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Sample records for adverse drug-drug interactions

  1. Adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicholas; Pollack, Charles; Butkerait, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. PMID:26203254

  2. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review 1

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; de Oliveira, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. PMID:27598380

  3. Informatics confronts drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Percha, Bethany; Altman, Russ B

    2013-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are an emerging threat to public health. Recent estimates indicate that DDIs cause nearly 74000 emergency room visits and 195000 hospitalizations each year in the USA. Current approaches to DDI discovery, which include Phase IV clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance, are insufficient for detecting many DDIs and do not alert the public to potentially dangerous DDIs before a drug enters the market. Recent work has applied state-of-the-art computational and statistical methods to the problem of DDIs. Here we review recent developments that encompass a range of informatics approaches in this domain, from the construction of databases for efficient searching of known DDIs to the prediction of novel DDIs based on data from electronic medical records, adverse event reports, scientific abstracts, and other sources. We also explore why DDIs are so difficult to detect and what the future holds for informatics-based approaches to DDI discovery. PMID:23414686

  4. Extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence and associated factors of drug-drug interaction and potential adverse drug reactions in Gondar Teaching Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Admassie, Endalkachew; Melese, Tesfahun; Mequanent, Woldeselassie; Hailu, Wubshet; Srikanth, B Akshaya

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence, and associated factors for the occurrence of drug-drug interaction (DDI) and potential adverse drug reaction (ADR) in Gondar University Teaching Referral Hospital. Institutional-based retrospective cross-sectional study. This study was conducted on prescriptions of both in and out-patients for a period of 3 months at Gondar University Hospital. Both bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and possible ADRs. All the statistical calculations were performed using SPSS(®) software. A total of 12,334 prescriptions were dispensed during the study period of which, 2,180 prescriptions were containing two or more drugs per prescription. A total of 21,210 drugs were prescribed and the average number of drugs per prescription was 1.72. Occurrences of DDI of all categories (Major, Moderate, and Minor) were analyzed and DDI were detected in 711 (32.6%) prescriptions. Sex was not found to be a risk factor for the occurrence of DDI and ADR, while age and number of medications per prescription were found to be significant risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and ADR. The mean number of drugs per prescription was 1.72 and hence with regard to the WHO limit of drugs per prescription, Gondar hospital was able to maintain the limit and prescriptions containing multiple drugs supposed to be taken systemically. Numbers of drugs per prescription as well as older age were found to be predisposing factors for the occurrence of DDI and potential ADRs while sex was not a risk factor. PMID:24350048

  5. A statistical methodology for drug-drug interaction surveillance.

    PubMed

    Norén, G Niklas; Sundberg, Rolf; Bate, Andrew; Edwards, I Ralph

    2008-07-20

    Interaction between drug substances may yield excessive risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when two drugs are taken in combination. Collections of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) related to suspected ADR incidents in clinical practice have proven to be very useful in post-marketing surveillance for pairwise drug--ADR associations, but have yet to reach their full potential for drug-drug interaction surveillance. In this paper, we implement and evaluate a shrinkage observed-to-expected ratio for exploratory analysis of suspected drug-drug interaction in ICSR data, based on comparison with an additive risk model. We argue that the limited success of previously proposed methods for drug-drug interaction detection based on ICSR data may be due to an underlying assumption that the absence of interaction is equivalent to having multiplicative risk factors. We provide empirical examples of established drug-drug interaction highlighted with our proposed approach that go undetected with logistic regression. A database wide screen for suspected drug-drug interaction in the entire WHO database is carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. As always in the analysis of ICSRs, the clinical validity of hypotheses raised with the proposed method must be further reviewed and evaluated by subject matter experts. PMID:18344185

  6. In vitro evaluation of metabolic drug-drug interactions: a descriptive and critical commentary.

    PubMed

    Li, Albert P

    2007-01-01

    Adverse drug-drug interactions represent a major challenge for the pharmaceutical industry. Recently, in vitro approaches for the evaluation of metabolism-related drug-drug interactions have been developed. These in vitro approaches are found to be useful in the assessment of clinical drug-drug interaction potential of new chemical entities and to aid the understanding of clinically significant drug-drug interactions observed with existing drugs. The general methods for the evaluation of drug-drug interactions using in vitro, human-based experimental systems are described and critically reviewed.

  7. Opioid pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Overholser, Brian R; Foster, David R

    2011-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving opioid analgesics can be problematic. Opioids are widely used, have a narrow therapeutic index, and can be associated with severe toxicity. The purpose of this review is to describe pharmacokinetic DDIs associated with opioids frequently encountered in managed care settings (morphine, codeine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone). An introduction to the pharmacokinetic basis of DDIs is provided, and potential DDIs associated with opioids are reviewed. Opioids metabolized by the drug metabolizing enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) system (codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone) are associated with numerous DDIs that can result in either a reduction in opioid effect or excess opioid effects. Conversely, opioids that are not metabolized by that system (morphine, oxymorphone, and hydromorphone) tend to be involved in fewer CYP450-associated pharmacokinetic DDIs.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of antiretrovirals: an update.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Laura; Khoo, Saye; Back, David

    2010-01-01

    Current antiretroviral treatment has allowed HIV infection to become a chronic manageable condition with many HIV patients living longer. However, available antiretrovirals are not without limitations, for example the development of resistance and adverse effects. Consequently, new drugs in existing and novel classes are urgently required to provide viable treatment options to patients with few remaining choices. Darunavir, etravirine, maraviroc and raltegravir have been recently approved for treatment-experienced patients and other agents such as rilpivirine, vicriviroc and elvitegravir are currently under phase III study. Clinical studies are necessary to optimise potential treatment combinations and to manage drug-drug interactions to help avoid toxicity or therapy failure. This review aims to summarise the pharmacokinetics and key drug-drug interaction studies for newly available antiretrovirals and those in development. Further information regarding drug-drug interactions of well established antiretrovirals and those recently approved are readily available online at sites such as http://www.hiv-druginteractions.org, http://www.clinicaloptions.com/hiv, http://hivinsite.ucsf.edu. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, Vol 85, issue 1, 2010.

  9. A clinician's guide to statin drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Kellick, Kenneth A; Bottorff, Michael; Toth, Peter P; The National Lipid Association's Safety Task Force

    2014-01-01

    The statins are widely used worldwide to reduce risk for cardiovascular events in both the primary and secondary prevention settings. Although generally quite safe, the statins can be associated with a variety of serious side adverse effects, including myalgia, myopathy, and changes in plasma enzymes of hepatic origin. Although rare, the most serious of these is rhabdomyolysis. Several drugs can interfere with the metabolism and disposal of the statins, thereby increasing risk for adverse events. It is important that clinicians treating patients with statins be aware of the potential for drug-drug interactions between each statin and specific other drugs and take measures to prevent them. The prediction of potential drug-drug interactions derives from basic pharmacokinetic principles. Certain drug interactions are predicted by measuring the effect of interacting drugs on blood plasma concentrations of the statin. Individual patient variations resulting in part from polymorphisms in the metabolizing enzymes confound some of these predictions. Based on these known effects, a new classification for predicting statin drug interactions is proposed. This report discusses likely prescription and nonprescription interactions as well as potential alternatives for special populations.

  10. Evaluation of enzyme inhibition kinetics in drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ang; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yu; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Inhibition of CYP enzymes is thought to be the most common cause of drug-drug and/or herb-drug interactions. To characterize the inhibition of CYP enzymes activities by chemicals, enzyme inhibition kinetic experiments are usually carried out. The purpose of this letter is to call attention to evaluate the enzyme inhibition kinetics in drug-drug interactions.

  11. Potential Drug - Drug Interactions among Medications Prescribed to Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Barna

    2014-01-01

    Context: Drug-drug interactions(DDIs) are significant but avoidable causes of iatrogenic morbidity and hospital admission. Aim: To detect potential drug-drug interactions among medications received by hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Patients of both sex and all adult age groups, who were attending medicine out -patient department (OPD) of a tertiary care teaching rural hospital since last six months and were being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for essential hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patient with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were also included in the study. Potential drug drug interactions were checked with medscape drug interaction software. Results: With the help of medscape drug interaction software, 71.50% prescriptions were identified having atleast one drug-drug interaction. Total 918 DDIs were found in between 58 drug pairs. 55.23% DDIs were pharmacodynamic, 4.79% pharmacokinetic type of DDIs. 32.24% DDIs were found affecting serum potassium level. 95.42% DDIs were found significant type of DDIs. Drug drug interaction between atenolol & amlodipine was the most common DDI (136) followed by metoprolol and amlodine (88) in this study. Atenolol and amlodipine ( 25.92%) was the most common drugs to cause DDIs in our study. Conclusion: We detected a significant number of drug drug interaction in hypertensive patients. These interactions were between antihypertensive agents or between hypertensive and drug for co-morbid condition. PMID:25584241

  12. Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 inhibitors (gliptins): focus on drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2010-09-01

    speaking, almost no drug-drug interactions or only minor drug-drug interactions have been reported between DPP-4 inhibitors and any of these drugs. The gliptins do not significantly modify the pharmacokinetic profile and exposure of the other tested drugs, and the other drugs do not significantly alter the pharmacokinetic profile of the gliptins or exposure to these. The only exception concerns saxagliptin, which is metabolized to an active metabolite by CYP3A4/5. Therefore, exposure to saxagliptin and its primary metabolite may be significantly modified when saxagliptin is coadministered with specific strong inhibitors (ketoconazole, diltiazem) or inducers (rifampicin) of CYP3A4/5 isoforms. The absence of significant drug-drug interactions could be explained by the favourable pharmacokinetic characteristics of DPP-4 inhibitors, which are not inducers or inhibitors of CYP isoforms and are not bound to plasma proteins to a great extent. Therefore, according to these pharmacokinetic findings, which were generally obtained in healthy young male subjects, no dosage adjustment is recommended when gliptins are combined with other pharmacological agents in patients with T2DM, with the exception of a reduction in the daily dosage of saxagliptin when this drug is used in association with a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4/A5. It is worth noting, however, that a reduction in the dose of sulfonylureas is usually recommended when a DPP-4 inhibitor is added, because of a pharmacodynamic interaction (rather than a pharmacokinetic interaction) between the sulfonylurea and the DPP-4 inhibitor, which may result in a higher risk of hypoglycaemia. Otherwise, any gliptin may be combined with metformin or a thiazolidinedione (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone), leading to a significant improvement in glycaemic control without an increased risk of hypoglycaemia or any other adverse event in patients with T2DM. Finally, the absence of drug-drug interactions in clinical trials in healthy subjects requires

  13. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION PROFILES OF MEDICATION REGIMENS EXTRACTED FROM A DE-IDENTIFIED ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Restrepo, Nicole A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    With age, the number of prescribed medications increases and subsequently raises the risk for adverse drug-drug interactions. These adverse effects lower quality of life and increase health care costs. Quantifying the potential burden of adverse effects before prescribing medications can be a valuable contribution to health care. This study evaluated medication lists extracted from a subset of the Vanderbilt de-identified electronic medical record system. Reported drugs were cross-referenced with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG database to identify known drug-drug interactions. On average, a medication regimen contained 6.58 medications and 2.68 drug-drug interactions. Here, we quantify the burden of potential adverse events from drug-drug interactions through drug-drug interaction profiles and include a number of alternative medications as provided by the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. PMID:27570646

  14. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION PROFILES OF MEDICATION REGIMENS EXTRACTED FROM A DE-IDENTIFIED ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Restrepo, Nicole A; Haines, Jonathan L; Crawford, Dana C

    2016-01-01

    With age, the number of prescribed medications increases and subsequently raises the risk for adverse drug-drug interactions. These adverse effects lower quality of life and increase health care costs. Quantifying the potential burden of adverse effects before prescribing medications can be a valuable contribution to health care. This study evaluated medication lists extracted from a subset of the Vanderbilt de-identified electronic medical record system. Reported drugs were cross-referenced with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG database to identify known drug-drug interactions. On average, a medication regimen contained 6.58 medications and 2.68 drug-drug interactions. Here, we quantify the burden of potential adverse events from drug-drug interactions through drug-drug interaction profiles and include a number of alternative medications as provided by the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. PMID:27570646

  15. Statin drug-drug interactions in a Romanian community pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    BADIU, RALUCA; BUCSA, CAMELIA; MOGOSAN, CRISTINA; DUMITRASCU, DAN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Statins are frequently prescribed for patients with dyslipidemia and have a well-established safety profile. However, when associated with interacting dugs, the risk of adverse effects, especially muscular toxicity, is increased. The objective of this study was to identify, characterize and quantify the prevalence of the potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) of statins in reimbursed prescriptions from a community pharmacy in Bucharest. Methods We analyzed the reimbursed prescriptions including statins collected during one month in a community pharmacy. The online program Medscape Drug Interaction Checker was used for checking the drug interactions and their classification based on severity: Serious – Use alternative, Significant – Monitor closely and Minor. Results 132 prescriptions pertaining to 125 patients were included in the analysis. Our study showed that 25% of the patients who were prescribed statins were exposed to pDDIs: 37 Serious and Significant interactions in 31 of the statins prescriptions. The statins involved were atorvastatin, simvastatin and rosuvastatin. Conclusions Statin pDDIs have a high prevalence and patients should be monitored closely in order to prevent the development of adverse effects that result from statin interactions. PMID:27152080

  16. Irreversible enzyme inhibition kinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mohutsky, Michael; Hall, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the types of irreversible inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and the methods commonly employed to quantify the irreversible inhibition and subsequently predict the extent and time course of clinically important drug-drug interactions.

  17. QSAR Modeling and Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Alexey V; Varlamova, Ekaterina V; Lagunin, Alexey A; Dmitriev, Alexander V; Muratov, Eugene N; Fourches, Denis; Kuz'min, Victor E; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Tropsha, Alexander; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-02-01

    Severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the fourth leading cause of fatality in the U.S. with more than 100,000 deaths per year. As up to 30% of all ADRs are believed to be caused by drug-drug interactions (DDIs), typically mediated by cytochrome P450s, possibilities to predict DDIs from existing knowledge are important. We collected data from public sources on 1485, 2628, 4371, and 27,966 possible DDIs mediated by four cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 for 55, 73, 94, and 237 drugs, respectively. For each of these data sets, we developed and validated QSAR models for the prediction of DDIs. As a unique feature of our approach, the interacting drug pairs were represented as binary chemical mixtures in a 1:1 ratio. We used two types of chemical descriptors: quantitative neighborhoods of atoms (QNA) and simplex descriptors. Radial basis functions with self-consistent regression (RBF-SCR) and random forest (RF) were utilized to build QSAR models predicting the likelihood of DDIs for any pair of drug molecules. Our models showed balanced accuracy of 72-79% for the external test sets with a coverage of 81.36-100% when a conservative threshold for the model's applicability domain was applied. We generated virtually all possible binary combinations of marketed drugs and employed our models to identify drug pairs predicted to be instances of DDI. More than 4500 of these predicted DDIs that were not found in our training sets were confirmed by data from the DrugBank database. PMID:26669717

  18. Participatory design for drug-drug interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Almerares, Alfredo; Stanziola, Enrique; Risk, Marcelo; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of decision support systems, in the point of care, to alert drug-drug interactions has been shown to improve quality of care. Still, the use of these systems has not been as expected, it is believed, because of the difficulties in their knowledge databases; errors in the generation of the alerts and the lack of a suitable design. This study expands on the development of alerts using participatory design techniques based on user centered design process. This work was undertaken in three stages (inquiry, participatory design and usability testing) it showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction in the system.

  19. Participatory design for drug-drug interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Almerares, Alfredo; Stanziola, Enrique; Risk, Marcelo; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of decision support systems, in the point of care, to alert drug-drug interactions has been shown to improve quality of care. Still, the use of these systems has not been as expected, it is believed, because of the difficulties in their knowledge databases; errors in the generation of the alerts and the lack of a suitable design. This study expands on the development of alerts using participatory design techniques based on user centered design process. This work was undertaken in three stages (inquiry, participatory design and usability testing) it showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction in the system. PMID:25991099

  20. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor. PMID:25707701

  1. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  2. The nasty surprise of a complex drug-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Bode, Chris

    2010-05-01

    In vitro investigation of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) has officially been part of the regulatory pathway for new drugs in the USA since the publication of an FDA guidance on the subject in 1997. The field has continued to evolve, driven by preclinical and clinical experience, improved understanding of the molecular basis of DDIs, technological advances, and a continuous dialogue between the FDA and pharmaceutical industry scientists. Some striking DDIs involve multiple molecular species and targets; their mechanisms and magnitude would have been difficult or impossible to predict with available in vitro tools. This article focuses on one such example.

  3. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Patel, Mitesh; Paturi, Durga K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete delineation of the HIV-1 life cycle has resulted in the development of several antiretroviral drugs. Twenty-five therapeutic agents belonging to five different classes are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. Advent of triple combination antiretroviral therapy has significantly lowered the mortality rate in HIV patients. However, fungal infections still represent major opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients worldwide. Areas covered Antiretroviral drugs that target enzymes and/or proteins indispensable for viral replication are discussed in this article. Fungal infections, causative organisms, epidemiology and preferred treatment modalities are also outlined. Finally, observed/predicted drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals are summarized along with clinical recommendations. Expert opinion Concomitant use of amphotericin B and tenofovir must be closely monitored for renal functioning. Due to relatively weak interactive potential with the CYP450 system, fluconazole is the preferred antifungal drug. High itraconazole doses (> 200 mg/day) are not advised in patients receiving booster protease inhibitor (PI) regimen. Posaconazole is contraindicated in combination with either efavirenz or fosamprenavir. Moreover, voriconazole is contraindicated with high-dose ritonavir-boosted PI. Echino-candins may aid in overcoming the limitations of existing antifungal therapy. An increasing number of documented or predicted drug-drug interactions and therapeutic drug monitoring may aid in the management of HIV-associated opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:24521092

  4. Making Transporter Models for Drug-Drug Interaction Prediction Mobile.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Clark, Alex M; Wright, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    The past decade has seen increased numbers of studies publishing ligand-based computational models for drug transporters. Although they generally use small experimental data sets, these models can provide insights into structure-activity relationships for the transporter. In addition, such models have helped to identify new compounds as substrates or inhibitors of transporters of interest. We recently proposed that many transporters are promiscuous and may require profiling of new chemical entities against multiple substrates for a specific transporter. Furthermore, it should be noted that virtually all of the published ligand-based transporter models are only accessible to those involved in creating them and, consequently, are rarely shared effectively. One way to surmount this is to make models shareable or more accessible. The development of mobile apps that can access such models is highlighted here. These apps can be used to predict ligand interactions with transporters using Bayesian algorithms. We used recently published transporter data sets (MATE1, MATE2K, OCT2, OCTN2, ASBT, and NTCP) to build preliminary models in a commercial tool and in open software that can deliver the model in a mobile app. In addition, several transporter data sets extracted from the ChEMBL database were used to illustrate how such public data and models can be shared. Predicting drug-drug interactions for various transporters using computational models is potentially within reach of anyone with an iPhone or iPad. Such tools could help prioritize which substrates should be used for in vivo drug-drug interaction testing and enable open sharing of models. PMID:26199424

  5. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP) has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM) with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN), a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%. PMID:26941831

  6. Text Mining Driven Drug-Drug Interaction Detection

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Su; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Identifying drug-drug interactions is an important and challenging problem in computational biology and healthcare research. There are accurate, structured but limited domain knowledge and noisy, unstructured but abundant textual information available for building predictive models. The difficulty lies in mining the true patterns embedded in text data and developing efficient and effective ways to combine heterogenous types of information. We demonstrate a novel approach of leveraging augmented text-mining features to build a logistic regression model with improved prediction performance (in terms of discrimination and calibration). Our model based on synthesized features significantly outperforms the model trained with only structured features (AUC: 96% vs. 91%, Sensitivity: 90% vs. 82% and Specificity: 88% vs. 81%). Along with the quantitative results, we also show learned “latent topics”, an intermediary result of our text mining module, and discuss their implications. PMID:25131635

  7. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP) has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM) with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN), a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%.

  8. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms.

  9. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms. PMID:26392756

  10. Intrapartum Magnesium Sulfate and the Potential for Cardiopulmonary Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sarah C.; Stockmann, Chris; Balch, Alfred; Clark, Erin A.S.; Kamyar, Manijeh; Varner, Michael; Korgenski, E. Kent; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.; Spigarelli, Michael G.; Sherwin, Catherine M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the frequency of possible cardiopulmonary drug-drug interactions among pregnant women who received intrapartum magnesium sulfate (MgSO4). Methods Pregnant women admitted to an Intermountain Healthcare facility between January 2009 and October 2011 were studied if they received one or more doses of MgSO4. Concomitant medications were electronically queried from an electronic health records system. Adverse events were identified using administrative discharge codes. The frequency of cardiopulmonary drug-drug interactions was compared among women who did, and did not, receive aminoglycoside antibiotics, antacids / laxatives, calcium channel blockers, corticosteroids, diuretics, neuromuscular blocking agents, and vitamin D analogs, all of which are contraindicated for patients receiving MgSO4. Results Overall, 683 women received intrapartum MgSO4 during the study period. A total of 219 MgSO4 potentially interacting drugs were identified among 155 (23%) unique patients. The most commonly identified potentially interacting agents included calcium channel blockers (26%), diuretics (25%), and antacids / laxatives (19%). Longer hospital stays were significantly associated with increasing numbers of MgSO4 interacting drugs (P<0.001). Three of 53 (6%) women who received furosemide experienced a cardiac arrest, compared to 0 of 618 (0%) women who did not receive furosemide (Fisher’s Exact Test P<0.001). Conclusion Intrapartum administration of drugs that interact with MgSO4 is common and associated with prolonged hospital stays and potentially cardiopulmonary drug-drug interactions. Caution is warranted when prescribing MgSO4 in combination with known interacting medications. PMID:24487252

  11. Mechanism of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Warfarin and Statins.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Abdul Naveed; Bohnert, Tonika; Williams, David A; Gan, Lawrence L; LeDuc, Barbara W

    2016-06-01

    The anticoagulant drug warfarin and the lipid-lowering statin drugs are commonly co-administered to patients with cardiovascular diseases. Clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between these drugs have been recognized through case studies for many years, but the biochemical mechanisms causing these interactions have not been explained fully. Previous theories include kinetic alterations in cytochrome P-450-mediated drug metabolism or disturbances of drug-protein binding, leading to anticoagulant activity of warfarin; however, neither the enantioselective effects on warfarin metabolism nor the potential disruption of drug transporter function have been well investigated. This study investigated the etiology of the DDIs between warfarin and statins. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods were developed and validated to quantify racemic warfarin, 6 of its hydroxylated metabolites, and pure enantiomers of warfarin; these methods were applied to study the role of different absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties, leading to DDIs. Plasma protein binding displacement of warfarin was performed in the presence of statins using equilibrium dialysis method. Substrate kinetics of warfarin and pure enantiomers were performed with human liver microsomes to determine the kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) for the formation of all 6 hydroxywarfarin metabolites, inhibition of warfarin metabolism in the presence of statins, was determined. Uptake transport studies of warfarin were performed using overexpressing HEK cell lines and efflux transport using human adenocarcinoma colonic cell line cells. Fluvastatin significantly displaced plasma protein binding of warfarin and pure enantiomers; no other statin resulted in significant displacement of warfarin. All the statins that inhibited the formation of 10-hydroxywarfarin, atorvastatin, pitavastatin, and simvastatin were highly potent compared to other statins; in contrast, only fluvastatin

  12. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Bogetti-Salazar, Michele; González-González, Cesar; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Rosas-Carrasco, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe) (n=64) and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent) (n=117). Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5%) and 124 women (68.5%) with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1%) patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81%) were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%), clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%), and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%). Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population. PMID:26872079

  13. Sildenafil and furosemide associated ototoxicity: consideration of drug-drug interactions, synergy, and broader clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Skeith, Leslie; Yamashita, Cory; Mehta, Sanjay; Farquhar, Donald; Kim, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced ototoxicity, particularly those involving phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors, is considered to be rare and to our knowledge such an adverse effect has not been reported in Canada. Here we present a case of a 77-year old man initiated on a sildenfil regimen for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, who developed sudden bilateral hearing loss after taking sildenafil, in the setting of high dose furosemide and diltiazem. We outline the likely interplay of patient characteristics, drug synergy and drug-drug interactions in the development of his ototoxicity. Importantly, given the extent and popularity of PDE-5 inhibitors for erectile dysfunction as well as a newer therapeutic option for pulmonary hypertension, clinicians should be aware of the risk for drug-induced ototoxicity, particularly in the setting of concomitant loop diuretics and CYP3A4 inhibiting medications. PMID:23756362

  14. Herb-drug, food-drug, nutrient-drug, and drug-drug interactions: mechanisms involved and their medical implications.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Janina Maria

    2002-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and iatrogenic diseases have been identified as significant factors responsible for patient morbidity and mortality. Significant studies on drug metabolism in humans have been published during the last few years, offering a deeper comprehension of the mechanisms underlying adverse drug reactions and interactions. More understanding of these mechanisms, and of recent advances in laboratory technology, can help to evaluate potential drug interactions when drugs are prescribed concurrently. Increasing knowledge of interindividual variation in drug breakdown capacity and recent findings concerning the influence of environment, diet, nutrients, and herbal products can be used to reduce ADRs and iatrogenic diseases. Reviewed data suggest that drug treatment should be increasingly custom tailored to suit the individual patient and that appropriately co-prescribed diet and herbal remedies, could increase drug efficacy and lessen drug toxicity. This review focuses mainly on recently published research material. The cytochrome p450 enzymes, their role in metabolism, and their mechanisms of action are reviewed, and their role in drug-drug interactions are discussed. Drug-food and drug-herb interactions have garnered attention. Interdisciplinary communication among medical herbalists, medical doctors, and dietetic experts needs to be improved and encouraged. Internet resources for obtaining current information regarding drug-drug, drug-herb, and drug-nutrient interactions are provided. PMID:12165187

  15. Label Propagation Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Clinical Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is an important topic for public health, and thus attracts attention from both academia and industry. Here we hypothesize that clinical side effects (SEs) provide a human phenotypic profile and can be translated into the development of computational models for predicting adverse DDIs. We propose an integrative label propagation framework to predict DDIs by integrating SEs extracted from package inserts of prescription drugs, SEs extracted from FDA Adverse Event Reporting System, and chemical structures from PubChem. Experimental results based on hold-out validation demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. In addition, the new algorithm also ranked drug information sources based on their contributions to the prediction, thus not only confirming that SEs are important features for DDI prediction but also paving the way for building more reliable DDI prediction models by prioritizing multiple data sources. By applying the proposed algorithm to 1,626 small-molecule drugs which have one or more SE profiles, we obtained 145,068 predicted DDIs. The predicted DDIs will help clinicians to avoid hazardous drug interactions in their prescriptions and will aid pharmaceutical companies to design large-scale clinical trial by assessing potentially hazardous drug combinations. All data sets and predicted DDIs are available at http://astro.temple.edu/~tua87106/ddi.html. PMID:26196247

  16. Label Propagation Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Clinical Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is an important topic for public health, and thus attracts attention from both academia and industry. Here we hypothesize that clinical side effects (SEs) provide a human phenotypic profile and can be translated into the development of computational models for predicting adverse DDIs. We propose an integrative label propagation framework to predict DDIs by integrating SEs extracted from package inserts of prescription drugs, SEs extracted from FDA Adverse Event Reporting System, and chemical structures from PubChem. Experimental results based on hold-out validation demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. In addition, the new algorithm also ranked drug information sources based on their contributions to the prediction, thus not only confirming that SEs are important features for DDI prediction but also paving the way for building more reliable DDI prediction models by prioritizing multiple data sources. By applying the proposed algorithm to 1,626 small-molecule drugs which have one or more SE profiles, we obtained 145,068 predicted DDIs. The predicted DDIs will help clinicians to avoid hazardous drug interactions in their prescriptions and will aid pharmaceutical companies to design large-scale clinical trial by assessing potentially hazardous drug combinations. All data sets and predicted DDIs are available at http://astro.temple.edu/~tua87106/ddi.html.

  17. Drug-drug interactions and Idiosyncratic Hepatotoxicity in the Liver Transplant setting

    PubMed Central

    Tischer, Sarah; Fontana, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary studies of boceprevir and telaprevir based antiviral therapy in liver transplant (LT) recipients with hepatitis C have demonstrated dramatic increases in tacrolimus, cyclosporine, and the mTOR inhibitor exposure. In addition to empiric dose reductions, daily monitoring of immunosuppressant blood levels is required when initiating as well as discontinuing the protease inhibitors to maximize patient safety. Although improved suppression of HCV replication is anticipated, 20 to 40% of treated subjects have required early treatment discontinuation due to various adverse events including anemia (100%), infection (30%), nephrotoxicity (20%) and rejection (5 to 10%). Simeprevir and faldepravir are 2nd generation protease inhibitors which may have improved efficacy and tolerability profiles but potential drug interactions with other OATP1B1 substrates and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia are expected. In contrast, sofosbuvir and daclatasvir based therapies are not expected to lead to clinically significant drug-drug interactions in LT recipients but confirmatory studies are needed. Liver transplant recipients may also be at increased risk of developing drug induced liver injury (DILI). Establishing a diagnosis of DILI in the transplant setting is very difficult with the variable latency, laboratory features and histopathological manifestations of hepatotoxicity associated with a given drug, the need to exclude competing causes of allograft injury, and the lack of an objective and verifiable confirmatory test. Nonetheless, a heightened awareness of the possibility of DILI is warranted in light of the large number of medications used in LT recipients and the potential adverse impact that DILI may have on patient outcomes. PMID:24280292

  18. Identification and Mechanistic Investigation of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated With Myopathy: A Translational Approach.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Quinney, S K; Wang, Z; Zhang, P; Duke, J; Desta, Z; Elmendorf, J S; Flockhart, D A; Li, L

    2015-09-01

    Myopathy is a group of muscle diseases that can be induced or exacerbated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We sought to identify clinically important myopathic DDIs and elucidate their underlying mechanisms. Five DDIs were found to increase the risk of myopathy based on analysis of observational data from the Indiana Network of Patient Care. Loratadine interacted with simvastatin (relative risk 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.39, 2.06]), alprazolam (1.50, 2.31), ropinirole (2.06, 5.00), and omeprazole (1.15, 1.38). Promethazine interacted with tegaserod (1.94, 4.64). In vitro investigation showed that these DDIs were unlikely to result from inhibition of drug metabolism by CYP450 enzymes or from inhibition of hepatic uptake via the membrane transporter OATP1B1/1B3. However, we did observe in vitro synergistic myotoxicity of simvastatin and desloratadine, suggesting a role in loratadine-simvastatin interaction. This interaction was epidemiologically confirmed (odds ratio 95% CI = [2.02, 3.65]) using the data from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System.

  19. Clinical pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Venitz, Jürgen; Zack, Julia; Gillies, Hunter; Allard, Martine; Regnault, Jean; Dufton, Christopher

    2012-12-01

    The authors review the basic pharmacology and potential for adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of bosentan and ambrisentan, the 2 endothelin receptor antagonists currently approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treatment. Bosentan, an endothelin (ET) receptor-type ET(A) and ET(B) antagonist, is metabolized to active metabolites by and an inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C9 and CYP3A. Ambrisentan, a selective ET(A) receptor antagonist, is metabolized primarily by uridine 5'diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) 1A9S, 2B7S, and 1A3S and, to a lesser extent, by CYP3A and CYP2C19. Drug interactions observed with bosentan DDI studies have demonstrated a potential for significant clinical implications during PAH management: bosentan is contraindicated with cyclosporine A and glyburide, and additional monitoring/dose adjustments are required when coadministered with hormonal contraceptives, simvastatin, lopinavir/ritonavir, and rifampicin. As bosentan carries a boxed warning regarding risks of liver injury and showed dose-dependant increases in serum aminotransferase abnormalities, drug interactions that increase bosentan exposure are of particular clinical concern. Ambrisentan DDI studies performed to date have shown only one clinically relevant DDI, an interaction with cyclosporine A that requires ambrisentan dose reduction. As the treatment of PAH moves toward multimodal combination therapy, scrutiny should be placed on ensuring that drug combinations achieve maximal clinical benefit while minimizing side effects.

