drug effects (ADEs). Computational methods along with the integration of current big data sources provide a useful framework for drug-target and drug-adverse effect discovery. In this article, we propose a method based on the integration of 3D chemical similarity, target and adverse effect data to generate a drug-target-adverse effect predictor along with a simple leveraging system to improve identification of drug-targets and drug-adverse effects. In the first step, we generated a system for multiple drug-target identification based on the application of 3D drug similarity into a large target dataset extracted from the ChEMBL. Next, we developed a target-adverse effect predictor combining targets from ChEMBL with phenotypic information provided by SIDER data source. Both modules were linked to generate a final predictor that establishes hypothesis about new drug-target-adverse effect candidates. Additionally, we showed that leveraging drug-target candidates with phenotypic data is very useful to improve the identification of drug-targets. The integration of phenotypic data into drug-target candidates yielded up to twofold precision improvement. In the opposite direction, leveraging drug-phenotype candidates with target data also yielded a significant enhancement in the performance. The modeling described in the current study is simple and efficient and has applications at large scale in drug repurposing and drug safety through the identification of mechanism of action of biological effects.

  10. Epidemiologic studies of adverse effects of anti-retroviral drugs: how well is statistical power reported.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Scott D; Barton, Todd D; Gross, Robert; Hennessy, Sean; Berlin, Jesse A; Strom, Brian L

    2005-03-01

    To determine whether there is a difference in average statistical power between pharmacoepidemiologic studies of anti-retroviral adverse drug effects (ADEs) sponsored by for-profit versus non-profit organizations. We studied all published pharmacoepidemiologic studies of ADEs associated with the 15 anti-retroviral drugs approved through the end of 1999. A priori, the primary outcome was the power of each study to detect a clinically important difference in the risk for an adverse effect among patients exposed to the study drug(s). We could not evaluate this outcome because of the infrequent reporting of power calculations. We instead report the distribution of studies across a 5-tiered measure of adequacy of reporting of statistical power, as well as the sponsorship of these studies. Of 48 studies meeting our inclusion criteria, only 1 (2%) reported either a completed, a priori power calculation or sufficient details for readers to calculate the power to detect a pre-defined, clinically important effect. Thirty-five studies (73%) reported the minimum information required for sophisticated readers to determine the power to detect an event rate of interest to them; 6 additional studies (13%) reported confidence intervals around at least one summary effect measure and 6 (13%) provided no indication of power or uncertainty. Of the 41 studies for which sponsorship was determined, only 3 (7%) were sponsored by for-profit organizations. The poor reporting of statistical power in this sample suggests a need for guidelines to improve the reporting of pharmacoepidemiologic studies of ADEs. Future research is needed to determine whether the observed paucity of industry-sponsored observational studies of anti-retroviral ADEs extends to other clinical areas, and if so, to identify the causes of this phenomenon. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Adverse drug effects attributed to phenylpropanolamine: a review of 142 case reports.

    PubMed

    Lake, C R; Gallant, S; Masson, E; Miller, P

    1990-08-01

    Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is contained in about 106 products, over half of which are available over-the-counter (OTC). Most are cough/cold remedies; nine are OTC diet aids. More than nine million Americans were using OTC diet aids in 1981, making PPA the fifth most used drug in the United States, responsible for over $200 million in revenues. The safety of PPA remains controversial. Although most controlled studies indicate minimal pressor effects with recommended doses, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) continue to be documented. Since 1965, 142 ADRs have been reported in 85 studies, 69% of these in North America. Many such cases may go unrecognized. About two thirds of all ADRs occurred in females and in patients under 30. Of ADRs attributed to legitimately sold PPA products, 85% occurred after consumption of OTC products versus only 15% after prescription drugs. The PPA product often contained combination ingredients, or PPA was consumed along with additional drugs. An overdose of PPA was taken in about a third of the cases. After ingestion of non-overdose amounts, 82% of the ADRs were severe. The most frequent side effects involved symptoms compatible with acute hypertension, with severe headache the most common complaint. Twenty-four intracranial hemorrhages, eight seizures, and eight deaths (most due to stroke) were associated with PPA ingestion. We have summarized these data in an effort to alert clinicians to the prevalence of usage of PPA products and the potential for adverse effects. In patients who present with elevated blood pressure or signs of acute hypertension, especially hypertensive encephalopathy of undetermined origin, we recommend inquiry about recent ingestion of PPA-containing diet aids and cough/cold products and suggest having such patients remain upright rather than supine.

  12. Modeling Liver-Related Adverse Effects of Drugs Using kNN QSAR Method

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Amie D.; Zhu, Hao; Fourches, Dennis; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Adverse effects of drugs (AEDs) continue to be a major cause of drug withdrawals both in development and post-marketing. While liver-related AEDs are a major concern for drug safety, there are few in silico models for predicting human liver toxicity for drug candidates. We have applied the Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) approach to model liver AEDs. In this study, we aimed to construct a QSAR model capable of binary classification (active vs. inactive) of drugs for liver AEDs based on chemical structure. To build QSAR models, we have employed an FDA spontaneous reporting database of human liver AEDs (elevations in activity of serum liver enzymes), which contains data on approximately 500 approved drugs. Approximately 200 compounds with wide clinical data coverage, structural similarity and balanced (40/60) active/inactive ratio were selected for modeling and divided into multiple training/test and external validation sets. QSAR models were developed using the k nearest neighbor method and validated using external datasets. Models with high sensitivity (>73%) and specificity (>94%) for prediction of liver AEDs in external validation sets were developed. To test applicability of the models, three chemical databases (World Drug Index, Prestwick Chemical Library, and Biowisdom Liver Intelligence Module) were screened in silico and the validity of predictions was determined, where possible, by comparing model-based classification with assertions in publicly available literature. Validated QSAR models of liver AEDs based on the data from the FDA spontaneous reporting system can be employed as sensitive and specific predictors of AEDs in pre-clinical screening of drug candidates for potential hepatotoxicity in humans. PMID:20192250

  13. Recognizing and reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L. M.; Colley, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Although physicians in practice are most likely to see patients with adverse drug reactions, they may fail to recognize an adverse effect or to attribute it to a drug effect and, when recognized, they may fail to report serious reactions to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To recognize and attribute an adverse event to a drug effect, physicians should review the patient's clinical course, looking at patient risk factors, the known adverse reactions to the suspected drug, and the likelihood of a causal relationship between the drug and the adverse event-based on the temporal relationship, response to stopping or restarting the drug, and whether other factors could explain the reaction. Once an adverse drug reaction has been identified, the patient should be informed and appropriate documentation made in the patient's medical record. Serious known reactions and all reactions to newly released drugs or those not previously known to occur (even if the certainty is low) should be reported to the FDA. PMID:1536067

  14. Tramadol hydrochloride: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse side effects, co-administration of drugs and new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, M; Andreani, T; Fangueiro, J; Faggio, C; Silva, C; Santini, A; Garcia, M L; Silva, A M; Souto, E B

    2015-03-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride (TrHC) is a synthetic analgesic drug exhibiting opioid and non-opioid properties, acting mainly on the central nervous system. It has been mostly used to treat pain, although its use to treat anxiety and depression has also been documented. These properties arise from the fact that they inhibit serotonin (5-HT) reuptake augmenting 5-HT concentration on the synaptic cleft. Despite this, TrHC has also been described to have several side effects which are mainly due to its fast metabolization and excretion which in turn requires multiple doses per day. To surpass this limitation, new pharmaceutical formulations are being developed intending the protection, target and sustained delivery as well as a reduction on daily dose aiming a reduction on the side effects. In the present work we have revised the efficacy, safety, biological and adverse effects of TrHC, and the added value of developing a novel drug delivery system for topical administration.

  15. Investigating clandestine drug laboratories: adverse medical effects in law enforcement personnel.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J L; Barnhart, S; Checkoway, H

    1996-10-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted among an international group of 46 law enforcement chemists and 13 Washington State clandestine drug laboratory investigation team members with more than 2,800 combined investigations. Each participant completed a questionnaire concerning previous drug laboratory investigations and adverse health effects during response activities. Methamphetamine laboratories accounted for 81-97% of all responses. Total illness incident rates varied between 0.75-3.4% of responses. Most exposures were through inhalation, and many occurred in the years prior to use of personal protective equipment. Symptoms were primarily those of headache and respiratory, mucous membrane, and skin irritation. Most illness episodes occurred during the processing phase of laboratory responses, and none occurred during the entry phase. A majority of illness episodes occurred in laboratories with leak/spills, fire/explosion, or uncontrolled reactions. Responding to an active laboratory was associated with a 7 to 15-fold risk of becoming ill as compared with setup, in-transit, or former (equipment removed) laboratory responses. No other laboratories characteristics were consistently associated with a significantly elevated relative risk of adverse health effects.

  16. PERSYVE - Design and validation of a questionnaire about adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Silva, Daniela; Figueiras, Adolfo; Herdeiro, Maria T.; Teixeira Rodrigues, António; Silva Branco, Fábio; Polónia, Jorge; Figueiredo, Isabel V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to design and validate a questionnaire to measure perceived symptoms associated with antihypertensive drugs (PERSYVE). Methods The PERSYVE development and validation included four stages: 1) item development (bibliographic review and questionnaire elaboration); 2) face and content validation; 3) field testing (pre-test); and 4) test-retest validation, assessment of internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) and reproducibility over time (intraclass correlation coefficient and Cohen’s kappa coefficient). Results PERSYVE is divided into six sections according to results obtained from the literature review: (1) drug adherence, (2) perceived symptoms and how they affect quality of life (five-point Likert scale), (3) communication with health professionals, (4) perception of symptoms as adverse reactions, (5) influence on therapy compliance, and (6) adoption of non-pharmacological methods for blood pressure control. Content and face validation of the questionnaire led to some vocabulary changes and the introduction of section 2.1. Field-testing (n=26) revealed high comprehensibility of the questions. The Cronbach's alpha, calculated for section 2 (five-point Likert scale) was 0.850. PERSYVE was reproducible (n=167): kappa values presented fair to substantial reproducibility and, in section 2, ICC values resulted in good to excellent reproducibility. Conclusion Results showed that PERSYVE is a well-structured, objective, patient-friendly, valid and reliable questionnaire. PERSYVE can be a very useful instrument in hypertensive patients’ monitoring and in the screening of adverse effects. PMID:25035716

  17. IDAAPM: integrated database of ADMET and adverse effects of predictive modeling based on FDA approved drug data.

    PubMed

    Legehar, Ashenafi; Xhaard, Henri; Ghemtio, Leo

    2016-01-01

    The disposition of a pharmaceutical compound within an organism, i.e. its Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, Toxicity (ADMET) properties and adverse effects, critically affects late stage failure of drug candidates and has led to the withdrawal of approved drugs. Computational methods are effective approaches to reduce the number of safety issues by analyzing possible links between chemical structures and ADMET or adverse effects, but this is limited by the size, quality, and heterogeneity of the data available from individual sources. Thus, large, clean and integrated databases of approved drug data, associated with fast and efficient predictive tools are desirable early in the drug discovery process. We have built a relational database (IDAAPM) to integrate available approved drug data such as drug approval information, ADMET and adverse effects, chemical structures and molecular descriptors, targets, bioactivity and related references. The database has been coupled with a searchable web interface and modern data analytics platform (KNIME) to allow data access, data transformation, initial analysis and further predictive modeling. Data were extracted from FDA resources and supplemented from other publicly available databases. Currently, the database contains information regarding about 19,226 FDA approval applications for 31,815 products (small molecules and biologics) with their approval history, 2505 active ingredients, together with as many ADMET properties, 1629 molecular structures, 2.5 million adverse effects and 36,963 experimental drug-target bioactivity data. IDAAPM is a unique resource that, in a single relational database, provides detailed information on FDA approved drugs including their ADMET properties and adverse effects, the corresponding targets with bioactivity data, coupled with a data analytics platform. It can be used to perform basic to complex drug-target ADMET or adverse effects analysis and predictive modeling. IDAAPM is

  18. Cost-effectiveness Analysis for Genotyping before Allopurinol Treatment to Prevent Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ching-Hua; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wen, Yen-Hsia; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Tain, You-Lin; Wang, Yu-Ching Lily; Wu, Cheng-Chih; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2017-06-01

    Patients with an HLA-B*58:01 allele have an increased risk of developing severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCAR) when treated with allopurinol. Although one-off pharmacogenetic testing may prevent life-threatening adverse drug reactions, testing prior to allopurinol initiation incurs additional costs. The study objective was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of HLA-B*58:01 screening compared with using other available urate-lowering agents (ULA). A decision-analytical model was used to compare direct medical costs and effectiveness [including lifetime saved, quality-adjusted life-yrs (QALY) gained] in treating new patients with the following options: (1) genetic screening followed by allopurinol prescribing for noncarriers of HLA-B*58:01, (2) prescribing benzbromarone without screening, (3) prescribing febuxostat without screening, and (4) prescribing allopurinol without screening. A 1-year time frame and third-party payer perspective were modeled for both the entire cohort (base-case) and for the subgroup of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of genetic screening prior to ULA therapy was estimated as New Taiwan (NT) $234,610 (US$7508) per QALY gained in the base-case cohort. For patients with CKD, it was estimated as NT$230,925 (US$7390) per QALY. The study results were sensitive to the probability of benzbromarone/febuxostat-related hypersensitivity, and a negative predicted value of genotyping. HLA-B*58:01 screening gave good value for money in preventing allopurinol-induced SCAR in patients indicated for ULA therapy. In addition to the costs of genotyping, it is important to monitor ULA safety closely in adopting HLA-B*58:01 screening in practice.

  19. CORAL: binary classifications (active/inactive) for Liver-Related Adverse Effects of Drugs.

    PubMed

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor F; Benfenati, Emilio; Gini, Giuseppina; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-09-01

    Classification data related to the Liver-Related Adverse Effects of Drugs have been studied with the CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). Two datasets which contain compounds with two serum enzyme markers of liver toxicity: alanine aminotransferase (ALT, n=187) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST, n=209) are analyzed. Statistical quality of the prediction for ALT activity is n=35, Sensitivity = 0.5556, Specificity = 0.8077, and Accuracy = 0.7429. In the case of AST activity the prediction is characterized by n=42, Sensitivity = 0.6875, Specificity = 0.7692, and Accuracy = 0.7381. A number of structural alerts which can be related to the studied activities are revealed. It is the first attempt to build up the classification QSAR model by means of the Monte Carlo technique based on representation of the molecular structure by SMILES using the CORAL software.

  20. Adverse endocrine and metabolic effects of psychotropic drugs: selective clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswar, Chaya G; Baldessarini, Ross J; Harsh, Veronica L; Alpert, Jonathan E

    2009-12-01

    The article critically reviews selected, clinically significant, adverse endocrine and metabolic effects associated with psychotropic drug treatments, including hyperprolactinaemia, hyponatraemia, diabetes insipidus, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, sexual dysfunction and virilization, weight loss, weight gain and metabolic syndrome (type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and hypertension). Such effects are prevalent and complex, but can be managed clinically when recognized. They encourage continued critical assessment of benefits versus risks of psychotropic drugs and underscore the importance of close coordination of psychiatric and general medical care to improve long-term health of psychiatric patients. Options for management of hyperprolactinaemia include lowering doses, switching to agents such as aripiprazole, clozapine or quetiapine, managing associated osteoporosis, carefully considering the use of dopamine receptor agonists and ruling out stress, oral contraceptive use and hypothyroidism as contributing factors. Disorders of water homeostasis may include syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), managed by water restriction or slow replacement by hypertonic saline along with drug discontinuation. Safe management of diabetes insipidus, commonly associated with lithium, involves switching mood stabilizer and consideration of potassium-sparing diuretics. Clinical hypothyroidism may be a more useful marker than absolute cut-offs of hormone values, and may be associated with quetiapine, antidepressant and lithium use, and managed by thyroxine replacement. Hyper-parathyroidism requires comprehensive medical evaluation for occult tumours. Hypocalcaemia, along with multiple other psychiatric and medical causes, may result in decreased bone density and require evaluation and management. Strategies for reducing sexual dysfunction with psychotropics remain largely unsatisfactory. Finally, management strategies for obesity and metabolic syndrome

  1. Cost-effectiveness of one-time genetic testing to minimize lifetime adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, O; Durham, D; Kasirajan, K

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of one-time pharmacogenomic testing for preventing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) over a patient's lifetime. We developed a Markov-based Monte Carlo microsimulation model to represent the ADR events in the lifetime of each patient. The base-case considered a 40-year-old patient. We measured health outcomes in life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted LYs (QALYs) and estimated costs using 2013 US$. In the base-case, one-time genetic testing had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $43,165 (95% confidence interval (CI) is ($42,769,$43,561)) per additional LY and $53,680 per additional QALY (95% CI is ($53,182,$54,179)), hence under the base-case one-time genetic testing is cost-effective. The ICER values were most sensitive to the average probability of death due to ADR, reduction in ADR rate due to genetic testing, mean ADR rate and cost of genetic testing.

  2. Charge is an important determinant of hemodynamic and adverse cardiovascular effects of cationic drugs.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, Michael K; Authier, Simon; Curtis, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Cationic compounds are diverse and atypical therapeutic substances. In the present study we examined whether a prototypical class effect of cationic drugs in the cardiovascular system exists and whether this might be predictable on the basis of chemistry. The dose-dependent effects of cationic compounds of varying molecular weights and charge were examined on the blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and the ECG in anesthetized rats. The compounds examined were protamine, hexadimethrine, tetraethylammonium (TEA), low molecular weight poly-L-lysine (LMW-PLL) and high molecular weight PLL (HMW-PLL). All of the compounds examined except TEA produced a dose-dependent reduction in BP. No changes occurred in HR even when high doses were administered. The ECG effects of these cationic compounds included a dose-dependent prolongation of the QT interval, especially at higher doses. All compounds transiently decreased the size of the P-wave after i.v. bolus administration whereas only protamine and hexadimethrine prolonged the PR and QRS intervals and only at the highest dose (32 mg/kg) administered. All cationic compounds, except TEA and saline, evoked ventricular premature beats (VPB), and protamine and HMW-PLL also evoked brief episodes of ventricular tachycardia (VT). The incidence and frequency of arrhythmias was not dose-dependent and no animals experienced protracted episodes of arrhythmia incidence. These dose dependent effects of the polycationic compounds tested suggest a collective mechanism of action that relates the effect of charge of the compound to the onset and persistence of observed cardiovascular toxicity, and adverse cardiovascular effect risk appears to be predictable on this basis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of a novel mechanism accounting for the adverse cholinergic effects of the anticancer drug irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Blandizzi, Corrado; De Paolis, Barbara; Colucci, Rocchina; Lazzeri, Gloria; Baschiera, Fabio; Del Tacca, Mario

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms accounting for the adverse cholinergic effects of the antitumour drug irinotecan. The activity of irinotecan and its active metabolite, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), was assayed in models suitable for pharmacological studies on cholinergic system. Irinotecan moderately inhibited human or electric eel acetylcholinesterase activity, SN-38 had no effect, whereas physostigmine blocked both the enzymes with high potency and efficacy. Irinotecan and SN-38 did not affect spontaneous or electrically-induced contractile activity of human colonic muscle. Acetylcholine and dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) caused phasic contractions or relaxations, respectively. Physostigmine enhanced the motor responses elicited by electrical stimulation. Although irinotecan and SN-38 did not modify the basal contractile activity of guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle strips, irinotecan 100 μM moderately enhanced cholinergic twitch contractions. Acetylcholine or DMPP caused phasic contractions, whereas physostigmine enhanced the twitch responses. Electrically-induced [3H]-acetylcholine release was reduced by irinotecan (100 μM) or physostigmine (0.1 μM). Intravenous irinotecan stimulated gastric acid secretion in rats, but no effects were obtained with SN-38, physostigmine or i.c.v. irinotecan. Hypersecretion induced by irinotecan was partly prevented by ondansetron, and unaffected by capsazepine. In the presence of atropine, vagotomy and systemic or vagal ablation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibres, irinotecan did not stimulate gastric secretion. The present results indicate that irinotecan and SN-38 do not act as specific acetylcholinesterase blockers or acetylcholine receptor agonists. It is rather suggested that irinotecan promotes a parasympathetic discharge to peripheral organs, mediated by capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent fibres, and that serotonin 5-HT3 receptors are implicated in the genesis of vago-vagal reflex

  4. Relationship between adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs, number of coprescribed drugs, and drug load in a large cohort of consecutive patients with drug-refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Canevini, Maria Paola; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Gatti, Giuliana; Licchetta, Laura; Malerba, Ambra; Muscas, Giancarlo; La Neve, Angela; Striano, Pasquale; Perucca, Emilio

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the adverse effects (AEs) of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in adults with refractory epilepsy and their relationship with number of coprescribed AEDs and AED load. Patients with refractory epilepsy were enrolled consecutively at 11 tertiary referral centers. AEs were assessed through unstructured interview and the Adverse Event Profile (AEP) questionnaire. AED loads were calculated as the sum of prescribed daily dose (PDD)/defined daily dose (DDD) ratios for each coprescribed AED. Of 809 patients enrolled, 709 had localization-related epilepsy and 627 were on polytherapy. AED loads increased with increasing number of AEDs in the treatment regimen, from 1.2 +/- 0.5 for patients on monotherapy to 2.5 +/- 1, 3.7 +/- 1.1, and 4.7 +/- 1.1 for those on two, three, and > or =4 AEDs, respectively. The number of spontaneously reported AEs correlated with the number of AEs identified by the AEP (r = 0.27, p < 0.0001). AEP scores did not differ between patients with monotherapy and patients with polytherapy (42.8 +/- 11.7 vs. 42.6 +/- 11.2), and there was no correlation between AEP scores and AED load (r = -0.05, p = 0.16). AEs did not differ between monotherapy and polytherapy patients, and did not correlate with AED load, possibly as a result of physicians' intervention in individualizing treatment regimens. Taking into account the limitations of a cross-sectional survey, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AEs are determined more by individual susceptibility, type of AEDs used, and physicians' skills, than number of coprescribed AEDs and AED load.

  5. Prediction of drug-induced eosinophilia adverse effect by using SVM and naïve Bayesian approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Yu, Peng; Xiang, Ming-Li; Li, Xi-Bo; Kong, Wei-Bao; Ma, Jun-Yi; Wang, Jun-Long; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Ji

    2016-03-01

    Drug-induced eosinophilia is a potentially life-threatening adverse effect; clinical manifestations, eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome, mainly include severe skin eruption, fever, hematologic abnormalities, and organ system dysfunction. Using experimental methods to evaluate drug-induced eosinophilia is very complicated, time-consuming, and costly in the early stage of drug development. Thus, in this investigation, we established computational prediction models of drug-induced eosinophilia using SVM and naïve Bayesian approaches. For the SVM modeling, the overall prediction accuracy for the training set by means of fivefold cross-validation is 91.6 and for the external test set is 82.9 %. For the naïve Bayesian modeling, the overall prediction accuracy for the training set is 92.5 and for the external test set is 85.4 %. Moreover, some molecular descriptors and substructures considered as important for drug-induced eosinophilia were identified. Thus, we hope the prediction models of drug-induced eosinophilia built in this work should be applied to filter early-stage molecules for potential eosinophilia adverse effect, and the selected molecular descriptors and substructures of toxic compounds should be taken into consideration in the design of new candidate drugs to help medicinal chemists rationally select the chemicals with the best prospects to be effective and safe.

  6. Making a bad thing worse: adverse effects of stress on drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Cleck, Jessica N; Blendy, Julie A

    2008-02-01

    Sustained exposure to various psychological stressors can exacerbate neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. Addiction is a chronic brain disease in which individuals cannot control their need for drugs, despite negative health and social consequences. The brains of addicted individuals are altered and respond very differently to stress than those of individuals who are not addicted. In this Review, we highlight some of the common effects of stress and drugs of abuse throughout the addiction cycle. We also discuss both animal and human studies that suggest treating the stress-related aspects of drug addiction is likely to be an important contributing factor to a long-lasting recovery from this disorder.

  7. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  8. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  9. Adverse effects produced by different drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: A mixed treatment comparison.

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-Dong; Bi, Zhen-Yun; Liu, Jing-Feng; Si, Wei-Jun; Shi, Qian-Qian; Xue, Li-Peng; Bai, Jing

    2017-10-01

    This mixed treatment comparison is used to compare the adverse effects of eleven different drugs used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD). The drugs that we compare include the following: ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, apomorphine, pramipexole, sumanirole, bromocriptine, piribedil, pergolide, and levodopa. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library were searched from the inception to December 2015. Our analysis combines the evidences of direct comparison and indirect comparison between various literatures. We evaluated the merging odds ratios (OR) value and surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) of each of the drugs and used this as a mode of comparison. Twenty-four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in this study. Our results demonstrated that the incidence of adverse reactions of ropinirole, rotigotine, entacapone, and sumanirole were obviously higher in terms of nausea compared to the placebo. Ropinirole produced the highest incidence rates of dyskinesia side effects, whereas pramipexole was significantly higher in terms of patients' hallucination. In addition, the SUCRA values of all the drugs showed that the incidence of adverse reaction of pergolide was relatively high (nausea: 83.5%; hallucination: 79.8%); for dyskinesia and somnolence, the incidence of ropinirole was higher (dyskinesia: 80.5%; somnolence: 69.4%); the incidence of adverse reaction of piribedil was higher on PD in terms of dizziness (67.0%); and the incidence of bromocriptine was relatively high in terms of constipation (62.3%). This mixed treatment comparison showed that the drugs ropinirole, bromocriptine, and piribedil produced the highest incidence rates of nausea, dyskinesia, hallucination, dizziness, constipation, and somnolence symptoms. Thus, we conclude that as these three drugs produced the most frequent symptoms, they are not recommended for the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Influences of Age, Obesity, and Adverse Drug Effects on Balance and Mobility Testing Scores in Ambulatory Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Anson, Eric; Thompson, Elizabeth; Odle, Brian L; Jeka, John; Walls, Zachary F; Panus, Peter C

    2017-01-10

    The adverse effects of drugs may influence results on tests of mobility and balance, but the drug-specific impact is not identified when using these tests. We propose that a quantitative drug index (QDI) will assist in assessing fall risk based on these tests, when combined with other fall risk variables. Fifty-seven community-dwelling older adults who could walk independently on a treadmill and had Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores equal to or greater than 24 participated. Mobility and balance outcome measures included the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) and cognitive dual task TUG (TUGc). Fall history, current drug list, and Activity-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale scores were also collected. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The QDI was derived from the drug list for each individual, and based on fall-related drug adverse effects. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted using age, BMI, and QDI as predictor variables for determining mobility and balance test scores, and ABC scale scores. Subsequently, participants were divided into (QDI = 0) low-impact drug group (LIDG) and (QDI > 0) high-impact drug group (HIDG) for Mann-Whitney 2-group comparisons. Age, BMI, and QDI were all significant (P < .001) independent variables in multiple regression analyses for mobility and balance test scores, but not for the ABC scale. Separately, the 2 group comparisons for the BESTest, BBS, TUG, and TUGc demonstrated that HIDG scored significantly (P < .05) worse on these tests compared with the LIDG. Drug counts were also significantly higher for the HIDG than for the LIDG. In contrast, age, BMI, MMSE, and reported falls in the last 12 months were not significantly different between groups. Age, BMI, and QDI-all contributed independently to the mobility and balance test scores examined, and may provide health care professionals a screening tool to determine whether additional mobility and

  11. Severity of anxiety and depression are related to a higher perception of adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arias, Bety; Crail-Meléndez, Daniel; López-Zapata, Rosario; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E

    2012-10-01

    After reviewing the negative effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on general health and quality of life, the Commission on Outcome Measurement from the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) recommended incorporating reliable and valid tools in clinical essays in order to achieve a more accurate assessment of the subjective adverse effects rate and disease severity when using AEDs. The aim of this study was to correlate the severity of adverse effects of AEDs, with the presence of anxiety and depression in patients with epilepsy. The Spanish version of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) and the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) were applied on 130 consecutive outpatients with epilepsy from the epilepsy clinic at the Mexico's National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery. A correlation analysis was carried out to determine if the presence of depression and anxiety was related to the adverse effects of AEDs. The relation between LAEP scores with other epidemiological variables was also assessed. Our study found a positive correlation between the LAEP and the HADS scores (p < or = 0.01). The most common adverse effects were drowsiness (81.5% [n=106]), difficulty in concentrating (76% [n=99]), and nervousness and/or agitation (75% [n=97]). Female gender, a history of febrile seizures, persistent seizures and polytherapy were associated with a higher toxicity on LAEP. In our study, age at epilepsy onset, duration of epilepsy, type of epilepsy and patients' age were not related to higher LAEP scores. Adverse effects to AEDs can be related with the presence of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression in patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    PubMed

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P<0.001), older age (P<0.001), and uncontrolled seizures (P=0.045). The intraclass coefficient (test-retest reliability) for LAEP overall score was 0.848 (95% CI=0.782-0.895), with a range from 0.370 (unsteadiness) to 0.750 (memory problems). Cronbach's α coefficient (internal consistency) was 0.903. The LAEP was highly correlated with Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 inventory (r=-0.804, P>0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups.

  13. Adverse drug reactions induced by valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Nanau, Radu M; Neuman, Manuela G

    2013-10-01

    Valproic acid is a widely-used first-generation antiepileptic drug, prescribed predominantly in epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. VPA has good efficacy and pharmacoeconomic profiles, as well as a relatively favorable safety profile. However, adverse drug reactions have been reported in relation with valproic acid use, either as monotherapy or polytherapy with other antiepileptic drugs or antipsychotic drugs. This systematic review discusses valproic acid adverse drug reactions, in terms of hepatotoxicity, mitochondrial toxicity, hyperammonemic encephalopathy, hypersensitivity syndrome reactions, neurological toxicity, metabolic and endocrine adverse events, and teratogenicity. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design of a graphical and interactive interface for facilitating access to drug contraindications, cautions for use, interactions and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Venot, Alain; Bar-Hen, Avner; Ouvrard, Patrick; Duclos, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Background Drug iatrogeny is important but could be decreased if contraindications, cautions for use, drug interactions and adverse effects of drugs described in drug monographs were taken into account. However, the physician's time is limited during consultations, and this information is often not consulted. We describe here the design of "Mister VCM", a graphical interface based on the VCM graphical language, facilitating access to drug monographs. We also provide an assessment of the usability of this interface. Methods The "Mister VCM" interface was designed by dividing the screen into two parts: a graphical interactive one including VCM icons and synthetizing drug properties, a textual one presenting on demand drug monograph excerpts. The interface was evaluated over 11 volunteer general practitioners, trained in the use of "Mister VCM". They were asked to answer clinical questions related to fictitious randomly generated drug monographs, using a textual interface or "Mister VCM". When answering the questions, correctness of the responses and response time were recorded. Results "Mister VCM" is an interactive interface that displays VCM icons organized around an anatomical diagram of the human body with additional mental, etiological and physiological areas. Textual excerpts of the drug monograph can be displayed by clicking on the VCM icons. The interface can explicitly represent information implicit in the drug monograph, such as the absence of a given contraindication. Physicians made fewer errors with "Mister VCM" than with text (factor of 1.7; p = 0.034) and responded to questions 2.2 times faster (p < 0.001). The time gain with "Mister VCM" was greater for long monographs and questions with implicit replies. Conclusion "Mister VCM" seems to be a promising interface for accessing drug monographs. Similar interfaces could be developed for other medical domains, such as electronic patient records. PMID:18518945

  15. Design of a graphical and interactive interface for facilitating access to drug contraindications, cautions for use, interactions and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Venot, Alain; Bar-Hen, Avner; Ouvrard, Patrick; Duclos, Catherine

    2008-06-02

    Drug iatrogeny is important but could be decreased if contraindications, cautions for use, drug interactions and adverse effects of drugs described in drug monographs were taken into account. However, the physician's time is limited during consultations, and this information is often not consulted. We describe here the design of "Mister VCM", a graphical interface based on the VCM graphical language, facilitating access to drug monographs. We also provide an assessment of the usability of this interface. The "Mister VCM" interface was designed by dividing the screen into two parts: a graphical interactive one including VCM icons and synthetizing drug properties, a textual one presenting on demand drug monograph excerpts. The interface was evaluated over 11 volunteer general practitioners, trained in the use of "Mister VCM". They were asked to answer clinical questions related to fictitious randomly generated drug monographs, using a textual interface or "Mister VCM". When answering the questions, correctness of the responses and response time were recorded. "Mister VCM" is an interactive interface that displays VCM icons organized around an anatomical diagram of the human body with additional mental, etiological and physiological areas. Textual excerpts of the drug monograph can be displayed by clicking on the VCM icons. The interface can explicitly represent information implicit in the drug monograph, such as the absence of a given contraindication. Physicians made fewer errors with "Mister VCM" than with text (factor of 1.7; p = 0.034) and responded to questions 2.2 times faster (p < 0.001). The time gain with "Mister VCM" was greater for long monographs and questions with implicit replies. "Mister VCM" seems to be a promising interface for accessing drug monographs. Similar interfaces could be developed for other medical domains, such as electronic patient records.

  16. Neuroleptic drugs in breast-milk: a study of pharmacokinetics and of possible adverse effects in breast-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Smith, B; Craggs, M; Kumar, R

    1998-01-01

    Very little is known about the pharmacokinetics of neuroleptic drugs in breast-feeding mothers and their infants or about possible adverse effects in the infants. Twelve mothers who breast-fed their infants were prescribed haloperidol, chlorpromazine or trifluoperazine. Two methods, enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to assay these drugs in samples from mothers, but infants' samples were assayed only by the more sensitive EIA. Repeated clinical and developmental assessments of the breast-fed infants were carried out up to 30 months of age. The control subjects were 18 bottle-fed infants whose mothers were also prescribed neuroleptic or mood-stabilizing drugs. The total concentrations of neuroleptic drugs and their principal metabolites in maternal plasma were correlated with concentrations in fore-milk. Infants were ingesting up to 3% of the maternal daily dose per kg body weight and small amounts of the drugs were detected in infants' plasma and urine. Concentrations of haloperidol in the adult range were found in plasma from 2 of 5 infants assayed by EIA but there was no evidence of any acute or delayed adverse effects. Three other breast-fed infants whose mothers were prescribed both haloperidol and chlorpromazine showed a decline in their developmental scores from the first to the second assessment at 12-18 months. More extensive longitudinal studies are needed but, in the meantime, there appears to be grounds for caution if breast-feeding mothers are prescribed doses of single or two neuroleptic drugs at the upper end of their recommended ranges.

  17. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Vasudevan, Biju; Pragasam, Vijendran

    2013-01-01

    Severe cutaneous drug reactions are one of the commonest medical challenges presenting to an emergency room in any hospital. The manifestations range from maculopapular rash to severe systemic symptoms like renal failure and cardiovascular compromise. Toxic epidermal necrolysis, erythroderma, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis and drug induced vasculitis are the common cutaneous drug reactions which can have severe morbidity and even mortality. Careful history taking of the lag period after drug intake and associated symptoms, along with detailed examination of the skin, mucosa and various systems, help in early diagnosis of these reactions. Early stoppage of the incriminating drug, specific therapy including corticosteroids, cyclosporine and intravenous immunoglobulin depending on the case along with supportive therapy and local measures help in salvaging most patients. An overview of these important cutaneous drug reactions along with their management is being reviewed in this article. PMID:24600147

  18. Role of systems pharmacology in understanding drug adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Seth I.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Systems pharmacology involves the application of systems biology approaches, combining large-scale experimental studies with computational analyses, to the study of drugs, drug targets, and drug effects. Many of these initial studies have focused on identifying new drug targets, new uses of known drugs, and systems-level properties of existing drugs. This review focuses on systems pharmacology studies that aim to better understand drug side effects and adverse events. By studying the drugs in the context of cellular networks, these studies provide insights into adverse events caused by off-targets of drugs as well as adverse events-mediated complex network responses. This allows rapid identification of biomarkers for side effect susceptibility. In this way, systems pharmacology will lead to not only newer and more effective therapies, but safer medications with fewer side effects. PMID:20803507

  19. Standardizing drug adverse event reporting data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwei; Jiang, Guoqian; Li, Dingcheng; Liu, Hongfang

    2013-01-01

    Normalizing data in the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), an FDA database, would improve the mining capacity of AERS for drug safety signal detection. In this study, we aim to normalize AERS and build a publicly available normalized Adverse drug events (ADE) data source.he drug information in AERS is normalized to RxNorm, a standard terminology source for medication. Drug class information is then obtained from the National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Adverse drug events (ADE) are aggregated through mapping with the PT (Preferred Term) and SOC (System Organ Class) codes of MedDRA. Our study yields an aggregated knowledge-enhanced AERS data mining set (AERS-DM). The AERS-DM could provide more perspectives to mine AERS database for drug safety signal detection and could be used by research community in the data mining field.

  20. The Checkpoint Immunotherapy Revolution: What Started as a Trickle Has Become a Flood, Despite Some Daunting Adverse Effects; New Drugs, Indications, and Combinations Continue to Emerge.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Walter

    2016-03-01

    What started as a trickle of new agents that help the body's immune system fight cancer has now become a flood, despite some daunting adverse effects. This report discusses the new drugs, indications, and combinations that continue to emerge.

  1. Investigation of adverse effects of interactions between herbal drugs and natural blood clotting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Adhyapak, M S; Kachole, M S

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the world, herbal medicines are consumed by most of the patients without considering their adverse effects. Many herbal medicines/plant extracts have been reported to interact with the natural blood clotting system. In continuation to this effort, thirty medicinal plant extracts were allowed to interact with citrated human blood and the clotting time was measured after re-calcification in vitro using Lee and White method. The aq. leaf ext. of Syzygium cumini and Camellia sinensis significantly prolonged the clotting time. In response to the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests, the ext. of C. sinensis showed normal APTT and marginally prolonged the PT to 16.7 s (control-15.2 s) while S. cumini showed normal PT but significantly prolonged the APTT to 66.9 s (control-20.7 s). This suggests that, C. sinensis acts on the extrinsic pathway while S. cumini on the intrinsic pathway. There are some common herbal formulations that are frequently used by the patients which contain above plant materials, like, Syzygium cumin in anti-diabetic formulations, while the ext. of C. sinensis is consumed frequently as beverage in many part of the world. Hence, patients having known bleeding tendency or haemophilia disease should take into account the interaction potential of these plants with the natural blood clotting system while taking herbal formulations containing above plants; specially, the patients suffering from intrinsic pathway factor deficiency should keep a limit on the consumption of S. cumini while extrinsic pathway factor deficiency patients should limit C. sinensis. Also, the medical practitioners should consider the patient's food consumption history before doing any major surgical procedures.

  2. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalized Colombian children

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Agudelo, Daniela; Burgos-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Vaca, Claudia; Serrano-Meriño, Dolores Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The occurrence of adverse drug reactions is an important issue due to the lack of drug safety data in children. Objective: To describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Methods: A prospective cohort study based on intensive pharmacovigilance was conducted during six months in order to monitor the emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatients children under 6 years of age with at least one medication prescribed. The study was conducted in two pediatric wards of two hospitals located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Naranjo´s Algorithm was used to evaluate imputability, the modified Hartwig and Siegel assessment scale to establish severity and the Schumock and Thornton criteria to determine preventability. Results: Of a total of 772 monitored patients, 156 Adverse Drug Reactions were detected on 147 children. The cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions was 19.0% (147/772); the incidence density was 37.6 Adverse Drug Reactions per 1,000 patients-days (147/3,913). The frequency was higher in children under 2 years of age (12.7%). Emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions was higher in male patients (RR= 1.66; 95% CI= 1.22-2.22, p= 0.001) and in those who used systemic antibiotics (RR= 1.82; 95% CI= 1.17-2.82, p= 0.005). Conclusions: Adverse Drug Reactions are common among hospitalized children and represent an additional burden of morbidity and risk, particularly in those who used several medicines, including antibiotics. PMID:27821893

  3. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalized Colombian children.

    PubMed

    de Las Salas, Roxana; Díaz-Agudelo, Daniela; Burgos-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Vaca, Claudia; Serrano-Meriño, Dolores Vanessa

    2016-09-30

    The occurrence of adverse drug reactions is an important issue due to the lack of drug safety data in children. To describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia. A prospective cohort study based on intensive pharmacovigilance was conducted during six months in order to monitor the emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatients children under 6 years of age with at least one medication prescribed. The study was conducted in two pediatric wards of two hospitals located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Naranjo´s Algorithm was used to evaluate imputability, the modified Hartwig and Siegel assessment scale to establish severity and the Schumock and Thornton criteria to determine preventability. Of a total of 772 monitored patients, 156 Adverse Drug Reactions were detected on 147 children. The cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions was 19.0% (147/772); the incidence density was 37.6 Adverse Drug Reactions per 1,000 patients-days (147/3,913). The frequency was higher in children under 2 years of age (12.7%). Emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions was higher in male patients (RR= 1.66; 95% CI= 1.22-2.22, p= 0.001) and in those who used systemic antibiotics (RR= 1.82; 95% CI= 1.17-2.82, p= 0.005). Adverse Drug Reactions are common among hospitalized children and represent an additional burden of morbidity and risk, particularly in those who used several medicines, including antibiotics.

  4. Current trends in the treatment of hepatitis C: interventions to avoid adverse effects and increase effectiveness of anti-HCV drugs.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Mushtaq, Muhammed Fahd; Saleem, Muhammad; Muhammad, Syed Taqi; Akhtar, Bushra; Sharif, Ali; Peerzada, Sohaib

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis, an inflammatory liver disease, is caused by various genotypes of hepatitis C viruses (HCV). Hepatitis C slowly sprouts into fibrosis, which progresses to cirrhosis. Over a prolonged period of time compensated cirrhosis can advance to decompensated cirrhosis culminating in hepatic failure and death. Conventional treatment of HCV involves the administration of interferons. However, association of interferon with the adverse drug reactions led to the development of novel anti-HCV drugs given as monotherapy or in combination with the other drugs. Advances in drug delivery systems (DDS) improved the pharmacokinetic profile and stability of drugs, ameliorated tissue damages on extravasation and increased the targeting of affected sites. Liposomes and lipid based vehicles have been employed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) so as to stabilize the formulations as PEG drug complex. Sofosbuvir, a novel anti-HCV drug, is administered as monotherapy or in combination with daclatasvir, ledipasivir, protease inhibitors, ribavirin and interferon for the treatment of HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3. These drug combinations are highly effective in eradicating the interferon resistance, recurrent HCV infection in liver transplant, concurrent HIV infection and preventing interferon related adverse effects. Further investigations to improve drug targeting and identification of new drug targets are highly warranted due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance in HCV.

  5. Current trends in the treatment of hepatitis C: interventions to avoid adverse effects and increase effectiveness of anti-HCV drugs

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Mushtaq, Muhammed Fahd; Saleem, Muhammad; Muhammad, Syed Taqi; Akhtar, Bushra; Sharif, Ali; Peerzada, Sohaib

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis, an inflammatory liver disease, is caused by various genotypes of hepatitis C viruses (HCV). Hepatitis C slowly sprouts into fibrosis, which progresses to cirrhosis. Over a prolonged period of time compensated cirrhosis can advance to decompensated cirrhosis culminating in hepatic failure and death. Conventional treatment of HCV involves the administration of interferons. However, association of interferon with the adverse drug reactions led to the development of novel anti-HCV drugs given as monotherapy or in combination with the other drugs. Advances in drug delivery systems (DDS) improved the pharmacokinetic profile and stability of drugs, ameliorated tissue damages on extravasation and increased the targeting of affected sites. Liposomes and lipid based vehicles have been employed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) so as to stabilize the formulations as PEG drug complex. Sofosbuvir, a novel anti-HCV drug, is administered as monotherapy or in combination with daclatasvir, ledipasivir, protease inhibitors, ribavirin and interferon for the treatment of HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3. These drug combinations are highly effective in eradicating the interferon resistance, recurrent HCV infection in liver transplant, concurrent HIV infection and preventing interferon related adverse effects. Further investigations to improve drug targeting and identification of new drug targets are highly warranted due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance in HCV. PMID:28096788

  6. Design of Adverse Drug Events-Scorecards.

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Chazard, Emmanuel; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Hackl, Werner; Băceanu, Adrian; Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of Adverse Drug Event-Scorecards. The scorecards described are innovative and novel, not having previously been reported in the literature. The Scorecards provide organizations (e.g. hospitals) with summary information about Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) using a Web-based platform. The data used in the Scorecards are routinely updated and report on ADEs detected through data mining processes. The development of the ADE Scorecards is ongoing and they are currently undergoing clinical testing.

  7. Refill adherence and self-reported adverse drug reactions and sub-therapeutic effects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hedna, Khedidja; Hägg, Staffan; Andersson Sundell, Karolina; Petzold, Max; Hakkarainen, Katja M

    2013-12-01

    To assess refill adherence to dispensed oral long-term medications among the adult population and to investigate whether the percentages of self-reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and sub-therapeutic effects (STEs) differed for medications with adequate refill adherence, oversupply, and undersupply. Survey responses on self-reported ADRs and STEs were linked to the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register in a cross-sectional population-based study. Refill adherence to antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and oral anti-diabetic medications was measured using the continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA). The percentages of self-reported ADRs and STEs were compared between medications with adequate refill adherence (CMA 0.8-1.2), oversupply (CMA > 1.2), and undersupply (CMA < 0.8). The study included 1827 persons, and the refill adherence was measured for 3014 antihypertensive, 839 lipid lowering, and 253 oral anti-diabetic medications. Overall, 65.7% of the medications had adequate refill adherence, 21.9% oversupply, and 12.4% undersupply. The percentages of self-reported ADRs and STEs were respectively 2.6%, 2.7%, and 2.1% (p > 0.5) for ADRs and 1.1%, 1.6%, and 1.5% (p > 0.5) for STEs. Adequate refill adherence was found in two thirds of the medication therapies. ADRs and STEs were unexpectedly equally commonly reported for medications with adequate refill adherence, oversupply, and undersupply. These results suggest that a better understanding of patients' refill behaviors and their perceived medication adverse outcomes is needed and should be considered in improving medication management. The impact of individual and healthcare factors that may influence the association between refill adherence and reported medication adverse outcomes should be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Adverse Drug Reactions and Expected Effects to Therapy with Subcutaneous Mistletoe Extracts (Viscum album L.) in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Megan L.; Happe, Antje; Kröz, Matthias; Matthes, Harald; Schad, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Background. In Europe, mistletoe extracts are widely used as a complementary cancer therapy. We assessed the safety of subcutaneous mistletoe as a conjunctive therapy in cancer patients within an anthroposophic medicine setting in Germany. Methods. A multicentre, observational study was performed within the Network Oncology. Suspected mistletoe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were described by frequency, causality, severity, and seriousness. Potential risk factors, dose relationships and drug-drug interactions were investigated. Results. Of 1923 cancer patients treated with subcutaneous mistletoe extracts, 283 patients (14.7%) reported 427 expected effects (local reactions <5 cm and increased body temperature <38°C). ADRs were documented in 162 (8.4%) patients who reported a total of 264 events. ADRs were mild (50.8%), moderate (45.1%), or severe (4.2%). All were nonserious. Logistic regression analysis revealed that expected effects were more common in females, while immunoreactivity decreased with increasing age and tumour stage. No risk factors were identified for ADRs. ADR frequency increased as mistletoe dose increased, while fewer ADRs occurred during mistletoe therapy received concurrent with conventional therapies. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that mistletoe therapy is safe. ADRs were mostly mild to moderate in intensity and appear to be dose-related and explained by the immune-stimulating, pharmacological activity of mistletoe. PMID:24672577

  9. Adverse Drug Reactions and Expected Effects to Therapy with Subcutaneous Mistletoe Extracts (Viscum album L.) in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Steele, Megan L; Axtner, Jan; Happe, Antje; Kröz, Matthias; Matthes, Harald; Schad, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Background. In Europe, mistletoe extracts are widely used as a complementary cancer therapy. We assessed the safety of subcutaneous mistletoe as a conjunctive therapy in cancer patients within an anthroposophic medicine setting in Germany. Methods. A multicentre, observational study was performed within the Network Oncology. Suspected mistletoe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were described by frequency, causality, severity, and seriousness. Potential risk factors, dose relationships and drug-drug interactions were investigated. Results. Of 1923 cancer patients treated with subcutaneous mistletoe extracts, 283 patients (14.7%) reported 427 expected effects (local reactions <5 cm and increased body temperature <38°C). ADRs were documented in 162 (8.4%) patients who reported a total of 264 events. ADRs were mild (50.8%), moderate (45.1%), or severe (4.2%). All were nonserious. Logistic regression analysis revealed that expected effects were more common in females, while immunoreactivity decreased with increasing age and tumour stage. No risk factors were identified for ADRs. ADR frequency increased as mistletoe dose increased, while fewer ADRs occurred during mistletoe therapy received concurrent with conventional therapies. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that mistletoe therapy is safe. ADRs were mostly mild to moderate in intensity and appear to be dose-related and explained by the immune-stimulating, pharmacological activity of mistletoe.

  10. Adverse effects of conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Langman, Michael J S

    2003-08-01

    This article reviews the clinical and epidemiological features of conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) related peptic ulcer complications, and the associated risk factors. The degree of gastrointestinal toxicity varies widely between the available drugs and with dose of each. The risk of ulcer complications can however be reduced, and perhaps completely removed, by using the lowest dose of the least toxic member of the class. Enteric coating and other delayed release formulations have not been shown to reduce risk. Estimates of the imposed disease burden have varied widely, in part through assuming that risks in selected patient groups will necessarily translate to the general population. Nevertheless, the imposed disease burden is one of the largest associated with current drug treatment. Associated risk factors such as prior ulcer, corticosteroid use and concurrent aspirin as well as general cardiovascular disease will raise the likelihood of an ulcer complication in NSAID takers and non-takers. Therefore, strategies dependent on substituting COX-selective drugs will then be only partially successful.

  11. Adverse drug reaction cards carried by patients.

    PubMed

    Hannaford, P C

    1986-04-26

    Five hundred patients were asked whether they were allergic to any medicines. The description given of any stated reaction was assessed to see whether an important adverse drug reaction was likely to have occurred. The patients' records were also examined for collaborative evidence. Poor documentation often made it difficult to confirm the patient's claim of drug sensitivity. A total of 89 patients may have suffered from important adverse reactions to 113 drugs. Full documentation of adverse reactions is important, but only eight patients carried any information to warn others of their sensitivities. Patients should be asked about any drug sensitivities and, if appropriate, given written confirmation of them. A quick, simple method of doing this would be to provide patients' with a plastic card, similar to a credit card, with instructions and details of the reaction written on it with an indelible pen.

  12. [Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. Risks and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Voigt, N; Heijman, J; Dobrev, D

    2014-03-01

    Adverse side effects of drugs are a significantly underestimated problem in modern medicine. In this review article, we summarize common adverse side effects of cardiovascular drugs. In particular, we highlight the factors promoting these adverse side effects in patients, including reduced hepatic or renal clearance in elderly patients that often requires dosage adjustment. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs (e.g. through the cytochrome P450 system or P-glycoproteins) can modify the plasma concentration of many compounds, thereby also increasing the likelihood of unwanted side effects. The most prominent cardiac side effects include arrhythmias, e.g. atrioventricular (AV) block, drug-induced long-QT syndrome and torsade de pointes and altered inotropy. Non-cardiac side effects are subsequently discussed grouped by drug class. A better understanding of the risks and side effects of cardiovascular drugs is expected to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with adverse side effects.

  13. [Analysis of the use and adverse effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Perić, Aneta; Toskić-Radojicić, Marija

    2006-03-01

    The use and adverse effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in outpatients with rheumatic diseases has not yet been studied enough. The aim of this study was to evaluate the data about the efficacy and safety of NSAIDs obtained from the questionnaires submitted to the outpatients receiving these drugs. The patients who had been prescribed any of NSAIDs whithin the period from June to September, 2004 were included in the study. The answers obtained from the questionnaires were statistically analyzed by means of chi2-test. At the time of the study, 150 patients had been prescribed ibuprofen or some other NSAID. Out of the total number of dispensed questionnaires (n = 150), only 45 (30%) were shown to be correctly filled-in. Their analysis showed that 64.4% of the patients had suffered from rheumatic diseases for more than five years, and had regularly used NSAIDs. The average age of these patients was about 70 years, and the number of females was double as high as that of the males. The most frequently used NSAIDs were diclofenac and ibuprofen (46.14%, and 23.24%, respectively). According to the answers given by the patients, the most often adverse reactions were gastric complaints such as nausea (11.1%), and stomach pain (8.9%). Due to this, the majority of the patients (64.4%) used some of the antiulcer drugs, most often ranitidine (31.1%). The results of this pilot study revealed that among the outpatients suffering from rheumatic diseases, the number of females was double as high as the number of males, that these patients were of the mean age of 70 years, and that their diseases lasted longer than five years. Gastric complains such as nausea and gastric pain of mild intensity were the most often adverse effects of NSAIDs reported by our patients. It could be the consequence of the predominant use of diclofenac and ibuprofen, NSAIDs with mild to moderate ulcerogenic potential, as well as the concomitant use of H2-receptor antagonists.