  20. Similarity-based modeling in large-scale prediction of drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Friedman, Carol; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a major cause of adverse drug effects and a public health concern, as they increase hospital care expenses and reduce patients’ quality of life. DDI detection is, therefore, an important objective in patient safety, one whose pursuit affects drug development and pharmacovigilance. In this article, we describe a protocol applicable on a large scale to predict novel DDIs based on similarity of drug interaction candidates to drugs involved in established DDIs. the method integrates a reference standard database of known DDIs with drug similarity information extracted from different sources, such as 2D and 3D molecular structure, interaction profile, target and side-effect similarities. the method is interpretable in that it generates drug interaction candidates that are traceable to pharmacological or clinical effects. We describe a protocol with applications in patient safety and preclinical toxicity screening. the time frame to implement this protocol is 5–7 h, with additional time potentially necessary, depending on the complexity of the reference standard DDI database and the similarity measures implemented. PMID:25122524

  1. Similarity-based modeling in large-scale prediction of drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Friedman, Carol; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2014-09-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a major cause of adverse drug effects and a public health concern, as they increase hospital care expenses and reduce patients' quality of life. DDI detection is, therefore, an important objective in patient safety, one whose pursuit affects drug development and pharmacovigilance. In this article, we describe a protocol applicable on a large scale to predict novel DDIs based on similarity of drug interaction candidates to drugs involved in established DDIs. The method integrates a reference standard database of known DDIs with drug similarity information extracted from different sources, such as 2D and 3D molecular structure, interaction profile, target and side-effect similarities. The method is interpretable in that it generates drug interaction candidates that are traceable to pharmacological or clinical effects. We describe a protocol with applications in patient safety and preclinical toxicity screening. The time frame to implement this protocol is 5-7 h, with additional time potentially necessary, depending on the complexity of the reference standard DDI database and the similarity measures implemented. PMID:25122524

  2. Computerized techniques pave the way for drug-drug interaction prediction and interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Reza; Ferdousi, Reza; Aziziheris, Kamal; Niakan-Kalhori, Sharareh R.; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Health care industry also patients penalized by medical errors that are inevitable but highly preventable. Vast majority of medical errors are related to adverse drug reactions, while drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are the main cause of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). DDIs and ADRs have mainly been reported by haphazard case studies. Experimental in vivo and in vitro researches also reveals DDI pairs. Laboratory and experimental researches are valuable but also expensive and in some cases researchers may suffer from limitations. Methods: In the current investigation, the latest published works were studied to analyze the trend and pattern of the DDI modelling and the impacts of machine learning methods. Applications of computerized techniques were also investigated for the prediction and interpretation of DDIs. Results: Computerized data-mining in pharmaceutical sciences and related databases provide new key transformative paradigms that can revolutionize the treatment of diseases and hence medical care. Given that various aspects of drug discovery and pharmacotherapy are closely related to the clinical and molecular/biological information, the scientifically sound databases (e.g., DDIs, ADRs) can be of importance for the success of pharmacotherapy modalities. Conclusion: A better understanding of DDIs not only provides a robust means for designing more effective medicines but also grantees patient safety. PMID:27525223

  3. Drug-drug and food-drug pharmacokinetic interactions with new insulinotropic agents repaglinide and nateglinide.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the current knowledge on drug-drug and food-drug interactions with repaglinide and nateglinide. These two meglitinide derivatives, commonly called glinides, have been developed for improving insulin secretion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are increasingly used either in monotherapy or in combination with other oral antihyperglycaemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Compared with sulfonylureas, glinides have been shown to (i) provide a better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia, (ii) overcome some adverse effects, such as hypoglycaemia, and (iii) have a more favourable safety profile, especially in patients with renal failure. The meal-related timing of administration of glinides and the potential influence of food and meal composition on their bioavailability may be important. In addition, some food components (e.g. grapefruit juice) may cause pharmacokinetic interactions. Because glinides are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 isoenzyme, they are indeed exposed to pharmacokinetic interactions. In addition to CYP3A4, repaglinide is metabolised via CYP2C8, while nateglinide metabolism also involves CYP2C9. Furthermore, both compounds and their metabolites may undergo specialised transport/uptake in the intestine, another source of pharmacokinetic interactions. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are those that occur when glinides are administered together with other glucose-lowering agents or compounds widely coadministered to diabetic patients (e.g. lipid-lowering agents), with drugs that are known to induce (risk of lower glinide plasma levels and thus of deterioration of glucose control) or inhibit (risk of higher glinide plasma levels leading to hypoglycaemia) CYP isoenzymes concerned in their metabolism, or with drugs that have a narrow efficacy : toxicity ratio. Pharmacokinetic interactions reported in the literature appear to be more frequent and more important with repaglinide than with

  4. Impact of Participatory Design for Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts. A Comparison Study Between Two Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Risk, Marcelo; Stanziola, Enrique; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2016-01-01

    Decision support systems for alert drug-drug interactions have been shown as valid strategy to reduce medical error. Even so the use of these systems has not been as expected, probably due to the lack of a suitable design. This study compares two interfaces, one of them developed using participatory design techniques (based on user centered design processes). This work showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction with the system.

  5. USING SEMANTIC PREDICATIONS TO UNCOVER DRUG-DRUG INTERACTIONS IN CLINICAL DATA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Cairelli, Michael J.; Fiszman, Marcelo; Rosemblat, Graciela; Kilicoglu, Halil; Rindflesch, Thomas C.; Pakhomov, Serguei V.; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we report on potential drug-drug interactions between drugs occurring in patient clinical data. Results are based on relationships in SemMedDB, a database of structured knowledge extracted from all MEDLINE citations (titles and abstracts) using SemRep. The core of our methodology is to construct two potential drug-drug interaction schemas, based on relationships extracted from SemMedDB. In the first schema, Drug1 and Drug2 interact through Drug1’s effect on some gene, which in turn affects Drug2. In the second, Drug1 affects Gene1, while Drug2 affects Gene2. Gene1 and Gene2, together, then have an effect on some biological function. After checking each drug pair from the medication lists of each of 22 patients, we found 19 known and 62 unknown drug-drug interactions using both schemas. For example, our results suggest that the interaction of Lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor commonly prescribed for hypertension, and the antidepressant sertraline can potentially increase the likelihood and possibly the severity of psoriasis. We also assessed the relationships extracted by SemRep from a linguistic perspective and found that the precision of SemRep was 0.58 for 300 randomly selected sentences from MEDLINE. Our study demonstrates that the use of structured knowledge in the form of relationships from the biomedical literature can support the discovery of potential drug-drug interactions occurring in patient clinical data. Moreover, SemMedDB provides a good knowledge resource for expanding the range of drugs, genes, and biological functions considered as elements in various drug-drug interaction pathways. PMID:24448204

  6. Drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin based on pharmacokinetics in vivo in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lifei; Liu, Jiajun; Yu, Xin; Shi, Lei; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Heping; Huang, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Moxifloxacin and rifampicin are all the first-line options for the treatment of active tuberculosis, which are often combined for the treatment of multidrug resistance pulmonary tuberculosis in clinic. However, the potential drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin were unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin based on their pharmacokinetics in vivo after oral administration of the single drug and both drugs, and reveal their mutual effects on their pharmacokinetics. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: moxifloxacin group, rifampicin group and moxifloxacin + rifampicin group. Plasma concentrations of moxifloxacin and rifampicin were determined using LC-MS at the designated time points after drug administration, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. In addition, effects of moxifloxacin and rifampicin on their metabolic rate and absorption were investigated using rat liver microsome incubation systems and Caco-2 cell transwell model. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of moxifloxacin including Tmax , Cmax , t1/2 and AUC(0-t) increased more in the moxifloxacin + rifampicin group than in the moxifloxacin group, but the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). However, the pharmacokinetic parameters of rifampicin, including peak concentration, area under the concentration-time curve, half-life and the area under the first moment plasma concentration-time curve, increased significantly (p < 0.05) compared with the rifampicin group, and the time to peak concentration decreased significantly (p < 0.05). The mean residence time of rifampicin also increased in moxifloxacin + rifampicin group compared with the rifampicin group, but the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). The rat liver microsome incubation experiment indicated that moxifloxacin could increase the metabolic rate of rifampicin from 23.7 to 38.7 min. However

  7. Pharmacologic Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Review of Prescriptions and Potential Drug-Drug Interactions in a Military Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kara L.; Devore, Maria D.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Streeter, Emily L.; Tolentino, Jerlyn C.; Klinski, Angelica A.; Bahlawan, Nahed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe outpatient prescription treatment for active-duty military members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Medical records were screened for drug-drug interactions with PTSD-related medications and for adverse drug events. Method: A retrospective chart review was conducted of the medical records of active-duty service members aged 18 to 65 years who had a diagnosis of PTSD (ICD-9 criteria) and received psychiatric treatment at Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton, Camp Pendleton, California, between October 1, 2010, and October 31, 2010. Prescription medication treatment over a 6-month period (October 1, 2010, through March 31, 2011) was reviewed. Results: Among 275 patients, 243 (88.4%) had at least 1 prescription dispensed and 219 (79.6%) had at least 1 PTSD-related medication dispensed. More than 1 PTSD-related medication was dispensed to 153 (55.6%) patients. The most common medication classes dispensed were selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (35.1%), novel antidepressants (15.6%), and anticonvulsants (15.0%). The most frequently dispensed PTSD-related medications were zolpidem: 149 (9.8%), sertraline: 147 (9.7%), gabapentin: 134 (8.8%), prazosin: 111 (7.3%), and trazodone: 110 (7.2%). In the subgroup of 219 patients who received PTSD-related medications, overlapping periods of treatment between an SSRI and another PTSD-related medication occurred in 58 (26.5%) patients. Potential drug-drug interactions with this combination involved 44 (20.1%) patients; no adverse drug events were reported. Among these 44 patients, 55 different potential drug-drug interactions were identified. Conclusions: Patients receiving medications for PTSD are frequently treated with SSRIs or SNRIs and are likely to be prescribed more than 1 PTSD-related medication. PMID:27057415

  8. Measuring Drug Metabolism Kinetics and Drug-Drug Interactions Using Self-Assembled Monolayers for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lyndsey L; Berns, Eric J; Bugga, Pradeep; George, Alfred L; Mrksich, Milan

    2016-09-01

    The competition of two drugs for the same metabolizing enzyme is a common mechanism for drug-drug interactions that can lead to altered kinetics in drug metabolism and altered elimination rates in vivo. With the prevalence of multidrug therapy, there is great potential for serious drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions. In an effort to prevent adverse drug reactions, the FDA mandates the evaluation of the potential for metabolic inhibition by every new chemical entity. Conventional methods for assaying drug metabolism (e.g., those based on HPLC) have been established for measuring drug-drug interactions; however, they are low-throughput. Here we describe an approach to measure the catalytic activity of CYP2C9 using the high-throughput technique self-assembled monolayers for matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry. We measured the kinetics of CYP450 metabolism of the substrate, screened a set of drugs for inhibition of CYP2C9 and determined the Ki values for inhibitors. The throughput of this platform may enable drug metabolism and drug-drug interactions to be interrogated at a scale that cannot be achieved with current methods. PMID:27467208

  9. Impact of genetic polymorphisms and drug-drug interactions on clopidogrel and prasugrel response variability.

    PubMed

    Ancrenaz, V; Daali, Y; Fontana, P; Besson, M; Samer, C; Dayer, P; Desmeules, J

    2010-10-01

    Thienopyridine antiaggregating platelet agents (clopidogrel and prasugrel) act as irreversible P2Y12 receptor inhibitors. They are used with aspirin to prevent thrombotic complications after an acute coronary syndrome or percutaneous coronary intervention. A large interindividual variability in response to clopidogrel and to a lesser extent to prasugrel is observed and may be related to their metabolism. Clopidogrel and prasugrel are indeed prodrugs converted into their respective active metabolites by several cytochromes P450 (CYPs). Besides clopidogrel inactivation (85%) by esterases to the carboxylic acid, clopidogrel is metabolized by CYPs to 2-oxo-clopidogrel (15%) and further metabolized to an unstable but potent platelet-aggregating inhibitor. Prasugrel is more potent than clopidogrel with a better bioavailability and lower pharmacodynamic variability. Prasugrel is completely converted by esterases to an intermediate oxo-metabolite (R-95913) further bioactivated by CYPs. Numerous clinical studies have shown the influence of CYP2C19 polymorphism on clopidogrel antiplatelet activity. Moreover, unwanted drug-drug pharmacokinetic interactions influencing CYP2C19 activity and clopidogrel bioactivation such as with proton pump inhibitors remain a matter of intense controversy. Several studies have also demonstrated that CYP3A4/5 and CYP1A2 are important in clopidogrel bioactivation and should also be considered as potential targets for unwanted drug-drug interactions. Prasugrel bioactivation is mainly related to CYP3A4 and 2B6 activity and therefore the question of the effect of drug-drug interaction on its activity is open. The purpose of this review is to critically examine the current literature evaluating the influence of genetic and environmental factors such as unwanted drug-drug interaction affecting clopidogrel and prasugrel antiplatelet activity. PMID:20942779

  10. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  11. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  12. Using Nonexperts for Annotating Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Mentions in Product Labeling: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Yifan; Hernandez, Andres; Horn, John R; Jacobson, Rebecca; Boyce, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Background Because vital details of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are often described in free-text structured product labels, manual curation is a necessary but expensive step in the development of electronic drug-drug interaction information resources. The use of nonexperts to annotate potential drug-drug interaction (PDDI) mentions in drug product label annotation may be a means of lessening the burden of manual curation. Objective Our goal was to explore the practicality of using nonexpert participants to annotate drug-drug interaction descriptions from structured product labels. By presenting annotation tasks to both pharmacy experts and relatively naïve participants, we hoped to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonexpert annotators for drug-drug information annotation. We were also interested in exploring whether and to what extent natural language processing (NLP) preannotation helped improve task completion time, accuracy, and subjective satisfaction. Methods Two experts and 4 nonexperts were asked to annotate 208 structured product label sections under 4 conditions completed sequentially: (1) no NLP assistance, (2) preannotation of drug mentions, (3) preannotation of drug mentions and PDDIs, and (4) a repeat of the no-annotation condition. Results were evaluated within the 2 groups and relative to an existing gold standard. Participants were asked to provide reports on the time required to complete tasks and their perceptions of task difficulty. Results One of the experts and 3 of the nonexperts completed all tasks. Annotation results from the nonexpert group were relatively strong in every scenario and better than the performance of the NLP pipeline. The expert and 2 of the nonexperts were able to complete most tasks in less than 3 hours. Usability perceptions were generally positive (3.67 for expert, mean of 3.33 for nonexperts). Conclusions The results suggest that nonexpert annotation might be a feasible option for comprehensive

  13. Roles of rifampicin in drug-drug interactions: underlying molecular mechanisms involving the nuclear pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiezhong; Raymond, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Rifampicin, an important drug in the treatment of tuberculosis, is used extensively despite its broad effects on drug-drug interactions, creating serious problems. The clinical importance of such interactions includes autoinduction leading to suboptimal or failed treatment. The concomitantly administered effects of rifampicin on other drugs can result in their altered metabolism or transportation that are metabolised by cytochromes P450 or transported by p-glycoprotein in the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This review paper summarises recent findings with emphases on the molecular mechanisms used to explain these broad drug-drug interactions. In general, rifampicin can act on a pattern: rifampicin activates the nuclear pregnane X receptor that in turn affects cytochromes P450, glucuronosyltransferases and p-glycoprotein activities. This pattern of action may explain many of the rifampicin inducing drug-drug interactions. However, effects through other mechanisms have also been reported and these make any explanation of such drug-drug interactions more complex. PMID:16480505

  14. Detection of Drug-Drug Interactions by Modeling Interaction Profile Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) constitute an important problem in postmarketing pharmacovigilance and in the development of new drugs. The effectiveness or toxicity of a medication could be affected by the co-administration of other drugs that share pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. For this reason, a great effort is being made to develop new methodologies to detect and assess DDIs. In this article, we present a novel method based on drug interaction profile fingerprints (IPFs) with successful application to DDI detection. IPFs were generated based on the DrugBank database, which provided 9,454 well-established DDIs as a primary source of interaction data. The model uses IPFs to measure the similarity of pairs of drugs and generates new putative DDIs from the non-intersecting interactions of a pair. We described as part of our analysis the pharmacological and biological effects associated with the putative interactions; for example, the interaction between haloperidol and dicyclomine can cause increased risk of psychosis and tardive dyskinesia. First, we evaluated the method through hold-out validation and then by using four independent test sets that did not overlap with DrugBank. Precision for the test sets ranged from 0.4–0.5 with more than two fold enrichment factor enhancement. In conclusion, we demonstrated the usefulness of the method in pharmacovigilance as a DDI predictor, and created a dataset of potential DDIs, highlighting the etiology or pharmacological effect of the DDI, and providing an exploratory tool to facilitate decision support in DDI detection and patient safety. PMID:23520498

  15. Drug-Drug Interactions between Sofosbuvir and Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir with or without Dasabuvir.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer R; Dutta, Sandeep; Cohen, Daniel; Podsadecki, Thomas J; Ding, Bifeng; Awni, Walid M; Menon, Rajeev M

    2016-02-01

    The combination of ombitasvir (an NS5A inhibitor), paritaprevir (an NS3/4A inhibitor) coadministered with ritonavir (r), and dasabuvir (an NS5B nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitor), referred to as the 3D regimen, and the combination of ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, referred to as the 2D regimen, have demonstrated high efficacy with and without ribavirin in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected subjects. These regimens have potential for coadministration with sofosbuvir (nucleoside NS5B inhibitor) in the treatment of HCV. This phase 1, drug-drug interaction, open-label, multiple-dose study enrolled 32 healthy subjects to receive the 3D or 2D regimen in combination with sofosbuvir. Doses of study drugs were as follows: ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, 25/150/100 mg daily (QD); dasabuvir, 250 mg twice daily (BID); and sofosbuvir, 400 mg QD. Blood samples were collected on study days 7, 14, and 21 for evaluating drug interaction at steady state. The effect of the 3D and 2D regimens on the pharmacokinetics of sofosbuvir and its circulating metabolite GS-331007 and vice versa was assessed by a repeated-measures analysis. Exposures of the 3D and 2D regimens were similar (≤20% change) during coadministration with sofosbuvir and during administration alone. Sofosbuvir exposures were 61% to 112% higher with the 3D regimen and 64% to 93% higher with the 2D regimen than with sofosbuvir alone. GS-331007 total exposures were 27% and 32% higher with the 3D and 2D regimens, respectively, than with sofosbuvir alone. Increases in sofosbuvir and GS-331007 exposures likely resulted from breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and/or P glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter inhibition by paritaprevir and ritonavir. No subjects discontinued the study due to study drug-related adverse events. No dose adjustment is recommended for 3D, 2D, or sofosbuvir in clinical trials exploring the safety and efficacy of the combination. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT

  16. Drug-Drug Interactions between Sofosbuvir and Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir with or without Dasabuvir

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sandeep; Cohen, Daniel; Podsadecki, Thomas J.; Ding, Bifeng; Awni, Walid M.; Menon, Rajeev M.

    2015-01-01

    The combination of ombitasvir (an NS5A inhibitor), paritaprevir (an NS3/4A inhibitor) coadministered with ritonavir (r), and dasabuvir (an NS5B nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitor), referred to as the 3D regimen, and the combination of ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, referred to as the 2D regimen, have demonstrated high efficacy with and without ribavirin in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected subjects. These regimens have potential for coadministration with sofosbuvir (nucleoside NS5B inhibitor) in the treatment of HCV. This phase 1, drug-drug interaction, open-label, multiple-dose study enrolled 32 healthy subjects to receive the 3D or 2D regimen in combination with sofosbuvir. Doses of study drugs were as follows: ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, 25/150/100 mg daily (QD); dasabuvir, 250 mg twice daily (BID); and sofosbuvir, 400 mg QD. Blood samples were collected on study days 7, 14, and 21 for evaluating drug interaction at steady state. The effect of the 3D and 2D regimens on the pharmacokinetics of sofosbuvir and its circulating metabolite GS-331007 and vice versa was assessed by a repeated-measures analysis. Exposures of the 3D and 2D regimens were similar (≤20% change) during coadministration with sofosbuvir and during administration alone. Sofosbuvir exposures were 61% to 112% higher with the 3D regimen and 64% to 93% higher with the 2D regimen than with sofosbuvir alone. GS-331007 total exposures were 27% and 32% higher with the 3D and 2D regimens, respectively, than with sofosbuvir alone. Increases in sofosbuvir and GS-331007 exposures likely resulted from breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and/or P glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter inhibition by paritaprevir and ritonavir. No subjects discontinued the study due to study drug-related adverse events. No dose adjustment is recommended for 3D, 2D, or sofosbuvir in clinical trials exploring the safety and efficacy of the combination. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT

  17. Evaluation of a drug-drug interaction: fax alert intervention program

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinicians often encounter information about drug-drug interactions (DDIs) during clinical practice. This information is found within product information (hardcopy and electronic) and various electronic systems. Prescribers may receive medication-related communications in practice that are distributed by facsimile (fax), mail, or telephone from pharmacies and pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs). The purpose of this study was to determine if near-real time fax alerts for potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) would influence prescribing. Methods A prospective study, in cooperation with a pharmacy benefit manager (PBM), was conducted targeting 18 clinically important PDDIs. Fax alerts included an individualized letter to the prescriber with a list of the interacting drugs, PDDI evidence summaries with citations, and recommended clinical management strategies. Among the 18 PDDIs, 13 PDDIs could be assessed for prescription therapy changes using pharmacy claims data. A prospective cohort design was used to evaluate changes in prescription dispensing 90-days following a PDDI fax alert. Results A total of 8,075 fax alerts were sent to prescribers and there were 4,712 alerts for the 13 PDDIs that could be assessed for change using pharmacy claims data. There were 2,019 patients (interventions) for which fax alerts were sent to their prescribers who were matched with a control group consisting of patients with the same PDDIs but for whom no fax alert was sent. Overall, this study found 154 (7.6%) of patients in the fax alert group compared to 132 (6.5%) in the control group had changes in therapy (p = 0.177). Conclusions This fax alert intervention program observed no statistically significant differences in prescribing with a fax alert compared to the control group. If PBMs chose to send individualized, evidence-based information to clinicians regarding drug-drug interactions, this study suggests it may not be an effective intervention to mitigate harm. PMID

  18. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Udrescu, Lucreţia; Sbârcea, Laura; Topîrceanu, Alexandru; Iovanovici, Alexandru; Kurunczi, Ludovic; Bogdan, Paul; Udrescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection algorithms, we link the network clusters to 9 relevant pharmacological properties. Out of the 1141 drugs from the DrugBank 4.1 database, our extensive literature survey and cross-checking with other databases such as Drugs.com, RxList, and DrugBank 4.3 confirm the predicted properties for 85% of the drugs. As such, we argue that network analysis offers a high-level grasp on a wide area of pharmacological aspects, indicating possible unaccounted interactions and missing pharmacological properties that can lead to drug repositioning for the 15% drugs which seem to be inconsistent with the predicted property. Also, by using network centralities, we can rank drugs according to their interaction potential for both simple and complex multi-pathology therapies. Moreover, our clustering approach can be extended for applications such as analyzing drug-target interactions or phenotyping patients in personalized medicine applications. PMID:27599720

  19. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing.

    PubMed

    Udrescu, Lucreţia; Sbârcea, Laura; Topîrceanu, Alexandru; Iovanovici, Alexandru; Kurunczi, Ludovic; Bogdan, Paul; Udrescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection algorithms, we link the network clusters to 9 relevant pharmacological properties. Out of the 1141 drugs from the DrugBank 4.1 database, our extensive literature survey and cross-checking with other databases such as Drugs.com, RxList, and DrugBank 4.3 confirm the predicted properties for 85% of the drugs. As such, we argue that network analysis offers a high-level grasp on a wide area of pharmacological aspects, indicating possible unaccounted interactions and missing pharmacological properties that can lead to drug repositioning for the 15% drugs which seem to be inconsistent with the predicted property. Also, by using network centralities, we can rank drugs according to their interaction potential for both simple and complex multi-pathology therapies. Moreover, our clustering approach can be extended for applications such as analyzing drug-target interactions or phenotyping patients in personalized medicine applications. PMID:27599720

  20. A pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction study of venlafaxine and indinavir.

    PubMed

    Levin, G M; Nelson, L A; DeVane, C L; Preston, S L; Eisele, G; Carson, S W

    2001-01-01

    Depression is a common occurrence in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. Complications in treating depressed HIV-infected individuals include the use of multiple medications, additive side effects, and potentially significant drug-drug interactions. Based on the pharmacologic characteristics of venlafaxine and indinavir, we hypothesized that significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions would not occur when these drugs where taken concurrently. Nine healthy adult subjects were given a single 800 mg oral dose of indinavir and serial blood samples were collected for measurement of plasma drug concentrations. Over the next 9 days, venlafaxine was administered at a dosage of 50 mg every 8 hours following a brief titration. A venlafaxine trough plasma concentration and serial concentrations following venlafaxine administration were obtained on day 10. On day 11, venlafaxine and indinavir were administered together and serial blood sampling was repeated. Indinavir had no effect on venlafaxine plasma concentrations but resulted in a 7% decrease in plasma concentrations of O-desmethyl-venlafaxine (ODV)(P = 0.028). This effect is unlikely to be clinically significant. Venlafaxine coadministration resulted in a 28% decrease in the area under the concentration time curve (AUC) of plasma indinavir (P = 0.016) and a 36% decrease in its maximum plasma concentration (Cmax; P = 0.038). As the plasma concentration of protease inhibitors is a critical factor in maintaining efficacy and minimizing the potential for viral resistance, the decrease in both AUC and Cmax of indinavir from coadministration of venlafaxine is of concern. The clinical significance of these results obtained from a small number of healthy volunteers is unknown. Further studies are needed to substantiate or refute this apparent drug-drug interaction. Until such time, venlafaxine should be used cautiously in patients receiving indinavir.

  1. A Single Kernel-Based Approach to Extract Drug-Drug Interactions from Biomedical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijia; Lin, Hongfei; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian; Li, Yanpeng

    2012-01-01

    When one drug influences the level or activity of another drug this is known as a drug-drug interaction (DDI). Knowledge of such interactions is crucial for patient safety. However, the volume and content of published biomedical literature on drug interactions is expanding rapidly, making it increasingly difficult for DDIs database curators to detect and collate DDIs information manually. In this paper, we propose a single kernel-based approach to extract DDIs from biomedical literature. This novel kernel-based approach can effectively make full use of syntactic structural information of the dependency graph. In particular, our approach can efficiently represent both single subgraph topological information and the relation of two subgraphs in the dependency graph. Experimental evaluations showed that our single kernel-based approach can achieve state-of-the-art performance on the publicly available DDI corpus without exploiting multiple kernels or additional domain resources. PMID:23133662

  2. Computing with evidence part II: an evidential approach to predicting metabolic drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Richard; Collins, Carol; Horn, John; Kalet, Ira

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel experiment that we conducted with the Drug Interaction Knowledge-base (DIKB) to determine which combinations of evidence enable a rule-based theory of metabolic drug-drug interactions to make the most optimal set of predictions. The focus of the experiment was a group of 16 drugs including six members of the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor family (statins). The experiment helped identify evidence-use strategies that enabled the DIKB to predict significantly more interactions present in a validation set than the most rigorous strategy developed by drug experts with no loss of accuracy. The best-performing strategies included evidence types that would normally be of lesser predictive value but that are often more accessible than more rigorous types. Our experimental methods represent a new approach to leveraging the available scientific evidence within a domain where important evidence is often missing or of questionable value for supporting important assertions. PMID:19539050

  3. Assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia in listing and ranking of drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Božana S.; Ilić, Maja S.

    2013-01-01

    Inconsistent information about drug-drug interactions can cause variations in prescribing, and possibly increase the incidence of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess whether there is an inconsistency in drug-drug interaction listing and ranking in three authoritative, freely accessible online drug information sources: The British National Formulary; The Compendium about Drugs Licensed for Use in the United Kingdom (the Electronic Medicines Compendium) and the Compendium about Drugs Licensed for Use in the United States (the DailyMed). Information on drug-drug interactions for thirty drugs which have a high or medium potential for interactions have been selected for analysis. In total, 1971 drug-drug interactions were listed in all three drug information sources, of these 992 were ranked as the interactions with the potential of clinical significance. Comparative analysis identified that 63.98% of interactions were listed in only one drug information source, and 66.63% of interactions were ranked in only one drug information source. Only 15.12% listed and 11.19% ranked interactions were identified in all three information sources. Intraclass correlation coefficient indicated a weak correlation among the three drug information sources in listing (0.366), as well as in ranking drug interactions (0.467). This study showed inconsistency of information on drug-drug interaction for the selected drugs in three authoritative, freely accessible online drug information sources. The application of a uniform methodology in assessment of information, and then the presentation of information in a standardized format is required to prevent and adequately manage drug-drug interactions. PMID:24289762

  4. Co-Prescription Trends in a Large Cohort of Subjects Predict Substantial Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jeffrey J.; Daly, Thomas M.; Liu, Xiong; Goldstein, Keith; Johnston, Joseph A.; Ryan, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical prescribing and drug-drug interaction data underlie recommendations on drug combinations that should be avoided or closely monitored by prescribers. Because the number of patients taking multiple medications is increasing, a comprehensive view of prescribing patterns in patients is important to better assess real world pharmaceutical response and evaluate the potential for multi-drug interactions. We obtained self-reported prescription data from NHANES surveys between 1999 and 2010, and confirm the previously reported finding of increasing drug use in the elderly. We studied co-prescription drug trends by focusing on the 2009-2010 survey, which contains prescription data on 690 drugs used by 10,537 subjects. We found that medication profiles were unique for individuals aged 65 years or more, with ≥98 unique drug regimens encountered per 100 subjects taking 3 or more medications. When drugs were viewed by therapeutic class, it was found that the most commonly prescribed drugs were not the most commonly co-prescribed drugs for any of the 16 drug classes investigated. We cross-referenced these medication lists with drug interaction data from Drugs.com to evaluate the potential for drug interactions. The number of drug alerts rose proportionally with the number of co-prescribed medications, rising from 3.3 alerts for individuals prescribed 5 medications to 11.7 alerts for individuals prescribed 10 medications. We found 22% of elderly subjects taking both a substrate and inhibitor of a given cytochrome P450 enzyme, and 4% taking multiple inhibitors of the same enzyme simultaneously. By examining drug pairs prescribed in 0.1% of the population or more, we found low agreement between co-prescription rate and co-discussion in the literature. These data show that prescribing trends in treatment could drive a large extent of individual variability in drug response, and that current pairwise approaches to assessing drug-drug interactions may be inadequate for

  5. Assessment of non-linear combination effect terms for drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gilbert; Schropp, Johannes; Jusko, William J

    2016-10-01

    Drugs interact with their targets in different ways. A diversity of modeling approaches exists to describe the combination effects of two drugs. We investigate several combination effect terms (CET) regarding their underlying mechanism based on drug-receptor binding kinetics, empirical and statistical summation principles and indirect response models. A list with properties is provided and the interrelationship of the CETs is analyzed. A method is presented to calculate the optimal drug concentration pair to produce the half-maximal combination effect. This work provides a comprehensive overview of typically applied CETs and should shed light into the question as to which CET is appropriate for application in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models to describe a specific drug-drug interaction mechanism. PMID:27638639

  6. Impact of drug-drug and drug-disease interactions on gait speed in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Marcum, Zachary A.; Perera, Subashan; Newman, Anne B.; Greenspan, Susan L.; Gray, Shelly L.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Shorr, Ronald I.; Hanlon, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gait speed decline, an early marker of functional impairment, is a sensitive predictor of adverse health outcomes in older adults. The effect of potentially inappropriate prescribing on gait speed decline is not well known. Objective To determine if potentially inappropriate drug interactions impair functional status as measured by gait speed. Methods The sample included 2,402 older adults with medication and gait speed data from the Health, Aging and Body Composition study. The independent variable was the frequency of drug-disease and/or drug-drug interactions at baseline and three additional years. The main outcome was a clinically meaningful gait speed decline ≥ 0.1 m/s the year following drug interaction assessment. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multivariate generalized estimating equations for both the overall sample and a sample stratified by gait speed at time of drug interaction assessment. Results The prevalence of drug-disease and drug-drug interactions ranged from 7.6–9.3% and 10.5–12.3%, respectively, with few participants (3.8–5.7%) having multiple drug interactions. At least 22% of participants had a gait speed decline of ≥ 0.1 m/s annually. Drug interactions were not significantly associated with gait speed decline overall or in the stratified sample of fast walkers. There was some evidence, however, that drug interactions increased the risk of gait speed decline among those participants with slower gait speeds, though p values did not reach statistical significance (adjusted odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence intervals 0.96–1.56, p=0.11). Moreover, a marginally significant dose-response relationship was seen with multiple drug interactions and gait speed decline (adjusted odds ratio 1.40; 95% confidence intervals 0.95–2.04, p=0.08). Conclusions Drug interactions may increase the likelihood of gait speed decline among older adults with evidence of preexisting debility. Future studies

  7. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-01-01

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug-drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. PMID:26927160

  8. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis triggered by drug-drug interaction with itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Dybro, Anne Mette; Damkier, Per; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch; Hellfritzsch, Maja

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman had been treated with high-dose simvastatin for several years. After systemic treatment with the antifungal agent itraconazole, she developed muscle pain and highly elevated levels of creatine kinase and myoglobin. Muscle biopsy was compatible with statin-associated rhabdomyolysis, probably caused by a drug-drug interaction between simvastatin and itraconazole. The patient made full recovery. Three commonly used statins-simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin-are metabolised by the liver enzyme CYP3A4. Several potent inhibitors of this enzyme are known, for example, azole antifungal agents such as itraconazole and posaconazole. If antifungal treatment is indicated in a patient using a CYP3A4-metabolised statin, we recommend (1) topical administration of the antifungal agent if possible, (2) the use of a non-CYP3A4-inhibiting antifungal drug such as terbinafine or (3) temporary discontinuation of statin treatment. PMID:27605198

  9. Enhancing Extraction of Drug-Drug Interaction from Literature Using Neutral Candidates, Negation, and Clause Dependency

    PubMed Central

    Bokharaeian, Behrouz; Diaz, Alberto; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Motivation Supervised biomedical relation extraction plays an important role in biomedical natural language processing, endeavoring to obtain the relations between biomedical entities. Drug-drug interactions, which are investigated in the present paper, are notably among the critical biomedical relations. Thus far many methods have been developed with the aim of extracting DDI relations. However, unfortunately there has been a scarcity of comprehensive studies on the effects of negation, complex sentences, clause dependency, and neutral candidates in the course of DDI extraction from biomedical articles. Results Our study proposes clause dependency features and a number of features for identifying neutral candidates as well as negation cues and scopes. Furthermore, our experiments indicate that the proposed features significantly improve the performance of the relation extraction task combined with other kernel methods. We characterize the contribution of each category of features and finally conclude that neutral candidate features have the most prominent role among all of the three categories. PMID:27695078

  10. In silico methods for predicting drug-drug interactions with cytochrome P-450s, transporters and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ai, Ni; Fan, Xiaohui; Ekins, Sean

    2015-06-23

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are associated with severe adverse effects that may lead to the patient requiring alternative therapeutics and could ultimately lead to drug withdrawal from the market if they are severe. To prevent the occurrence of DDI in the clinic, experimental systems to evaluate drug interaction have been integrated into the various stages of the drug discovery and development process. A large body of knowledge about DDI has also accumulated through these studies and pharmacovigillence systems. Much of this work to date has focused on the drug metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P-450s as well as drug transporters, ion channels and occasionally other proteins. This combined knowledge provides a foundation for a hypothesis-driven in silico approach, using either cheminformatics or physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PK) modeling methods to assess DDI potential. Here we review recent advances in these approaches with emphasis on hypothesis-driven mechanistic models for important protein targets involved in PK-based DDI. Recent efforts with other informatics approaches to detect DDI are highlighted. Besides DDI, we also briefly introduce drug interactions with other substances, such as Traditional Chinese Medicines to illustrate how in silico modeling can be useful in this domain. We also summarize valuable data sources and web-based tools that are available for DDI prediction. We finally explore the challenges we see faced by in silico approaches for predicting DDI and propose future directions to make these computational models more reliable, accurate, and publically accessible.