  14. Exposure to Prescription Drugs Labeled for Risk of Adverse Effects of Suicidal Behavior or Ideation among 100 Air Force Personnel Who Died by Suicide, 2006-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavigne, Jill E.; McCarthy, Michael; Chapman, Richard; Petrilla, Allison; Knox, Kerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Prescription drugs for many indications are labeled with warnings for potential risk of suicidal ideation or behavior. Exposures to prescription drugs labeled for adverse effects of suicidal behavior or ideation among 100 Air Force personnel who died by suicide between 2006 and 2009 are described. Air Force registry data were linked to…

  15. Exposure to Prescription Drugs Labeled for Risk of Adverse Effects of Suicidal Behavior or Ideation among 100 Air Force Personnel Who Died by Suicide, 2006-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavigne, Jill E.; McCarthy, Michael; Chapman, Richard; Petrilla, Allison; Knox, Kerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Prescription drugs for many indications are labeled with warnings for potential risk of suicidal ideation or behavior. Exposures to prescription drugs labeled for adverse effects of suicidal behavior or ideation among 100 Air Force personnel who died by suicide between 2006 and 2009 are described. Air Force registry data were linked to…

  16. Pharmaceutical excipients. Adverse effects associated with inactive ingredients in drug products (Part I).

    PubMed

    Golightly, L K; Smolinske, S S; Bennett, M L; Sutherland, E W; Rumack, B H

    1988-01-01

    Excipient reactions have resulted from the use of clearly toxic substances (e.g. diethyleneglycol), the use of certain excipients in a susceptible group (e.g. very low birthweight neonates, patients with large surface area burns, patients with a history of asthma or contact dermatitis), the alteration of an excipient mixture resulting in altered bioavailability (e.g. phenytoin), and the deliberate or inadvertent extradural administration of preserved medications intended for intravenous use. Inadvertent excipient overdose has also occurred when unusually large doses of a drug containing a preservative were used [chlorbutol in morphine, ethanol in glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin)]. Most excipient problems are preventable with knowledge of the currently available formulation. Government drug regulatory agencies have largely prevented introduction of a new toxic excipient; however, the new use of previously approved (but not adequately studied) excipients continues to result in unfortunate tragedies (e.g. the E-ferol incident). Populations at risk should be monitored carefully. Very low birthweight infants (less than 100g) have a well-demonstrated intolerance to many excipients, particularly during the first 2 weeks of life. Research should be directed toward development of non-preserved medications and safer diluents for this population. Drugs and excipients which have previously been demonstrated to be safer in other populations (e.g. doxapram) should be meticulously studied in this age group before widespread use is recommended. Asthmatic patients comprise another population that are frequently sensitive to excipient toxicity. In some cases, as in sulphiting agents, which are ubiquitous in foods as well as in medications, total avoidance may not be possible and prophylactic therapy may be beneficial. Inactive ingredients are clearly not consistently inert in their biological activity and therefore should not be listed as such. A more useful and concise term is

  17. Promoting adverse drug reaction reporting: comparison of different approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Vaz, Inês; Santos, Cristina Costa; Cruz-Correia, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe different approaches to promote adverse drug reaction reporting among health care professionals, determining their cost-effectiveness. METHODS We analyzed and compared several approaches taken by the Northern Pharmacovigilance Centre (Portugal) to promote adverse drug reaction reporting. Approaches were compared regarding the number and relevance of adverse drug reaction reports obtained and costs involved. Costs by report were estimated by adding the initial costs and the running costs of each intervention. These costs were divided by the number of reports obtained with each intervention, to assess its cost-effectiveness. RESULTS All the approaches seem to have increased the number of adverse drug reaction reports. We noted the biggest increase with protocols (321 reports, costing 1.96 € each), followed by first educational approach (265 reports, 20.31 €/report) and by the hyperlink approach (136 reports, 15.59 €/report). Regarding the severity of adverse drug reactions, protocols were the most efficient approach, costing 2.29 €/report, followed by hyperlinks (30.28 €/report, having no running costs). Concerning unexpected adverse drug reactions, the best result was obtained with protocols (5.12 €/report), followed by first educational approach (38.79 €/report). CONCLUSIONS We recommend implementing protocols in other pharmacovigilance centers. They seem to be the most efficient intervention, allowing receiving adverse drug reactions reports at lower costs. The increase applied not only to the total number of reports, but also to the severity, unexpectedness and high degree of causality attributed to the adverse drug reactions. Still, hyperlinks have the advantage of not involving running costs, showing the second best performance in cost per adverse drug reactions report. PMID:27143614

  18. Patch testing for adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Sahil; Nedorost, Susan T

    2017-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions result in a substantial number of hospital admissions and inpatient events. Diagnosis usually is made with clinical judgment and circumstantiality without diagnostic testing. Furthermore, even in situations where diagnostic testing is performed, no safe gold standard tests exist. Oral rechallenge is currently the gold standard but carries the risk of recrudescence of severe allergic symptoms. Other tests include skin prick tests, the lymphocyte transformation test, immunohistochemistry, and patch testing. This article provides a review of patch testing in cases of adverse drug reactions and presents new data on this topic.

  19. Tamoxifen nanostructured lipid carriers: enhanced in vivo antitumor efficacy with reduced adverse drug effects.

    PubMed

    Shete, Harshad K; Selkar, Nilakash; Vanage, Geeta R; Patravale, Vandana B

    2014-07-01

    A novel approach of enhancing the Tamoxifen uptake via Intestinal Lymphatic System is executed by developing long chain lipid and oil based nanostructured lipid carrier system (Tmx-NLC). The aim was to achieve improved systemic bioavailability of Tamoxifen, prevent systemic and hepatotoxicity and enhance antitumor efficacy. Following the proof of concept achieved in cell culture experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetic and biodistribution study, the current work focuses on investigation of antitumor efficacy and treatment associated toxicity in murine mammary tumor mice model. The efficacy study demonstrated greater tumor suppression and 100% survival with 1.5 and 3 mg/kg Tmx-NLC compared to 3 mg/kg Tamoxifen suspension and Mamofen(®) (Khandelwal Pharmaceuticals, Mumbai, India). Tmx-NLC treatment for a month demonstrated improved systemic toxicity profile and no evidences of hepatotoxicity. Thus, developed Tmx-NLC could prove to be a promising delivery strategy to confer superior therapeutic efficacy and ability to address the biopharmaceutical and toxicity associated issues of drug. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of Anemia and Risk of Adverse Bleeding Effect of Drugs: Implication for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uba Nwose, Ezekiel

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the progress in reduction of prevalence of anemia in rural Australia. It also investigates the prevalence of hypoviscosity in anaemia with a view to determine the fraction of anaemic patients at risk of drug-inducible exacerbation of anemia. Archived clinical pathology data (N = 130, 354) for the period of 1999 to 2008 were utilized. The prevalence of anemia and hypoviscosity was evaluated by working out (i) the number that fell within anemia definition as a percentage of the population and (ii) the number that fell within hypoviscosity definition as a percentage of anemic patients. The prevalence in anemic diabetes and dyslipidaemia was further determined. There was progressive reduction in anemia from 6.1% to 3.2% over the ten years period. Prevalence of anemia is statistically significantly higher in males than in females (P < 0.0001), but protein level is lower in anemic females than in anemic males (P < 0.01). The results further show that up to 75% of anemic patients may benefit from NSAID or salicylates. This paper highlights differences between genders. It suggests more concerted effort in men's health and speculates a new factor to investigate in women's health. PMID:22506109

  1. Bibliometric Analysis of Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events Studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hung-Chi; Wang, Cheng-Hua; Chen, Pi-Ching; Lee, Yen-Der

    2015-07-31

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are a key concern of the health-care industry. The objectives of this study were to map the intellectual structure of the studies of medication errors and adverse drug events and to investigate the developing path of this literature and interrelationships among the main topics. The Web of Science database was searched for documentation of medication errors and adverse drug events from 1961 to 2013. The most cited articles and references were profiled and analyzed using HistCite software to draw a historiograph and Ucinet software to draw a sociogram. The database search revealed 3343 medication errors and 3342 adverse drug event documents. The most cited articles on medication errors focused on 3 key themes from 1961 to 2013, namely, medication errors in adult inpatients, computerized physician order entry in medication error studies, and medication errors in pediatric inpatients. The developing path for the most cited articles about adverse drug events from 1987 to 2013 was as follows: detection, analysis, effect, and prevention from adult inpatient to pediatric inpatient settings and from hospitalized care to ambulatory care. In addition, social network analysis based on the most cited references revealed a close relationship between medication errors and adverse drug events. The mapping results provide a valuable tool for researchers to access the literature in this field and can be used to help identify the direction of medication errors and adverse drug events research.

  2. Adverse Drug Event Monitoring at the Food and Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Syed Rizwanuddin

    2003-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible not only for approving drugs but also for monitoring their safety after they reach the market. The complete adverse event profile of a drug is not known at the time of approval because of the small sample size, short duration, and limited generalizability of pre-approval clinical trials. This report describes the FDA's postmarketing surveillance system, to which many clinicians submit reports of adverse drug events encountered while treating their patients. Despite its limitations, the spontaneous reporting system is an extremely valuable mechanism by which hazards with drugs that were not observed or recognized at the time of approval are identified. Physicians are strongly encouraged to submit reports of adverse outcomes with suspect drugs to the FDA, and their reports make a difference. The FDA is strengthening its postmarketing surveillance with access to new data sources that have the potential to further improve the identification, quantification, and subsequent management of drug risk. PMID:12534765

  3. Adverse drug event monitoring at the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Syed Rizwanuddin

    2003-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible not only for approving drugs but also for monitoring their safety after they reach the market. The complete adverse event profile of a drug is not known at the time of approval because of the small sample size, short duration, and limited generalizability of pre-approval clinical trials. This report describes the FDA's postmarketing surveillance system, to which many clinicians submit reports of adverse drug events encountered while treating their patients. Despite its limitations, the spontaneous reporting system is an extremely valuable mechanism by which hazards with drugs that were not observed or recognized at the time of approval are identified. Physicians are strongly encouraged to submit reports of adverse outcomes with suspect drugs to the FDA, and their reports make a difference. The FDA is strengthening its postmarketing surveillance with access to new data sources that have the potential to further improve the identification, quantification, and subsequent management of drug risk.

  4. Minimizing Cardiovascular Adverse Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Khasawneh, Fadi T.; Shankar, Gollapudi S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of atypical antipsychotic agents has rapidly increased in the United States and worldwide in the last decade. Nonetheless, many health care practitioners do not appreciate the significance of the cardiovascular side effects that may be associated with their use and the means to minimize them. Thus, atypical antipsychotic medications can cause cardiovascular side effects such as arrhythmias and deviations in blood pressure. In rare cases, they may also cause congestive heart failure, myocarditis, and sudden death. Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality than healthy individuals, possibly because of excessive smoking, the underlying disorder itself, or a combination of both factors. Increased awareness of these potential complications can allow pharmacists and physicians to better manage and monitor high risk patients. Accurate assessments are very important to avoid medications from being given to patients inappropriately. Additionally, monitoring patients regularly via blood draws and checking blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram can help catch any clinical problems and prevent further complications. Finally, patient and family-member education, which pharmacists in particular can play key roles in, is central for the management and prevention of side effects, which is known to reflect positively on morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:24649390

  5. Erythropoietin as a performance-enhancing drug: Its mechanistic basis, detection, and potential adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Salamin, Olivier; Kuuranne, Tiia; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2017-01-22

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is the main hormone regulating red blood cell (RBC) production. The large-scale production of a recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) by biotechnological methods has made possible its widespread therapeutic use as well as its misuse in sports. Since the marketing of the first epoetin in 1989, the development has progressed to the third-generation analogs. However, the production of rHuEPO is costly, and the frequent administration of an injectable formula is not optimal for compliance of therapeutic patients. Hence, pharmaceutical industries are currently developing alternative approaches to stimulate erythropoiesis, which might offer new candidates for doping purposes. The hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) pathway is of particular interest. The introduction of new erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) for clinical use requires subsequent development of anti-doping methods for detecting the abuse of these substances. The detection of ESAs is based on two different approaches, namely, the direct detection of exogenous substances and the indirect detection, for which the effects of the substances on specific biomarkers are monitored. Omics technologies, such as ironomics or transcriptomics, are useful for the development of new promising biomarkers for the detection of ESAs. Finally, the illicit use of ESAs associates with multiple health risks that can be irreversible, and an essential facet of anti-doping work is to educate athletes of these risks. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the evolution of ESAs, the research and implementation of the available detection methods, and the side effects associated with the misuse of ESAs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  7. Cadec: A corpus of adverse drug event annotations.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Sarvnaz; Metke-Jimenez, Alejandro; Kemp, Madonna; Wang, Chen

    2015-06-01

    CSIRO Adverse Drug Event Corpus (Cadec) is a new rich annotated corpus of medical forum posts on patient-reported Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). The corpus is sourced from posts on social media, and contains text that is largely written in colloquial language and often deviates from formal English grammar and punctuation rules. Annotations contain mentions of concepts such as drugs, adverse effects, symptoms, and diseases linked to their corresponding concepts in controlled vocabularies, i.e., SNOMED Clinical Terms and MedDRA. The quality of the annotations is ensured by annotation guidelines, multi-stage annotations, measuring inter-annotator agreement, and final review of the annotations by a clinical terminologist. This corpus is useful for studies in the area of information extraction, or more generally text mining, from social media to detect possible adverse drug reactions from direct patient reports. The corpus is publicly available at https://data.csiro.au.(1).

  8. Adverse childhood experience effects on opioid use initiation, injection drug use, and overdose among persons with opioid use disorder.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michael D; Conti, Micah T; Kenney, Shannon; Anderson, Bradley J; Flori, Jessica N; Risi, Megan M; Bailey, Genie L

    2017-10-01

    Adverse childhood experiences are associated with the development of substance use disorders. With opioid use disorder, a growing concern in the United States, we were interested in examining the relationship between adverse experiences and three landmarks of opioid use: age of opioid initiation, injection drug use, and lifetime overdose. Between May and December 2015, we interviewed consecutive persons seeking inpatient opioid detoxification. Participants were asked about age of opioid initiation, last month injection drug use, and lifetime history of overdose, and completed the ten-item Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) questionnaire. Participants (n=457) averaged 32.2 (±8.64) years of age, 71.3% were male, and 82.5% were non-Hispanic White. The mean score on the ACE scale was 3.64 (±2.75). Mean age at time of initiating opioid use was 21.7 (±7.1) years, 68.7% had injected drugs within the past month, and 39.0% had overdosed. After adjusting for age, gender, and ethnicity, the ACE score was inversely associated with age of initiating opioid use (b=-0.50, 95% CI -0.70; -0.29, p<.001), and positively associated with recent injection drug use (OR=1.11, 95% CI 1.02; 1.20, p=0.014) and the likelihood of experiencing an overdose (OR=1.10, 95% CI 1.02; 1.20, p=0.015) in a graded dose response manner. Greater adverse childhood experiences are associated with three landmarks of opioid use risk. ACE screening may be useful in identifying high-risk subsets of opioid-using populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Appropriate risk criteria for OATP inhibition at the drug discovery stage based on the clinical relevancy between OATP inhibitors and drug-induced adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Nakakariya, Masanori; Goto, Akihiko; Amano, Nobuyuki

    2016-10-01

    DDI could be caused by the inhibition of OATP-mediated hepatic uptakes. The aim of this study is to set the risk criteria for the compounds that would cause DDI via OATP inhibition at the drug discovery stage. The IC50 values of OATP inhibitors for human OATP-mediated atorvastatin uptake were evaluated in the expression system. In order to set the risk criteria for OATP inhibition, the relationship was clarified between OATP inhibitory effect and severe adverse effects of OATP substrates, rhabdomyolysis, hyperbilirubinemia and jaundice. Rhabdomyolysis would be caused in the atorvastatin AUC more than 9-fold of that at a minimum therapeutic dose. The atorvastatin AUC was 6- to 9-fold increased with the OATP inhibitors of which IC50 values were ≤1 μmol/L. Hyperbilirubinemia and jaundice would be caused with the OATP inhibitors of which IC50 values were ≤6 μmol/L. This investigation showed that the compounds with IC50 of ≤1 μmol/L would have high risk for OATP-mediated DDI that would cause severe side effects. Before the detailed analysis based on the dosage, unbound fraction in blood and effective concentration to evaluate the clinical DDI potency, this criteria enable high throughput screening and optimize lead compounds at the drug discovery stage.

  10. Adverse Events in Healthy Individuals and MDR-TB Contacts Treated with Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs Potentially Effective for Preventing Development of MDR-TB: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Langendam, Miranda W.; Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Sandgren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A recent systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness to support or reject preventive therapy for treatment of contacts of patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Whether preventive therapy is favorable depends both on the effectiveness and the adverse events of the drugs used. We performed a systematic review to assess adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other databases (August 2011). Record selection, data extraction, and study quality assessment were done in duplicate. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Of 6,901 identified references, 20 studies were eligible. Among the 16 studies in healthy volunteers (a total of 87 persons on either levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, or rifabutin, mostly for 1 week), serious adverse events and treatment discontinuation due to adverse events were rare (<1 and <5%, respectively), but mild adverse events frequently occurred. Due to small sample sizes of the levofloxacin and ofloxacin studies an increased frequency of mild adverse events compared to placebo could not be demonstrated or excluded. For moxifloxacin the comparative results were inconsistent. In four studies describing preventive therapy of MDR-TB contacts, therapy was stopped for 58–100% of the included persons because of the occurrence of adverse events ranging from mild adverse events such as nausea and dizziness to serious events requiring treatment. The quality of the evidence was very low. Although the number of publications and quality of evidence are low, the available evidence suggests that shortly after starting treatment the occurrence of serious adverse events is rare. Mild adverse events occur more frequently and may be of importance because these may provoke treatment interruption. PMID:23326464

  11. Adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Langendam, Miranda W; Tiemersma, Edine W; van der Werf, Marieke J; Sandgren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A recent systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness to support or reject preventive therapy for treatment of contacts of patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Whether preventive therapy is favorable depends both on the effectiveness and the adverse events of the drugs used. We performed a systematic review to assess adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other databases (August 2011). Record selection, data extraction, and study quality assessment were done in duplicate. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Of 6,901 identified references, 20 studies were eligible. Among the 16 studies in healthy volunteers (a total of 87 persons on either levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, or rifabutin, mostly for 1 week), serious adverse events and treatment discontinuation due to adverse events were rare (<1 and <5%, respectively), but mild adverse events frequently occurred. Due to small sample sizes of the levofloxacin and ofloxacin studies an increased frequency of mild adverse events compared to placebo could not be demonstrated or excluded. For moxifloxacin the comparative results were inconsistent. In four studies describing preventive therapy of MDR-TB contacts, therapy was stopped for 58-100% of the included persons because of the occurrence of adverse events ranging from mild adverse events such as nausea and dizziness to serious events requiring treatment. The quality of the evidence was very low. Although the number of publications and quality of evidence are low, the available evidence suggests that shortly after starting treatment the occurrence of serious adverse events is rare. Mild adverse events occur more frequently and may be of importance because these may provoke treatment interruption.

  12. Association of caffeine to MDMA does not increase antinociception but potentiates adverse effects of this recreational drug.

    PubMed

    Camarasa, Jordi; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena

    2006-09-21

    Ecstasy (MDMA) street tablets often contain several other compounds in addition to MDMA, particularly caffeine. Then, it becomes necessary to study the consequences of caffeine plus MDMA combination. MDMA (1 mg/kg) elicited an analgesic response both at the spinal and supraspinal levels. However, when associated, MDMA and caffeine did not show any synergistic interaction. When caffeine was administered prior to MDMA, a potentiation of locomotor activity was observed, which consisted in an increase in maximal values and in a prolonged time of activity. In the neurotoxicity studies, a hyperthermic effect of MDMA was observed. Although caffeine alone failed to alter body temperature, it potentiated MDMA-induced hyperthermia. This association also significantly increased MDMA lethality (from 22% to 34%). Following administration of MDMA to rats, there was a persistent decrease in the number of serotonin transporter sites in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus, which was potentiated by caffeine co-treatment. This MDMA toxicity in rats was accompanied by a transient dopaminergic impairment in the striatum, measured as decreased [(3)H]WIN35428 binding sites, by 31% 3 days after treatment, which was not modified by caffeine. A transient down-regulation of 5-HT(2) receptors occurred in the cortex of MDMA-treated rats, whose recovery was slowed by co-treatment with caffeine. In conclusion, the association of MDMA with caffeine does not generate any beneficial effects at the antinociceptive level. The acute effects stemming from this association, in tandem with the final potentiation of serotonergic terminals injury, provide evidence of the potentially greater long-term adverse effects of this particular recreational drug combination.

  13. Effects of organizational safety practices and perceived safety climate on PPE usage, engineering controls, and adverse events involving liquid antineoplastic drugs among nurses.

    PubMed

    DeJoy, David M; Smith, Todd D; Woldu, Henok; Dyal, Mari-Amanda; Steege, Andrea L; Boiano, James M

    2017-07-01

    Antineoplastic drugs pose risks to the healthcare workers who handle them. This fact notwithstanding, adherence to safe handling guidelines remains inconsistent and often poor. This study examined the effects of pertinent organizational safety practices and perceived safety climate on the use of personal protective equipment, engineering controls, and adverse events (spill/leak or skin contact) involving liquid antineoplastic drugs. Data for this study came from the 2011 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers which included a sample of approximately 1,800 nurses who had administered liquid antineoplastic drugs during the past seven days. Regression modeling was used to examine predictors of personal protective equipment use, engineering controls, and adverse events involving antineoplastic drugs. Approximately 14% of nurses reported experiencing an adverse event while administering antineoplastic drugs during the previous week. Usage of recommended engineering controls and personal protective equipment was quite variable. Usage of both was better in non-profit and government settings, when workers were more familiar with safe handling guidelines, and when perceived management commitment to safety was higher. Usage was poorer in the absence of specific safety handling procedures. The odds of adverse events increased with number of antineoplastic drugs treatments and when antineoplastic drugs were administered more days of the week. The odds of such events were significantly lower when the use of engineering controls and personal protective equipment was greater and when more precautionary measures were in place. Greater levels of management commitment to safety and perceived risk were also related to lower odds of adverse events. These results point to the value of implementing a comprehensive health and safety program that utilizes available hazard controls and effectively communicates

  14. Effects of blood-pressure-lowering treatment in hypertension: 9. Discontinuations for adverse events attributed to different classes of antihypertensive drugs: meta-analyses of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Thomopoulos, Costas; Parati, Gianfranco; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Choice of antihypertensive drugs is also based on the expected burden of adverse events associated with each class of agents, and we have recently identified treatment discontinuation for adverse events as a measure of treatment tolerability frequently reported in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). To investigate whether all classes of blood pressure (BP) lowering drugs increase discontinuations for adverse events when compared with placebo and whether risk of discontinuation is similar for all classes when compared in head-to-head RCTs. RCTs of BP-lowering treatment were subdivided in groups according to class of drug compared with placebo or with other classes. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals of major cardiovascular events and of treatment discontinuations for adverse events were calculated (random-effects model). Thirty-eight placebo-controlled RCTs (147 788 patients) and 37 head-to-head RCTs (242 481 patients) provided comparative information on discontinuations for adverse events. All classes of drugs significantly increased discontinuations for adverse events over those occurring on placebo: risk ratio diuretics 2.23 (1.32-3.76), beta-blockers 2.88 (1.58-5.28), calcium antagonists 2.03 (1.17-3.56), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors 2.78 (1.37-5.47), central agents 1.74 (1.24-2.45), with the single exception of angiotensin receptor blockers, which did not significantly increase adverse events over placebo [risk ratio 1.13 (0.78-1.62)]. Similarly, in head-to-head comparison RCTs with other classes, angiotensin receptor blockers were the only class associated with a significantly lower risk of adverse events [risk ratio 0.71 (0.58-0.87)] when head-to-head compared with other classes. Regression analysis also shows that incidence of discontinuations for adverse events is proportional to the number of antihypertensive and other cardiovascular drugs, which accounts for the high incidence of this outcome often found in groups randomized to

  15. Adverse drug reactions and their measurement in the rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Day, R O; Quinn, D I; Conaghan, P G; Tett, S E

    1995-05-01

    Drugs administered as therapy for rheumatological disorders are a relatively common cause of adverse events. Important data regarding the effects of drugs on patients with rheumatological conditions is being lost or rendered inaccessible because of deficiencies in classification, measurement, and collection methods for adverse drug reactions. A significant number of adverse reactions to drugs will not be known before marketing, and hence vigilance on the part of clinicians and patients in observing and documenting these reactions is paramount in building our knowledge and modifying our practice accordingly. A variety of systems and methods for detecting adverse drug reactions are described, critically evaluated, and compared for cost, potential bias, ethical concerns, and subject recruitment required for necessary statistical power. Systems need to be developed to give access to the wealth of clinical experimental data available in the individual practices of a broad spectrum of clinicians. To facilitate this, representative organizations need to make adverse drug reactions a high priority as well as contributing expertise and finance to database formulation and accessibility.

  16. Systematic Analysis of Adverse Event Reports for Sex Differences in Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Li, Dingcheng; Wang, Liwei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that sex differences exist in Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). Identifying those sex differences in ADEs could reduce the experience of ADEs for patients and could be conducive to the development of personalized medicine. In this study, we analyzed a normalized US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Chi-squared test was conducted to discover which treatment regimens or drugs had sex differences in adverse events. Moreover, reporting odds ratio (ROR) and P value were calculated to quantify the signals of sex differences for specific drug-event combinations. Logistic regression was applied to remove the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events. We detected among 668 drugs of the most frequent 20 treatment regimens in the United States, 307 drugs have sex differences in ADEs. In addition, we identified 736 unique drug-event combinations with significant sex differences. After removing the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events, there are 266 combinations remained. Drug labels or previous studies verified some of them while others warrant further investigation. PMID:27102014

  17. Idiosyncratic Adverse Drug Reactions: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Naisbitt, Dean J.

    2013-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for patients; they also markedly increase the uncertainty of drug development. The major targets are skin, liver, and bone marrow. Clinical characteristics suggest that IDRs are immune mediated, and there is substantive evidence that most, but not all, IDRs are caused by chemically reactive species. However, rigorous mechanistic studies are very difficult to perform, especially in the absence of valid animal models. Models to explain how drugs or reactive metabolites interact with the MHC/T-cell receptor complex include the hapten and P-I models, and most recently it was found that abacavir can interact reversibly with MHC to alter the endogenous peptides that are presented to T cells. The discovery of HLA molecules as important risk factors for some IDRs has also significantly contributed to our understanding of these adverse reactions, but it is not yet clear what fraction of IDRs have a strong HLA dependence. In addition, with the exception of abacavir, most patients who have the HLA that confers a higher IDR risk with a specific drug will not have an IDR when treated with that drug. Interindividual differences in T-cell receptors and other factors also presumably play a role in determining which patients will have an IDR. The immune response represents a delicate balance, and immune tolerance may be the dominant response to a drug that can cause IDRs. PMID:23476052

  18. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) postmarket reported side effects and adverse events associated with pulmonary hypertension therapy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Maxey, Dawn M; Ivy, D Dunbar; Ogawa, Michelle T; Feinstein, Jeffrey A

    2013-10-01

    Because most medications for pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH) are used off label and based on adult trials, little information is available on pediatric-specific adverse events (AEs). Although drug manufacturers are required to submit postmarket AE reports to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), this information is rarely transmitted to practitioners. In the setting of a recent FDA warning for sildenafil, the authors sought to give a better description of the AEs associated with current therapies in pediatric PH. In January 2010, a written request was made to the Food and Drug Administration for AE records of commonly used PH medications. Reports were screened for pediatric patients, analyzed in terms of AEs, and compared with the medical literature. Arbitrarily, AEs that could be attributed to concomitant medications were not attributed to the PH medication in question. Adverse events occurring in more than 5 % of events for each drug were assumed to be associated with the targeted PH medication. Between November 1997 and December 2009, 588 pediatric AE reports (death in 257 cases) were reported for the three most commonly used therapies: bosentan, epoprostenol, and sildenafil. Many of the AEs were similar to those reported previously. However, 27 AEs not previously reported in the literature (e.g., pulmonary hemorrhage, hemoptysis, and pneumonia) were found. The FDA postmarket records for PH medications in pediatric patients show a significant number of AEs. The discovery of AEs not previously reported will better inform those caring for these complex and critically ill children, and the large number of deaths suggest they may be underreported in current literature.

  19. [Clinical survey of tizanidine-induced adverse effects--impact of concomitant drugs providing cytochrome P450 1A2 modification--].

    PubMed

    Momo, Kenji; Homma, Masato; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Sasaki, Tadanori; Kohda, Yukinao

    2013-01-01

    The drug-drug interactions of tizanidine and cytochrome (CYP) P450 1A2 inhibitors, which potentially alter the hepatic metabolism of tizanidine, were investigated by retrospective survey of medical records with regard to prescription. One thousand five hundred sixty-three patients treated with tizanidine at University of Tsukuba Hospital were investigated. Of those, 713 patients (45.6%) were treated with coadministration of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors (37 drugs). The patients who received a combination of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors were characterized as elderly, having multiple diseases, and taking a large number of comedications (over 10 drugs) for a long period as compared with the patients who did not receive CYP1A2 inhibitors. Tizanidine-induced adverse effects were examined in 100 patients treated with coadministration of tizanidine and 8 CYP1A2 inhibitors. Adverse effects (e.g., drowsiness: 10 patients; low blood pressure: 9 patients; low heart rate: 9 patients) were observed in 23 patients (23%) 8±10 days after CYP1A2 inhibitors were coadministered. The patients with tizanidine-induced adverse effects were of older age (64.3±9.8 vs. 57.5±18.1 years, p<0.05) and received a higher daily dose of tizanidine (3.00±0.74 vs. 2.56±0.86 mg/day, p<0.05) than the patients without adverse effects. The present results suggest that coadministration of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors enhances tizanidine-induced adverse effects, especially in elderly patients treated with a higher dose of tizanidine.

  20. Drug switch because of treatment-related adverse side effects in endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy: how often and how often does it work?

    PubMed

    Güth, Uwe; Myrick, Mary Elizabeth; Schötzau, Andreas; Kilic, Nerbil; Schmid, Seraina Margaretha

    2011-10-01

    Therapy-related adverse side effects are a main reason for non-persistence to adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy. This study reports frequency of drug-related adverse side effects that were so severe that a modification of the therapy was necessary. We evaluated how many patients discontinued adjuvant endocrine therapy because of these side effects (non-persistence). Last, we analyzed how often a drug switch was undertaken for this reason and how often this measure led to the patient successfully continuing their endocrine therapy. Data concerning all postmenopausal breast cancer patients (≤ 80 years), who initiated endocrine adjuvant therapy between 1998 and 2008 in a Swiss breast center (n = 400), were analyzed. Out of these 400 women, 37 (9.3%) were defined as being non-persistent to the therapy; out of these, 24 (64.9%) because of therapy-related side effects. About 78 patients (19.5%) suffered from severe therapy-related side effects that made a modification of therapy necessary. Out of these 78 cases, 14 patients (17.9%) stopped the therapy without attempting a drug switch (non-persistence). In 64 patients (82.1%; 16% of all women who started endocrine therapy), a drug switch was undertaken. Out of these 64 cases, in 52 cases (81.3%) endocrine therapy was completed after therapy modification. Patients who reported one major adverse effect were more likely to continue the endocrine therapy after a drug switch (P = 0.048) compared with those who suffered from at least two different side effects. In 10 of the 64 cases (15.6%), modification of the therapy was not successful and the patients stopped the treatment prematurely (non-persistence) because of ongoing side effects. In cases when therapy-related side effects occur, a drug switch is a promising step to further improve persistence and, by doing so, the outcome of breast cancer patients.

  1. Adverse drug reactions in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Lo Russo, Lucio; Guida, Laura; Di Masi, Maria; Buccelli, Claudio; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Di Fede, Olga; Di Lorenzo, Pierpaolo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Several drugs may have a number of adverse reactions (ADRs) involving the oro-facial region. The dose of the drug and the time required for the reaction to take place are relevant parameters; nonetheless, ADRs mechanisms are not always known and ADRs are not always predictable since aspects other than drug pharmacodynamics and/or pharmacokinetics, as well as various interacting variables contribute to the final outcome. All tissues and many functions of the oral cavity can be affected. In particular, salivary function is frequently involved and hypo-salivation is the main manifestation; several mucosal lesions with different morphology (ulcerations, vesiculobullous lesions, white lesions, pigmentations, swelling) are also possible. Taste, sensation and trigeminal function alterations have been reported and the recent evidence regarding the occurrence of jawbones osteonecrosis, especially in bisphosphonates treated patients, is increasing. Clinical management may be quite difficult due to the multiplicity of involved classes of drugs and substances (dental materials, foods), the variety of affected tissues and functions, the type of produced lesions and disturbances, the complexity of related pathogenetic mechanisms (if known), the difficulties in assessing causality and managing drug withdrawal and/or dose adjustment, as well as in establishing specific treatments, if any. In this paper the most common and significant oral ADRs, their related aspects and importance (including medico-legal implications) for health care providers will be discussed.

  2. Mechanisms of adverse drug reactions to biologics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Janet B

    2010-01-01

    Biologics encompass a broad range of therapeutics that include proteins and other products derived from living systems. Although the multiplicity of target organs often seen with new chemical entities is generally not seen with biologics, they can produce significant adverse reactions. Examples include IL-12 and an anti-CD28 antibody that resulted in patient deaths and/or long stays in intensive care units. Mechanisms of toxicities can be categorized as pharmacological or nonpharmacological, with most, excepting hypersensitivity reactions, associated with the interaction of the agent with its planned target. Unexpected toxicities generally arise as a result of previously unknown biology. Manufacturing quality is a significant issue relative to the toxicity of biologics. The development of recombinant technology represented the single biggest advance leading to humanized products with minimal or no contaminants in comparison to products purified from animal tissues. Nevertheless, the type of manufacturing process including choice of cell type, culture medium, and purification method can result in changes to the protein. For example, a change to the closure system for erythropoietin led to an increase in aplastic anemia as a result of changing the immunogenicity characteristics of the protein. Monoclonal antibodies represent a major class of successful biologics. Toxicities associated with these agents include those associated with the binding of the complementary determining region (CDR) with the target. First dose reactions or infusion reactions are generally thought to be mediated via the Fc region of the antibody activating cytokine release, and have been observed with several antibodies. Usually, these effects (flu-like symptoms, etc.) are transient with subsequent dosing. Although biologics can have nonpharmacologic toxicities, these are less common than with small molecule drugs.

  3. The metoclopramide black box warning for tardive dyskinesia: effect on clinical practice, adverse event reporting, and prescription drug lawsuits.

    PubMed

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D; Deepak, Parakkal; Sifuentes, Humberto; Devi, Radha; Du, Hongyan; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2013-06-01

    We examined the effects of the black box warning about the risk of tardive dyskinesia (TD) with chronic use of metoclopramide on management of gastroparesis within a single clinical practice, and on reporting of adverse events. Medical records of gastroparesis patients were evaluated for physician management choices. The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) was analyzed for event reports, and for lawyer-initiated reports, with metoclopramide from 2004 to 2010. Google Scholar was searched for court opinions against metoclopramide manufacturers. Before the black box warning, 69.8% of patients received metoclopramide for gastroparesis, compared with 23.7% after the warning. Gastroenterologists prescribed domperidone more often after than before the warning. Metoclopramide prescriptions decreased after 2008. Adverse event reporting increased after the warning. Only 3.6% of all FAERS reports but 70% of TD reports were filed by lawyers, suggesting a distortion in signal. Forty-seven legal opinions were identified, 33 from 2009-2010. The black box warning for metoclopramide has decreased its usage and increased its rate of adverse event reporting. Lawyer-initiated reports of TD hinder pharmacovigilance.

  4. Pharmacogenetics of adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Fricke-Galindo, I; Jung-Cook, H; LLerena, A; López-López, M

    2015-05-11

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In the case of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), ADRs constitute a barrier to successful treatment since they decrease treatment adherence and impact patients' quality of life of patients. Pharmacogenetics aims to identify genetic polymorphisms associated with drug safety. This article presents a review of genes coding for drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters, and HLA system genes that have been linked to AED-induced ADRs. To date, several genetic variations associated with drug safety have been reported: CYP2C9*2 and *3 alleles, which code for enzymes with decreased activity, have been linked to phenytoin (PHT)-induced neurotoxicity; GSTM1 null alleles with hepatotoxicity induced by carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproic acid (VPA); EPHX1 polymorphisms with teratogenesis; ABCC2 genetic variations with CBZ- and VPA-induced neurological ADRs; and HLA alleles (e.g. HLA-B*15:02, -A*31:01, -B*15:11, -C*08:01) with cutaneous ADRs. Published findings show that there are ADRs with a pharmacogenetic basis and a high interethnic variability, which indicates a need for future studies in different populations to gather more useful results for larger number of patients. The search for biomarkers that would allow predicting ADRs to AEDs could improve pharmacotherapy for epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Adverse drug events in hospital: pilot study with trigger tool

    PubMed Central

    Rozenfeld, Suely; Giordani, Fabiola; Coelho, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the frequency of and to characterize the adverse drug events at a terciary care hospital. METHODS A retrospective review was carried out of 128 medical records from a hospital in Rio de Janeiro in 2007, representing 2,092 patients. The instrument used was a list of triggers, such as antidotes, abnormal laboratory analysis results and sudden suspension of treatment, among others. A simple random sample of patients aged 15 and over was extracted. Oncologic and obstetric patients were excluded as were those hospitalized for less than 48 hours or in the emergency room. Social and demographic characteristics and those of the disease of patients who underwent adverse events were compared with those of patients who did not in order to test for differences between the groups. RESULTS Around 70.0% of the medical records assessed showed at least one trigger. Adverse drug events triggers had an overall positive predictive value of 14.4%. The incidence of adverse drug events was 26.6 per 100 patients and 15.6% patients suffered one or more event. The median length of stay for patients suffering an adverse drug event was 35.2 days as against 10.7 days for those who did not (p < 0.01). The pharmacological classes most commonly associated with an adverse drug event were related to the cardiovascular system, nervous system and alimentary tract and metabolism. The most common active substances associated with an adverse drug event were tramadol, dypirone, glibenclamide and furosemide. Over 80.0% of events provoked or contributed to temporary harm to the patient and required intervention and 6.0% may have contributed to the death of the patient. It was estimated that in the hospital, 131 events involving drowsiness or fainting 33 involving falls, and 33 episodes of hemorrhage related to adverse drug effects occur annually. CONCLUSIONS Almost one-sixth of in-patients (16,0%) suffered an adverse drug event. The instrument used may prove useful as a technique for

  6. Adverse effects of commonly ordered oral narcotics.

    PubMed

    Kantor, T G; Hopper, M; Laska, E

    1981-01-01

    Approximately equianalgesic oral doses of codeine, an oxycodone compound resembling Percodan, and pentazocine were compared for adverse effects in a double-blind, randomized study of four doses of each drug given over two days to 247 postsurgical patients with pain. Placebo and parenteral morphine were also treated as negative and positive controls, respectively. Approximately 50 patients each received one of the five drugs. Codeine, pentazocine, and morphine had the same incidence of adverse effects (22 to 28 per cent). One capsule of oxycodone compound was the analgesic equivalent of 12.5 mg morphine with an adverse effect incidence of 4 per cent (placebo 8 per cent). Smoking made no difference in analgesic effect or adverse effects. Analgesics given in the evening intervening between the two days may have affected the analgesic performance of placebo.

  7. Adverse drug events: database construction and in silico prediction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Li, Weihua; Wang, Xichuan; Zhou, Yadi; Wu, Zengrui; Shen, Jie; Tang, Yun

    2013-04-22

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are the harms associated with uses of given medications at normal dosages, which are crucial for a drug to be approved in clinical use or continue to stay on the market. Many ADEs are not identified in trials until the drug is approved for clinical use, which results in adverse morbidity and mortality. To date, millions of ADEs have been reported around the world. Methods to avoid or reduce ADEs are an important issue for drug discovery and development. Here, we reported a comprehensive database of adverse drug events (namely MetaADEDB), which included more than 520,000 drug-ADE associations among 3059 unique compounds (including 1330 drugs) and 13,200 ADE items by data integration and text mining. All compounds and ADEs were annotated with the most commonly used concepts defined in Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). Meanwhile, a computational method, namely the phenotypic network inference model (PNIM), was developed for prediction of potential ADEs based on the database. The area under the receive operating characteristic curve (AUC) is more than 0.9 by 10-fold cross validation, while the AUC value was 0.912 for an external validation set extracted from the US-FDA Adverse Events Reporting System, which indicated that the prediction capability of the method was reliable. MetaADEDB is accessible free of charge at http://www.lmmd.org/online_services/metaadedb/. The database and the method provide us a useful tool to search for known side effects or predict potential side effects for a given drug or compound.

  8. [Nursing role in reporting adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Zurita-Garaicoechea, Ana; Reis-Carvalho, Joana; Ripa-Aisa, Irantzu; Jiménez-Mendoza, Ana; Díaz-Balén, Almudena; Oroviogoicoechea, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous report system, in which suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR) are reported by healthcare workers, is currently one of the primary methods to prevent and discover new and serious ADR to marketed medicinal products. The collaboration of nursing professionals with this task makes it possible to improve patient safety and to reduce ADR costs. Although a total of 781 cases of ADR cases were reported in Navarra in 2011, only 7.33% were reported by nurses. The objectives werw to determine the factors that influence nurses in reporting of ADR, and second, to devise strategies which help to increase reporting. A bibliographic search for articles that included the words: reacciones adversas medicamentosas (adverse drug reactions), notificación (reporting) and enfermería (nursing) was conducted using the PubMed and Cinhal databases. A total of 107 articles were retrieved, of which 27 were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The conclusion learned by reading and analyzing the selected articles was that the factors that affect the notification depend on the attitude of the notifier, as well as personal and professional factors. The main strategies to encourage notification are education and training, motivation, and the availability of facilitating tools. The main factors that have an influence on under-notification are the lack of knowledge and motivation among professionals. To solve the problem of under-notification, the main actions and strategies to undertake are education, motivation and persistence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Using Drug Similarities for Discovery of Possible Adverse Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Emir; Nováček, Vít; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new computational method for discovery of possible adverse drug reactions. The method consists of two key steps. First we use openly available resources to semi-automatically compile a consolidated data set describing drugs and their features (e.g., chemical structure, related targets, indications or known adverse reaction). The data set is represented as a graph, which allows for definition of graph-based similarity metrics. The metrics can then be used for propagating known adverse reactions between similar drugs, which leads to weighted (i.e., ranked) predictions of previously unknown links between drugs and their possible side effects. We implemented the proposed method in the form of a software prototype and evaluated our approach by discarding known drug-side effect links from our data and checking whether our prototype is able to re-discover them. As this is an evaluation methodology used by several recent state of the art approaches, we could compare our results with them. Our approach scored best in all widely used metrics like precision, recall or the ratio of relevant predictions present among the top ranked results. The improvement was as much as 125.79% over the next best approach. For instance, the F1 score was 0.5606 (66.35% better than the next best method). Most importantly, in 95.32% of cases, the top five results contain at least one, but typically three correctly predicted side effect (36.05% better than the second best approach). PMID:28269889

  10. Medications and Adverse Voice Effects.

    PubMed

    Nemr, Kátia; Di Carlos Silva, Ariana; Rodrigues, Danilo de Albuquerque; Zenari, Marcia Simões

    2017-08-16

    To identify the medications used by patients with dysphonia, describe the voice symptoms reported on initial speech-language pathology (SLP) examination, evaluate the possible direct and indirect effects of medications on voice production, and determine the association between direct and indirect adverse voice effects and self-reported voice symptoms, hydration and smoking habits, comorbidities, vocal assessment, and type and degree of dysphonia. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study. Fifty-five patients were evaluated and the vocal signs and symptoms indicated in the Dysphonia Risk Protocol were considered, as well as data on hydration, smoking and medication use. We analyzed the associations between type of side effect and self-reported vocal signs/symptoms, hydration, smoking, comorbidities, type of dysphonia, and auditory-perceptual and acoustic parameters. Sixty percent were women, the mean age was 51.8 years, 29 symptoms were reported on the screening, and 73 active ingredients were identified with 8.2% directly and 91.8% indirectly affecting vocal function. There were associations between the use of drugs with direct adverse voice effects, self-reported symptoms, general degree of vocal deviation, and pitch deviation. The symptoms of dry throat and shortness of breath were associated with the direct vocal side effect of the medicine, as well as the general degree of vocal deviation and the greater pitch deviation. Shortness of breath when speaking was also associated with the greatest degree of vocal deviation. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs*

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Laíse Soares Oliveira; dos Santos-Neto, Edson Theodoro

    2015-01-01

    This review sought to identify the available scientific evidence on risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs. We performed a systematic review of studies published in the 1965-2012 period and indexed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases. A total of 1,389 articles were initially selected. After reading their abstracts, we selected 85 studies. Of those 85 studies, 16 were included in the review. Risk factors for adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs included age > 60 years, treatment regimens, alcoholism, anemia, and HIV co-infection, as well as sodium, iron, and albumin deficiency. Protective factors against hepatic adverse effects of antituberculosis drugs included being male (combined OR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.20-0.72) and showing a rapid/intermediate N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator phenotype (combined OR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.18-0.90). There is evidence to support the need for management of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs at public health care facilities. PMID:25750677

  12. Risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs.

    PubMed

    Resende, Laíse Soares Oliveira; Santos-Neto, Edson Theodoro Dos

    2015-01-01

    This review sought to identify the available scientific evidence on risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs. We performed a systematic review of studies published in the 1965-2012 period and indexed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases. A total of 1,389 articles were initially selected. After reading their abstracts, we selected 85 studies. Of those 85 studies, 16 were included in the review. Risk factors for adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs included age > 60 years, treatment regimens, alcoholism, anemia, and HIV co-infection, as well as sodium, iron, and albumin deficiency. Protective factors against hepatic adverse effects of antituberculosis drugs included being male (combined OR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.20-0.72) and showing a rapid/intermediate N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator phenotype (combined OR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.18-0.90). There is evidence to support the need for management of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs at public health care facilities.

  13. From ultrasocial to antisocial: a role for oxytocin in the acute reinforcing effects and long-term adverse consequences of drug use?

    PubMed

    McGregor, I S; Callaghan, P D; Hunt, G E

    2008-05-01

    Addictive drugs can profoundly affect social behaviour both acutely and in the long-term. Effects range from the artificial sociability imbued by various intoxicating agents to the depressed and socially withdrawn state frequently observed in chronic drug users. Understanding such effects is of great potential significance in addiction neurobiology. In this review we focus on the 'social neuropeptide' oxytocin and its possible role in acute and long-term effects of commonly used drugs. Oxytocin regulates social affiliation and social recognition in many species and modulates anxiety, mood and aggression. Recent evidence suggests that popular party drugs such as MDMA and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) may preferentially activate brain oxytocin systems to produce their characteristic prosocial and prosexual effects. Oxytocin interacts with the mesolimbic dopamine system to facilitate sexual and social behaviour, and this oxytocin-dopamine interaction may also influence the acquisition and expression of drug-seeking behaviour. An increasing body of evidence from animal models suggests that even brief exposure to drugs such as MDMA, cannabinoids, methamphetamine and phencyclidine can cause long lasting deficits in social behaviour. We discuss preliminary evidence that these adverse effects may reflect long-term neuroadaptations in brain oxytocin systems. Laboratory studies and preliminary clinical studies also indicate that raising brain oxytocin levels may ameliorate acute drug withdrawal symptoms. It is concluded that oxytocin may play an important, yet largely unexplored, role in drug addiction. Greater understanding of this role may ultimately lead to novel therapeutics for addiction that can improve mood and facilitate the recovery of persons with drug use disorders.

  14. Learning Lessons from Adverse Drug Reactions in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Helen M.; Choonara, Imti

    2016-01-01

    Drug toxicity is, unfortunately, a significant problem in children both in the hospital and in the community. Drug toxicity in children is different to that seen in adults. At least one in 500 children will experience an adverse drug reaction each year. For children in hospital, the risk is far greater (one in ten). Additionally, different and sometimes unique adverse drug reactions are seen in the paediatric age groups. Some of the major cases of drug toxicity historically have occurred in neonates. It is important that we understand the mechanism of action of adverse drug reactions. Greater understanding alongside rational prescribing should hopefully reduce drug toxicity in children in the future. PMID:27417239

  15. Critical thinking about adverse drug effects: lessons from the psychology of risk and medical decision-making for clinical psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Andrew A; Smoller, Jordan W; Eidelman, Polina; Wu, Yelena P; Tilley, Claire A

    2008-01-01

    Systematic biases in decision-making have been well characterized in medical and nonmedical fields but mostly ignored in clinical psychopharmacology. The purpose of this paper is to sensitize clinicians who prescribe psychiatric drugs to the issues of the psychology of risk, especially as they pertain to the risk of side effects. Specifically, the present analysis focuses on heuristic organization and framing effects that create cognitive biases in medical practice. Our purpose is to increase the awareness of how pharmaceutical companies may influence physicians by framing the risk of medication side effects to favor their products.

  16. Adverse drug reactions related to drug administration in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Gallelli, Luca; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Palleria, Caterina; Mumoli, Laura; Staltari, Orietta; Squillace, Aida; Maida, Francesca; Russo, Emilio; Gratteri, Santo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2017-06-15

    Drug treatment may be related with the development of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Here, we evaluated the ADRs in patients admitted to Catanzaro Hospital. After we obtained the approval by local Ethical Committee, we performed a retrospective study on clinical records from March 01, 2013 to April30, 2015. The association between drug and ADR or between drug and drug-drug-interactions (DDIs) was evaluated using the Naranjo's probability scale and Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS), respectively. During this time, we analyzed 2870 clinical records and 11,138 prescriptions and we documented the development of 770 ADRs. The time of hospitalization was significantly higher (P<0.05) in women with ADRs (12.6± 1.2 days) respect to men (11.8± 0.83 days). Using the Naranjo score, we documented a probable association in 78% of these reactions, while DIPS revealed that about 22% of ADRs were related to DDIs. Patients with ADRs received 3052 prescription on 11,138 (27.4%), with a mean of 6.1±0.29 drugs that was significantly higher (P<0.01) respect to patients that not experienced ADRs (mean of 3.4±0.13 drugs). About 19% of ADRs were not diagnosed and treated as new disease. In conclusion, we documented that age and gender are risk factors for the development of ADRs, that in some patients are under-diagnosed. Therefore, it is important to motivate healthcare to report the ADRs in order optimize the patient safety. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Proposed actions for the US Food and Drug Administration to implement to minimize adverse effects associated with energy drink consumption.

    PubMed

    Thorlton, Janet; Colby, David A; Devine, Paige

    2014-07-01

    Energy drink sales are expected to reach $52 billion by 2016. These products, often sold as dietary supplements, typically contain stimulants. The Dietary Supplement Protection Act claims an exemplary public health safety record. However, in 2011 the number of emergency department visits related to consumption of energy drinks exceeded 20,000. Nearly half of these visits involved adverse effects occurring from product misuse. Political, social, economic, practical, and legal factors shape the landscape surrounding this issue. In this policy analysis, we examine 3 options: capping energy drink caffeine levels, creating a public education campaign, and increasing regulatory scrutiny regarding the manufacture and labeling of energy drinks. Increased regulatory scrutiny may be in order, especially in light of wrongful death lawsuits related to caffeine toxicity resulting from energy drink consumption.

  18. Proposed Actions for the US Food and Drug Administration to Implement to Minimize Adverse Effects Associated With Energy Drink Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Colby, David A.; Devine, Paige

    2014-01-01

    Energy drink sales are expected to reach $52 billion by 2016. These products, often sold as dietary supplements, typically contain stimulants. The Dietary Supplement Protection Act claims an exemplary public health safety record. However, in 2011 the number of emergency department visits related to consumption of energy drinks exceeded 20 000. Nearly half of these visits involved adverse effects occurring from product misuse. Political, social, economic, practical, and legal factors shape the landscape surrounding this issue. In this policy analysis, we examine 3 options: capping energy drink caffeine levels, creating a public education campaign, and increasing regulatory scrutiny regarding the manufacture and labeling of energy drinks. Increased regulatory scrutiny may be in order, especially in light of wrongful death lawsuits related to caffeine toxicity resulting from energy drink consumption. PMID:24832439

  19. Exposure to prescription drugs labeled for risk of adverse effects of suicidal behavior or ideation among 100 Air Force personnel who died by suicide, 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jill E; McCarthy, Michael; Chapman, Richard; Petrilla, Allison; Knox, Kerry L

    2012-10-01

    Prescription drugs for many indications are labeled with warnings for potential risk of suicidal ideation or behavior. Exposures to prescription drugs labeled for adverse effects of suicidal behavior or ideation among 100 Air Force personnel who died by suicide between 2006 and 2009 are described. Air Force registry data were linked to administrative prescription data. Descriptive statistics illustrate utilization: 89 personnel had a prescription history, 35 filled at least one prescription labeled with a warning, 26 had antidepressants on hand at death, and 2 died by drug overdose. Most airmen were not exposed to any prescriptions labeled for risk of suicidal ideation or behavior prior to death by suicide. © 2012 The American Association of Suicidology.

  20. Clinical applications of pharmacogenomics to adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Issa, Amalia M

    2008-03-01

    The problem of adverse drug reactions is a well-documented global public health problem. Recent withdrawals of several widely used prescription medications in the USA and other countries have raised concerns among patients, clinicians, scientists and policy makers. The increasing interest and concern regarding withdrawal of previously approved prescription medications and drug safety has prompted renewed research efforts aimed at improving surveillance of approved drugs and reducing adverse drug reactions. Pharmacogenomics research is increasingly directed at developing genomic diagnostics and tests with predictive ability for adverse drug reactions. This paper focuses on the problem of adverse drug reactions and reviews the evidence and the state of the science for the application of pharmacogenomics to adverse drug reactions.

  1. Nonhemostatic adverse effects of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Walenga, Jeanine M; Thethi, Indermohan; Lewis, Bruce E

    2012-11-01

    The topic of adverse effects of drugs is now receiving due attention in both the lay and medical communities. For drugs of the coagulation disorder class, such as anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, the obvious adverse effects are bleeding from a dose too high and thrombosis from a dose too low. However, these drugs have other potential adverse effects that are not directly related to blood coagulation, yet cannot be dismissed due to their medical importance. There has been a recent advancement of several new drugs in this category and this number will soon grow as more drugs are reaching the end of their clinical trials. This article will discuss the nonhemostatic adverse effects of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. As the adverse effects of bleeding and thrombosis will be excluded, this article will be in contrast to the typical discussions on the anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug classes.