  11. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction study of ranolazine and metformin in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zack, Julia; Berg, Jolene; Juan, Axel; Pannacciulli, Nicola; Allard, Martine; Gottwald, Mildred; Zhang, Heather; Shao, Yongwu; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Jochelson, Phil

    2015-03-01

    Ranolazine and metformin may be frequently co-administered in subjects with chronic angina and co-morbid type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The potential for a drug-drug interaction was explored in two phase 1 clinical studies in subjects with T2DM to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of metformin 1000 mg BID when administered with ranolazine 1000 mg BID (Study 1, N = 28) or ranolazine 500 mg BID (Study 2, N = 25) as compared to metformin alone. Co-administration of ranolazine 1000 mg BID with metformin 1000 mg BID resulted in 1.53- and 1.79-fold increases in steady-state metformin Cmax and AUCtau , respectively; co-administration of ranolazine 500 mg BID with metformin 1000 mg BID resulted in 1.22- and 1.37-fold increases in steady-state metformin Cmax and AUCtau , respectively. Co-administration of ranolazine and metformin was well tolerated in these T2DM subjects, with no serious adverse events or drug-related adverse events leading to discontinuation. The most common adverse events were nausea, diarrhea, and dizziness. These findings are consistent with a dose-related interaction between ranolazine and metformin, and suggest that a dose adjustment of metformin may not be required with ranolazine 500 mg BID; whereas, the metformin dose should not exceed 1700 mg of total daily dose when using ranolazine 1000 mg BID. PMID:27128216

  12. A novel algorithm for analyzing drug-drug interactions from MEDLINE literature.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Shen, Dan; Pietsch, Maxwell; Nagar, Chetan; Fadli, Zayd; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is becoming a serious clinical safety issue as the use of multiple medications becomes more common. Searching the MEDLINE database for journal articles related to DDI produces over 330,000 results. It is impossible to read and summarize these references manually. As the volume of biomedical reference in the MEDLINE database continues to expand at a rapid pace, automatic identification of DDIs from literature is becoming increasingly important. In this article, we present a random-sampling-based statistical algorithm to identify possible DDIs and the underlying mechanism from the substances field of MEDLINE records. The substances terms are essentially carriers of compound (including protein) information in a MEDLINE record. Four case studies on warfarin, ibuprofen, furosemide and sertraline implied that our method was able to rank possible DDIs with high accuracy (90.0% for warfarin, 83.3% for ibuprofen, 70.0% for furosemide and 100% for sertraline in the top 10% of a list of compounds ranked by p-value). A social network analysis of substance terms was also performed to construct networks between proteins and drug pairs to elucidate how the two drugs could interact. PMID:26612138

  13. Drug-drug interaction studies: regulatory guidance and an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Chu, Xiaoyan; Gibson, Christopher; Cui, Donghui; Yee, Ka Lai; Ballard, Jeanine; Cabalu, Tamara; Hochman, Jerome

    2013-07-01

    Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency have issued new guidance for industry on drug interaction studies, which outline comprehensive recommendations on a broad range of in vitro and in vivo studies to evaluate drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential. This paper aims to provide an overview of these new recommendations and an in-depth scientifically based perspective on issues surrounding some of the recommended approaches in emerging areas, particularly, transporters and complex DDIs. We present a number of theoretical considerations and several case examples to demonstrate complexities in applying (1) the proposed transporter decision trees and associated criteria for studying a broad spectrum of transporters to derive actionable information and (2) the recommended model-based approaches at an early stage of drug development to prospectively predict DDIs involving time-dependent inhibition and mixed inhibition/induction of drug metabolizing enzymes. We hope to convey the need for conducting DDI studies on a case-by-case basis using a holistic scientifically based interrogative approach and to communicate the need for additional research to fill in knowledge gaps in these areas where the science is rapidly evolving to better ensure the safety and efficacy of new therapeutic agents. PMID:23543602

  14. Effects of Shared Electronic Health Record Systems on Drug-Drug Interaction and Duplication Warning Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rinner, Christoph; Grossmann, Wilfried; Sauter, Simone Katja; Wolzt, Michael; Gall, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Shared electronic health records (EHRs) systems can offer a complete medication overview of the prescriptions of different health care providers. We use health claims data of more than 1 million Austrians in 2006 and 2007 with 27 million prescriptions to estimate the effect of shared EHR systems on drug-drug interaction (DDI) and duplication warnings detection and prevention. The Austria Codex and the ATC/DDD information were used as a knowledge base to detect possible DDIs. DDIs are categorized as severe, moderate, and minor interactions. In comparison to the current situation where only DDIs between drugs issued by a single health care provider can be checked, the number of warnings increases significantly if all drugs of a patient are checked: severe DDI warnings would be detected for 20% more persons, and the number of severe DDI warnings and duplication warnings would increase by 17%. We show that not only do shared EHR systems help to detect more patients with warnings but DDIs are also detected more frequently. Patient safety can be increased using shared EHR systems. PMID:26682218

  15. Extracting Drug-Drug Interaction from the Biomedical Literature Using a Stacked Generalization-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    He, Linna; Yang, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhehuan; Lin, Hongfei; Li, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) detection is particularly important for patient safety. However, the amount of biomedical literature regarding drug interactions is increasing rapidly. Therefore, there is a need to develop an effective approach for the automatic extraction of DDI information from the biomedical literature. In this paper, we present a Stacked Generalization-based approach for automatic DDI extraction. The approach combines the feature-based, graph and tree kernels and, therefore, reduces the risk of missing important features. In addition, it introduces some domain knowledge based features (the keyword, semantic type, and DrugBank features) into the feature-based kernel, which contribute to the performance improvement. More specifically, the approach applies Stacked generalization to automatically learn the weights from the training data and assign them to three individual kernels to achieve a much better performance than each individual kernel. The experimental results show that our approach can achieve a better performance of 69.24% in F-score compared with other systems in the DDI Extraction 2011 challenge task. PMID:23785452

  16. Detection of potential drug-drug interactions for outpatients across hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Min-Hui; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lo, Yu-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2014-02-01

    The National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) has adopted smart cards (or NHI-IC cards) as health cards to carry patients' medication histories across hospitals in Taiwan. The aims of this study are to enhance a computerized physician order entry system to support drug-drug interaction (DDI) checking based on a patient's medication history stored in his/her NHI-IC card. For performance evaluation, we developed a transaction tracking log to keep track of every operation on NHI-IC cards. Based on analysis of the transaction tracking log from 1 August to 31 October 2007, physicians read patients' NHI-IC cards in 71.01% (8,246) of patient visits; 33.02% (2,723) of the card reads showed at least one medicine currently being taken by the patient, 82.94% of which were prescribed during the last visit. Among 10,036 issued prescriptions, seven prescriptions (0.09%) contained at least one drug item that might interact with the currently-taken medicines stored in NHI-IC cards and triggered pop-up alerts. This study showed that the capacity of an NHI-IC card is adequate to support DDI checking across hospitals. Thus, the enhanced computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system can support better DDI checking when physicians are making prescriptions and provide safer medication care, particularly for patients who receive medication care from different hospitals. PMID:24473112

  17. Design Features of Drug-Drug Interaction Trials Between Antivirals and Oral Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ruben C; Arya, Vikram; Younis, Islam R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the major design features of drug-drug interaction trials between antiviral medications (AVs) and oral contraceptives (OCs). Information on these trials (n = 27) was collected from approved drug labels and clinical pharmacology reviews conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The primary objective of all trials was to evaluate changes in OC exposure following the coadministration of AVs. In addition, an evaluation of potential pharmacodynamic interaction was performed in 10 of these trials. Twenty-two trials were open label with a fixed-sequence design, and 5 trials used a double-blind crossover design. The trials were conducted using one, two, or three 28-day ovulatory cycles in 10, 8, and 9 trials, respectively. Only 1 trial enrolled HIV-infected women. The median number of women in a trial was 20 (range, 12 to 52). Norethindrone/ethinyl estradiol (EE) combination was the most commonly used OC (n = 16, 59%) followed by norgestimate/EE (n = 9, 33%). Labeling recommendations were based on exposure changes in 25 cases and on safety observations in the trial in 2 cases. In conclusion, a wide variety of trial designs was used, and there is no preferred design. The answer to the exposure question can be achieved using multiple designs.

  18. Lack of clinical pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions between warfarin and the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoyang; Hard, Marjie L; Grundy, John S; Singh, Tejdip; von Moltke, Lisa L; Boltje, Ingrid

    2014-08-01

    Mipomersen is a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide indicated as an adjunct therapy for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). Warfarin is commonly prescribed for a variety of cardiac disorders in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia population, and concurrent use of warfarin and mipomersen is likely. This open-label, single-sequence 2-period phase 1 study in healthy subjects evaluated the potential drug-drug interactions between mipomersen and warfarin. The subjects received a single oral 25 mg dose of warfarin alone on day 1, and after a 7-day washout period, received 200 mg mipomersen alone subcutaneously every other day on days 8-12, and received both concurrently on day 14. Coadministration of mipomersen did not change the pharmacodynamics (international normalized ratio, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time) and pharmacokinetics (PK) of warfarin. There were no clinically significant changes in the PK of mipomersen with concurrent administration of warfarin. There were no events indicative of an increase in bleeding tendency when warfarin was coadministered with mipomersen, and the adverse event profile of mipomersen did not appear to be altered in combination with warfarin, as compared with that of the respective reference treatment. The combination of these 2 medications appeared to be safe and well tolerated. These results suggest that the dosage adjustment of warfarin or mipomersen is not expected to be necessary with coadministration. PMID:24691275

  19. Text mining for pharmacovigilance: Using machine learning for drug name recognition and drug-drug interaction extraction and classification.

    PubMed

    Ben Abacha, Asma; Chowdhury, Md Faisal Mahbub; Karanasiou, Aikaterini; Mrabet, Yassine; Lavelli, Alberto; Zweigenbaum, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacovigilance (PV) is defined by the World Health Organization as the science and activities related to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other drug-related problem. An essential aspect in PV is to acquire knowledge about Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs). The shared tasks on DDI-Extraction organized in 2011 and 2013 have pointed out the importance of this issue and provided benchmarks for: Drug Name Recognition, DDI extraction and DDI classification. In this paper, we present our text mining systems for these tasks and evaluate their results on the DDI-Extraction benchmarks. Our systems rely on machine learning techniques using both feature-based and kernel-based methods. The obtained results for drug name recognition are encouraging. For DDI-Extraction, our hybrid system combining a feature-based method and a kernel-based method was ranked second in the DDI-Extraction-2011 challenge, and our two-step system for DDI detection and classification was ranked first in the DDI-Extraction-2013 task at SemEval. We discuss our methods and results and give pointers to future work. PMID:26432353

  20. Discovery and explanation of drug-drug interactions via text mining.

    PubMed

    Percha, Bethany; Garten, Yael; Altman, Russ B

    2012-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) can occur when two drugs interact with the same gene product. Most available information about gene-drug relationships is contained within the scientific literature, but is dispersed over a large number of publications, with thousands of new publications added each month. In this setting, automated text mining is an attractive solution for identifying gene-drug relationships and aggregating them to predict novel DDIs. In previous work, we have shown that gene-drug interactions can be extracted from Medline abstracts with high fidelity - we extract not only the genes and drugs, but also the type of relationship expressed in individual sentences (e.g. metabolize, inhibit, activate and many others). We normalize these relationships and map them to a standardized ontology. In this work, we hypothesize that we can combine these normalized gene-drug relationships, drawn from a very broad and diverse literature, to infer DDIs. Using a training set of established DDIs, we have trained a random forest classifier to score potential DDIs based on the features of the normalized assertions extracted from the literature that relate two drugs to a gene product. The classifier recognizes the combinations of relationships, drugs and genes that are most associated with the gold standard DDIs, correctly identifying 79.8% of assertions relating interacting drug pairs and 78.9% of assertions relating noninteracting drug pairs. Most significantly, because our text processing method captures the semantics of individual gene-drug relationships, we can construct mechanistic pharmacological explanations for the newly-proposed DDIs. We show how our classifier can be used to explain known DDIs and to uncover new DDIs that have not yet been reported.

  1. Polypharmacy-induced drug-drug interactions; threats to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, H; Hasanloei, M A V; Mahmoudi, J

    2014-12-01

    Patient safety is an increasingly recognized challenge and opportunity for stakeholders in improving health care delivery. Because of extensive use of medicines, life expectancy is increasing and elderly as well as comorbidities need polypharmacy, and therefore the risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) increases.We searched PubMed and ScienseDirect for epidemiology of articles describing the frequency of potential DDIs published up to 2011 in title, abstract, keywords and text.Studies show that the rate of DDIs both in outpatients and hospitalized patients is high. The elderly, <5 year-old children and women are at higher risks for it. Also, the rate of DDIs in patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD), cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as heart failure (HF) and hypertension (HTN) and cancers is significant.Physicians, for lowering the risk of DDIs, should take precise drug history, prescribe appropriate and lowest drugs and ultimately counsel with clinical pharmacologist as a key strategy in order to insure the patient safety. This article reviews the existing data concerning this problem to provide an aid for choosing the appropriate drugs and prescribe the most effective with the lowest DDIs for providing patient safety. PMID:24500732

  2. DINTO: Using OWL Ontologies and SWRL Rules to Infer Drug-Drug Interactions and Their Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Zazo, María; Segura-Bedmar, Isabel; Hastings, Janna; Martínez, Paloma

    2015-08-24

    The early detection of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is limited by the diffuse spread of DDI information in heterogeneous sources. Computational methods promise to play a key role in the identification and explanation of DDIs on a large scale. However, such methods rely on the availability of computable representations describing the relevant domain knowledge. Current modeling efforts have focused on partial and shallow representations of the DDI domain, failing to adequately support computational inference and discovery applications. In this paper, we describe a comprehensive ontology for DDI knowledge (DINTO), which is the first formal representation of different types of DDIs and their mechanisms and its application in the prediction of DDIs. This project has been developed using currently available semantic web technologies, standards, and tools, and we have demonstrated that the combination of drug-related facts in DINTO and Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) rules can be used to infer DDIs and their different mechanisms on a large scale. The ontology is available from https://code.google.com/p/dinto/.

  3. Consensus Recommendations for Systematic Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Evidence for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Scheife, Richard T.; Hines, Lisa E.; Boyce, Richard D.; Chung, Sophie P.; Momper, Jeremiah; Sommer, Christine D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.; Horn, John; Sklar, Stephen J.; Wong, Samantha K.; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary; Grizzle, Amy J.; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A.; Rich, Alissa; Malone, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. Objective To provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents with respect to DDIs for clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 15 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. Results We developed expert-consensus answers to three key questions: 1) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence?; 2) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs?; and 3) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Conclusion Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug information systems that implement these recommendations should be able to provide higher quality information about DDIs in drug compendia and clinical decision support tools. PMID:25556085

  4. Absence of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction of pertuzumab with trastuzumab and docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Javier; Swain, Sandra M; Kudaba, Iveta; Hauschild, Maik; Patel, Taral; Grincuka, Elza; Masuda, Norikazu; McNally, Virginia; Ross, Graham; Brewster, Mike; Marier, Jean-François; Trinh, My My; Garg, Amit; Nijem, Ihsan; Visich, Jennifer; Lum, Bert L; Baselga, José

    2013-11-01

    Pertuzumab is a novel antihuman epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) humanized monoclonal antibody. Combined with trastuzumab plus docetaxel, pertuzumab improved progression-free and overall survival versus trastuzumab plus docetaxel in the phase III CLEOPATRA trial (NCT00567190) in first-line HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Thirty-seven patients participated in a pharmacokinetic (PK)/corrected QT interval substudy of CLEOPATRA, which evaluated potential PK drug-drug interaction (DDI). PK parameters were calculated using noncompartmental methods, and DDI analyses were carried out. In the presence of trastuzumab and docetaxel, the mean pertuzumab Cmin and Cmax in cycle 3 were 63.6 and 183 µg/ml, respectively. The pertuzumab concentrations observed were consistent with simulations from a validated population PK model, indicating that trastuzumab and docetaxel did not alter pertuzumab PK. Comparison of geometric least-squares mean PK parameters between arms showed no impact of pertuzumab on the PK of trastuzumab or docetaxel. In conclusion, no PK DDI was observed when pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel were combined for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

  5. A graph kernel based on context vectors for extracting drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Hongfei; Zhao, Zhehuan; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Yijia; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The clinical recognition of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a crucial issue for both patient safety and health care cost control. Thus there is an urgent need that DDIs be extracted automatically from biomedical literature by text-mining techniques. Although the top-ranking DDIs systems explore various features of texts, these features can't yet adequately express long and complicated sentences. In this paper, we present an effective graph kernel which makes full use of different types of contexts to identify DDIs from biomedical literature. In our approach, the relations among long-range words, in addition to close-range words, are obtained by the graph representation of a parsed sentence. Context vectors of a vertex, an iterative vectorial representation of all labeled nodes adjacent and nonadjacent to it, adequately capture the direct and indirect substructures' information. Furthermore, the graph kernel considering the distance between context vectors is used to detect DDIs. Experimental results on the DDIExtraction 2013 corpus show that our system achieves the best detection and classification performance (F-score) of DDIs (81.8 and 68.4, respectively). Especially for the Medline-2013 dataset, our system outperforms the top-ranking DDIs systems by F-scores of 10.7 and 12.2 in detection and classification, respectively.

  6. DINTO: Using OWL Ontologies and SWRL Rules to Infer Drug-Drug Interactions and Their Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Zazo, María; Segura-Bedmar, Isabel; Hastings, Janna; Martínez, Paloma

    2015-08-24

    The early detection of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is limited by the diffuse spread of DDI information in heterogeneous sources. Computational methods promise to play a key role in the identification and explanation of DDIs on a large scale. However, such methods rely on the availability of computable representations describing the relevant domain knowledge. Current modeling efforts have focused on partial and shallow representations of the DDI domain, failing to adequately support computational inference and discovery applications. In this paper, we describe a comprehensive ontology for DDI knowledge (DINTO), which is the first formal representation of different types of DDIs and their mechanisms and its application in the prediction of DDIs. This project has been developed using currently available semantic web technologies, standards, and tools, and we have demonstrated that the combination of drug-related facts in DINTO and Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) rules can be used to infer DDIs and their different mechanisms on a large scale. The ontology is available from https://code.google.com/p/dinto/. PMID:26147071

  7. Evaluation and Quantitative Prediction of Renal Transporter-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bo; Varma, Manthena V

    2016-07-01

    With numerous drugs cleared renally, inhibition of uptake transporters localized on the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubule cells, eg, organic anion transporters (OATs) and organic cation transporters (OCTs), may lead to clinically meaningful drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Additionally, clinical evidence for the possible involvement of efflux transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1/2-K (MATE1/2-K), in the renal DDIs is emerging. Herein, we review recent progress regarding mechanistic understanding of transporter-mediated renal DDIs as well as the quantitative predictability of renal DDIs using static and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. Generally, clinical DDI data suggest that the magnitude of plasma exposure changes attributable to renal DDIs is less than 2-fold, unlike the DDIs associated with inhibition of cytochrome P-450s and/or hepatic uptake transporters. It is concluded that although there is a need for risk assessment early in drug development, current available data imply that safety concerns related to the renal DDIs are generally low. Nevertheless, consideration must be given to the therapeutic index of the victim drug and potential risk in a specific patient population (eg, renal impairment). Finally, in vitro transporter data and clinical pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from the first-in-human studies have proven useful in support of quantitative prediction of DDIs associated with inhibition of renal secretory transporters, OATs or OCTs. PMID:27385169

  8. Drug-drug Interaction between Pravastatin and Gemfibrozil (Antihyperlipidemic) with Gliclazide (Antidiabetic) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sultanpur, Cm; Satyanarayana, S; Reddy, Ns; Kumar, Ke; Kumar, S

    2010-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a condition of increased blood glucose level in the body. Antihyperlipidemic drugs like statins and fibrates are widely used for prophylactic treatment in dyslipideamia and atherosclerosis. Diabetic dislipidemia exists with increased triglycerides, low HDL and high LDL levels. Hence, with oral hypoglycemic drugs, the addition of a lipid-lowering drug is necessary for controlling dislipidemia. In such a situation, there may be chances of drug-drug interactions between antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic drugs. The present study is planned to evaluate the safety of gliclazide (antidiabetic) in the presence of pravastatin and gemfibrozil (antihyperlpidemic) in rats. Studies in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats were conducted with oral doses of gliclazide and their combination with pravastatin and gemfibrozil, with an adequate washout period in between the treatments. Blood samples were collected in rats by retroorbital puncture at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 h. All the blood samples were analyzed for glucose by GOD -POD. Gliclazide (½ TD) produced hypoglycemic activity in normal and diabetic rats, with peak activity at 2 and 8 h. Pravastatin (TD) + gemfibrozil (TD) combination treatment increased the hypoglycemic effect of gliclazide in normal rats or diabetic rats when administered together. The interaction observed due to inhibition of both the enzymes (CYP 450 2C9 and CYP 450 3A4) responsible for the metabolism of gliclazide showed increased half-life, which was seen in the present study. Because concomitant administration of gliclazide with provastatin and gemfibrozil in diabetes is associated with atherosclerosis, it should be contraindicated or used with caution.

  9. Drug-Drug Interaction Potentials of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors via Inhibition of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Liu, Yong; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are anticancer drugs that may be co-administered with other drugs. The aims of this study are to investigate the inhibitory effects of TKIs on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activities, and to quantitatively evaluate their potential to cause drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Inhibition kinetic profiles of a panel of UGT enzymes (UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17) by four TKIs (axitinib, imatinib, lapatinib and vandetanib) were characterized by using hepatic microsomes and recombinant proteins. Lapatinib exhibited potent competitive inhibition against UGT1A1 activity with a Ki of 0.5 μM. Imatinib was found to exhibit broad inhibition on several UGTs, particularly potent competitive inhibition against UGT2B17 with a Ki of 0.4 μM. The TKIs also exerted intermediate inhibition against several UGTs (i.e., UGT1A7 by lapatinib; UGT1A1 by imatinib; UGT1A4, 1A7 and 1A9 by axitinib; and UGT1A9 by vandetanib). Results from modeling for the quantitative prediction of DDI risk indicated that the coadministration of lapatinib or imatinib at clinical doses could result in a significant increase in AUC of drugs primarily cleared by UGT1A1 or 2B17. Lapatinib and imatinib may cause clinically significant DDIs when co-administered UGT1A1 or 2B17 substrates. PMID:26642944

  10. Prediction of Drug Clearance and Drug-Drug Interactions in Microscale Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Christine; Shi, Julianne; Moore, Amanda; Khetani, Salman R

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of in vivo hepatic drug clearance using in vitro assays is important to properly estimate clinical dosing regimens. Clearance of low-turnover compounds is especially difficult to predict using short-lived suspensions of unpooled primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and functionally declining PHH monolayers. Micropatterned cocultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 fibroblasts have been shown previously to display major liver functions for several weeks in vitro. In this study, we first characterized long-term activities of major cytochrome P450 enzymes in MPCCs created from unpooled cryopreserved PHH donors. MPCCs were then used to predict the clearance of 26 drugs that exhibit a wide range of turnover rates in vivo (0.05-19.5 ml/min per kilogram). MPCCs predicted 73, 92, and 96% of drug clearance values for all tested drugs within 2-fold, 3-fold, and 4-fold of in vivo values, respectively. There was good correlation (R(2) = 0.94, slope = 1.05) of predictions between the two PHH donors. On the other hand, suspension hepatocytes and conventional monolayers created from the same donor had significantly reduced predictive capacity (i.e., 30-50% clearance values within 4-fold of in vivo), and were not able to metabolize several drugs. Finally, we modulated drug clearance in MPCCs by inducing or inhibiting P450s. Rifampin-mediated CYP3A4 induction increased midazolam clearance by 73%, while CYP3A4 inhibition with ritonavir decreased midazolam clearance by 79%. Similarly, quinidine-mediated CYP2D6 inhibition reduced clearance of dextromethorphan and desipramine by 71 and 22%, respectively. In conclusion, MPCCs created using cryopreserved unpooled PHHs can be used for drug clearance predictions and to model drug-drug interactions. PMID:26452722

  11. Recommendations for Selecting Drug-Drug Interactions for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Tilson, Hugh; Hines, Lisa E.; McEvoy, Gerald; Weinstein, David M.; Hansten, Philip D.; Matuszewski, Karl; le Comte, Marianne; Higby-Baker, Stefanie; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Pezzullo, Lynn; Vieson, Kathleen; Helwig, Amy L.; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Perre, Anthony; Bates, David W.; Poikonen, John; Wittie, Michael A.; Grizzle, Amy J.; Brown, Mary; Malone, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To recommend principles for including drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to improve clinical decision support (CDS) for DDIs. The Content Workgroup met monthly by webinar from January 2013 to February 2014, with two in-person meetings to reach consensus. The workgroup consisted of 20 experts in pharmacology, drug information, and CDS from academia, government agencies, health information (IT) vendors, and healthcare organizations. Workgroup members addressed four key questions: (1) What process should be used to develop and maintain a standard set of DDIs?; (2) What information should be included in a knowledgebase of standard DDIs?; (3) Can/should a list of contraindicated drug pairs be established?; and (4) How can DDI alerts be more intelligently filtered? Results To develop and maintain a standard set of DDIs for CDS in the United States, we recommend a transparent, systematic, and evidence-driven process with graded recommendations by a consensus panel of experts and oversight by a national organization. We outline key DDI information needed to help guide clinician decision-making. We recommend judicious classification of DDIs as contraindicated, as only a small set of drug combinations are truly contraindicated. Finally, we recommend more research to identify methods to safely reduce repetitive and less relevant alerts. Conclusion A systematic ongoing process is necessary to select DDIs for alerting clinicians. We anticipate that our recommendations can lead to consistent and clinically relevant content for interruptive DDIs, and thus reduce alert fatigue and improve patient safety. PMID:27045070

  12. Use of PET Imaging to Evaluate Transporter-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Langer, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Several membrane transporters belonging to the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) families can transport drugs and drug metabolites and thereby exert an effect on drug absorption, distribution, and excretion, which may potentially lead to transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Some transporter-mediated DDIs may lead to changes in organ distribution of drugs (eg, brain, liver, kidneys) without affecting plasma concentrations. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive imaging method that allows studying of the distribution of radiolabeled drugs to different organs and tissues and is therefore the method of choice to quantitatively assess transporter-mediated DDIs on a tissue level. There are 2 approaches to how PET can be used in transporter-mediated DDI studies. When the drug of interest is a potential perpetrator of DDIs, it may be administered in unlabeled form to assess its influence on tissue distribution of a generic transporter-specific PET tracer (probe substrate). When the drug of interest is a potential victim of DDIs, it may be radiolabeled with carbon-11 or fluorine-18 and used in combination with a prototypical transporter inhibitor (eg, rifampicin). PET has already been used both in preclinical species and in humans to assess the effects of transporter-mediated DDIs on drug disposition in different organ systems, such as brain, liver, and kidneys, for which examples are given in the present review article. Given the growing importance of membrane transporters with respect to drug safety and efficacy, PET is expected to play an increasingly important role in future drug development. PMID:27385172

  13. A linguistic rule-based approach to extract drug-drug interactions from pharmacological documents

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A drug-drug interaction (DDI) occurs when one drug influences the level or activity of another drug. The increasing volume of the scientific literature overwhelms health care professionals trying to be kept up-to-date with all published studies on DDI. Methods This paper describes a hybrid linguistic approach to DDI extraction that combines shallow parsing and syntactic simplification with pattern matching. Appositions and coordinate structures are interpreted based on shallow syntactic parsing provided by the UMLS MetaMap tool (MMTx). Subsequently, complex and compound sentences are broken down into clauses from which simple sentences are generated by a set of simplification rules. A pharmacist defined a set of domain-specific lexical patterns to capture the most common expressions of DDI in texts. These lexical patterns are matched with the generated sentences in order to extract DDIs. Results We have performed different experiments to analyze the performance of the different processes. The lexical patterns achieve a reasonable precision (67.30%), but very low recall (14.07%). The inclusion of appositions and coordinate structures helps to improve the recall (25.70%), however, precision is lower (48.69%). The detection of clauses does not improve the performance. Conclusions Information Extraction (IE) techniques can provide an interesting way of reducing the time spent by health care professionals on reviewing the literature. Nevertheless, no approach has been carried out to extract DDI from texts. To the best of our knowledge, this work proposes the first integral solution for the automatic extraction of DDI from biomedical texts. PMID:21489220

  14. Extraction of pharmacokinetic evidence of drug-drug interactions from the literature.

    PubMed

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Lourenço, Anália; Wu, Heng-Yi; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and a subject of intense scientific interest. Biomedical literature mining can aid DDI research by extracting evidence for large numbers of potential interactions from published literature and clinical databases. Though DDI is investigated in domains ranging in scale from intracellular biochemistry to human populations, literature mining has not been used to extract specific types of experimental evidence, which are reported differently for distinct experimental goals. We focus on pharmacokinetic evidence for DDI, essential for identifying causal mechanisms of putative interactions and as input for further pharmacological and pharmacoepidemiology investigations. We used manually curated corpora of PubMed abstracts and annotated sentences to evaluate the efficacy of literature mining on two tasks: first, identifying PubMed abstracts containing pharmacokinetic evidence of DDIs; second, extracting sentences containing such evidence from abstracts. We implemented a text mining pipeline and evaluated it using several linear classifiers and a variety of feature transforms. The most important textual features in the abstract and sentence classification tasks were analyzed. We also investigated the performance benefits of using features derived from PubMed metadata fields, various publicly available named entity recognizers, and pharmacokinetic dictionaries. Several classifiers performed very well in distinguishing relevant and irrelevant abstracts (reaching F1≈0.93, MCC≈0.74, iAUC≈0.99) and sentences (F1≈0.76, MCC≈0.65, iAUC≈0.83). We found that word bigram features were important for achieving optimal classifier performance and that features derived from Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms significantly improved abstract classification. We also found that some drug-related named entity recognition tools and dictionaries led to slight but significant improvements, especially in

  15. [OATP1B1 in drug-drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine Danshensu and rosuvastatin].

    PubMed

    Wen, Jin-hua; Wei, Xiao-hua; Cheng, Xiao-hua; Zuo, Rong; Peng, Hong-wei; Lü, Yan-ni; Zhou, Jian; Zheng, Xue-lian; Cai, Jun; Xiong, Yu-qing; Cao, Li

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to explore the drug-drug interactions mechanisms mediated by OATP1B1 between traditional Chinese medicine Danshensu and rosuvastatin. First, the changes of rosuvastatin pharmacokinetics were investigated in presence of Danshensu in rats. Then, the primary rat hepatocytes model was established to explore the effects of Danshensu on the uptake of rosuvastatin by hepatocytes. Finally, HEK293T cells with overexpression of OATP1B1*a and OATP1B1*5 were established using a lentiviral delivery system to explore the effects of Danshensu on the uptake of rosuvastatin. Rosuvastatin pharmacokinetic parameters of C(max0, AUCO(0-t), AUC(0-∞) were increased about 123%, 194% and 195%, by Danshensu in rats, while the CL z/F value was decreased by 60%. Uptake of rosuvastatin in the primary rat hepatocytes was decreased by 3.13%, 41.15% and 74.62%, respectively in the presence of 20, 40 and 80 μmol x L(-1) Danshensu. The IC50 parameters was (53.04 ± 2.43) μmol x L(-1). The inhibitory effect of Danshensu on OATP1B1 mediated transport of rosuvastatin was related to the OATP1B1 gene type. In OATP1B1*5-HEK293T mutant cells, transport of rosuvastatin were reduced by (39.11 ± 4.94)% and (63.61 ± 3.94)%, respectively, by Danshensu at 1 and 10 μmol x L(-1). While transport of rosuvastatin was reduced by (8.22 ± 2.40)% and (11.56 ± 3.04)% and in OATP1B1*1a cells, respectively. Danshensu significantly altered the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in rats, which was related to competitive inhibition of transport by OATPJBI. Danshensu exhibited a significant activity in the inhibition of rosuvastatin transport by OATP1B1*5-HEK293T, but not by OATP1B1*1a, suggesting a dependence on OATP1B1 sequence. PMID:27405165

  16. Toward a complete dataset of drug-drug interaction information from publicly available sources.

    PubMed

    Ayvaz, Serkan; Horn, John; Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhu, Qian; Stan, Johann; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Vilar, Santiago; Brochhausen, Mathias; Samwald, Matthias; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Dumontier, Michel; Boyce, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Although potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) are a significant source of preventable drug-related harm, there is currently no single complete source of PDDI information. In the current study, all publically available sources of PDDI information that could be identified using a comprehensive and broad search were combined into a single dataset. The combined dataset merged fourteen different sources including 5 clinically-oriented information sources, 4 Natural Language Processing (NLP) Corpora, and 5 Bioinformatics/Pharmacovigilance information sources. As a comprehensive PDDI source, the merged dataset might benefit the pharmacovigilance text mining community by making it possible to compare the representativeness of NLP corpora for PDDI text extraction tasks, and specifying elements that can be useful for future PDDI extraction purposes. An analysis of the overlap between and across the data sources showed that there was little overlap. Even comprehensive PDDI lists such as DrugBank, KEGG, and the NDF-RT had less than 50% overlap with each other. Moreover, all of the comprehensive lists had incomplete coverage of two data sources that focus on PDDIs of interest in most clinical settings. Based on this information, we think that systems that provide access to the comprehensive lists, such as APIs into RxNorm, should be careful to inform users that the lists may be incomplete with respect to PDDIs that drug experts suggest clinicians be aware of. In spite of the low degree of overlap, several dozen cases were identified where PDDI information provided in drug product labeling might be augmented by the merged dataset. Moreover, the combined dataset was also shown to improve the performance of an existing PDDI NLP pipeline and a recently published PDDI pharmacovigilance protocol. Future work will focus on improvement of the methods for mapping between PDDI information sources, identifying methods to improve the use of the merged dataset in PDDI NLP algorithms

  17. Toward a complete dataset of drug-drug interaction information from publicly available sources.

    PubMed

    Ayvaz, Serkan; Horn, John; Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhu, Qian; Stan, Johann; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Vilar, Santiago; Brochhausen, Mathias; Samwald, Matthias; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Dumontier, Michel; Boyce, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Although potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) are a significant source of preventable drug-related harm, there is currently no single complete source of PDDI information. In the current study, all publically available sources of PDDI information that could be identified using a comprehensive and broad search were combined into a single dataset. The combined dataset merged fourteen different sources including 5 clinically-oriented information sources, 4 Natural Language Processing (NLP) Corpora, and 5 Bioinformatics/Pharmacovigilance information sources. As a comprehensive PDDI source, the merged dataset might benefit the pharmacovigilance text mining community by making it possible to compare the representativeness of NLP corpora for PDDI text extraction tasks, and specifying elements that can be useful for future PDDI extraction purposes. An analysis of the overlap between and across the data sources showed that there was little overlap. Even comprehensive PDDI lists such as DrugBank, KEGG, and the NDF-RT had less than 50% overlap with each other. Moreover, all of the comprehensive lists had incomplete coverage of two data sources that focus on PDDIs of interest in most clinical settings. Based on this information, we think that systems that provide access to the comprehensive lists, such as APIs into RxNorm, should be careful to inform users that the lists may be incomplete with respect to PDDIs that drug experts suggest clinicians be aware of. In spite of the low degree of overlap, several dozen cases were identified where PDDI information provided in drug product labeling might be augmented by the merged dataset. Moreover, the combined dataset was also shown to improve the performance of an existing PDDI NLP pipeline and a recently published PDDI pharmacovigilance protocol. Future work will focus on improvement of the methods for mapping between PDDI information sources, identifying methods to improve the use of the merged dataset in PDDI NLP algorithms

  18. ITC commentary on the prediction of digoxin clinical drug-drug interactions from in vitro transporter assays.

    PubMed

    Lee, C A; Kalvass, J C; Galetin, A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, M J

    2014-09-01

    The "P-glycoprotein" IC50 working group reported an 18- to 796-fold interlaboratory range in digoxin transport IC50 (inhibitor concentration achieving 50% of maximal inhibition), raising concerns about the predictability of clinical transporter-based drug-drug interactions (DDIs) from in vitro data. This Commentary describes complexities of digoxin transport, which involve both uptake and efflux processes. We caution against attributing digoxin transport IC50 specifically to P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or extending this composite uptake/efflux IC50 variability to individual transporters. Clinical digoxin interaction studies should be interpreted as evaluation of digoxin safety, not P-gp DDIs.

  19. Clinical pharmacology profile of boceprevir, a hepatitis C virus NS3 protease inhibitor: focus on drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Feng, Hwa-Ping; Hulskotte, Ellen G J; Wenning, Larissa A; Butterton, Joan R

    2015-06-01

    Boceprevir is a potent, orally administered ketoamide inhibitor that targets the active site of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural (NS) 3 protease. The addition of boceprevir to peginterferon plus ribavirin resulted in higher rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) than for peginterferon plus ribavirin alone in phase III studies in both previously treated and untreated patients with HCV infection. Because boceprevir is metabolized by metabolic routes common to many other drugs, and is an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/5, there is a high potential for drug-drug interactions when boceprevir is administered with other therapies, particularly when treating patients with chronic HCV infection who are often receiving other medications concomitantly. Boceprevir is no longer widely used in the US or EU due to the introduction of second-generation treatments for HCV infection. However, in many other geographic regions, first-generation protease inhibitors such as boceprevir continue to form an important treatment option for patients with HCV infection. This review summarizes the interactions between boceprevir and other therapeutic agents commonly used in this patient population, indicating dose adjustment requirements where needed. Most drug interactions do not affect boceprevir plasma concentrations to a clinically meaningful extent, and thus efficacy is likely to be maintained when boceprevir is coadministered with the majority of other therapeutics. Overall, the drug-drug interaction profile of boceprevir suggests that this agent is suitable for use in a wide range of HCV-infected patients receiving concomitant therapies. PMID:25787025

  20. Evaluation of a New Molecular Entity as a Victim of Metabolic Drug-Drug Interactions-an Industry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Tonika; Patel, Aarti; Templeton, Ian; Chen, Yuan; Lu, Chuang; Lai, George; Leung, Louis; Tse, Susanna; Einolf, Heidi J; Wang, Ying-Hong; Sinz, Michael; Stearns, Ralph; Walsky, Robert; Geng, Wanping; Sudsakorn, Sirimas; Moore, David; He, Ling; Wahlstrom, Jan; Keirns, Jim; Narayanan, Rangaraj; Lang, Dieter; Yang, Xiaoqing

    2016-08-01

    Under the guidance of the International Consortium for Innovation and Quality in Pharmaceutical Development (IQ), scientists from 20 pharmaceutical companies formed a Victim Drug-Drug Interactions Working Group. This working group has conducted a review of the literature and the practices of each company on the approaches to clearance pathway identification (fCL), estimation of fractional contribution of metabolizing enzyme toward metabolism (fm), along with modeling and simulation-aided strategy in predicting the victim drug-drug interaction (DDI) liability due to modulation of drug metabolizing enzymes. Presented in this perspective are the recommendations from this working group on: 1) strategic and experimental approaches to identify fCL and fm, 2) whether those assessments may be quantitative for certain enzymes (e.g., cytochrome P450, P450, and limited uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase, UGT enzymes) or qualitative (for most of other drug metabolism enzymes), and the impact due to the lack of quantitative information on the latter. Multiple decision trees are presented with stepwise approaches to identify specific enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of a given drug and to aid the prediction and risk assessment of drug as a victim in DDI. Modeling and simulation approaches are also discussed to better predict DDI risk in humans. Variability and parameter sensitivity analysis were emphasized when applying modeling and simulation to capture the differences within the population used and to characterize the parameters that have the most influence on the prediction outcome. PMID:27052879

  1. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction assessment between LCZ696, an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, and hydrochlorothiazide, amlodipine, or carvedilol.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hsiu-Ling; Langenickel, Thomas Heiko; Greeley, Michael; Roberts, John; Zhou, Wei; Pal, Parasar; Rebello, Sam; Rajman, Iris; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2015-11-01

    LCZ696 is a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor in development for treatments of hypertension and heart failure indications. In 3 separate studies, pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) potential was assessed when LCZ696 was coadministered with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), amlodipine, or carvedilol. The studies used a open-label, single-sequence, 3-period, crossover design in healthy subjects. Blood samples were collected to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of LCZ696 analytes (AHU377, LBQ657, and valsartan), HCTZ, amlodipine, or carvedilol (R[+]- and S[-]-carvedilol) for statistical analysis. When coadministered LCZ696 with HCTZ, the 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios of AUCtau,ss of HCTZ and that of LBQ657 were within a 0.80-1.25 interval, whereas HCTZ Cmax,ss decreased by 26%, LBQ657 Cmax,ss increased by 19%, and the AUCtau,ss and Cmax,ss of valsartan increased by 14% and 16%, respectively. Pharmacokinetics of amlodipine, R(+)- and S(-)-carvedilol, or LBQ657 were not altered after coadministration of LCZ696 with amlodipine or carvedilol. Coadministration of LCZ696 400 mg once daily (qd) with HCTZ 25 mg qd, amlodipine 10 mg qd, or carvedilol 25 mg twice a day (bid) had no clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. LCZ696, HCTZ, amlodipine, and carvedilol were safe and well tolerated when given alone or concomitantly in the investigated studies. PMID:27137712

  2. Mechanism of Drug-Drug Interactions Mediated by Human Cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 Monomer

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, Ilia G.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Baylon, Javier L.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Using Nanodiscs, we quantitate the heterotropic interaction between two different drugs mediated by monomeric CYP3A4 incorporated into a native-like membrane environment. The mechanism of this interaction is deciphered by global analysis of multiple turnover experiments performed under identical conditions using the pure substrates progesterone (PGS) and carbamazepine (CBZ) and their mixtures. Activation of CBZ epoxidation and simultaneous inhibition of PGS hydroxylation are measured and quantitated through differences in their respective affinities towards both a remote allosteric site and the productive catalytic site near the heme iron. Preferred binding of PGS at the allosteric site and higher preference of CBZ binding at the productive site give rise to a non-trivial drug-drug interaction. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate functionally important conformational changes caused by PGS binding at the allosteric site and by two CBZ molecules positioned inside the substrate binding pocket. Structural changes involving Phe-213, Phe-219, and Phe-241 are suggested to be responsible for the observed synergetic effects and positive allosteric interactions between these two substrates. Such a mechanism is likely of general relevance to the mutual heterotropic effects caused by biologically active compounds which exhibit different patterns of interaction with the distinct allosteric and productive sites of CYP3A4, as well as other xenobiotic metabolizing cytochromes P450 that are also involved in drug-drug interactions. Importantly, this work demonstrates that a monomeric CYP3A4 can display the full spectrum of activation and cooperative effects that are observed in hepatic membranes. PMID:25777547

  3. A Study on Polypharmacy and Potential Drug-Drug Interactions among Elderly Patients Admitted in Department of Medicine of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Puducherry

    PubMed Central

    Kalyansundaram, Dharani; Bahurupi, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The proportion of elderly population has been constantly increasing over last few years. Polypharmacy is unavoidable in the elderly as they often suffer from multiple co-morbidities. Potential drug-drug interaction due to polypharmacy and potential inappropriate medication among the elderly must be carefully assessed. Aim To find out polypharmacy and potential drug-drug interactions among elderly patients admitted and discharged in Department of Medicine. Materials and Methods This study was carried out on 100 patients above 65 years of age both males and females. Data was collected through review of case sheets. Polypharmacy was observed based on admission and discharge prescriptions. Frequently occurring drug-drug interactions were assessed using online checks. Results Mean number of drugs prescribed to patients on admission (7.61 ± 3.37) was more than that on discharge (5.48±2.46). More than half of these patients received 5 to 9 number of drugs. On admission 52.69% potential drug-drug interactions were observed and on discharge 52.91%. Most common drug interactions observed in both the groups were of moderate grade. Conclusion From the present study we can conclude that polypharmacy leads to more potential drug-drug interactions. To improve drug safety in this high-risk population, appropriate prescribing is very important. PMID:27042480

  4. Is pomegranate juice a potential perpetrator of clinical drug-drug interactions? Review of the in vitro, preclinical and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2013-12-01

    The area of fruit juice-drug interaction has received wide attention with numerous scientific and clinical investigations performed and reported for scores of drugs metabolized by CYP3A4/CYP2C9. While grapefruit juice has been extensively studied with respect to its drug-drug interaction potential, numerous other fruit juices such as cranberry juice, orange juice, grape juice, pineapple juice and pomegranate juice have also been investigated for its potential to show drug-drug interaction of any clinical relevance. This review focuses on establishing any relevance for clinical drug-drug interaction potential with pomegranate juice, which has been shown to produce therapeutic benefits over a wide range of disease areas. The review collates and evaluates relevant published in vitro, preclinical and clinical evidence of the potential of pomegranate juice to be a perpetrator in drug-drug interactions mediated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C9. In vitro and animal pharmacokinetic data support the possibility of CYP3A4/CYP2C9 inhibition by pomegranate juice; however, the human relevance for drug-drug interaction was not established based on the limited case studies.

  5. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety.

  6. Delamanid Coadministered with Antiretroviral Drugs or Antituberculosis Drugs Shows No Clinically Relevant Drug-Drug Interactions in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Charles; Petersen, Carolyn; Paccaly, Anne; Shoaf, Susan E.; Patil, Shiva; Geiter, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Delamanid is a medicinal product approved for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Three studies were conducted to evaluate the potential drug-drug interactions between delamanid and antiretroviral drugs, including ritonavir, a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4, and selected anti-TB drugs, including rifampin, a strong inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes. Multiple-dose studies were conducted in parallel groups of healthy subjects. Plasma samples were analyzed for delamanid, delamanid metabolite, and coadministered drug concentrations, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were determined. The magnitude of the interaction was assessed by the ratio of the geometric means and 90% confidence intervals. Coadministration of delamanid with tenofovir or efavirenz did not affect the PK characteristics of delamanid. Coadministration of Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) with delamanid resulted in an approximately 25% higher delamanid area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to the end of the dosing interval (AUCτ). Tenofovir, efavirenz, lopinavir, and ritonavir exposure were not affected by delamanid. Coadministration of delamanid with the TB drugs (ethambutol plus Rifater [rifampin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid]) resulted in lower delamanid exposures (47 and 42% for the AUCτ and Cmax [maximum concentration of a drug in plasma] values, respectively), as well as decreased exposure of three primary metabolites (approximately 30 to 50% lower AUCτ values). Delamanid did not affect rifampin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid exposure; the ethambutol AUCτ and Cmax values were about 25% higher with delamanid coadministration. The lack of clinically significant drug-drug interactions between delamanid and selected antiretroviral agents (including the strong CYP inhibitor ritonavir) and a combination of anti-TB drugs was demonstrated. Although there was a decrease in the delamanid concentrations when coadministered with ethambutol plus Rifater, this is likely related to

  7. Integration of heterogeneous clinical decision support systems and their knowledge sets: feasibility study with Drug-Drug Interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Kam, Hye Jin; Kim, Jeong Ah; Cho, InSook; Kim, Yoon; Park, Rae Woong

    2011-01-01

    There exist limitations in both commercial and in-house clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and issues related to the integration of different knowledge sources and CDSSs. We chose Standard-based Shareable Active Guideline Environment (SAGE) as a new architecture with knowledge integration and a centralized knowledge base which includes authoring/management functions and independent CDSS, and applied it to Drug-Drug Interaction (DDI) CDSS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the newly integrated DDI alerting CDSS into a real world hospital information system involving construction of an integrated CDSS derived from two heterogeneous systems and their knowledge sets. The proposed CDSS was successfully implemented and compensated for the weaknesses of the old CDSS from knowledge integration and management, and its applicability in actual situations was verified. Although the DDI CDSS was constructed as an example case, the new CDS architecture might prove applicable to areas of CDSSs.

  8. Drug-drug Interaction Discovery Using Abstraction Networks for “National Drug File – Reference Terminology” Chemical Ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Christopher; Zheng, Ling; Gu, Huanying; Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan; Zakharchenko, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    The National Drug File – Reference Terminology (NDF-RT) is a large and complex drug terminology. NDF-RT provides important information about clinical drugs, e.g., their chemical ingredients, mechanisms of action, dosage form and physiological effects. Within NDF-RT such information is represented using tens of thousands of roles. It is difficult to comprehend large, complex terminologies like NDF-RT. In previous studies, we introduced abstraction networks to summarize the content and structure of terminologies. In this paper, we introduce the Ingredient Abstraction Network to summarize NDF-RT’s Chemical Ingredients and their associated drugs. Additionally, we introduce the Aggregate Ingredient Abstraction Network, for controlling the granularity of summarization provided by the Ingredient Abstraction Network. The Ingredient Abstraction Network is used to support the discovery of new candidate drug-drug interactions (DDIs) not appearing in First Databank, Inc.’s DDI knowledgebase. PMID:26958234

  9. Transport characteristics and transporter-based drug-drug interactions of TM-25659, a novel TAZ modulator.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min-Koo; Kwon, Mihwa; Ahn, Jin Hee; Kim, Nak Jung; Bae, Myung-Ae; Song, Im-Sook

    2014-04-01

    The in vitro metabolic stability and transport mechanism of TM-25659, a novel TAZ modulator, was investigated in human hepatocytes and human liver microsomes (HLMs) based on the preferred hepatobiliary elimination in rats. In addition, the in vitro transport mechanism and transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions were evaluated using oocytes and MDCKII cells overexpressing clinically important drug transporters. After a 1 h incubation in HLMs, 92.9 ± 9.5% and 95.5 ± 11.6% of the initial TM-25659 remained in the presence of NADPH and UDPGA, respectively. Uptake of TM-25659 readily accumulated in human hepatocytes at 37 ºC (i.e. 6.7-fold greater than that at 4 ºC), in which drug transporters such as OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 were involved. TM-25659 had a significantly greater basal to apical transport rate (5.9-fold) than apical to basal transport rate in the Caco-2 cell monolayer, suggesting the involvement of an efflux transport system. Further studies using inhibitors of efflux transporters and overexpressing cells revealed that MRP2 was involved in the transport of TM-25659. These results, taken together, suggested that TM-25659 can be actively influxed into hepatocytes and undergo biliary excretion without substantial metabolism. Additionally, TM-25659 inhibited the transport activities of OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 with IC50 values of 36.3 and 25.9 μm, respectively. TM-25659 (100 μm) increased the accumulation of the probe substrate by 160% and 213%, respectively, through the inhibition of efflux function of P-gp and MRP2. In conclusion, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, P-gp and MRP2 might be major transporters responsible for the pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction of TM-25659, although their contribution to in vivo pharmacokinetics needs to be further investigated.

  10. Management of drug-drug interactions: considerations for special populations--focus on opioid use in the elderly and long term care.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tom

    2011-09-01

    Elderly patients and residents in long term care facilities requiring pain medication often have multiple pharmacologic and physiologic factors that can impact the choice of analgesic. One particular problem with prescribing opioids to the elderly and long term care residents is that opioid safety and efficacy have not been well studied in these populations, and it may be difficult to predict how these patients will respond to opioid treatment. As people age, numerous physiological changes occur, which may affect opioid pharmacokinetics and the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Long term care residents include the elderly but also include many younger patients who require assistance for a variety of reasons, such as physical or mental disability. Many elderly and long term care patients have cognitive deficits that impede communication about their pain, thus making detection of opioid DDIs more difficult. Knowledge of the patient's medical history and current prescriptions can help guide the pain management team in the selection of treatment, help minimize the risk of DDIs, and provide these patients with the pain relief they require. There are several practice management recommendations for opioid therapy in the elderly and long term care residents, with the goal of optimizing analgesia while avoiding adverse events and drug interactions.

  11. DDI-CPI, a server that predicts drug-drug interactions through implementing the chemical-protein interactome.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Zhang, Ping; Huang, Hui; Huang, Jialiang; Kao, Emily; Shi, Leming; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2014-07-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may cause serious side-effects that draw great attention from both academia and industry. Since some DDIs are mediated by unexpected drug-human protein interactions, it is reasonable to analyze the chemical-protein interactome (CPI) profiles of the drugs to predict their DDIs. Here we introduce the DDI-CPI server, which can make real-time DDI predictions based only on molecular structure. When the user submits a molecule, the server will dock user's molecule across 611 human proteins, generating a CPI profile that can be used as a feature vector for the pre-constructed prediction model. It can suggest potential DDIs between the user's molecule and our library of 2515 drug molecules. In cross-validation and independent validation, the server achieved an AUC greater than 0.85. Additionally, by investigating the CPI profiles of predicted DDI, users can explore the PK/PD proteins that might be involved in a particular DDI. A 3D visualization of the drug-protein interaction will be provided as well. The DDI-CPI is freely accessible at http://cpi.bio-x.cn/ddi/. PMID:24875476

  12. Drug/drug interaction of common NSAIDs with antiplatelet effect of aspirin in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Aaruni; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Saxena, Anil K

    2013-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may interfere with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin at the level of the platelet cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzyme. In order to examine the interference of common NSAIDs with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin the human platelet rich plasma from voluntary donors was used for arachidonic acid-induced aggregation and determination of thromboxane synthesis. Further, docking studies were used to explain the molecular basis of the NSAID/aspirin interaction. The experimental results showed that celecoxib, dipyrone (active metabolite), ibuprofen, flufenamic acid, naproxen, nimesulide, oxaprozin, and piroxicam significantly interfere with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin, while diclofenac, ketorolac and acetaminophen do not. Docking studies suggested that NSAIDs forming hydrogen bonds with Ser530, Arg120, Tyr385 and other amino acids of the COX-1 hydrophobic channel interfere with antiplatelet activity of aspirin while non interfering NSAIDs do not form relevant hydrogen bond interactions within the aspirin binding site. In conclusion, docking analysis of NSAID interactions at the COX-1 active site appears useful to predict their interference with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin. The results, demonstrate that some NSAIDs do not interfere with the antiplatelet action of aspirin while many others do and provide a basis for understanding the observed differences among individual non-aspirin NSAIDs. PMID:24075938

  13. A novel algorithm for analyzing drug-drug interactions from MEDLINE literature

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yin; Shen, Dan; Pietsch, Maxwell; Nagar, Chetan; Fadli, Zayd; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Drug–drug interaction (DDI) is becoming a serious clinical safety issue as the use of multiple medications becomes more common. Searching the MEDLINE database for journal articles related to DDI produces over 330,000 results. It is impossible to read and summarize these references manually. As the volume of biomedical reference in the MEDLINE database continues to expand at a rapid pace, automatic identification of DDIs from literature is becoming increasingly important. In this article, we present a random-sampling-based statistical algorithm to identify possible DDIs and the underlying mechanism from the substances field of MEDLINE records. The substances terms are essentially carriers of compound (including protein) information in a MEDLINE record. Four case studies on warfarin, ibuprofen, furosemide and sertraline implied that our method was able to rank possible DDIs with high accuracy (90.0% for warfarin, 83.3% for ibuprofen, 70.0% for furosemide and 100% for sertraline in the top 10% of a list of compounds ranked by p-value). A social network analysis of substance terms was also performed to construct networks between proteins and drug pairs to elucidate how the two drugs could interact. PMID:26612138

  14. Drug-drug interactions related to altered absorption and plasma protein binding: theoretical and regulatory considerations, and an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Jerome; Tang, Cuyue; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant

    2015-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) related to altered drug absorption and plasma protein binding have received much less attention from regulatory agencies relative to DDIs mediated via drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. In this review, a number of theoretical bases and regulatory framework are presented for these DDI aspects. Also presented is an industry perspective on how to approach these issues in support of drug development. Overall, with the exception of highly permeable and highly soluble (BCS 1) drugs, DDIs related to drug-induced changes in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology can be substantial, thus warranting more attentions. For a better understanding of absorption-associated DDI potential in a clinical setting, mechanistic studies should be conducted based on holistic integration of the pharmaceutical profiles (e.g., pH-dependent solubility) and pharmacological properties (e.g., GI physiology and therapeutic margin) of drug candidates. Although majority of DDI events related to altered plasma protein binding are not expected to be of clinical significance, exceptions exist for a subset of compounds with certain pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties. Knowledge of the identity of binding proteins and the binding extent in various clinical setting (including disease states) can be valuable in aiding clinical DDI data interpretations, and ensuring safe and effective use of new drugs.

  15. Drug-metabolism mechanism: Knowledge-based population pharmacokinetic approach for characterizing clobazam drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, Dwain; Bekersky, Ihor; Chu, Hui-May; Ette, Ene I

    2016-03-01

    A metabolic mechanism-based characterization of antiepileptic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with clobazam in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) was performed using a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) approach. To characterize potential DDIs with clobazam, pharmacokinetic (PK) data from 153 patients with LGS in study OV-1012 (NCT00518713) and 18 healthy participants in bioavailability study OV-1017 were pooled. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were grouped based on their effects on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes responsible for the metabolism of clobazam and its metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam (N-CLB): CYP3A inducers (phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine), CYP2C19 inducers (valproic acid, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine), or CYP2C19 inhibitors (felbamate, oxcarbazepine). CYP3A4 inducers-which did not affect the oral clearance of clobazam-significantly increased the formation of N-CLB by 9.4%, while CYP2C19 inducers significantly increased the apparent elimination rate of N-CLB by 10.5%, resulting in a negligible net change in the PK of the active metabolite. CYP2C19 inhibitors did not affect N-CLB elimination. Because concomitant use of AEDs that are either CYP450 inhibitors or inducers with clobazam in the treatment of LGS patients had negligible to no effect on clobazam PK in this study, dosage adjustments may not be required for clobazam in the presence of the AEDs investigated here.

  16. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  17. Best practices for the use of itraconazole as a replacement for ketoconazole in drug-drug interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lichuan; Bello, Akintunde; Dresser, Mark J; Heald, Donald; Komjathy, Steven Ferenc; O'Mara, Edward; Rogge, Mark; Stoch, S Aubrey; Robertson, Sarah M

    2016-02-01

    Ketoconazole has been widely used as a strong cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A (CYP3A) inhibitor in drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies. However, the US Food and Drug Administration has recommended limiting the use of ketoconazole to cases in which no alternative therapies exist, and the European Medicines Agency has recommended the suspension of its marketing authorizations because of the potential for serious safety concerns. In this review, the Innovation and Quality in Pharmaceutical Development's Clinical Pharmacology Leadership Group (CPLG) provides a compelling rationale for the use of itraconazole as a replacement for ketoconazole in clinical DDI studies and provides recommendations on the best practices for the use of itraconazole in such studies. Various factors considered in the recommendations include the choice of itraconazole dosage form, administration in the fasted or fed state, the dose and duration of itraconazole administration, the timing of substrate and itraconazole coadministration, and measurement of itraconazole and metabolite plasma concentrations, among others. The CPLG's recommendations are based on careful review of available literature and internal industry experiences.

  18. Human hepatoma cell lines on gas foaming templated alginate scaffolds for in vitro drug-drug interaction and metabolism studies.

    PubMed

    Stampella, A; Rizzitelli, G; Donati, F; Mazzarino, M; de la Torre, X; Botrè, F; Giardi, M F; Dentini, M; Barbetta, A; Massimi, M

    2015-12-25

    Liver in vitro systems that allow reliable prediction of major human in vivo metabolic pathways have a significant impact in drug screening and drug metabolism research. In the present study, a novel porous scaffold composed of alginate was prepared by employing a gas-in-liquid foaming approach. Galactose residues were introduced on scaffold surfaces to promote cell adhesion and to enhance liver specific functions of the entrapped HepG2/C3A cells. Hepatoma cells in the gal-alginate scaffold showed higher levels of liver specific products (albumin and urea) and were more responsive to specific inducers (e.g. dexamethasone) and inhibitors (e.g. ketoconazole) of the CYP3A4 system than in conventional monolayer culture. HepG2/C3A cells were also more efficient in terms of rapid elimination of testosterone, used as a model substance, at rates comparable to those of in vivo excretion. In addition, an improvement in metabolism of testosterone, in terms of phase II metabolite formation, was also observed when the more differentiated HepaRG cells were used. Together the data suggest that hepatocyte/gas templated alginate-systems provide an innovative high throughput platform for in vitro drug metabolism and drug-drug interaction studies, with broad fields of application, and might provide a valid tool for minimizing animal use in preclinical testing of human relevance.

  19. Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions between Daclatasvir and Methadone or Buprenorphine-Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, R.; Luo, W.-L.; Wastall, P.; Kandoussi, H.; DeMicco, M.; Bruce, R. D.; Hwang, C.; Bertz, R.; Bifano, M.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among people who inject drugs, including those managed with maintenance opioids. Pharmacokinetic interactions between opioids and emerging oral HCV antivirals merit evaluation. Daclatasvir is a potent pangenotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex recently approved for HCV treatment in Europe and Japan in combination with other antivirals. The effect of steady-state daclatasvir (60 mg daily) on stable plasma exposure to oral opioids was assessed in non-HCV-infected subjects receiving methadone (40 to 120 mg; n = 14) or buprenorphine plus naloxone (8 to 24 mg plus 2 to 6 mg; n = 11). No relevant interaction was inferred if the 90% confidence interval (CI) of the geometric mean ratio (GMR) of opioid area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUCτ) or maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax) with versus without daclatasvir was within literature-derived ranges of 0.7 to 1.43 (R- and S-methadone) or 0.5 to 2.0 (buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine). Dose-normalized AUCτ for R-methadone (GMR, 1.08; 90% CI, 0.94 to 1.24), S-methadone (1.13; 0.99 to 1.30), and buprenorphine (GMR, 1.37; 90% CI, 1.24 to 1.52) were within the no-effect range. The norbuprenorphine AUCτ was slightly elevated in the primary analysis (GMR, 1.62; 90% CI, 1.30 to 2.02) but within the no-effect range in a supplementary analysis of all evaluable subjects. Dose-normalized Cmax for both methadone enantiomers, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, were within the no-effect range. Standardized assessments of opioid pharmacodynamics were unchanged throughout daclatasvir administration with methadone or buprenorphine. Daclatasvir pharmacokinetics were similar to historical data. Coadministration of daclatasvir and opioids was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, these data suggest that daclatasvir can be administered with buprenorphine or methadone without dose adjustments. PMID:26124175

  20. Assessment of drug-drug interactions between daclatasvir and methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone.