  2. Impact of depression mood disorder on the adverse drug reaction incidence rate of anticancer drugs in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, T; Duan, J J; Zhou, G P; Cai, J Y; Huang, Z H; Zeng, Y T; Xu, F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of depression mood disorder on the incidence of adverse drug reactions of anticancer drugs in cancer patients. The Hamilton Depression Scale 17 was used to evaluate the depression mood disorder level in 73 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Pharmacists monitored adverse drug reactions during the chemotherapy period. The relationship between depression mood disorder level and the incidence of adverse drug reactions was analysed. The frequency and extent of total adverse drug reactions were not related to depression mood disorder level. The frequency and extent of subjectively experienced adverse drug reactions such as anorexia, nausea and fatigue were related to depression mood disorder level. In conclusion, psychological support and intervention should be provided to cancer patients in order to improve patient adherence and cancer chemotherapy effectiveness, and to decrease the incidence of adverse drug reactions.

  3. Data mining for potential adverse drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Hammann, Felix; Drewe, Juergen

    2014-05-01

    Patients, in particular elderly ones, frequently receive more than one drug at a time. With each drug added to a regime, the number of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) increases by a power law. Early prediction of relevant interactions by computerized tools greatly aids clinicians and can guide their prescribing choices. In this article, we discuss different types of DDIs, on which levels they can arise and what efforts have been made in the past to detect and predict them. The emphasis is on data mining technology and network analysis, but overlaps with traditional pharmacovigilance are also discussed. Finally, we discuss strategies to focus and simplify mining efforts to get meaningful results with less effort. The necessary technology for detecting adverse DDIs exists and is quite refined, although it is more often implied in lower risk scenarios (such as syntactic analysis in web searches and online libraries). Data mining for DDIs, on the other hand, still requires a great deal of human intervention, not only to validate the results but also, more importantly, to separate the relevant from the spurious. The fields of network analysis and graph theory show great promise but have not yet shown much beyond descriptive analyses.

  4. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: A Review of Its Antioxidant Activity, Protective Effects against Ischemia-reperfusion Injury and Drug Adverse Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Mai F; Omar, Hany A; Azab, Samar S; Khalifa, Amani E; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2016-10-02

    Propolis, a honey bee product, has been used in folk medicine for centuries for the treatment of abscesses, canker sores and for wound healing. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is one of the most extensively investigated active components of propolis which possess many biological activities, including antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects. CAPE is a polyphenolic compound characterized by potent antioxidant and cytoprotective activities and protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury in multiple tissues such as brain, retina, heart, skeletal muscles, testis, ovaries, intestine, colon, and liver. Furthermore, several studies indicated the protective effects of CAPE against chemotherapy-induced adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including several antibiotics (streptomycin, vancomycin, isoniazid, ethambutol) and chemotherapeutic agents (mitomycin, doxorubicin, cisplatin, methotrexate). Due to the broad spectrum of pharmacological activities of CAPE, this review makes a special focus on the recently published data about CAPE antioxidant activity as well as its protective effects against I/R-induced injury and many adverse drug reactions.

  5. Pattern of Adverse Drug Reactions Reported with Cardiovascular Drugs in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Muthiah; George, Melvin; Subramaniyan, Ganesan; Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; Jayaraman, Balachander; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are one of the leading causes of non-communicable disease related deaths globally. Patients with cardiovascular diseases are often prescribed multiple drugs and have higher risk for developing more adverse drug reactions due to polypharmacy. Aim To evaluate the pattern of adverse drug reactions reported with cardiovascular drugs in an adverse drug reaction monitoring centre (AMC) of a tertiary care hospital. Settings and Design Adverse drug reactions related to cardiovascular drugs reported to an AMC of a tertiary care hospital were included in this prospective observational study. Materials and Methods All cardiovascular drugs related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) received in AMC through spontaneous reporting system and active surveillance method from January 2011 to March 2013 were analysed for demographic profile, ADR pattern, severity and causality assessment. Statistical Analysis used The study used descriptive statistics and the values were expressed in numbers and percentages. Results During the study period, a total of 463 ADRs were reported from 397 patients which included 319 males (80.4%) and 78 females (19.6%). The cardiovascular drug related reports constituted 18.1% of the total 2188 ADR reports. In this study, the most common ADRs observed were cough (17.3%), gastritis (7.5%) and fatigue (6.5%). Assessment of ADRs using WHO-causality scale revealed that 62% of ADRs were possible, 28.2% certain and 6.8% probable. As per Naranjo’s scale most of the reports were possible (68.8%) followed by probable (29.7%). According to Hartwig severity scale majority of the reports were mild (95%) followed by moderate (4.5%). A system wise classification of ADRs showed that gastrointestinal system (20.7%) related reactions were the most frequently observed adverse reactions followed by respiratory system (18.4%) related adverse effects. From the reported ADRs, the drugs most commonly associated with ADRs were found to be

  6. An adverse drug event manager facilitates spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Vinther, Siri; Klarskov, Pia; Borgeskov, Hanne; Darsø, Perle; Christophersen, Anette Kvindebjerg; Borck, Bille; Christensen, Catrine; Hansen, Melissa Voigt; Halladin, Natalie Monica Løvland; Christensen, Mikkel Bring; Harboe, Kirstine Moll; Lund, Marie; Jimenez-Solem, Espen

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is used for continuous risk-benefit evaluation of marketed pharmaceutical products and for signal detection. The Adverse Drug Event Manager (ADEM) is a service offered to clinicians employed at hospitals in the Capital Region of Denmark. The ADEM assists healthcare professionals in reporting suspected ADRs to the Danish Health Authority. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to quantify and describe ADRs reported via the ADEM in 2014. All ADR reports handled by the ADEM in 2014 were recorded anonymously and analysed descriptively. A total of 484 ADRs were reported through the ADEM in 2014 (the median number of reports per month was 37; range: 17-78). The majority of the reports came from departments of internal medicine (61%), psychiatry (14%) and dermatology, ophthalmology or otorhinolaryngology (11%). The drugs most frequently reported were lisdexamphetamine (n = 40), rivaroxaban (n = 16) and warfarin (n = 15) (vaccines excluded). In 13 out of 484 reports, the ADR was associated with a fatal outcome. The findings of this study indicate that an ADEM promotes and facilitates spontaneous ADR reporting and helps raise awareness about ADRs, including how and why they should be reported. Hopefully, this will assist national and European spontaneous reporting systems in their work to increase patient safety nationally and abroad. none. not relevant. .

  7. Predicting adverse drug events from personal health messages.

    PubMed

    Chee, Brant W; Berlin, Richard; Schatz, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) remain a large problem in the United States, being the fourth leading cause of death, despite post market drug surveillance. Much post consumer drug surveillance relies on self-reported "spontaneous" patient data. Previous work has performed datamining over the FDA's Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) and other spontaneous reporting systems to identify drug interactions and drugs correlated with high rates of serious adverse events. However, safety problems have resulted from the lack of post marketing surveillance information about drugs, with underreporting rates of up to 98% within such systems. We explore the use of online health forums as a source of data to identify drugs for further FDA scrutiny. In this work we aggregate individuals' opinions and review of drugs similar to crowd intelligence3. We use natural language processing to group drugs discussed in similar ways and are able to successfully identify drugs withdrawn from the market based on messages discussing them before their removal.

  8. The short-term effect of particulate matter on cardiorespiratory drug prescription, as a proxy of mild adverse events.

    PubMed

    Conti, Sara; Lafranconi, Alessandra; Zanobetti, Antonella; Cesana, Giancarlo; Madotto, Fabiana; Fornari, Carla

    2017-08-01

    The association between particulate matter < 10µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) and mild disease episodes, not leading to hospitalization or death, has been rarely investigated. We studied the short-term effect of PM10 on purchases of specific cardiorespiratory medications, as proxies of mild episodes, in 7 small- and medium-sized cities of Northern Italy, during 2005-2006. We extracted information on purchased prescriptions from healthcare administrative databases, and we obtained daily PM10 concentrations from fixed monitoring stations. We applied a time-stratified case-crossover design, using the time-series of antidiabetic drugs purchases to control for confounding due to irregularities in daily purchase frequencies. During the warm season, we estimated a delayed (lags 2-6) increased risk of buying glucocorticoid (4.53%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.62, 6.48) and adrenergic inhalants (1.66%, 95% CI: 0.10, 3.24), following an increment (10μg/m(3)) in PM10 concentration. During the cold season, we observed an immediate (lags 0-1) increased risk of purchasing antiarrhythmics (0.76%; 95% CI: 0.16, 1.36) and vasodilators (0.72%; 95% CI: 0.30, 1.13), followed by a risk reduction (lags 2-6), probably due to harvesting. Focusing on drug purchases, we reached sufficient statistical power to study PM10 effect outside large urban areas and conclude that short-term increments in PM10 concentrations might cause mild cardiorespiratory disease episodes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating adverse drug event reporting in administrative data from emergency departments: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse drug events are a frequent cause of emergency department presentations. Administrative data could be used to identify patients presenting with adverse drug events for post-market surveillance, and to conduct research in patient safety and in drug safety and effectiveness. However, such data sources have not been evaluated for their completeness with regard to adverse drug event reporting. Our objective was to determine the proportion of adverse drug events to outpatient medications diagnosed at the point-of-care in emergency departments that were documented in administrative data. Methods We linked the records of patients enrolled in a prospective observational cohort study on adverse drug events conducted in two Canadian tertiary care emergency departments to their administrative data. We compared the number of adverse drug events diagnosed and recorded at the point-of-care in the prospective study with the number of adverse drug events recorded in the administrative data. Results Among 1574 emergency department visits, 221 were identified as adverse drug event-related in the prospective database. We found 15 adverse drug events documented in administrative records with ICD-10 codes clearly indicating an adverse drug event, indicating a sensitivity of 6.8% (95% CI 4.0–11.2%) of this code set. When the ICD-10 code categories were broadened to include codes indicating a very likely, likely or possible adverse event to a medication, 62 of 221 events were identifiable in administrative data, corresponding to a sensitivity of 28.1% (95% CI 22.3-34.6%). Conclusions Adverse drug events to outpatient medications were underreported in emergency department administrative data compared to the number of adverse drug events diagnosed and recorded at the point-of-care. PMID:24219303

  10. Is obesity in psoriatic arthritis associated with a poorer therapeutic response and more adverse effects of treatment with an anchor drug?

    PubMed

    Galíndez, Eva; Carmona, Loreto

    To assess the association between obesity, control of inflammatory activity and increased adverse effects in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) with disease-modifying anti-inflammatory drugs (DMARD). A systematic literature review was performed using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases following the guidelines of the Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) consensus statement. Studies were selected if they included patients with PsA, obesity was studied as a predictive factor, and the outcome was adverse effects, including efficacy failure. Quality was assessed using an ad hoc risk of bias tool. A qualitative analysis was carried out by type of study and study population, quality and specific results. We found 1043 articles, discarding most of them on the basis of title and abstract. Ten articles were studied in detail and finally excluded three. The majority concluded, with statistically significant results, that in patients with PsA and treated with TNFα inhibitors (TNFαi), obesity is associated with poorer chances of achieving and maintaining a minimal disease activity, higher treatment discontinuation rates, and lower skin response. Regarding conventional synthetic DMARD, a trend toward a moderate increase in transaminases with methotrexate (MTX) was observed in obese patients with PsA. Obesity is a negative predictor of clinical response in patients with PsA being treated with TNFαi. Except MTX hepatotoxicity, no other adverse effects, either with TNFαi or other drugs, were found in relation to obesity in PsA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  11. Sharing adverse drug event data using business intelligence technology.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Monica M; Cozart, Heidi; Ahmad, Asif; Langman, Matthew K; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    Duke University Health System uses computerized adverse drug event surveillance as an integral part of medication safety at 2 community hospitals and an academic medical center. This information must be swiftly communicated to organizational patient safety stakeholders to find opportunities to improve patient care; however, this process is encumbered by highly manual methods of preparing the data. Following the examples of other industries, we deployed a business intelligence tool to provide dynamic safety reports on adverse drug events. Once data were migrated into the health system data warehouse, we developed census-adjusted reports with user-driven prompts. Drill down functionality enables navigation from aggregate trends to event details by clicking report graphics. Reports can be accessed by patient safety leadership either through an existing safety reporting portal or the health system performance improvement Web site. Elaborate prompt screens allow many varieties of reports to be created quickly by patient safety personnel without consultation with the research analyst. The reduction in research analyst workload because of business intelligence implementation made this individual available to additional patient safety projects thereby leveraging their talents more effectively. Dedicated liaisons are essential to ensure clear communication between clinical and technical staff throughout the development life cycle. Design and development of the business intelligence model for adverse drug event data must reflect the eccentricities of the operational system, especially as new areas of emphasis evolve. Future usability studies examining the data presentation and access model are needed.

  12. Managing adverse effects of glaucoma medications

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic, progressive disease in which retinal ganglion cells disappear and subsequent, gradual reductions in the visual field ensues. Glaucoma eye drops have hypotensive effects and like all other medications are associated with adverse effects. Adverse reactions may either result from the main agent or from preservatives used in the drug vehicle. The preservative benzalkonium chloride, is one such compound that causes frequent adverse reactions such as superficial punctate keratitis, corneal erosion, conjunctival allergy, and conjunctival injection. Adverse reactions related to main hypotensive agents have been divided into those affecting the eye and those affecting the entire body. In particular, β-blockers frequently cause systematic adverse reactions, including bradycardia, decrease in blood pressure, irregular pulse and asthma attacks. Prostaglandin analogs have distinctive local adverse reactions, including eyelash bristling/lengthening, eyelid pigmentation, iris pigmentation, and upper eyelid deepening. No systemic adverse reactions have been linked to prostaglandin analog eye drop usage. These adverse reactions may be minimized when they are detected early and prevented by reducing the number of different eye drops used (via fixed combination eye drops), reducing the number of times eye drops are administered, using benzalkonium chloride-free eye drops, using lower concentration eye drops, and providing proper drop instillation training. Additionally, a one-time topical medication can be given to patients to allow observation of any adverse reactions, thereafter the preparation of a topical medication with the fewest known adverse reactions can be prescribed. This does require precise patient monitoring and inquiries about patient symptoms following medication use. PMID:24872675

  13. Vagus nerve stimulation in drug-resistant epilepsy: the efficacy and adverse effects in a 5-year follow-up study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pakdaman, Hossein; Amini Harandi, Ali; Abbasi, Mehdi; Karimi, Mohammad; Arami, Mohammad Ali; Mosavi, Seyed Ali; Haddadian, Karim; Rezaei, Omidvar; Sadeghi, Sohrab; Sharifi, Guive; Gharagozli, Koroush; Bahrami, Parviz; Ashrafi, Farzad; Kasmae, Hosein Delavar; Ghassemi, Amirhossein; Arabahmadi, Mehran; Behnam, Behdad

    2016-11-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy seems like a different disease compared with easy to control epilepsy, and new strategies are needed to help these patients. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy is the most frequently used neurostimulation modality for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy who are not eligible for seizure surgery. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of VNS in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy in an open-label, prospective, long-term study in Iran. We selected 48 patients with partial-onset drug-resistant epilepsy. Implantations were performed in the neurosurgery department of Loghman Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Follow-up visits were done on monthly bases for 5 years. Forty-four patients completed the study. Mean age of patients was 24.4 years. Mean years of epilepsy history was 14 years. The mean number of anti-epileptic drugs did not significantly change over five years (p = 0.15). There was no exacerbation of epilepsy; however, one patient discontinued his therapy due to unsatisfactory results. Five patient had more than 50 %, and 26 patients (59 %) had 25-49 % reduction in the frequency of monthly seizures persistently. Overall mean frequency of monthly seizures decreased by 57.8, 59.6, 65, 65.9, and 67 %, in 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th years of follow-up, respectively. Most common side effects were as follows: hoarseness (25 %) and throat discomfort (10 %). We found VNS as a safe and effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy, with an approximate long-term decrease in mean seizure frequency of 57.8-67 %. Thus, VNS is recommended for suitable patients in developing countries.

  14. Post-surgical analgesia in rainbow trout: is reduced cardioventilatory activity a sign of improved animal welfare or the adverse effects of an opioid drug?

    PubMed

    Gräns, Albin; Sandblom, Erik; Kiessling, Anders; Axelsson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The use of fish models in biomedical research is increasing. Since behavioural and physiological consequences of surgical procedures may affect experimental results, these effects should be defined and, if possible, ameliorated. Thus, the use of post-surgical analgesia should be considered after invasive procedures also in fish, but presently, little information exists on the effects of analgesics in fish. This study assessed the effects of an opioid drug, buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg IM), on resting ventilation and heart rates during 7 days of postsurgical recovery in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at 10°C by non-invasively recording bioelectric potentials from the fish via electrodes in the water. Baseline ventilation and heart rates were considerably lower compared to previously reported values for rainbow trout at 10°C, possibly due to the non-invasive recording technique. Buprenorphine significantly decreased both ventilation and heart rates further, and the effects were most pronounced at 4-7 days after anaesthesia, surgical procedures and administration of the drug. Somewhat surprisingly, the same effects of buprenorphine were seen in the two control groups that had not been subject to surgery. These results indicate that the reductions in ventilation and heart rates are not caused by an analgesic effect of the drug, but may instead reflect a general sedative effect acting on both behaviour as well as e.g. central control of ventilation in fishes. This resembles what has previously been demonstrated in mammals, although the duration of the drug effect is considerably longer in this ectothermic animal. Thus, before using buprenorphine for postoperative analgesic treatment in fish, these potentially adverse effects need further characterisation.

  15. Differences between Drug-Induced and Contrast Media-Induced Adverse Reactions Based on Spontaneously Reported Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Suh, JinUk; Yang, MyungSuk; Kang, WonKu; Kim, EunYoung

    2015-01-01

    Objective We analyzed differences between spontaneously reported drug-induced (not including contrast media) and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Methods Adverse drug reactions reported by an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center (St. Mary’s teaching hospital, Daejeon, Korea) from 2010–2012 were classified as drug-induced or contrast media-induced. Clinical patterns, frequency, causality, severity, Schumock and Thornton’s preventability, and type A/B reactions were recorded. The trends among causality tools measuring drug and contrast-induced adverse reactions were analyzed. Results Of 1,335 reports, 636 drug-induced and contrast media-induced adverse reactions were identified. The prevalence of spontaneously reported adverse drug reaction-related admissions revealed a suspected adverse drug reaction-reporting rate of 20.9/100,000 (inpatient, 0.021%) and 3.9/100,000 (outpatients, 0.004%). The most common adverse drug reaction-associated drug classes included nervous system agents and anti-infectives. Dermatological and gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions were most frequently and similarly reported between drug and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Compared to contrast media-induced adverse reactions, drug-induced adverse reactions were milder, more likely to be preventable (9.8% vs. 1.1%, p < 0.001), and more likely to be type A reactions (73.5% vs. 18.8%, p < 0.001). Females were over-represented among drug-induced adverse reactions (68.1%, p < 0.001) but not among contrast media-induced adverse reactions (56.6%, p = 0.066). Causality patterns differed between the two adverse reaction classes. The World Health Organization–Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality evaluation and Naranjo algorithm results significantly differed from those of the Korean algorithm version II (p < 0.001). Conclusions We found differences in sex, preventability, severity, and type A/B reactions between spontaneously reported drug and contrast media-induced adverse

  16. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions (Review article)

    PubMed Central

    Alomar, Muaed Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To discuss the effect of certain factors on the occurrence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Data Sources A systematic review of the literature in the period between 1991 and 2012 was made based on PubMed, the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE and IDIS. Key words used were: medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease factors, ambulatory care, primary health care, side effects and treatment hazards. Summary Many factors play a crucial role in the occurrence of ADRs, some of these are patient related, drug related or socially related factors. Age for instance has a very critical impact on the occurrence of ADRs, both very young and very old patients are more vulnerable to these reactions than other age groups. Alcohol intake also has a crucial impact on ADRs. Other factors are gender, race, pregnancy, breast feeding, kidney problems, liver function, drug dose and frequency and many other factors. The effect of these factors on ADRs is well documented in the medical literature. Taking these factors into consideration during medical evaluation enables medical practitioners to choose the best drug regimen. Conclusion Many factors affect the occurrence of ADRs. Some of these factors can be changed like smoking or alcohol intake others cannot be changed like age, presence of other diseases or genetic factors. Understanding the different effects of these factors on ADRs enables healthcare professionals to choose the most appropriate medication for that particular patient. It also helps the healthcare professionals to give the best advice to patients. Pharmacogenomics is the most recent science which emphasizes the genetic predisposition of ADRs. This innovative science provides a new perspective in dealing with the decision making process of drug selection. PMID:24648818

  17. 30-Day Potentially Avoidable Readmissions Due to Adverse Drug Events.

    PubMed

    Dalleur, Olivia; Beeler, Patrick E; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Donzé, Jacques

    2017-03-17

    To analyze the patterns of potentially avoidable readmissions due to adverse drug events (ADEs) to identify the most appropriate risk reduction interventions. In this observational study, we analyzed a random sample of 534 potentially avoidable 30-day readmissions from 10,275 consecutive discharges from the medical department of an academic hospital. Readmissions due to ADEs were reviewed to identify the causative drugs and the severity and interventions to prevent them. Seventy cases (13.1%) of readmission were partially or predominantly due to ADEs, of which, 58 (82.9%) were serious ADEs. Overall, 65 (92.9%) of the ADEs have been confirmed to be preventable. Inappropriate prescribing was identified as the cause of ADE in 34 cases (48.6%) mainly involving diuretics, analgesics, or antithrombotics: misprescribing n = 19 (27.1%), underprescribing n = 8 (11.4%), and overprescribing n = 7 (10.0%). The remaining half of preventable ADEs (n = 36; 51.4%) were related to suboptimal patient monitoring/education, such as adherence issues (n = 6; 8.6%) or lack of monitoring (n = 31; 44.3%). In 64 cases (91.4%), the readmission could have been potentially prevented by better monitoring for drug efficacy/disease control, or for predictable side effect. Thirty-three (97.1%) of the 34 ADEs due to inappropriate prescribing could have also been prevented by better monitoring. Adverse drug events accounted for approximately 13% of 30-day preventable readmissions. A half were due to prescription errors involving mainly diuretics, analgesics, or antithrombotics, and the other half were due to suboptimal patient monitoring/education, most frequently with antineoplastics. Both these avoidable causes may represent opportunities to reduce the total drug-related adverse events.

  18. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Dogs Treated with Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tina; Mueller, Ralf S.; Dobenecker, Britta; Fischer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders in dogs and life-long treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is frequently required. Adverse events of AED targeting the skin are only rarely reported in veterinary medicine and the true incidence and spectrum of cutaneous reactions in epileptic dogs remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that cutaneous reactions commonly occur in epileptic dogs and are related to AED treatment. A retrospective case review of 185 dogs treated for epilepsy identified 20.0% with simultaneous appearance of dermatologic signs. In a subsequent prospective case investigation (n = 137), we identified newly appearing or distinct worsening of skin lesions following initiation of AED therapy in 10.9% of dogs treated for epilepsy (95% CI 6.8–17.7%). Cutaneous lesions were classified as probably drug-induced in 40.0% of these cases. Patch testing and intradermal testing were further investigated as potential diagnostic methods to confirm AED hypersensitivity. They were of high specificity but sensitivity and positive predictive value appeared inappropriate to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:27148543

  19. Quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: the impact of socio-economic factors and adverse effects of atypical antipsychotics drugs.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; de Araújo Dantas, Diego; do Nascimento, Gemma Galgani; Ribeiro, Susana Barbosa; Chaves, Katarina Melo; de Lima Silva, Vanessa; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier

    2014-09-01

    This cross-sectional study compared the effects of treatment with atypical antipsychotic drugs on quality of life (QoL) and side effects in 218 patients with schizophrenia attending the ambulatory services of psychiatric in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Socio-economic variables were compared. The five-dimension EuroQoL (EQ-5D) was used to evaluate QoL, and side effects were assessed using the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) Side Effect Rating Scale and the Simpson-Angus Scale. Data were analysed using the χ (2) test and Student's t test, with a significance level of 5 %. Average monthly household incomes in the medication groups were 1.1-2.1 minimum wages ($339-$678). UKU Scale scores showed significant differences in side effects, mainly, clozapine, quetiapine and ziprasidone (p < 0.05). EQ-5D scores showed that all drugs except olanzapine significantly impacted mobility (p < 0.05), and proportions of individuals reporting problems in other dimensions were high: 63.6 % of clozapine users reported mobility problems, 63.7 and 56.3 % of clozapine and ziprasidone users, respectively, had difficulties with usual activities, 68.8 and 54.5 % of ziprasidone and clozapine users, respectively, experienced pain and/or discomfort, and 72.8 % of clozapine users reported anxiety and/or depression. Psychiatric, neurological, and autonomous adverse effects, as well as other side effects, were prevalent in users of atypical antipsychotic drugs, especially clozapine and ziprasidone. Olanzapine had the least side effects. QoL was impacted by side effects and economic conditions in all groups. Thus, the effects of these antipsychotic agents appear to have been masked by aggravating social and economic situations.

  20. "It's Russian roulette": adulteration, adverse effects and drug use transitions during the 2010/2011 United Kingdom heroin shortage.

    PubMed

    Harris, Magdalena; Forseth, Kirsten; Rhodes, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Between late 2010 and mid 2011 there was a significant heroin shortage in the United Kingdom (UK), resulting in a rapid drop in street heroin purity and increase in price. The most well documented event of this kind is the 2000-2001 Australian heroin shortage, with little published research addressing the UK context. In this paper we draw on qualitative data to explore the impact of, and responses to, the 2010/2011 shortage among London-based heroin users. Data collection comprised longitudinal life history and narrative interviews with 37 PWID in 2010-2011. The average age of participants was 40, with a 20-year average duration of injecting. Heroin was the drug of choice for the majority of participants (25), with 12 preferring to inject a crack-cocaine and heroin mix. Recruitment took place through London drug and alcohol services and peer networks. The majority of participants continued to source and inject heroin despite reported decline in purity and increased adulteration. Transitions to poly-drug use during the heroin shortage were also common, increasing vulnerability to overdose and other drug related harms. Participants enacted indigenous harm reduction strategies in attempting to manage changes in drug purity and availability, with variable success. Epidemiological data gathered during periods of heroin shortage is often drawn on to emphasise the health benefits of reductions in supply. Our findings highlight the importance of understanding the ways in which heroin shortages may increase, as well as reduce, harm. There is a need for enhanced service provision during periods of drug shortage as well as caution in regard to the posited benefits of supply-side drug law enforcement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Adverse Effects of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Filippatos, Theodosios D.; Panagiotopoulou, Thalia V.; Elisaf, Moses S.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a class of injective anti-diabetic drugs that improve glycemic control and many other atherosclerosis-related parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the use of this relatively new class of drugs may be associated with certain adverse effects. Concerns have been expressed regarding the effects of these drugs on pancreatic and thyroid tissue, since animal studies and analyses of drug databases indicate an association of GLP-1 receptor agonists with pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, and thyroid cancer. However, several meta-analyses failed to confirm a cause-effect relation between GLP-1 receptor agonists and the development of these adverse effects. One benefit of GLP-1 receptor agonists is that they do not cause hypoglycemia when combined with metformin or thiazolidinediones, but the dose of concomitant sulphonylurea or insulin may have to be decreased to reduce the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. On the other hand, several case reports have linked the use of these drugs, mainly exenatide, with the occurrence of acute kidney injury, primarily through hemodynamic derangement due to nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The most common symptoms associated with the use of GLP-1 receptor agonists are gastrointestinal symptoms, mainly nausea. Other common adverse effects include injection site reactions, headache, and nasopharyngitis, but these effects do not usually result in discontinuation of the drug. Current evidence shows that GLP-1 receptor agonists have no negative effects on the cardiovascular risk of patients with T2D. Thus, GLP-1 receptor agonists appear to have a favorable safety profile, but ongoing trials will further assess their cardiovascular effects. The aim of this review is to analyze critically the available data regarding adverse events of GLP-1 receptor agonists in different anatomic systems published in Pubmed and Scopus. Whenever possible, certain differences between GLP-1

  2. Sex and gender in adverse drug events, addiction, and placebo.

    PubMed

    Franconi, Flavia; Campesi, Ilaria; Occhioni, Stefano; Antonini, Paola; Murphy, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Sex-gender-based differences in response to pharmaceutical treatments are still under evaluation but evidence already exists regarding the impact of sex-gender-related differences on drug safety profile, drug abuse/addiction, and placebo effects. For a number of drugs it is well recognized that a sex-gender dimorphic profile in terms of drug adverse effects exists and appears to be more frequent and severe in women than in men. However, it is not well known whether this is due to pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic differences. Indeed the optimization of therapy requires that attention is paid to single sex-gender. Numerous pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and sociocultural differences between women and men in drug abuse have been described. Here we focus on sex-gender differences in alcoholism and nicotine addiction. The relevance of sex and gender differences in addiction appear to be relevant. Specific programs aimed to address addicted women's specific needs (child care, pregnancy, housing, and violence and others) are recommended. Finally, this article discusses the possible effect of sex-gender on placebo response in the light of the more significant recent literature evidencing that studies are urgently required in order to better understand the role of sex-gender on placebo mechanism and its impact on randomized clinical trials outcomes.

  3. Toxins and adverse drug reactions affecting the equine nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Dominic R

    2011-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the more common toxins and adverse drug reactions, along with more rare toxins and reactions (Table 1), that result in neurologic dysfunction in horses. A wide variety of symptoms, treatments, and outcomes are seen with toxic neurologic disease in horses. An in-depth history and thorough physical examination are needed to determine if a toxin or adverse drug reaction is responsible for the clinical signs. Once a toxin or adverse drug reaction is identified, the specific antidote, if available, and supportive care should be administered promptly.

  4. Herbal medication: potential for adverse interactions with analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Abebe, W

    2002-12-01

    The use of herbal supplements in the US has increased dramatically in recent years. These products are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with the same scrutiny as conventional drugs. Patients who use herbal supplements often do so in conjunction with conventional drugs. This article is a review of potential adverse interactions between some of the commonly used herbal supplements and analgesic drugs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly aspirin, have the potential to interact with herbal supplements that are known to possess antiplatelet activity (ginkgo, garlic, ginger, bilberry, dong quai, feverfew, ginseng, turmeric, meadowsweet and willow), with those containing coumarin (chamomile, motherworth, horse chestnut, fenugreek and red clover) and with tamarind, enhancing the risk of bleeding. Acetaminophen may also interact with ginkgo and possibly with at least some of the above herbs to increase the risk of bleeding. Further, the incidences of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity may be augmented by acetaminophen when concomitantly used with the potentially hepatotoxic herbs Echinacea and kava, and with herbs containing salicylate (willow, meadowsweet), respectively. The concomitant use of opioid analgesics with the sedative herbal supplements, valerian, kava and chamomile, may lead to increased central nervous system (CNS) depression. The analgesic effect of opioids may also be inhibited by ginseng. It is suggested that health-care professionals should be more aware of the potential adverse interactions between herbal supplements and analgesic drugs, and take appropriate precautionary measures to avoid their possible occurrences. However, as most of the interaction information available is based on individual case reports, animal studies and in vitro data, further research is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions.

  5. Antiepileptic drugs and adverse skin reactions: An update.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Barbara; Lasoń, Władysław; Czuczwar, Stanisław Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    This paper summarizes current views on clinical manifestation, pathogenesis, prognosis and management of antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced adverse skin reactions. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed) and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched. The recent classification, among drug-induced skin injuries, points to Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS), which may be also recognized as a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS). The use of aromatic AEDs, e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, primidone, zonisamide, and lamotrigine is more frequently associated with cutaneous eruption and other signs or symptoms of drug hypersensitivity. There is a high degree of cross-reactivity (40-80%) in patients with hypersensitivity or allergic reactions to AEDs. Pharmacogenetic variations in drug biotransformation may also play a role in inducing these undesired effects. It is suggested that avoidance of specific AEDs in populations at special risk, cautious dose titration and careful monitoring of clinical response and, if applicable, laboratory parameters can minimize the serious consequences of idiosyncratic reactions.

  6. (1)H-Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced adverse effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Um, So Young; Park, Jung Hyun; Chung, Myeon Woo; Choi, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hwa Jeong

    2016-09-10

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are globally prescribed, exhibit mainly anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects but also can cause adverse effects including gastrointestinal erosions, ulceration, bleeding, and perforation. The purpose of this study was to investigate surrogate biomarkers associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) damage caused by NSAID treatment using pattern recognition analysis of (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra of rat urine. Urine was collected for 5h after oral administration of the following NSAIDs at low or high doses: acetylsalicylic acid (10 or 200mgkg(-1)), diclofenac (0.5 or 15mgkg(-1)), piroxicam (1 or 10mgkg(-1)), indomethacin (1 or 25mgkg(-1)), or ibuprofen (10, or 150mgkg(-1)) as nonselective COX inhibitors and celecoxib (10 or 100mgkg(-1)) as a COX-2 selective inhibitor. The urine was analyzed using 500MHz (1)H NMR for spectral binning and targeted profiling and the level of gastric damage was examined. The nonselective COX inhibitors caused severe gastric damage while no lesions were observed in the celecoxib-treated rats. The (1)H NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04ppm) for global profiling, and a total of 44 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. Multivariate data analyses were performed to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to NSAIDs using partial least square-discrimination analysis (PLS-DA). The (1)H NMR spectra clustered differently according to gastric damage score in global profiling. In targeted profiling, the endogenous metabolites of citrate, allantoin, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, benzoate, glycine, and trimethylamine N-oxide were selected as putative biomarkers for gastric damage caused by NSAIDs. These putative biomarkers might be useful for predicting the risk of adverse effects caused by NSAIDs in the early stage of drug development process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A rare adverse effect of metronidazole: nervous system symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kafadar, Ihsan; Moustafa, Fatma; Yalçın, Koray; Klç, Betül Aydn

    2013-06-01

    Metronidazole, as a 5-nitroimidazole compound, is effective on anaerobic bacteria and protozoon diseases. Mostly, metronidazole is a tolerable drug but rarely presents serious adverse effects on the nervous system. In case of these adverse effects, treatment must be stopped.In this report, a 3-year-old child hospitalized because of diarrhea is presented. During the metronidazole treatment, loss of sight, vertigo, ataxia, and headache occurred as the adverse effects. By this report, we want to express the rare adverse effects of drugs in the differential diagnoses of nervous system diseases.

  8. The Relationship between Psychotropic Drug Use and Suicidal Behavior in Japan: Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Takenoshita, S; Taka, F; Nakao, M; Nomura, K

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Very few studies have explored the adverse effect of psychotropic drugs worldwide. Methods: This study analyzed 1 813 suicide-related drug reports involving 553 patients collected from the Japanese National Adverse Drug Report Database between October 2001 and January 2012 to investigate psychotropic drugs associated with completed suicide vs. other suicide-related behaviors, including ideation and self-injury. The drugs investigated included antidepressants, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, non-benzodiazepine hypnotic agents, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and other drugs. Results: These reports referenced 300 (54.2%) individuals who completed suicide. Adjusting for age, sex, and drugs used, the multivariate model revealed that participants who took antipsychotics were 1.70 times (95% CI, 1.11-2.61) more likely to complete suicide compared with those who did not. All other drugs became non-significant. Compared with those who took only one medication, those prescribed more than 4 drugs were more likely to complete suicide (OR 4.44, 95% CI, 2.40-8.20). Discussion: Antipsychotic drugs and polypharmacy may be regarded as predictors of completed suicide.

  9. Thiocolchicoside: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Thiocolchicoside has long been used as a muscle relaxant, despite a lack of proven efficacy beyond the placebo effect. Its chemical structure consists of colchicine, a sugar (ose) and a sulphur-containing radical (thio), and its adverse effects are therefore likely to be similar to those of colchicine. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we reviewed the available data on the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. Liver injury, pancreatitis, seizures, blood cell disorders, severe cutaneous disorders, rhabdomyolysis and reproductive disorders have all been recorded in the French and European pharmacovigilance databases and in the periodic updates that the companies concerned submit to regulatory agencies. These data do not specify the frequency of the disorders nor do they identify the most susceptible patient populations. Thiocolchicoside is teratogenic in experimental animals and also damages chromosomes. Human data are limited to a follow-up of about 30 pregnant women (no major malformations) and reports of altered spermatogenesis, including cases of azoospermia. In practice, there is no justification for exposing patients to the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. It is better to use an effective, well-known analgesic for patients complaining of muscle pain, starting with paracetamol.

  10. The beneficial and adverse effects of hypnotics.

    PubMed

    Balter, M B; Uhlenhuth, E H

    1991-07-01

    Findings from a four-city study of the beneficial and adverse effects of hypnotics are reported. The study employed a new volunteer call-in method for monitoring drug effects outside of the clinical setting. Respondents were recruited through newspaper advertisements. They were invited to complete a short telephone interview if, during the past 12 months, they (1) had significant trouble with insomnia or (2) had taken a medication to induce sleep. Comparison groups were flurazepam, temazepam, triazolam, and over-the-counter (OTC) sleep medications. An untreated insomnia group also was included. Results indicate that most users of prescription hypnotics attributed positive effects to their sleep medications and that adverse effects were infrequent. OTC hypnotics were less effective and more likely to produce negative effects. The untreated insomnia group was more symptomatic than any of the medication groups.

  11. Metabolic and adverse effects of diuretics.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C S

    1999-11-01

    Diuretics are among the most frequently prescribed drugs. They enjoy a very high clinical reputation for safety and efficacy. However, more than 3 decades of clinical investigation have disclosed a number of abnormalities in fluid electrolyte handling, metabolism, and other adverse effects that can complicate therapy with diuretic drugs. Some of these complications are a direct extension of the wanted action of the drug. These include extracellular fluid volume depletion, associated orthostatic hypotension, and prerenal azotemia. Others are not a direct action of the diuretic, but can be explained as an intranephronal compensation to the diuretic action. These include hypokalemia, in part to increased potassium secretion secondary to the enhanced tubular fluid flow and aldosterone secretion induced by diuretic administration. Metabolic abnormalities are usually mild. Hyperglycemia and carbohydrate intolerance have been related to diuretic-induced hypokalemia, which inhibits insulin secretion by the beta cells, and reductions in extracellular fluid volume and cardiac output. This is compounded by increases in catecholamines from sympathetic nerve activity which decrease peripheral glucose utilization. A mild increase in serum cholesterol concentration is seen frequently during initiation of diuretic therapy, but during steady state therapy after 6 to 12 months, values usually return to baseline. Knowledge of the more common adverse effects induced by diuretics helps the physician in predicting patients at risk and taking effective steps to anticipate or treat adverse responses.

  12. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects.

  13. Adverse Effects of Plasma Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Suchitra; Vyas, Girish N.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma utilization has increased over the last two decades, and there is a growing concern that many plasma transfusions are inappropriate. Plasma transfusion is not without risk, and certain complications are more likely with plasma than other blood components. Clinical and laboratory investigations of the patients suffering reactions following infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) define the etiology and pathogenesis of the panoply of adverse effects. We review here the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of the risks associated with plasma transfusion. Risks commonly associated with FFP include: (1) transfusion related acute lung injury; (2) transfusion associated circulatory overload, and (3) allergic/anaphylactic reactions. Other less common risks include (1) transmission of infections, (2) febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions, (3) RBC allo-immunization, and (4) hemolytic transfusion reactions. The affect of pathogen inactivation/reduction methods on these risks are also discussed. Fortunately, a majority of the adverse effects are not lethal and are adequately treated in clinical practice. PMID:22578374

  14. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  15. Physician access to drug profiles to reduce adverse reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasnoff, William A.; Tomkins, Edward L.; Dunn, Louise M.

    1995-10-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major source of preventable morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly, who use more drugs and are more sensitive to them. The insurance industry has recently addressed this problem through the implementation of drug interaction alerts to pharmacists in conjunction with immediate online claims adjudication for almost 60% of prescriptions (expected to reach 90% within 5 years). These alerts are based on stored patient drug profiles maintained by pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) which are updated whenever prescriptions are filled. While these alerts are very helpful, the pharmacist does not prescribe, resulting in time-consuming and costly delays to contact the physician and remedy potential interactions. We have developed and demonstrated the feasibility of the PINPOINT (Pharmaceutical Information Network for prevention of interactions) system for making the drug profile and interaction information easily available to the physician before the prescription is written. We plan to test the cost-effectiveness of the system in a prospective controlled clinical trial.

  16. Analysis of adverse drug reactions using drug and drug target interactions and graph-based methods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Fang; Xiao, Ke-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ting; Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to integrate knowledge about drugs, drug targets, and topological methods. The goals were to build a system facilitating the study of adverse drug events, to make it easier to find possible explanations, and to group similar drug-drug interaction cases in the adverse drug reaction reports from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We developed a system that analyses adverse drug reaction (ADR) cases reported by the FDA. The system contains four modules. First, we integrate drug and drug target databases that provide information related to adverse drug reactions. Second, we classify drug and drug targets according to anatomical therapeutic chemical classification (ATC) and drug target ontology (DTO). Third, we build drug target networks based on drug and drug target databases. Finally, we apply topological analysis to reveal drug interaction complexity for each ADR case reported by the FDA. We picked 1952 ADR cases from the years 2005-2006. Our dataset consisted of 1952 cases, of which 1471 cases involved ADR targets, 845 cases involved absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) targets, and 507 cases involved some drugs acting on the same targets, namely, common targets (CTs). We then investigated the cases involving ADR targets, ADME targets, and CTs using the ATC system and DTO. In the cases that led to death, the average number of common targets (NCTs) was 0.879 and the average of average clustering coefficient (ACC) was 0.067. In cases that did not lead to death, the average NCTs was 0.551, and the average of ACC was 0.039. We implemented a system that can find possible explanations and cluster similar ADR cases reported by the FDA. We found that the average of ACC and the average NCTs in cases leading to death are higher than in cases not leading to death, suggesting that the interactions in cases leading to death are generally more complicated than in cases not leading to death. This indicates that our system

  17. Effects of polypharmacy on adverse drug reactions among geriatric outpatients at a tertiary care hospital in Karachi: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bilal; Nanji, Kashmira; Mujeeb, Rakshinda; Patel, Muhammad Junaid

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) present a challenging and expensive public health problem. Polypharmacy is defined according to the WHO criteria as the, "concurrent use of five or more different prescription medication". Elderly are more prone to adverse reactions due to comorbid conditions, longer lists of medications and sensitivity to drug effects. The aim of the study is to estimate the incidence and strength of association of ADRs due to polypharmacy among the geriatric cohort attending outpatient clinics at a tertiary care center. A hospital based prospective cohort study was conducted at ambulatory care clinics of Aga Khan University Hospital April 2012 to March 2013. One thousand geriatrics patients (age ≥ 65 years) visiting ambulatory clinics were identified. They were divided on the basis of exposure (polypharmacy vs. no polypharmacy). We followed them from the time of their enrollment (day zero) to six weeks, checking up on them once a week. Incidence was calculated and Cox Proportional Hazard Model estimates were used. The final analysis was performed on 1000 elderly patients. The occurrence of polypharmacy was 70% and the incidence of ADRs was 10.5% among the study cohort. The majority (30%) of patients were unable to read or write. The use of herbal medicine was reported by 3.2% of the patients and homeopathic by 3%. Our Cox adjusted model shows that polypharmacy was 2.3 times more associated with ADRs, con-current complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was 7.4 times and those who cannot read and write were 1.5 times more associated with ADRs. The incidence of ADRs due to poly pharmacy is alarmingly high. The factors associated with ADRs are modifiable. Policies are needed to design and strengthen the prescription pattern.

  18. A Survey of Adverse Drug Reactions in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, 232 Canadian family physicians recorded suspected adverse drug reactions (SADRs) in their practices for five months. Patients' age and sex, the drug(s) implicated, type of reaction and any disability were recorded on a card and sent to a central coordinating office each week. The number of SADRs in clinical practice seems to be small. An estimated 300,000 patients were involved in the study, and a total of 314 suspected adverse drug reactions in 314 patients were reported. A proposal is made for a surveillance system for new drugs. Family physicians would monitor all patients taking a drug or group of drugs and matched controls. The status of patients and controls would be recorded regularly and any SADRs reported to a central coordinating centre. PMID:21283495

  19. Adverse selection in the Medicare prescription drug program.

    PubMed

    Riley, Gerald F; Levy, Jesse M; Montgomery, Melissa A

    2009-01-01

    The Medicare Part D drug benefit created choices for beneficiaries among many prescription drug plans with varying levels of coverage. As a result, Medicare enrollees with high prescription drug costs have strong incentives to enroll in Part D, especially in plans with more comprehensive coverage. To measure this potential problem of "adverse selection," which could threaten plans' finances, we compared baseline characteristics among groups of beneficiaries with various drug coverage arrangements in 2006. We found some significant differences. For example, enrollees in stand-alone prescription drug plans, especially in plans offering benefits in the coverage gap, or "doughnut hole," had higher baseline drug costs and worse health than enrollees in Medicare Advantage prescription drug plans. Although risk-adjusted payments and other measures have been put in place to account for selection, these patterns could adversely affect future Medicare costs and should be watched carefully.

  20. Automatic detection of adverse events to predict drug label changes using text and data mining techniques.

    PubMed

    Gurulingappa, Harsha; Toldo, Luca; Rajput, Abdul Mateen; Kors, Jan A; Taweel, Adel; Tayrouz, Yorki

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of automatically detected adverse event signals from text and open-source data on the prediction of drug label changes. Open-source adverse effect data were collected from FAERS, Yellow Cards and SIDER databases. A shallow linguistic relation extraction system (JSRE) was applied for extraction of adverse effects from MEDLINE case reports. Statistical approach was applied on the extracted datasets for signal detection and subsequent prediction of label changes issued for 29 drugs by the UK Regulatory Authority in 2009. 76% of drug label changes were automatically predicted. Out of these, 6% of drug label changes were detected only by text mining. JSRE enabled precise identification of four adverse drug events from MEDLINE that were undetectable otherwise. Changes in drug labels can be predicted automatically using data and text mining techniques. Text mining technology is mature and well-placed to support the pharmacovigilance tasks. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The knowledge, attitude and behaviours of nurses about pharmacovigilance, adverse drug reaction and adverse event reporting in a state hospital.

    PubMed

    Vural, Fisun; Ciftci, Seval; Vural, Birol

    2014-01-01

    With the use of any drug comes the possibility of unintended consequences which when harmful are referred to as adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The development of national pharmacovigilance systems is the responsibility of all health workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge of nurses about pharmacovigilance and attitudes about ADR and adverse event reporting. This descriptive-cross sectional study was performed in 112 nurses working in a public hospital. The questionnaire was applied about pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions. The knowledge, attitudes and practices about adverse drug reactions were asked. The 74.1% of the nurses definition of "severe adverse effect" of drug therapy. The ratio of participants who knew that ADRs are reported to contact person responsible from pharmacovigilance was 34.9%. Although 70.5% of nurses knew the necessity of ADR reporting, the 8% of the nurses knew Turkish Pharmacovigilance Center (TÜFAM). Only 8% of nurses reported ADRs in their professionality. Although most of the participants knew the importance of ADR event reporting, event reporting was low. Thiese results showed that there is a lack of knowledge about pharmacovigilance. Futher studies with different settings and healthcare staff are needed to improve awareness about pharmacovigilance.

  2. iADRs: towards online adverse drug reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Yang; Li, He-Yi; Du, Jhih-Wei; Feng, Wen-Yu; Lo, Chiao-Feng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2012-12-01

    Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) is one of the most important issues in the assessment of drug safety. In fact, many adverse drug reactions are not discovered during limited pre-marketing clinical trials; instead, they are only observed after long term post-marketing surveillance of drug usage. In light of this, the detection of adverse drug reactions, as early as possible, is an important topic of research for the pharmaceutical industry. Recently, large numbers of adverse events and the development of data mining technology have motivated the development of statistical and data mining methods for the detection of ADRs. These stand-alone methods, with no integration into knowledge discovery systems, are tedious and inconvenient for users and the processes for exploration are time-consuming. This paper proposes an interactive system platform for the detection of ADRs. By integrating an ADR data warehouse and innovative data mining techniques, the proposed system not only supports OLAP style multidimensional analysis of ADRs, but also allows the interactive discovery of associations between drugs and symptoms, called a drug-ADR association rule, which can be further developed using other factors of interest to the user, such as demographic information. The experiments indicate that interesting and valuable drug-ADR association rules can be efficiently mined.

  3. Adverse drug reactions from birth to early childhood.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Waldhauser, L K

    1997-02-01

    Neonates and older infants are a diverse group of children, quite different from their older counterparts. Adverse drug reactions may have profound immediate, delayed, and long-term implications for their neurologic and somatic development. The intrauterine, neonatal, and infancy periods are the only stages in life in which one is exposed to and affected by drugs administered to another person, the mother. In addition, because of the fragility of the neonate and the complexity of their illnesses, their pharmacotherapy is frequently complicated with misadventure and adverse drug reactions that are unavoidable or difficult to assess. Because of their differences in morphology and disease process and treatments, infants and children experience a different range of adverse drug reactions. These reactions are not necessarily predictable from the adult experience. Despite the advances made in the field of pediatric adverse drug reactions and the lessons learned through the misfortunes involving children, children continue to suffer. Sixty years after the Elixir of Sulfanilamide-Massengill disaster, children continue to be given medications with diethylene glycol in developing countries. Pediatricians, pharmacologists, and others must continue to be vigilant and active in preventing, monitoring, and treating adverse drug reactions in children. Learning from mistakes of the past will improve the health of children by preventing mistakes in the future.

  4. Adverse effects of statins - myths and reality.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Iveta; Reiner, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity as well as cardiovascular events in patients with a very high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and also in subjects with high or moderate risk by reducing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Although they are considered to be drugs with a very good safety profile, because of their wide use there are many concerns that their adverse effects might compromise their proven beneficial effects. Therefore this article reviews all the data and provides an evidence- based insight what are the proven adverse effects of statins and what are the "myths" about them. The most important side effects include myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Another side effect is increased activity of liver tests which occurs occasionally and is reversible. However, recent studies even suggest that statin therapy can improve hepatic steatosis. It is beyond any doubt that statins do slightly increase the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in people with two or more components of metabolic syndrome but the cardiovascular benefits of such a treatment by far exceed this risk. Statin therapy has also been associated with some adverse renal effects, eg. acute renal failure, but recent data suggest even a possible protective effect of these drugs on renal dysfunction. Concerns that statins might increase cancer have not been proven. On the contrary, several studies have indicated a possible benefit of these drugs in patients with different types of cancer. Early concerns about cognitive dysfunction and memory loss associated with statins use could not be proven and most recent data even suggest a possible beneficial effect of statins in the prevention of dementia. Systematic reviews and clinical guidelines suggest that the cardiovascular benefits of statins by far out-weight non-cardiovascular harms in patients with cardiovascular risk.

  5. Predicting Adverse Drug Events from Personal Health Messages

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Brant W.; Berlin, Richard; Schatz, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) remain a large problem in the United States, being the fourth leading cause of death, despite post market drug surveillance. Much post consumer drug surveillance relies on self-reported “spontaneous” patient data. Previous work has performed datamining over the FDA’s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) and other spontaneous reporting systems to identify drug interactions and drugs correlated with high rates of serious adverse events. However, safety problems have resulted from the lack of post marketing surveillance information about drugs, with underreporting rates of up to 98% within such systems1,2. We explore the use of online health forums as a source of data to identify drugs for further FDA scrutiny. In this work we aggregate individuals’ opinions and review of drugs similar to crowd intelligence3. We use natural language processing to group drugs discussed in similar ways and are able to successfully identify drugs withdrawn from the market based on messages discussing them before their removal. PMID:22195073

  6. [Novel oral anticancer drugs: a review of adverse drug reactions, interactions and patient adherence].

    PubMed

    Bartal, Alexandra; Mátrai, Zoltán; Szucs, Attila; Belinszkaja, Galina; Langmár, Zoltán; Rosta, András

    2012-01-15

    Each aspect of oncological care is widely affected by the spread of oral anticancer agents, which raises several questions in terms of safe medication use and patient adherence. Over the past decade targeted therapies have appeared in clinical practice and revolutionized the pharmacological treatment of malignancies. Regular patient - doctor visits and proper patient education is crucial in order to comply with the therapy previously agreed upon with the oncologist, to increase patient adherence, to detect and to treat adverse effects in early stages. Since the information on the new medicines in Hungarian language is sparse it is the intention of the authors to give an overview of the basic knowledge, patient safety issues, adverse effects and interactions. Official drug information summaries and data on pharmacokinetics, interactions and adverse effects from the literature are reviewed as the basis for this overview.

  7. An evaluation of small-molecule p53 activators as chemoprotectants ameliorating adverse effects of anticancer drugs in normal cells.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Ingeborg M M; Rao, Bhavya; Sachweh, Marijke C C; Laín, Sonia

    2012-05-01

    Pharmacological activation of wild-type p53 has been found to protect normal cells in culture from cytotoxicity and nuclear aberrations caused by conventional cancer therapeutics. Hence, small-molecule p53 activators could have clinical benefits as chemoprotectants for cancer patients bearing p53-mutant tumors. We have evaluated 16 p53-based cyclotherapy regimes combining p53 activators tenovin-6, leptomycin B, nutlin-3 and low dose actinomycin D, with clinically utilized chemotherapeutic agents (S- and M-phase poisons), vinblastine, vinorelbine, cytosine arabinoside and gemcitabine. All the p53 activators induce reversible cell-cycle arrest in primary human fibroblasts and protect them from both S- and M-phase poisons. Furthermore, studies with p53-mutant cancer cell lines show that nutlin-3 and low dose actinomycin D do not affect the sensitivity of these cells to any of the chemotherapeutics tested. Thus, these two small molecules could be suitable choices for cyclotherapy regimes involving S- or M-phase poisons. In contrast, pre-incubation of p53-mutant cells with tenovin-6 or leptomycin B reduces the efficacy of vinca alkaloids, suggesting that these p53 activators could be effective as chemoprotectants if combined with S- but not M-phase poisons. Discrepancies were observed between the levels of protection detected immediately after treatment and following recovery in fresh medium. This highlights the need to assess both short- and long-term effects when evaluating compounds as potential chemoprotectants for cancer therapy.