    PubMed

    Garimella, T; Wang, R; Luo, W-L; Wastall, P; Kandoussi, H; DeMicco, M; Bruce, R D; Hwang, C; Bertz, R; Bifano, M

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among people who inject drugs, including those managed with maintenance opioids. Pharmacokinetic interactions between opioids and emerging oral HCV antivirals merit evaluation. Daclatasvir is a potent pangenotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex recently approved for HCV treatment in Europe and Japan in combination with other antivirals. The effect of steady-state daclatasvir (60 mg daily) on stable plasma exposure to oral opioids was assessed in non-HCV-infected subjects receiving methadone (40 to 120 mg; n = 14) or buprenorphine plus naloxone (8 to 24 mg plus 2 to 6 mg; n = 11). No relevant interaction was inferred if the 90% confidence interval (CI) of the geometric mean ratio (GMR) of opioid area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUCτ) or maximum concentration in plasma (C max) with versus without daclatasvir was within literature-derived ranges of 0.7 to 1.43 (R- and S-methadone) or 0.5 to 2.0 (buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine). Dose-normalized AUCτ for R-methadone (GMR, 1.08; 90% CI, 0.94 to 1.24), S-methadone (1.13; 0.99 to 1.30), and buprenorphine (GMR, 1.37; 90% CI, 1.24 to 1.52) were within the no-effect range. The norbuprenorphine AUCτ was slightly elevated in the primary analysis (GMR, 1.62; 90% CI, 1.30 to 2.02) but within the no-effect range in a supplementary analysis of all evaluable subjects. Dose-normalized C max for both methadone enantiomers, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, were within the no-effect range. Standardized assessments of opioid pharmacodynamics were unchanged throughout daclatasvir administration with methadone or buprenorphine. Daclatasvir pharmacokinetics were similar to historical data. Coadministration of daclatasvir and opioids was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, these data suggest that daclatasvir can be administered with buprenorphine or methadone without dose adjustments. PMID:26124175

  1. The Role of Drug-Drug Interactions in Hydrogel Delivery Systems: Experimental and Model Study.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Filippo; Castiglione, Franca; Ferro, Monica; Moioli, Marta; Mele, Andrea; Masi, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    To address the increasing need for improved tissue substitutes, tissue engineering seeks to create synthetic, three-dimensional scaffolds made from polymeric materials able to incorporate cells and drugs. The interpretation of transport phenomena is a key step, but comprehensive theoretical data is still missing and many issues related to these systems are still unsolved. In particular, the contribution of solute-solute interactions is not yet completely understood. Here, we investigate a promising agar-carbomer (AC) hydrogel loaded with sodium fluorescein (SF), a commonly used drug mimetic. The self-diffusion coefficient of SF in AC formulations was measured by using high resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR). Starting from experimental data, a complete overview on SF transport properties is provided, in particular a mathematical model that describes and rationalizes the differences between gel and water environments is developed and presented. The hydrogel molecular environment is able to prevent SF aggregation, owing to the adsorption mechanism that reduces the number of monomers available for oligomer formation at low solute concentration. Then, when all adsorption sites are saturated free SF molecules are able to aggregate and form oligomers. The model predictions satisfactorily match with experimental data obtained in water and the gel environment, thus indicating that the model presented here, despite its simplicity, is able to describe the key phenomena governing device behavior and could be used to rationalize experimental activity. PMID:26919298

  2. Potential drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients with chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Roblek, Tina; Trobec, Katja; Mrhar, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polypharmacy is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but little is known about the prevalence and significance of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This study evaluates DDIs in hospitalized patients. Material and methods We retrospectively screened medical charts over a 6-month period for diagnosis of chronic HF and/or COPD. Potential DDIs were evaluated using Lexi-Interact software. Results Seven hundred and seventy-eight patients were included in the study (median age 75 years, 61% men). The median number of drugs on admission and discharge was 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 4–9) and 7 (IQR 5–), respectively (p = 0.10). We recorded 6.5 ±5.7 potential DDIs per patient on admission and 7.2 ±5.6 on discharge (p = 0.2). From admission to discharge, type-C and type-X potential DDIs increased (p < 0.05 for both). Type X interactions were rare (< 1%), with the combination of a β-blocker and a β2 agonist being the most common (64%). There were significantly more type-C and type-D potential DDIs in patients with chronic HF as compared to patients with COPD (p < 0.001). Patients with concomitant chronic HF and COPD had more type-C and type-X potential DDIs when compared to those with individual disease (p < 0.005). An aldosterone antagonist and ACE inhibitor/ARB were prescribed to 3% of chronic HF patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30 ml/(min × 1.73 m2). Conclusions The DDIs are common in patients with chronic HF and/or COPD, but only a few appear to be of clinical significance. The increase in potential DDIs from admission to discharge may reflect better guideline implementation rather than poor clinical practice. PMID:25395943

  3. Impact of Multiple Pharmacy Use on Medication Adherence and Drug-drug Interactions in Older Adults with Medicare Part D

    PubMed Central

    Marcum, Zachary A.; Driessen, Julia; Thorpe, Carolyn T.; Gellad, Walid F.; Donohue, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between multiple pharmacy use and medication adherence and potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) among older adults. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional propensity score-weighted analysis of 2009 claims data from a nationally representative sample of 926,956 Medicare Part D beneficiaries aged >65 continuously enrolled in fee-for-service Medicare and Part D that year, and filled >1 prescription at a community/retail or mail order pharmacy. Multiple pharmacy use was defined as concurrent (overlapping time periods) or sequential use (non-overlapping time periods) of >2 pharmacies in the year. Measurements Medication adherence was calculated using a proportion of days covered ≥0.80 for eight therapeutic categories (β-blockers, renin angiotensin system antagonists, calcium channel blockers, statins, sulfonylureas, biguanides [i.e., metformin], thiazolidinediones, and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors). Potential DDIs arising from use of certain drugs across a broad set of classes were defined as the concurrent filling of two interacting drugs. Results Overall, 38.1% of the sample used multiple pharmacies. Those using multiple pharmacies (both concurrently and sequentially) consistently had higher adjusted odds of non-adherence (ranging from 1.10 to 1.31, p<0.001) across all chronic medication classes assessed after controlling for socio-demographic, health status and access to care factors, compared to single pharmacy users. The adjusted predicted probability of exposure to a DDI was also slightly higher for those using multiple pharmacies concurrently (3.6%) compared to single pharmacy users (3.2%, AOR 1.11, 95% CI 1.08–1.15) but lower in individuals using multiple pharmacies sequentially (2.8%, AOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.81–0.91). Conclusions Filling prescriptions at multiple pharmacies was associated with lower medication adherence across multiple chronic medications, and a small but statistically significant

  4. Incidence rate and pattern of clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions in a large outpatient population of a developing country.

    PubMed

    Nabovati, Ehsan; Vakili-Arki, Hasan; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine incidence rate, type, and pattern of clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in a large outpatient population of a developing country. A retrospective, descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on outpatients' prescriptions in Khorasan Razavi province, Iran, over 12 months. A list of 25 clinically relevant DDIs, which are likely to occur in the outpatient setting, was used as the reference. Most frequent clinically relevant pDDIs, most common drugs contributing to the pDDIs, and the pattern of pDDIs for each medical specialty were determined. Descriptive statistics were used to report the results. In total, out of 8,169,142 prescriptions, 6,096 clinically relevant pDDIs were identified. The most common identified pDDIs were theophyllines-quinolones, warfarin-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, benzodiazepines-azole antifungal agents, and anticoagulants-thyroid hormones. The most common drugs contributing to the identified pDDIs were ciprofloxacin, theophylline, warfarin, aminophylline, alprazolam, levothyroxine, and selegiline. While the incidence rate of clinically relevant pDDIs in prescriptions of general practitioners, internists, and cardiologists was the highest, the average pDDI incidence per 10,000 prescriptions of pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists, and cardiologists was highest. Although a small proportion of the analyzed prescriptions contained drug pairs with potential for clinically relevant DDIs, a significant number of outpatients have been exposed to the adverse effects associated with these interactions. It is recommended that in addition to training physicians and pharmacists, other effective interventions such as computerized alerting systems and electronic prescribing systems be designed and implemented. PMID:27499793

  5. Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions Arising from CYP3A induction Using a Physiologically Based Dynamic Model.

    PubMed

    Almond, Lisa M; Mukadam, Sophie; Gardner, Iain; Okialda, Krystle; Wong, Susan; Hatley, Oliver; Tay, Suzanne; Rowland-Yeo, Karen; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Kenny, Jane R

    2016-06-01

    Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling, we predicted the magnitude of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) for studies with rifampicin and seven CYP3A4 probe substrates administered i.v. (10 studies) or orally (19 studies). The results showed a tendency to underpredict the DDI magnitude when the victim drug was administered orally. Possible sources of inaccuracy were investigated systematically to determine the most appropriate model refinement. When the maximal fold induction (Indmax) for rifampicin was increased (from 8 to 16) in both the liver and the gut, or when the Indmax was increased in the gut but not in liver, there was a decrease in bias and increased precision compared with the base model (Indmax = 8) [geometric mean fold error (GMFE) 2.12 vs. 1.48 and 1.77, respectively]. Induction parameters (mRNA and activity), determined for rifampicin, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital in hepatocytes from four donors, were then used to evaluate use of the refined rifampicin model for calibration. Calibration of mRNA and activity data for other inducers using the refined rifampicin model led to more accurate DDI predictions compared with the initial model (activity GMFE 1.49 vs. 1.68; mRNA GMFE 1.35 vs. 1.46), suggesting that robust in vivo reference values can be used to overcome interdonor and laboratory-to-laboratory variability. Use of uncalibrated data also performed well (GMFE 1.39 and 1.44 for activity and mRNA). As a result of experimental variability (i.e., in donors and protocols), it is prudent to fully characterize in vitro induction with prototypical inducers to give an understanding of how that particular system extrapolates to the in vivo situation when using an uncalibrated approach. PMID:27026679

  6. Inhibition of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzymes by Canagliflozin and Dapagliflozin: Implications for Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pattanawongsa, Attarat; Chau, Nuy; Rowland, Andrew; Miners, John O

    2015-10-01

    Canagliflozin (CNF) and dapagliflozin (DPF) are the first sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors to be approved for clinical use. Although available evidence excludes clinically significant inhibition of cytochromes P450, the effects of CNF and DPF on human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes are unknown. Here, we report the inhibition of human recombinant UGTs by CNF and DPF, along with the Ki values for selected recombinant and human liver microsomal UGTs. CNF inhibited all UGT1A subfamily enzymes, but the greatest inhibition was observed with UGT1A1, UGT1A9, and UGT1A10 (IC50 values ≤ 10 µM). DPF similarly inhibited UGT1A1, UGT1A9, and UGT1A10, with IC50 values ranging from 39 to 66 µM. In subsequent kinetic studies, CNF inhibited recombinant and human liver microsomal UGT1A9; Ki values ranged from 1.4 to 3.0 µM, depending on the substrate (propofol/4-methylumbelliferone) enzyme combination. Ki values for CNF inhibition of UGT1A1 were approximately 3-fold higher. Consistent with the activity screening data, DPF was a less potent inhibitor of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9. The Ki for DPF inhibition of UGT1A1 was 81 µM, whereas the Ki values for inhibition of UGT1A9 ranged from 12 to 15 µM. Based on the in vitro Ki values and plasma concentrations reported in the literature, DPF may be excluded as a perpetrator of DDIs arising from inhibition of UGT enzymes, but CNF inhibition of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 in vivo cannot be discounted. Since the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors share common structural features, notably a glycoside moiety, investigation of drugs in this class for effects on UGT to identify (or exclude) potential drug-drug interactions is warranted.

  7. Fusidic Acid Inhibits Hepatic Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Potential Cause of Clinical Drug-Drug Interaction Observed with Statin Coadministration.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshul; Harris, Jennifer J; Lin, Jianrong; Bulgarelli, James P; Birmingham, Bruce K; Grimm, Scott W

    2016-10-01

    Fusidic acid (FA), which was approved in the 1960s in many European and Asian countries, has gained renewed interest due to its continued effectiveness against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus As rhabdomyolysis has been reported upon coadministration of FA with statins, we aimed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms that contribute to FA-statin drug-drug interactions. Because of the association between rhabdomyolysis and increased exposure to statins, we investigated if cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and transporters involved in the disposition of various statins are inhibited by FA. FA was found to inhibit BCRP and OATP1B1 but not P-gp. In overexpressing cell systems, FA inhibited BCRP-mediated efflux (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], ∼50 to 110 μM) and OATP1B1-mediated uptake (IC50, ∼4 to 35 μM) of statins at clinically relevant concentrations achievable in the intestine and liver (based on a 550-mg oral dose of FA, the expected maximum theoretical gastrointestinal concentration is ∼4 mM, and the maximum total or unbound concentration in the inlet to the liver was reported to be up to 223 μM or 11 μM, respectively, upon multiple dosing). Similarly, FA inhibited metabolism of statins in human liver microsomes (IC50, ∼17 to 195 μM). These data suggest that FA inhibits at least 3 major dispositional pathways (BCRP, OATP1B1, and CYP3A) and thus affects the clearance of several statins. We confirmed that FA is eliminated via phase 1 metabolism (primarily via CYP3A); however, there is also some phase 2 metabolism (mediated primarily by UGT1A1). Taken together, these data provide evidence for molecular mechanisms that may explain the occurrence of rhabdomyolysis when FA is administered with statins.

  8. Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions Arising from CYP3A induction Using a Physiologically Based Dynamic Model

    PubMed Central

    Mukadam, Sophie; Gardner, Iain; Okialda, Krystle; Wong, Susan; Hatley, Oliver; Tay, Suzanne; Rowland-Yeo, Karen; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Kenny, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling, we predicted the magnitude of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) for studies with rifampicin and seven CYP3A4 probe substrates administered i.v. (10 studies) or orally (19 studies). The results showed a tendency to underpredict the DDI magnitude when the victim drug was administered orally. Possible sources of inaccuracy were investigated systematically to determine the most appropriate model refinement. When the maximal fold induction (Indmax) for rifampicin was increased (from 8 to 16) in both the liver and the gut, or when the Indmax was increased in the gut but not in liver, there was a decrease in bias and increased precision compared with the base model (Indmax = 8) [geometric mean fold error (GMFE) 2.12 vs. 1.48 and 1.77, respectively]. Induction parameters (mRNA and activity), determined for rifampicin, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital in hepatocytes from four donors, were then used to evaluate use of the refined rifampicin model for calibration. Calibration of mRNA and activity data for other inducers using the refined rifampicin model led to more accurate DDI predictions compared with the initial model (activity GMFE 1.49 vs. 1.68; mRNA GMFE 1.35 vs. 1.46), suggesting that robust in vivo reference values can be used to overcome interdonor and laboratory-to-laboratory variability. Use of uncalibrated data also performed well (GMFE 1.39 and 1.44 for activity and mRNA). As a result of experimental variability (i.e., in donors and protocols), it is prudent to fully characterize in vitro induction with prototypical inducers to give an understanding of how that particular system extrapolates to the in vivo situation when using an uncalibrated approach. PMID:27026679

  9. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict drug-drug interactions involving inhibitory metabolite: a case study of amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Mao, Jialin; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2015-02-01

    Evaluation of drug-drug interaction (DDI) involving circulating inhibitory metabolites of perpetrator drugs has recently drawn more attention from regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies. Here, using amiodarone (AMIO) as an example, we demonstrate the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to assess how a potential inhibitory metabolite can contribute to clinically significant DDIs. Amiodarone was reported to increase the exposure of simvastatin, dextromethorphan, and warfarin by 1.2- to 2-fold, which was not expected based on its weak inhibition observed in vitro. The major circulating metabolite, mono-desethyl-amiodarone (MDEA), was later identified to have a more potent inhibitory effect. Using a combined "bottom-up" and "top-down" approach, a PBPK model was built to successfully simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of AMIO and MDEA, particularly their accumulation in plasma and liver after a long-term treatment. The clinical AMIO DDIs were predicted using the verified PBPK model with incorporation of cytochrome P450 inhibition from both AMIO and MDEA. The closest prediction was obtained for CYP3A (simvastatin) DDI when the competitive inhibition from both AMIO and MDEA was considered, for CYP2D6 (dextromethorphan) DDI when the competitive inhibition from AMIO and the competitive plus time-dependent inhibition from MDEA were incorporated, and for CYP2C9 (warfarin) DDI when the competitive plus time-dependent inhibition from AMIO and the competitive inhibition from MDEA were considered. The PBPK model with the ability to simulate DDI by considering dynamic change and accumulation of inhibitor (parent and metabolite) concentration in plasma and liver provides advantages in understanding the possible mechanism of clinical DDIs involving inhibitory metabolites.

  10. Targeted screen for human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases inhibitors and the evaluation of potential drug-drug interactions with zafirlukast.

    PubMed

    Oda, Shingo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi; Kutsuno, Yuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Itoh, Tomoo; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki

    2015-06-01

    Inhibition of drug metabolizing enzymes is a major mechanism in drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A number of cases of DDIs via inhibition of UDP-glucuronosyltranseferases (UGTs) have been reported, although the changes in pharmacokinetics are relatively small in comparison with drugs that are metabolized by cytochrome P450s. Most of the past studies have investigated hepatic UGTs, although recent studies have revealed a significant contribution of UGTs in the small intestine to drug clearance. To evaluate potential DDIs caused by inhibition of intestinal UGTs, we assessed inhibitory effects of 578 compounds, including drugs, xenobiotics, and endobiotics, on human UGT1A8 and UGT1A10, which are major contributors to intestinal glucuronidation. We identified 29 inhibitors by monitoring raloxifene glucuronidation with recombinant UGTs. All of the inhibitors potently inhibited UGT1A1 activity, as well. We found that zafirlukast is a potent general inhibitor of UGT1As and a moderate inhibitor of UGT2Bs because it monitors 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronidation by recombinant UGTs. However, zafirlukast did not potently inhibit diclofenac glucuronidation, suggesting that the inhibitory effects might be substrate specific. Inhibitory effects of zafirlukast on some UGT substrates were further investigated in human liver and human small intestine microsomes in order to evaluate potential DDIs. The R values (the ratios of intrinsic clearance with and without an inhibitor) revealed that zafirlukast has potential to cause clinical DDIs in the small intestine. Although we could not identify specific UGT1A8 and UGT1A10 inhibitors, zafirlukast was identified as a general inhibitor for UGTs in vitro. The present study suggests that the inhibition of UGT in the small intestine would be an underlying mechanism for DDIs. PMID:25834030

  11. Pitavastatin as an in vivo probe for studying hepatic organic anion transporting polypeptide-mediated drug-drug interactions in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Ohtsuka, Tatsuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Tatekawa, Ichiro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kume, Toshiyuki

    2013-10-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) caused by the inhibition of hepatic uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) can affect therapeutic efficacy and cause adverse reactions. We investigated the potential utility of pitavastatin as an in vivo probe substrate for preclinically studying OATP-mediated DDIs using cynomolgus monkeys. Cyclosporine A (CsA) and rifampicin (RIF), typical OATP inhibitors, inhibited active uptake of pitavastatin into monkey hepatocytes with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values comparable with those in human hepatocytes. CsA and RIF increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of intravenously administered pitavastatin in cynomolgus monkeys by 3.2- and 3.6-fold, respectively. In addition, there was no apparent prolongation of the elimination half-life of pitavastatin due to the decrease in both hepatic clearance and volume of distribution. These findings suggest that DDIs were caused by the inhibition of hepatic uptake of pitavastatin. CsA and RIF increased the AUC of orally administered pitavastatin by 10.6- and 14.8-fold, respectively, which was additionally caused by the effect of the CsA and RIF in the gastrointestinal tract. Hepatic contribution to the overall DDI for oral pitavastatin with CsA was calculated from the changes in hepatic availability and clearance, and it was shown that the magnitude of hepatic DDI was comparable between the present study and the clinical study. In conclusion, pharmacokinetic studies using pitavastatin as a probe in combination with drug candidates in cynomolgus monkeys are useful to support the assessment of potential clinical DDIs involving hepatic uptake transporters.

  12. How the Probability and Potential Clinical Significance of Pharmacokinetically Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions Are Assessed in Drug Development: Desvenlafaxine as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Alice I.; Preskorn, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The avoidance of adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a high priority in terms of both the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the individual prescriber. With this perspective in mind, this article illustrates the process for assessing the risk of a drug (example here being desvenlafaxine) causing or being the victim of DDIs, in accordance with FDA guidance. Data Sources/Study Selection: DDI studies for the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desvenlafaxine conducted by the sponsor and published since 2009 are used as examples of the systematic way that the FDA requires drug developers to assess whether their new drug is either capable of causing clinically meaningful DDIs or being the victim of such DDIs. In total, 8 open-label studies tested the effects of steady-state treatment with desvenlafaxine (50–400 mg/d) on the pharmacokinetics of cytochrome (CYP) 2D6 and/or CYP 3A4 substrate drugs, or the effect of CYP 3A4 inhibition on desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics. The potential for DDIs mediated by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter was assessed in in vitro studies using Caco-2 monolayers. Data Extraction: Changes in area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC; CYP studies) and efflux (P-gp studies) were reviewed for potential DDIs in accordance with FDA criteria. Results: Desvenlafaxine coadministration had minimal effect on CYP 2D6 and/or 3A4 substrates per FDA criteria. Changes in AUC indicated either no interaction (90% confidence intervals for the ratio of AUC geometric least-squares means [GM] within 80%–125%) or weak inhibition (AUC GM ratio 125% to < 200%). Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in a weak interaction with desvenlafaxine (AUC GM ratio of 143%). Desvenlafaxine was not a substrate (efflux ratio < 2) or inhibitor (50% inhibitory drug concentration values > 250 μM) of P-gp. Conclusions: A 2-step process based on FDA guidance can be used first to determine whether a pharmacokinetically mediated

  13. Role of Human Organic Cation Transporter 1 (hOCT1) Polymorphisms in Lamivudine (3TC) Uptake and Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Arimany-Nardi, Cristina; Minuesa, Gerard; Keller, Thorsten; Erkizia, Itziar; Koepsell, Hermann; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2016-01-01

    Lamivudine (3TC), a drug used in the treatment of HIV infection, needs to cross the plasma membrane to exert its therapeutic action. Human Organic cation transporter 1 (hOCT1), encoded by the SLC22A1 gene, is the transporter responsible for its uptake into target cells. As SLC22A1 is a highly polymorphic gene, the aim of this study was to determine how SNPs in the OCT1-encoding gene affected 3TC internalization and its interaction with other co-administered drugs. HEK293 cells stably transfected with either the wild type form or the polymorphic variants of hOCT1 were used to perform kinetic and drug-drug interaction studies. Protein co-immunoprecipitation was used to assess the impact of selected polymorphic cysteines on the oligomerization of the transporter. Results showed that 3TC transport efficiency was reduced in all polymorphic variants tested (R61C, C88R, S189L, M420del, and G465R). This was not caused by lack of oligomerization in case of variants located at the transporter extracellular loop (R61C and C88R). Drug-drug interaction measurements showed that co-administered drugs [abacavir (ABC), zidovudine (AZT), emtricitabine (FTC), tenofovir diproxil fumarate (TDF), efavirenz (EFV) and raltegravir (RAL)], differently inhibited 3TC uptake depending upon the polymorphic variant analyzed. These data highlight the need for accurate analysis of drug transporter polymorphic variants of clinical relevance, because polymorphisms can impact on substrate (3TC) translocation but even more importantly they can differentially affect drug-drug interactions at the transporter level. PMID:27445813

  14. Role of Human Organic Cation Transporter 1 (hOCT1) Polymorphisms in Lamivudine (3TC) Uptake and Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Arimany-Nardi, Cristina; Minuesa, Gerard; Keller, Thorsten; Erkizia, Itziar; Koepsell, Hermann; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2016-01-01

    Lamivudine (3TC), a drug used in the treatment of HIV infection, needs to cross the plasma membrane to exert its therapeutic action. Human Organic cation transporter 1 (hOCT1), encoded by the SLC22A1 gene, is the transporter responsible for its uptake into target cells. As SLC22A1 is a highly polymorphic gene, the aim of this study was to determine how SNPs in the OCT1-encoding gene affected 3TC internalization and its interaction with other co-administered drugs. HEK293 cells stably transfected with either the wild type form or the polymorphic variants of hOCT1 were used to perform kinetic and drug-drug interaction studies. Protein co-immunoprecipitation was used to assess the impact of selected polymorphic cysteines on the oligomerization of the transporter. Results showed that 3TC transport efficiency was reduced in all polymorphic variants tested (R61C, C88R, S189L, M420del, and G465R). This was not caused by lack of oligomerization in case of variants located at the transporter extracellular loop (R61C and C88R). Drug-drug interaction measurements showed that co-administered drugs [abacavir (ABC), zidovudine (AZT), emtricitabine (FTC), tenofovir diproxil fumarate (TDF), efavirenz (EFV) and raltegravir (RAL)], differently inhibited 3TC uptake depending upon the polymorphic variant analyzed. These data highlight the need for accurate analysis of drug transporter polymorphic variants of clinical relevance, because polymorphisms can impact on substrate (3TC) translocation but even more importantly they can differentially affect drug-drug interactions at the transporter level. PMID:27445813

  15. Differential drug-drug interactions of the synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073: implications for drug abuse liability and pain therapy.

    PubMed

    Brents, Lisa K; Zimmerman, Sarah M; Saffell, Amanda R; Prather, Paul L; Fantegrossi, William E

    2013-09-01

    Marijuana substitutes often contain blends of multiple psychoactive synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), including the prevalent SCBs (1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-018) and (1-butyl-1H-indole-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-073). Because SCBs are frequently used in combinations, we hypothesized that coadministering multiple SCBs induces synergistic drug-drug interactions. Drug-drug interactions between JWH-018 and JWH-073 were investigated in vivo for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)-like discriminative stimulus effects, analgesia, task disruption, and hypothermia. Combinations (JWH-018:JWH-073) of these drugs were administered to mice in assays of Δ(9)-THC discrimination, tail-immersion, and food-maintained responding, and rectal temperatures were measured. Synergism occurred in the Δ(9)-THC discrimination assay for two constant dose ratio combinations (1:3 and 1:1). A 1:1 and 2:3 dose ratio induced additivity and synergy, respectively, in the tail-immersion assay. Both 1:1 and 2:3 dose ratios were additive for hypothermia, whereas a 1:3 dose ratio induced subadditive suppression of food-maintained responding. In vitro drug-drug interactions were assessed using competition receptor-binding assays employing mouse brain homogenates and cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R)-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity in Neuro2A wild-type cells. Interestingly, synergy occurred in the competition receptor-binding assay for two dose ratios (1:5 and 1:10), but not in the adenylyl cyclase activity assay (1:5). Altogether, these data indicate that drug-drug interactions between JWH-018 and JWH-073 are effect- and ratio-dependent and may increase the relative potency of marijuana substitutes for subjective Δ(9)-THC-like effects. Combinations may improve the therapeutic profile of cannabinoids, considering that analgesia but not hypothermia or task disruption was potentiated. Importantly, synergy in the competition receptor-binding assay

  16. Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Pharmacogenetic Profile between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Antiblastic Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients with HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Caraglia, Michele; Martellotta, Ferdinando; Zappavigna, Silvia; Lombardi, Angela; Fierro, Carla; Atripaldi, Luigi; Muto, Tommaso; Valente, Daniela; De Paoli, Paolo; Tirelli, Umberto; Di Francia, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) into clinical practice has dramatically changed the natural approach of HIV-related cancers. Several studies have shown that intensive antiblastic chemotherapy (AC) is feasible in HIV-infected patients with cancer, and that the outcome is similar to that of HIV-negative patients receiving the same AC regimens. However, the concomitant use of HAART and AC can result in drug accumulation or possible toxicity with consequent decreased efficacy of one or both classes of drugs. In fact, many AC agents are preferentially metabolized by CYP450 and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with HAART are common. Therefore, it is important that HIV patients with cancer in HAART receiving AC treatment at the same time receive an individualized cancer management plan based on their liver and renal functions, their level of bone marrow suppression, their mitochondrial dysfunction, and their genotype profile. The rationale of this review is to summarize the existing data on the impact of HAART on the clinical management of cancer patients with HIV/AIDS and DDIs between antiretrovirals and AC. In addition, in order to maximize the efficacy of antiblastic therapy and minimize the risk of drug-drug interaction, a useful list of pharmacogenomic markers is provided.

  17. Evaluation of Mutual Drug-Drug Interaction within Geneva Cocktail for Cytochrome P450 Phenotyping using Innovative Dried Blood Sampling Method.

    PubMed

    Bosilkovska, Marija; Samer, Caroline; Déglon, Julien; Thomas, Aurélien; Walder, Bernhard; Desmeules, Jules; Daali, Youssef

    2016-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity can be assessed using a 'cocktail' phenotyping approach. Recently, we have developed a cocktail (Geneva cocktail) which combines the use of low-dose probes with a low-invasiveness dried blood spots (DBS) sampling technique and a single analytical method for the phenotyping of six major CYP isoforms. We have previously demonstrated that modulation of CYP activity after pre-treatment with CYP inhibitors/inducer could be reliably predicted using Geneva cocktail. To further validate this cocktail, in this study, we have verified whether probe drugs contained in the latter cause mutual drug-drug interactions. In a randomized, four-way, Latin-square crossover study, 30 healthy volunteers received low-dose caffeine, flurbiprofen, omeprazole, dextromethorphan and midazolam (a previously validated combination with no mutual drug-drug interactions); fexofenadine alone; bupropion alone; or all seven drugs simultaneously (Geneva cocktail). Pharmacokinetic profiles of the probe drugs and their metabolites were determined in DBS samples using both conventional micropipette sampling and new microfluidic device allowing for self-sampling. The 90% confidence intervals for the geometric mean ratios of AUC metabolite/AUC probe for CYP probes administered alone or within Geneva cocktail fell within the 0.8-1.25 bioequivalence range indicating the absence of pharmacokinetic interaction. The same result was observed for the chosen phenotyping indices, that is metabolic ratios at 2 hr (CYP1A2, CYP3A) or 3 hr (CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6) post-cocktail administration. DBS sampling could successfully be performed using a new microfluidic device. In conclusion, Geneva cocktail combined with an innovative DBS sampling device can be used routinely as a test for simultaneous CYP phenotyping.

  18. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions: practical recommendations for clinical victim and perpetrator drug-drug interaction study design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caroline A; O'Connor, Meeghan A; Ritchie, Tasha K; Galetin, Aleksandra; Cook, Jack A; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Ellens, Harma; Feng, Bo; Taub, Mitchell E; Paine, Mary F; Polli, Joseph W; Ware, Joseph A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) limits intestinal absorption of low-permeability substrate drugs and mediates biliary excretion of drugs and metabolites. Based on clinical evidence of BCRP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and the c.421C>A functional polymorphism affecting drug efficacy and safety, both the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency recommend preclinical evaluation and, when appropriate, clinical assessment of BCRP-mediated DDIs. Although many BCRP substrates and inhibitors have been identified in vitro, clinical translation has been confounded by overlap with other transporters and metabolic enzymes. Regulatory recommendations for BCRP-mediated clinical DDI studies are challenging, as consensus is lacking on the choice of the most robust and specific human BCRP substrates and inhibitors and optimal study design. This review proposes a path forward based on a comprehensive analysis of available data. Oral sulfasalazine (1000 mg, immediate-release tablet) is the best available clinical substrate for intestinal BCRP, oral rosuvastatin (20 mg) for both intestinal and hepatic BCRP, and intravenous rosuvastatin (4 mg) for hepatic BCRP. Oral curcumin (2000 mg) and lapatinib (250 mg) are the best available clinical BCRP inhibitors. To interrogate the worst-case clinical BCRP DDI scenario, study subjects harboring the BCRP c.421C/C reference genotype are recommended. In addition, if sulfasalazine is selected as the substrate, subjects having the rapid acetylator phenotype are recommended. In the case of rosuvastatin, subjects with the organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 c.521T/T genotype are recommended, together with monitoring of rosuvastatin's cholesterol-lowering effect at baseline and DDI phase. A proof-of-concept clinical study is being planned by a collaborative consortium to evaluate the proposed BCRP DDI study design.

  19. PEPT1- and OAT1/3-mediated drug-drug interactions between bestatin and cefixime in vivo and in vitro in rats, and in vitro in human.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Qi; Meng, Qiang; Huo, Xiaokui; Sun, Pengyuan; Yang, Xiaobo; Sun, Huijun; Zhen, Yuhong; Peng, Jinyong; Ma, Xiaochi; Liu, Kexin

    2014-10-15

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics mechanism of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between bestatin and cefixime. The plasma concentrations and bioavailabilities of bestatin and cefixime were decreased after oral co-administration in rats. The uptake in rat everted intestinal sacs of bestatin and cefixime were dramatically declined after co-administration of the two drugs. Bestatin and cefixime can mutually competitively inhibit the uptake by hPEPT1-HeLa cells. The plasma concentrations of bestatin and cefixime were increased; however, the cumulative biliary excretion had no significant change, and the cumulative urinary excretion and renal clearance of the two drugs in rats decreased after intravenous coadministration. Moreover, decreased uptake of the two drugs was observed in human kidney slices, rat kidney slices and hOAT1/hOAT3-transfected HEK293 cells when bestatin and cefixime were coadministered. The accumulation of bestatin and cefixime in kidney slices can be inhibited by p-aminohippurate, benzylpenicillin and probenecid, but not by tetraethyl ammonium. The results suggest that intestinal absorption and renal excretion of bestatin and cefixime can be inhibited when the two drugs were co-administered in rats. The pharmacokinetic mechanism indicates that the DDIs between bestatin and cefixime are mainly mediated by Pept1 and Oat1/3 in rats. PEPT1 and OAT1/3 are the target transporters of DDIs between bestatin and cefixime in human kidney slices and human transfected cells, proposing possible drug-drug interaction in humans.

  20. A Rapid Study of Botanical Drug-Drug Interaction with Protein by Re-ligand Fishing using Human Serum Albumin-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qing, Lin-Sen; Xue, Ying; Ding, Li-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Ming; Liang, Jian; Liao, Xun

    2015-12-01

    A great many active constituents of botanical drugs bind to human serum albumin (HSA) reversibly with a dynamic balance between the free- and bound-forms in blood. The curative or side effect of a drug depends on its free-form level, which is always influenced by other drugs, combined dosed or multi-constituents of botanical drugs. This paper presented a rapid and convenient methodology to investigate the drug-drug interactions with HSA. The interaction of two steroidal saponins, dioscin and pseudo-protodioscin, from a botanical drug was studied for their equilibrium time and equilibrium amount by re-ligand fishing using HSA functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. A clear competitive situation was obtained by this method. The equilibrium was reached soon about 15 s at a ratio of 0.44: 1. Furthermore, the interaction of pseudo-protodioscin to total steroidal saponins from DAXXK was also studied. The operation procedures of this method were faster and more convenient compared with other methods reported. PMID:26882690

  1. Drug-drug interaction between oxycodone and adjuvant analgesics in blood-brain barrier transport and antinociceptive effect.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yusuke; Okura, Takashi; Shimomura, Keita; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    To examine possible blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport interactions between oxycodone and adjuvant analgesics, we firstly screened various candidates in vitro using [(3)H]pyrilamine, a substrate of the oxycodone transporter, as a probe drug. The uptake of [(3)H]pyrilamine by conditionally immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (TR-BBB13) was inhibited by antidepressants (amitriptyline, imipramine, clomipramine, amoxapine, and fluvoxamine), antiarrhythmics (mexiletine, lidocaine, and flecainide), and ketamine. On the other hand, antiepileptics (carbamazepine, phenytoin, and clonazepam) and corticosteroids (dexamethasone and prednisolone) did not inhibit [(3)H]pyrilamine uptake, with the exception of sodium valproate. The uptake of oxycodone was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by amitriptyline, fluvoxamine and mexiletine with K(i) values of 13, 65, and 44 microM, respectively. These K(i) values are 5-300 times greater than the human therapeutic plasma concentrations. Finally, we evaluated in vivo interaction between oxycodone and amitriptyline in mice. Antinociceptive effects of oxycodone were increased by coadministration of amitriptyline. The oxycodone concentrations in plasma and brain were not changed by coadministration of amitriptyline. Overall, the results suggest that several adjuvant analgesics may interact with the BBB transport of oxycodone at relatively high concentrations. However, it is unlikely that there would be any significant interaction at therapeutically or pharmacologically relevant concentrations. PMID:19499573

  2. Evaluation of the use of static and dynamic models to predict drug-drug interaction and its associated variability: impact on drug discovery and early development.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sheila Annie; Schroeder, Patricia E; Giri, Nagdeep; Dolgos, Hugues

    2012-08-01

    Simcyp, a population-based simulator, is widely used for evaluating drug-drug interaction (DDI) risks in healthy and disease populations. We compare the prediction performance of Simcyp with that of mechanistic static models using different types of inhibitor concentrations, with the aim of understanding their strengths/weaknesses and recommending the optimal use of tools in drug discovery/early development. The inclusion of an additional term in static equations to consider the contribution of hepatic first pass to DDIs (AUCR(hfp)) has also been examined. A second objective was to assess Simcyp's estimation of variability associated with DDIs. The data set used for the analysis comprises 19 clinical interactions from 11 proprietary compounds. Except for gut interaction parameters, all other input data were identical for Simcyp and static models. Static equations using an unbound average steady-state systemic inhibitor concentration (I(sys)) and a fixed fraction of gut extraction and neglecting gut extraction in the case of induction interactions performed better than Simcyp (84% compared with 58% of the interactions predicted within 2-fold). Differences in the prediction outcomes between the static and dynamic models are attributable to differences in first-pass contribution to DDI. The inclusion of AUCR(hfp) in static equations leads to systematic overprediction of interaction, suggesting a limited role for hepatic first pass in determining inhibition-based DDIs for our data set. Our analysis supports the use of static models when elimination routes of the victim compound and the role of gut extraction for the victim and/or inhibitor in humans are not well defined. A fixed variability of 40% of predicted mean area under the concentration-time curve ratio is recommended.

  3. Evaluation of drug-drug interaction between henagliflozin, a novel sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, and metformin in healthy Chinese males.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liupeng; Wu, Chunyong; Shen, Lu; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Ying; Liu, Fang; Wang, Youqun; Yang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    1. Henagliflozin is a novel sodium-glucose transporter 2 inhibitor and presents a complementary therapy to metformin for patients with T2DM due to its insulin-independent mechanism of action. This study evaluated the potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between henagliflozin and metformin in healthy Chinese male subjects. 2. In open-label, single-center, single-arm, two-period, three-treatment self-control study, 12 subjects received 25 mg henagliflozin, 1000 mg metformin or the combination. Lack of PK interaction was defined as the ratio of geometric means and 90% confidence interval (CI) for combination: monotherapy being within the range of 0.80-1.25. 3. Co-administration of henagliflozin with metformin had no effect on henagliflozin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) (GRM: 1.08; CI: 1.05, 1.10) and peak plasma concentration (Cmax) (GRM: 0.99; CI: 0.92, 1.07). Reciprocally, co-administration of metformin with henagliflozin had no clinically significant on metformin AUC0-24 (GRM: 1.09, CI: 1.02, 1.16) although there was an 11% increase in metformin Cmax (GRM 1.12; CI 1.02, 1.23). All monotherapies and combination therapy were well tolerated. 4. Henagliflozin can be co-administered with metformin without dose adjustment of either drug.

  4. Evaluation of drug-drug interaction between henagliflozin, a novel sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, and metformin in healthy Chinese males.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liupeng; Wu, Chunyong; Shen, Lu; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Ying; Liu, Fang; Wang, Youqun; Yang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    1. Henagliflozin is a novel sodium-glucose transporter 2 inhibitor and presents a complementary therapy to metformin for patients with T2DM due to its insulin-independent mechanism of action. This study evaluated the potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between henagliflozin and metformin in healthy Chinese male subjects. 2. In open-label, single-center, single-arm, two-period, three-treatment self-control study, 12 subjects received 25 mg henagliflozin, 1000 mg metformin or the combination. Lack of PK interaction was defined as the ratio of geometric means and 90% confidence interval (CI) for combination: monotherapy being within the range of 0.80-1.25. 3. Co-administration of henagliflozin with metformin had no effect on henagliflozin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) (GRM: 1.08; CI: 1.05, 1.10) and peak plasma concentration (Cmax) (GRM: 0.99; CI: 0.92, 1.07). Reciprocally, co-administration of metformin with henagliflozin had no clinically significant on metformin AUC0-24 (GRM: 1.09, CI: 1.02, 1.16) although there was an 11% increase in metformin Cmax (GRM 1.12; CI 1.02, 1.23). All monotherapies and combination therapy were well tolerated. 4. Henagliflozin can be co-administered with metformin without dose adjustment of either drug. PMID:26608671

  5. Inhaled loxapine and intramuscular lorazepam in healthy volunteers: a randomized placebo-controlled drug-drug interaction study.

    PubMed

    Spyker, Daniel A; Cassella, James V; Stoltz, Randall R; Yeung, Paul P

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacodynamic effects and safety of single-dose inhaled loxapine administered via the Staccato(®) system and intramuscular (IM) lorazepam in combination versus each agent alone were compared in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study in healthy volunteers. Subjects received: inhaled loxapine 10 mg + IM lorazepam 1 mg; inhaled loxapine 10 mg + IM placebo; IM lorazepam 1 mg + Staccato placebo in random order, each separated by a 3-day washout. Primary endpoints were maximum effect (minimum value) and area under the curve (AUC) from baseline to 2 h post treatment for respirations/min and pulse oximetry. Least-squares means (90% confidence interval [CI]) for concomitant treatment versus each agent alone were derived and equivalence (no difference) confirmed if the 90% CI was within 0.8-1.25. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), sedation (100-mm visual analog scale), and adverse events (AEs) were recorded. All 18 subjects (mean age, 20.4 years; 61% male) completed the study. There was no difference between inhaled loxapine + IM lorazepam and either agent alone on respiration or pulse oximetery during the 12-h postdose period, confirmed by 90% CIs for AUC and C min ratios. BP and HR were no different for inhaled loxapine + IM lorazepam and each agent alone over a 12-h postdose period. Although the central nervous system sedative effects were observed for each treatment in healthy volunteers, the effect was greater following concomitant lorazepam 1 mg IM + inhaled loxapine 10 mg administration. There were no deaths, serious AEs, premature discontinuations due to AEs, or treatment-related AEs. PMID:27022468

  6. Development, validation and utility of an in vitro technique for assessment of potential clinical drug-drug interactions involving P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Keogh, John P; Kunta, Jeevan R

    2006-04-01

    Regulatory interest is increasing for drug transporters generally and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) in particular, primarily in the area of drug-drug interactions. To aid in both identifying and discharging the potential liabilities associated with drug-transporter interactions, the pharmaceutical industry has a growing requirement for routine and robust non-clinical assays. An assay was designed, optimised and validated to determine the in vitro inhibitory potency of new chemical entities (NCEs) towards human Pgp-mediated transport. [3H]-Digoxin was established as a suitable probe substrate by investigating its characteristics in the in vitro system (MDCKII-MDR1 cells grown in 24-multiwell inserts). The inhibitory potencies (apparent IC50) of known Pgp inhibitors astemizole, GF120918, ketoconazole, itraconazole, quinidine, verapamil and quinine were determined over at least a 1000-fold concentration range. Validation was carried out using manual and automatic techniques. [3H]-Digoxin was found to be stable and have good mass balance in the system. In contrast to [A-->B] transport, [3H]-digoxin [B-->A] transport rates were readily measured with good reproducibility. There was no evidence of saturation of transport up to 10 microM digoxin and 30 nM digoxin was selected for routine assay use, reflecting clinical therapeutic concentrations. IC50 values ranged over approximately 100-fold with excellent reproducibility. Results from manual and automated versions were in close agreement. This method is suitable for routine use to assess the in vitro inhibitory potency of NCEs on Pgp-mediated digoxin transport. Comparison of IC50 values against clinical interaction profiles for the probe inhibitors indicated the in vitro assay is predictive of clinical digoxin-drug interactions mediated via Pgp.

  7. Strong inhibitory effect of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B7 might induce drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Fang, Z Z; Yang, L

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) on four important UGT isoforms (UGT1A1, 1A6, 1A9 and 2B7). 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) was used as a nonselective substrate, and recombinant UGT isoforms were utilized as an enzyme source. The results showed that MPA exhibited inhibitory effects on UGT2B7 (IC50 = 29.3 +/- 1.5 microM), with a negligible influence on other UGT isoforms. The results obtained from Lineweaver-Burk and Dixon plots showed that MPA competitively inhibited UGT2B7. The Ki value was calculated to be 7.2 microM. Based on the concentration of MPA in human liver, the magnitude of in vivo drug-drug interaction (DDI) was predicted. The [I]/Ki value was calculated to be 0.31, which suggested that DDIs might occur when MPA was co-administered with drugs which mainly undergo UGT2B7-mediated metabolism. PMID:21284263

  8. Use of three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict hepatic blood levels of fluvoxamine relevant for drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Iga, Katsumi

    2015-04-01

    Using a three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and a tube model for hepatic extraction kinetics, equations for calculating blood drug levels (Cb s) and hepatic blood drug levels (Chb s, proportional to actual hepatic drug levels), were derived mathematically. Assuming the actual values for total body clearance (CLtot ), oral bioavailability (F), and steady-state distribution volume (Vdss ), Cb s, and Chb s after intravenous and oral administration of fluvoxamine (strong perpetrator in drug-drug interactions, DDIs), propranolol, imipramine, and tacrine were simulated. Values for Cb s corresponded to the actual values for all tested drugs, and mean Chb and maximal Chb -to-maximal Cb ratio predicted for oral fluvoxamine administration (50 mg twice-a-day administration) were nearly 100 nM and 2.3, respectively, which would be useful for the predictions of the DDIs caused by fluvoxamine. Fluvoxamine and tacrine are known to exhibit relatively large F values despite having CLtot similar to or larger than hepatic blood flow, which may be because of the high liver uptake (almost 0.6) upon intravenous administration. The present method is thus considered to be more predictive of the Chb for perpetrators of DDIs than other methods. PMID:25558834

  9. Drug-Drug Interactions Potential of Icariin and Its Intestinal Metabolites via Inhibition of Intestinal UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yun-Feng; He, Rong-Rong; Cao, Jun; Chen, Jian-Xing; Huang, Ting; Liu, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Icariin is known as an indicative constituent of the Epimedium genus, which has been commonly used in Chinese herbal medicine to enhance treat impotence and improve sexual function, as well as for several other indications for over 2000 years. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of icariin and its intestinal metabolites on the activities of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activities. Using a panel of recombinant human UGT isoforms, we found that icariin exhibited potent inhibition against UGT1A3. It is interesting that the intestinal metabolites of icariin exhibited a different inhibition profile compared with icariin. Different from icariin, icariside II was a potent inhibitor of UGT1A4, UGT1A7, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7, and icaritin was a potent inhibitor of UGT1A7 and UGT1A9. The potential for drug interactions in vivo was also quantitatively predicted and compared. The quantitative prediction of risks indicated that in vivo inhibition against intestinal UGT1A3, UGT1A4, and UGT1A7 would likely occur after oral administration of icariin products. PMID:23118789

  10. Cobicistat versus ritonavir boosting and differences in the drug-drug interaction profiles with co-medications.

    PubMed

    Marzolini, Catia; Gibbons, Sara; Khoo, Saye; Back, David

    2016-07-01

    Nearly all HIV PIs and the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir require a pharmacokinetic enhancer in order to achieve therapeutic plasma concentrations at the desired dose and frequency. Whereas ritonavir has been the only available pharmacokinetic enhancer for more than a decade, cobicistat has recently emerged as an alternative boosting agent. Cobicistat and ritonavir are equally strong inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 and consequently were shown to be equivalent pharmacokinetic enhancers for elvitegravir and for the PIs atazanavir and darunavir. Since cobicistat is a more selective CYP inhibitor than ritonavir and is devoid of enzyme-inducing properties, differences are expected in their interaction profiles with some co-medications. Drugs whose exposure might be altered by ritonavir but unaltered by cobicistat are drugs primarily metabolized by CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 or drugs undergoing mainly glucuronidation. Thus, co-medications should be systematically reviewed when switching the pharmacokinetic enhancer to anticipate potential dosage adjustments.

  11. Drug-drug Interaction between Losartan and Paclitaxel in Human Liver Microsomes with Different CYP2C8 Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Yuji; Senda, Asuna; Toda, Takaki; Hayakawa, Toru; Eliasson, Erik; Rane, Anders; Inotsume, Nobuo

    2015-06-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8*3 allele is associated with reduced metabolic activity of paclitaxel. This study was aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of losartan on paclitaxel metabolism in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to determine the impact of the CYP2C8*3 polymorphism. HLMs that contained the CYP2C8*1 homozygote (HL60) or CYP2C8*3 heterozygote (HL54) genotype were used for the inhibition study. Losartan, at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, significantly inhibited paclitaxel metabolism by 29% and 57% in the HL60 (p < 0.001) and HL54 (p < 0.01), respectively. When using HL60, losartan and the CYP3A4-selective inhibitors, erythromycin and ketoconazole, caused a greater inhibition of the paclitaxel metabolism than quercetin, a CYP2C8-selective inhibitor. This demonstrated that the paclitaxel metabolism was mainly catalysed by CYP3A4 in HL60. There were no significant differences found for the inhibitory effects caused by the four inhibitors of the paclitaxel metabolism in HL54, indicating that both CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 play important roles in paclitaxel metabolism in HL54. These findings suggest that 50 μmol/L of losartan inhibits both CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 in HLMs. In summary, losartan inhibited paclitaxel metabolism, with concentrations over 50 μmol/L in HLMs. The CYP2C8*3 allele carriers are likely susceptible to the interactions of losartan and CYP3A4 inhibitors to paclitaxel metabolism.

  12. Clinical Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic, and Drug-Drug Interaction Profile of Canagliflozin, a Sodium-Glucose Co-transporter 2 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Devineni, Damayanthi; Polidori, David

    2015-10-01

    The sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors represent novel therapeutic approaches in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus; they act on kidneys to decrease the renal threshold for glucose (RTG) and increase urinary glucose excretion (UGE). Canagliflozin is an orally active, reversible, selective SGLT2 inhibitor. Orally administered canagliflozin is rapidly absorbed achieving peak plasma concentrations in 1-2 h. Dose-proportional systemic exposure to canagliflozin has been observed over a wide dose range (50-1600 mg) with an oral bioavailability of 65 %. Canagliflozin is glucuronidated into two inactive metabolites, M7 and M5 by uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A9 and UGT2B4, respectively. Canagliflozin reaches steady state in 4 days, and there is minimal accumulation observed after multiple dosing. Approximately 60 % and 33 % of the administered dose is excreted in the feces and urine, respectively. The half-life of orally administered canagliflozin 100 or 300 mg in healthy participants is 10.6 and 13.1 h, respectively. No clinically relevant differences are observed in canagliflozin exposure with respect to age, race, sex, and body weight. The pharmacokinetics of canagliflozin remains unaffected by mild or moderate hepatic impairment. Systemic exposure to canagliflozin is increased in patients with renal impairment relative to those with normal renal function; however, the efficacy is reduced in patients with renal impairment owing to the reduced filtered glucose load. Canagliflozin did not show clinically relevant drug interactions with metformin, glyburide, simvastatin, warfarin, hydrochlorothiazide, oral contraceptives, probenecid, and cyclosporine, while co-administration with rifampin modestly reduced canagliflozin plasma concentrations and thus may necessitate an appropriate monitoring of glycemic control. Canagliflozin increases UGE and suppresses RTG in a dose-dependent manner, thereby lowering the plasma glucose

  13. Local Drug-Drug Interaction of Donepezil with Cilostazol at Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2) Increases Drug Accumulation in Heart.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ryota; Shinozaki, Kohki; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical reports indicate that cardiotoxicity due to donepezil can occur after coadministration with cilostazol. We speculated that the concentration of donepezil in heart tissue might be increased as a result of interaction with cilostazol at efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2), which are expressed in many tissues including the heart, and our study tested this hypothesis. First, donepezil was confirmed to be a substrate of both BCRP and P-glycoprotein in transporter-transfected cells in vitro. Cilostazol inhibited BCRP and P-glycoprotein with half-inhibitory concentrations of 130 nM and 12.7 μM, respectively. Considering the clinically achievable unbound plasma concentration of cilostazol (about 200 nM), it is plausible that BCRP-mediated transport of donepezil would be affected by cilostazol in vivo. Indeed, in an in vivo rat study, we found that coadministration of cilostazol significantly increased the concentrations of donepezil in the heart and brain, where BCRP functions as a part of the blood-tissue barrier, whereas the plasma concentration of donepezil was unaffected. In addition, in vitro accumulation of donepezil in heart tissue slices of rats was significantly increased in the presence of cilostazol. These results indicate that donepezil-cilostazol interaction at BCRP may be clinically relevant in heart and brain tissues. In other words, the tissue distribution of drugs can be influenced by drug-drug interaction (DDI) at efflux transporters in certain tissues (local DDI) without any apparent change in plasma concentration (systemic DDI).

  14. Contribution of metabolites to P450 inhibition-based drug-drug interactions: scholarship from the drug metabolism leadership group of the innovation and quality consortium metabolite group.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbin; Balani, Suresh K; Chen, Weichao; Cui, Donghui; He, Ling; Humphreys, W Griffith; Mao, Jialin; Lai, W George; Lee, Anthony J; Lim, Heng-Keang; MacLauchlin, Christopher; Prakash, Chandra; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tse, Susanna; Upthagrove, Alana; Walsky, Robert L; Wen, Bo; Zeng, Zhaopie

    2015-04-01

    Recent European Medicines Agency (final) and US Food and Drug Administration (draft) drug interaction guidances proposed that human circulating metabolites should be investigated in vitro for their drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential if present at ≥ 25% of the parent area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) (US Food and Drug Administration) or ≥ 25% of the parent and ≥ 10% of the total drug-related AUC (European Medicines Agency). To examine the application of these regulatory recommendations, a group of scientists, representing 18 pharmaceutical companies of the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group of the Innovation and Quality Consortium, conducted a scholarship to assess the risk of contributions by metabolites to cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibition-based DDIs. The group assessed the risk of having a metabolite as the sole contributor to DDI based on literature data and analysis of the 137 most frequently prescribed drugs, defined structural alerts associated with P450 inhibition/inactivation by metabolites, and analyzed current approaches to trigger in vitro DDI studies for metabolites. The group concluded that the risk of P450 inhibition caused by a metabolite alone is low. Only metabolites from 5 of 137 drugs were likely the sole contributor to the in vivo P450 inhibition-based DDIs. Two recommendations were provided when assessing the need to conduct in vitro P450 inhibition studies for metabolites: 1) consider structural alerts that suggest P450 inhibition potential, and 2) use multiple approaches (e.g., a metabolite cut-off value of 100% of the parent AUC and the R(met) strategy) to predict P450 inhibition-based DDIs caused by metabolites in the clinic.

  15. Contribution of metabolites to P450 inhibition-based drug-drug interactions: scholarship from the drug metabolism leadership group of the innovation and quality consortium metabolite group.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbin; Balani, Suresh K; Chen, Weichao; Cui, Donghui; He, Ling; Humphreys, W Griffith; Mao, Jialin; Lai, W George; Lee, Anthony J; Lim, Heng-Keang; MacLauchlin, Christopher; Prakash, Chandra; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tse, Susanna; Upthagrove, Alana; Walsky, Robert L; Wen, Bo; Zeng, Zhaopie

    2015-04-01

    Recent European Medicines Agency (final) and US Food and Drug Administration (draft) drug interaction guidances proposed that human circulating metabolites should be investigated in vitro for their drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential if present at ≥ 25% of the parent area under the time-concentration curve (AUC) (US Food and Drug Administration) or ≥ 25% of the parent and ≥ 10% of the total drug-related AUC (European Medicines Agency). To examine the application of these regulatory recommendations, a group of scientists, representing 18 pharmaceutical companies of the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group of the Innovation and Quality Consortium, conducted a scholarship to assess the risk of contributions by metabolites to cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibition-based DDIs. The group assessed the risk of having a metabolite as the sole contributor to DDI based on literature data and analysis of the 137 most frequently prescribed drugs, defined structural alerts associated with P450 inhibition/inactivation by metabolites, and analyzed current approaches to trigger in vitro DDI studies for metabolites. The group concluded that the risk of P450 inhibition caused by a metabolite alone is low. Only metabolites from 5 of 137 drugs were likely the sole contributor to the in vivo P450 inhibition-based DDIs. Two recommendations were provided when assessing the need to conduct in vitro P450 inhibition studies for metabolites: 1) consider structural alerts that suggest P450 inhibition potential, and 2) use multiple approaches (e.g., a metabolite cut-off value of 100% of the parent AUC and the R(met) strategy) to predict P450 inhibition-based DDIs caused by metabolites in the clinic. PMID:25655830

  16. [Enantioselective determinination of R-warfarin/S-warfarin in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application in a drug-drug interaction study].

    PubMed

    Jin, Shu; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Ke; Zhong, Da-Fang

    2012-01-01

    To study the drug-drug interaction of morinidazole and warfarin and its application, a sensitive and rapid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of R-warfarin/S-warfarin in human plasma. In a random, two-period crossover study, 12 healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of 5 mg racemic warfarin in the absence and presence of morinidazole. Blood samples were collected according to a pre-designed time schedule. R-warfarin, S-warfarin and methyclothiazide were extracted with ethylether : methylenechloride (3 : 2), then separated on a Astec Chirobiotic V (150 mm x 4.6 mm ID, 5 microm) column using 5 mmol x L(-1) ammonium acetate (pH 4.0) - acetonitrile as mobile phase at a flow-rate of 1.5 mL x min(-1). The mobile phase was splitted and 0.5 mL x min(-1) was introduced into MS. A tandem mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization source was used as detector and operated in the negative ion mode. Quantification was performed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The resolution of warfarin enantiomers is 1.56. The linear calibration curves for R-warfarin and S-warfarin both were obtained in the concentration range of 5 - 1 000 ng x mL(-1). Intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation (RSD) for R-warfarin and S-warfarin over the entire concentration range across three validation runs was both less than 10%, and relative error (RE) ranged from -4.9% to 0.7%, separately. The method herein described is effective and convenient, and suitable for the study of metabolic interaction between morinidazole and warfarin. The results showed that coadministration of warfarin with morinidazole did not affect the pharmacokinetics of either R-warfarin or S-warfarin. PMID:22493814

  17. An assessment of drug-drug interactions: the effect of desvenlafaxine and duloxetine on the pharmacokinetics of the CYP2D6 probe desipramine in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Patroneva, Albena; Connolly, Sandra M; Fatato, Penny; Pedersen, Ron; Jiang, Qin; Paul, Jeffrey; Guico-Pabia, Christine; Isler, Jennifer A; Burczynski, Michael E; Nichols, Alice I

    2008-12-01

    A number of antidepressants inhibit the activity of the cytochrome P450 2D6 enzyme system, which can lead to drug-drug interactions. Based on its metabolic profile, desvenlafaxine, administered as desvenlafaxine succinate, a new serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is not expected to have an impact on activity of CYP2D6. This single-center, randomized, open-label, four-period, crossover study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of multiple doses of desvenlafaxine (100 mg/day, twice the recommended therapeutic dose for major depressive disorder in the United States) and duloxetine (30 mg b.i.d.) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a single dose of desipramine (50 mg). A single dose of desipramine was given first to assess its PK. Desvenlafaxine or duloxetine was then administered, in a crossover design, so that steady-state levels were achieved; a single dose of desipramine was then coadministered. The geometric least-square mean ratios (coadministration versus desipramine alone) for area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) and peak plasma concentrations (C(max)) of desipramine and 2-hydroxydesipramine were compared using analysis of variance. Relative to desipramine alone, increases in AUC and C(max) of desipramine associated with duloxetine administration (122 and 63%, respectively) were significantly greater than those associated with desvenlafaxine (22 and 19%, respectively; P < 0.001). Duloxetine coadministered with desipramine was also associated with a decrease in 2-hydroxydesipramine C(max) that was significant compared with the small increase seen with desvenlafaxine and desipramine (-24 versus 9%; P < 0.001); the difference between changes in 2-hydroxydesipramine AUC did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.054). Overall, desvenlafaxine had a minimal impact on the PK of desipramine compared with duloxetine, suggesting a lower risk for CYP2D6-mediated drug interactions.

  18. Inhibition of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 by Omeprazole Metabolites and Their Contribution to Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Sager, Jennifer E.; Lutz, Justin D.; Davis, Connie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of metabolites to drug-drug interactions (DDI) using the inhibition of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 by omeprazole and its metabolites as a model. Of the metabolites identified in vivo, 5-hydroxyomeprazole, 5′-O-desmethylomeprazole, omeprazole sulfone, and carboxyomeprazole had a metabolite to parent area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUCm/AUCp) ratio ≥ 0.25 when either total or unbound concentrations were measured after a single 20-mg dose of omeprazole in a cocktail. All of the metabolites inhibited CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 reversibly. In addition omeprazole, omeprazole sulfone, and 5′-O-desmethylomeprazole were time dependent inhibitors (TDI) of CYP2C19, whereas omeprazole and 5′-O-desmethylomeprazole were found to be TDIs of CYP3A4. The in vitro inhibition constants and in vivo plasma concentrations were used to evaluate whether characterization of the metabolites affected DDI risk assessment. Identifying omeprazole as a TDI of both CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 was the most important factor in DDI risk assessment. Consideration of reversible inhibition by omeprazole and its metabolites would not identify DDI risk with CYP3A4, and with CYP2C19, reversible inhibition values would only identify DDI risk if the metabolites were included in the assessment. On the basis of inactivation data, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 inhibition by omeprazole would be sufficient to identify risk, but metabolites were predicted to contribute 30–63% to the in vivo hepatic interactions. Therefore, consideration of metabolites may be important in quantitative predictions of in vivo DDIs. The results of this study show that, although metabolites contribute to in vivo DDIs, their relative abundance in circulation or logP values do not predict their contribution to in vivo DDI risk. PMID:23620487

  19. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction assessment of LCZ696 (an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor) with omeprazole, metformin or levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Jiang, Xuemin; Mendonza, Anisha; Swan, Therese; Reynolds, Christine; Nguyen, Joanne; Pal, Parasar; Neelakantham, Srikanth; Dahlke, Marion; Langenickel, Thomas; Rajman, Iris; Akahori, Mizuki; Zhou, Wei; Rebello, Sam; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2016-01-01

    LCZ696 is a novel angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor in development for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction of LCZ696 (400 mg, single dose or once daily [q.d.]) when co-administered with omeprazole 40 mg q.d. (n = 28) or metformin 1000 mg q.d. (n = 27) or levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol 150/30 μg single dose (n = 24) in three separate open-label, single-sequence studies in healthy subjects. Pharmacokinetic parameters of LCZ696 analytes (sacubitril, LBQ657, and valsartan), metformin, and levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol were assessed. Omeprazole did not alter the AUCinf of sacubitril and pharmacokinetics of LBQ657; however, 7% decrease in the Cmax of sacubitril, and 11% and 13% decreases in AUCinf and Cmax of valsartan were observed. Co-administration of LCZ696 with metformin had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of LBQ657 and valsartan; however, AUCtau,ss and Cmax,ss of metformin were decreased by 23%. Co-administration of LCZ696 with levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of ethinyl estradiol and LBQ657 or AUCinf of levonorgestrel. The Cmax of levonorgestrel decreased by 15%, and AUCtau,ss and Cmax,ss of valsartan decreased by 14% and 16%, respectively. Co-administration of LCZ696 with omeprazole, metformin, or levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol was not associated with any clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions. PMID:27119576

  20. Predictions of cytochrome P450-mediated drug-drug interactions using cryopreserved human hepatocytes: comparison of plasma and protein-free media incubation conditions.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jialin; Mohutsky, Michael A; Harrelson, John P; Wrighton, Steven A; Hall, Stephen D

    2012-04-01

    Cryopreserved human hepatocytes suspended in human plasma (HHSHP) have previously provided accurate CYP3A drug-drug interaction (DDI) predictions from a single IC(50) that captures both reversible and time-dependent inhibition. The goal of this study was to compare the accuracy of DDI predictions by a protein-free human hepatocyte system combined with the fraction unbound in plasma for inhibitor(s) with those obtained with protein-containing incubations. Seventeen CYP3A, CYP2C9, or CYP2D6 inhibitors were incubated with hepatocytes in human plasma or hepatocyte maintenance medium (HMM) for 20 min over a range of concentrations after which midazolam 1'-hydroxylation, diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation or (R)-bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation were used to quantify the corresponding cytochrome P450 (P450) catalytic activities. Two methods were used to predict the human exposure ratio of the victim drug in the presence and absence of inhibitor. The HMM K(i, app) values were combined with the free average systemic plasma concentration ("free [I] with HMM K(i, app)") and the plasma K(i, app) values were combined with the total average systemic plasma concentration ("total [I] with plasma K(i, app)"). Of 63 clinical DDI studies, the total [I] with plasma K(i, app) method predicted 89% of cases within 2-fold of the reported interaction whereas the free [I] with HMM K(i, app) method predicted only 59%. There was a general underprediction by the free [I] with HMM K(i, app) method, which is consistent with an underestimation of in vitro inhibition potency in this system. In conclusion, the HHSHP system proved to be a simple, accurate predictor of DDIs for three major P450s and superior to the protein-free approach. PMID:22228749

  1. Using a Simulated Infobutton Linked to an Evidence-Based Resource to Research Drug-Drug Interactions: A Pilot Study with Third-Year Dental Students.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Irina F; Newman, Michael; Stark, Paul; Steffensen, Bjorn; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-11-01

    Many health professions students and clinicians are using evidence-based databases that allow for quicker and more accurate clinical decisions. The aims of this pilot study were to compare third-year dental students' speed and accuracy in researching questions about drug-drug interactions (DDI) when using two different methods: a simulated infobutton linked to the evidence-based clinical decision support resource UpToDate versus traditional Internet resources accessed through a computer or smart device. Students researched two simulated cases during two sessions. In the first session, half the students used the infobutton, while the other half used traditional electronic tools only. In the second session, ten days later, a cross-over took place. The sessions were timed, and after researching the case, students answered three questions on the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and local anesthetics. Of the 50 students who volunteered for the study, two were excluded, and 44 participated in both sessions and the exam. The results showed that the students took a similar amount of time to identify DDI whether they used the infobutton (mean=286.5 seconds) or traditional tools (265.2 seconds); the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.429). Their scores using the two research methods were similar in all three content areas: antibiotics (p=0.797), analgesics (p=0.850), and local anesthetics (p=0.850). In a post-intervention survey, students were generally favorable about infobutton and UpToDate, reporting the tool was easy to use (62.5%), provided the answer they were looking for (53.1%), was fast (50%), and they would use it again (68.8%). This pilot study found that the time and accuracy of these students conducting DDI research with the infobutton and UpToDate were about the same as using traditional Internet resources.