  8. Medical marijuana patient counseling points for health care professionals based on trends in the medical uses, efficacy, and adverse effects of cannabis-based pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jayesh R; Forrest, Benjamin D; Freeman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a review of the medical uses, efficacy, and adverse effects of the three approved cannabis-based medications and ingested marijuana. A literature review was conducted utilizing key search terms: dronabinol, nabilone, nabiximols, cannabis, marijuana, smoke, efficacy, toxicity, cancer, multiple sclerosis, nausea, vomiting, appetite, pain, glaucoma, and side effects. Abstracts of the included literature were reviewed, analyzed, and organized to identify the strength of evidence in medical use, efficacy, and adverse effects of the approved cannabis-based medications and medical marijuana. A total of 68 abstracts were included for review. Dronabinol's (Marinol) most common medical uses include weight gain, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), and neuropathic pain. Nabiximol's (Sativex) most common medical uses include spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuropathic pain. Nabilone's (Cesamet) most common medical uses include CINV and neuropathic pain. Smoked marijuana's most common medical uses include neuropathic pain and glaucoma. Orally ingested marijuana's most common medical uses include improving sleep, reducing neuropathic pain, and seizure control in MS. In general, all of these agents share similar medical uses. The reported adverse effects of the three cannabis-based medications and marijuana show a major trend in central nervous system (CNS)-related adverse effects along with cardiovascular and respiratory related adverse effects. Marijuana shares similar medical uses with the approved cannabis-based medications dronabinol (Marinol), nabiximols (Sativex), and nabilone (Cesamet), but the efficacy of marijuana for these medical uses has not been fully determined due to limited and conflicting literature. Medical marijuana also has similar adverse effects as the FDA-approved cannabis-based medications mainly consisting of CNS related adverse effects but also including cardiovascular and respiratory

  9. [Metabolism of xenobiotics: beneficial and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Mansuy, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The systems developed by living organisms for the metabolism of xenobiotics play a key role in the adaptation of living species to their chemical environment. Recent data about mammalian cytochrome P450 structures have led to a better understanding of the molecular basis for the adaptability of these enzymes to xenobiotics exhibiting highly variable structures. The action of these enzymes on xenobiotics leads to other beneficial effects such as the bioactivation of some drugs, but also to adverse effects with the formation of aggressive metabolites for the cell that are responsible for the appearance of many toxicities. © Société de Biologie, 2013.

  10. [Reported adverse reactions of veterinary drugs and vaccines in 2005].

    PubMed

    Müntener, C R; Bruckner, L; Gassner, B; Demuth, D C; Althaus, F R; Zwahlen, R

    2007-02-01

    We received 105 reports of suspected adverse events (SARs) following the use of veterinary drugs for the year 2005. This corresponds to a 35% increase compared to 2004. Practicing veterinarians sent most of these declarations. 73% of these concerned drugs used on companion animals. Antiparasitic drugs approved for topical use were the most frequently represented group with 48%, followed by drugs used to treat gastrointestinal disorders (11%) and drugs used off-label (14%; other target species or other indication). For the first time 2 declarations concerning the application of permethrin containing spot-on preparations used by mistake on cats were received. An overview of 20 declarations about adverse reactions following application of different vaccines is also presented with emphasis on the problem of fibrosarcoma in cats. We are pleased by the growing interest shown by practicing veterinarians for the vigilance system and hope to further develop this collaboration in the future.

  11. Postmarketing surveillance of adverse drug reactions: problems and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Lortie, F M

    1986-01-01

    The surveillance of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is an unqualified must. However, the optimal means of surveillance is still unclear. Although anecdotal reports are the backbone of an ADR surveillance system, they are not enough. The pharmaceutical industry, academics and regulatory agencies need to expand their efforts in monitoring ADRs. The author discusses the various techniques for counting and evaluating adverse reactions and suggests ways in which the system could be improved. PMID:3719483

  12. Debatable evidence for the adverse drug reactions to local anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Maitland, Ronald I

    2013-01-01

    Medline, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, case-control studies, case reports, case series and cross-sectional studies that focused on adverse drug reactions of local anaesthetics were considered. Data abstraction was conducted independently by two reviewers, and summary data and a meta-analysis presented. One hundred and one studies reporting 1645 events were included. Seven of these were deaths. Lidocaine (43.17%) and bupivacaine (16.32%) were the most often involved local anaesthetics. According to the meta-analysis, the risk of using LA alone was lower than when combined with epinephrine. The present study demonstrated that the adverse drug reactions of local anaesthetics could not be ignored, especially in oral and ophthalmologic treatments. Some adverse drug reactions could be avoided by properly evaluating the conditions of patients and correctly applying local anaesthetics.

  13. Adverse Drug Reactions and quality deviations monitored by spontaneous reports

    PubMed Central

    Visacri, Marília Berlofa; de Souza, Cinthia Madeira; Sato, Catarina Miyako Shibata; Granja, Silvia; de Marialva, Mécia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Moriel, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and profile of spontaneous reports of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) and quality deviations in a Brazilian teaching hospital and propose a consistent classification to study quality deviations. Methods This is a descriptive and retrospective study involving the analysis of spontaneous reports of ADRs and quality deviations in 2010. ADRs were classified according to the reaction mechanism, severity, and causality. The drugs were classified according to their therapeutic classes and symptoms according to the affected organ. The quality deviations were classified according to the type of deviation and type of medicine available in the Brazilian market. Results A total of 68 forms were examined; ADRs accounted for 39.7% of the notifications, while quality deviations accounted for 60.3%. ADRs occurred more frequently in men (51.9%) and adults (63.0%). The skin (28.0%) was the most affected organ, while anti-infectives (40.7%) were the therapeutic class that caused the most ADRs. The most common ADRs were type B (74.0%), moderates (37.0%), and probables (55.6%). In relation to quality deviations, the most frequent notifications were breaks, splits and leaks (20.9%) and related to generic drugs (43.9%). Conclusion The classification system to study quality deviations was clear and consistent. This study demonstrated that practices and public policies related to more effective pharmacovigilance need to be implemented so that the number of spontaneous reports increases. PMID:25972731

  14. New concepts in the management of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Bahna, Sami L; Khalili, Barzin

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of drug reactions and their management has changed markedly in recent years with the development of several new concepts. Epidermal cell death seen in Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) may result from Fas-Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) contains anti-Fas antibodies that can abrogate apoptosis. Most studies on IVIG in SJS and TEN reported improvement in arresting disease progression and reduction in time to healing. Furthermore, several studies have dispelled the myth of sulfonamide cross-reactivity. Immune-mediated reactions against antibacterial sulfonamides are directed against two unique side chains that non-antibacterial sulfonamides do not contain. Certain patients seem to have a genetic predisposition for "multiple drug sensitivities." Hence, they may react to several drugs that are not necessarily cross-reacting. Also, multiple studies have shown that IgE-mediated nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cross-reactivity is uncommon. Rather, it is cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 inhibition that results in pseudoallergic reactions to multiple NSAIDs. Several studies have indicated that selective COX-2 inhibitors can be safely administered in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease and NSAID-induced cutaneous reactions, although their use has been curtailed by their cardiovascular side effects. Biological agents, such as infliximab, are being increasingly used for a variety of diseases and have caused adverse reactions in some patients. Studies differ as to whether concomitant immunosuppressive use with infliximab affects the development of drug-specific antibodies and infusion reactions. Successful desensitization protocols have been developed for reactions to some of these agents.

  15. Adverse drug reactions in neonates: could we be documenting more?

    PubMed

    Hawcutt, Daniel B; O'Connor, Olya; Turner, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    Neonates are vulnerable to adverse drug reactions but reports of these events are relatively infrequent. Reporting can be increased by adapting a number of standard techniques to the unique features of neonatal care and pathology. However, clinicians and parents will be reluctant to report information about harms in the absence of mechanisms to ensure that reports affect clinical practice. Improved reporting will depend on education and cultural change that are informed by research about pharmacovigilance in neonatal settings. The efficient use of neonatal adverse drug reaction reports will require harmonization of terminology and interoperable databases.

  16. Adverse event detection in drug development: recommendations and obligations beyond phase 3.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Jesse A; Glasser, Susan C; Ellenberg, Susan S

    2008-08-01

    Premarketing studies of drugs, although large enough to demonstrate efficacy and detect common adverse events, cannot reliably detect an increased incidence of rare adverse events or events with significant latency. For most drugs, only about 500 to 3000 participants are studied, for relatively short durations, before a drug is marketed. Systems for assessment of postmarketing adverse events include spontaneous reports, computerized claims or medical record databases, and formal postmarketing studies. We briefly review the strengths and limitations of each. Postmarketing surveillance is essential for developing a full understanding of the balance between benefits and adverse effects. More work is needed in analysis of data from spontaneous reports of adverse effects and automated databases, design of ad hoc studies, and design of economically feasible large randomized studies.

  17. Effects of SULT1A1 Copy Number Variation on Estrogen Concentration and Tamoxifen-Associated Adverse Drug Reactions in Premenopausal Thai Breast Cancer Patients: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Charoenchokthavee, Wanaporn; Ayudhya, Duangchit Panomvana Na; Sriuranpong, Virote; Areepium, Nutthada

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a pharmacological estrogen inhibitor that binds to the estrogen receptor (ER) in breast cells. However, it shows an estrogenic effect in other organs, which causes adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) enzyme encoded by the SULT1A1 gene is involved in estrogen metabolism. Previous research has suggested that the SULT1A1 copy number is linked with the plasma estradiol (E2) concentration. Here, a total of 34 premenopausal breast cancer patients, selected from the Thai Tamoxifen (TTAM) Project, were screened for their SULT1A1 copy number, plasma E2 concentration and ADRs. The mean age was 44.3±11.1 years, and they were subtyped as ER+/ progesterone receptor (PR) + (28 patients), ER+/ PR- (5 patients) and ER-/PR- (1 patient). Three patients reported ADRs, which were irregular menstruation (2 patients) and vaginal discharge (1 patient). Most (33) patients had two SULT1A1 copies, with one patient having three copies. The median plasma E2 concentration was 1,575.6 (IQR 865.4) pg/ml. Patients with ADRs had significantly higher plasma E2 concentrations than those patients without ADRs (p = 0.014). The plasma E2 concentration was numerically higher in the patient with three SULT1A1 copies, but this lacked statistical significance.

  18. Development of the Virtual Physical Assessment Learning Material That Allows the Learners to Check Drug Efficacy and Early Detection of Adverse Effects through Virtual Experience.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Jin; Takamura, Norito; Kourogi, Yasuyuki; Imada, Misato; Kozasa, Ayaka; Komori, Kanako; Ono, Chisa; Nishimura, Akie; Ogata, Kenji; Setoguchi, Nao; Matsuoka, Toshikazu; Kai, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Keizo; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

     We utilized the information and communication technology to develop the physical assessment (PA) learning materials in the virtual experience type. This learning material consists of two parts which include case learning and basic learning. We created example scenarios about various conditions that a pharmacist may experience in medical scenes such as in a hospital ward, community pharmacy, home, and drugstore. Illustrations of a virtual patient's avatar before and after taking the medicines were incorporated in the learning materials. The virtual training includes a stethoscope that was used in examining sounds (heart, pulmonary and bowel sounds) that served as evidences in the confirmation of drug efficacy and its possible adverse effects. In addition, we included the images of each body part, the 24 format question items, the palpation (rate and rhythm) of the radial artery, brachial artery and pedal artery, the clinical data obtained from several medical equipment, the pupillary reflex, and the urine dipstick test. This way, learners are able to experience PA with reference to the subjective and objective data from patient reception and questions. The virtual patient's avatar displayed on the monitor features auscultatory sounds on the stethoscope. It also features clinical data obtained from other medical equipment that can give the learners an interactive way of learning about various medical conditions. For evaluation, we gave out questionnaires on the virtual PA to pharmacy students. As a result, a high evaluation was reflected in terms of the degree of usefulness for both case learning and basic learning.

  19. Agomelatine: a review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    More pharmacovigilance data on agomelatine became available in 2012. The main sources of information were surveillance data from the French national monitoring system, EU periodic safety update reports (PSURs), and the European pharmacovigilance database. The principal adverse effects of agomelatine consist of hepatic, pancreatic, neuropsychiatric, muscular and cutaneous disorders. The harms associated with agomelatine, which has no proven efficacy in depression, clearly outweigh the benefits. Until regulatory agencies decide to withdraw agomelatine from the market, it is up to healthcare professionals to protect patients from this unnecessarily dangerous drug.

  20. Adverse reactions to oncologic drugs: spontaneous reporting and signal detection.

    PubMed

    Tuccori, Marco; Montagnani, Sabrina; Capogrosso-Sansone, Alice; Mantarro, Stefania; Antonioli, Luca; Fornai, Matteo; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Oncology is one of the areas of medicine with the most active research being conducted on new drugs. New pharmacological entities frequently enter the clinical arena, and therefore, the safety profile of anticancer products deserves continuous monitoring. However, only very severe and (unusual) suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are usually reported, since cancer patients develop ADRs very frequently and some practical selectivity must be used. Notably, a recent study was able to identify 76 serious ADRs reported in updated drug labels of oncologic drugs and 50% of them (n = 38) were potentially fatal. Of these, 49 and 58%, respectively, were not described in initial drug labels. The aims of this article are to provide an overview about spontaneous reporting of ADRs of oncologic drugs and to discuss the available methods to analyze the safety of anticancer drugs using databases of spontaneous ADR reporting.

  1. Mining adverse drug reactions from online healthcare forums using hidden Markov model.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Hariprasad; Chen, Xue-wen; Luo, Bo

    2014-10-23

    Adverse Drug Reactions are one of the leading causes of injury or death among patients undergoing medical treatments. Not all Adverse Drug Reactions are identified before a drug is made available in the market. Current post-marketing drug surveillance methods, which are based purely on voluntary spontaneous reports, are unable to provide the early indications necessary to prevent the occurrence of such injuries or fatalities. The objective of this research is to extract reports of adverse drug side-effects from messages in online healthcare forums and use them as early indicators to assist in post-marketing drug surveillance. We treat the task of extracting adverse side-effects of drugs from healthcare forum messages as a sequence labeling problem and present a Hidden Markov Model(HMM) based Text Mining system that can be used to classify a message as containing drug side-effect information and then extract the adverse side-effect mentions from it. A manually annotated dataset from http://www.medications.com is used in the training and validation of the HMM based Text Mining system. A 10-fold cross-validation on the manually annotated dataset yielded on average an F-Score of 0.76 from the HMM Classifier, in comparison to 0.575 from the Baseline classifier. Without the Plain Text Filter component as a part of the Text Processing module, the F-Score of the HMM Classifier was reduced to 0.378 on average, while absence of the HTML Filter component was found to have no impact. Reducing the Drug names dictionary size by half, on average reduced the F-Score of the HMM Classifier to 0.359, while a similar reduction to the side-effects dictionary yielded an F-Score of 0.651 on average. Adverse side-effects mined from http://www.medications.com and http://www.steadyhealth.com were found to match the Adverse Drug Reactions on the Drug Package Labels of several drugs. In addition, some novel adverse side-effects, which can be potential Adverse Drug Reactions, were also

  2. Interpreting Adverse Signals in Diabetes Drug Development Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and interpretation of adverse signals during preclinical and clinical stages of drug development inform the benefit-risk assessment that determines suitability for use in real-world situations. This review considers some recent signals associated with diabetes therapies, illustrating the difficulties in ascribing causality and evaluating absolute risk, predictability, prevention, and containment. Individual clinical trials are necessarily restricted for patient selection, number, and duration; they can introduce allocation and ascertainment bias and they often rely on biomarkers to estimate long-term clinical outcomes. In diabetes, the risk perspective is inevitably confounded by emergent comorbid conditions and potential interactions that limit therapeutic choice, hence the need for new therapies and better use of existing therapies to address the consequences of protracted glucotoxicity. However, for some therapies, the adverse effects may take several years to emerge, and it is evident that faint initial signals under trial conditions cannot be expected to foretell all eventualities. Thus, as information and experience accumulate with time, it should be accepted that benefit-risk deliberations will be refined, and adjustments to prescribing indications may become appropriate. PMID:23695817

  3. Mining unexpected temporal associations: applications in detecting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huidong Warren; Chen, Jie; He, Hongxing; Williams, Graham J; Kelman, Chris; O'Keefe, Christine M

    2008-07-01

    In various real-world applications, it is very useful mining unanticipated episodes where certain event patterns unexpectedly lead to outcomes, e.g., taking two medicines together sometimes causing an adverse reaction. These unanticipated episodes are usually unexpected and infrequent, which makes existing data mining techniques, mainly designed to find frequent patterns, ineffective. In this paper, we propose unexpected temporal association rules (UTARs) to describe them. To handle the unexpectedness, we introduce a new interestingness measure, residual-leverage, and develop a novel case-based exclusion technique for its calculation. Combining it with an event-oriented data preparation technique to handle the infrequency, we develop a new algorithm MUTARC to find pairwise UTARs. The MUTARC is applied to generate adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from real-world healthcare administrative databases. It reliably shortlists not only six known ADRs, but also another ADR, flucloxacillin possibly causing hepatitis, which our algorithm designers and experiment runners have not known before the experiments. The MUTARC performs much more effectively than existing techniques. This paper clearly illustrates the great potential along the new direction of ADR signal generation from healthcare administrative databases.

  4. Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions: A Clinicoepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Riyaz, Najeeba; Khader, Anza; Rajan, Uma; Binitha, Manikoth P; Sureshan, Deepthi N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Drug eruptions range from transient erythema to the life threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) that encompass Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms complex (DRESS). Aims and Objectives: To study the clinical and epidemiological aspects of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR). Materials and Methods: Ethical clearance was obtained from the institutional ethics committee. All patients admitted in the Dermatology ward of our tertiary care hospital with CADR (those who fit in the category of probable or possible drug reaction as per WHO casuality assessment) from first September 2011 to 31st August 2012 were included in this cross sectional study after obtaining written informed consent. The drug reaction patterns observed in the study population were determined and the common offending drugs were identified. Results: In the study, population of males outnumbered females and the majority were between 46 and 60 years of age. The commonest reaction pattern observed was SJS- TEN spectrum of illness and aromatic anticonvulsants were the common offending drugs. Prompt withdrawal of the culprit drug and administration of systemic steroids with or without I/V Ig reverted the adverse reaction in all except one. Conclusion: Severe drug reactions predominated as the study population was comprised of inpatients of a tertiary referral centre. Though; previous authors had reported a mortality rate of up to 20% in DRESS, all our patients with this reaction pattern, responded well to treatment. The mortality rate among TEN cases was much lower than the previous reports. Early diagnosis, prompt withdrawal of the suspected drug, careful monitoring for development of complications and immediate intervention can improve the prognosis of CADR. PMID:25657416

  5. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  6. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    PubMed

    Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Park, Kyounghoon; Yang, Bo Ram; Lee, Joongyub; Jin, Xue Mei; Park, Byung Joo

    2016-09-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability.

  7. [Photodegradation of chlorpromazine, a drug-related adverse event].

    PubMed

    Chabi, Yossounon; Brahim, Kheira; Da Costa, Maryline; Caffin, Anne-Gaëlle; Camus, Gisèle; Paillet, Michel; Bohand, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The photodegradation of an active substance during treatment is a rare drug-related adverse event which can sometimes have serious consequences. Health professionals must be aware of the specific storage and administration instructions with regard to chlorpromazine and ensure that they are respected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Adverse drug reactions reporting is helping "non substituable" prescription!].

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Julien; Bagheri, Haleh; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In August 2012, general practitioners of Haute- Garonne received a letter from Health insurance system, informing that prescriptions could be endorsed by "not substituable" after reporting an adverse drug reactions (ADR). Compared to an equivalent period before this letter, we observed an increase of ADRs reports for generics, mainly concerning gastrointestinal ADR and lack of efficacy.

  9. An adverse drug interaction of haloperidol with levodopa.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Jisha M; Ramesh, Madhan; Parthasarathi, Gurumurthy; Raman, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Drug interactions are known to play a significant role in the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) both in the community and in hospitals. Both the newer atypical antipsychotics and their more traditional counterparts are subject to drug - drug interactions amongst themselves, with other psychotropics, and with the agents used in the treatment of various physical ailments. The most common interactions encountered in clinical practice are pharmacodynamic in nature. It is well established that antipsychotic drugs reduce the efficacy of levodopa in parkinson's disease by blockade of dopamine receptors in the corpus striatum. The case reported here illustrates a common pharmacodynamic drug interaction of haloperidol with levodopa in a 60-year-old female patient.

  10. A time-indexed reference standard of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Odgers, David; Gaskin, Greg; DuMouchel, William; Winnenburg, Rainer; Bodenreider, Olivier; Ripple, Anna; Szarfman, Ana; Sorbello, Alfred; Horvitz, Eric; White, Ryen W; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-11-11

    Undetected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) pose a major burden on the health system. Data mining methodologies designed to identify signals of novel ADRs are of deep importance for drug safety surveillance. The development and evaluation of these methodologies requires proper reference benchmarks. While progress has recently been made in developing such benchmarks, our understanding of the performance characteristics of the data mining methodologies is limited because existing benchmarks do not support prospective performance evaluations. We address this shortcoming by providing a reference standard to support prospective performance evaluations. The reference standard was systematically curated from drug labeling revisions, such as new warnings, which were issued and communicated by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2013. The reference standard includes 62 positive test cases and 75 negative controls, and covers 44 drugs and 38 events. We provide usage guidance and empirical support for the reference standard by applying it to analyze two data sources commonly mined for drug safety surveillance.

  11. [Management of adverse effects with antituberculosis chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Wada, Masako

    2011-02-01

    Tuberculosis has now become a curable disease with chemotherapy. So it is natural that the present issues in tuberculosis management are focused on how to complete standard chemotherapy. In this context, management of adverse effects constitutes an essential part of antituberculosis chemotherapy, as well as directly observed therapy. In this symposium, discussions were held about three major subjects on this issue. First, hepatotoxicity develops frequently and has sometimes fatal outcome, which makes it the most problematic adverse effect. "Management of hepatotoxicity during antituberculosis chemotherapy" was published by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis (JST) in 2006. Dr. Shinsho Yoshiba evaluated this recommendation and pointed out that the criteria for discontinuation of drug based on AST, ALT and bilirubin levels is too sensitive and the concept of predicting fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is lacking. He stressed the importance of monitoring serum prothrombin time for predicting FHF. Next, allergic drug reaction such as fever or skin rash often causes distress, although rarely fatal. As isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP) are key drugs for the cure, readministration of these drugs is often attempted by desensitization therapy. "Recommendation about desensitization therapy of antituberculosis drugs" was also published by JST in 1997. Dr. Yoshihiro Kobashi reported high success rates of 79 percent for INH and 75 percent for RFP according to this recommendation. He also reported correlated factor with the success, such as the longer period from the discontinuation to the desensitization therapy and lower doses of drugs at starting desensitization. Finally, we sometimes experience transient worsening of radiographical findings and general symptoms during antituberculosis chemotherapy. This is presumed to be due to allergic reaction to dead bacilli without requiring discontinuation of the drug. Differential diagnosis includes drug-induced pneumonia requring

  12. The effectiveness of computerized order entry at reducing preventable adverse drug events and medication errors in hospital settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act subsidizes implementation by hospitals of electronic health records with computerized provider order entry (CPOE), which may reduce patient injuries caused by medication errors (preventable adverse drug events, pADEs). Effects on pADEs have not been rigorously quantified, and effects on medication errors have been variable. The objectives of this analysis were to assess the effectiveness of CPOE at reducing pADEs in hospital-related settings, and examine reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors. Methods Articles were identified using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Econlit, web-based databases, and bibliographies of previous systematic reviews (September 2013). Eligible studies compared CPOE with paper-order entry in acute care hospitals, and examined diverse pADEs or medication errors. Studies on children or with limited event-detection methods were excluded. Two investigators extracted data on events and factors potentially associated with effectiveness. We used random effects models to pool data. Results Sixteen studies addressing medication errors met pooling criteria; six also addressed pADEs. Thirteen studies used pre-post designs. Compared with paper-order entry, CPOE was associated with half as many pADEs (pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.47, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71) and medication errors (RR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.60). Regarding reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors, five intervention factors and two contextual factors were sufficiently reported to support subgroup analyses or meta-regression. Differences between commercial versus homegrown systems, presence and sophistication of clinical decision support, hospital-wide versus limited implementation, and US versus non-US studies were not significant, nor was timing of publication. Higher baseline rates of medication errors predicted greater reductions (P < 0.001). Other context and

  13. Successful Drug Development Despite Adverse Preclinical Findings Part 2: Examples

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Junji; Plassmann, Stephanie; Hayashi, Makoto; Prentice, David E.

    2010-01-01

    To illustrate the process of addressing adverse preclinical findings (APFs) as outlined in the first part of this review, a number of cases with unexpected APF in toxicity studies with drug candidates is discussed in this second part. The emphasis is on risk characterization, especially regarding the mode of action (MoA), and risk evaluation regarding relevance for man. While severe APFs such as retinal toxicity may turn out to be of little human relevance, minor findings particularly in early toxicity studies, such as vasculitis, may later pose a real problem. Rodents are imperfect models for endocrine APFs, non-rodents for human cardiac effects. Liver and kidney toxicities are frequent, but they can often be monitored in man and do not necessarily result in early termination of drug candidates. Novel findings such as the unusual lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and the bones presented in this review can be difficult to explain. It will be shown that well known issues such as phospholipidosis and carcinogenicity by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The latter is of particular interest because the new PPAR α and dual α/γ agonists resulted in a change of the safety paradigm established with the older PPAR α agonists. General toxicologists and pathologists need some understanding of the principles of genotoxicity and reproductive toxicity testing. Both types of preclinical toxicities are major APF and clinical monitoring is difficult, generally leading to permanent use restrictions. PMID:22272032

  14. A pipeline to extract drug-adverse event pairs from multiple data sources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacovigilance aims to uncover and understand harmful side-effects of drugs, termed adverse events (AEs). Although the current process of pharmacovigilance is very systematic, the increasing amount of information available in specialized health-related websites as well as the exponential growth in medical literature presents a unique opportunity to supplement traditional adverse event gathering mechanisms with new-age ones. Method We present a semi-automated pipeline to extract associations between drugs and side effects from traditional structured adverse event databases, enhanced by potential drug-adverse event pairs mined from user-comments from health-related websites and MEDLINE abstracts. The pipeline was tested using a set of 12 drugs representative of two previous studies of adverse event extraction from health-related websites and MEDLINE abstracts. Results Testing the pipeline shows that mining non-traditional sources helps substantiate the adverse event databases. The non-traditional sources not only contain the known AEs, but also suggest some unreported AEs for drugs which can then be analyzed further. Conclusion A semi-automated pipeline to extract the AE pairs from adverse event databases as well as potential AE pairs from non-traditional sources such as text from MEDLINE abstracts and user-comments from health-related websites is presented. PMID:24559132

  15. Comparing probabilistic and descriptive analyses of time-dose-toxicity relationship for determining no-observed-adverse-effect level in drug development.

    PubMed

    Glatard, Anaïs; Berges, Aliénor; Sahota, Tarjinder; Ambery, Claire; Osborne, Jan; Smith, Randall; Hénin, Emilie; Chen, Chao

    2015-10-15

    The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of a drug defined from animal studies is important for inferring a maximal safe dose in human. However, several issues are associated with its concept, determination and application. It is confined to the actual doses used in the study; becomes lower with increasing sample size or dose levels; and reflects the risk level seen in the experiment rather than what may be relevant for human. We explored a pharmacometric approach in an attempt to address these issues. We first used simulation to examine the behaviour of the NOAEL values as determined by current common practice; and then fitted the probability of toxicity as a function of treatment duration and dose to data collected from all applicable toxicology studies of a test compound. Our investigation was in the context of an irreversible toxicity that is detected at the end of the study. Simulations illustrated NOAEL's dependency on experimental factors such as dose and sample size, as well as the underlying uncertainty. Modelling the probability as a continuous function of treatment duration and dose simultaneously to data from multiple studies allowed the estimation of the dose, along with its confidence interval, for a maximal risk level that might be deemed as acceptable for human. The model-based data integration also reconciled between-study inconsistency and explicitly provided maximised estimation confidence. Such alternative NOAEL determination method should be explored for its more efficient data use, more quantifiable insight to toxic doses, and the potential for more relevant animal-to-human translation.

  16. Low quality of reporting adverse drug reactions in paediatric randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Tjalling W; van Roon, Eric N

    2010-12-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCT) offer an opportunity to learn about frequency and character of adverse drug reactions. To improve the quality of reporting adverse effects, the Consort group published recommendations. The authors studied the application of these recommendations in RCTs performed in children. Literature search. The authors found 107 articles on paediatric RCTs written in English and published between 1 January 2006 and 1 April 2009. 83 articles (78%) mentioned adverse drug reactions, 36 articles (34%) used standardised methods for the disclosure of adverse drug reactions, 33 articles (31%) tabulated the reactions, and 27 (25%) stated numbers of and reasons for withdrawal. Registration of the RCT did not influence reporting. Sponsoring did lead to better reporting. According to the Consort guidelines, 19 (18%) reported safety data adequately. Reporting of adverse drug reactions in RCTs is often inadequate. Authors should anticipate and define adverse drug reactions. During research all adverse events should be monitored and assessed actively. Monitoring and assessment should be described in articles in accordance with the extended Consort recommendations. Both authors and editors share the responsibility for the improvement of reporting safety data.

  17. Genetic predisposition to adverse drug reactions in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Empey, Philip E

    2010-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a significant public health problem that leads to mortality, hospital admissions, an increased length of stay, increasing healthcare costs, and withdrawal of drugs from market. Intensive care unit patients are particularly vulnerable and are at an elevated risk. Critical care practitioners, regulatory agencies, and the pharmaceutical industry aggressively seek biomarkers to mitigate patient risk. The rapidly expanding field of pharmacogenomics focuses on the genetic contributions to the variability in drug response. Polymorphisms may explain why some groups of patients have the expected response to pharmacotherapy whereas others experience adverse drug reactions. Historically, genetic association studies have focused on characterizing the effects of variation in drug metabolizing enzymes on pharmacokinetics. Recent work has investigated drug transporters and the variants of genes encoding drug targets, both intended and unintended, that comprise pharmacodynamics. This has led to an appreciation of the role that genetics plays in adverse drug reactions that are either predictable extensions of a drug's known therapeutic effect or idiosyncratic.This review presents the evidence for a genetic predisposition to adverse drug reactions, focusing on gene variants producing alterations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in intensive care unit patients. Genetic biomarkers with the strongest associations to adverse drug reaction risk in the intensive care unit are presented along with the medications involved. Variant genotypes and phenotypes, allelic frequencies in different populations, and clinical studies are discussed. The article also presents the current recommendations for pharmacogenetic testing in clinical practice and explores the drug, patient, research study design, regulatory, and practical issues that presently limit more widespread implementation.

  18. Role of peripheral eosinophilia in adverse cutaneous drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Drago, F; Cogorno, L; Agnoletti, A F; Parodi, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to verify whether peripheral eosinophilia (PE) may be a marker of severity for adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR). We investigated for PE in sixty-three patients diagnosed as adverse cutaneous drug reactions. All the patients underwent blood tests at baseline visit. Only patients that showed a very likely connection between ACDR and the suspected causative drug were induced in the study. We found that 11 out of 63 patients (17%) presented PE for values ≥ 0.6 x 10(9) cells/l or for a percentage of total leukocytes ≥ 6%. These 11 patients compared to patients without eosinophilia had a longer recovery time, they showed diffuse severe cutaneous reactions and they all needed a systemic therapy compared to the 41% of patients without eosinophilia. These outcomes prompt us to believe that peripheral eosinophilia may be an index of severity for adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Therefore, we suggest physicians to always detect the presence of peripheral eosinophilia in order to not underestimate the reaction and to promptly start an appropriate therapy.

  19. Opportunities for Web-based Drug Repositioning: Searching for Potential Antihypertensive Agents with Hypotension Adverse Events.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kejian; Wan, Mei; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Weng, Zuquan

    2016-04-01

    Drug repositioning refers to the process of developing new indications for existing drugs. As a phenotypic indicator of drug response in humans, clinical side effects may provide straightforward signals and unique opportunities for drug repositioning. We aimed to identify drugs frequently associated with hypotension adverse reactions (ie, the opposite condition of hypertension), which could be potential candidates as antihypertensive agents. We systematically searched the electronic records of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) through the openFDA platform to assess the association between hypotension incidence and antihypertensive therapeutic effect regarding a list of 683 drugs. Statistical analysis of FAERS data demonstrated that those drugs frequently co-occurring with hypotension events were more likely to have antihypertensive activity. Ranked by the statistical significance of frequent hypotension reporting, the well-known antihypertensive drugs were effectively distinguished from others (with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve > 0.80 and a normalized discounted cumulative gain of 0.77). In addition, we found a series of antihypertensive agents (particularly drugs originally developed for treating nervous system diseases) among the drugs with top significant reporting, suggesting the good potential of Web-based and data-driven drug repositioning. We found several candidate agents among the hypotension-related drugs on our list that may be redirected for lowering blood pressure. More important, we showed that a pharmacovigilance system could alternatively be used to identify antihypertensive agents and sustainably create opportunities for drug repositioning.

  20. [Adverse Event Trends Associated with Over-the-counter Drugs: Data Mining of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    PubMed

    Umetsu, Ryogo; Abe, Junko; Ueda, Natsumi; Kato, Yamato; Nakayama, Yoko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs play an important role in self-medication. To ensure patient safety, pharmacists should ask patients to pay attention to possible adverse events (AE) associated with OTC drugs and educate patients about the symptoms related to those AEs. The aims of the present study were as follows: (1) to assess the tendency of AEs to occur with OTC drug use in Japan; (2) to detect a safety signal for OTC drugs using the reporting odds ratio (ROR); and (3) to evaluate clustery features, which include suspected drugs and therapeutic classifications, and safety signal indices (number of reports and the ROR), using cluster analysis. The number of reports of AEs following use of combination cold remedy, antipyretic and analgesic remedy, and herbal medicine was 1007, 566, and 221, respectively. We set the cluster number at five; clustery features obtained were as follows: (1) high reporting rate for skin and subcutaneous tissue disorder AEs was the largest group related to combination cold remedy; (2) high reporting rate for nervous system disorder AEs including dizziness was the second largest group. The same medicinal ingredient may demonstrate similar tendencies of the occurrence of AEs and similar clustery features in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database. Our analysis of AEs associated with OTC drugs may be useful for pharmacists and patients alike. Further studies are required to draw better-informed conclusions.

  1. Phenotyping Adverse Drug Reactions: Statin-Related Myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Laura K; Moretz, Jeremy D; Denny, Joshua C; Peterson, Josh F; Bush, William S

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear the extent to which best practices for phenotyping disease states from electronic medical records (EMRs) translate to phenotyping adverse drug events. Here we use statin-induced myotoxicity as a case study to identify best practices in this area. We compared multiple phenotyping algorithms using administrative codes, laboratory measurements, and full-text keyword matching to identify statin-related myopathy from EMRs. Manual review of 300 deidentified EMRs with exposure to at least one statin, created a gold standard set of 124 cases and 176 controls. We tested algorithms using ICD-9 billing codes, laboratory measurements of creatine kinase (CK) and keyword searches of clinical notes and allergy lists. The combined keyword algorithms produced were the most accurate (PPV=86%, NPV=91%). Unlike in most disease phenotyping algorithms, addition of ICD9 codes or laboratory data did not appreciably increase algorithm accuracy. We conclude that phenotype algorithms for adverse drug events should consider text based approaches.

  2. Points of view on adverse drug reactions terminology.

    PubMed

    Benichou, C; Castle, W

    1998-01-01

    Global management of drug safety data is the best way to make the detection and validation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) earlier. Centralization needs a previous standardization, of which terminology is a crucial component. ADR terminology must be designed so as to enable users to know exactly what is covered by each term regarding the nature of the reaction and its significance for public health. A worldwide standardized terminology for all drug reporting purposes is currently being developed by the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. However, practical definitions of medical terms will be necessary and could be developed by specialists on drug safety in collaboration with specialists of different system organs, as has already been achieved for some of them.

  3. Profile of adverse drug reactions in drug resistant tuberculosis from Punjab.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Chander, Ramesh; Kajal, N C; Ranga, Vikrant; Gupta, Ajay; Bharti, Heena

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the profile of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with second-line anti-tubercular treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis. ADR profile of diagnosed drug-resistant tuberculosis cases on supervised second-line anti-tubercular drug regimen under Programmatic Management of Drug-resistant Tuberculosis under Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme, were studied over two years' period. Adverse reactions were categorised into mild, moderate and severe types with subsequent systematic data-analysis. Out of total 207 patients in the study, 81.16% reported with adverse drug reactions. Out of total 195 adverse events, 63.58%, 18.46% and 17.94% were of mild, moderate and severe types respectively. Gastrointestinal events, hepatitis, hearing impairment, arthralgia, psychosis, hypothyroidism, visual disturbances, giddiness, peripheral neuropathy, skin reactions, swelling or pain at injection site, anorexia and sleep disturbances were important amongst these. High proportion of drug and/or alcohol abuse was an important observation. The offending drug(s) had to be terminated in 12.08% of the patients. Early detection, management and pharmaco-vigilance reporting of ADRs remain key factors in the management of drug-resistant tuberculosis with remarkable relevance of the need for early diagnosis and treatment of 'drug-sensitive tuberculosis', to prevent emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  4. Analysis of Adverse Drug Reactions of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Psychiatry OPD

    PubMed Central

    Piparva, Kiran G.; Buch, J. G.; Chandrani, Kalpesh V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Novel atypical antipsychotics are superior to conventional antipsychotics as they significantly reduce both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and have lower risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). However, these drugs have separate set of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Therefore, this study was carried out to assess these ADRs, which can have impact on long-term compliance and achieving successful treatment. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of analysis of ADR of atypical antipsychotic drugs was carried out in the psychiatry outpatient department. Patients of psychotic disorder (any age, either sex), who were prescribed atypical antipsychotic drugs, were included. Those who were prescribed conventional antipsychotics or combinations of antipsychotics were excluded from the study. Apart from spontaneously reported ADRs, a questionnaire related to the likely ADR was used and patients’ responses were recorded in the case record form. Results: Totally 93 ADRs were recorded from 84 prescriptions. Majority of the ADRs (82 out of 93) were seen with risperidone and olanzepine, as they were the commonly prescribed drugs. Weight gain, dizziness, sleep disturbance and appetite disturbance accounted for nearly 78% of the total events. With risperidone (at 4–6 mg/day) and olanzepine (at 10–15 mg/day), gastrointestinal and sleep disturbance were observed in the initial (within 7 days to 2–3 months after treatment) course of treatment, while EPS, fatigue, seizure, increased frequency of micturition and dizziness were observed after long-term (3–9 months) use. Conclusion: The present study adds to the existing information on the prevalence of adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Role of active surveillance in post-marketing phase is also emphasized. PMID:22345840

  5. Patient knowledge on reporting adverse drug reactions in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Staniszewska, Anna; Dąbrowska-Bender, Marta; Olejniczak, Dominik; Duda-Zalewska, Aneta; Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to assess patient knowledge on reporting of adverse drug reactions. Materials and methods A prospective study was conducted among 200 patients. The study was based on an original survey composed of 15 single- and multiple-choice questions. The study involved individuals who have experienced adverse reactions as well as individuals who have never experienced any adverse reactions; people over the age of 18; literate; residing in Mazowieckie Voivodeship, who have not been diagnosed with any disease that could compromise their logical thinking skills. Results The respondents who lived in the city had a greater knowledge compared to the respondents who lived in the countryside (Pearson’s χ2=47.70, P=0.0013). The respondents who lived in the city were also more statistically likely to provide a correct answer to the question about the type of adverse reactions to be reported (Pearson’s χ2=50.66, P=0.012). Statistically significant associations were found between the place of residence of the respondents and the correct answer to the question about the data that must be included in the report on adverse reactions (Pearson’s χ2=11.7, P<0.0001). PMID:28096661

  6. Pharmacokinetic patterns of risperidone-associated adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Schoretsanitis, Georgios; Stegmann, Benedikt; Hiemke, Christoph; Gründer, Gerhard; Schruers, Koen R J; Walther, Sebastian; Lammertz, Sarah E; Haen, Ekkehard; Paulzen, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate a correlation between plasma concentrations of risperidone (RIS), its active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone (9-OH-RIS) and the active moiety (AM) (RIS + 9-OH-RIS), and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in a naturalistic sample. Plasma concentrations of RIS, 9-OH-RIS, and AM in patients out of a therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) database complaining ADRs were categorized according to the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersogelser side effect rating scales (UKU) (n = 97) and compared to patients without ADRs (n = 398). Patients in the ADR group received a significantly lower daily dosage of risperidone (trimmed mean 3.64 mg/day) than patients without ADRs (4.40 mg/day). No differences were found for active moiety plasma concentrations between the groups (p = 0.454). Differences were detected only in the case of dose-adjusted plasma concentration values (concentration-by-dose, C/D) for 9-OH-RIS, being higher in patients reporting ADRs (4.78 ng/mL/mg) than in patients without ADRs (4.3 ng/mL/mg) (p = 0.037 for Mann-Whitney U test). Note that differences for non-adjusted 9-OH-RIS plasma levels between groups failed to reach significance (p = 0.697). Our findings are consistent with previous data supporting a prominent role of 9-hydroxyrisperidone, but not of risperidone with regard to ADRs. When studying the various subgroups of reported ADRs separately, the size of these subsamples offers some plausible limitations by reducing the power of the analysis.

  7. Understanding pharmacist decision making for adverse drug event (ADE) detection.

    PubMed

    Phansalkar, Shobha; Hoffman, Jennifer M; Hurdle, John F; Patel, Vimla L

    2009-04-01

    Manual chart review is an effective but expensive method for adverse drug event (ADE) detection. Building an expert system capable of mimicking the human expert's decision pathway, to deduce the occurrence of an ADE, can improve efficiency and lower cost. As a first step to build such an expert system, this study explores pharmacist's decision-making processes for ADE detection. Think-aloud procedures were used to elicit verbalizations as pharmacists read through ADE case scenarios. Two types of information were extracted, firstly pharmacists' decision-making strategies regarding ADEs and secondly information regarding pharmacists' unmet information needs for ADE detection. Verbal protocols were recorded and analysed qualitatively to extract ADE information signals. Inter-reviewer agreement for classification of ADE information signals was calculated using Cohen's kappa. We extracted a total of 110 information signals, of which 73% consisted of information that was interpreted by the pharmacists from the case scenario and only about half (53%, n = 32) of the information signals were considered relevant for the detection of the ADEs. Excellent reliability was demonstrated between the reviewers for classifying signals. Fifty information signals regarding unmet information needs were extracted and grouped into themes based on the type of missing information. Pharmacists used a forward reasoning approach to make implicit deductions and validate hypotheses about possible ADEs. Verbal protocols also indicated that pharmacists' unmet information needs occurred frequently. Developing alerting systems that meet pharmacists' needs adequately will enhance their ability to reduce preventable ADEs, thus improving patient safety.

  8. Treatment with Tacrolimus and Sirolimus Reveals No Additional Adverse Effects on Human Islets In Vitro Compared to Each Drug Alone but They Are Reduced by Adding Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Kloster-Jensen, Kristine; Sahraoui, Afaf; Vethe, Nils Tore; Korsgren, Olle; Bergan, Stein; Foss, Aksel; Scholz, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Tacrolimus and sirolimus are important immunosuppressive drugs used in human islet transplantation; however, they are linked to detrimental effects on islets and reduction of long-term graft function. Few studies investigate the direct effects of these drugs combined in parallel with single drug exposure. Human islets were treated with or without tacrolimus (30 μg/L), sirolimus (30 μg/L), or a combination thereof for 24 hrs. Islet function as well as apoptosis was assessed by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and Cell Death ELISA. Proinflammatory cytokines were analysed by qRT-PCR and Bio-Plex. Islets exposed to the combination of sirolimus and tacrolimus were treated with or without methylprednisolone (1000 μg/L) and the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines was investigated. We found the following: (i) No additive reduction in function and viability in islets existed when tacrolimus and sirolimus were combined compared to the single drug. (ii) Increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines mRNA and protein levels in islets took place. (iii) Methylprednisolone significantly decreased the proinflammatory response in islets induced by the drug combination. Although human islets are prone to direct toxic effect of tacrolimus and sirolimus, we found no additive effects of the drug combination. Short-term exposure of glucocorticoids could effectively reduce the proinflammatory response in human islets induced by the combination of tacrolimus and sirolimus. PMID:26885529

  9. Identification of structure-activity relationships for adverse effects of pharmaceuticals in humans: Part C: use of QSAR and an expert system for the estimation of the mechanism of action of drug-induced hepatobiliary and urinary tract toxicities.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Edwin J; Kruhlak, Naomi L; Benz, R Daniel; Aragonés Sabaté, David; Marchant, Carol A; Contrera, Joseph F

    2009-06-01

    This report describes an in silico methodology to predict off-target pharmacologic activities and plausible mechanisms of action (MOAs) associated with serious and unexpected hepatobiliary and urinary tract adverse effects in human patients. The investigation used a database of 8,316,673 adverse event (AE) reports observed after drugs had been marketed and AEs noted in the published literature that were linked to 2124 chemical structures and 1851 approved clinical indications. The Integrity database of drug patent and literature studies was used to find pharmacologic targets and proposed clinical indications. BioEpisteme QSAR software was used to predict possible molecular targets of drug molecules and Derek for Windows expert system software to predict chemical structural alerts and plausible MOAs for the AEs. AEs were clustered into five types of liver injury: liver enzyme disorders, cytotoxic injury, cholestasis and jaundice, bile duct disorders, and gall bladder disorders, and six types of urinary tract injury: acute renal disorders, nephropathies, bladder disorders, kidney function tests, blood in urine, and urolithiasis. Results showed that drug-related AEs were highly correlated with: (1) known drug class warnings, (2) predicted off-target activities of the drugs, and (3) a specific subset of clinical indications for which the drug may or may not have been prescribed.

  10. Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2009-10-17

    For over two decades, cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, has been the most widely used illicit drug by young people in high-income countries, and has recently become popular on a global scale. Epidemiological research during the past 10 years suggests that regular use of cannabis during adolescence and into adulthood can have adverse effects. Epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies have established an association between cannabis use and adverse outcomes. We focus on adverse health effects of greatest potential public health interest-that is, those that are most likely to occur and to affect a large number of cannabis users. The most probable adverse effects include a dependence syndrome, increased risk of motor vehicle crashes, impaired respiratory function, cardiovascular disease, and adverse effects of regular use on adolescent psychosocial development and mental health.

  11. Mixed-effects Poisson regression analysis of adverse event reports

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Segawa, Eisuke; Karabatsos, George; Amatya, Anup K.; Bhaumik, Dulal K.; Brown, C. Hendricks; Kapur, Kush; Marcus, Sue M.; Hur, Kwan; Mann, J. John

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A new statistical methodology is developed for the analysis of spontaneous adverse event (AE) reports from post-marketing drug surveillance data. The method involves both empirical Bayes (EB) and fully Bayes estimation of rate multipliers for each drug within a class of drugs, for a particular AE, based on a mixed-effects Poisson regression model. Both parametric and semiparametric models for the random-effect distribution are examined. The method is applied to data from Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) on the relationship between antidepressants and suicide. We obtain point estimates and 95 per cent confidence (posterior) intervals for the rate multiplier for each drug (e.g. antidepressants), which can be used to determine whether a particular drug has an increased risk of association with a particular AE (e.g. suicide). Confidence (posterior) intervals that do not include 1.0 provide evidence for either significant protective or harmful associations of the drug and the adverse effect. We also examine EB, parametric Bayes, and semiparametric Bayes estimators of the rate multipliers and associated confidence (posterior) intervals. Results of our analysis of the FDA AERS data revealed that newer antidepressants are associated with lower rates of suicide adverse event reports compared with older antidepressants. We recommend improvements to the existing AERS system, which are likely to improve its public health value as an early warning system. PMID:18404622

  12. Can Drosophila melanogaster represent a model system for the detection of reproductive adverse drug reactions?

    PubMed

    Avanesian, Agnesa; Semnani, Sahar; Jafari, Mahtab

    2009-08-01

    Once a molecule is identified as a potential drug, the detection of adverse drug reactions is one of the key components of its development and the FDA approval process. We propose using Drosophila melanogaster to screen for reproductive adverse drug reactions in the early stages of drug development. Compared with other non-mammalian models, D. melanogaster has many similarities to the mammalian reproductive system, including putative sex hormones and conserved proteins involved in genitourinary development. Furthermore, the D. melanogaster model would present significant advantages in time efficiency and cost-effectiveness compared with mammalian models. We present data on methotrexate (MTX) reproductive adverse events in multiple animal models, including fruit flies, as proof-of-concept for the use of the D. melanogaster model.

  13. Efficiently mining Adverse Event Reporting System for multiple drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Albin, Aaron; Ren, Kaiyu; Zhang, Pengyue; Etter, Jonathan P.; Lin, Simon; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    Efficiently mining multiple drug interactions and reactions from Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) is a challenging problem which has not been sufficiently addressed by existing methods. To tackle this challenge, we propose a FCI-fliter approach which leverages the efforts of UMLS mapping, frequent closed itemset mining, and uninformative association identification and removal. By applying our method on AERS, we identified a large number of multiple drug interactions with reactions. By statistical analysis, we found most of the identified associations have very small p-values which suggest that they are statistically significant. Further analysis on the results shows that many multiple drug interactions and reactions are clinically interesting, and suggests that our method may be further improved with the combination of external knowledge. PMID:25717411

  14. Ofloxacin Induced Angioedema: A Rare Adverse Drug Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Kumar, Raj; Wani, Umar Rasool

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) to a commonly prescribed anti-microbial can pose a major public health problem. The authors report a rare case of 24-year-old young lady who presented with angioedema of lips after ingestion of Ofloxacin, prescribed to her for treatment of loose motions. Fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed antibiotics for various disease conditions. The history, clinical examination and normal laboratory parameters led to the diagnosis of ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction and the patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids and antihistamines. The hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones are rare with an incidence of 0.4% to 2%. The pharmacovigilance program and self-reporting of all the ADR’s by the health care workers can help in ensuring the judicious use of the drug, drug safety and thus decrease the associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:28050397

  15. Clinical association between pharmacogenomics and adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Sneed, Kevin B; Yang, Yin-Xue; Zhang, Xueji; He, Zhi-Xu; Chow, Kevin; Yang, Tianxin; Duan, Wei; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern and cause significant patient morbidity and mortality. Pharmacogenomics is the study of how genetic polymorphisms affect an individual's response to pharmacotherapy at the level of a whole genome. This article updates our knowledge on how genetic polymorphisms of important genes alter the risk of ADR occurrence after an extensive literature search. To date, at least 244 pharmacogenes identified have been associated with ADRs of 176 clinically used drugs based on PharmGKB. At least 28 genes associated with the risk of ADRs have been listed by the Food and Drug Administration as pharmacogenomic biomarkers. With the availability of affordable and reliable testing tools, pharmacogenomics looks promising to predict, reduce, and minimize ADRs in selected populations.

  16. Rare and very rare adverse effects of clozapine

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Pasquale; Gaetano, Raffaele; Caroleo, Mariarita; Cerminara, Gregorio; Maida, Francesca; Bruno, Antonio; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria; Moreno, Maria Jose Jaén; Russo, Emilio; Segura-García, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine (CLZ) is the drug of choice for the treatment of resistant schizophrenia; however, its suitable use is limited by the complex adverse effects’ profile. The best-described adverse effects in the literature are represented by agranulocytosis, myocarditis, sedation, weight gain, hypotension, and drooling; nevertheless, there are other known adverse effects that psychiatrists should readily recognize and manage. This review covers the “rare” and “very rare” known adverse effects of CLZ, which have been accurately described in literature. An extensive search on the basis of predefined criteria was made using CLZ and its combination with adverse effects as keywords in electronic databases. Data show the association between the use of CLZ and uncommon adverse effects, including ischemic colitis, paralytic ileus, hematemesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, priapism, urinary incontinence, pityriasis rosea, intertriginous erythema, pulmonary thromboembolism, pseudo-pheochromocytoma, periorbital edema, and parotitis, which are influenced by other variables including age, early diagnosis, and previous/current pharmacological therapies. Some of these adverse effects, although unpredictable, are often manageable if promptly recognized and treated. Others are serious and potentially life-threatening. However, an adequate knowledge of the drug, clinical vigilance, and rapid intervention can drastically reduce the morbidity and mortality related to CLZ treatment. PMID:26273202

  17. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nicholas; Pollack, Charles; Butkerait, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. PMID:26203254

  18. Adverse drug reactions in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Witcher, Robert; Dzierba, Amy L.; Kim, Catherine; Smithburger, Pamela L.; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves survival and neurologic function in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Many medications used to support TH have altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during this treatment. It is unknown if or at what frequency the medications used during TH cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac arrest and treated with TH from January 2009 to June 2012 at two urban, university-affiliated, tertiary-care medical centres. Medications commonly used during TH were screened for association with significant ADRs (grade 3 or greater per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) using three published ADR detection instruments. Results: A total of 229 patients were included, the majority being males with median age of 62 presenting with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pulseless electrical activity or asystole. The most common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. There were 670 possible ADRs and 69 probable ADRs identified. Of the 670 possible ADRs, propofol, fentanyl, and acetaminophen were the most common drugs associated with ADRs. Whereas fentanyl, insulin, and propofol were the most common drugs associated with a probable ADR. Patients were managed with TH for a median of 22 hours, with 38% of patients surviving to hospital discharge. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TH after cardiac arrest frequently experience possible adverse reactions associated with medications and the corresponding laboratory abnormalities are significant. There is a need for judicious use and close monitoring of drugs in the setting of TH until recommendations for dose adjustments are available to help prevent ADRs.

  19. Adverse Drug Reactions in Children—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Rebecca Mary Diane; Gargon, Elizabeth; Kirkham, Jamie; Cresswell, Lynne; Golder, Su; Smyth, Rosalind; Williamson, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions in children are an important public health problem. We have undertaken a systematic review of observational studies in children in three settings: causing admission to hospital, occurring during hospital stay and occurring in the community. We were particularly interested in understanding how ADRs might be better detected, assessed and avoided. Methods and Findings We searched nineteen electronic databases using a comprehensive search strategy. In total, 102 studies were included. The primary outcome was any clinical event described as an adverse drug reaction to one or more drugs. Additional information relating to the ADR was collected: associated drug classification; clinical presentation; associated risk factors; methods used for assessing causality, severity, and avoidability. Seventy one percent (72/102) of studies assessed causality, and thirty four percent (34/102) performed a severity assessment. Only nineteen studies (19%) assessed avoidability. Incidence rates for ADRs causing hospital admission ranged from 0.4% to 10.3% of all children (pooled estimate of 2.9% (2.6%, 3.1%)) and from 0.6% to 16.8% of all children exposed to a drug during hospital stay. Anti-infectives and anti-epileptics were the most frequently reported therapeutic class associated with ADRs in children admitted to hospital (17 studies; 12 studies respectively) and children in hospital (24 studies; 14 studies respectively), while anti-infectives and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were frequently reported as associated with ADRs in outpatient children (13 studies; 6 studies respectively). Fourteen studies reported rates ranging from 7%–98% of ADRs being either definitely/possibly avoidable. Conclusions There is extensive literature which investigates ADRs in children. Although these studies provide estimates of incidence in different settings and some indication of the therapeutic classes most frequently associated with ADRs, further

  20. Improving the reporting of adverse drug reactions in the hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Richard; Frassetto, Lynda; Tsourounis, Candy; Segal, Eleanor S; Kim, Stephanie

    2010-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is perceived by the public as having a substantial responsibility to ensure drug safety; however, the FDA has limited resources for active surveillance and relies on voluntary reporting of adverse events and potential adverse drug reactions. Studies have shown that underreporting of adverse events and adverse drug reactions is widespread. Furthermore, a review of several studies demonstrates that most adverse drug reactions are reported by pharmacists and nurses, with physicians reporting the fewest. The hospital setting, with its clearly defined patient population observed around the clock, is an ideal setting in which to identify potential adverse drug reaction signals and to report them to either the drug manufacturer or the FDA. In this article we describe the present system for addressing adverse events, obstacles to reporting them, and the important role any hospital physician could play in reporting adverse events and potential adverse drug reactions.

  1. Association between the insulin-induced gene 2 (INSIG2) and weight gain in a German sample of antipsychotic-treated schizophrenic patients: perturbation of SREBP-controlled lipogenesis in drug-related metabolic adverse effects?

    PubMed

    Le Hellard, S; Theisen, F M; Haberhausen, M; Raeder, M B; Fernø, J; Gebhardt, S; Hinney, A; Remschmidt, H; Krieg, J C; Mehler-Wex, C; Nöthen, M M; Hebebrand, J; Steen, V M

    2009-03-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are nowadays the most widely used drugs to treat schizophrenia and other psychosis. Unfortunately, some of them can cause major metabolic adverse effects, such as weight gain, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. The underlying lipogenic mechanisms of the antipsychotic drugs are not known, but several studies have focused on a central effect in the hypothalamic control of appetite regulation and energy expenditure. In a functional convergent genomic approach we recently used a cellular model and demonstrated that orexigenic antipsychotics that induce weight gain activate the expression of lipid biosynthesis genes controlled by the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors. We therefore hypothesized that the major genes involved in the SREBP activation of fatty acids and cholesterol production (SREBF1, SREBF2, SCAP, INSIG1 and INSIG2) would be strong candidate genes for interindividual variation in drug-induced weight gain. We genotyped a total of 44 HapMap-selected tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms in a sample of 160 German patients with schizophrenia that had been monitored with respect to changes in body mass index during antipsychotic drug treatment. We found a strong association (P=0.0003-0.00007) between three markers localized within or near the INSIG2 gene (rs17587100, rs10490624 and rs17047764) and antipsychotic-related weight gain. Our finding is supported by the recent involvement of the INSIG2 gene in obesity in the general population and implicates SREBP-controlled lipogenesis in drug-induced metabolic adverse effects.

  2. Computational approaches to understand the adverse drug effect on potassium, sodium and calcium channels for predicting TdP cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Mohsen

    2017-09-01

    Ion channels play a crucial role in the cardiovascular system. Our understanding of cardiac ion channel function has improved since their first discoveries. The flow of potassium, sodium and calcium ions across cardiomyocytes is vital for regular cardiac rhythm. Blockage of these channels, delays cardiac repolarization or tend to shorten repolarization and may induce arrhythmia. Detection of drug risk by channel blockade is considered essential for drug regulators. Advanced computational models can be used as an early screen for torsadogenic potential in drug candidates. New drug candidates that are determined to not cause blockage are more likely to pass successfully through preclinical trials and not be withdrawn later from the marketplace by manufacturer. Several different approved drugs, however, can cause a distinctive polymorphic ventricular arrhythmia known as torsade de pointes (TdP), which may lead to sudden death. The objective of the present study is to review the mechanisms and computational models used to assess the risk that a drug may TdP. There is strong evidence from multiple studies that blockage of the L-type calcium current reduces risk of TdP. Blockage of sodium channels slows cardiac action potential conduction, however, not all sodium channel blocking antiarrhythmic drugs produce a significant effect, while late sodium channel block reduces TdP. Interestingly, there are some drugs that block the hERG potassium channel and therefore cause QT prolongation, but they are not associated with TdP. Recent studies confirmed the necessity of studying multiple distinctionic ion channels which are responsible for cardiac related diseases or TdP, to obtain an improved clinical TdP risk prediction of compound interactions and also for designing drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adverse Effects Associated With Newer Diabetes Therapies.

    PubMed

    Akiyode, Oluwaranti F; Adesoye, Adebola A

    2017-04-01

    The increasing number of newer type 2 diabetes therapies has allowed providers an increased armamentarium for the optimal management of patients with diabetes. In fact, these newer agents have unique benefits in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, they are also associated with certain adverse effects. This review article aims to describe the notable adverse effects of these newer antidiabetic therapies including the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. The adverse effects reviewed herein include pancreatitis, medullary thyroid carcinoma, heart failure, gastrointestinal disturbances, renal impairment, and genitourinary infections. More clinical data are necessary to solidify the association of some of these adverse effects with the newer diabetes agents. However, it is important for health care practitioners to be well informed and prepared to properly monitor patients for these adverse effects.

  4. Adverse drug reactions and off-label drug use in paediatric outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Horen, Benjamin; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lapeyre-mestre, Maryse

    2002-01-01

    Aims To investigate the potential relationship between off-label drug use and increased risk of adverse drug reactions in paediatric outpatients. Methods A prospective pharmacovigilance survey of drug prescribing in office based paediatricians was carried out in Haute-Garonne County (south west of France). Results The study involved a sample of 1419 children under 16 years old. Forty-two percent of patients were exposed to at least one off-label prescription. The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 1.41% (95% CI 0.79, 2.11). Off-label drug use was significantly associated with adverse drug reactions (relative risk 3.44; 95% CI 1.26, 9.38), particularly when it was due to an indication different than that defined in the Summary Product Characteristics (relative risk 4.42; 95% CI 1.60, 12.25). Conclusions Our data suggest an increasing risk of adverse drug reactions related to off-label drug use. This risk would be acceptable if further studies prove the potential benefit of such a drug use. PMID:12492616

  5. Patient stratification and identification of adverse event correlations in the space of 1190 drug related adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Roitmann, Eva; Eriksson, Robert; Brunak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: New pharmacovigilance methods are needed as a consequence of the morbidity caused by drugs. We exploit fine-grained drug related adverse event information extracted by text mining from electronic medical records (EMRs) to stratify patients based on their adverse events and to determine adverse event co-occurrences. Methods: We analyzed the similarity of adverse event profiles of 2347 patients extracted from EMRs from a mental health center in Denmark. The patients were clustered based on their adverse event profiles and the similarities were presented as a network. The set of adverse events in each main patient cluster was evaluated. Co-occurrences of adverse events in patients (p-value < 0.01) were identified and presented as well. Results: We found that each cluster of patients typically had a most distinguishing adverse event. Examination of the co-occurrences of adverse events in patients led to the identification of potentially interesting adverse event correlations that may be further investigated as well as provide further patient stratification opportunities. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach in pharmacovigilance to stratify patients based on fine-grained adverse event profiles, which also makes it possible to identify adverse event correlations. Used on larger data sets, this data-driven method has the potential to reveal unknown patterns concerning adverse event occurrences. PMID:25249979

  6. Pattern mining for extraction of mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions from user comments.

    PubMed

    Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela H

    2011-01-01

    Rapid growth of online health social networks has enabled patients to communicate more easily with each other. This way of exchange of opinions and experiences has provided a rich source of information about drugs and their effectiveness and more importantly, their possible adverse reactions. We developed a system to automatically extract mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) from user reviews about drugs in social network websites by mining a set of language patterns. The system applied association rule mining on a set of annotated comments to extract the underlying patterns of colloquial expressions about adverse effects. The patterns were tested on a set of unseen comments to evaluate their performance. We reached to precision of 70.01% and recall of 66.32% and F-measure of 67.96%.

  7. Pattern Mining for Extraction of mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions from User Comments

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela H.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid growth of online health social networks has enabled patients to communicate more easily with each other. This way of exchange of opinions and experiences has provided a rich source of information about drugs and their effectiveness and more importantly, their possible adverse reactions. We developed a system to automatically extract mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) from user reviews about drugs in social network websites by mining a set of language patterns. The system applied association rule mining on a set of annotated comments to extract the underlying patterns of colloquial expressions about adverse effects. The patterns were tested on a set of unseen comments to evaluate their performance. We reached to precision of 70.01% and recall of 66.32% and F-measure of 67.96%. PMID:22195162

  8. Adverse drug reactions experience in a teaching hospital in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Alsbou, Mohammed; Alzubiedi, Sameh; Alzobi, Hamed; Samhadanah, Nawal Abu; Alsaraireh, Yousef; Alrawashdeh, Omar; Aqel, Amin; Al-Salem, Khalil

    2015-12-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent a major health care problem. To identify the most common ADRs, drugs implicated in ADRs, and to assess their causality, severity, preventability and risk factors predisposing to reported ADRs in Jordan. Al-Karak teaching hospital, southern of Jordan. Method A cross sectional observational study was carried out for 11 months from January to November 2013. Suspected ADRs were recorded in ADRs report forms and analyzed for causality, severity, and preventability. Most common ADRs, drugs involved in these ADRs, causality, severity, and preventability of suspected ADRs. A total of 64 reports were received. Some patients suffered more than one ADR. The total number of ADRs identified was 108. Forty one drugs were involved in causing these ADRs. About 2/3 of adverse reactions (73.4 %) did not cause admission to the hospital, whereas 26.6 % of the ADRs resulted in admission. Majority of the ADRs were type A (62.5 %). Most of ADRs (92.2 %) were assessed as probable. Nearly, 65.6 % of ADRs were categorized as mild. Majority of ADRs were assessed as "not preventable" (75 %). The most common classes of drugs involved in ADRs were antibiotics, analgesics, vaccines and antiepileptics. The most commonly identified ADRs were abdominal pain, skin rash, shortness of breath, fever, upper gastrointestinal bleeding and vomiting. Risk factors contributed to ADRs were age and polypharmacy. Jordanian healthcare providers should be aware of the importance of detecting and reporting ADRs, in order to prevent and reduce the incidence of ADRs. Awareness of risk factors predisposing to ADRs may help in identifying patients with higher risk and therefore reducing the risk of these ADRs and improving patient outcome.

  9. A prospective study of adverse drug reactions in hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mir, Inocencia; García-López, Mercedes; Palop, Vicente; Ferrer, José M; Rubio, Elena; Morales-Olivas, Francisco J

    1999-01-01

    Aims There are few publications of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among paediatric patients, though ADR incidence is usually stated to be higher during the first year of life and in male patients. We have carried out a prospective study to assess the extent, pattern and profile risk for ADRs in hospitalized patients between 1 and 24 months of age. Methods An intensive events monitoring scheme was used. A total of 512 successive admissions to two medical paediatric wards (47 beds) were analysed. The hospital records were screened daily during two periods (summer, 105 days and winter, 99 days), and adverse clinical events observed were recorded. Results A total of 282 events were detected; of these, 112 were considered to be manifestations of ADRs. The cumulative incidence was 16.6%, no differences being observed between periods. Although there were no differences between patients under and over 12 months of age, risk was found to be significantly higher among girls compared with boys (RR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.03–2.52). The gastro-intestinal system was most frequently affected. The therapeutic group most commonly implicated was anti-infective drugs and vaccines (41.5%). The ADRs were mild or moderate in over 90% of cases. A consistent relationship was noted between the number of drugs administered and the incidence of ADRs. Conclusions Hospitalized patients exhibited an ADR risk profile that included female sex and the number of drugs administered. No particular age predisposition was observed. The most commonly prescribed drugs are those most often implicated in ADRs in paediatric patients. PMID:10383547

  10. Adverse drug interactions in dental practice: interactions associated with vasoconstrictors. Part V of a series.

    PubMed

    Yagiela, J A

    1999-05-01

    Adrenergic vasoconstrictors are commonly used by dentists to enhance the pain-relieving action of local anesthetics and to control local bleeding. Although normally considered safe for these applications, vasoconstrictors can participate in drug interactions that potentially are harmful to patients. The faculty of a March 1998 symposium entitled "Adverse Drug Interactions in Dentistry: Separating the Myths From the Facts" extensively reviewed the literature on drug interactions. They then established a significance rating of alleged adverse drug interactions pertaining to dentistry, based on the quality of documentation and severity of effect. The author of this article focused on the adrenergic vasoconstrictors epinephrine and levonordefrin. Vasoconstrictor drug interactions involving tricyclic antidepressants, nonselective beta-adrenergic blocking drugs, certain general anesthetics and cocaine are well-documented in both humans and animals as having the potential for causing serious morbidity or death. Evidence for adverse interactions involving adrenergic neuronal blocking drugs, drugs with alpha-adrenergic blocking activity, local anesthetics and thyroid hormones is much less compelling, suggesting for the most part that clinically significant reactions may occur only when both the vasoconstrictor and the interacting drug are used in excessive doses. In the case of monoamine oxidase inhibitors, there is no credible evidence of a significant interaction with epinephrine or levonordefrin. Potentially serious adverse drug interactions involving adrenergic vasoconstrictors can occur in dental practice. In most circumstances, careful administration of small doses of vasoconstrictors and avoidance of gingival retraction cord containing epinephrine, coupled with monitoring of vita signs, will permit these drugs to be used with no risk or only minimally increased risk. Only in the case of cocaine intoxication must adrenergic vasoconstrictors be avoided completely. For

  11. Ayurvedic management of adverse drug reactions with Shvitrahara Varti

    PubMed Central

    Jadav, Hasmukh R.; Ghetiya, Hitesh; Prashanth, B.; Galib; Patgiri, B. J.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADR) are an expression that describes harm associated with the use of medications at therapeutic dose. Traditional medicines also can develop ADRs due to their improper use. Shvitrahara Varti, one of such medicines holds Bakuchi as a component and is to be used judiciously. Furanocoumarins like psoralen present in Bakuchi makes skin hypersensitive and causes phytophotodermatitis in few cases. Hence, one should be careful while using medicines that contain Bakuchi. One such case is observed, where extensive reactions with application of Shvitrahara Varti were noticed and managed with Ayurvedic treatment. PMID:24250129

  12. Toward automatic detection and prevention of adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Nicolas; Chazard, Emmanuel; Beuscart, Régis; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Adverse Drug Events (ADE) due to medication errors and human factors are a major public health issue. They endanger patient safety and cause considerable extra healthcare costs. The European project PSIP (Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in medication) aims to identify and prevent ADE. Data mining of the structured hospital data bases will give a list of observed ADE with frequencies and probabilities, thereby giving a better understanding of potential risks. The main objective of the project is to develop innovative knowledge based on the mining results and to deliver to professionals and patients, in the form of alerts and decision support functions, a contextualized knowledge fitting the local risk parameters.

  13. Data-mining-based detection of adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Chazard, Emmanuel; Preda, Cristian; Merlin, Béatrice; Ficheur, Grégoire; Beuscart, Régis

    2009-01-01

    Every year adverse drug events (ADEs) are known to be responsible for 98,000 deaths in the USA. Classical methods rely on report statements, expert knowledge, and staff operated record review. One of our objectives, in the PSIP project framework, is to use data mining (e.g., decision trees) to electronically identify situations leading to risk of ADEs. 10,500 hospitalization records from Denmark and France were used. 500 rules were automatically obtained, which are currently being validated by experts. A decision support system to prevent ADEs is then to be developed. The article examines a decision tree and the rules in the field of vitamin K antagonists.

  14. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions in Indian population: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Tejas K; Thakkar, Sejal H; Sharma, DC

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological data is limited for cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs) in India. Most of the Indian studies have small sample size and are of limited duration. Aims: The aim of this study is to analyze CADRs with reference to the causative drugs and their clinical characteristics in Indian population. Materials and Methods: As per selection criteria, electronic databases were searched for publications describing CADRs from January-1995 to April-2013 by two independent investigators. Data of the causative drugs and clinical characteristics were extracted and summarized by absolute numbers, percentages, ranges, and means as presented by the authors. The subgroup analysis of causative drugs was performed for causality assessment, severe or nonsevere reactions and occurrence of common CADRs. Studies showing “definite” and “probable” categories of causality analysis were labeled as “definite and probable causality (DPC) studies”. The other included studies were labeled as “non-DPC studies”. Results: Of 8337 retrieved references, 18 prospective studies were selected for analysis. The pooled incidence was 9.22/1000 total among outpatient and inpatient cases. Commonly observed reactions were maculopapular rash (32.39%), fixed drug eruptions (FDEs) (20.13%), urticaria (17.49%) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) (6.84%). The major causative drug groups were antimicrobials (45.46%), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (20.87%) and anti-epileptic drugs (14.57%). Commonly implicated drugs were sulfa (13.32%), β-lactams (8.96%) and carbamazepine (6.65%). High frequency of CADRs is observed with anti-epileptic drugs in DPC studies only. Carbamazepine, phenytoin and fluoroquinolones had higher severe to nonsevere cutaneous reaction ratio than other drugs. Antimicrobials were the main causative drugs for maculopapular rash, FDEs and SJS/TEN, and NSAIDs for the urticaria. The mortality for overall CADRs, SJS

  15. Putting knowledge into practice: Does information on adverse drug interactions influence people's dosing behaviour?

    PubMed

    Dohle, Simone; Dawson, Ian G J

    2017-05-01

    Adverse drug events relating to drug-drug interactions are a common cause of patient harm. Central to avoiding this harm is the patients' understanding that certain drug combinations present a synergistic risk. Two studies tested whether providing individuals with information about a drug combination that presents a synergistic (cf. additive) risk would elicit higher perceived risk and, therefore, would result in greater precaution in terms of dosing behaviour. Both studies employed an experimental design. Participants were presented with a scenario describing how two symptoms of an infection could each be treated by a different drug. In Experiment 1, information about the effects of combining the two drugs was varied: (1) no information, (2) combination elicits an additive risk, or (3) combination elicits a synergistic risk. In Experiment 2, the size of the risk (small or large) and the participant's role (patient or doctor) was also varied. In both experiments, perceived risk and negative affect increased in response to information about the increased probability of side effects from the drug-drug interaction. Despite these increases, participants did not adjust their drug dosing behaviour in either experiment: Dosing was similar when these interactions were large or small, or when they were due to synergistic or additive effects. People may struggle to transfer their knowledge of drug-drug interaction risks into decision-making behaviours. Care should be taken not to assume that holding accurate risk perceptions of a drug's side effect will result in decisions that help avoid adverse drug events. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Adverse effects of drug-drug interactions are a cause of hospital admissions and increase morbidity and mortality. Patients' understanding that certain drug combinations present a synergistic risk is crucial to avoid harm. It is not clear whether synergistic drug interactions increase risk perception and

  16. Involvement of anticancer drugs in the relief system for adverse drug reactions in Japan.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2013-12-01

    The compensation scheme for adverse drug reactions in Japan was implemented more than three decades ago as relief system by regulatory agencies. Because of the high frequency of adverse drug reactions, anticancer drugs have been excluded from coverage by the relief system since its implementation. Requests have recently been made by some patient advocates for the expansion of relief coverage to include anticancer drugs. In response to these requests, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan established a committee to discuss relief from anticancer drug-induced health damages in June 2011. We conducted comprehensive research into the compensation scheme for adverse drug reactions in the world. We also investigated the situation of compensation and the committee for discussing inclusion of anticancer drugs into the relief system in Japan. Many countries including the United States and UK do not have relief or compensation schemes for no-fault compensation. We investigated whether a no-fault compensation system exists in Nordic countries (Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland), France, Germany, New Zealand and Taiwan in the world, although they offer different services from Japan. We also reviewed current situation and the fundamental difficulties associated with including anticancer drugs in the systems in Japan. The present study investigated the current situation and the fundamental difficulties associated with including anticancer drugs in the systems in Japan and pointed out part of the reason why the committee could not conclude involvement of anticancer drugs in the relief system.

  17. [Analgesics in geriatric patients. Adverse side effects and interactions].

    PubMed

    Gosch, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Pain is a widespread symptom in clinical practice. Older adults and chronically ill patients are particularly affected. In multimorbid geriatric patients, pharmacological pain treatment is an extension of a previously existing multimedication. Besides the efficacy of pain treatment, drug side effects and drug-drug interactions have to be taken into account to minimize the health risk for these patients. Apart from the number of prescriptions, the age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes significantly increase the risk among older adults. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) is widespread but NSAIDs have the highest risk of adverse drug reactions and drug interactions. In particular, the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal and coagulation systems are affected. Apart from the known toxic effect on the liver (in high doses), paracetamol (acetaminophen) has similar risks although to a lesser degree. According to current data, metamizol is actually better than its reputation suggests. The risk of potential drug interactions seems to be low. Apart from the risk of sedation in combination with other drugs, tramadol and other opioids can induce the serotonin syndrome. Among older adults, especially in the case of polypharmacy, an individualized approach should be considered instead of sticking to the pain management recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) in order to minimize drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions.

  18. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions with Antimalarials and Allergological Skin Tests.

    PubMed

    Soria, Angèle; Barbaud, Annick; Assier, Haudrey; Avenel-Audran, Martine; Tétart, Florence; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Amarger, Stéphanie; Girardin, Pascal; Francès, Camille

    2015-01-01

    Currently used antimalarial drugs (AM) are hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, which are prescribed for many autoimmune disorders. The value of skin tests on cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) with AM remains unknown. The main objective of this retrospective study is to know whether skin tests for AM are useful and how to manage the recovery of AM therapy in these patients. All patients referred for suspected CADR secondary to AM between 2001 and 2014 in eight French dermatology centers were retrospectively reviewed. We report herein a retrospective series of 20 patients with CADR and AM involvement. Skin tests, performed in 14/20 patients, were negative in all cases. Six patients had an oral provocation test with recurrence of CADR in 1 case. We encourage dermatologists to perform oral provocation tests in nonsevere CADR in order to allow AM rechallenge at progressive doses. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Adverse drug reactions: a hospital pharmacy-based reporting scheme.

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, P A; Irvin, L E; Smith, J C; Orme, M L; Breckenridge, A M

    1989-01-01

    A pharmacy-based adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting scheme, using pharmacists, nurses and medical practitioners as initiators of reports, was set up at the end of 1984 in the Royal Liverpool Hospital in order to encourage reporting. New reports were inspected at weekly intervals by a staff pharmacist, and a clinical pharmacologist. Reports were forwarded to the Committee on Safety of Medicines if the reaction was considered to be serious by the clinicians, or the ADR team or involved 'black triangle' drugs. The total number of ADR reports was increased eightfold by the introduction of the scheme (from 14 in 1984 to 76, 102 and 94 in 1985, 1986 and 1987 respectively), and this rate of reporting has been sustained. PMID:2775609

  20. Pharmacogenetics to predict drug-related adverse events.

    PubMed

    Hosford, David A; Lai, Eric H; Riley, John H; Xu, Chun-Fang; Danoff, Theodore M; Roses, Allen D

    2004-01-01

    Identification of reliable markers to predict drug-related adverse events (DRAEs) is an important goal of the pharmaceutical industry and others within the healthcare community. We have used genetic polymorphisms, including the most frequent source of variation (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) in the human genome, in pharmacogenetic approaches designed to predict DRAEs. Three studies exemplify the principles of using polymorphisms to identify associations in progressively larger genomic regions: polymorphic repeats within the UDP-glucuronysltransferase I (UGT1A1) gene in patients experiencing hyperbilirubinemia after administration of tranilast, an experimental drug to prevent re-stenosis following coronary revascularization; high linkage disequilibrium within the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene in patients with Alzheimer Disease (AD); and the polymorphic variant HLA-B57 in patients with hypersensitivity reaction after administration of abacavir, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV. Together, these studies demonstrate in a stepwise manner the feasibility of using pharmacogenetic approaches to predict DRAEs.

  1. Human leukocyte antigen and idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Usui, Toru; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2017-02-01

    A clinical association between a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele and idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs) is a strong indication that IADRs are mediated by the adaptive immune system. For example, it is well-established that HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-B*57:01 are associated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and abacavir-induced hypersensitivity/flucloxacillin-induced liver injury, respectively. Drug-specific T-cells whose response is restricted by specific HLA risk alleles have been detected from IADR patients, also suggesting an adaptive immune pathogenesis. T-cells from carbamazepine SJS/TEN patients are activated by direct pharmacological interaction between carbamazepine and HLA-B*15:02 expressed on antigen presenting cells (APCs). Abacavir-specific, HLA-B*57:01-restricted T-cells are activated by APCs presenting peptides which are only displayed by the HLA molecule when abacavir is bound during peptide loading. Finally, HLA-B*57:01-restricted activation of T-cells from patients with flucloxacillin-induced liver injury is dependent on processing of drug protein adducts. Based on these observations, it is now possible to utilize blood from healthy drug-naïve volunteers to study the priming of naïve T-cells to drugs. Future development of these methodologies may lead to the development of assays that predict intrinsic immunogenicity of drugs and chemicals at the preclinical stage of drug development. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Telematics integrated system to perform drugs prescription and administration reducing adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Iadanza, E; Pettenati, M C; Bianchi, L; Turchi, S; Ciofi, L; Pirri, F; Biffi Gentili, G; Giuli, D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present PHARMA 2.0 a telematics integrated system aimed at reducing Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) in the phases of drug prescription, transcription, distribution and administration. The proposed system is grounded on three sub-systems: a CPOE (Computerized Prescription Order Entry), an RFID-based drug container and dispenser and a middleware system. The visualization and management of prescription and administration data are handled through a web application designed to comply with international usability regulation.

  3. A Synthesis of Current Surveillance Planning Methods for the Sequential Monitoring of Drug and Vaccine Adverse Effects Using Electronic Health Care Data

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jennifer C.; Wellman, Robert; Yu, Onchee; Cook, Andrea J.; Maro, Judith C.; Ouellet-Hellstrom, Rita; Boudreau, Denise; Floyd, James S.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Pinheiro, Simone; Reichman, Marsha; Shoaibi, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The large-scale assembly of electronic health care data combined with the use of sequential monitoring has made proactive postmarket drug- and vaccine-safety surveillance possible. Although sequential designs have been used extensively in randomized trials, less attention has been given to methods for applying them in observational electronic health care database settings. Existing Methods: We review current sequential-surveillance planning methods from randomized trials, and the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) and Mini-Sentinel Pilot projects—two national observational electronic health care database safety monitoring programs. Future Surveillance Planning: Based on this examination, we suggest three steps for future surveillance planning in health care databases: (1) prespecify the sequential design and analysis plan, using available feasibility data to reduce assumptions and minimize later changes to initial plans; (2) assess existing drug or vaccine uptake, to determine if there is adequate information to proceed with surveillance, before conducting more resource-intensive planning; and (3) statistically evaluate and clearly communicate the sequential design with all those designing and interpreting the safety-surveillance results prior to implementation. Plans should also be flexible enough to accommodate dynamic and often unpredictable changes to the database information made by the health plans for administrative purposes. Conclusions: This paper is intended to encourage dialogue about establishing a more systematic, scalable, and transparent sequential design-planning process for medical-product safety-surveillance systems utilizing observational electronic health care databases. Creating such a framework could yield improvements over existing practices, such as designs with increased power to assess serious adverse events. PMID:27713904

  4. [International reporting of adverse drug reactions. Final report of CIOMS ADR Working Group].

    PubMed

    Royer, R J; Benichou, C

    1991-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences, a working group composed of representatives of seven multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers and six regulatory authorities developed and implemented a standardized method for reporting post-approval adverse drug reactions (ADR). The method is based on a set of uniform definitions and procedures and a single reporting form, and has been demonstrated to be feasible and effective. Regulators and manufacturers, in establishing requirements and systems for reporting of adverse drug reactions, should consider adopting this method.

  5. Adverse drug reactions in special populations – the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E A; O’Mahony, M S

    2015-01-01

    The International Conference on Harmonization considers older people a ‘special population’, as they differ from younger adults in terms of comorbidity, polypharmacy, pharmacokinetics and greater vulnerability to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Medical practice is often based on single disease guidelines derived from clinical trials that have not included frail older people or those with multiple morbidities. This presents a challenge caring for older people, as drug doses in trials may not be achievable in real world patients and risks of ADRs are underestimated in clinical trial populations. The majority of ADRs in older people are Type A, potentially avoidable and associated with commonly prescribed medications. Several ADRs are particularly associated with major adverse consequences in the elderly and their reduction is therefore a clinical priority. Falls are strongly associated with benzodiazepines, neuroleptics, antidepressants and antihypertensives. There is good evidence for medication review as part of a multifactorial intervention to reduce falls risk in community dwelling elderly. Multiple medications also contribute to delirium, another multifactorial syndrome resulting in excess mortality particularly in frail older people. Clostridium difficile associated with use of broad spectrum antibiotics mainly affects frail older people and results in prolonged hospital stay with substantial morbidity and mortality. Antipsychotics increase the risk of stroke by more than three-fold in patients with dementia. Inappropriate prescribing can be reduced by adherence to prescribing guidelines, suitable monitoring and regular medication review. Given the heterogeneity within the older population, providing individualized care is pivotal to preventing ADRs. PMID:25619317

  6. 3D Pharmacophoric Similarity improves Multi Adverse Drug Event Identification in Pharmacovigilance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Hripcsak, George

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining.

  7. 3D pharmacophoric similarity improves multi adverse drug event identification in pharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Hripcsak, George

    2015-03-06

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining.

  8. Natural Inhibitors of Cholinesterases: Implications for Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase are two closely related enzymes important in the metabolism of acetylcholine and anaesthetic drugs, including succinylcholine, mivacurium, and cocaine. The solanaceous glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are naturally occurring steroids in potatoes and related plants that inhibit both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. There are many clinical examples of direct SGA toxicity due to cholinesterase inhibition. The aim of this study was to review the hypotheses that (1) SGAs may be the evolutionary driving force for atypical butyrylcholinesterase alleles and that (2) SGAs may adversely influence the actions of anaesthetic drugs that metabolized by acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Source The information was obtained by Medline search and consultation with experts in the study of SGAs and cholinesterases. Principal findings The SGAs inhibit both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in numerous in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although accurate assays of SGA levels are difficult, published data indicate human serum SGA concentrations at least ten-fold lower than required to inhibit acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in vitro. However, we review evidence that suggests the dietary ingestion of SGAs can initiate a cholinergic syndrome in humans. This syndrome occurs at SGA levels lower than those which interfere with anaesthetic drug catabolism. The world distribution of solanaceous plants parallels the distribution of atypical alleles of butyrylcholinesterase and may explain the genetic diversity of the butyrylcholinesterase gene. Conclusion Correlative evidence suggests that dietary SGAs may be the driving force for atypical butyrylcholinesterase alleles. In addition, SGAs may influence the metabolism of anaesthetic drugs and this hypothesis warrants experimental investigation. PMID:9161749

  9. Predicting risk of adverse drug reactions in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lavan, Amanda Hanora; Gallagher, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common in older adults, with falls, orthostatic hypotension, delirium, renal failure, gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding being amongst the most common clinical manifestations. ADR risk increases with age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, increasing burden of comorbidity, polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing and suboptimal monitoring of drugs. ADRs are a preventable cause of harm to patients and an unnecessary waste of healthcare resources. Several ADR risk tools exist but none has sufficient predictive value for clinical practice. Good clinical practice for detecting and predicting ADRs in vulnerable patients includes detailed documentation and regular review of prescribed and over-the-counter medications through standardized medication reconciliation. New medications should be prescribed cautiously with clear therapeutic goals and recognition of the impact a drug can have on multiple organ systems. Prescribers should regularly review medication efficacy and be vigilant for ADRs and their contributory risk factors. Deprescribing should occur at an individual level when drugs are no longer efficacious or beneficial or when safer alternatives exist. Inappropriate prescribing and unnecessary polypharmacy should be minimized. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and the use of explicit prescribing criteria can be useful in this regard. PMID:26834959

  10. Data mining to generate adverse drug events detection rules.

    PubMed

    Chazard, Emmanuel; Ficheur, Grégoire; Bernonville, Stéphanie; Luyckx, Michel; Beuscart, Régis

    2011-11-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are a public health issue. Their detection usually relies on voluntary reporting or medical chart reviews. The objective of this paper is to automatically detect cases of ADEs by data mining. 115,447 complete past hospital stays are extracted from six French, Danish, and Bulgarian hospitals using a common data model including diagnoses, drug administrations, laboratory results, and free-text records. Different kinds of outcomes are traced, and supervised rule induction methods (decision trees and association rules) are used to discover ADE detection rules, with respect to time constraints. The rules are then filtered, validated, and reorganized by a committee of experts. The rules are described in a rule repository, and several statistics are automatically computed in every medical department, such as the confidence, relative risk, and median delay of outcome appearance. 236 validated ADE-detection rules are discovered; they enable to detect 27 different kinds of outcomes. The rules use a various number of conditions related to laboratory results, diseases, drug administration, and demographics. Some rules involve innovative conditions, such as drug discontinuations.

  11. Quality of case reports of adverse drug reactions with psychotropic drugs: a 25-year review.

    PubMed

    Talat, Bilal; Mayers, Andrew; Baldwin, David S

    2013-09-01

    Case reports of adverse reactions with psychotropic drugs can be useful in raising hypotheses, to be tested with more rigorous study designs. However such reports have significant methodological drawbacks, making it hard to determine causality. We undertook a systematic assessment of the quality of case reports and small case series published within Human Psychopharmacology over 25 years. For reports of adverse drug reactions, modified Bradford Hill criteria for causality (for consistency, strength, specificity, temporal relationship and plausibility) were used to ascertain the quality of the account. Reports which had been cited at least 10 times by December 2010 were examined in detail, to assess their overall contribution in extending understanding and influencing clinical practice. Of 40 reports of adverse drug reactions, only seven were sufficiently robust for confidence in probable or possible causality. Nine reports had been cited more than 10 times: the five most frequently cited reports of adverse drug reactions described movement disorders, suicidal thoughts and discontinuation symptoms with SSRIs: clinical relevance was high, but their quality was not markedly greater than less frequently cited reports. Nearly all reports of adverse drug reactions, published in a single journal over 25 years, were insufficiently robust to demonstrate probable causality. Reports that are cited frequently become influential because of their potential clinical relevance, rather than due to their methodological quality. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Using disease management and market reforms to address the adverse economic effects of drug budgets and price and reimbursement regulations in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schwermann, Tim; Greiner, Wolfgang; v d Schulenburg, J M Graf

    2003-01-01

    Germany spends the highest share (10.4%) of its gross domestic product on health care among European Union countries. The majority of this financing comes from an earmarked tax on labor earnings. Drug spending, as a share (12.7%), is relatively low, as is per-capita drug spending. Over the past decade, a number of specific budgeting initiatives were introduced to control drug spending-with some success, at least until the 11% increase in the first 6 months of 2001. This article describes and analyzes these governmental initiatives as well as other market reforms. Germany has had a "drug budget silo mentality" throughout this period. But the focus of the mentality moved rapidly from the central budget to regional budgets and to drug budgets per physician based on historical data. These amounts do not correspond to either medical necessity or economic considerations. An analysis of the health-care system as a whole shows that the efforts to constrain spending with budget in one area can lead to higher total costs. This article also considers the impact of introducing other actual or proposed reforms such as a positive list to replace the negative list, generic substitution, retail price competition among pharmacies, and E-health commerce. There is also a new national institute constructing a database of information on health technology assessments. To overcome the strong segmentation of the health system in physician, drug, and hospital budgets, we recommend using this information from proper cost-effectiveness evaluations to develop clear guidelines for disease management programs, reinforced by appropriate financial incentives.

  13. Ocular Toxoplasmosis: Therapy-Related Adverse Drug Reactions and Their Management.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein, M; Zweifel, S; Barthelmes, D; Meier, F; Fehr, J; Böni, C

    2017-03-22

    Background There are different treatment options for ocular toxoplasmosis (OT). "Classic" therapy consists of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid combined with systemic steroids and is still widely used. However, potentially severe side effects of this therapy have been reported. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence and types of adverse drug reactions in patients treated for OT. Clinical management of each adverse drug reaction was assessed. Patients and Methods In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed data of patients with OT, who were consecutively examined between December 2011 and December 2015 at the Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich. Results In total, 49 patients had at least one episode of active OT. In 54 (83.0 %) of 65 treated episodes, the classic regimen was used. Of the 37 patients who received classic treatment, 9 (24.3 %) developed at least one adverse drug reaction which led to drug discontinuation, including elevated creatinine (5.4 %), elevated liver enzymes (5.4 %), vomiting (5.4 %), rash (5.4 %) and facial swelling (2.7 %). In 5 patients, treatment was switched to another drug, while in the other 4 patients, therapy was stopped. In these 9 patients, inflammation was well controlled 8 weeks after onset of therapy. No patient suffered from severe side effects, such as potentially life-threatening allergic reactions or pancytopenia. Conclusions In OT patients who were treated with classic therapy, adverse drug reactions are common. Therefore, clinical and laboratory monitoring is mandatory. Adverse drug reactions may require interdisciplinary management.

  14. Opportunities for Web-based Drug Repositioning: Searching for Potential Antihypertensive Agents with Hypotension Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Wan, Mei; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug repositioning refers to the process of developing new indications for existing drugs. As a phenotypic indicator of drug response in humans, clinical side effects may provide straightforward signals and unique opportunities for drug repositioning. Objective We aimed to identify drugs frequently associated with hypotension adverse reactions (ie, the opposite condition of hypertension), which could be potential candidates as antihypertensive agents. Methods We systematically searched the electronic records of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) through the openFDA platform to assess the association between hypotension incidence and antihypertensive therapeutic effect regarding a list of 683 drugs. Results Statistical analysis of FAERS data demonstrated that those drugs frequently co-occurring with hypotension events were more likely to have antihypertensive activity. Ranked by the statistical significance of frequent hypotension reporting, the well-known antihypertensive drugs were effectively distinguished from others (with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve > 0.80 and a normalized discounted cumulative gain of 0.77). In addition, we found a series of antihypertensive agents (particularly drugs originally developed for treating nervous system diseases) among the drugs with top significant reporting, suggesting the good potential of Web-based and data-driven drug repositioning. Conclusions We found several candidate agents among the hypotension-related drugs on our list that may be redirected for lowering blood pressure. More important, we showed that a pharmacovigilance system could alternatively be used to identify antihypertensive agents and sustainably create opportunities for drug repositioning. PMID:27036325

  15. The adverse effects of kava.

    PubMed

    Kava, R

    2001-03-01

    In Fiji, kava is also known as yaqona or grog. A convenient sample of 300 kava drinkers in Nadi, Lautoka, Ba and Sigatoka were studied to see whether local people in Fiji experienced side effects of kava use. Because males usually consume kava in Fiji, we approached specific groups of people and asked them to participate in the survey. To evaluate the side effects of kava consumption, we interviewed housewives of male kava drinkers regarding specific effects of kava. We interviewed these housewives during kava drinking sessions since they were usually not taking part in the kava drinking. We also interviewed employers of these kava drinkers and the market vendors in Nadi Town since they were closely involved with kava drinkers. Wives of kava users felt deprived of basic family needs due to the amount of money spent on kava. In Urban schools, 64% males and 46.2% had tried kava. The present study aims to assess the prevalence of side effects of kava usage among a community sample of kava drinkers in Fiji and to compare the result with some of the side effects provided by other studies. The questionnaire also asked how much kava was consumed and the reasons. Since kava use is very much part of our everyday culture and existence, convincing people to change their behavior and kava consumption is a major tasks. I hope that this study would emphasize the need at a national level to educate people on the harmful effects of kava and the need for the health ministry to view very heavy kava intake as contributing to morbidity in Fiji.

  16. Adverse effects of marijuana use.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Kathleen E; Kampman, Kyle M

    2016-05-01

    Marijuana has consistently been reported as the most commonly used illicit substance in the United States each year. Currently, the legalization of marijuana is up for debate across the nation. While marijuana use is prevalent among the adolescent population, research has shown that there can be devastating effects on health and well-being. A review of the literature shows that marijuana use can have a negative impact on physical health, psychological well-being, and multiple psychosocial outcomes. Adolescents who used marijuana more frequently and began using marijuana at an earlier age experienced worse outcomes and long-lasting effects.

  17. Are the true impacts of adverse events considered in economic models of antineoplastic drugs? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Alison; Haas, Marion; Viney, Rosalie

    2013-12-01

    Antineoplastic drugs for cancer are often associated with adverse events, which influence patients' physical health, quality of life and survival. However, the modelling of adverse events in cost-effectiveness analyses of antineoplastic drugs has not been examined. This article reviews published economic evaluations that include a calculated cost for adverse events of antineoplastic drugs. The aim is to identify how existing models manage four issues specific to antineoplastic drug adverse events: the selection of adverse events for inclusion in models, the influence of dose modifications on drug quantity and survival outcomes, the influence of adverse events on quality of life and the consideration of multiple simultaneous or recurring adverse events. A systematic literature search was conducted using MESH headings and key words in multiple electronic databases, covering the years 1999-2009. Inclusion criteria for eligibility were papers covering a population of adults with solid tumour cancers, the inclusion of at least one adverse event and the resource use and/or costs of adverse event treatment. From 4,985 citations, 26 eligible articles were identified. Studies were generally of moderate quality and addressed a range of cancers and treatment types. While the four issues specific to antineoplastic drug adverse events were addressed by some studies, no study addressed all of the issues in the same model. This review indicates that current modelling assumptions may restrict our understanding of the true impact of adverse events on cost effectiveness of antineoplastic drugs. This understanding could be improved through consideration of the selection of adverse events, dose modifications, multiple events and quality of life in cost-effectiveness studies.

  18. Adverse drug reaction profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs: A focused pharmacovigilance study in India.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Hasitha Diana; Adiga, Shalini; Thomas, Joseph; Sharma, Ajitha

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs (taxanes and vinca alkaloids) and to look for unexpected ADRs among the local population. Focused study on these drugs, rampantly used in oncology department for a wide variety of tumors including early and advanced malignancies, would enable better treatment care by physicians. Data on ADRs were collected from the cancer patients belonging to both gender and of all ages, on taxanes- or vinca-based cancer chemotherapy and reported in the Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission form. Causality was assessed using the WHO criteria and Naranjo's Algorithm. Preventability and severity of ADRs were also assessed. A total of 97 ADRs were reported among 488 patients on microtubule-damaging anticancer drugs admitted over a period of 1 year. The incidence rate was 19.87%. Gastrointestinal system (40.2%) was the most affected followed by bone marrow (33%) and skin (8.2%). The highest incidence of ADRs was reported among paclitaxel (54.6%), and vincristine (39.2%). Most of the reported ADRs were of milder nature and preventable. The WHO causality assessment scale indicated 71.1% possible reactions. This study showed that most ADRs are preventable with effective ADR monitoring. There is a great need to create awareness among healthcare professionals regarding the importance of the pharmacovigilance system. Judicious use of the preventive measures will lead to a reduction in the incidence of ADRs due to the drug armamentarium, thereby enabling additional economic benefit to the patient and society.

  19. Adverse drug reaction profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs: A focused pharmacovigilance study in India

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Hasitha Diana; Adiga, Shalini; Thomas, Joseph; Sharma, Ajitha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to analyze the adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs (taxanes and vinca alkaloids) and to look for unexpected ADRs among the local population. Focused study on these drugs, rampantly used in oncology department for a wide variety of tumors including early and advanced malignancies, would enable better treatment care by physicians. Materials and Methods: Data on ADRs were collected from the cancer patients belonging to both gender and of all ages, on taxanes- or vinca-based cancer chemotherapy and reported in the Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission form. Causality was assessed using the WHO criteria and Naranjo's Algorithm. Preventability and severity of ADRs were also assessed. Results: A total of 97 ADRs were reported among 488 patients on microtubule-damaging anticancer drugs admitted over a period of 1 year. The incidence rate was 19.87%. Gastrointestinal system (40.2%) was the most affected followed by bone marrow (33%) and skin (8.2%). The highest incidence of ADRs was reported among paclitaxel (54.6%), and vincristine (39.2%). Most of the reported ADRs were of milder nature and preventable. The WHO causality assessment scale indicated 71.1% possible reactions. Conclusions: This study showed that most ADRs are preventable with effective ADR monitoring. There is a great need to create awareness among healthcare professionals regarding the importance of the pharmacovigilance system. Judicious use of the preventive measures will lead to a reduction in the incidence of ADRs due to the drug armamentarium, thereby enabling additional economic benefit to the patient and society. PMID:27721535

  20. [Dealing with adverse drug reactions in dentistry. Procedures on encountering adverse drug reactions and goal of the Swiss Pharmacovigilance system].

    PubMed

    Egger, Sabin S; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Schlienger, Raymond G

    2005-01-01

    Dentists may be confronted with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in their dental practice, and are--like other health professionals--obliged to report certain ADRs. The aim of this article is to sensitise dentists for this topic, to show how to proceed in case of a supposed ADR, and to emphasise the importance of spontaneous reporting of ADRs. ADRs may not always be clearly distinguished from symptoms of underlying diseases, and in cases of polypharmacy multiple drugs may be responsible for the reaction. It is therefore important to get a detailed medical history, and to establish a temporal relationship between start of a therapy and appearance of the symptom. Information from the medical literature, exclusion of other possible causes, and identification of risk factors help to confirm a causal relationship between a suspected drug and an observed reaction. In Switzerland severe and unexpected ADRs have to be reported to one of the regional Pharmacovigilance centres with the yellow ADR reporting form from Swissmedic. The spontaneous reports of ADRs help to early identify new problems of a drug therapy, and permit to take measures to minimise the risk.

  1. Spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting in rural districts of Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Sevene, Esperança; Mariano, Alda; Mehta, Ushma; Machai, Maria; Dodoo, Alexander; Vilardell, David; Patel, Sam; Barnes, Karen; Carné, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    The roll out of various public health programmes involving mass administration of medicines calls for the deployment of responsive pharmacovigilance systems to permit identification of signals of rare or even common adverse reactions. In developing countries in Africa, these systems are mostly absent and their performance under any circumstance is difficult to predict given the known shortage of human, financial and technical resources. Nevertheless, the importance of such systems in all countries is not in doubt, and research to identify problems, with the aim of offering pragmatic solutions, is urgently needed. To examine the impact of training and monitoring of healthcare workers, making supervisory visits and the availability of telecommunication and transport facilities on the implementation of a pharmacovigilance system in Mozambique. This was a descriptive study enumerating the lessons learnt and challenges faced in implementing a spontaneous reporting system in two rural districts of Mozambique - Namaacha and Matutuíne - where remote location, poor telecommunication services and a low level of education of health professionals are ongoing challenges. A 'yellow card' system for spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) was instituted following training of health workers in the selected districts. Thirty-five health professionals (3 medical doctors, 2 technicians, 24 nurses, 4 basic healthcare agents and 2 pharmacy agents) in these districts were trained to diagnose, treat and report ADRs to all medicines using a standardized yellow card system. There were routine site visits to identify and clarify any problems in filling in and sending the forms. One focal person was identified in each district to facilitate communication between the health professionals and the National Pharmacovigilance Unit (NPU). The report form was assessed for quality and causality. The availability of telecommunications and transport was assessed. Fourteen months after

  2. Adverse Drug Events caused by Serious Medication Administration Errors

    PubMed Central

    Sawarkar, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A.; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how often serious or life-threatening medication administration errors with the potential to cause patient harm (or potential adverse drug events) result in actual patient harm (or adverse drug events (ADEs)) in the hospital setting. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of clinical events that transpired following observed medication administration errors. BACKGROUND Medication errors are common at the medication administration stage for hospitalized patients. While many of these errors are considered capable of causing patient harm, it is not clear how often patients are actually harmed by these errors. METHODS In a previous study where 14,041 medication administrations in an acute-care hospital were directly observed, investigators discovered 1271 medication administration errors, of which 133 had the potential to cause serious or life-threatening harm to patients and were considered serious or life-threatening potential ADEs. In the current study, clinical reviewers conducted detailed chart reviews of cases where a serious or life-threatening potential ADE occurred to determine if an actual ADE developed following the potential ADE. Reviewers further assessed the severity of the ADE and attribution to the administration error. RESULTS Ten (7.5% [95% C.I. 6.98, 8.01]) actual adverse drug events or ADEs resulted from the 133 serious and life-threatening potential ADEs, of which 6 resulted in significant, three in serious, and one life threatening injury. Therefore 4 (3% [95% C.I. 2.12, 3.6]) serious and life threatening potential ADEs led to serious or life threatening ADEs. Half of the ten actual ADEs were caused by dosage or monitoring errors for anti-hypertensives. The life threatening ADE was caused by an error that was both a transcription and a timing error. CONCLUSION Potential ADEs at the medication administration stage can cause serious patient harm. Given previous estimates of serious or life-threatening potential ADE of 1.33 per 100

  3. An overview on adverse drug reactions to traditional Chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kelvin; Zhang, Hongwei; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2015-10-01

    The safe use of Chinese materia medica (CMM) and products in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practice conventionally relies on correct pharmacognostic identification, good agricultural and manufacturing practices based on pharmacopoeia standards and rational/correct CMM combinations with TCM-guided clinical prescribing. These experience-based principles may not absolutely ensure safety without careful toxicological investigations when compared with development of new pharmaceutical drugs. Clinically observed toxicity reports remain as guidance for gathering toxicological evidence, though essential as pharmacovigilance, but are considered as late events for ensuring safety. The overview focuses on the following factors: global development of TCM that has affected conventional healthcare; examples of key toxic substances in CMM; reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) consequential to taking CMM and TCM products; and proposals on rational approaches to integrate the knowledge of biomedical science and the principles of TCM practice for detecting early ADRs if both TCM products and orthodox drugs are involved. It is envisaged that good control of the quality and standards of CMM and proprietary Chinese medicines can certainly reduce the incidence of ADRs in TCM practice when these medications are used. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. An overview on adverse drug reactions to traditional Chinese medicines

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kelvin; Zhang, Hongwei; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2015-01-01

    The safe use of Chinese materia medica (CMM) and products in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practice conventionally relies on correct pharmacognostic identification, good agricultural and manufacturing practices based on pharmacopoeia standards and rational/correct CMM combinations with TCM-guided clinical prescribing. These experience-based principles may not absolutely ensure safety without careful toxicological investigations when compared with development of new pharmaceutical drugs. Clinically observed toxicity reports remain as guidance for gathering toxicological evidence, though essential as pharmacovigilance, but are considered as late events for ensuring safety. The overview focuses on the following factors: global development of TCM that has affected conventional healthcare; examples of key toxic substances in CMM; reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) consequential to taking CMM and TCM products; and proposals on rational approaches to integrate the knowledge of biomedical science and the principles of TCM practice for detecting early ADRs if both TCM products and orthodox drugs are involved. It is envisaged that good control of the quality and standards of CMM and proprietary Chinese medicines can certainly reduce the incidence of ADRs in TCM practice when these medications are used. PMID:25619530

  5. Adverse drug reactions in older people: detection and prevention.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Mirko; van der Cammen, Tischa; Onder, Graziano

    2012-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in older adults are an important healthcare problem since they are frequently a cause of hospitalization, occur commonly during admission, and are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Older adults are particularly susceptible to ADRs because they are usually on multiple drug regimens and because age is associated with changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The presentation of an ADR in older adults is often atypical, which further complicates its recognition. One potential strategy for improving recognition of ADRs is to identify those patients who are at risk of an ADR. The recently developed GerontoNet ADR Risk Score is a practical tool for identification of older patients who are at increased risk for an ADR and who may represent a target for interventions aimed at reducing ADRs. Provision of adequate education in the domain of clinical geriatric pharmacology can improve recognition of ADRs. Besides formal surveillance systems, built-in computer programs with electronic prescribing databases and clinical pharmacist involvement in patient care within multidisciplinary geriatric teams might help to minimize the occurrence of ADRs. In addition, a number of actions can be taken in hospitals to stimulate appropriate prescribing and to assure adequate communication between primary and hospital care. In older adults with complex medical problems and needs, a global evaluation obtained through a comprehensive geriatric assessment may be helpful in simplifying drug prescription and prioritizing pharmacological and healthcare needs, resulting in an improvement in quality of prescribing.

  6. Adverse drug reactions to herbal and synthetic expectorants.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Sieder, C; März, R

    1995-01-01

    Our knowledge relating to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of phytomedicines is highly fragmentary. The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of ADRs following medication with herbal or synthetic expectorants. In a multicentre, comparative post-marketing surveillance study of more than 3000 patients with acute bronchitis, about half were treated with a herbal remedy (SinupretR) and the other half with various other expectorants. In ascending order of incidence, ADRs were noted during mono-medication of SinupretR (0.8%), Ambroxol (1.0%) and acetylcysteine (4.3%). When concomitant drugs were used, this rank order was unchanged but incidence rates were markedly increased (3.4, 6.5 and 8.2%, respectively). The most frequent ADRs were gastrointestinal symptoms. It is concluded that expectorants are associated with ADRs in roughly 1-5% of cases undergoing single drug treatment and in 3-10% when more than one medication is being used. Amongst the expectorants used in this study, the herbal preparation SinupretR is associated with the lowest incidence of ADRs.