  2. Using a Simulated Infobutton Linked to an Evidence-Based Resource to Research Drug-Drug Interactions: A Pilot Study with Third-Year Dental Students.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Irina F; Newman, Michael; Stark, Paul; Steffensen, Bjorn; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-11-01

    Many health professions students and clinicians are using evidence-based databases that allow for quicker and more accurate clinical decisions. The aims of this pilot study were to compare third-year dental students' speed and accuracy in researching questions about drug-drug interactions (DDI) when using two different methods: a simulated infobutton linked to the evidence-based clinical decision support resource UpToDate versus traditional Internet resources accessed through a computer or smart device. Students researched two simulated cases during two sessions. In the first session, half the students used the infobutton, while the other half used traditional electronic tools only. In the second session, ten days later, a cross-over took place. The sessions were timed, and after researching the case, students answered three questions on the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and local anesthetics. Of the 50 students who volunteered for the study, two were excluded, and 44 participated in both sessions and the exam. The results showed that the students took a similar amount of time to identify DDI whether they used the infobutton (mean=286.5 seconds) or traditional tools (265.2 seconds); the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.429). Their scores using the two research methods were similar in all three content areas: antibiotics (p=0.797), analgesics (p=0.850), and local anesthetics (p=0.850). In a post-intervention survey, students were generally favorable about infobutton and UpToDate, reporting the tool was easy to use (62.5%), provided the answer they were looking for (53.1%), was fast (50%), and they would use it again (68.8%). This pilot study found that the time and accuracy of these students conducting DDI research with the infobutton and UpToDate were about the same as using traditional Internet resources. PMID:26522641

  3. In vitro predictability of drug-drug interaction likelihood of P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux of dabigatran etexilate based on [I]2/IC50 threshold.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Wataru; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ludwig-Schwellinger, Eva; Ebner, Thomas; Schaefer, Olaf

    2014-02-01

    Dabigatran etexilate, an oral, reversible, competitive, and direct thrombin inhibitor, is an in vitro and in vivo substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Dabigatran etexilate was proposed as an in vivo probe substrate for intestinal P-gp inhibition in a recent guidance on drug-drug interactions (DDI) from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We conducted transcellular transport studies across Caco-2 cell monolayers with dabigatran etexilate in the presence of various P-gp inhibitors to examine how well in vitro IC50 data, in combination with mathematical equations provided by regulatory guidances, predict DDI likelihood. From a set of potential P-gp inhibitors, clarithromycin, cyclosporin A, itraconazole, ketoconazole, quinidine, and ritonavir inhibited P-gp-mediated transport of dabigatran etexilate over a concentration range that may hypothetically occur in the intestine. IC50 values of P-gp inhibitors for dabigatran etexilate transport were comparable to those of digoxin, a well established in vitro and in vivo P-gp substrate. However, IC50 values varied depending whether they were calculated from efflux ratios or permeability coefficients. Prediction of DDI likelihood of P-gp inhibitors using IC50 values, the hypothetical concentration of P-gp inhibitors, and the cut-off value recommended by both the FDA and EMA were in line with the DDI occurrence in clinical studies with dabigatran etexilate. However, it has to be kept in mind that validity of the cut-off criteria proposed by the FDA and EMA depends on in vitro experimental systems and the IC50-calculation methods that are employed, as IC50 values are substantially influenced by these factors.

  4. VX-509 (Decernotinib)-Mediated CYP3A Time-Dependent Inhibition: An Aldehyde Oxidase Metabolite as a Perpetrator of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Craig; Maltais, Francois; Laitinen, Leena; Liao, Shengkai; Tsao, Hong; Chakilam, Ananthsrinivas; Hariparsad, Niresh

    2016-08-01

    (R)-2-((2-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)-2-methyl-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)butanamide (VX-509, decernotinib) is an oral Janus kinase 3 inhibitor that has been studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis often receive multiple medications, such as statins and steroids, to manage the signs and symptoms of comorbidities, which increases the chances of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Mechanism-based inhibition is a subset of time-dependent inhibition (TDI) and occurs when a molecule forms a reactive metabolite which irreversibly binds and inactivates drug-metabolizing enzymes, potentially increasing the systemic load to toxic concentrations. Traditionally, perpetrating compounds are screened using human liver microsomes (HLMs); however, this system may be inadequate when the precipitant is activated by a non-cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated pathway. Even though studies assessing competitive inhibition and TDI using HLM suggested a low risk for CYP3A4-mediated DDI in the clinic, VX-509 increased the area under the curve of midazolam, atorvastatin, and methyl-prednisolone by approximately 12.0-, 2.7-, and 4.3-fold, respectively. Metabolite identification studies using human liver cytosol indicated that VX-509 is converted to an oxidative metabolite, which is the perpetrator of the DDIs observed in the clinic. As opposed to HLM, hepatocytes contain the full complement of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and can be used to assess TDI arising from non-P450-mediated metabolic pathways. In the current study, we highlight the role of aldehyde oxidase in the formation of the hydroxyl-metabolite of VX-509, which is involved in clinically significant TDI-based DDIs and represents an additional example in which a system-dependent prediction of TDI would be evident.

  5. Oral epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: comparative pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Solange; Zimmermann, Stefan; Adjei, Alex A

    2014-09-01

    The development of orally active small molecule inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has led to new treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with activating mutations of the EGFR gene show sensitivity to, and clinical benefit from, treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKls). First generation reversible ATP-competitive EGFR-TKls, gefitinib and erlotinib, are effective as first, second-line or maintenance therapy. Despite initial benefit, most patients develop resistance within a year, 50-60% of cases being related to the appearance of a T790M gatekeeper mutation. Newer, irreversible EGFR-TKls - afatinib and dacomitinib - covalently bind to and inhibit multiple receptors in the ErbB family (EGFR, HER2 and HER4). These agents have been mainly evaluated for first-line treatment but also in the setting of acquired resistance to first-generation EGFR-TKls. Afatinib is the first ErbB family blocker approved for patients with NSCLC with activating EGFR mutations; dacomitinib is in late stage clinical development. Mutant-selective EGFR inhibitors (AZD9291, CO-1686, HM61713) that specifically target the T790M resistance mutation are in early development. The EGFR-TKIs differ in their spectrum of target kinases, reversibility of binding to EGFR receptor, pharmacokinetics and potential for drug-drug interactions, as discussed in this review. For the clinician, these differences are relevant in the setting of polymedicated patients with NSCLC, as well as from the perspective of innovative anticancer drug combination strategies.

  6. Drug-drug interactions with sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, new oral glucose-lowering agents for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2014-04-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycaemia by decreasing renal glucose threshold and thereby increasing urinary glucose excretion. They are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. They have proven their efficacy in reducing glycated haemoglobin, without inducing hypoglycaemia, as monotherapy or in combination with various other glucose-lowering agents, with the add-on value of promoting some weight loss and lowering arterial blood pressure. As they may be used concomitantly with many other drugs, we review the potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) regarding the three leaders in the class (dapagliglozin, canagliflozin and empagliflozin). Most of the available studies were performed in healthy volunteers and have assessed the pharmacokinetic interferences with a single administration of the SGLT2 inhibitor. The exposure [assessed by peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)] to each SGLT2 inhibitor tested was not significantly influenced by the concomitant administration of other glucose-lowering agents or cardiovascular agents commonly used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Reciprocally, these medications did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of dapagliflozin, canagliflozin or empagliflozin. Some modest changes were not considered as clinically relevant. However, drugs that could specifically interfere with the metabolic pathways of SGLT2 inhibitors [rifampicin, inhibitors or inducers of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] may result in significant changes in the exposure of SGLT2 inhibitors, as shown for dapagliflozin and canagliflozin. Potential DDIs in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving chronic treatment with an SGLT2 inhibitor deserve further attention, especially in individuals treated with several medications or in more fragile patients with hepatic and/or renal impairment.

  7. Evaluation of CYP2B6 Induction and Prediction of Clinical Drug-Drug Interactions: Considerations from the IQ Consortium Induction Working Group-An Industry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Odette A; Shebley, Mohamad; Palamanda, Jairam; Sinz, Michael W; Ramsden, Diane; Einolf, Heidi J; Chen, Liangfu; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-10-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) due to CYP2B6 induction have recently gained prominence and clinical induction risk assessment is recommended by regulatory agencies. This work aimed to evaluate the potency of CYP2B6 versus CYP3A4 induction in vitro and from clinical studies and to assess the predictability of efavirenz versus bupropion as clinical probe substrates of CYP2B6 induction. The analysis indicates that the magnitude of CYP3A4 induction was higher than CYP2B6 both in vitro and in vivo. The magnitude of DDIs caused by induction could not be predicted for bupropion with static or dynamic models. On the other hand, the relative induction score, net effect, and physiologically based pharmacokinetics SimCYP models using efavirenz resulted in improved DDI predictions. Although bupropion and efavirenz have been used and are recommended by regulatory agencies as clinical CYP2B6 probe substrates for DDI studies, CYP3A4 contributes to the metabolism of both probes and is induced by all reference CYP2B6 inducers. Therefore, caution must be taken when interpreting clinical induction results because of the lack of selectivity of these probes. Although in vitro-in vivo extrapolation for efavirenz performed better than bupropion, interpretation of the clinical change in exposure is confounded by the coinduction of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4, as well as the increased contribution of CYP3A4 to efavirenz metabolism under induced conditions. Current methods and probe substrates preclude accurate prediction of CYP2B6 induction. Identification of a sensitive and selective clinical substrate for CYP2B6 (fraction metabolized > 0.9) is needed to improve in vitro-in vivo extrapolation for characterizing the potential for CYP2B6-mediated DDIs. Alternative strategies and a framework for evaluating the CYP2B6 induction risk are proposed.

  8. In Vivo Information-Guided Prediction Approach for Assessing the Risks of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated with Circulating Inhibitory Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert B.; Laizure, S. Casey

    2012-01-01

    The in vivo drug-drug interaction (DDI) risks associated with cytochrome P450 inhibitors that have circulating inhibitory metabolites cannot be accurately predicted by conventional in vitro-based methods. A novel approach, in vivo information-guided prediction (IVIP), was recently introduced for CYP3A- and CYP2D6-mediated DDIs. This technique should be applicable to the prediction of DDIs involving other important cytochrome P450 metabolic pathways. Therefore, the aims of this study were to extend the IVIP approach to CYP2C9-mediated DDIs and evaluate the IVIP approach for predicting DDIs associated with inhibitory metabolites. The analysis was based on data from reported DDIs in the literature. The IVIP approach was modified and extended to CYP2C9-mediated DDIs. Thereafter, the IVIP approach was evaluated for predicting the DDI risks of various inhibitors with inhibitory metabolites. Although the data on CYP2C9-mediated DDIs were limited compared with those for CYP3A- and CYP2D6-mediated DDIs, the modified IVIP approach successfully predicted CYP2C9-mediated DDIs. For the external validation set, the prediction accuracy for area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) ratios ranged from 70 to 125%. The accuracy (75–128%) of the IVIP approach in predicting DDI risks of inhibitors with circulating inhibitory metabolites was more accurate than in vitro-based methods (28–805%). The IVIP model accommodates important confounding factors in the prediction of DDIs, which are difficult to handle using in vitro-based methods. In conclusion, the IVIP approach could be used to predict CYP2C9-mediated DDIs and is easily modified to incorporate the additive effect of circulating inhibitory metabolites. PMID:22563046

  9. In Vitro Dissolution of Fluconazole and Dipyridamole in Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS), Predicting in Vivo Dissolution and Drug-Drug Interaction Caused by Acid-Reducing Agents.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kazuki; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gregory E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-07-01

    Weakly basic drugs typically exhibit pH-dependent solubility in the physiological pH range, displaying supersaturation or precipitation along the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, their oral bioavailabilities may be affected by coadministration of acid-reducing agents that elevate gastric pH. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of a multicompartmental in vitro dissolution apparatus, Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS), in predicting in vivo dissolution of certain oral medications. In vitro dissolution studies of fluconazole, a BCS class I, and dipyridamole, a BCS class II weak bases (class IIb), were performed in the GIS as well as United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus II and compared with the results of clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies. In both USP apparatus II and GIS, fluconazole completely dissolved within 60 min regardless of pH, reflecting no DDI between fluconazole and acid-reducing agents in a clinical study. On the other hand, seven-fold and 15-fold higher concentrations of dipyridamole than saturation solubility were observed in the intestinal compartments in GIS with gastric pH 2.0. Precipitation of dipyridamole was also observed in the GIS, and the percentage of dipyridamole in solution was 45.2 ± 7.0%. In GIS with gastric pH 6.0, mimicking the coadministration of acid-reducing agents, the concentration of dipyridamole was equal to its saturation solubility, and the percentage of drug in solution was 9.3 ± 2.7%. These results are consistent with the clinical DDI study of dipyridamole with famotidine, which significantly reduced the Cmax and area under the curve. An In situ mouse infusion study combined with GIS revealed that high concentration of dipyridamole in the GIS enhanced oral drug absorption, which confirmed the supersaturation of dipyridamole. In conclusion, GIS was shown to be a useful apparatus to predict in vivo dissolution for BCS class IIb drugs.

  10. VX-509 (Decernotinib)-Mediated CYP3A Time-Dependent Inhibition: An Aldehyde Oxidase Metabolite as a Perpetrator of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Craig; Maltais, Francois; Laitinen, Leena; Liao, Shengkai; Tsao, Hong; Chakilam, Ananthsrinivas; Hariparsad, Niresh

    2016-08-01

    (R)-2-((2-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)-2-methyl-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)butanamide (VX-509, decernotinib) is an oral Janus kinase 3 inhibitor that has been studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis often receive multiple medications, such as statins and steroids, to manage the signs and symptoms of comorbidities, which increases the chances of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Mechanism-based inhibition is a subset of time-dependent inhibition (TDI) and occurs when a molecule forms a reactive metabolite which irreversibly binds and inactivates drug-metabolizing enzymes, potentially increasing the systemic load to toxic concentrations. Traditionally, perpetrating compounds are screened using human liver microsomes (HLMs); however, this system may be inadequate when the precipitant is activated by a non-cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated pathway. Even though studies assessing competitive inhibition and TDI using HLM suggested a low risk for CYP3A4-mediated DDI in the clinic, VX-509 increased the area under the curve of midazolam, atorvastatin, and methyl-prednisolone by approximately 12.0-, 2.7-, and 4.3-fold, respectively. Metabolite identification studies using human liver cytosol indicated that VX-509 is converted to an oxidative metabolite, which is the perpetrator of the DDIs observed in the clinic. As opposed to HLM, hepatocytes contain the full complement of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and can be used to assess TDI arising from non-P450-mediated metabolic pathways. In the current study, we highlight the role of aldehyde oxidase in the formation of the hydroxyl-metabolite of VX-509, which is involved in clinically significant TDI-based DDIs and represents an additional example in which a system-dependent prediction of TDI would be evident. PMID:27298338

  11. Drug-drug interactions in older patients with cancer: a report from the 15th Conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, Prague, Czech Republic, November 2015.

    PubMed

    Stepney, Rob; Lichtman, Stuart M; Danesi, Romano

    2016-01-01

    Drugs taken for cancer can interact with each other, with agents taken as part of supportive care, with drugs taken for comorbid conditions (which are particularly common in the elderly patients), and with herbal supplements and complementary medicines. We tend to focus on the narrow therapeutic window of cytotoxics, but the metabolism of tyrosine kinase inhibitors by the cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme (CYP3A4) makes some TKIs particularly prone to interference with or from other agents sharing this pathway. There is also potential for adverse pharmacokinetic interactions with new hormonal agents used in advanced prostate cancer.

  12. Drug-drug interactions in older patients with cancer: a report from the 15th Conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, Prague, Czech Republic, November 2015

    PubMed Central

    Stepney, Rob; Lichtman, Stuart M; Danesi, Romano

    2016-01-01

    Drugs taken for cancer can interact with each other, with agents taken as part of supportive care, with drugs taken for comorbid conditions (which are particularly common in the elderly patients), and with herbal supplements and complementary medicines. We tend to focus on the narrow therapeutic window of cytotoxics, but the metabolism of tyrosine kinase inhibitors by the cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme (CYP3A4) makes some TKIs particularly prone to interference with or from other agents sharing this pathway. There is also potential for adverse pharmacokinetic interactions with new hormonal agents used in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26823680

  13. Mitigation of adverse interactions in pairs of clinical practice guidelines using constraint logic programming.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; Michalowski, Martin; Farion, Ken; Hing, Marisela Mainegra; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2013-04-01

    We propose a new method to mitigate (identify and address) adverse interactions (drug-drug or drug-disease) that occur when a patient with comorbid diseases is managed according to two concurrently applied clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). A lack of methods to facilitate the concurrent application of CPGs severely limits their use in clinical practice and the development of such methods is one of the grand challenges for clinical decision support. The proposed method responds to this challenge. We introduce and formally define logical models of CPGs and other related concepts, and develop the mitigation algorithm that operates on these concepts. In the algorithm we combine domain knowledge encoded as interaction and revision operators using the constraint logic programming (CLP) paradigm. The operators characterize adverse interactions and describe revisions to logical models required to address these interactions, while CLP allows us to efficiently solve the logical models - a solution represents a feasible therapy that may be safely applied to a patient. The mitigation algorithm accepts two CPGs and available (likely incomplete) patient information. It reports whether mitigation has been successful or not, and on success it gives a feasible therapy and points at identified interactions (if any) together with the revisions that address them. Thus, we consider the mitigation algorithm as an alerting tool to support a physician in the concurrent application of CPGs that can be implemented as a component of a clinical decision support system. We illustrate our method in the context of two clinical scenarios involving a patient with duodenal ulcer who experiences an episode of transient ischemic attack.

  14. Factors Governing P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions at the Blood-Brain Barrier Measured with Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Wanek, Thomas; Römermann, Kerstin; Mairinger, Severin; Stanek, Johann; Sauberer, Michael; Filip, Thomas; Traxl, Alexander; Kuntner, Claudia; Pahnke, Jens; Bauer, Florian; Erker, Thomas; Löscher, Wolfgang; Müller, Markus; Langer, Oliver

    2015-09-01

    The adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter P-glycoprotein (ABCB1/Abcb1a) restricts at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) brain distribution of many drugs. ABCB1 may be involved in drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at the BBB, which may lead to changes in brain distribution and central nervous system side effects of drugs. Positron emission tomography (PET) with the ABCB1 substrates (R)-[(11)C]verapamil and [(11)C]-N-desmethyl-loperamide and the ABCB1 inhibitor tariquidar has allowed direct comparison of ABCB1-mediated DDIs at the rodent and human BBB. In this work we evaluated different factors which could influence the magnitude of the interaction between tariquidar and (R)-[(11)C]verapamil or [(11)C]-N-desmethyl-loperamide at the BBB and thereby contribute to previously observed species differences between rodents and humans. We performed in vitro transport experiments with [(3)H]verapamil and [(3)H]-N-desmethyl-loperamide in ABCB1 and Abcb1a overexpressing cell lines. Moreover we conducted in vivo PET experiments and biodistribution studies with (R)-[(11)C]verapamil and [(11)C]-N-desmethyl-loperamide in wild-type mice without and with tariquidar pretreatment and in homozygous Abcb1a/1b((-/-)) and heterozygous Abcb1a/1b((+/-)) mice. We found no differences for in vitro transport of [(3)H]verapamil and [(3)H]-N-desmethyl-loperamide by ABCB1 and Abcb1a and its inhibition by tariquidar. [(3)H]-N-Desmethyl-loperamide was transported with a 5 to 9 times higher transport ratio than [(3)H]verapamil in ABCB1- and Abcb1a-transfected cells. In vivo, brain radioactivity concentrations were lower for [(11)C]-N-desmethyl-loperamide than for (R)-[(11)C]verapamil. Both radiotracers showed tariquidar dose dependent increases in brain distribution with tariquidar half-maximum inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 1052 nM (95% confidence interval CI: 930-1189) for (R)-[(11)C]verapamil and 1329 nM (95% CI: 980-1801) for [(11)C]-N-desmethyl-loperamide. In homozygous Abcb1a/1b

  15. Metabolic drug-drug interaction potential of macrolactin A and 7-O-succinyl macrolactin A assessed by evaluating cytochrome P450 inhibition and induction and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase inhibition in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Kwon, Min Jo; Park, Jung Bae; Kim, Doyun; Kim, Dong-Hee; Kang, Jae-Seon; Kim, Chun-Gyu; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2014-09-01

    Macrolactin A (MA) and 7-O-succinyl macrolactin A (SMA), polyene macrolides containing a 24-membered lactone ring, show antibiotic effects superior to those of teicoplanin against vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. MA and SMA are currently being evaluated as antitumor agents in preclinical studies in Korea. We evaluated the potential of MA and SMA for the inhibition or induction of human liver cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in vitro to assess their safety as new molecular entities. We demonstrated that MA and SMA are potent competitive inhibitors of CYP2C9, with Ki values of 4.06 μM and 10.6 μM, respectively. MA and SMA also weakly inhibited UGT1A1 activity, with Ki values of 40.1 μM and 65.3 μM, respectively. However, these macrolactins showed no time-dependent inactivation of the nine CYPs studied. In addition, MA and SMA did not induce CYP1A2, CYP2B6, or CYP3A4/5. On the basis of an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation, our data strongly suggested that MA and SMA are unlikely to cause clinically significant drug-drug interactions mediated via inhibition or induction of most of the CYPs involved in drug metabolism in vivo, except for the inhibition of CYP2C9 by MA. Similarly, MA and SMA are unlikely to inhibit the activity of UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 enzymes in vivo. Although further investigations will be required to clarify the in vivo interactions of MA with CYP2C9-targeted drugs, our findings offer a clearer understanding and prediction of drug-drug interactions for the safe use of MA and SMA in clinical practice. PMID:24890600

  16. Metabolic Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of Macrolactin A and 7-O-Succinyl Macrolactin A Assessed by Evaluating Cytochrome P450 Inhibition and Induction and UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Inhibition In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Kwon, Min Jo; Park, Jung Bae; Kim, Doyun; Kim, Dong-Hee; Kang, Jae-Seon; Kim, Chun-Gyu; Oh, Euichaul

    2014-01-01

    Macrolactin A (MA) and 7-O-succinyl macrolactin A (SMA), polyene macrolides containing a 24-membered lactone ring, show antibiotic effects superior to those of teicoplanin against vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. MA and SMA are currently being evaluated as antitumor agents in preclinical studies in Korea. We evaluated the potential of MA and SMA for the inhibition or induction of human liver cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in vitro to assess their safety as new molecular entities. We demonstrated that MA and SMA are potent competitive inhibitors of CYP2C9, with Ki values of 4.06 μM and 10.6 μM, respectively. MA and SMA also weakly inhibited UGT1A1 activity, with Ki values of 40.1 μM and 65.3 μM, respectively. However, these macrolactins showed no time-dependent inactivation of the nine CYPs studied. In addition, MA and SMA did not induce CYP1A2, CYP2B6, or CYP3A4/5. On the basis of an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation, our data strongly suggested that MA and SMA are unlikely to cause clinically significant drug-drug interactions mediated via inhibition or induction of most of the CYPs involved in drug metabolism in vivo, except for the inhibition of CYP2C9 by MA. Similarly, MA and SMA are unlikely to inhibit the activity of UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 enzymes in vivo. Although further investigations will be required to clarify the in vivo interactions of MA with CYP2C9-targeted drugs, our findings offer a clearer understanding and prediction of drug-drug interactions for the safe use of MA and SMA in clinical practice. PMID:24890600

  17. An evaluation of the CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibition potential of metoprolol metabolites and their contribution to drug-drug and drug-herb interaction by LC-ESI/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Roshan M; Bhandi, Murali Mohan; Dubey, Ajay P; Ganga Reddy, V; Komirishetty, Prashanth; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Kamal, Ahmed; Banerjee, Sanjay K; Srinivas, R

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of metabolites to drug-drug interaction and drug-herb interaction using the inhibition of CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 by metoprolol (MET) and its metabolites. The peak concentrations of unbound plasma concentration of MET, α-hydroxy metoprolol (HM), O-desmethyl metoprolol (ODM) and N-desisopropyl metoprolol (DIM) were 90.37 ± 2.69, 33.32 ± 1.92, 16.93 ± 1.70 and 7.96 ± 0.94 ng/mL, respectively. The metabolites identified, HM and ODM, had a ratio of metabolic area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) to parent AUC of ≥0.25 when either total or unbound concentration of metabolite was considered. In vitro CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibition by MET, HM and ODM study revealed that MET, HM and ODM were not inhibitors of CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam metabolism and CYP2D6-catalyzed dextromethorphan metabolism. However, DIM only met the criteria of >10% of the total drug related material and <25% of the parent using unbound concentrations. If CYP inhibition testing is solely based on metabolite exposure, DIM metabolite would probably not be considered. However, the present study has demonstrated that DIM contributes significantly to in vitro drug-drug interaction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Open-label, single-dose, parallel-group study in healthy volunteers to determine the drug-drug interaction potential between KAE609 (cipargamin) and piperaquine.

    PubMed

    Stein, Daniel S; Jain, Jay Prakash; Kangas, Michael; Lefèvre, Gilbert; Machineni, Surendra; Griffin, Paul; Lickliter, Jason

    2015-01-01

    KAE609 represents a new class of potent, fast-acting, schizonticidal antimalarials. This study investigated the safety and pharmacokinetics of KAE609 in combination with the long-acting antimalarial piperaquine (PPQ) in healthy volunteers. A two-way pharmacokinetic interaction was hypothesized for KAE609 and PPQ, as both drugs are CYP3A4 substrates and inhibitors. The potential for both agents to affect the QT interval was also assessed. This was an open-label, parallel-group, single-dose study with healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomized to four parallel dosing arms with five cohorts (2:2:2:2:1), receiving 75 mg KAE609 plus 320 mg PPQ, 25 mg KAE609 plus 1,280 mg PPQ, 25 mg KAE609 alone, 320 mg PPQ alone, or 1,280 mg PPQ alone. Triplicate electrocardiograms were performed over the first 24 h after dosing, with single electrocardiograms at other time points. Routine safety (up to 89 days) and pharmacokinetic (up to 61 days) assessments were performed. Of the 110 subjects recruited, 99 completed the study. Coadministration of PPQ had no overall effect on exposure to KAE609, although 1,280 mg PPQ decreased the KAE609 maximum concentration (Cmax) by 17%. The group that received 25 mg KAE609 plus 1,280 mg PPQ showed a 32% increase in the PPQ area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity (AUCinf), while the group that received 75 mg KAE609 plus 320 mg PPQ showed a 14% reduction. Mean changes from baseline in the QT interval corrected by Fridericia's method (QTcF) and the QT interval corrected by Bazett's method (QTcB) with PPQ were consistent with its known effects. PPQ but not KAE609 exposure correlated with corrected QT interval (QTc) increases, and KAE609 did not affect the PPQ exposure-QTc relationship. The QTcF effect for PPQ (least-squares estimate of the difference in mean maximal changes from baseline of 7.47 ms [90% confidence interval, 3.55 to 11.4 ms]) was consistent with the criteria for a positive thorough QT study. No subject had QTcF or

  19. Open-Label, Single-Dose, Parallel-Group Study in Healthy Volunteers To Determine the Drug-Drug Interaction Potential between KAE609 (Cipargamin) and Piperaquine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Jay Prakash; Kangas, Michael; Lefèvre, Gilbert; Machineni, Surendra; Griffin, Paul; Lickliter, Jason

    2015-01-01

    KAE609 represents a new class of potent, fast-acting, schizonticidal antimalarials. This study investigated the safety and pharmacokinetics of KAE609 in combination with the long-acting antimalarial piperaquine (PPQ) in healthy volunteers. A two-way pharmacokinetic interaction was hypothesized for KAE609 and PPQ, as both drugs are CYP3A4 substrates and inhibitors. The potential for both agents to affect the QT interval was also assessed. This was an open-label, parallel-group, single-dose study with healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomized to four parallel dosing arms with five cohorts (2:2:2:2:1), receiving 75 mg KAE609 plus 320 mg PPQ, 25 mg KAE609 plus 1,280 mg PPQ, 25 mg KAE609 alone, 320 mg PPQ alone, or 1,280 mg PPQ alone. Triplicate electrocardiograms were performed over the first 24 h after dosing, with single electrocardiograms at other time points. Routine safety (up to 89 days) and pharmacokinetic (up to 61 days) assessments were performed. Of the 110 subjects recruited, 99 completed the study. Coadministration of PPQ had no overall effect on exposure to KAE609, although 1,280 mg PPQ decreased the KAE609 maximum concentration (Cmax) by 17%. The group that received 25 mg KAE609 plus 1,280 mg PPQ showed a 32% increase in the PPQ area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity (AUCinf), while the group that received 75 mg KAE609 plus 320 mg PPQ showed a 14% reduction. Mean changes from baseline in the QT interval corrected by Fridericia's method (QTcF) and the QT interval corrected by Bazett's method (QTcB) with PPQ were consistent with its known effects. PPQ but not KAE609 exposure correlated with corrected QT interval (QTc) increases, and KAE609 did not affect the PPQ exposure-QTc relationship. The QTcF effect for PPQ (least-squares estimate of the difference in mean maximal changes from baseline of 7.47 ms [90% confidence interval, 3.55 to 11.4 ms]) was consistent with the criteria for a positive thorough QT study. No subject had QTcF or

  20. [Interactions and adverse drug reactions: how to obtain information].

    PubMed

    Fattinger, K E

    1999-04-15

    Adverse drug reactions (ADR) are common. They may mimick many other diseases. It is therefore important to consider always ADR as possible causes for new complaints. Interactions are less common but they may also be the source of serious problems. First informations on both topics are commonly found in the Swiss Drug Compendium ("Arzneimittel-Kompendium der Schweiz") and in the accompanying "Grundlagen der Pharmakotherapie". Further information is found in several standard text books, on new substances eventually also via the internet. Rare side-effects require a Medline-search or eventually consultation of the WHO-database on ADR. Several institutions in Switzerland provide information on ADR (an index is found in an annex of the "Arzneimittel-Kompendium der Schweiz"). It is essential for drug safety monitoring that every physician communicates observation of ADR. PMID:10355337

  1. Treatment of Plasmodium chabaudi Parasites with Curcumin in Combination with Antimalarial Drugs: Drug Interactions and Implications on the Ubiquitin/Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Zoraima; Machado, Marta; Lindeza, Ana; do Rosário, Virgílio; Gazarini, Marcos L.; Lopes, Dinora

    2013-01-01

    Antimalarial drug resistance remains a major obstacle in malaria control. Evidence from Southeast Asia shows that resistance to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is inevitable. Ethnopharmacological studies have confirmed the efficacy of curcumin against Plasmodium spp. Drug interaction assays between curcumin/piperine/chloroquine and curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combinations and the potential of drug treatment to interfere with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) were analyzed. In vivo efficacy of curcumin was studied in BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi clones resistant to chloroquine and artemisinin, and drug interactions were analyzed by isobolograms. Subtherapeutic doses of curcumin, chloroquine, and artemisinin were administered to mice, and mRNA was collected following treatment for RT-PCR analysis of genes encoding deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs). Curcumin was found be nontoxic in BALB/c mice. The combination of curcumin/chloroquine/piperine reduced parasitemia to 37% seven days after treatment versus the control group's 65%, and an additive interaction was revealed. Curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combination did not show a favorable drug interaction in this murine model of malaria. Treatment of mice with subtherapeutic doses of the drugs resulted in a transient increase in genes encoding DUBs indicating UPS interference. If curcumin is to join the arsenal of available antimalarial drugs, future studies exploring suitable drug partners would be of interest. PMID:23691276

  2. Multidrug PLA-PEG filomicelles for concurrent delivery of anticancer drugs-The influence of drug-drug and drug-polymer interactions on drug loading and release properties.