  7. Perspective on Lithotripsy Adverse Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Thomas; Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar

    2008-09-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an effective and without any doubt the least invasive procedure to treat upper urinary tract calculi. Acute complications are rarely reported and do not require specific treatment in most cases. However, one should be aware that energy levels sufficient for stone breakage are capable of damaging tissue as well, and significant hematoma—not only in the kidney but as well in surrounding organs—has been observed. Furthermore, only little is known about the long-term effects of SWL. Some authors have reported an increased incidence of hypertension and possibly also diabetes mellitus. Such chronic diseases—if indeed related to prior SWL—may be a late result of acute SWL-related trauma but the discussion on the underlying pathogenesis is controversial. Many factors have to be considered, such as the natural history of recurrent stone formers, technical principles of SWL, and differences in treatment protocols. Promising studies are currently underway to optimize stone breakage while limiting potential collateral damage. With this progress, SWL remains a safe treatment option for most urinary calculi.

  8. Potential adverse effects of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Whitten, P L; Lewis, C; Russell, E; Naftolin, F

    1995-03-01

    Evaluation of the potential benefits and risks offered by naturally occurring plant estrogens requires investigation of their potency and sites of action when consumed at natural dietary concentrations. Our investigations have examined the effects of a range of natural dietary concentrations of the most potent plant isoflavonoid, coumestrol, using a rat model and a variety of estrogen-dependent tissues and endpoints. Treatments of immature females demonstrated agonistic action in the reproductive tract, brain, and pituitary at natural dietary concentrations. Experiments designed to test for estrogen antagonism demonstrated that coumestrol did not conform to the picture of a classic antiestrogen. However, coumestrol did suppress estrous cycles in adult females. Developmental actions were examined by neonatal exposure of pups through milk of rat dams fed a coumestrol, control, or commercial soy-based diet during the critical period of the first 10 postnatal days or throughout the 21 days of lactation. The 10-day treatment did not significantly alter adult estrous cyclicity, but the 21-day treatment produced in a persistent estrus state in coumestrol-treated females by 132 days of age. In contrast, the 10-day coumestrol treatments produced significant deficits in the sexual behavior of male offspring. These findings illustrate the broad range of actions of these natural estrogens and the variability in potency across endpoints. This variability argues for the importance of fully characterizing each phytoestrogen in terms of its sites of action, balance of agonistic and antagonistic properties, natural potency, and short-term and long-term effects.

  9. Modelling the adverse effects associated with ecstasy use.

    PubMed

    Fisk, John E; Murphy, Philip N; Montgomery, Catharine; Hadjiefthyvoulou, Florentia

    2011-04-01

    Ecstasy, the street name for 3,4-meththylenedioxymethamphetamine, has been associated with a range of psychiatric symptoms and impaired psychological health in both problem and recreational users. The purpose of the present paper is to determine how these impairments are related to the history of polydrug use, and the conditions under which individuals ingest ecstasy. Associations between the variables of interest were investigated utilizing negative binomial regression. Liverpool and Preston in the North West of England. A convenience sample of 159 recreational ecstasy/polydrug users (80 males, 79 females). The sample was composed primarily of undergraduates. The dependent variable was the number of reported ecstasy-related adverse effects. Independent variables included quantitative aspects of ecstasy and other drug use, and the various beliefs and behaviours associated with ecstasy use. The number of adverse effects was associated positively with life-time exposure to ecstasy and negatively with period of abstinence from the drug. Adverse effects were more common among those who consumed ecstasy and alcohol concurrently, but were unrelated to other aspects of polydrug use. They were unaffected by whether the user took precautions when using the drug, and only weakly related to prior beliefs concerning the effects of ecstasy. Greater life-time exposure to ecstasy and consuming the drug concurrently with alcohol increase the likelihood of experiencing adverse effects, including paranoia, poor general health, irritability, confusion and moodiness. Adverse effects decrease with the period of abstinence from the drug. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. Adverse events and the relation with quality of life in adults with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour using psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Scheifes, Arlette; Walraven, Sanne; Stolker, Joost Jan; Nijman, Henk L I; Egberts, Toine C G; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2016-01-01

    Psychotropic drugs are prescribed to approximately 30-40% of adults with intellectual disability (ID) and challenging behaviour, despite the limited evidence of effectiveness and the potential of adverse events. To assess the prevalence of adverse events in association with psychotropic drug use in adults with ID and challenging behaviour and to examine the relation of these adverse events with the person's quality of life. The presence of adverse events was measured with a questionnaire that had to be filled in by the physicians of the participants. Movement disorders were measured separately with a standardised protocol. The strength of the association between adverse events and Intellectual Disability Quality of Life-16 (IDQOL-16), and daily functioning was investigated using linear regression analyses, taking into account the severity of disease (CGI-S) as potential confounder. Virtually all of 103 adults with ID and challenging behaviour had at least one adverse event (84.4%) and almost half had ≥3 adverse events (45.6%) across different subclasses. Using psychotropic drugs increased the prevalence of adverse events significantly. Respectively 13% of the patients without psychotropic drugs and 61% of the patients with ≥2 psychotropic drugs had ≥3 adverse events. Having adverse events had a significantly negative influence on the quality of life. A large majority of all patients had at least one adverse event associated with psychotropic drug use. More attention is needed for these adverse events and their negative influence on the quality of life of these patients, taking into account the lack of evidence of effectiveness of psychotropic drugs for challenging behaviour. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Study on the Increased Probability of Detecting Adverse Drug Reactions Based on Bayes' Theorem: Evaluation of the Usefulness of Information on the Onset Timing of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Shinji; Enjuji, Takako; Negishi, Akio; Akimoto, Hayato; Ohara, Kousuke; Okita, Mitsuyoshi; Numajiri, Sachihiko; Inoue, Naoko; Ohshima, Shigeru; Terao, Akira; Kobayashi, Daisuke

    2017-09-01

    In order to avoid adverse drug reactions (ADRs), pharmacists are reconstructing ADR-related information based on various types of data gathered from patients, and then providing this information to patients. Among the data provided to patients is the time-to-onset of ADRs after starting the medication (i.e., ADR onset timing information). However, a quantitative evaluation of the effect of onset timing information offered by pharmacists on the probability of ADRs occurring in patients receiving this information has not been reported to date. In this study, we extracted 40 ADR-drug combinations from the data in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database. By applying Bayes' theorem to these combinations, we quantitatively evaluated the usefulness of onset timing information as an ADR detection predictor. As a result, when information on days after taking medication was added, 54 ADR-drug combinations showed a likelihood ratio (LR) in excess of 2. In particular, when considering the ADR-drug combination of anaphylactic shock with levofloxacin or loxoprofen, the number of days elapsed between start of medication and the onset of the ADR was 0, which corresponded to increased likelihood ratios (LRs) of 138.7301 or 58.4516, respectively. When information from 1-7 d after starting medication was added to the combination of liver disorder and acetaminophen, the LR was 11.1775. The results of this study indicate the clinical usefulness of offering information on ADR onset timing.

  12. Muscle spasms: an unexpected adverse drug reaction of pemetrexed?

    PubMed Central

    de Rouw, Hendrika J. A.; Jessurun, Naomi T.; Masen-Poos, Lucie J. P.; Derijks, Hieronymus J.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we describe a 53-year-old woman with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, treated with pemetrexed and cisplatin combination therapy, followed by pemetrexed monotherapy. The patient developed severe muscle spasms at least twice, shortly after administration of pemetrexed monotherapy. A possible explanation for this observation is that in combination with cisplatin therapy, the patient was hyperhydrated before administration to promote renal excretion and reduce toxicity. Pemetrexed is also renally excreted, which supports the finding that toxicity did not occur when the patient was hyperhydrated. After discontinuation of pemetrexed the symptoms did not reoccur. All aspects of this case point to a possible relationship between pemetrexed and an adverse drug reaction (ADR). We conclude that muscle spasms are a rare, but possibly dose-related ADR of pemetrexed-based therapy. PMID:28203304

  13. Enhancing Communication about Paediatric Medicines: Lessons from a Qualitative Study of Parents' Experiences of Their Child's Suspected Adverse Drug Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Arnott, Janine; Hesselgreaves, Hannah; Nunn, Anthony J.; Peak, Matthew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Smyth, Rosalind L.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is little research on parents' experiences of suspected adverse drug reactions in their children and hence little evidence to guide clinicians when communicating with families about problems associated with medicines. Objective To identify any unmet information and communication needs described by parents whose child had a suspected adverse drug reaction. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews with parents of 44 children who had a suspected adverse drug reaction identified on hospital admission, during in-patient treatment or reported by parents using the Yellow Card Scheme (the UK system for collecting spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions). Interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone; most interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Analysis was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method. Results Many parents described being dissatisfied with how clinicians communicated about adverse drug reactions and unclear about the implications for their child's future use of medicines. A few parents felt that clinicians had abandoned their child and reported refusing the use of further medicines because they feared a repeated adverse drug reaction. The accounts of parents of children with cancer were different. They emphasised their confidence in clinicians' management of adverse drug reactions and described how clinicians prospectively explained the risks associated with medicines. Parents linked symptoms to medicines in ways that resembled the established reasoning that clinicians use to evaluate the possibility that a medicine has caused an adverse drug reaction. Conclusion Clinicians' communication about adverse drug reactions was poor from the perspective of parents, indicating that improvements are needed. The accounts of parents of children with cancer indicate that prospective explanation about adverse drug reactions at the time of prescription can be effective. Convergence between parents and

  14. Enhancing communication about paediatric medicines: lessons from a qualitative study of parents' experiences of their child's suspected adverse drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Arnott, Janine; Hesselgreaves, Hannah; Nunn, Anthony J; Peak, Matthew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Smyth, Rosalind L; Turner, Mark A; Young, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    There is little research on parents' experiences of suspected adverse drug reactions in their children and hence little evidence to guide clinicians when communicating with families about problems associated with medicines. To identify any unmet information and communication needs described by parents whose child had a suspected adverse drug reaction. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with parents of 44 children who had a suspected adverse drug reaction identified on hospital admission, during in-patient treatment or reported by parents using the Yellow Card Scheme (the UK system for collecting spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions). Interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone; most interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Analysis was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method. Many parents described being dissatisfied with how clinicians communicated about adverse drug reactions and unclear about the implications for their child's future use of medicines. A few parents felt that clinicians had abandoned their child and reported refusing the use of further medicines because they feared a repeated adverse drug reaction. The accounts of parents of children with cancer were different. They emphasised their confidence in clinicians' management of adverse drug reactions and described how clinicians prospectively explained the risks associated with medicines. Parents linked symptoms to medicines in ways that resembled the established reasoning that clinicians use to evaluate the possibility that a medicine has caused an adverse drug reaction. Clinicians' communication about adverse drug reactions was poor from the perspective of parents, indicating that improvements are needed. The accounts of parents of children with cancer indicate that prospective explanation about adverse drug reactions at the time of prescription can be effective. Convergence between parents and clinicians in their reasoning for linking children

  15. Mining clinical text for signals of adverse drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Srinivasan V; Harpaz, Rave; LePendu, Paea; Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Electronic health records (EHRs) are increasingly being used to complement the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and to enable active pharmacovigilance. Over 30% of all adverse drug reactions are caused by drug–drug interactions (DDIs) and result in significant morbidity every year, making their early identification vital. We present an approach for identifying DDI signals directly from the textual portion of EHRs. Methods We recognize mentions of drug and event concepts from over 50 million clinical notes from two sites to create a timeline of concept mentions for each patient. We then use adjusted disproportionality ratios to identify significant drug–drug–event associations among 1165 drugs and 14 adverse events. To validate our results, we evaluate our performance on a gold standard of 1698 DDIs curated from existing knowledge bases, as well as with signaling DDI associations directly from FAERS using established methods. Results Our method achieves good performance, as measured by our gold standard (area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve >80%), on two independent EHR datasets and the performance is comparable to that of signaling DDIs from FAERS. We demonstrate the utility of our method for early detection of DDIs and for identifying alternatives for risky drug combinations. Finally, we publish a first of its kind database of population event rates among patients on drug combinations based on an EHR corpus. Conclusions It is feasible to identify DDI signals and estimate the rate of adverse events among patients on drug combinations, directly from clinical text; this could have utility in prioritizing drug interaction surveillance as well as in clinical decision support. PMID:24158091

  16. Mining severe drug-drug interaction adverse events using Semantic Web technologies: a case study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqian; Liu, Hongfang; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a major contributing factor for unexpected adverse drug events (ADEs). However, few of knowledge resources cover the severity information of ADEs that is critical for prioritizing the medical need. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based approach for mining severe DDI-induced ADEs. We utilized a normalized FDA Adverse Event Report System (AERS) dataset and performed a case study of three frequently prescribed cardiovascular drugs: Warfarin, Clopidogrel and Simvastatin. We extracted putative DDI-ADE pairs and their associated outcome codes. We developed a pipeline to filter the associations using ADE datasets from SIDER and PharmGKB. We also performed a signal enrichment using electronic medical records (EMR) data. We leveraged the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) grading system and classified the DDI-induced ADEs into the CTCAE in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). We identified 601 DDI-ADE pairs for the three drugs using the filtering pipeline, of which 61 pairs are in Grade 5, 56 pairs in Grade 4 and 484 pairs in Grade 3. Among 601 pairs, the signals of 59 DDI-ADE pairs were identified from the EMR data. The approach developed could be generalized to detect the signals of putative severe ADEs induced by DDIs in other drug domains and would be useful for supporting translational and pharmacovigilance study of severe ADEs.

  17. Adverse drug event notification on a semantic interoperability framework.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Tobias; Eichelberg, Marco; Müller, Frerk; Gönül, Suat; Laleci Erturkmen, Gokce B; Sinaci, A Anil; Appelrath, H-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are common, costly and one of the most important issues in contemporary pharmacotherapy. Current drug safety surveillance methods are largely based on spontaneous reports. However, this is known to be rather ineffective. There is a lack of automated systems checking potential ADEs on routine data captured in electronic health records (EHRs); present systems are usually built directly on top of specific clinical information systems through proprietary interfaces. In the context of the European project "SALUS", we aim to provide an infrastructure as well as a tool-set for accessing and analyzing clinical patient data of heterogeneous clinical information systems utilizing standard methods. This paper focuses on two components of the SALUS architecture: The "Semantic Interoperability Layer" (SIL) enables an access to disparate EHR sources in order to provide the patient data in a common data model for ADE detection within the "ADE Detection and Notification Tool" (ANT). The SIL in combination with the ANT can be used in different clinical environments to increase ADE detection and reporting rates. Thus, our approach promises a profound impact in the domain of pharmacovigilance.

  18. Early identification of adverse drug reactions from search log data.

    PubMed

    White, Ryen W; Wang, Sheng; Pant, Apurv; Harpaz, Rave; Shukla, Pushpraj; Sun, Walter; DuMouchel, William; Horvitz, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The timely and accurate identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) following drug approval is a persistent and serious public health challenge. Aggregated data drawn from anonymized logs of Web searchers has been shown to be a useful source of evidence for detecting ADRs. However, prior studies have been based on the analysis of established ADRs, the existence of which may already be known publically. Awareness of these ADRs can inject existing knowledge about the known ADRs into online content and online behavior, and thus raise questions about the ability of the behavioral log-based methods to detect new ADRs. In contrast to previous studies, we investigate the use of search logs for the early detection of known ADRs. We use a large set of recently labeled ADRs and negative controls to evaluate the ability of search logs to accurately detect ADRs in advance of their publication. We leverage the Internet Archive to estimate when evidence of an ADR first appeared in the public domain and adjust the index date in a backdated analysis. Our results demonstrate how search logs can be used to detect new ADRs, the central challenge in pharmacovigilance.

  19. Knowledge and attitudes to reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Pulford, Andrew; Malcolm, William

    The reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by health professionals forms an important component of ongoing surveillance of post-marketing drug safety. The extension of responsibility for all health professionals to report ADRs has coincided with national immunization programmes, such as the national childhood immunization, human papillomavirus (HPV), and seasonal and H1N1 influenza programmes. The study objective was to evaluate knowledge of, and attitudes to, reporting ADRs among the professional groups most likely to see suspected reactions to vaccines. This included nursing professionals, whose views have not been included in previous studies. A survey of 91 practice nurses, health visitors, school nurses and GPs working in Ayrshire and Arran during June, July and August 2007 was undertaken. The respondents' knowledge of ADR reporting varied considerably. Although the majority of respondents recognized that it is the responsibility of health professionals to report suspected ADRs, there were lower levels of knowledge about the purpose of the Yellow Card system specifically; less than 50% of the respondents reported good knowledge about the system. The study suggests implications for practice with regard to the implementation of large-scale immunization programmes and potential solutions to under-reporting among these professional groups.

  20. Pharmacovigilance on Twitter? Mining Tweets for Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Karen; Pimpalkhute, Pranoti; Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Ginn, Rachel; Smith, Karen L; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has shown that Twitter data analytics can have broad implications on public health research. However, its value for pharmacovigilance has been scantly studied – with health related forums and community support groups preferred for the task. We present a systematic study of tweets collected for 74 drugs to assess their value as sources of potential signals for adverse drug reactions (ADRs). We created an annotated corpus of 10,822 tweets. Each tweet was annotated for the presence or absence of ADR mentions, with the span and Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concept ID noted for each ADR present. Using Cohen’s kappa1, we calculated the inter-annotator agreement (IAA) for the binary annotations to be 0.69. To demonstrate the utility of the corpus, we attempted a lexicon-based approach for concept extraction, with promising success (54.1% precision, 62.1% recall, and 57.8% F-measure). A subset of the corpus is freely available at: http://diego.asu.edu/downloads. PMID:25954400

  1. SMARTS (Systematic Monitoring of Adverse events Related to TreatmentS): The development of a pragmatic patient-completed checklist to assess antipsychotic drug side effects

    PubMed Central

    Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Peuskens, Joseph; Cavallaro, Roberto; Lean, Michael EJ; Morozova, Margarita; Reynolds, Gavin; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Thomas, Pierre; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Antipsychotic drug side effects are common and can cause stigmatisation, decreased quality of life, poor adherence, and secondary morbidity and mortality. Systematic assessment of anticipated side effects is recommended as part of good clinical care, but is uncommon in practice and patients may not spontaneously report side effects. We aimed to develop a simple patient-completed checklist to screen systematically for potential antipsychotic side effects. Methods: The SMARTS checklist was developed over a series of group meetings by an international faculty of 12 experts (including psychiatrists, a general physician and a psychopharmacologist) based on their clinical experience and knowledge of the literature. The emphasis is on tolerability (i.e. assessment of side effects that ‘trouble’ the patient) as subjective impact of side effects is most relevant to medication adherence. The development took account of feedback from practising psychiatrists in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, a process that contributed to face validity. Results: The SMARTS checklist assesses whether patients are currently ‘troubled’ by 11 well-established potential antipsychotic side effects. Patients provide their responses to these questions by circling relevant side effects. An additional open question enquires about any other possible side effects. The checklist has been translated into Italian and Turkish. Conclusions: The SMARTS checklist aims to strike a balance between brevity and capturing the most common and important antipsychotic side effects. It is appropriate for completion by patients prior to a clinical consultation, for example, in the waiting room. It can then form the focus for a more detailed clinical discussion about side effects. It can be used alone or form part of a more comprehensive assessment of antipsychotic side effects including blood tests and a physical examination when appropriate. The checklist assesses current problems and can be used

  2. Impact of a Swiss adverse drug event prevention collaborative.

    PubMed

    Staines, Anthony; Mattia, Costanza; Schaad, Nicolas; Lécureux, Estelle; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    The Hospital Federation of Vaud (Switzerland) used a Breakthrough Collaborative with the aim of reducing adverse drug events (ADEs) by 20% in 10 participating hospitals. A set of interventions (covering patient identification, high-alert medication and medication preparation in the ward) was deployed over 18 months starting in October 2010. All hospitals monitored discrepancies between drugs prescribed and those prepared for administration, as well as the occurrence of ADEs using the ADE Trigger Tool for 18 months (cohort 1). A subset of five hospitals continued this monitoring for 12 additional months (cohort 2). In cohort 1, pill box discrepancies were present in 5.9% of doses (n = 9772) in 2011 and in 5.8% (n = 2251) in the first 3 months of 2012 (no statistical significance). There were no significant differences in the rate of ADEs/1000 doses across time (1.2 in 2010, 1.0 in 2011 and 1.0 in 2012). In cohort 2, pill box discrepancies were reduced from 6.5% (n = 4846 doses) in 2011 to 4.4% (n = 7355) in 2012 (P < 0.001) to 3.0% for the first 3 months of 2013 (n = 2251; P = 0.004). The rate of ADEs/1000 doses decreased (1.8 in 2010, 1.1 in 2011 and 0.6 in 2012/13 (P = 0.008 for 2010-2011, and P < 0.001 for 2011-2012/2013). Reductions in drug discrepancies and ADEs occurred in the cohort with the longer monitoring duration. Factors contributing to success may include the strategic status of the project, executive support, perseverance in post-intervention measurement, and institution-wide rather than partial deployment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Adverse drug reactions reported to the drug and poison information center of Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Saheb Sharif-Askari, Fatemeh; Saheb Sharif-Askari, Narjes; Javadi, Mohammadreza; Gholami, Kheirollah

    2017-01-01

    Burden of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in home-environment and domestic settings, is unknown. To discuss the epidemiology of reported ADRs to 13-Aban drug and poison information center (DPIC) and to discuss the burden of hospitalization caused by these ADRs from commonly implicated therapeutic groups. A retrospective analysis of the yellow card schemes of suspected ADRs reported to the 13-Aban DPIC was conducted from 21 March 2013 to 21 November 2016 inclusive. Characteristics of the ADRs, such as the sex and age of the patient, the therapeutic group involved, and the medical outcome of the exposure, were examined. ADR Hospitalization (ADRH) index was calculated for each drug group by dividing the number of ADR-related hospitalizations with total number of reported ADR cases (n = 748), and then multiplying by 100. ADRs were reported for 748 patients representing 5 cases per 1000 enquiries to the 13-Aban DPIC over almost 4-years of the study period. Public were responsible for reporting every 4 out of 5 ADR cases (n = 651, 87%) and the remaining 1 out of 5 ADR cases was reported by the health care professionals (n = 97, 13%). Most of the ADRs had a medical outcome documented as having a minor effect or were minimally bothersome to the patients (n = 509, 68%), and less than 4.9% (n = 37) were documented as having a major effect or were life-threatening. Overall, 7.4% (n = 55) of ADRs were resulted in hospitalization. Antibacterials for systemic use represented the therapeutic group with the highest hospitalization index (1.7%). The study concluded that ADRs to antibiotics are common and some of them resulted in hospitalization.

  4. Silicone gel breast implant adverse event reports to the Food and Drug Administration, 1984-1995.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S L; Parmentier, C M; Woo, E K; Vishnuvajjala, R L; Headrick, M L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize the adverse event reports on silicone gel breast implants (SGBIs), including death reports, submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 1984 through 1995 and to analyze changes in the type and complexity of reports following extensive media coverage of breast implants. METHODS: The authors analyzed mandatory and voluntary reports from the adverse events reporting system for medical devices at the FDA. RESULTS: In 1988, adverse event reports related to SGBIs accounted for 2.4% of the 14,473 mandatory reports entered into the FDA database on medical devices. In 1992, SGBI-related reports accounted for 30.3% of the total 66,476 mandatory reports of adverse events. The most frequently reported adverse event in 1988, before the widespread publicity on breast implants, was implant burst or rupture. In contrast, in 1992 the most frequently reported event was reaction, a term used to describe a range of adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS: The numbers of mandatory and voluntary reports of SGBI-related adverse events increased exponentially, as did the complexity of the reports, following publicity over the lack of safety data on breast implants and a short voluntary moratorium on their sale. A significant proportion of reports lacked information on specific medical symptoms or diagnoses. PMID:9847926

  5. Identifying plausible adverse drug reactions using knowledge extracted from the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ning; Xu, Hua; Rindflesch, Thomas C.; Cohen, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance involves continually monitoring drug safety after drugs are put to market. To aid this process; algorithms for the identification of strongly correlated drug/adverse drug reaction (ADR) pairs from data sources such as adverse event reporting systems or Electronic Health Records have been developed. These methods are generally statistical in nature, and do not draw upon the large volumes of knowledge embedded in the biomedical literature. In this paper, we investigate the ability of scalable Literature Based Discovery (LBD) methods to identify side effects of pharmaceutical agents. The advantage of LBD methods is that they can provide evidence from the literature to support the plausibility of a drug/ ADR association, thereby assisting human review to validate the signal, which is an essential component of pharmacovigilance. To do so, we draw upon vast repositories of knowledge that has been extracted from the biomedical literature by two Natural Language Processing tools, MetaMap and SemRep. We evaluate two LBD methods that scale comfortably to the volume of knowledge available in these repositories. Specifically, we evaluate Reflective Random Indexing (RRI), a model based on concept-level co-occurrence, and Predication-based Semantic Indexing (PSI), a model that encodes the nature of the relationship between concepts to support reasoning analogically about drug-effect relationships. An evaluation set was constructed from the Side Effect Resource 2 (SIDER2), which contains known drug/ADR relations, and models were evaluated for their ability to “rediscover” these relations. In this paper, we demonstrate that both RRI and PSI can recover known drug-adverse event associations. However, PSI performed better overall, and has the additional advantage of being able to recover the literature underlying the reasoning pathways it used to make its predictions. PMID:25046831

  6. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes. A constant threat.

    PubMed

    Maravelias, C; Dona, A; Stefanidou, M; Spiliopoulou, C

    2005-09-15

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are used as ergogenic aids by athletes and non-athletes to enhance performance by augmenting muscular development and strength. AAS administration is often associated with various adverse effects that are generally dose related. High and multi-doses of AAS used for athletic enhancement can lead to serious and irreversible organ damage. Among the most common adverse effects of AAS are some degree of reduced fertility and gynecomastia in males and masculinization in women and children. Other adverse effects include hypertension and atherosclerosis, blood clotting, jaundice, hepatic neoplasms and carcinoma, tendon damage, psychiatric and behavioral disorders. More specifically, this article reviews the reproductive, hepatic, cardiovascular, hematological, cerebrovascular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, renal, immunologic and psychologic effects. Drug-prevention counseling to athletes is highlighted and the use of anabolic steroids is must be avoided, emphasizing that sports goals may be met within the framework of honest competition, free of doping substances.

  7. The role of the clinical pharmacologist in the management of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Moore, N

    2001-01-01

    The classical definition of clinical pharmacology is the study or the knowledge of the effects of drugs in humans. The activities of a clinical pharmacologist can vary from country to country, usually ranging from involvement in clinical trials, especially fundamental pharmacodynamic studies, to studies of pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism, to pharmacogenetics. Most clinical pharmacologists outside industry are in hospitals or university hospitals and research centres. In addition to research, this implies teaching of clinical pharmacology, and interacting with other medical staff: in the field of research, giving advice on clinical trials methodology and often managing a therapeutic drug monitoring centre. Some clinical pharmacologists have clinical departments with beds or consulting offices. Can there be another role for the clinical pharmacologist that would increase his or her usefulness for the medical community? Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are remarkably complex events, related to drug effects, patient characteristics (background diseases, genetics), and drug/disease interactions. Evaluation of ADRs requires understanding of drug mechanisms and interactions, and of disease diagnostics, especially in the discussion of alternative diagnoses. This implies expertise as a pharmacologist and a clinician. In addition, because not all adverse reactions or interactions are in the Summary of Product Characteristics, and because problems arise long before they report in the literature, it is necessary for the clinical pharmacologist to have knowledge of ongoing regulatory processes, in addition to having access to the published literature. Helping clinicians cope with individual patient problems will also improve the clinical pharmacologist's integration into the healthcare process.

  8. Drug-Related Adverse Events of Osteoporosis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moin; Cheung, Angela M; Khan, Aliya A

    2017-03-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is associated with microarchitectural deterioration and increased risk of fracture. Osteoporosis therapy effectively reduces the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fracture and has been associated with increased survival. Currently approved treatments for osteoporosis include bisphosphonates, denosumab, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and teriparatide. This article reviews the adverse events of therapy associated with these medical interventions. Hormone replacement therapy is not included, because it is no longer indicated for the treatment of osteoporosis in all countries. Calcitonin and strontium ranelate are also not included, because their indication for osteoporosis has recently been limited or withdrawn.

  9. [Evaluation of the Association of Hand-Foot Syndrome with Anticancer Drugs Using the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Databases].

    PubMed

    Sasaoka, Sayaka; Matsui, Toshinobu; Abe, Junko; Umetsu, Ryogo; Kato, Yamato; Ueda, Natsumi; Hane, Yuuki; Motooka, Yumi; Hatahira, Haruna; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare lists hand-foot syndrome as a serious adverse drug event. Therefore, we evaluated its association with anticancer drug therapy using case reports in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). In addition, we calculated the reporting odds ratio (ROR) of anticancer drugs potentially associated with hand-foot syndrome, and applied the Weibull shape parameter to time-to-event data from JADER. We found that JADER contained 338224 reports from April 2004 to November 2014, while FAERS contained 5821354 reports from January 2004 to June 2014. In JADER, the RORs [95% confidence interval (CI)] of hand-foot syndrome for capecitabine, tegafur-gimeracil-oteracil, fluorouracil, sorafenib, and regorafenib were 63.60 (95%CI, 56.19-71.99), 1.30 (95%CI, 0.89-1.89), 0.48 (95%CI, 0.30-0.77), 26.10 (95%CI, 22.86-29.80), and 133.27 (95%CI, 112.85-157.39), respectively. Adverse event symptoms of hand-foot syndrome were observed with most anticancer drugs, which carry warnings of the propensity to cause these effects in their drug information literature. The time-to-event analysis using the Weibull shape parameter revealed differences in the time-dependency of the adverse events of each drug. Therefore, anticancer drugs should be used carefully in clinical practice, and patients may require careful monitoring for symptoms of hand-foot syndrome.

  10. Tailoring of recommendations to reduce serious cutaneous adverse drug reactions: a pharmacogenomics approach.

    PubMed

    Tan-Koi, Wei Chuen; Sung, Cynthia; Chong, Yong Yeow; Lateef, Aisha; Pang, Shiu Ming; Vasudevan, Archana; Aw, Derrick; Lui, Nai Lee; Lee, Shan Xian; Ren, Ee Chee; Koay, Evelyn Sc; Tay, Yong Kwang; Lim, Yen Loo; Lee, Haur Yueh; Dong, Di; Loke, Celine; Tan, Liesbet; Limenta, Michael; Lee, Edmund Jd; Toh, Dorothy; Chan, Cheng Leng

    2017-06-01

    The Health Sciences Authority launched a pharmacogenetics initiative in 2008 to facilitate evaluation of pharmacogenetics associations pertinent for Chinese, Malays and Indians in Singapore. The aim was to reduce the incidence and unpredictability of serious adverse drug reactions, with a focus on serious skin adverse drug reactions. This paper describes the gathering of evidence and weighing of factors that led to different genotyping recommendations for HLA-B*15:02 with carbamazepine and HLA-B*58:01 with allopurinol, despite both having strong genetic associations. Translation of pharmacogenomics at a national level requires careful deliberation of the prevalence of at-risk allele, strength of genetic associations, positive predictive value, cost-effectiveness and availability of alternative therapies. Our experience provides a perspective on translating genomic discoveries in advancing drug safety.

  11. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Juan M.; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Ryan, Patrick B.; Shah, Nigam H.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies. PMID:27193236

  12. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research.

    PubMed

    Banda, Juan M; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Ryan, Patrick B; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-05-10

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies.

  13. Adverse drug reactions amongst adult patients admitted in Lagos State University Teaching Hospital Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Aderemi-Williams, R I; Awodele, O; Boyle, C A

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is a global drug therapy problem. It has been rated as one of the top leading causes of morbidity and mortality. In Nigeria, not much is known about ADRs especially with the existing weak post marketing surveillance for monitoring drug use, and its effect on the population. The study is aimed at determining the incidence of ADRs, presentations of ADRs, classes of drugs that frequently cause ADRs and predictors of ADRs in adult medical in-patients in LASUTH. A retrospective study of six hundred and twenty four (624) case notes of all patients admitted to the medical wards in LASUTH between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2009 was carried out. Information obtained included age, gender, and adverse drug reaction and drug details. The results obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 16 statistical software. Level of significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. A total of 624 case notes consisting of 358 males and 266 females were assessed. The number of patients who experienced adverse drug reactions was 67 (n = 624, 10.7%). The incidence rate of ADRs in LASUTH from the study was 10.7 per 100 patients' population. Most of the ADRs observed were type A reactions (97.8%). Mostly implicated classes of drugs were antidiabetics (26.7%) and NSAIDs (29.3%). The incidence rate of ADRs was 10.7%. ADRs which are predictable and preventable occur in hospitalized patients, such may be prevented or minimized by implementing measures to target specific drugs that are commonly suspected.

  14. The knowledge, attitude and behaviours of nurses about pharmacovigilance, adverse drug reaction and adverse event reporting in a state hospital

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Fisun; Ciftci, Seval; Vural, Birol

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: With the use of any drug comes the possibility of unintended consequences which when harmful are referred to as adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The development of national pharmacovigilance systems is the responsibility of all health workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge of nurses about pharmacovigilance and attitudes about ADR and adverse event reporting. METHODS: This descriptive-cross sectional study was performed in 112 nurses working in a public hospital. The questionnaire was applied about pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions. The knowledge, attitudes and practices about adverse drug reactions were asked. RESULTS: The 74.1% of the nurses definition of “severe adverse effect” of drug therapy. The ratio of participants who knew that ADRs are reported to contact person responsible from pharmacovigilance was 34.9%. Although 70.5% of nurses knew the necessity of ADR reporting, the 8% of the nurses knew Turkish Pharmacovigilance Center (TÜFAM). Only 8% of nurses reported ADRs in their professionality. CONCLUSION: Although most of the participants knew the importance of ADR event reporting, event reporting was low. Thiese results showed that there is a lack of knowledge about pharmacovigilance. Futher studies with different settings and healthcare staff are needed to improve awareness about pharmacovigilance. PMID:28058321

  15. Antiepileptic Drug-Related Adverse Reactions and Factors Influencing These Reactions

    PubMed Central

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; BAKRANI, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Objective According to the basic role of drug side effects in selection of an appropriate drug, patient compliance and the quality of life in epileptic patients, and forasmuch as new drugs with unknown side effect have been introduced, necessity of this research is explained. This study was conducted to evaluate the incidence and clinical characteristics of anti epileptic drug (AED) related adverse reactions in children. Material & Methods In this descriptive study, children less than 14 years old with AED side effects referred to the Children’s Medical Center and Mofid Childeren’s Hospital (Tehran, Iran) were evaluated during 2010-2012. The informations were: sex, age, incriminating drug, type of drug side effect, incubation period, history of drug usage, and patient and family allergy history. Exclusive criterions were age more than 14 years old and reactions due to reasons other than AEDs. Results A total of 70 patients with AED reaction were enrolled in this study. They included 26 (37%) females and 44 (63%) males. The maximum rate of incidence was seen at age less than 5 years old. All the patients had cutaneous eruptions that the most common cutaneous drug eruption was maculopapular rash. The most common culprit was phenobarbital (70%) and the least common was lamotrigine (1.4%). Conclusion In this study, we found higher rates of drug rash in patients treated with aromatic AEDs and lower rates with non-aromatic AEDs. Various endogenous and environmental factors may influence the propensity to develop these reactions. PMID:24665302

  16. Antiepileptic drug-related adverse reactions and factors influencing these reactions.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Bakrani, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    According to the basic role of drug side effects in selection of an appropriate drug, patient compliance and the quality of life in epileptic patients, and forasmuch as new drugs with unknown side effect have been introduced, necessity of this research is explained. This study was conducted to evaluate the incidence and clinical characteristics of anti epileptic drug (AED) related adverse reactions in children. In this descriptive study, children less than 14 years old with AED side effects referred to the Children's Medical Center and Mofid Childeren's Hospital (Tehran, Iran) were evaluated during 2010-2012. The informations were: sex, age, incriminating drug, type of drug side effect, incubation period, history of drug usage, and patient and family allergy history. Exclusive criterions were age more than 14 years old and reactions due to reasons other than AEDs. A total of 70 patients with AED reaction were enrolled in this study. They included 26 (37%) females and 44 (63%) males. The maximum rate of incidence was seen at age less than 5 years old. All the patients had cutaneous eruptions that the most common cutaneous drug eruption was maculopapular rash. The most common culprit was phenobarbital (70%) and the least common was lamotrigine (1.4%). In this study, we found higher rates of drug rash in patients treated with aromatic AEDs and lower rates with non-aromatic AEDs. Various endogenous and environmental factors may influence the propensity to develop these reactions.

  17. Development of the Liverpool Adverse Drug Reaction Avoidability Assessment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Louise E.; Nunn, Anthony J.; Kirkham, Jamie J.; Peak, Matthew; Arnott, Janine; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Turner, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim To develop and test a new tool to assess the avoidability of adverse drug reactions that is suitable for use in paediatrics but which is also applicable to a variety of other settings. Methods The study involved multiple phases. Preliminary work involved using the Hallas scale and a modification of the existing Hallas scale, to assess two different sets of adverse drug reaction (ADR) case reports. Phase 1 defined, modified and refined a new tool using multidisciplinary teams. Phase 2 involved the assessment of 50 ADR case reports from a prospective study of paediatric inpatients by individual assessors. Phase 3 compared assessments with the new tool for individuals and groups in comparison to the ‘gold standard’ (the avoidability outcome set by a panel of senior investigators: an experienced clinical pharmacologist, paediatrician and pharmacist). Main Outcome Measures Inter-rater reliability (IRR), measure of disagreement and utilization of avoidability categories. Results Preliminary work—Pilot phase: results for the original Hallas cases were fair and pairwise kappa scores ranged from 0.21 to 0.36. Results for the modified Hallas cases were poor, pairwise kappa scores ranged from 0.06 to 0.16. Phase 1: on initial use of the new tool, agreement between the two multidisciplinary groups was found on 13/20 cases with a kappa score of 0.29 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.62). Phase 2: the assessment of 50 ADR case reports by six individual reviewers yielded pairwise kappa scores ranging from poor to good 0.12 to 0.75 and percentage exact agreement (%EA) ranged from 52–90%. Phase 3: Percentage exact agreement ranged from 35–70%. Overall, individuals had better agreement with the ‘gold standard’. Conclusion Avoidability assessment is feasible but needs careful attention to methods. The Liverpool ADR avoidability assessment tool showed mixed IRR. We have developed and validated a method for assessing the avoidability of ADRs that is transparent, more objective than

  18. Risk of adverse behavioral effects with pediatric use of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Wayne K; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews evidence that led the Food and Drug Administration to issue a "black box" warning about the risk of "suicidality" (suicidal thoughts and behavior) in children and adolescents during treatment with antidepressants. Re-analysis of data from randomized clinical trials of antidepressants in the pediatric population revealed a significantly greater overall (all drugs across all indications) risk ratio for drug 1.95 (95% Cl, 1.28-2.98) compared to placebo in this sample of approximately 4,000 subjects. The essential message of the "black box" is to remind prescribers and consumers about the importance of monitoring closely for adverse behavioral changes during the initiation of (or changes in) antidepressant therapy. Possible mechanisms that might account for this phenomenon, particularly the so-called activation syndrome, are discussed. Empirical studies are needed to identify the precursors of suicidality and to predict which individuals are most susceptible to adverse behavioral side effects of antidepressants.

  19. Imputation of adverse drug reactions: Causality assessment in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Varallo, Fabiana Rossi; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Herdeiro, Maria Teresa; Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Different algorithms have been developed to standardize the causality assessment of adverse drug reactions (ADR). Although most share common characteristics, the results of the causality assessment are variable depending on the algorithm used. Therefore, using 10 different algorithms, the study aimed to compare inter-rater and multi-rater agreement for ADR causality assessment and identify the most consistent to hospitals. Using ten causality algorithms, four judges independently assessed the first 44 cases of ADRs reported during the first year of implementation of a risk management service in a medium complexity hospital in the state of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Owing to variations in the terminology used for causality, the equivalent imputation terms were grouped into four categories: definite, probable, possible and unlikely. Inter-rater and multi-rater agreement analysis was performed by calculating the Cohen´s and Light´s kappa coefficients, respectively. None of the algorithms showed 100% reproducibility in the causal imputation. Fair inter-rater and multi-rater agreement was found. Emanuele (1984) and WHO-UMC (2010) algorithms showed a fair rate of agreement between the judges (k = 0.36). Although the ADR causality assessment algorithms were poorly reproducible, our data suggest that WHO-UMC algorithm is the most consistent for imputation in hospitals, since it allows evaluating the quality of the report. However, to improve the ability of assessing the causality using algorithms, it is necessary to include criteria for the evaluation of drug-related problems, which may be related to confounding variables that underestimate the causal association.

  20. Imputation of adverse drug reactions: Causality assessment in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives Different algorithms have been developed to standardize the causality assessment of adverse drug reactions (ADR). Although most share common characteristics, the results of the causality assessment are variable depending on the algorithm used. Therefore, using 10 different algorithms, the study aimed to compare inter-rater and multi-rater agreement for ADR causality assessment and identify the most consistent to hospitals. Methods Using ten causality algorithms, four judges independently assessed the first 44 cases of ADRs reported during the first year of implementation of a risk management service in a medium complexity hospital in the state of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Owing to variations in the terminology used for causality, the equivalent imputation terms were grouped into four categories: definite, probable, possible and unlikely. Inter-rater and multi-rater agreement analysis was performed by calculating the Cohen´s and Light´s kappa coefficients, respectively. Results None of the algorithms showed 100% reproducibility in the causal imputation. Fair inter-rater and multi-rater agreement was found. Emanuele (1984) and WHO-UMC (2010) algorithms showed a fair rate of agreement between the judges (k = 0.36). Interpretation & conclusions Although the ADR causality assessment algorithms were poorly reproducible, our data suggest that WHO-UMC algorithm is the most consistent for imputation in hospitals, since it allows evaluating the quality of the report. However, to improve the ability of assessing the causality using algorithms, it is necessary to include criteria for the evaluation of drug-related problems, which may be related to confounding variables that underestimate the causal association. PMID:28166274

  1. Adverse effects of dental local anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Meechan, J G; Rood, J P

    1997-10-01

    This paper considers the adverse effects that a patient may suffer as a result of anticipating an injection of dental local anaesthetic. Although most of these are extremely rare (a testimony to good technique), the dental practitioner should be aware of the possibility of their occurrence and of ways to deal with them.

  2. [Laser trabeculoplasty: therapeutic options and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Wacker, T; Eckert, S

    2010-01-01

    Laser trabeculoplasty is a simple method for treating glaucoma and ocular hypertension and has few adverse effects. There are different laser systems for reducing the intraocular pressure of patients with glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Complications include transient intraocular pressure elevation, iritis, and anterior synechiae.

  3. Predicting and managing adverse reactions of psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ilyina, Rosa Yu; Pasynkova, Olga O; Ziganshina, Lilia E

    2013-01-01

    Neuroleptic induced extrapyramidal disorders are often presented in a form of orofacial hyperkinesias and dystonia. Rational use of neuroleptic drugs requires individualised approach to a patient, however simple criteria for determining individual, "personalised" dosage regimen have not been fully developed for routine practice in resource-limited hospital settings. To study the tonus of tongue muscles as a measure of orofacial dystonia and the total hepatic oxidative capacity as a potential predictor of excessive vulnerability to neuroleptic-induced dystonia in psychiatric patients. We measured the maximal force of the tongue manoeuvre (F, g/cm2), the total (integral) hepatic oxidative capacity by the antipyrine-test and used chlorpromazine equivalent to calculate the total daily neuroleptic load in 283 psychiatric patients and 30 healthy volunteers. The tonus of tongue muscles depends on the total daily neuroleptic dose and the length of antipsychotic treatment. The higher the total daily neuroleptic dose and the longer the treatment history, the greater the tongue muscles' tonus is. The tongue muscles' tonus was greater in patients with low rate of oxidative antipyrine metabolism. Antidepressants contributed to the increased tonus of the tongue muscles in "slow metabolisers" of antipyrine. The simple and cheap measurements of total hepatic oxidative capacity and of muscle tonus of the tongue could be used to predict and manage neuroleptic-induced adverse reactions.

  4. Adverse drug events and medication errors: detection and classification methods.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, T; Gandhi, T K; Seger, A C; Hsieh, T C; Bates, D W

    2004-08-01

    Investigating the incidence, type, and preventability of adverse drug events (ADEs) and medication errors is crucial to improving the quality of health care delivery. ADEs, potential ADEs, and medication errors can be collected by extraction from practice data, solicitation of incidents from health professionals, and patient surveys. Practice data include charts, laboratory, prescription data, and administrative databases, and can be reviewed manually or screened by computer systems to identify signals. Research nurses, pharmacists, or research assistants review these signals, and those that are likely to represent an ADE or medication error are presented to reviewers who independently categorize them into ADEs, potential ADEs, medication errors, or exclusions. These incidents are also classified according to preventability, ameliorability, disability, severity, stage, and responsible person. These classifications, as well as the initial selection of incidents, have been evaluated for agreement between reviewers and the level of agreement found ranged from satisfactory to excellent (kappa = 0.32-0.98). The method of ADE and medication error detection and classification described is feasible and has good reliability. It can be used in various clinical settings to measure and improve medication safety.

  5. Perception of Nigerian medical students on adverse drug reaction reporting.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, Abdullahi Rabiu; Chedi, Bashir A Z; Mohammed, Khalid Garba; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous reporting (SPR) and intensive monitoring are the conventional systems used for detecting, recording, and reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Using spontaneous reporting a lot of successes has been made as existing ADRs were identified and new ones prevented through this methods. The aim of this appraisal was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and the practice of medical students with regards to ADRs reporting and to see if differences exist between the level of study and genders. The questionnaire was adopted, modified, and validated from previous studies. It comprised of 25 questions. It was administered year-IV and V medical students of Bayero University Kano, Nigeria. The data collected were coded and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20, currently known as IBM SPSS Statistics. The response rate was 74%. Among the 108 participants, 80% got the definition of ADRs correct; 63% of them knew the precise functions of pharmacovigilance (PV). In addition, 82% strongly agreed that ADR reporting is health care workers responsibility; 82% also said PV should be taught in detail. Meanwhile, 99% have noticed patient experiencing ADRs; 67% said even mild ADRs should be reported. The outcome of this study showed good knowledge and attitude with respect to ADRs and PV among the medical students surveyed. Unfortunately, the practice of medical students was found to be unsatisfactory. There is a need to upgrade the students teaching the curriculum with respect to ADRs monitoring.

  6. Adverse drug reactions in hospitals: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Davies, Emma C; Green, Christophe F; Mottram, David R; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2007-01-01

    The serious nature of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has been highlighted in a number of instances over the last forty years, the most recent of these being the occurrence of serious thrombotic events with the use of COX-2 inhibitors. ADRs are estimated to be between the 4(th) and 6(th) leading cause of death in the USA, with fatal ADRs occurring in 0.32% of patients. A recent UK study showed that 6.5% of hospital admissions were related to ADRs. ADRs can therefore be regarded as a significant public health and economic problem. There is an urgent need to develop better preventive strategies to reduce the burden of ADRs. Because ADRs can affect any bodily system, can have many different clinical presentations, and are of widely variable severity, prevention will not be easy and will have to be multifactorial in its approach. This paper reviews the epidemiology of ADRs in hospitals and evaluates the research that has been undertaken to date to prevent ADRs.

  7. Tetany: possible adverse effect of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Anwikar, S R; Bandekar, M S; Patel, T K; Patel, P B; Kshirsagar, N A

    2011-01-01

    Bevacizumab a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody was approved in 2004 by US FDA for metastatic colorectal cancer. It is reported to cause potentially serious toxicities including severe hypertension, proteinuria, and congestive heart failure. To correlate adverse event tetany with the use of bevacizumab. World Health Organization's Uppsala Monitoring Centre, Sweden, for reporting of adverse drug reactions from all over the world, identified 7 cases with tetany-related symptoms to bevacizumab from four different countries. These 7 patients reported to UMC database developed adverse events described as musculoskeletal stiffness (1), muscle spasm (1), muscle cramps (1), lock jaw or jaw stiffness (4), and hypertonia (1), with hypocalcaemia. After detailed study of the possible mechanism of actions of bevacizumab and factors causing tetany, it is proposed that there is a possibility of tetany by bevacizumab, which may occur by interfering with calcium metabolism. Resorption of bone through osteoclasts by affecting VEGF may interfere with calcium metabolism. Another possibility of tetany may be due to associated hypomagnesaemia, hypokalemia, or hyponatremia. Tetany should be considered as a one of the signs. Patient on bevacizumab should carefully watch for tetany-related symptoms and calcium and magnesium levels for their safety.

  8. Adverse effects of widowhood in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bíró, Anikó

    2013-03-01

    I investigate the relationship between widowhood and the financial situation among women aged 50 and above in Europe. The results of the paper are based on the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, and its retrospective third wave (SHARELIFE). Using retrospective data makes it possible to analyze the dynamics of the adverse effects of widowhood. I estimate both the short run and long run effects of widowhood on financial circumstances, health, and labor force status. I argue that not only the lack of the deceased husband's income, but also the worse health condition and earlier retirement of widows contribute to the unfavorable financial conditions, although these indirect effects are small. I also analyze the role survivors' pensions have in mitigating the adverse effects of widowhood, and provide evidence for varying compensating effects of survivors' pensions in the European countries analyzed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacogenomics and active surveillance for serious adverse drug reactions in children.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tenneille T; Ross, Colin J D; Sistonen, Johanna; Visscher, Henk; Madadi, Parvaz; Koren, Gideon; Hayden, Michael R; Carleton, Bruce C

    2010-09-01

    Juxtaposing clinical pharmacology with human genetics, pharmacogenomics utilizes a patient's genetic information to identify genetic variants that have the potential to provide clinically relevant predictions of toxicity and efficacy. The goal is to develop personalized and genetic-based predictions of an individual's drug response and likelihood of experiencing an adverse drug reaction. The Canadian Pharmacogenomics Network for Drug Safety (CPNDS) has implemented active adverse drug reaction surveillance to monitor and discover genetic markers related to serious adverse drug reactions in the pediatric population. Evidence-based pharmacogenomics research will inform public policy and influence drug benefit-risk decision-making. Regulatory processes and future challenges in pharmacogenomics research will be discussed.

  10. [Patterns of drug consumption and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions among students of public health].

    PubMed

    Plichta, Danuta; Doryńska, Agnieszka; Spiewak, Radosław

    2012-04-01

    The research of drug consumption is focused mainly upon the elderly, while the knowledge of drug consumption patterns among young people remains insufficient. Public health students (PHS) seem of particular interest as future opinion leaders and drug policy makers. The aim of the study was to analyze opinions and patterns of drug consumption, and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in this group. 130 PHS took part in the anonymous questionnaire survey. All students admitted to using some drug at least once in their lives. While purchasing over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, 51.6% students trusted their own knowledge and experience. Women more often relied on a pharmacist's recommendation (47.2% vs 21.7% men; p = 0.045), while men were more influenced by advertising (34.8% vs 12.3% women, p = 0.008). Strict adherence to recommended dosage of OTC and prescription drugs (Rx) was declared by 41.1% and 71.9% students, respectively. Every fourth student (24.8%) admitted to having purchased a Rx drug at least once without having the prescription. Past episodes of ADR to OTC were reported by 7.8% students and to Rx by 38.4% (p < 0.001). Respectively 27.2% and 34.4% students were never, or hardly ever asked about past ADR by prescribing physicians. According to 89.2% students, drug advertising should be subject to regulation and policing, and 66.1% considered it inaccurate and unreliable. Forty-five percent of students had an OTC drug on them while responding the questionnaire, 20.0% had a prescription drug. Students of public health seem to be notorious consumers of drugs and their attitude seems not fully rational.

  11. Adverse effects of fillers and their histopathology.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2014-12-01

    Injectable fillers nowadays represent a pillar in facial rejuvenation and make a significant contribution to the success of the treatment. Despite their obvious benefits, a wide range of possible complications such as immediate, late, delayed, temporary, or irreversible adverse effects have to be respected. Differentiating the various filler materials, these effects are assigned to histopathology findings and currently available treatment options. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. International reporting on adverse drug reactions: the CIOMS project. CIOMS ADR Working Group.

    PubMed

    Faich, G A; Castle, W; Bankowski, Z

    1990-04-01

    A method for standardized postapproval adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting has been developed and implemented by seven multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers and six regulatory authorities. This is based on a set of uniform definitions, procedures and a single reporting form, and has been demonstrated to be useful and effective. When regulators and manufacturers develop requirements and systems for ADR reporting they should consider adapting this method.

  13. Awareness among nurses about reporting of adverse drug reactions in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Ekman, Elisabet; Petersson, Göran; Tågerud, Sven; Bäckström, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate awareness among nurses regarding their new role as reporters of adverse drug reactions in Sweden and factors that may influence reporting by nurses. Methods In 2007, all nurses were included in the adverse drug reaction reporting scheme in Sweden. A questionnaire was sent to 753 randomly selected nurses in September 2010. Results Of the 453 (60%) responding nurses, 265 (58%) were aware that nurses were included in the reporting of adverse drug reactions. Sixty-one nurses (14%) stated that they had reported an adverse drug reaction. Fifteen percent (n = 70) of the respondents had received training about reporting of adverse drug reactions. Almost one third of these (n = 21, 30%) had reported an adverse drug reaction on at least one occasion. Among nurses without training, a smaller proportion (n = 40, 11%, P < 0.05) had reported an adverse drug reaction on at least one occasion. The two factors considered most important by nurses for reporting were the severity of the adverse drug reaction and if the reaction was to a newly approved drug. A majority of the nurses (n = 397, 88%) were interested in a training course in pharmacology as part of their ongoing professional development. One third (32%) of all nurses stated that one reason for not reporting a suspected adverse drug reaction was that the physician responsible did not regard the reaction necessary to report. Conclusion We found that more than half of the study population of nurses in Sweden were aware of their new role as reporters of adverse drug reactions, but few of the responding nurses had reported an adverse drug reaction. Given that training seems to be associated with high reporting frequency, we suggest more training in pharmacovigilance for nurses. PMID:22826643

  14. Adverse drug reactions in childhood: a review of prospective studies and safety alerts.

    PubMed

    Clavenna, A; Bonati, M

    2009-09-01

    To assess the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the paediatric population and the safety alerts concerning children and adolescents issued by international drug regulatory agencies since 2001. A bibliographic search was performed in the Medline and Embase databases for prospective studies published between January 2001 and December 2007 evaluating the ADR incidence in the paediatric population. Data were analysed by a random effect model. Moreover, the websites of nine international drug regulatory agencies were searched to collect information on safety alerts concerning the paediatric population. A total of eight prospective studies were evaluated, six of which concerned the ADR incidence in hospitalised children. The overall incidence of ADRs was 10.9% (95% CI 4.8 to 17.0) in hospitalised children and 1.0% (95% CI 0.3 to 1.7) in outpatient children. The rate of hospital admission due to ADRs was 1.8% (95% CI 0.4 to 3.2). The skin and gastrointestinal system were the organs most commonly affected and antibiotics were the drugs most commonly associated with ADRs. Safety alerts in the paediatric population were retrieved for 28 drugs, five of which were for psychotropic drugs and most of which were issued by the Food and Drug Administration (20 drugs). For 12 drugs, warnings were published in the 2006-2007 period. Antidepressants were the only drugs for which alerts were issued by all the drug regulatory agencies. To ensure safe and effective medicines for children, efforts are needed at different levels (governments, drug regulatory agencies, pharmaceutical industries, health care professionals, and parents). Collaborative regulatory initiatives, such as the use of common warnings, can also contribute to a more rational use of drugs for children.

  15. Predicting neurological Adverse Drug Reactions based on biological, chemical and phenotypic properties of drugs using machine learning models.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Salma; Goyal, Sukriti; Shanker, Asheesh; Grover, Abhinav

    2017-04-13

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) have become one of the primary reasons for the failure of drugs and a leading cause of deaths. Owing to the severe effects of ADRs, there is an urgent need for the generation of effective models which can accurately predict ADRs during early stages of drug development based on integration of various features of drugs. In the current study, we have focused on neurological ADRs and have used various properties of drugs that include biological properties (targets, transporters and enzymes), chemical properties (substructure fingerprints), phenotypic properties (side effects (SE) and therapeutic indications) and a combinations of the two and three levels of features. We employed relief-based feature selection technique to identify relevant properties and used machine learning approach to generated learned model systems which would predict neurological ADRs prior to preclinical testing. Additionally, in order to explain the efficiency and applicability of the models, we tested them to predict the ADRs for already existing anti-Alzheimer drugs and uncharacterized drugs, respectively in side effect resource (SIDER) database. The generated models were highly accurate and our results showed that the models based on chemical (accuracy 93.20%), phenotypic (accuracy 92.41%) and combination of three properties (accuracy 94.18%) were highly accurate while the models based on biological properties (accuracy 82.11%) were highly informative.

  16. Managing adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Grossman Barr, Nancy

    2010-12-15

    Adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives usually diminish with continued use of the same method. Often, physi- cians only need to reassure patients that these symptoms will likely resolve within three to five months. Long-acting injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is the only hormonal contraceptive that is consistently associated with weight gain; other hormonal methods are unlikely to increase weight independent of lifestyle choices. Switching com- bined oral contraceptives is not effective in treating headaches, nor is the use of multivitamins or diuretics. There are no significant differences among various combined oral contraceptives in terms of breast tenderness, mood changes, and nausea. Breakthrough bleeding is common in the first months of combined oral contraceptive use. If significant abnormal bleeding persists beyond three months, other methods can be considered, and the patient may need to be evaluated for other causes. Studies of adverse sexual effects in women using hormonal contraceptives are inconsistent, and the pharmacologic basis for these symptoms is unclear. If acne develops or worsens with progestin-only contra- ceptives, the patient should be switched to a combination method if she is medically eligible. There is insufficient evidence of any effect of hormonal contraceptives on breast milk quantity and quality. Patient education should be encouraged to decrease the chance of unanticipated adverse effects. Women can also be assessed for medical eligibility before and during the use of hormonal contraceptives.

  17. Adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Montessori, Valentina; Press, Natasha; Harris, Marianne; Akagi, Linda; Montaner, Julio S G

    2004-01-20

    Long-term remission of HIV-1 disease can be readily achieved by combinations of antiretroviral agents. The suppression of plasma viral loads to less than the limit of quantification of the most sensitive commercially available assays (i.e., less than 50 copies/mL) and the coincident improvement in CD4 T cell counts is associated with resolution of established opportunistic infections and a decrease in the risk of new opportunistic infections. However, prolonged treatment with combination regimens can be difficult to sustain because of problems with adherence and toxic effects. All antiretroviral drugs can have both short-term and long-term adverse events. The risk of specific side effects varies from drug to drug, from drug class to drug class, and from patient to patient. A better understanding of the adverse effects of antiretroviral agents is of interest not only for HIV specialists as they try to optimize therapy, but also for other physicians who care for HIV-positive patients.

  18. Adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Montessori, Valentina; Press, Natasha; Harris, Marianne; Akagi, Linda; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2004-01-01

    LONG-TERM REMISSION OF HIV-1 DISEASE CAN BE READILY ACHIEVED by combinations of antiretroviral agents. The suppression of plasma viral loads to less than the limit of quantification of the most sensitive commercially available assays (i.e., less than 50 copies/mL) and the coincident improvement in CD4 T cell counts is associated with resolution of established opportunistic infections and a decrease in the risk of new opportunistic infections. However, prolonged treatment with combination regimens can be difficult to sustain because of problems with adherence and toxic effects. All antiretroviral drugs can have both short-term and long-term adverse events. The risk of specific side effects varies from drug to drug, from drug class to drug class, and from patient to patient. A better understanding of the adverse effects of antiretroviral agents is of interest not only for HIV specialists as they try to optimize therapy, but also for other physicians who care for HIV-positive patients. PMID:14734438

  19. Evaluation of Perioperative Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Karen C.; Patel, Amit; Shaikh, Sofia; Seger, Diane L.; Bates, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to assess the rates of perioperative medication errors (MEs) and adverse drug events (ADEs) as percentages of medication administrations, evaluate their root causes, and formulate targeted solutions to prevent them. Methods In this prospective observational study, anesthesia-trained study staff (anesthesiologists/nurse anesthetists) observed randomly selected operations at a 1,046 bed tertiary care academic medical center to identify MEs and ADEs over eight months. Retrospective chart abstraction was performed to flag events that were missed by observation. All events subsequently underwent review by two independent reviewers. Primary outcomes were the incidence of MEs and ADEs. Results A total of 277 operations were observed with 3,671 medication administrations of which 193 (5.3%, 95% CI 4.5 to 6.0) involved a ME and/or ADE. Of these, 153 (79.3%) were preventable and 40 (20.7%) were non-preventable. The events included 153 (79.3%) errors and 91 (47.2%) ADEs. While 32 (20.9%) of the errors had little potential for harm, 51 (33.3%) led to an observed ADE and an additional 70 (45.8%) had the potential for patient harm. Of the 153 errors, 99 (64.7%) were serious, 51 (33.3%) were significant and 3 (2.0%) were life-threatening. Conclusions One in twenty perioperative medication administrations included an ME and/or ADE. More than one third of the MEs led to observed ADEs, and the remaining two thirds had the potential for harm. These rates are markedly higher than those reported by retrospective surveys. Specific solutions exist which have the potential to decrease the incidence of perioperative MEs. PMID:26501385

  20. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  1. Adverse outcome pathways as tools to assess drug-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vinken, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    Summary Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are novel tools in toxicology and human risk assessment with broad potential. AOPs are designed to provide a clear-cut mechanistic representation of toxicological effects that span over different layers of biological organization. AOPs share a common structure consisting of a molecular initiating event, a series of key events connected by key event relationships and an adverse outcome. Development and evaluation of AOPs ideally complies with OECD guidelines. AOP frameworks have yet been proposed for major types of drug-induced injury, especially in the liver, including steatosis, fibrosis and cholestasis. These newly postulated AOPs can serve a number of purposes pertinent to safety assessment of drugs, in particular the establishment of quantitative structure-activity relationships, the development of novel in vitro toxicity screening tests and the elaboration of prioritization strategies. PMID:27311472

  2. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; Oliveira, Cesar de

    2016-09-01

    to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. identificar e sintetizar estudos que examinam as interações medicamentosas (IM) e reações adversas a medicamentos (RAM) em idosos polimedicados. revisão integrativa de estudos publicados de janeiro de 2008 a dezembro de 2013, de acordo com critérios de inclusão e exclusão, nas bases de dados eletrônicas MEDLINE e EMBASE. foram analisados 47 estudos de texto completo, incluindo 14,624,492 idosos (≥ 60 anos): 24 (51,1%) sobre RAM, 14 (29,8%) sobre IM e 9 estudos (19,1%) que investigaram tanto IM como RAM. Encontramos uma variedade de desenhos metodológicos. Os estudos revisados reforçaram que a polifarmácia é um processo multifatorial, e os preditores e a prescrição inadequada estão associados a

  4. Adverse Effects of Intravenous Cannabis Tea

    PubMed Central

    Mims, Robert B.; Lee, Joel H.

    1977-01-01

    Adverse effects occurred in four youths after intravenous injection of an aqueous cannabis-seed tea, which was prepared by boiling the seeds. The effects were immediate and included nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, watery diarrhea, chills, fever, hypovolemic shock, hypotension, and non-oligemic transitory renal failure. Other manifestations included persistent hypoglycemia, tachycardia, gastrointestinal bleeding, conjunctival hemorrhage, injury, jaundice, splenomegaly, leucocytosis, myalgia, arthralgia, motor weakness, and prostration. Ischemia was noted on electrocardiogram (EKG). All manifestations appeared to reverse within weeks, but these effects had been potentially fatal. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:875075

  5. Adverse health effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Opperhuizen, Antoon; Hartgens, Fred

    2010-06-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic drugs derived from testosterone. Illegally, these drugs are regularly self-administered by body builders and power lifters to enhance their sportive performance. Adverse side effects of AAS include sexual dysfunction, alterations of the cardiovascular system, psyche and behavior, and liver toxicity. However, severe side effects appear only following prolonged use of AAS at high dose and their occurrence is limited. Occasionally, AAS abuse may be linked to certain social and psychological traits of the user, like low self-esteem, low self-confidence, suffered hostility, childhood conduct disorder, and tendency to high-risk behavior. The overwhelming stereotype about AAS is that these compounds cause aggressive behavior in males. However, the underlying personality traits of a specific subgroup of the AAS abusers, who show aggression and hostility, may be relevant, as well. Use of AAS in combination with alcohol largely increases the risk of violence and aggression. The dependence liability of AAS is very low, and withdrawal effects are relatively mild. Based on the scores for acute and chronic adverse health effects, the prevalence of use, social harm and criminality, AAS were ranked among 19 illicit drugs as a group of drugs with a relatively low harm.

  6. Symptomatic sinus bradycardia: A rare adverse effect of intravenous ondansetron

    PubMed Central

    Moazzam, Md Shahnawaz; Nasreen, Farah; Bano, Shahjahan; Amir, Syed Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Ondansetron is a serotonin receptor antagonist which has been used frequently to reduce the incidence of post-operative nausea and vomiting in laparoscopic surgery. It has become very popular drug for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting due to its superiority in-terms of efficacy as well as lack of side effects and drug interactions. Although cardiovascular adverse effects of this drug are rare, we found a case of symptomatic sinus bradycardia in a 43-year-old female patient, going for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, who developed the same after she was given intravenous ondansetron in operation theater during premedication. Hence, we report this case, as the rare possibility of encountering bradycardia effect after intravenous administration of ondansetron should be born in mind. PMID:21655029

  7. Needs for an expanded ontology-based classification of adverse drug reactions and related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhichkin, P E; Athey, B D; Avigan, M I; Abernethy, D R

    2012-06-01

    The growing significance of bioinformatics and systems biology in drug safety research requires a system of adverse-event classification that goes beyond a simple vocabulary. This opinion piece outlines the need for development of an ontology-based framework of describing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and describes the potential applications for such a framework.

  8. Adverse-drug-event surveillance using narrative nursing records in electronic nursing records.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee-Jung; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of adverse drug events can be extracted by analyzing narrative nursing statements documented in standardized terminology-based electronic nursing records. For this study, we reviewed the narrative nursing documentations of 487 admissions of 355 cancer patients who were treated with cisplatin at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea. Narrative nursing statements with the terms "adverse drug reaction," "allergy," "hypersensitivity," and other adverse drug events listed in the safety information were analyzed. In addition, nausea, one of the most frequent adverse drug events, was further examined. Narrative statements documenting the presence or absence of an "adverse drug reaction," "allergy," and "hypersensitivity" were found in 162 admissions (33.3%). The presence or absence of adverse drug events due to cisplatin was documented in 476 admissions (97.7%). At least one adverse drug event was noted in 258 admissions (53.0%). The presence of nausea was documented in 214 admissions (43.9%), and the mean duration of nausea was 5.2 days. The results of this study suggest that adverse drug events can be monitored using narrative nursing statements documented in standardized terminology-based electronic nursing records.

  9. Local adverse effects of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    McCullough, M J; Tyas, M J

    2008-02-01

    Amalgam has been used for the restoration of teeth for well over 100 years, and is the most successful of the direct restorative materials with respect to longevity. Despite the increasing use of tooth-coloured materials, with advantages of aesthetics and adhesion, amalgam is one of the most widely used dental restorative materials. One of the principal disadvantages of amalgam, apart from aesthetics, is that it may have adverse biological effects, both locally and systemically. Locally, it can cause an erythematous lesion on the adjacent oral soft tissues (tongue and buccal mucosa), and systemically free mercury in the amalgam may give rise to a hypersensitivity reaction. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature concerning the local adverse reactions to dental amalgam. The focus will be on the reactions of the oral mucosa, and brief consideration will be given to laboratory cytotoxicity of dental amalgam and its components, and to the 'amalgam tattoo'.

  10. The validation of an invitro colonic motility assay as a biomarker for gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Christopher; Martinez, Vicente; Ewart, Lorna; Gibbons, Stephen; Grundy, Luke; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Grundy, David

    2010-06-15

    Motility-related gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (GADRs), such as constipation and diarrhea, are some of the most frequently reported adverse events associated with the clinical development of new chemical entities, and for marketed drugs. However, biomarkers capable of detecting such GADRs are lacking. Here, we describe an in vitro assay developed to detect and quantify changes in intestinal motility as a surrogate biomarker for constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. In vitro recordings of intraluminal pressure were used to monitor the presence of colonic peristaltic motor complexes (CPMCs) in mouse colonic segments. CPMC frequency, contractile and total mechanical activity were assessed. To validate the assay, two experimental protocols were conducted. Initially, five drugs with known gastrointestinal effects were tested to determine optimal parameters describing excitation and inhibition as markers for disturbances in colonic motility. This was followed by a 'blinded' evaluation of nine drugs associated with or without clinically identified constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. Concentration-response relationships were determined for these drugs and the effects were compared with their maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration in humans. The assay detected stimulatory and inhibitory responses, likely correlating to the occurrence of diarrhea or constipation. Concentration-related effects were identified and potential mechanisms of action were inferred for several drugs. Based on the results from the fourteen drugs assessed, the sensitivity of the assay was calculated at 90%, with a specificity of 75% and predictive capacity of 86%. These results support the potential use of this assay in screening for motility-related GADRs during early discovery phase, safety pharmacology assessment.

  11. Minimizing AED adverse effects: improving quality of life in the interictal state in epilepsy care.

    PubMed

    St Louis, Erik K; Louis, Erik K

    2009-06-01

    The goals of epilepsy therapy are to achieve seizure freedom while minimizing adverse effects of treatment. However, producing seizure-freedom is often overemphasized, at the expense of inducing adverse effects of treatment. All antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have the potential to cause dose-related, "neurotoxic" adverse effects (i.e., drowsiness, fatigue, dizziness, blurry vision, and incoordination). Such adverse effects are common, especially when initiating AED therapy and with polytherapy. Dose-related adverse effects may be obviated in most patients by dose reduction of monotherapy, reduction or elimination of polytherapy, or substituting for a better tolerated AED. Additionally, all older and several newer AEDs have idiosyncratic adverse effects which usually require withdrawal in an affected patient, including serious rash (i.e., Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), hematologic dyscrasias, hepatotoxicity, teratogenesis in women of child bearing potential, bone density loss, neuropathy, and severe gingival hyperplasia. Unfortunately, occurrence of idiosyncratic AED adverse effects cannot be predicted or, in most cases, prevented in susceptible patients. This article reviews a practical approach for the definition and identification of adverse effects of epilepsy therapies, and reviews the literature demonstrating that adverse effects result in detrimental quality of life in epilepsy patients. Strategies for minimizing AED adverse effects by reduction or elimination of AED polytherapy, appropriately employing drug-sparing therapies, and optimally administering AEDs are outlined, including tenets of AED selection, titration, therapeutic AED laboratory monitoring, and avoidance of chronic idiosyncratic adverse effects.

  12. Adverse drug events in surgical patients: an observational multicentre study.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Monica; Boeker, Eveline B; Ramrattan, Maya A; Kiewiet, Jordy J S; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Boermeester, Marja A; Lie-A-Huen, Loraine

    2013-10-01

    Errors occurring during different steps of the medication process can lead to adverse drug events (ADEs). Surgical patients are expected to have an increased risk for ADEs during hospitalization. However, detailed information about ADEs in the surgical patient is lacking. In this study, we aim to measure the incidence and nature of (preventable) ADEs, potential risk factors for and outcome parameters of (preventable) ADEs in surgical patients. Observational multicentre cohort study in which eight surgical wards participated from three Dutch hospitals, all using computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems with clinical decision support. Electively admitted surgical patients of the participating wards were included from March until June 2009. ADEs were measured using a standardized method with expert judgment. Incidence, severity, preventability and accountable medication were assessed. Poisson regression analysis was applied to determine the associations between possible risk factors and the occurrence of ADEs, expressed as incidence rate ratio (IRR). Also outcomes of ADEs in surgical patients were measured. The incidence and nature of (preventable) ADEs in surgical patients. A total of 567 surgical patients were included. We found an incidence of 27.5 ADEs and 4.2 preventable ADEs (pADEs) per 100 admissions (15.4 %). A quarter of the pADEs were severe or life-threatening. Opioids and anti-coagulation medication play a major role in the occurrence of ADEs and pADEs respectively. Univariate analysis revealed an American Society of Anesthesiologists classification of III or more as a risk factor for ADEs. Patients older than 65 years [IRR 2.77 (1.14-6.72)], with cardiovascular comorbidity [IRR 2.87 (1.13-7.28)], or undergoing vascular surgery [IRR 2.32 (1.01-5.32)] were at risk for pADEs. Patients experiencing an ADE had a significant longer duration of admission than patients without an ADE. Surgical patients are at considerable risk of experiencing one or more

  13. Direct and indirect effects of childhood adversity on adult depression.

    PubMed

    LaNoue, Marianna; Graeber, David; de Hernandez, Brisa Urquieta; Warner, Teddy D; Helitzer, Deborah L

    2012-04-01

    Exposure to adverse events in childhood is a predictor of subsequent exposure to adverse events in adulthood, and both are predictors of depression in adults. The degree to which adult depression has a direct effect of childhood adversity versus an indirect effect mediated by adult adversity has not previously been reported. We report data collected from 210 adult participants regarding childhood and adult adversity and current symptoms of depression. Mediation of the relationship between childhood adversity and adult depression by adult adversity was statistically assessed to evaluate the relative direct and indirect effects of childhood adversity on current depression levels in adults. Both the direct effect of childhood adversity on adult depression and the indirect effect, mediated by adulthood events, were significant. Therefore, partial mediation of the relationship between childhood adversity and adult symptoms of depression by adult adverse events was found in the sample. Implications for treatment are presented.

  14. Factors that affect adverse drug reaction reporting among hospital pharmacists in Western China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Zhongliang; Yang, Shimin; Feng, Bianling; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Hua; Huang, Haiyan; Fang, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Hospital pharmacists can make a considerable contribution to the spontaneous reporting system of adverse drug reactions. The factors that influence adverse drug reaction reporting among hospital pharmacists remain largely unknown in China. This study aims to identify factors that affect hospital pharmacist-led adverse drug reaction reporting in Xi'an, and to obtain suggestions from pharmacists about how to improve the current adverse drug reaction reporting system. Hospital settings throughout Xi'an, a region of Western China. A matched case-control study was conducted on a population of 2,814 hospital pharmacists in Xi'an during 2011. Cases included all pharmacists who had reported at least one adverse drug reaction between 2008 and 2010 and agreed to participate in the study (186/204; 91.2 %); controls (n = 372) were pharmacists who had not reported any adverse drug reaction during the same period. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to the participants. Logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between indicator variables and the outcome of having reported at least one adverse drug reaction. Pharmacists' knowledge, attitude and practice towards adverse drug reaction reporting and factors affecting reporting. Higher professional title (adjusted OR 1.44; 95 % CI 1.07-1.94; p = 0.018), having received training about adverse drug reaction reporting (1.64; 1.04-2.57; p = 0.032), better knowledge about reporting (1.53; 1.12-2.08; p = 0.007), "lack of access to adverse drug reaction reporting form" (0.29; 0.12-0.72; p = 0.008) was independently associated with adverse drug reaction reporting. Clinical pharmacists were more likely to report an adverse drug reaction than dispensary pharmacists (1/adjusted OR 5.26; p < 0.001), pharmacy administrators (5.00; p = 0.003), and other technicians (5.56; p = 0.001). Higher professional title, having received training, mastering knowledge about reporting, and being a clinical pharmacist were

  15. Epidemiology of drug exposure and adverse drug reactions in two Swiss departments of internal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fattinger, Karin; Roos, Malgorzata; Vergères, Patrice; Holenstein, Clemens; Kind, Brigitt; Masche, Urspeter; Stocker, David N; Braunschweig, Suzanne; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Galeazzi, Renato L; Follath, Ferenc; Gasser, Theo; Meier, Peter J

    2000-01-01

    Aims To explore drug exposure, frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), types of ADRs, predisposing risk factors and ADR-related excess hospital stay in medical inpatients. Methods Structured data regarding patient characteristics, ‘events’ (symptoms, laboratory results), diagnoses (ICD10) and drug therapy were collected using a computer-supported data entry system and an interface for data retrieval from electronic patient records. ADR data were collected by ‘event monitoring’ to minimize possible bias by the drug monitor. The causality of each event was assessed in relation to disease(s) and drug therapy. Results The analysis included 4331 (100%) hospitalizations. The median observation period was 8 days. The median number of different drugs administered per patient and day was 6 and varied between 4 (Q1) and 9 (Q3) different drugs in 50% of all hospital days. In 41% of all hospitalizations at least one disease-unrelated event could be possibly attributed to drug therapy. Clinically relevant ADRs occurred in 11% of all hospitalizations. In 3.3% of all hospitalizations ADRs were the cause of hospital admission. The incidence of possibly ADR-related deaths was 1.4. Factors predisposing for clinically relevant ADRs were female gender and polypharmacy. ADR-related excess hospital stay accounted for 8.6% of hospital days. Conclusions These data demonstrate the feasibility of the developed ‘event monitoring’ system for quantitative analysis of ADRs in medical inpatients. With increasing numbers of recorded patients the pharmacoepidemiological database provides a valuable tool to study specific questions regarding drug efficacy and safety in hospitalized patients. PMID:10671911

  16. Knowledge-based extraction of adverse drug events from biomedical text

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many biomedical relation extraction systems are machine-learning based and have to be trained on large annotated corpora that are expensive and cumbersome to construct. We developed a knowledge-based relation extraction system that requires minimal training data, and applied the system for the extraction of adverse drug events from biomedical text. The system consists of a concept recognition module that identifies drugs and adverse effects in sentences, and a knowledge-base module that establishes whether a relation exists between the recognized concepts. The knowledge base was filled with information from the Unified Medical Language System. The performance of the system was evaluated on the ADE corpus, consisting of 1644 abstracts with manually annotated adverse drug events. Fifty abstracts were used for training, the remaining abstracts were used for testing. Results The knowledge-based system obtained an F-score of 50.5%, which was 34.4 percentage points better than the co-occurrence baseline. Increasing the training set to 400 abstracts improved the F-score to 54.3%. When the system was compared with a machine-learning system, jSRE, on a subset of the sentences in the ADE corpus, our knowledge-based system achieved an F-score that is 7 percentage points higher than the F-score of jSRE trained on 50 abstracts, and still 2 percentage points higher than jSRE trained on 90% of the corpus. Conclusion A knowledge-based approach can be successfully used to extract adverse drug events from biomedical text without need for a large training set. Whether use of a knowledge base is equally advantageous for other biomedical relation-extraction tasks remains to be investigated. PMID:24593054

  17. Bayesian model selection in logistic regression for the detection of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Marbac, Matthieu; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Sedki, Mohammed

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous adverse event reports have a high potential for detecting adverse drug reactions. However, due to their dimension, the analysis of such databases requires statistical methods. In this context, disproportionality measures can be used. Their main idea is to project the data onto contingency tables in order to measure the strength of associations between drugs and adverse events. However, due to the data projection, these methods are sensitive to the problem of coprescriptions and masking effects. Recently, logistic regressions have been used with a Lasso type penalty to perform the detection of associations between drugs and adverse events. On different examples, this approach limits the drawbacks of the disproportionality methods, but the choice of the penalty value is open to criticism while it strongly influences the results. In this paper, we propose to use a logistic regression whose sparsity is viewed as a model selection challenge. Since the model space is huge, a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm carries out the model selection by maximizing the BIC criterion. Thus, we avoid the calibration of penalty or threshold. During our application on the French pharmacovigilance database, the proposed method is compared to well-established approaches on a reference dataset, and obtains better rates of positive and negative controls. However, many signals (i.e., specific drug-event associations) are not detected by the proposed method. So, we conclude that this method should be used in parallel to existing measures in pharmacovigilance. Code implementing the proposed method is available at the following url: https://github.com/masedki/MHTrajectoryR.

  18. Could chiropractors screen for adverse drug events in the community? Survey of US chiropractors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The "Put Prevention into Practice" campaign of the US Public Health Service (USPHS) was launched with the dissemination of the Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services that recommended standards of clinical care for various prevention activities, including preventive clinical strategies to reduce the risk of adverse drug events. We explored whether nonprescribing clinicians such as chiropractors may contribute to advancing drug safety initiatives by identifying potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients, and by bringing suspected adverse drug events to the attention of the prescribing clinicians. Methods Mail survey of US chiropractors about their detection of potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients. Results Over half of responding chiropractors (62%) reported having identified a suspected adverse drug event occurring in one of their chiropractic patients. The severity of suspected drug-related events detected ranged from mild to severe. Conclusions Chiropractors or other nonprescribing clinicians may be in a position to detect potential adverse drug events in the community. These detection and reporting mechanisms should be standardized and policies related to clinical case management of suspected adverse drug events occurring in their patients should be developed. PMID:21083911

  19. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  20. Environmental perchlorate exposure: potential adverse thyroid effects.

    PubMed

    Leung, Angela M; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Braverman, Lewis E

    2014-10-01

    This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant intelligence quotient in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recently proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants.

  1. Industrial wind turbines and adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Roy D; Krogh, Carmen M E; Horner, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Some people living in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWTs) report experiencing adverse health and socioeconomic effects. This review considers the hypothesis that annoyance from audible IWTs is the cause of these adverse health effects. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar for articles published since 2000 that included the terms "wind turbine health," "wind turbine infrasound," "wind turbine annoyance," "noise annoyance" or "low frequency noise" in the title or abstract. Industrial wind turbines produce sound that is perceived to be more annoying than other sources of sound. Reported effects from exposure to IWTs are consistent with well-known stress effects from persistent unwanted sound. If placed too close to residents, IWTs can negatively affect the physical, mental and social well-being of people. There is sufficient evidence to support the conclusion that noise from audible IWTs is a potential cause of health effects. Inaudible low-frequency noise and infrasound from IWTs cannot be ruled out as plausible causes of health effects.

  2. Adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Mills, Nicholas L; Donaldson, Ken; Hadoke, Paddy W; Boon, Nicholas A; MacNee, William; Cassee, Flemming R; Sandström, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders; Newby, David E

    2009-01-01

    Air pollution is increasingly recognized as an important and modifiable determinant of cardiovascular disease in urban communities. Acute exposure has been linked to a range of adverse cardiovascular events including hospital admissions with angina, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. Long-term exposure increases an individual's lifetime risk of death from coronary heart disease. The main arbiter of these adverse health effects seems to be combustion-derived nanoparticles that incorporate reactive organic and transition metal components. Inhalation of this particulate matter leads to pulmonary inflammation with secondary systemic effects or, after translocation from the lung into the circulation, to direct toxic cardiovascular effects. Through the induction of cellular oxidative stress and proinflammatory pathways, particulate matter augments the development and progression of atherosclerosis via detrimental effects on platelets, vascular tissue, and the myocardium. These effects seem to underpin the atherothrombotic consequences of acute and chronic exposure to air pollution. An increased understanding of the mediators and mechanisms of these processes is necessary if we are to develop strategies to protect individuals at risk and reduce the effect of air pollution on cardiovascular disease.

  3. Suspected adverse drug reactions reported for children worldwide: an exploratory study using VigiBase.

    PubMed

    Star, Kristina; Norén, G Niklas; Nordin, Karin; Edwards, I Ralph

    2011-05-01

    As a first step towards implementing routine screening of safety issues specifically related to children at the Uppsala Monitoring Centre, this study was performed to explore reporting patterns of adverse reactions in children. The first aim of this study was to characterize and contrast child reports against adult reports in an overall drug and adverse reaction review. The second aim was to highlight increases in reporting of specific adverse reactions during recent years subdivided by age group. This was an exploratory study of internationally compiled individual case safety reports (ICSRs). Reports were extracted from the WHO global ICSR database, VigiBase, up until 5 February 2010. The reports in VigiBase originate from 97 countries and the likelihood that a medicine caused the adverse effect may vary from case to case. Suspected duplicate and vaccine reports were excluded from the analysis, as were reports with age not specified. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA®) and the WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification were used to group adverse reactions and drugs. In the general review, reports from 1968 to 5 February 2010 were divided into child (aged 0-17 years) and adult (≥ 18 years) age groups. To highlight increases in reporting rates of specific adverse reactions during recent years, reports from 2005 to February 2010 were compared with reports from 1995 to 1999. The ten adverse reactions with the greatest difference in the proportion of reports between the two time periods were reviewed. In the latter analysis, the reports were subdivided into age groups: neonates ≤ 27 days; infants 28 days-23 months; children 2-11 years; and adolescents 12-17 years. A total of 3,472,183 reports were included in the study, of which 7.7% (268,145) were reports for children (0-17 years). Fifty-three percent of the child reports were for males, whilst 39% of reports in the adult group were for males. The proportion of reports

  4. Capture and documentation of coded data on adverse drug reactions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lindsay; Robinson, Kerin M

    2012-01-01

    Allergic responses to prescription drugs are largely preventable, and incur significant cost to the community both financially and in terms of healthcare outcomes. The capacity to minimise the effects of repeated events rests predominantly with the reliability of allergy documentation in medical records and computerised physician order entry systems (CPOES) with decision support such as allergy alerts. This paper presents an overview of the nature and extent of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in Australia and other developed countries, a discussion and evaluation of strategies which have been devised to address this issue, and a commentary on the role of coded data in informing this patient safety issue. It is not concerned with pharmacovigilance systems that monitor ADRs on a global scale. There are conflicting reports regarding the efficacy of these strategies. Although in many cases allergy alerts are effective, lack of sensitivity and contextual relevance can often induce doctors to override alerts. Human factors such as user fatigue and inadequate adverse drug event reporting, including ADRs, are commonplace. The quality of and response to allergy documentation can be enhanced by the participation of nurses and pharmacists, particularly in medication reconciliation. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding of drug allergies potentially yields valuable evidence, but the quality of local and national level coded data is hampered by under-documenting and under-coding.

  5. Generalized enrichment analysis improves the detection of adverse drug events from the biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Winnenburg, Rainer; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-06-23

    Identification of associations between marketed drugs and adverse events from the biomedical literature assists drug safety monitoring efforts. Assessing the significance of such literature-derived associations and determining the granularity at which they should be captured remains a challenge. Here, we assess how defining a selection of adverse event terms from MeSH, based on information content, can improve the detection of adverse events for drugs and drug classes. We analyze a set of 105,354 candidate drug adverse event pairs extracted from article indexes in MEDLINE. First, we harmonize extracted adverse event terms by aggregating them into higher-level MeSH terms based on the terms' information content. Then, we determine statistical enrichment of adverse events associated with drug and drug classes using a conditional hypergeometric test that adjusts for dependencies among associated terms. We compare our results with methods based on disproportionality analysis (proportional reporting ratio, PRR) and quantify the improvement in signal detection with our generalized enrichment analysis (GEA) approach using a gold standard of drug-adverse event associations spanning 174 drugs and four events. For single drugs, the best GEA method (Precision: .92/Recall: .71/F1-measure: .80) outperforms the best PRR based method (.69/.69/.69) on all four adverse event outcomes in our gold standard. For drug classes, our GEA performs similarly (.85/.69/.74) when increasing the level of abstraction for adverse event terms. Finally, on examining the 1609 individual drugs in our MEDLINE set, which map to chemical substances in ATC, we find signals for 1379 drugs (10,122 unique adverse event associations) on applying GEA with p < 0.005. We present an approach based on generalized enrichment analysis that can be used to detect associations between drugs, drug classes and adverse events at a given level of granularity, at the same time correcting for known dependencies among

  6. Adverse Effects of Bisphosphonates: Implications for Osteoporosis Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennel, Kurt A.; Drake, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely prescribed and highly effective at limiting the bone loss that occurs in many disorders characterized by increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, including senile osteoporosis in both men and women, glucocorticoid-associated osteoporosis, and malignancies metastatic to bone. Although they are generally well tolerated, potential adverse effects may limit bisphosphonate use in some patients. Optimal use of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis requires adequate calcium and vitamin D intake before and during therapy. The World Health Organization fracture risk assessment algorithm is currently available to determine absolute fracture risk in patients with low bone mass and is a useful tool for clinicians in identifying patients most likely to benefit from pharmacological intervention to limit fracture risk. This fracture risk estimate may facilitate shared decision making, especially when patients are wary of the rare but serious adverse effects that have recently been described for this class of drugs. PMID:19567717

  7. Fatal adverse drug reactions of anticancer drugs detected by all-case post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Miura, Yuji; Kami, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    All-case post-marketing surveillance of newly approved anticancer drugs is usually conducted on all patients in Japan. The present study investigates whether all-case post-marketing surveillance identifies fatal adverse drug reactions undetected before market entry. We examined fatal adverse drug reactions identified via all-case post-marketing surveillance by reviewing the disclosed post-marketing surveillance results, and determined the time points in which the fatal adverse drug reactions were initially reported by reviewing drug labels. We additionally scanned emergency alerts on the Japanese regulatory authority website to assess the relationship between all-case post-marketing surveillance and regulatory action. Twenty-five all-case post-marketing surveillances were performed between January 1999 and December 2009. Eight all-case post-marketing surveillances with final results included information on all fatal cases. Of these, the median number of patients was 1287 (range: 106-4998), the median number of fatal adverse drug reactions was 14.5 (range: 4-23). Of the 111 fatal adverse drug reactions detected in the eight post-marketing surveillances, only 28 (25.0%) and 22 (19.6%) were described on the initial global and the initial Japanese drug label, respectively, and 58 (52.3%) fatal adverse drug reactions were first described in the all-case post-marketing surveillance reports. Despite this, the regulatory authority issued only four warning letters, and two of these were prompted by case reports from the all-case post-marketing surveillance. All-case post-marketing surveillance of newly approved anticancer drugs in Japan was useful for the rigorous compilation of non-specific adverse drug reactions, but it rarely detected clinically significant fatal adverse drug reactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Analysis of factors associated with hiccups based on the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database

    PubMed Central

    Hosoya, Ryuichiro; Ishii-Nozawa, Reiko; Kagaya, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Hiccups are occasionally experienced by most individuals. Although hiccups are not life-threatening, they may lead to a decline in quality of life. Previous studies showed that hiccups may occur as an adverse effect of certain medicines during chemotherapy. Furthermore, a male dominance in hiccups has been reported. However, due to the limited number of studies conducted on this phenomenon, debate still surrounds the few factors influencing hiccups. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of medicines and patient characteristics on hiccups using a large-sized adverse drug event report database and, specifically, the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. Cases of adverse effects associated with medications were extracted from JADER, and Fisher’s exact test was performed to assess the presence or absence of hiccups for each medication. In a multivariate analysis, we conducted a multiple logistic regression analysis using medication and patient characteristic variables exhibiting significance. We also examined the role of dexamethasone in inducing hiccups during chemotherapy. Medicines associated with hiccups included dexamethasone, levofolinate, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, carboplatin, and irinotecan. Patient characteristics associated with hiccups included a male gender and greater height. The combination of anti-cancer agent and dexamethasone use was noted in more than 95% of patients in the dexamethasone-use group. Hiccups also occurred in patients in the anti-cancer agent-use group who did not use dexamethasone. Most of the medications that induce hiccups are used in chemotherapy. The results of the present study suggest that it is possible to predict a high risk of hiccups using patient characteristics. We confirmed that dexamethasone was the drug that has the strongest influence on the induction of hiccups. However, the influence of anti-cancer agents on the induction of hiccups cannot be denied. We consider the results of the

  9. JADE: a tool for medical researchers to explore adverse drug events using health claims data.

    PubMed

    Edlinger, D; Sauter, S K; Rinner, C; Neuhofer, L M; Wolzt, M; Grossmann, W; Endel, G; Gall, W

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our project was to create a tool for physicians to explore health claims data with regard to adverse drug reactions. The Java Adverse Drug Event (JADE) tool should enable the analysis of prescribed drugs in connection with diagnoses from hospital stays. We calculated the number of days drugs were taken by using the defined daily doses and estimated possible interactions between dispensed drugs using the Austria Codex, a database including drug-drug interactions. The JADE tool was implemented using Java, R and a PostgreSQL database. Beside an overview of the study cohort which includes selection of gender and age groups, selected statistical methods like association rule learning, logistic regression model and the number needed to harm have been implemented. The JADE tool can support physicians during their planning of clinical trials by showing the occurrences of adverse drug events with population based information.

  10. JADE: A Tool for Medical Researchers to Explore Adverse Drug Events Using Health Claims Data

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, S.K.; Rinner, C.; Neuhofer, L.M.; Wolzt, M.; Grossmann, W.; Endel, G.; Gall, W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of our project was to create a tool for physicians to explore health claims data with regard to adverse drug reactions. The Java Adverse Drug Event (JADE) tool should enable the analysis of prescribed drugs in connection with diagnoses from hospital stays. Methods We calculated the number of days drugs were taken by using the defined daily doses and estimated possible interactions between dispensed drugs using the Austria Codex, a database including drug-drug interactions. The JADE tool was implemented using Java, R and a PostgreSQL database. Results Beside an overview of the study cohort which includes selection of gender and age groups, selected statistical methods like association rule learning, logistic regression model and the number needed to harm have been implemented. Conclusion The JADE tool can support physicians during their planning of clinical trials by showing the occurrences of adverse drug events with population based information. PMID:25298803

  11. Postmarket Drug Surveillance Without Trial Costs: Discovery of Adverse Drug Reactions Through Large-Scale Analysis of Web Search Queries

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilovich, Evgeniy

    2013-01-01

    Background Postmarket drug safety surveillance largely depends on spontaneous reports by patients and health care providers; hence, less common adverse drug reactions—especially those caused by long-term exposure, multidrug treatments, or those specific to special populations—often elude discovery. Objective Here we propose a low cost, fully automated method for continuous monitoring of adverse drug reactions in single drugs and in combinations thereof, and demonstrate the discovery of heretofore-unknown ones. Methods We used aggregated search data of large populations of Internet users to extract information related to drugs and adverse reactions to them, and correlated these data over time. We further extended our method to identify adverse reactions to combinations of drugs. Results We validated our method by showing high correlations of our findings with known adverse drug reactions (ADRs). However, although acute early-onset drug reactions are more likely to be reported to regulatory agencies, we show that less acute later-onset ones are better captured in Web search queries. Conclusions Our method is advantageous in identifying previously unknown adverse drug reactions. These ADRs should be considered as candidates for further scrutiny by medical regulatory authorities, for example, through phase 4 trials. PMID:23778053

  12. Adverse Health Consequences of Performance-Enhancing Drugs: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Harrison G.; Wood, Ruth I.; Rogol, Alan; Nyberg, Fred; Bowers, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, media attention has focused almost entirely on PED use by elite athletes to illicitly gain a competitive advantage in sports, and not on the health risks of PEDs. There is a widespread misperception that PED use is safe or that adverse effects are manageable. In reality, the vast majority of PED users are not athletes but rather nonathlete weightlifters, and the adverse health effects of PED use are greatly underappreciated. This scientific statement synthesizes available information on the medical consequences of PED use, identifies gaps in knowledge, and aims to focus the attention of the medical community and policymakers on PED use as an important public health problem. PED users frequently consume highly supraphysiologic doses of PEDs, combine them with other PEDs and/or other classical drugs of abuse, and display additional associated risk factors. PED use has been linked to an increased risk of death and a wide variety of cardiovascular, psychiatric, metabolic, endocrine, neurologic, infectious, hepatic, renal, and musculoskeletal disorders. Because randomized trials cannot ethically duplicate the large doses of PEDs and the many factors associated with PED use, we need observational studies to collect valid outcome data on the health risks associated with PEDs. In addition, we need studies regarding the prevalence of PED use, the mechanisms by which PEDs exert their adverse health effects, and the interactive effects of PEDs with sports injuries and other high-risk behaviors. We also need randomized trials to assess therapeutic interventions for treating the adverse effects of PEDs, such as the anabolic-androgen steroid withdrawal syndrome. Finally, we need to raise public awareness of the serious health consequences of PEDs. PMID:24423981

  13. Adverse health consequences of performance-enhancing drugs: an Endocrine Society scientific statement.

    PubMed

    Pope, Harrison G; Wood, Ruth I; Rogol, Alan; Nyberg, Fred; Bowers, Larry; Bhasin, Shalender

    2014-06-01

    Despite the high prevalence of performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, media attention has focused almost entirely on PED use by elite athletes to illicitly gain a competitive advantage in sports, and not on the health risks of PEDs. There is a widespread misperception that PED use is safe or that adverse effects are manageable. In reality, the vast majority of PED users are not athletes but rather nonathlete weightlifters, and the adverse health effects of PED use are greatly underappreciated. This scientific statement synthesizes available information on the medical consequences of PED use, identifies gaps in knowledge, and aims to focus the attention of the medical community and policymakers on PED use as an important public health problem. PED users frequently consume highly supraphysiologic doses of PEDs, combine them with other PEDs and/or other classical drugs of abuse, and display additional associated risk factors. PED use has been linked to an increased risk of death and a wide variety of cardiovascular, psychiatric, metabolic, endocrine, neurologic, infectious, hepatic, renal, and musculoskeletal disorders. Because randomized trials cannot ethically duplicate the large doses of PEDs and the many factors associated with PED use, we need observational studies to collect valid outcome data on the health risks associated with PEDs. In addition, we need studies regarding the prevalence of PED use, the mechanisms by which PEDs exert their adverse health effects, and the interactive effects of PEDs with sports injuries and other high-risk behaviors. We also need randomized trials to assess therapeutic interventions for treating the adverse effects of PEDs, such as the anabolic-androgen steroid withdrawal syndrome. Finally, we need to raise public awareness of the serious health consequences of PEDs.

  14. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences and clinical risk management

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zeng, Su; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zhou, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background Omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), is widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and functional dyspepsia. Polypharmacy is common in patients receiving omeprazole. Drug toxicity and treatment failure resulting from inappropriate combination therapy with omeprazole have been reported sporadically. Systematic review has not been available to address the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences, the factors determining the degree of DDI between omeprazole and comedication, and the corresponding clinical risk management. Methods Literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1988 to March 2013. The full text of each article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Results Omeprazole has actual adverse influences on the pharmacokinetics of medications such as diazepam, carbamazepine, clozapine, indinavir, nelfinavir, atazanavir, rilpivirine, methotrexate, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, clopidogrel, digoxin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and oral iron supplementation. Meanwhile, low efficacy of omeprazole treatment would be anticipated, as omeprazole elimination could be significantly induced by comedicated efavirenz and herb medicines such as St John’s wort, Ginkgo biloba, and yin zhi huang. The mechanism for DDI involves induction or inhibition of cytochrome P450, inhibition of P-glycoprotein or breast cancer resistance protein-mediated drug transport, and inhibition of oral absorption by gastric acid suppression. Sometimes, DDIs of omeprazole do not exhibit a PPI class effect. Other suitable PPIs or histamine 2 antagonists may be therapeutic alternatives that can be used to avoid adverse consequences. The degree of DDIs associated with omeprazole and clinical outcomes depend on factors such as genotype status of CYP2C19 and CYP1A2, ethnicity, dose and treatment course of precipitant

  15. Paradoxical and bidirectional drug effects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Silas W; Hauben, Manfred; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2012-03-01

    A paradoxical drug reaction constitutes an outcome that is opposite from the outcome that would be expected from the drug's known actions. There are three types: 1. A paradoxical response in a condition for which the drug is being explicitly prescribed. 2. Paradoxical precipitation of a condition for which the drug is indicated, when the drug is being used for an alternative indication. 3. Effects that are paradoxical in relation to an aspect of the pharmacology of the drug but unrelated to the usual indication. In bidirectional drug reactions, a drug may produce opposite effects, either in the same or different individuals, the effects usually being different from the expected beneficial effect. Paradoxical and bidirectional drug effects can sometimes be harnessed for benefit; some may be adverse. Such reactions arise in a wide variety of drug classes. Some are common; others are reported in single case reports. Paradoxical effects are often adverse, since they are opposite the direction of the expected effect. They may complicate the assessment of adverse drug reactions, pharmacovigilance, and clinical management. Bidirectional effects may be clinically useful or adverse. From a clinical toxicological perspective, altered pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics in overdose may exacerbate paradoxical and bidirectional effects. Certain antidotes have paradoxical attributes, complicating management. Apparent clinical paradoxical or bidirectional effects and reactions ensue when conflicts arise at different levels in self-regulating biological systems, as complexity increases from subcellular components, such as receptors, to cells, tissues, organs, and the whole individual. These may be incompletely understood. Mechanisms of such effects include different actions at the same receptor, owing to changes with time and downstream effects; stereochemical effects; multiple receptor targets with or without associated temporal effects; antibody-mediated reactions; three

  16. Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug events by Korean regional pharmacovigilance centers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Lee, Yong-Won; Choi, Young Hwa; Park, Byungjoo; Jee, Young Koo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Eung-Gyu; Park, Jung-Won; Hong, Chein-Soo

    2009-10-01

    Patterns of prescriptions are markedly influenced by regional disease entities, medical education, culture, economic status, and available pharmaceutical companies. Features of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) may vary in different countries. In this study, we analyzed the causative drugs and clinical manifestations of spontaneously reported ADRs in Korea. Six Korean Regional Pharmacovigilance Centers collected 1418 cases of spontaneously reported adverse drug events (ADEs) by doctors, pharmacists, and nurses, and the clinical features and causative drugs were evaluated. The data were collected from general hospitals (76.5%), primary clinics, and pharmacies (23.5%). Based upon the World Health Organization (WHO)-Uppsala Monitoring Center criteria (certain-13.7%, probable-46.1%, possible-32.1%), 91.9% of the collected events were suspected to be ADRs and 15.8% of patients experienced serious ADRs. The most prevalent causative drugs were antibiotics (31.6%), followed by contrast dyes (14.0%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (11.1%), anti-psychotics (5.4%), anti-convulsants (5.2%), cardiovascular agents (4.8%), anti-neoplastics (4.6%), and opiates and non-opiate pain killers (3.5%). Among the antibiotics, cephalosporins (8.1%) were the most common, followed by anti-tuberculosis agents (5.7%), quinolones (4.0%), vancomycin (3.1%), and penicillin (2.8%). The most common side effect was skin manifestations, which were seen in 42% of the patients, followed by neurologic manifestations (14%), gastrointestinal involvements (12.9%), generalized reactions (9.4%), and respiratory involvements (4.5%). Antibiotics, contrast dyes, and NSAIDs were the most common causative drugs for ADRs, which reflects the prescription pattern and the prevalence of diseases in Korea. These data may be useful in establishing a Korean pharmacovigilance system. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Automated Summarization of Publications Associated with Adverse Drug Reactions from PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Chen, Qinlang; Adams, Hayden; Friedman, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Academic literature provides rich and up-to-date information concerning adverse drug reactions (ADR), but it is time consuming and labor intensive for physicians to obtain information of ADRs from academic literature because they would have to generate queries, review retrieved articles and summarize the results. In this study, a method is developed to automatically detect and summarize ADRs from journal articles, rank them and present them to physicians in a user-friendly interface. The method studied ADRs for 6 drugs and returned on average 4.8 ADRs that were correct. The results demonstrated this method was feasible and effective. This method can be applied in clinical practice for assisting physicians to efficiently obtain information about ADRs associated with specific drugs. Automated summarization of ADR information from recent publications may facilitate translation of academic research into actionable information at point of care. PMID:27570654

  18. How Does This Happen? Part I: Mechanisms of Adverse Drug Reactions Associated with Psychotropic Medications

    PubMed Central

    Elbe, Dean; Savage, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To review the background and mechanisms behind how certain psychotropic medications cause adverse drug reactions. Methods: A literature review pertaining to several interesting and unusual adverse drug reactions attributed to selected psychotropic medications was conducted. These include: 1) QTc interval prolongation secondary to ziprasidone, pimozide, and other antipsychotic agents. 2) Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and hypernatremia secondary to lithium. 3) Hypothyroidism secondary to lithium. 4) Erectile dysfunction secondary to selective serotonin and serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs/SNRIs). Results: Biochemical mechanisms of how certain psychotropic medications cause adverse drug reactions were reviewed. Specific interventions and monitoring recommendations to prevent or reduce the impact of these adverse reactions are discussed briefly. Conclusion: Knowledge of risk factors and mechanisms of adverse drug reactions with psychotropic medications can help to guide medication prescribing, monitoring and interventions to prevent or mitigate these reactions. PMID:20119566

  19. Adverse effects of neuromuscular blockers and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Naguib, M; Magboul, M M

    1998-06-01

    Among all the drugs used for general anesthesia, neuromuscular blockers appear to play a prominent role in the incidence of severe adverse reactions. It now seems likely that most serious adverse drug reactions occurring during anesthesia are immunological in type. The frequency of life-threatening anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions occurring during anesthesia has been estimated to be between 1 in 1000 and 1 in 25,000 anesthetic procedures, with the neuromuscular blockers being involved in 80% of cases. The mortality from such serious reactions is reported to be in the range of 3.4 to 6%. The highly immunogenic drug, suxamethonium chloride (succinylcholine), was found to be the most hazardous agent. Drug-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies to suxamethonium chloride and other neuromuscular blockers have been demonstrated. This sensitivity to neuromuscular blockers seems to be a long-lasting phenomenon. During anesthesia, the clinical features of an allergic reaction are often masked. Tachycardia and circulatory collapse may be the only signs of an allergic reaction, and they are easily misdiagnosed. Bronchospasm is reported to be present in about 40% of cases. Successful management of these patients includes stabilisation during the acute reaction and avoidance of future reactions. The latter is based on the identification of the causative drug and potentially cross-reacting compounds. The use of suxamethonium chloride is associated with many other adverse effects, such as fasciculations, myalgia, potassium release, changes in the heart rate, increases in intragastric and intraocular pressures, and malignant hyperthermia. Because of the dangers of hyperkalemic cardiac arrest suxamethonium chloride administration in children with unrecognised muscular dystrophy, there have now been moves to limit the use of this drug in children. Although neuromuscular blockers are designed to specifically block nicotinic cholinergic receptors at the neuromuscular junction

  20. Evaluation of adverse drug reactions in HIV positive patients in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Anshu Kumar; Gadgade, Akash; Shenoy, Ashok K.; Chowta, Mukta N.; Ramapuram, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advancement and development of new drugs and treatment strategies increase the risk of unusual Adverse Events (AEs) in HIV patients. Aims: The objective of our study was to assess the incidence, types and nature of AEs in HIV positive subjects. Settings and Design: Patients with WHO stage IV disease irrespective of the CD4 cell count, or WHO stage III disease with a CD4 cell count <350 cell/cu. Mm, or, WHO stage I or II disease with a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/cu. mm, and on prior anti-retroviral therapy for not more than six months preceding the observation date, were included in the study. After initiation of therapy, the patients were examined for the occurrence any adverse events including the type and severity, or any other abnormal laboratory findings. Causality assessment of the adverse events was done using the Naranjo's scale. Results: Out of 327 patients studied prospectively, 43 patients developed AEs. Out of these, 23 (53.5%) were males and 20 (46.5%) were females. A total of 53 (16.21%) AEs were reported. Antitubercular drugs caused the maximum AEs (28.3%) followed by zidovudine (20.7%), nevirapine (15.0%) and efavirenz (5.6%). Stavudine, ethambutol, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, and atazanavir were also responsible for 3.7% of AEs individually. Causality assessment done according to the Naranjo's scale revealed that 66.04% AEs were ‘probable’ and 33.96% were ‘possible’. Conclusions: Anemia, hepatitis and dermatological adverse effects are the most common AEs. Antitubercular drugs contributed significantly for the incidence of AEs in these patients. Frequency of AEs was slightly more in males compared to females. PMID:25657900

  1. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Mago, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Adverse effects are common, bothersome, and a leading cause of discontinuation of treatment. The methodology for evaluating adverse effects of medications has been greatly neglected, however, especially in comparison to the methodology for assessment of efficacy of medications. Existing methods for assessment and reporting of adverse effects have important limitations leading to lack of much-needed data related to adverse effects. Lastly, there is little systematic research into management of most adverse effects. A series of recommendations are made in this article about how to improve identification, assessment, reporting, and management of adverse effects.

  2. Adverse effects of differential parental attention1

    PubMed Central

    Sajwaj, Thomas E.; Pinkston, Susan; Cordua, Glenn; Jackson, Carolyn; Herbert, Emily W.; Pinkston, Elsie M.; Hayden, M. Loeman

    1973-01-01

    In two independent parent training projects (Kansas and Mississippi), mothers of deviant young children were observed to follow almost all child behaviors with attention. The mothers were then trained to use differential attention procedures to increase their child's appropriate behaviors and to decrease deviant behaviors. Contrary to expectations, the differential attention procedure produced substantial increases in deviant behavior for four of the children. This adverse effect was maintained over many sessions and was replicated in single organism, reversal designs. A fifth child showed no change. A sixth child showed some improvement. However, this effect was not recovered in a second application of differential attention, and the child became worse. The results underline the importance of subject generality in applied behavior analysis and strongly suggest that service programs using operant techniques must carefully evaluate their effects on behavior. PMID:16795386

  3. Management of serious adverse drug reactions: proposals from a victims' organisation.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    Amalyste is a French patient-advocacy group for victims of two very serious adverse drug reactions: Lyell and Stevens-Johnson syndromes. The aims of this organisation are to represent the interests of patients who have experienced these syndromes; to better inform the public about these syndromes; to provide analyses of drug-related risks; and to demand collective compensation for victims of serious adverse drug reactions. The following text is our translation of an Amalyste position statement on drug-related risks. It provides valuable food for thought, both for healthcare professionals and for drug regulatory agencies, and has the potential to improve practice (a).

  4. Adverse drug events and medication errors in psychiatry: methodological issues regarding identification and classification.

    PubMed

    Mann, Klaus; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Keohane, Carol A; Chu, James A; Bates, David W

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Adverse drug events and medication errors have received extensive study recently in a variety of clinical populations, though compared to many other areas relatively little work has focused on this area in psychiatry, especially with respect to the contribution of error to harm. The goal of this paper is to discuss methodological issues around measurement of medication safety in psychiatric patients. Against the background of a systems approach, a modern perspective of error management is discussed, and a multidimensional procedure for detection and classification of incidents related to the medication process is presented. This method has proven successful in non-psychiatric settings yielding the current best estimate of error rates and providing insight into the underlying causes. While this general approach can be adapted to the psychiatric setting, a number of issues make measurement especially challenging in psychiatry. These include the fluctuating course of psychiatric disorders, reduced patient adherence to the medication process, adverse effects which are often similar to symptoms of the underlying disorder, the frequent use of wide dose intervals depending on the clinical situation, and the presence of many drug-drug interactions. Data collected by means of the presented approach provide a basis for the development of effective strategies to reduce the risk of medication errors and thus improve patient safety in psychiatric care.

  5. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Michael J.; Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle; Resende, Mauricio G. C.

    2007-11-05

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions.

  6. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael J.; Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle; Resende, Mauricio G. C.

    2007-11-01

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions.

  7. Reporting natural health product related adverse drug reactions: is it the pharmacist's responsibility?

    PubMed

    Walji, Rishma; Boon, Heather; Barnes, Joanne; Welsh, Sandy; Austin, Zubin; Baker, G Ross

    2011-12-01

    Herbal medicines and other natural health products (NHPs) are sold in Canadian pharmacies as over-the-counter products, yet there is limited information on their safety and adverse effect profile. Signals of safety concerns associated with medicines can arise through analysis of reports of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) submitted to national pharmacovigilance centres by health professionals, including pharmacists and the public. However, typically such systems experience substantial under-reporting for NHPs. The objective of this paper is to explore pharmacists' experiences with and responses to receiving or identifying reports of suspected ADRs associated with NHPs from pharmacy customers. A qualitative study in which in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 community pharmacists in Toronto, Canada. Pharmacists generally did not submit reports of adverse events associated with NHPs to the national ADR reporting system and cited several barriers, including lack of time, complexity of the reporting process and lack of knowledge about NHPs. Pharmacists who accepted responsibility for adverse event reporting appeared to have different perceptions of their professional role: they saw themselves as 'knowledge generators', contributing to overall healthcare knowledge. Reporting behaviour for suspected ADRs associated with NHPs may be explained by a pharmacist's perception of his/her professional role and perceptions of the relative importance of generating knowledge to share in the wider system of health care. © 2011 The Authors. IJPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Label-inconsistent use of sibutramine in spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports in Germany.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Wulf, F; Sachs, B

    2008-07-01

    In Germany, reports on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are centrally collected and analyzed by the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM). During routine analysis of ADR reports related to the antiobesity drug sibutramine, we repeatedly observed descriptions of its label*-inconsistent use (*European Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC)). In order to quantify this observation, we analyzed all sibutramine-related ADR reports received by the BfArM so far. Using the same data source, we further analyzed the effect of a Dear Doctor Letter (DDL) which was distributed in 2002 in order to reinforce the label-consistent use of sibutramine. Out of a total of 170 identified reports, 104 were considered as suitable for further analysis. Of these, applying a catalogue of 24 SmPC-derived criteria, 34% (35 reports) contained information indicative of label-inconsistent use. The individual SmPC-criteria most often violated were (% of total analyzed reports): the recommended starting dose of 10 mg/day (9%), the body mass index (BMI)-related threshold permitting drug therapy (6%), and the contraindicated "history of drug abuse" (6%). The DDL was ineffective. The observed percentage of ADR reports, indicating a label-inconsistent use of sibutramine, is considered a signal for a therapeutic risk. This signal should be addressed in a drug utilization study investigating the use of sibutramine by means of a representative patient sample.

  9. Patients' Perspectives on Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting in a Developing Country: A Case Study from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sabblah, George Tsey; Darko, Delese Mimi; Mogtari, Hudu; Härmark, Linda; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    2017-06-26

    Recent efforts to introduce direct patient reporting into pharmacovigilance systems have proved that patient reports contribute significantly to medicine safety, but there is a paucity of information relating to patients' perspectives regarding adverse drug reaction reporting in developing countries. The objective of this study was to explore patients' knowledge, attitudes, behaviours and opinions on spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting in Ghana. A cross-sectional study using questionnaires administered through face-to-face interviews was carried out from 25 August, 2016 to 20 September, 2016 with 442 patients aged 18 years and above selected by convenience sampling from two community pharmacies in urban and rural Ghana. Reasons and opinions on patients' reporting on adverse drug reactions were surveyed using a 5-point Likert scale. The Pearson chi-square test was used to determine associations between background variables and responses on knowledge of adverse drug reaction reporting. Responses from 434 patients (86.7%) were included in the analysis. Among those interviewed, there was a high level of awareness regarding the existence of the National Pharmacovigilance Centre (81.6%). Approximately half of the respondents (49.5%) were aware that patients were able to report adverse drug reactions associated with medicinal products directly to the National Pharmacovigilance Centre. Of the respondents, 46.3% stated that they had an adverse drug reaction to their medicines in the past; of these, 53.2% reported to healthcare professionals and 36.9% failed to report because they stopped their medication. The three main reasons for patients' reporting were desire for extra information (92.4%), desire to share experiences with other people (91.7%) and expectation for the National Pharmacovigilance Centre to inform others about the possible adverse drug reactions (88.0%). Patients' opinions were to contribute to research/knowledge (96.5%) and improvements in drug

  10. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Saini, V K; Sewal, R K; Ahmad, Yusra; Medhi, B

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and 73 patients of lung cancer were screened for occurrence of adverse drug reactions during their treatment with chemotherapy. About 87.36% patients experienced adverse drug reactions, 90.09% and 83.56% of breast and lung cancer patients experienced at least one adverse drug reaction respectively. In breast cancer patients, 41.58% patients were prescribed fluorouracil+doxorubicin+cyclophosphamide while paclitaxel was prescribed to 22.77% patients. Alopecia (54.94%), nail discolouration (43.96%), dysgeusia (38.46%), anorexia (30.77%), nausea (29.67%), and neuropathy (29.67%) were found to be very common in breast cancer patients treated with single/combined regimen. In lung cancer group of patients, cisplatin with docetaxel, cisplatin with pemetrexed and cisplatin with irinotecan were prescribed to 30.14, 24.65 and 17.81% patients, respectively. Dysgeusia (40.98%), diarrhoea (39.34%), anorexia (32.77%) and constipation (31.15%) and alopecia (31.15%) were commonly observed adverse drug reactions having lung cancer patients. Causality assessments using World Health Organization causality assessment scale showed that observed adverse drug reactions were of probable (64.67%) and possible (35.33%) categories. Alopecia, dysgeusia, anorexia, constipation diarrhoea, nausea, nail discoloration were more prevalent amongst the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  11. [Active drug monitoring of adverse drug reactions in pediatric emergency department].

    PubMed

    Planchamp, F; Nguyen, K-A; Vial, T; Nasri, S; Javouhey, E; Gillet, Y; Ranchin, B; Villard, F; Floret, D; Cochat, P; Gueyffier, F; Kassaï, B

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children consulting at the pediatric emergency unit during a 6-month period. The regional pharmacovigilance center (CRPV) and the department of clinical pharmacology prospectively and systematically recorded all potential ADRs among patients younger than 18 years of age in the pediatric emergency unit reported at the daily staff meetings. All cases were then screened and validated by the CRPV. For validated cases, preventability, seriousness, and off-label use were evaluated. During the study period, from 1 March to 1 September 2005, 90 children presented potential adverse drug events. ADRs were confirmed in 43 patients, 19 females and 24 males. Thirty-four patients (79%) were under the age of 5. According to the European definition, 14 patients (33%) had serious ADRs. One anaphylactic shock after amoxicillin injection; antimalarial prophylaxis misuse leading to convulsive status epilepticus, convulsion, and coma after hepatitis B and MMR vaccines were deemed life-threatening. Three ADRs were considered avoidable. Antibiotics and vaccines were the most common possible cause of ADRs (76%). Skin reactions (n=27), fever (n=8), and gastric disorders (n=5) were the most common clinical manifestations. Because ADRs were reported by clinicians on a voluntary basis, serious ADRs were probably reported more systematically. Compared to a similar period without active monitoring, active drug monitoring of ADRs doubled the number of confirmed cases 43 vs 17, p<0.001. Close collaboration between the pharmacovigilance center, pharmacologists, and clinicians is necessary and seems feasible for improving the monitoring of ADRs in children.

  12. Pharmacovigilance, risks and adverse effects of self-medication.

    PubMed

    Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Abadie, Delphine; Lacroix, Isabelle; Berreni, Aurélia; Pugnet, Grégory; Durrieu, Geneviève; Sailler, Laurent; Giroud, Jean-Paul; Damase-Michel, Christine; Montastruc, François

    2016-04-01

    Self-medication means resorting to one or more drugs in order to treat oneself without the help of a doctor. This phenomenon is developing fast. In this review, we will discuss the main definitions of self-medication; we will then present a few important characteristics of this therapeutic practice: prevalence, reasons, populations involved and drugs used. Whilst the theoretical risks of self-medication have been abundantly discussed in the literature (adverse effects, interactions, product, dosage or treatment duration errors, difficulty in self-diagnosis, risk of addiction or abuse…), there is in fact very little detailed pharmacovigilance data concerning the characteristics and the consequences of this usage in real life. This study therefore describes the all too rare data that is available: patients, clinical characteristics, "seriousness" and drugs involved in the adverse effects of self-medication. It also discusses leads to be followed in order to minimize medication risks, which are obviously not well known and clearly not sufficiently notified.

  13. [Direct costs and hospital morbimortality impact from preventable adverse drug events].

    PubMed

    Pinzón, José Fernando; Maldonado, Carlos; Díaz, Jorge A; Segura, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Implementing pharmacovigilance activities consists of monitoring and assessment of activities related to medical attention. However, additional data are necessary to identify conditions where care quality can be improved. Therefore, a focus on adverse drug events analysis from a prevention and economic perspective is needed, with emphasis on its local impact. Preventable adverse drug events were summarized to establishing their impact on morbidity and mortality, as well as to estimate the ensuing economic burden. The data were gathered from a level 3 hospital (high complexity), located in Bogotá, Colombia, where specific pharmacovigilance activities were recorded in 2007. Patient charts were reviewed to characterize adverse drug events according to their causality, severity and preventability. Direct costs were estimated by grouping diagnostic tests, length of hospitalization, procedures and additional drugs required. The charts of 283 patients and 448 reports were analyzed. These data indicated that 24.8% of adverse drug events were preventable and that an associated mortality of 1.1% had occurred. The associated direct costs were between USD $16,687 and $18,739. Factors more commonly associated with preventability were drug-drug interactions, as well as inappropriate doses and unsuitable frequencies at which the drugs were administrated. The data recommended that actions be taken to decrease preventable adverse drug events, because of negative impact on patient´s health, and unnecessary consumption of healthcare resources.

  14. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992

  15. Adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Glauciene Santana; Guaraldo, Lusiele; Engstrom, Elyne Montenegro; Filha, Mariza Miranda Theme; Santos, Reinaldo Souza-; Vasconcelos, Ana Gloria Godoi; Rozenfeld, Suely

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to characterize and estimate the frequency of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in the population treated at the Centro de Saúde Escola Germano Sinval Faria, a primary health care clinic in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro City, and to explore the relationship between adverse drug reactions and some of the patients' demographic and health characteristics. METHODS: This descriptive study was conducted via patient record review of incident cases between 2004 and 2008. RESULTS: Of the 176 patients studied, 41.5% developed one or more adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, totaling 126 occurrences. The rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs was higher among women, patients aged 50 years or older, those with four or more comorbidities, and those who used five or more drugs. Of the total reactions, 71.4% were mild. The organ systems most affected were as follows: the gastrointestinal tract (29.4%), the skin and appendages (21.4%), and the central and peripheral nervous systems (14.3%). Of the patients who experienced adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, 65.8% received no drug treatment for their adverse reactions, and 4.1% had one of the antituberculosis drugs suspended because of adverse reactions. “Probable reactions” (75%) predominated over “possible reactions” (24%). In the study sample, 64.3% of the reactions occurred during the first two months of treatment, and most (92.6%) of the reactions were ascribed to the combination of rifampicin + isoniazid + pyrazinamide (Regimen I). A high dropout rate from tuberculosis treatment (24.4%) was also observed. CONCLUSION: This study suggests a high rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs. PMID:23644852

  16. Improving drug safety: From adverse drug reaction knowledge discovery to clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuxiang; Hu, Yong; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yin, Zhinan; Chen, Xue-Wen; Liu, Mei

    2016-11-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern, causing over 100,000 fatalities in the United States every year with an annual cost of $136 billion. Early detection and accurate prediction of ADRs is thus vital for drug development and patient safety. Multiple scientific disciplines, namely pharmacology, pharmacovigilance, and pharmacoinformatics, have been addressing the ADR problem from different perspectives. With the same goal of improving drug safety, this article summarizes and links the research efforts in the multiple disciplines into a single framework from comprehensive understanding of the interactions between drugs and biological system and the identification of genetic and phenotypic predispositions of patients susceptible to higher ADR risks and finally to the current state of implementation of medication-related decision support systems. We start by describing available computational resources for building drug-target interaction networks with biological annotations, which provides a fundamental knowledge for ADR prediction. Databases are classified by functions to help users in selection. Post-marketing surveillance is then introduced where data-driven approach can not only enhance the prediction accuracy of ADRs but also enables the discovery of genetic and phenotypic risk factors of ADRs. Understanding genetic risk factors for ADR requires well organized patient genetics information and analysis by pharmacogenomic approaches. Finally, current state of clinical decision support systems is presented and described how clinicians can be assisted with the integrated knowledgebase to minimize the risk of ADR. This review ends with a discussion of existing challenges in each of disciplines with potential solutions and future directions.

  17. A research framework for pharmacovigilance in health social media: Identification and evaluation of patient adverse drug event reports.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Hsinchun

    2015-12-01

    Social media offer insights of patients' medical problems such as drug side effects and treatment failures. Patient reports of adverse drug events from social media have great potential to improve current practice of pharmacovigilance. However, extracting patient adverse drug event reports from social media continues to be an important challenge for health informatics research. In this study, we develop a research framework with advanced natural language processing techniques for integrated and high-performance patient reported adverse drug event extraction. The framework consists of medical entity extraction for recognizing patient discussions of drug and events, adverse drug event extraction with shortest dependency path kernel based statistical learning method and semantic filtering with information from medical knowledge bases, and report source classification to tease out noise. To evaluate the proposed framework, a series of experiments were conducted on a test bed encompassing about postings from major diabetes and heart disease forums in the United States. The results reveal that each component of the framework significantly contributes to its overall effectiveness. Our framework significantly outperforms prior work. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. [Influencing factor and mechanism analysis of adverse drug reaction in traditional Chinese medicine injection].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xu; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2012-09-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is the key contents in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injection safety research. However, influencing factors of ADR is not clearly, mechanism research is relatively rare, which are to be found in the literature to date. Qualified drugs and normal usage and dosage are the premise condition of ADR judgment. Age, sex, basic diseases, allergic constitution or drug allergy history are common factors. Kinds of solvent, drug concentration, storage time after liquid drug preparation, dripping speed, incompatibility of TCM injection and clinical commonly used medicine are the major ADR research factors. Adverse events mechanism should be synthetically judged by pre-clinical research, clinical manifestation, drug epidemiological trials results. In order to judge and study ADR correctly, It should be acquainted with TCM injection adverse events or ADR influencing factors,improve injection specification, and pay attention to the ADR mechanism, promote post-marketed reevaluation of safety in TCM injection.

  19. Evaluation of neuroprotection by melatonin against adverse effects of prenatal exposure to a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug during peripheral nerve development.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Ilknur; Kaplan, Suleyman; Kalkan, Serpil; Sutcu, Mustafa; Ulkay, M Basak; Esener, O Burak

    2015-04-01

    The potential ability of melatonin to protect against impairment of the fetal peripheral nerve system due to maternal consumption of diclofenac sodium (DS) was investigated. Eighty-four pregnant rats were divided into seven groups: control (CONT), saline administered (PS), DS administered (DS), DS with low-dose melatonin administered (DS+MLT10), DS with high-dose melatonin administered (DS+MLT50), low-dose melatonin administered (MLT10), and high-dose melatonin administered (MLT50). After the pregnancy, six male newborn rats from each group were sacrificed at 4 and 20 weeks of age. Their right sciatic nerves were harvested, and nerve fibers were evaluated using stereological techniques. Mean numbers of myelinated axons, axon cross-section areas and the mean thickness of the myelin sheet were estimated. Four-week-old prenatally DS-exposed rats had significantly fewer axons, a smaller myelinated axonal area, and a thinner myelin sheath compared to CONT group (p<0.05). Although melatonin at both doses significantly increased axon numbers, only a high dose of melatonin increased the diameter of those axons (p<0.05). At 20-weeks of age, myelinated axon number in the DS group was not only significantly lower than all other groups (p<0.05) but also the cross-sectional area of these axons was smaller than all other groups (p<0.05). There were no differences between the groups regarding the mean thickness of the myelin sheet. The current study indicates that prenatal exposure to DS decreases the number and the diameter of sciatic nerve axons and that melatonin prophylaxis can prevent these effects.

  20. Adverse Psychiatric Effects Associated with Herbal Weight-Loss Products

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, F. Saverio; Coviello, Marialuce; Imperatori, Claudio; Francesconi, Marta; Hough, Christina M.; Valeriani, Giuseppe; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Bolzan Mariotti Posocco, Flaminia; Santacroce, Rita; Minichino, Amedeo; Corazza, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and overeating are among the most prevalent health concerns worldwide and individuals are increasingly using performance and image-enhancing drugs (PIEDs) as an easy and fast way to control their weight. Among these, herbal weight-loss products (HWLPs) often attract users due to their health claims, assumed safety, easy availability, affordable price, extensive marketing, and the perceived lack of need for professional oversight. Reports suggest that certain HWLPs may lead to onset or exacerbation of psychiatric disturbances. Here we review the available evidence on psychiatric adverse effects of HWLPs due to their intrinsic toxicity and potential for interaction with psychiatric medications. PMID:26457296

  1. Linezolid-related adverse effects in clinical practice in children.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Nuri; Düzgöl, Mine; Kara, Ahu; Özdemir, Fatih M; Devrim, İlker

    2017-10-01

    Linezolid may cause adverse effects such as thrombocytopenia, which were found to be dependent on receiving linezolid for longer than 2 weeks. There are limited studies concerning the safety and timing of linezolid-related adverse effects in children. Objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of adverse effects associated with linezolid, with especially focusing on the time of occurrence. All children (<18 years of age) who received >3 days of linezolid therapy were included in this study. Adverse effects attributed to linezolid and time of occurrence of side effects was evaluated. A total of 179 children were enrolled to the study. The patients' median age was 4 years (6 days to 17 years). During linezolid treatment, 36 (20.1%) patients experienced adverse effects. The most common adverse effect was thrombocytopenia that was detected in 26 patients (14.5%). Other adverse effects were as following; elevated liver enzymes in 4 patients, leucopenia and anemia in 2 patients, renal function impairment in one patient, and serious skin reactions in 3 patients. Adverse effects were detected within median 7.5 days of therapy (ranging from 4 to 18 days). Among 36 patients, 26 (72.2%) patients had adverse effect on the first 10 days of therapy. Transient adverse effects were detected in 20.1% of the patients during linezolid therapy. These adverse effects may be detected earlier than ten days of treatment. Linezolid should be prescribed safely in children with monitoring adverse effects especially platelet count and level of liver enzymes.

  2. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: Myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kejian; Weng, Zuquan; Sun, Liya; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; He, Lin

    2015-02-13

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Drugs causing common toxicity lead to similar in vitro gene expression changes. • We built a model to predict drug toxicity with drug-specific expression profiles. • Drugs with FDA black box warnings were effectively identified by our model. • In vitro assay can detect severe toxicity in the early stage of drug development.

  3. 36 CFR 800.6 - Resolution of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resolution of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.6 Resolution of adverse effects. (a) Continue... the undertaking that could avoid, minimize, or mitigate adverse effects on historic properties....

  4. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Assessment of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.5 Assessment of adverse effects. (a) Apply criteria of adverse effect. In consultation with the SHPO/THPO and any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian...

  5. 36 CFR 800.6 - Resolution of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resolution of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.6 Resolution of adverse effects. (a) Continue... the undertaking that could avoid, minimize, or mitigate adverse effects on historic properties. (1...

  6. Improving the quality of adverse drug reaction reporting by 4th-year medical students.

    PubMed

    Rosebraugh, Curtis J; Tsong, Yi; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Min; Mackey, Ann Corken; Flowers, Charlene; Toyer, Denise; Flockhart, David A; Honig, Peter K

    2003-03-01

    Evaluate whether a 15-minute lecture intervention will improve adverse drug reaction reporting quality on standard MedWatch forms. Seventy-eight 4th-year medical students were randomized to intervention 'Group-A' or non-intervention 'Group-B' on the first day of a required five-day clinical pharmacology rotation. Group-A participants attended a 15-minute lecture on completing a MedWatch form with quality information considered by the Food and Drug Administration as critical to adequate adverse drug reaction reporting. Group-B participants did not attend this lecture. Both groups then watched a standardized patient interview of a recognizable adverse drug reaction and completed MedWatch forms. Four Safety Evaluators from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rated student responses in a blinded fashion for the primary efficacy variable of Overall Impression and six informational domins using a standardized data quality analysis form that was developed within the Office of Postmarketing Drug Risk Assessment of the FDA. Seventy-eight MedWatch forms were evaluated (Group-A = 40, Group B = 38). Overall MedWatch information quality scores for the intervention group were significantly higher than the non-intervention group (p < 0.004). As little as a 15-minute intervention can significantly improve the quality of adverse drug reaction reporting by 4th-year medical students. Academic medical centers should consider incorporating adverse drug reaction reporting curriculum into the clinical training of medical students.

  7. Quality check of spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting forms of different countries.

    PubMed

    Bandekar, M S; Anwikar, S R; Kshirsagar, N A

    2010-11-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are considered as one of the leading causes of death among hospitalized patients. Thus reporting of adverse drug reactions become an important phenomenon. Spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting form is an essential component and a major tool of the pharmacovigilance system of any country. This form is a tool to collect information of ADRs which helps in establishing the causal relationship between the suspected drug and the reaction. As different countries have different forms, our aim was to study, analyze the suspected adverse drug reaction reporting form of different countries, and assess if these forms can capture all the data regarding the adverse drug reaction. For this analysis we identified 18 points which are essential to make a good adverse drug reaction report, enabling proper causality assessment of adverse reaction to generate a safety signal. Adverse drug reaction reporting forms of 10 different countries were collected from the internet and compared for 18 points like patient information, information about dechallenge-rechallenge, adequacy of space and columns to capture necessary information required for its causality assessment, etc. Of the ADR forms that we analyzed, Malaysia was the highest scorer with 16 out of 18 points. This study reveals that there is a need to harmonize the ADR reporting forms of all the countries because there is a lot of discrepancy in data captured by the existing ADR reporting forms as the design of these forms is different for different countries. These incomplete data obtained result in inappropriate causality assessment. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Pharmacogenomics of statins: understanding susceptibility to adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Mikulik, Eduard B; Dauki, Anees M; Murkherjee, Chandrama; Luzum, Jasmine A

    2016-01-01

    Statins are a cornerstone of the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerotic disease is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Statins are among the most commonly prescribed classes of medications, and their prescribing indications and target patient populations have been significantly expanded in the official guidelines recently published by the American and European expert panels. Adverse effects of statin pharmacotherapy, however, result in significant cost and morbidity and can lead to nonadherence and discontinuation of therapy. Statin-associated muscle symptoms occur in ~10% of patients on statins and constitute the most commonly reported adverse effect associated with statin pharmacotherapy. Substantial clinical and nonclinical research effort has been dedicated to determining whether genetics can provide meaningful insight regarding an individual patient’s risk of statin adverse effects. This contemporary review of the relevant clinical research on polymorphisms in several key genes that affect statin pharmacokinetics (eg, transporters and metabolizing enzymes), statin efficacy (eg, drug targets and pathways), and end-organ toxicity (eg, myopathy pathways) highlights several promising pharmacogenomic candidates. However, SLCO1B1 521C is currently the only clinically relevant pharmacogenetic test regarding statin toxicity, and its relevance is limited to simvastatin myopathy. PMID:27757045

  9. Differences in reproductive toxicology between alopecia drugs: an analysis on adverse events among female and male cases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia is a dermatological condition with limited therapeutic options. Only two drugs, finasteride and minoxidil, are approved by FDA for alopecia treatment. However, little is known about the differences in adverse effects between these two drugs. We examined the clinical reports submitted to the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) from 2004 to 2014. For both female and males, finasteride was found to be more associated with reproductive toxicity as compared to minoxidil. Among male alopecia cases, finasteride was significantly more concurrent with several forms of sexual dysfunction. Among female alopecia cases, finasteride was significantly more concurrent with harm to fetus and disorder of uterus. In addition, drug-gene network analysis indicated that finasteride could profoundly disturb pathways related to sex hormone signaling and oocyte maturation. These findings could provide clues for subsequent toxicological research. Taken together, this analysis suggested that finasteride could be more liable to various reproductive adverse effects. Some of these adverse effects have yet to be warned in FDA-approved drug label. This information can help improve the treatment regimen of alopecia and post-marketing regulation of drug products. PMID:27738338

  10. A prospective study of adverse drug reactions as a cause of admission to a paediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    MARTÍNEZ-MIR, I.; GARCÍA-LÓPEZ, M.; PALOP, V.; FERRER, J. M.; ESTAÑ, L.; RUBIO, E.; MORALES-OLIVAS, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    1A total of 512 consecutive paediatric hospital admissions of children 2 years old or less were evaluated to assess the extent and pattern of admission caused by suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The proportion of suspected ADRs related to hospital admissions was 4.3%. 2The organ-systems most commonly implicated were the central nervous system (40.5%), digestive system (16.7%), and skin and appendages (14.3%). Together, they accounted for 71.5% of admissions attributed to ADRs. The most common clinical manifestations inducing admission were convulsions (4 cases), dizziness (4), vomiting (3), and tremor, fever, itching and apnoea (2 cases each). 3The four classes of drugs most frequently suspected in admissions due to ADRs were respiratory drugs (35%), anti-infective agents (25%), drugs active on the central nervous system (15%) and drugs used in dermatology (10%). The most common drugs related to ADRs were a combination of chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, phenylephrine, guaiphenesin and salicylic acid (4 cases), followed by fenoterol, adrenaline, paracetamol, DTP vaccine and antipolio vaccine (2 cases each). 4There were no significant differences between children older and younger than 1 year (odds ratio 0.89; 95% CI 0.37–2.17) or between the sexes as regards hospital admittance due to suspected ADRs (odds ratio 1.94; 95% CI 0.72–5.42). 5The results of this kind of study may be influenced by patterns of drug utilization. Nevertheless, the lack of specific studies of drug effects in young children makes it desirable to carry out pharmacoepidemiological studies in this age group. PMID:8877022

  11. Biological anti-TNF drugs: immunogenicity underlying treatment failure and adverse events.

    PubMed

    Prado, Mônica Simon; Bendtzen, Klaus; Andrade, Luis Eduardo Coelho

    2017-09-01

    Genetically engineered monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins directed against cytokines or their receptors represent a breakthrough in the treatment of various chronic immune-inflammatory diseases. Areas covered: Studies show high remission rates in several diseases, but clinical practice shows a significant percentage of individuals who do not exhibit the desired response. Loss of therapeutic benefit after initial successful response is designated secondary failure. Immune-biological agents are not self-antigens and are therefore potentially immunogenic. Secondary failure is frequently caused by antibodies against immune-biologicals, known as anti-drug antibodies (ADA). ADA that neutralize circulating immune-biologicals and/or promote their clearance can reduce treatment efficacy. Furthermore, ADA can induce adverse events by diverse immunological mechanisms. This review provides a comprehensive overview of ADA in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with anti-TNF immune-biologicals, and explores the concept of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) as an effective strategy to improve therapeutic management. Expert opinion: Monitoring circulating ADA and therapeutic immune-biological drugs is helpful when evaluating patients with secondary failure. However, immunological tests for ADA vary considerably regarding their ability to detect different types of ADA. Several assays are not designed to determine ADA-induced drug neutralizing capacity, and they may report clinically non-relevant data, especially if drug is present in test samples.

  12. [Pharmacogenomic research for avoiding adverse reactions by anti-cancer drugs].

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro

    2011-02-01

    Anti-cancer drugs have relatively low effective rates and high frequencies of adverse reactions, occasionally leading to cessation of their treatments. Use of pharmacogenomic (PGx) information could be able to select the patients with high-response and less-adverse reactions, resulting in increase of patients' QOL and proper use of drugs. We have been collaborating with National Cancer Center for PGx analysis of anti-cancer drugs including irinotecan and gemcitabine in Japanese cancer patients. Irinotecan, now used for treatments of many cancers, is metabolically activated to SN-38 and then inactivated to SN-38 glucuronide by a UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGT1A1. In the UGT1A1 gene, two representative genetic polymorphisms, *28 and *6, were detected at 0.138 and 0.167, respectively in 177 Japanese cancer patients. When the patients were homozygotes of *28 or *6, or compound heterozygotes of them, statistically significant decreases were observed in the SN-38 glucuronidation activity and increases in the rate of severe neutropenia, compared to those in the patients without *28 or *6. Our results and papers were cited in the Japanese package inserts of irinotecan. Gemcitabine was inactivated by cytidine deaminase (CDA) into 2'-2'-difluorodeoxyuridine. A CDA polymorphism 208G>A (Ala70Thr) was detected at 0.037 frequency in 256 Japanese cancer patients and associated with reduced gemcitabine clearance as well as increased frequency of severe neutropenia. In the 4 patients suffered from very severe bone marrow toxicities, 3 patients were homozygous CDA*3, suggesting that this polymorphism is exquisite for predicting severe adverse reactions by gemcitabine in Japanese.

  13. Adverse effects of common medications on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Samplaski, Mary K; Nangia, Ajay K

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of patients require long-term medication regimens at a young age, but the adverse effects of medications on male reproduction are often inadequately considered, recognized and investigated. Medications can affect male reproduction through central hormonal effects, direct gonadotoxic effects, effects on sperm function or on sexual function. For example, exogenous testosterone inhibits spermatogenesis through central suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal hormonal axis. 5α-reductase inhibitors can impair sexual function, decrease semen volume and negatively affect sperm parameters, depending on dose and treatment duration. α-Blockers might decrease seminal emission and cause retrograde ejaculation, depending on the receptor specificity and dose of the agent. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors seem to have variable effects based on the isoform inhibited and evidence is conflicting. Antihypertensive and psychotropic agents can affect sperm, sexual function and hormonal parameters. For antibiotics, the literature on effects on sperm and sperm function is limited and dated. Many chemotherapeutic agents have a direct gonadotoxic effect, depending on agents used, dosing and number of treatment cycles. Overall, many medications commonly used in urology can have effects on male fertility (mostly reversible) but conclusive evidence in humans is often limited. Men should be counselled appropriately about potential drug-related adverse effects on their fertility.

  14. Thromboembolic adverse event study of combined estrogen-progestin preparations using Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Shiori; Matsui, Toshinobu; Hane, Yuuki; Abe, Junko; Hatahira, Haruna; Motooka, Yumi; Sasaoka, Sayaka; Fukuda, Akiho; Naganuma, Misa; Hirade, Kouseki; Takahashi, Yukiko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Combined estrogen-progestin preparations (CEPs) are associated with thromboembolic (TE) side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of TE using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. Adverse events recorded from April 2004 to November 2014 in the JADER database were obtained from the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) website (www.pmda.go.jp). We calculated the reporting odds ratios (RORs) of suspected CEPs, analyzed the time-to-onset profile, and assessed the hazard type using Weibull shape parameter (WSP). Furthermore, we used the applied association rule mining technique to discover undetected relationships such as the possible risk factors. The total number of reported cases in the JADER contained was 338,224. The RORs (95% confidential interval, CI) of drospirenone combined with ethinyl estradiol (EE, Dro-EE), norethisterone with EE (Ne-EE), levonorgestrel with EE (Lev-EE), desogestrel with EE (Des-EE), and norgestrel with EE (Nor-EE) were 56.2 (44.3-71.4), 29.1 (23.5-35.9), 42.9 (32.3-57.0), 44.7 (32.7-61.1), and 38.6 (26.3-56.7), respectively. The medians (25%-75%) of the time-to-onset of Dro-EE, Ne-EE, Lev-EE, Des-EE, and Nor-EE were 150.0 (75.3-314.0), 128.0 (27.0-279.0), 204.0 (44.0-660.0), 142.0 (41.3-344.0), and 16.5 (8.8-32.0) days, respectively. The 95% CIs of the WSP-β for Ne-EE, Lev-EE, and Nor-EE were lower and excluded 1. Association rule mining indicated that patients with anemia had a potential risk of developing a TE when using CEPs. Our results suggest that it is important to monitor patients administered CEP for TE. Careful observation is recommended, especially for those using Nor-EE, and this information may be useful for efficient therapeutic planning.

  15. [Methodology for Estimating the Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions in Pregnant Women: Analysis of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takamasa; Ohtsu, Fumiko; Sekiya, Yasuaki; Mori, Chiyo; Sakata, Hiroshi; Goto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Safety information regarding drug use during pregnancy is insufficient. The present study aimed to establish an optimal signal detection method to identify adverse drug reactions in pregnant women and to evaluate information in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database between April 2004 and November 2014. We identified reports on pregnant women using the Standardised MedDRA Queries. We calculated the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) and reporting odds ratio (ROR) of the risk factors for the two known risks of antithyroid drugs and methimazole (MMI) embryopathy, and ritodrine and fetal/infant cardiovascular events. The PRR and ROR values differed between all reports in the JADER database and those on pregnant women, affecting whether signal detection criteria were met. Therefore we considered that reports on pregnant women should be used when risks associated with pregnancy were determined using signal detection. Analyses of MMI embryopathy revealed MMI signals [PRR, 159.7; ROR, 669.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 282.4-1588.7] but no propylthiouracil signals (PRR, 1.98; ROR, 2.0; 95%CI, 0.3-15.4). These findings were consistent with those of reported risks. Analyses of fetal/infant cardiovascular events revealed ritodrine signals (PRR, 2.1; ROR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.3). These findings were also consistent with reported risks. Mining the JADER database was helpful for analyzing adverse drug reactions in pregnant women.

  16. Incidence, causes, and consequences of preventable adverse drug events: protocol for an overview of reviews.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Brian; Kanji, Salmaan; McDonald, Erika; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Wolfe, Dianna; Thavorn, Kednapa; Pepper, Sally; Chapman, Laurie; Skidmore, Becky; Moher, David

    2016-12-05

    Medication errors represent a noteworthy source of harm to patients. In recent years, several systematic reviews have assessed the frequency and causes of these events, as well as other factors such as commonly associated drugs, their incidence in different specialties, and their consequences to patients. Despite this past literature, there remains a need to study discrepancies between these reviews and establish the current state of the evidence. The planned review will bring together, compare, and contract existing evidence related to the occurrence of medication errors in acute and continuing/long-term care settings. A systematic review of reviews will be performed. A literature search designed by an experienced information specialist will be carried out in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. We will seek systematic reviews and meta-analyses of primary research studies that evaluate one or more of the following aspects of the occurrence of preventable adverse drug events in hospitals and long-term care centers: the incidence of preventable adverse drug events, either overall or within subgroups of interest related to setting; drug or patient characteristics; cited consequences of these events to patients, including death, emergency room visits, or other outcomes; and established causes of the preventable adverse drug events. Two researchers will independently screen all abstracts and full texts for study selection and subsequently perform data extraction from all included studies. Quality of the reviews will be assessed using the assessing the methodological quality of systematic reviews (AMSTAR) tool. Where objectives from two or more reviews overlap, we will employ the Jadad framework to assess the causes of any noted discrepancies between reviews. An overall summary of results will be performed using tabular and graphical approaches and will be supplemented by narrative description. This overview will help synthesize the broad degree of information

  17. Identifying genomic and developmental causes of adverse drug reactions in children

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Mara L; Leeder, J Steven

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a concern for all clinicians who utilize medications to treat adults and children; however, the frequency of adult and pediatric adverse drug reactions is likely to be under-reported. In this age of genomics and personalized medicine, identifying genetic variation that results in differences in drug biotransformation and response has contributed to significant advances in the utilization of several commonly used medications in adults. In order to better understand the variability of drug response in children however, we must not only consider differences in genotype, but also variation in gene expression during growth and development, namely ontogeny. In this article, recommendations for systematically approaching pharmacogenomic studies in children are discussed, and several examples of studies that investigate the genomic and developmental contribution to adverse drug reactions in children are reviewed. PMID:21121777

  18. The radiology of adverse drug reactions and toxic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Ansell, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dr. Ansell has produced a scholarly review of the radiology of drug reactions and toxic hazards in his latest book, which is based on over 1,200 articles in the world literature. About 800 of these articles are taken from outside the radiology literature, which indicates the need for this subject to be brought to the attention of the radiologist, particularly as concern about drug reactions and toxic hazards is always increasing. The book includes sections covering the chest, gastrointestinal tract, renal tract, skeletal system and soft tissues, and skull and central nervous system. Each section treats specific substances, such as steroids and heavy metals; specific radiologic signs, such as ureteric dilation; specific symptoms, such as dysphagia; industrial toxins; radiographic abnormalities are discussed; and numerous high-quality radiographs.

  19. Risk factors for adverse drug reactions--epidemiological approaches.

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R; Lawson, D H; Weber, E

    1990-01-01

    Age by itself is not an important risk factor for ADRs. Age-related changes are the consequence of a number of individual factors, for example morbidity associated with polypharmacy, decline in renal or liver function in the elderly, hypoalbuminaemia, reduced body weight, etc. The relationship between gastrointestinal bleeding and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be assessed globally in large cohort studies with access to computerized data, but complete accuracy requires access to the original patient records. The increase in the risk of GI bleeding in users of NSAIDs and aspirin was 50% above that in non-users. About a quarter of ADRs in hospitalized patients seem not to arise from purely pharmacological mechanisms. They are mainly due to allergic, anaphylactoid, or idiosyncratic reactions and to intolerance. In such non-pharmacological reactions, the time of exposure, reaction time, and even dosage may be important factors in identification of the causal drug. The use of benzodiazepines can be optimized by taking into account potency, time of action and the different syndromes encountered after withdrawal. Following long-term use problems of relapse and rebound are being increasingly recognized, in addition to organic withdrawal symptoms. In psychiatric patients extrapyramidal disorders due to neuroleptics are common. The rates of these ADRs differ markedly between various drugs, even after dosages and co-medications are taken into account. Epidemiological screening for potentially carcinogenic drugs can only be done in large cohorts of patients with pre-recorded full information sets as may be found in an HMO (Health Maintenance Organization). The findings of several such studies have been published in specialist cancer journals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. [Adverse effects and hemodynamic effects of nifedipine as a tocolytic].

    PubMed

    Spiesser-Robelet, L; Martin, B; Carceller, A-M; Bussières, J-F; Touzin, K; Audibert, F; Lachance, C; Ferreira, E

    2015-09-01

    To describe maternal and fetal adverse effects, in particular cardiorespiratory, of nifedipine as tocolytic, as well as effects on hemodynamic parameters. A retrospective evaluative study describing the use of nifedipine as tocolytic at CHU Sainte-Justine in Montreal. Demographic data as well as maternal blood pressure and adverse effects, and maternal and fetal heart rate were collected from medical records of women treated with nifedipine following our tocolysis protocol between January 1st 2004 and March 1st 2007. The medical records of 213 pregnant women were included in the study. Cardiorespiratory adverse effects were noted in 69 (32.4%); of these, 19 (8.9%) had serious cardiorespiratory adverse events, including 6 acute pulmonary edema or overload. Mean maternal systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly decreased and mean maternal and fetal heart rates were significantly increased after the bolus dose. Other adverse effects were reported for 100 (46.9%) women. Nifedipine may cause cardiorespiratory adverse effects warranting a close monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Energy drink use and adverse effects among emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Nordt, Sean Patrick; Vilke, Gary M; Clark, Richard F; Lee Cantrell, F; Chan, Theodore C; Galinato, Melissa; Nguyen, Vincent; Castillo, Edward M

    2012-10-01

    Energy drink usage is common and contains caffeine or other stimulants. We evaluated demographics, prevalence, reasons and adverse effects with consuming energy beverages. Cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of patients recruited from two San Diego Emergency Departments from January to December 2009. One-thousand-two-hundred-ninety-eight subjects participated of which 52.6% were male. Ethnicity: Caucasian 48.3%, African American 17%, Hispanic 18%, Other 16.7%. Age ranges: 18-29 years (38.4%), 30-54 years (49.6%) and greater than 55 years (12%). Reasons for use: 57% to "increase energy", 9.5% for studying/work projects, 2.4% while prolonged driving, improve sports performance 2%, with ethanol 6.3%, "other" reasons 22.1%. Adverse reactions reported by 33.5% (429) patients. Two-hundred-eighty report feeling "shaky/jittery", insomnia 136, palpitations 150, gastrointestinal upset 82, headache 68, chest pain 39, and seizures in 6. Eighty-five patients reported co-ingestion with illicit "stimulants" including cocaine and methamphetamine. We identified one-third of patients reported at least one adverse effect. Whilst most were not severe, a small number were serious e.g., seizures. In addition, some report purposely ingesting with illicit drugs.

  2. Reporting of adverse events for marketed drugs: Need for strengthening safety database

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Aditi Anand

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is an evolving discipline in the Indian context. However, there is limited regulatory guidance for adverse event reporting outside the purview of clinical trials. There are number of deficiencies in the framework for adverse event reporting from the perspective of pharma industry, health-care professional and general public due to which adverse events for marketed drugs are highly underreported. This article discusses the need to strengthen national safety database by promoting and mandating reporting of adverse events by all the stakeholders. PMID:27453826

  3. [Research on foreign countries laws and regulations on surveillance and reporting of postmarketing drugs adverse reactions].

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Xie, Yanming

    2009-06-01

    Following more and more new drugs are authorized into market, new, serious or unexpected adverse drug reactions appear frequently, which is a serious threat to people health and life. Through making laws and guidelines, governments of various countries aim to strengthen and standardize the surveillance and reporting of postmarketing drugs. The drugs management department of our country are doing related jobs positively, but there are some problems, such as drug risk-menagement is not emphasized well, and the management department lacks clarity on operating related regulations. This article tries to explore foreign countries' laws and regulations on the surveillance and reporting of postmarketing drugs, aiming to provide reference for our courtry.

  4. Adverse effects of gentamicin in scarlet macaws and galahs.

    PubMed

    Flammer, K; Clark, C H; Drewes, L A; Wilson, R C; Fiorello-Barrett, J

    1990-03-01

    The adverse effects of administration of gentamicin (5 mg/kg of body weight, IM, q 12 h) for 7 days were studied in healthy scarlet macaws (Ara macao) and galahs (Eolophus roseicapillus; cockatoos). Polydipsia and polyuria developed in each species, but were greater and persisted longer in the cockatoos. Peak water intake in the cockatoos more than quadrupled, and remained increased for 23 days after cessation of gentamicin administration. Plasma aspartate transaminase activity increased significantly (P less than 0.05) after treatment in the macaws, and plasma aspartate transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase activities increased in the cockatoos. Single IM administration of gentamicin (5 mg/kg) resulted in mean (+/- SEM) plasma concentration of 20.6 (+/- 1.85) micrograms/ml at 0.5 hour for either species of birds. There were no significant differences between mean plasma gentamicin concentrations for cockatoos and macaws at any time after drug administration, except at 12 hours, when values for cockatoos were significantly (P less than 0.05) greater than those for macaws. The elimination half-life for gentamicin after IM administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg was 1.17 and 1.07 hours, respectively, for macaws and 1.23 and 1.44 hours, respectively, for cockatoos. Correlation between drug disposition and adverse side effects could not be detected.

  5. Denosumab. Limited efficacy in fracture prevention, too many adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    The standard drug for postmenopausal osteoporotic women with a high risk of fracture is alendronic acid, used in conjunction with non-drug measures. There are no drugs with demonstrated efficacy on the risk of fracture in castrated men with prostate cancer. Denosumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits a cytokine acting mainly on bone cells and lymphocytes, has been authorised in the European Union for use in both these settings. There are no trials comparing denosumab versus alendronic acid for symptomatic fracture prevention. In two trials involving 1189 and 504 women, the incidence of clinical fractures, recorded as simple adverse effects, did not differ significantly between the groups. In a placebo-controlled trial in about 7900 elderly osteoporotic women, denosumab significantly reduced the incidence of symptomatic vertebral fractures (0.8% versus 2.6% after 3 years) and hip fractures (0.7% versus 1.2%). An indirect comparison, providing weak evidence, suggests that denosumab is less effective than alendronic acid. In a placebo-controlled trial in 1468 castrated men with prostate cancer, denosumab did not reduce the incidence of symptomatic fractures after 3 years. Only the incidence of vertebral fractures, detected on routine radiographs, showed a statistically significant decline (1.5% versus 3.5%). Denosumab has numerous adverse effects. In placebo-controlled trials, this monoclonal antibody was associated with a higher incidence of deep-seated infections such as endocarditis, cancer, and skin rash. More data are needed on the risk of pancreatitis, long-term bone disorders (atypical fractures, delayed fracture healing, osteonecrosis of the jaw), hypocalcaemia and cataracts, all of which were reported in clinical trials. In practice, denosumab is not sufficiently effective to outweigh its established and potential risks in postmenopausal osteoporotic women or in castrated men with prostate cancer.

  6. Stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of an electronic medication management system to reduce medication errors, adverse drug events and average length of stay at two paediatric hospitals: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, J I; Li, L; Raban, M Z; Baysari, M T; Prgomet, M; Georgiou, A; Kim, T; Lake, R; McCullagh, C; Dalla-Pozza, L; Karnon, J; O'Brien, T A; Ambler, G; Day, R; Cowell, C T; Gazarian, M; Worthington, R; Lehmann, C U; White, L; Barbaric, D; Gardo, A; Kelly, M; Kennedy, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Medication errors are the most frequent cause of preventable harm in hospitals. Medication management in paediatric patients is particularly complex and consequently potential for harms are greater than in adults. Electronic medication management (eMM) systems are heralded as a highly effective intervention to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs), yet internationally evidence of their effectiveness in paediatric populations is limited. This study will assess the effectiveness of an eMM system to reduce medication errors, ADEs and length of stay (LOS). The study will also investigate system impact on clinical work processes. Methods and analysis A stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial (SWCRCT) will measure changes pre-eMM and post-eMM system implementation in prescribing and medication administration error (MAE) rates, potential and actual ADEs, and average LOS. In stage 1, 8 wards within the first paediatric hospital will be randomised to receive the eMM system 1 week apart. In stage 2, the second paediatric hospital will randomise implementation of a modified eMM and outcomes will be assessed. Prescribing errors will be identified through record reviews, and MAEs through direct observation of nurses and record reviews. Actual and potential severity will be assigned. Outcomes will be assessed at the patient-level using mixed models, taking into account correlation of admissions within wards and multiple admissions for the same patient, with adjustment for potential confounders. Interviews and direct observation of clinicians will investigate the effects of the system on workflow. Data from site 1 will be used to develop improvements in the eMM and implemented at site 2, where the SWCRCT design will be repeated (stage 2). Ethics and dissemination The research has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Sydney Children's Hospitals Network and Macquarie University. Results will be reported through academic journals and

  7. Hospitalizations Due to Adverse Drug Events in the Elderly—A Retrospective Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Laatikainen, Outi; Sneck, Sami; Bloigu, Risto; Lahtinen, Minna; Lauri, Timo; Turpeinen, Miia

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are more likely to affect geriatric patients due to physiological changes occurring with aging. Even though this is an internationally recognized problem, similar research data in Finland is still lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the number of geriatric medication-related hospitalizations in the Finnish patient population and to discover the potential means of recognizing patients particularly at risk of ADEs. The study was conducted retrospectively from the 2014 emergency department patient records in Oulu University Hospital. A total number of 290 admissions were screened for ADEs, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) by a multi-disciplinary research team. Customized Naranjo scale was used as a control method. All admissions were categorized into “probable,” “possible,” or “doubtful” by both assessment methods. In total, 23.1% of admissions were categorized as “probably” or “possibly” medication-related. Vertigo, falling, and fractures formed the largest group of ADEs. The most common ADEs were related to medicines from N class of the ATC-code system. Age, sex, residence, or specialty did not increase the risk for medication-related admission significantly (min p = 0.077). Polypharmacy was, however, found to increase the risk (OR 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5–6.9; p = 0.01). In conclusion, screening patients for specific demographics or symptoms would not significantly improve the recognition of ADEs. In addition, as ADE detection today is largely based on voluntary reporting systems and retrospective manual tracking of errors, it is evident that more effective methods for ADE detection are needed in the future. PMID:27761112

  8. Dictionary construction and identification of possible adverse drug events in Danish clinical narrative text

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Robert; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Objective Drugs have tremendous potential to cure and relieve disease, but the risk of unintended effects is always present. Healthcare providers increasingly record data in electronic patient records (EPRs), in which we aim to identify possible adverse events (AEs) and, specifically, possible adverse drug events (ADEs). Materials and methods Based on the undesirable effects section from the summary of product characteristics (SPC) of 7446 drugs, we have built a Danish ADE dictionary. Starting from this dictionary we have developed a pipeline for identifying possible ADEs in unstructured clinical narrative text. We use a named entity recognition (NER) tagger to identify dictionary matches in the text and post-coordination rules to construct ADE compound terms. Finally, we apply post-processing rules and filters to handle, for example, negations and sentences about subjects other than the patient. Moreover, this method allows synonyms to be identified and anatomical location descriptions can be merged to allow appropriate grouping of effects in the same location. Results The method identified 1 970 731 (35 477 unique) possible ADEs in a large corpus of 6011 psychiatric hospital patient records. Validation was performed through manual inspection of possible ADEs, resulting in precision of 89% and recall of 75%. Discussion The presented dictionary-building method could be used to construct other ADE dictionaries. The complication of compound words in Germanic languages was addressed. Additionally, the synonym and anatomical location collapse improve the method. Conclusions The developed dictionary and method can be used to identify possible ADEs in Danish clinical narratives. PMID:23703825

  9. Factors that condition the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Alessia; Colaceci, Sofia; Giusti, Angela; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    To describe and synthesise previous research on factors conditioning the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses. Spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions by health-care providers, are a main instrument for the continuous evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of every drug. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions by all health-care providers, in particular by nurses, is a major limitation to this system. An integrated review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus databases and Google Scholar. After evaluation for appropriateness related to inclusion/exclusion criteria, 16 studies were included in the final analysis and synthesis. Two factors emerged from the study: (1) intrinsic factors related to nurses' knowledge and attitudes; (2) extrinsic factors related to nurses' interaction with health-care organisations and to the relationship between nurses and physicians. Nurses' attitudes that hinder reporting include ignorance, insecurity, fear and lethargy. Nurses are not fully aware of their role in adverse drug reaction reporting. Nurses must acquire greater knowledge to implement specific skills into their daily clinical practice. To improve nurses' reporting of adverse drug reactions, it is necessary to develop management approaches that modify both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Seizures as adverse events of antibiotic drugs: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Raoul; Rüegg, Stephan; Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah

    2015-10-13

    Antibiotic drugs are commonly associated w