    PubMed

    Jelonek, Katarzyna; Li, Suming; Kaczmarczyk, Bożena; Marcinkowski, Andrzej; Orchel, Arkadiusz; Musiał-Kulik, Monika; Kasperczyk, Janusz

    2016-08-20

    This study aimed to analyze the influence of drug-drug and drug-polymer interactions on drug loading and release properties of multidrug micelles. Three hydrophobic drugs-paclitaxel (Ptx), 17-AAG and rapamycin (Rap) were incorporated in poly(l-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) filomicelles. Double loaded micelles containing Ptx and 17-AAG were used for the sake of comparison. (1)H NMR confirmed the effective incorporation of the various drugs in micelles, and HPLC allowed to determine the drug loading contents. FTIR was used to evaluate interactions between particular drugs and between drugs and copolymer. Ptx and 17-AAG present similar loading efficiencies in double loaded micelles probably due to interactions of drugs with each other and also with the copolymer. In contrast, unequal drug loading properties are observed for triple loaded micelles. Rapamycin shows very weak interactions with the copolymer, and displays the lowest loading efficiency. In vitro release of drugs from micelles was realized in pH 7.4 phosphate buffered saline at 37°C, and monitored by HPLC. Similar release profiles are observed for the three drugs: a strong burst followed by slower release. Nevertheless, Ptx release from micelles is significantly slower as compared to 17-AAG and Rap, probably due to interactions of NH and OH groups of Ptx with the carbonyl group of PLA. In vitro cytotoxicity of Ptx/17-AAG/Rap loaded micelles and a mixture of free drugs was determined. Drug loaded micelles exhibit advantageous effect of prolonged drug release and cytotoxic activity against Caco-2 cells, which makes them a promising solution for simultaneous drug delivery to solid tumors. Therefore, understanding of interactions within multidrug micelles should be a valuable approach for the development of concurrent delivery systems of anticancer drugs with tailored properties. PMID:27346726

  3. Drug-Drug Interaction between the Direct-Acting Antiviral Regimen of Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir plus Dasabuvir and the HIV Antiretroviral Agent Dolutegravir or Abacavir plus Lamivudine.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Amit; Trinh, Roger; Zhao, Weihan; Podsadecki, Thomas; Menon, Rajeev

    2016-10-01

    well tolerated, with no evidence of increased rates of adverse events during combination administration. These data indicate that the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen can be administered with dolutegravir or abacavir plus lamivudine without dose adjustment.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of propofol and fentanyl in patients undergoing abdominal aortic surgery - a study of pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Wiczling, Paweł; Bieda, Krzysztof; Przybyłowski, Krzysztof; Hartmann-Sobczyńska, Roma; Borsuk, Agnieszka; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Zenon J; Sobczyński, Paweł; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Bienert, Agnieszka

    2016-07-01

    Propofol is routinely combined with opioid analgesics to ensure adequate anesthesia during surgery. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of fentanyl on the hypnotic effect of propofol and the possible clinical implications of this interaction. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data were obtained from 11 patients undergoing abdominal aortic surgery, classified as ASA III. Propofol was administered by a target-controlled infusion system. Fentanyl 2-3 µg/kg was given whenever insufficient analgesia occurred. The bispectral index (BIS) was used to monitor the depth of anesthesia. A population PK/PD analysis with a non-linear mixed-effect model (NONMEM 7.2 software) was conducted. Two-compartment models satisfactorily described the PK of propofol and fentanyl. The delay of the anesthetic effect in relation to PK was described by the effect compartment. The BIS was linked to propofol and fentanyl effect-site concentrations through an additive Emax model. Context-sensitive decrement times (CSDT) determined from the final model were used to assess the influence of fentanyl on the recovery after anesthesia. The population PK/PD model was successfully developed to describe simultaneously the time course and variability of propofol and fentanyl concentrations and BIS. Additive propofol-fentanyl interactions were observed and quantitated. The duration of the fentanyl infusion had minimal effect on CSDT when it was shorter than the duration of the propofol infusion. If the fentanyl infusion was longer than the propofol infusion, an almost two-fold increase in CSDT occurred. Additional doses of fentanyl administered after the cessation of the propofol infusion result in lower BIS values, and can prolong the time of recovery from anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Use of Transporter Probe Drug Cocktails for the Assessment of Transporter-Based Drug-Drug Interactions in a Clinical Setting-Proposal of a Four Component Transporter Cocktail.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Thomas; Ishiguro, Naoki; Taub, Mitchell E

    2015-09-01

    Probe drug cocktails are used clinically to assess the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and in particular, DDIs resulting from coadministration of substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 enzymes. However, a probe drug cocktail has not been identified to assess DDIs involving inhibition of drug transporters. We propose a cocktail consisting of the following substrates to explore the potential for DDIs caused by inhibition of key transporters: digoxin (P-glycoprotein, P-gp), rosuvastatin (breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP; organic anion transporting polypeptides, OATP), metformin (organic cation transporter, OCT; multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters, MATE), and furosemide (organic anion transporter, OAT). Furosemide was evaluated in vitro, and is a substrate of OAT1 and OAT3, with Km values of 38.9 and 21.5 μM, respectively. Furosemide was also identified as a substrate of BCRP, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3. Furosemide inhibited BCRP (50% inhibition of drug transport: 170 μM), but did not inhibit OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT2, MATE1, and MATE2-K at concentrations below 300 μM, and P-gp at concentrations below 2000 μM. Conservative approaches for the estimation of the likelihood of in vivo DDIs indicate a remote chance of in vivo transporter inhibition by these probe drugs when administered at low single oral doses. This four component probe drug cocktail is therefore proposed for clinical evaluation. PMID:25981193

  6. The Use of Transporter Probe Drug Cocktails for the Assessment of Transporter-Based Drug-Drug Interactions in a Clinical Setting-Proposal of a Four Component Transporter Cocktail.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Thomas; Ishiguro, Naoki; Taub, Mitchell E

    2015-09-01

    Probe drug cocktails are used clinically to assess the potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and in particular, DDIs resulting from coadministration of substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 enzymes. However, a probe drug cocktail has not been identified to assess DDIs involving inhibition of drug transporters. We propose a cocktail consisting of the following substrates to explore the potential for DDIs caused by inhibition of key transporters: digoxin (P-glycoprotein, P-gp), rosuvastatin (breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP; organic anion transporting polypeptides, OATP), metformin (organic cation transporter, OCT; multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters, MATE), and furosemide (organic anion transporter, OAT). Furosemide was evaluated in vitro, and is a substrate of OAT1 and OAT3, with Km values of 38.9 and 21.5 μM, respectively. Furosemide was also identified as a substrate of BCRP, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3. Furosemide inhibited BCRP (50% inhibition of drug transport: 170 μM), but did not inhibit OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT2, MATE1, and MATE2-K at concentrations below 300 μM, and P-gp at concentrations below 2000 μM. Conservative approaches for the estimation of the likelihood of in vivo DDIs indicate a remote chance of in vivo transporter inhibition by these probe drugs when administered at low single oral doses. This four component probe drug cocktail is therefore proposed for clinical evaluation.

  7. Validated UPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination of simvastatin, simvastatin hydroxy acid and berberine in rat plasma: Application to the drug-drug pharmacokinetic interaction study of simvastatin combined with berberine after oral administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Su, Xianying; Li, Guofei; Zhao, Guilian; Zhao, Limei

    2015-12-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) assay method was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of simvastatin (SV), its metabolite simvastatin hydroxy acid (SVA) and berberine (BBR) in rat plasma. Separation was performed on Poroshell 120 EC-C18 column (4.6×50mm, 2.7μm) using gradient elution by mobile phase containing acetonitrile and 10mM ammonium acetate (pH 4.5). Polarity switch (positive-negative-positive ionization mode) was performed in a total run time of 4.0min. The lower limits of quantification (LLOQ) for SV, SVA and BBR were 0.10, 0.20 and 0.10ng/mL, respectively. The response function was established for concentration range of 0.10-100ng/mL for SV and BBR and 0.20-3000ng/mL for SVA, with a coefficient of correlation of >0.99 for all the compounds. The proposed method was applied to the drug-drug pharmacokinetic interaction study of SV combined with BBR after oral administration in rats.

  8. Methods and strategies for assessing uncontrolled drug-drug interactions in population pharmacokinetic analyses: results from the International Society of Pharmacometrics (ISOP) Working Group.

    PubMed

    Bonate, Peter L; Ahamadi, Malidi; Budha, Nageshwar; de la Peña, Amparo; Earp, Justin C; Hong, Ying; Karlsson, Mats O; Ravva, Patanjali; Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Struemper, Herbert; Wade, Janet R

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to present a consolidated set of guidelines for the analysis of uncontrolled concomitant medications (ConMed) as a covariate and potential perpetrator in population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) analyses. This white paper is the result of an industry-academia-regulatory collaboration. It is the recommendation of the working group that greater focus be given to the analysis of uncontrolled ConMeds as part of a PopPK analysis of Phase 2/3 data to ensure that the resulting outcome in the PopPK analysis can be viewed as reliable. Other recommendations include: (1) collection of start and stop date and clock time, as well as dose and frequency, in Case Report Forms regarding ConMed administration schedule; (2) prespecification of goals and the methods of analysis, (3) consideration of alternate models, other than the binary covariate model, that might more fully characterize the interaction between perpetrator and victim drug, (4) analysts should consider whether the sample size, not the percent of subjects taking a ConMed, is sufficient to detect a ConMed effect if one is present and to consider the correlation with other covariates when the analysis is conducted, (5) grouping of ConMeds should be based on mechanism (e.g., PGP-inhibitor) and not drug class (e.g., beta-blocker), and (6) when reporting the results in a publication, all details related to the ConMed analysis should be presented allowing the reader to understand the methods and be able to appropriately interpret the results. PMID:26837775

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Drug-Drug Interaction Studies to Assess the Effect of Abiraterone Acetate, Abiraterone, and Metabolites of Abiraterone on CYP2C8 Activity.

    PubMed

    Monbaliu, Johan; Gonzalez, Martha; Bernard, Apexa; Jiao, James; Sensenhauser, Carlo; Snoeys, Jan; Stieltjes, Hans; Wynant, Inneke; Smit, Johan W; Chien, Caly

    2016-10-01

    Abiraterone acetate, the prodrug of the cytochrome P450 C17 inhibitor abiraterone, plus prednisone is approved for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We explored whether abiraterone interacts with drugs metabolized by CYP2C8, an enzyme responsible for the metabolism of many drugs. Abiraterone acetate and abiraterone and its major metabolites, abiraterone sulfate and abiraterone sulfate N-oxide, inhibited CYP2C8 in human liver microsomes, with IC50 values near or below the peak total concentrations observed in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (IC50 values: 1.3-3.0 µM, 1.6-2.9 µM, 0.044-0.15 µM, and 5.4-5.9 µM, respectively). CYP2C8 inhibition was reversible and time-independent. To explore the clinical relevance of the in vitro data, an open-label, single-center study was conducted comprising 16 healthy male subjects who received a single 15-mg dose of the CYP2C8 substrate pioglitazone on day 1 and again 1 hour after the administration of abiraterone acetate 1000 mg on day 8. Plasma concentrations of pioglitazone, its active M-III (keto derivative) and M-IV (hydroxyl derivative) metabolites, and abiraterone were determined for up to 72 hours after each dose. Abiraterone acetate increased exposure to pioglitazone; the geometric mean ratio (day 8/day 1) was 125 [90% confidence interval (CI), 99.9-156] for Cmax and 146 (90% CI, 126-171) for AUClast Exposure to M-III and M-IV was reduced by 10% to 13%. Plasma abiraterone concentrations were consistent with previous studies. These results show that abiraterone only weakly inhibits CYP2C8 in vivo. PMID:27504016

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Drug-Drug Interaction Studies to Assess the Effect of Abiraterone Acetate, Abiraterone, and Metabolites of Abiraterone on CYP2C8 Activity.

    PubMed

    Monbaliu, Johan; Gonzalez, Martha; Bernard, Apexa; Jiao, James; Sensenhauser, Carlo; Snoeys, Jan; Stieltjes, Hans; Wynant, Inneke; Smit, Johan W; Chien, Caly

    2016-10-01

    Abiraterone acetate, the prodrug of the cytochrome P450 C17 inhibitor abiraterone, plus prednisone is approved for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We explored whether abiraterone interacts with drugs metabolized by CYP2C8, an enzyme responsible for the metabolism of many drugs. Abiraterone acetate and abiraterone and its major metabolites, abiraterone sulfate and abiraterone sulfate N-oxide, inhibited CYP2C8 in human liver microsomes, with IC50 values near or below the peak total concentrations observed in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (IC50 values: 1.3-3.0 µM, 1.6-2.9 µM, 0.044-0.15 µM, and 5.4-5.9 µM, respectively). CYP2C8 inhibition was reversible and time-independent. To explore the clinical relevance of the in vitro data, an open-label, single-center study was conducted comprising 16 healthy male subjects who received a single 15-mg dose of the CYP2C8 substrate pioglitazone on day 1 and again 1 hour after the administration of abiraterone acetate 1000 mg on day 8. Plasma concentrations of pioglitazone, its active M-III (keto derivative) and M-IV (hydroxyl derivative) metabolites, and abiraterone were determined for up to 72 hours after each dose. Abiraterone acetate increased exposure to pioglitazone; the geometric mean ratio (day 8/day 1) was 125 [90% confidence interval (CI), 99.9-156] for Cmax and 146 (90% CI, 126-171) for AUClast Exposure to M-III and M-IV was reduced by 10% to 13%. Plasma abiraterone concentrations were consistent with previous studies. These results show that abiraterone only weakly inhibits CYP2C8 in vivo.

  11. Investigation of drug-drug interactions caused by human pregnane X receptor-mediated induction of CYP3A4 and CYP2C subfamilies in chimeric mice with a humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Maki; Tahara, Harunobu; Inoue, Ryo; Kakuni, Masakazu; Tateno, Chise; Ushiki, Junko

    2012-03-01

    The induction of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes is one of the risk factors for drug-drug interactions (DDIs). To date, the human pregnane X receptor (PXR)-mediated CYP3A4 induction has been well studied. In addition to CYP3A4, the expression of CYP2C subfamily is also regulated by PXR, and the DDIs caused by the induction of CYP2C enzymes have been reported to have a major clinical impact. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether chimeric mice with a humanized liver (PXB mice) can be a suitable animal model for investigating the PXR-mediated induction of CYP2C subfamily, together with CYP3A4. We evaluated the inductive effect of rifampicin (RIF), a typical human PXR ligand, on the plasma exposure to the four P450 substrate drugs (triazolam/CYP3A4, pioglitazone/CYP2C8, (S)-warfarin/CYP2C9, and (S)-(-)-mephenytoin/CYP2C19) by cassette dosing in PXB mice. The induction of several drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the liver was also examined by measuring the enzyme activity and mRNA expression levels. Significant reductions in the exposure to triazolam, pioglitazone, and (S)-(-)-mephenytoin, but not to (S)-warfarin, were observed. In contrast to the in vivo results, all the four P450 isoforms, including CYP2C9, were elevated by RIF treatment. The discrepancy in the (S)-warfarin results between in vivo and in vitro studies may be attributed to the relatively small contribution of CYP2C9 to (S)-warfarin elimination in the PXB mice used in this study. In summary, PXB mice are a useful animal model to examine DDIs caused by PXR-mediated induction of CYP2C and CYP3A4. PMID:22126990

  12. Psychiatric symptoms in adolescents: FKBP5 genotype--early life adversity interaction effects.

    PubMed

    Comasco, Erika; Gustafsson, Per A; Sydsjö, Gunilla; Agnafors, Sara; Aho, Nikolas; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders are multi-factorial and their symptoms overlap. Constitutional and environmental factors influence each other, and this contributes to risk and resilience in mental ill-health. We investigated functional genetic variation of stress responsiveness, assessed as FKBP5 genotype, in relation to early life adversity and mental health in two samples of adolescents. One population-based sample of 909 12-year-old adolescents was assessed using the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events scale and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. One sample of 398 17-year-old adolescents, enriched for poly-victimized individuals (USSS), was assessed using the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC). The FKBP5 rs1360780 and rs3800373 polymorphisms were genotyped using a fluorescence-based competitive allele-specific PCR. Most prominently among poly-victimized older male adolescents, the least common alleles of the polymorphisms, in interaction with adverse life events, were associated with psychiatric symptoms, after controlling for ethno-socio-economic factors. The interaction effect between rs3800373 and adverse life events on the TSCC sub-scales-anxiety, depression, anger, and dissociation-and with the rs1360780 on dissociation in the USSS cohort remained significant after Bonferroni correction. This pattern of association is in line with the findings of clinical and neuroimaging studies, and implies interactive effects of FKBP5 polymorphisms and early life environment on several psychiatric symptoms. These correlates add up to provide constructs that are relevant to several psychiatric symptoms, and to identify early predictors of mental ill-health.

  13. Orlistat-associated adverse effects and drug interactions: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Derdemezis, Christos S; Gazi, Irene F; Nakou, Eleni S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Elisaf, Moses S

    2008-01-01

    Orlistat, an anti-obesity drug, is a potent and specific inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In light of the recent US FDA approval of the over-the-counter sale of orlistat (60 mg three times daily), clinicians need to be aware that its use may be associated with less well known, but sometimes clinically relevant, adverse effects. More specifically, the use of orlistat has been associated with several mild-to-moderate gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as oily stools, diarrhoea, abdominal pain and faecal spotting. A few cases of serious hepatic adverse effects (cholelithiasis, cholostatic hepatitis and subacute liver failure) have been reported. However, the effects of orlistat on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are beneficial. Orlistat-induced weight loss seems to have beneficial effects on blood pressure. No effect has been observed on calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper or zinc balance or on bone biomarkers. Interestingly, the use of orlistat has been associated with rare cases of acute kidney injury, possibly due to the increased fat malabsorption resulting from the inhibition of pancreatic and gastric lipase by orlistat, leading to the formation of soaps with calcium and resulting in increased free oxalate absorption and enteric hyperoxaluria. Orlistat has a beneficial effect on carbohydrate metabolism. No significant effect on cancer risk has been reported with orlistat.Orlistat interferes with the absorption of many drugs (such as warfarin, amiodarone, ciclosporin and thyroxine as well as fat-soluble vitamins), affecting their bioavailability and effectiveness. This review considers orlistat-related adverse effects and drug interactions. The clinical relevance and pathogenesis of these effects is also discussed.

  14. Preventing adverse drug reactions in the general population.

    PubMed

    Pezalla, Edmund

    2005-10-01

    In 2000, the number of patient deaths attributable to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) was estimated to be 218,000 annually. More than 51% of approved drugs in the market today may have serious side effects not detected before marketing approval. The causes of ADRs are many, ranging from drug-drug interactions to simple patient noncompliance. Until the use of electronic medical records becomes ubiquitous, other partnerships must be undertaken to lower the incidence of ADRs. Health plans and pharmacy benefit managers must work together to take effective steps to increase ADR monitoring and reporting and to proactively avoid ADRs through pharmacy management tools. PMID:16265935

  15. Development and application of a UPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination of fenofibric acid and berberine in rat plasma: application to the drug-drug pharmacokinetic interaction study of fenofibrate combined with berberine after oral administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Guofei; Yang, Fan; Liu, Mei; Su, Xianying; Zhao, Mingming; Zhao, Limei

    2016-07-01

    With the purpose of carrying out pharmacokinetic interaction studies ofnberberine (BBR) and fenofibrate (FBT), an UPLC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated. The analytes, BBR and fenofibric acid (FBA, metabolite of FBT) and the internal standard, tetrahydropalmatine, were extracted with dichloromethane-diethyl ether (3:2, v/v) and separated on an Agilent Eclipse XDB C18 column using a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and water. With positive ion electrospray ionization, the analytes were monitored on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Linear calibration curves were obtained over the concentration ranges of 0.1-100.0 ng/mL for BBR and 10.0-50,000.0 ng/mL for FBA. For BBR and FBA, the intra- and inter-day precisions were <11.5 and 11.9%, respectively. The accuracy was within 11.7% and 11.3%. The mean recoveries of BBR at three concentrations of 0.2, 20.0, 80.0 ng/mL were >85.6%, and those of FBA at three concentrations of 20.0, 2500.0, 40,000.0 ng/mL were >87.9%. Consequently, the proposed method was applied to the pharmacokinetic interaction study of FBT combined with BBR after oral administration in rats and was proved to be sensitive, specific and reliable to analyze BBR and FBA in biological samples simultaneously. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A Critical Approach to Evaluating Clinical Efficacy, Adverse Events and Drug Interactions of Herbal Remedies.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Angelo A; Hoon-Kim, Sung; Radhakrishnan, Rajan; Williamson, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses represent the uppermost ladders in the hierarchy of evidence. Systematic reviews/meta-analyses suggest preliminary or satisfactory clinical evidence for agnus castus (Vitex agnus castus) for premenstrual complaints, flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) for hypertension, feverfew (Tanacetum partenium) for migraine prevention, ginger (Zingiber officinalis) for pregnancy-induced nausea, ginseng (Panax ginseng) for improving fasting glucose levels as well as phytoestrogens and St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) for the relief of some symptoms in menopause. However, firm conclusions of efficacy cannot be generally drawn. On the other hand, inconclusive evidence of efficacy or contradictory results have been reported for Aloe vera in the treatment of psoriasis, cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) in cystitis prevention, ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) for tinnitus and intermittent claudication, echinacea (Echinacea spp.) for the prevention of common cold and pomegranate (Punica granatum) for the prevention/treatment of cardiovascular diseases. A critical evaluation of the clinical data regarding the adverse effects has shown that herbal remedies are generally better tolerated than synthetic medications. Nevertheless, potentially serious adverse events, including herb-drug interactions, have been described. This suggests the need to be vigilant when using herbal remedies, particularly in specific conditions, such as during pregnancy and in the paediatric population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26887532

  17. The Impact of Postnatal Depression and Associated Adversity on Early Mother-Infant Interactions and Later Infant Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Lynne; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of maternal depression and adversity on mother-infant face-to-face interactions at 2 months, and on subsequent infant cognitive development and attachment. Disturbances in early mother-infant interactions were found to be predictive of poorer infant cognitive outcomes at 18 months. (MDM)

  18. Do Verbal Interactions with Infants during Electronic Media Exposure Mitigate Adverse Impacts on Their Language Development as Toddlers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Fierman, Arthur H.; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B.; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether verbal interactions between mothers and their 6-month-old infants during media exposure ("media verbal interactions") might have direct positive impacts, or mitigate any potential adverse impacts of media exposure, on language development at 14 months. For 253 low-income mother-infant dyads…

  19. Mitigation of Adverse Effects Caused by Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions Through Optimal Wall Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, May-Fun; Lee, Byung Joon

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the adverse effects of shock wave boundary layer interactions in high speed inlets include reduced total pressure recovery and highly distorted flow at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP). This paper presents a design method for flow control which creates perturbations in geometry. These perturbations are tailored to change the flow structures in order to minimize shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) inside supersonic inlets. Optimizing the shape of two dimensional micro-size bumps is shown to be a very effective flow control method for two-dimensional SWBLI. In investigating the three dimensional SWBLI, a square duct is employed as a baseline. To investigate the mechanism whereby the geometric elements of the baseline, i.e. the bottom wall, the sidewall and the corner, exert influence on the flow's aerodynamic characteristics, each element is studied and optimized separately. It is found that arrays of micro-size bumps on the bottom wall of the duct have little effect in improving total pressure recovery though they are useful in suppressing the incipient separation in three-dimensional problems. Shaping sidewall geometry is effective in re-distributing flow on the side wall and results in a less distorted flow at the exit. Subsequently, a near 50% reduction in distortion is achieved. A simple change in corner geometry resulted in a 2.4% improvement in total pressure recovery.

  20. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nicholas; Pollack, Charles; Butkerait, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. PMID:26203254

  1. Investigation of adverse effects of interactions between herbal drugs and natural blood clotting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Adhyapak, M S; Kachole, M S

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the world, herbal medicines are consumed by most of the patients without considering their adverse effects. Many herbal medicines/plant extracts have been reported to interact with the natural blood clotting system. In continuation to this effort, thirty medicinal plant extracts were allowed to interact with citrated human blood and the clotting time was measured after re-calcification in vitro using Lee and White method. The aq. leaf ext. of Syzygium cumini and Camellia sinensis significantly prolonged the clotting time. In response to the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests, the ext. of C. sinensis showed normal APTT and marginally prolonged the PT to 16.7 s (control-15.2 s) while S. cumini showed normal PT but significantly prolonged the APTT to 66.9 s (control-20.7 s). This suggests that, C. sinensis acts on the extrinsic pathway while S. cumini on the intrinsic pathway. There are some common herbal formulations that are frequently used by the patients which contain above plant materials, like, Syzygium cumin in anti-diabetic formulations, while the ext. of C. sinensis is consumed frequently as beverage in many part of the world. Hence, patients having known bleeding tendency or haemophilia disease should take into account the interaction potential of these plants with the natural blood clotting system while taking herbal formulations containing above plants; specially, the patients suffering from intrinsic pathway factor deficiency should keep a limit on the consumption of S. cumini while extrinsic pathway factor deficiency patients should limit C. sinensis. Also, the medical practitioners should consider the patient's food consumption history before doing any major surgical procedures. PMID:26340850

  2. Seamless prevention of adverse events from tattooing: integrated strategy emphasising the customer-tattooist interaction.

    PubMed

    Serup, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The boom in tattooing has been paralleled by more frequent adverse events, which may be localised in the skin or systemic and manifested clinically or latent. Infections, allergic reactions from red-coloured tattoos and papulo-nodular reactions from black tattoos dominate. Mild complaints are very common, with 1/5 of all tattooed individuals having acquired sensitivity to sunlight in the tattooed skin. The potential risk of cancer due to potential carcinogens in some tattoo inks has hitherto not manifested in clinical reports, despite the millions of people who have been tattooed over many decades. A risk of death from tattooing remains associated with severe infection, i.e. sepsis. Preventive strategies may rely on focused preventions, and sterility and preservation of ink is essential, rational and knowledge-based. The chemical and particle contents of ink nanoparticles cannot be unrestricted; however, focused control of ink is facing many uncertainties, including analytical problems, lack of identification of allergens in ink and discrepancies between the content of potential carcinogens and manifestation of cancer in the clinic. The concept of seamless prevention is introduced as a pragmatic strategy that emphasises the customer-tattooist interaction, which is the 'engine' of tattoo safety. This strategy amalgamates the range of narrow-scope preventive instruments and shall ensure that any relevant instrument is used actively and without deficiency or drop out, thus resulting in a complete orchestration of a multi-targeted strategy. High-priority elements of this strategy shall facilitate a qualified 'go' or 'no go' decision by the customer before the tattoo is made and should involve informed consent, qualification of the tattooist and the parlour, including supplies of inks etc., and attention to hygienic security. Records and documentation of tattoo cases with complications and the culprit inks as well as the establishment of national or European

  3. Biological Sensitivity to Context: The Interactive Effects of Stress Reactivity and Family Adversity on Socioemotional Behavior and School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obradovic, Jelena; Bush, Nicole R.; Stamperdahl, Juliet; Adler, Nancy E.; Boyce, W. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the direct and interactive effects of stress reactivity and family adversity on socioemotional and cognitive development in three hundred and thirty-eight 5- to 6-year-old children. Neurobiological stress reactivity was measured as respiratory sinus arrhythmia and salivary cortisol responses to social, cognitive, sensory, and…

  4. Early Adverse Environments and Genetic Influences on Age at First Sex: Evidence for Gene × Environment Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Marie D.; Mendle, Jane; Harden, K. Paige

    2014-01-01

    Youth who experience adverse environments in early life initiate sexual activity at a younger age, on average, than those from more advantaged circumstances. Evolutionary theorists have posited that ecological stress precipitates earlier reproductive and sexual onset, but it is unclear how stressful environments interact with genetic influences on…

  5. Childhood Adversity Increases Risk for Nicotine Dependence and Interacts with α5 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Genotype Specifically in Males

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Pingxing; Kranzler, Henry R; Zhang, Huiping; Oslin, David; Anton, Raymond F; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of specific genetic and environmental factors in regulating nicotine dependence (ND) risk, including the effects on specific forms of childhood adversity on smoking risk, have been understudied. Genome-wide association studies and rodent models have demonstrated that the α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene (CHRNA5) is important in regulating nicotine intake. Childhood adversity increases the methylation level of the CHRNA5 promoter region in European Americans (EAs), an effect that was observed only in males (Zhang et al, submitted for publication). In view of this potential sex difference in the effects of early life experience on smoking, we investigated the presence of a sex-specific gene-by-environment effect of this marker on ND risk. A nonsynonymous SNP in CHRNA5 previously associated to ND and several related traits, rs16969968, was genotyped in 2206 EAs (1301 men and 905 women). The main and interactive effects of childhood adversity and rs16969968 genotype on diagnosis of ND and ND defined by dichotomized Fagerstrom test for ND (FTND) scores were explored. Men and women were analyzed separately to test for sex differences. Childhood adversity significantly increased ND risk in both sexes, and the effect in women was twice than that in men. Significant interactive effects of childhood adversity and rs16969968 genotype were observed in men (ND: OR=1.80, 95% CI=1.18–2.73, P=0.0044; FTND: OR=1.79, 95% CI=1.11–2.88, P=0.012). No interaction was found in women. This study provides evidence of a sex-specific gene × environment effect of CHRNA5 and childhood adversity on the risk for ND. PMID:22012472

  6. Mining for adverse drug events with formal concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Estacio-Moreno, Alexander; Toussaint, Yannick; Bousquet, Cédric

    2008-01-01

    The pharmacovigilance databases consist of several case reports involving drugs and adverse events (AEs). Some methods are applied consistently to highlight all signals, i.e. all statistically significant associations between a drug and an AE. These methods are appropriate for verification of more complex relationships involving one or several drug(s) and AE(s) (e.g; syndromes or interactions) but do not address the identification of them. We propose a method for the extraction of these relationships based on Formal Concept Analysis (FCA) associated with disproportionality measures. This method identifies all sets of drugs and AEs which are potential signals, syndromes or interactions. Compared to a previous experience of disproportionality analysis without FCA, the addition of FCA was more efficient for identifying false positives related to concomitant drugs. PMID:18487830

  7. Use of an Interactive, Telephone-based Self-management Support Program to Identify Adverse Events Among Ambulatory Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Margaret A.; Gupta, Reena; Tang, Audrey; Murphy, Elizabeth; Seligman, Hilary K.; Shojania, Kaveh G.; Schillinger, Dean

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is growing interest in the use of interactive telephone technology to support chronic disease management. We used the implementation of an automated telephone self-management support program for diabetes patients as an opportunity to monitor patient safety. METHODS We identified adverse and potential adverse events among a diverse group of diabetes patients who participated in an automated telephone health-IT self-management program via weekly interactions augmented by targeted nurse follow-up. We defined an adverse event (AE) as an injury that results from either medical management or patient self-management, and a potential adverse event (PotAE) as an unsafe state likely to lead to an event if it persists without intervention. We distinguished between incident, or new, and prevalent, or ongoing, events. We conducted a medical record review and present summary results for event characteristics including detection trigger, preventability, potential for amelioration, and primary care provider awareness. RESULTS Among the 111 patients, we identified 111 AEs and 153 PotAEs. Eleven percent of completed calls detected an event. Events were most frequently detected through health IT–facilitated triggers (158, 59%), followed by nurse elicitation (80, 30%), and patient callback requests (28, 11%). We detected more prevalent (68%) than incident (32%) events. The majority of events (93%) were categorized as preventable or ameliorable. Primary care providers were aware of only 13% of incident and 60% of prevalent events. CONCLUSIONS Surveillance via a telephone-based, health IT–facilitated self-management support program can detect AEs and PotAEs. Events detected were frequently unknown to primary providers, and the majority were preventable or ameliorable, suggesting that this between-visit surveillance, with appropriate system-level intervention, can improve patient safety for chronic disease patients. PMID:18373145

  8. Early adversity and combat exposure interact to influence anterior cingulate cortex volume in combat veterans☆

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Steven H.; Kuo, Janice R.; Schaer, Marie; Kaloupek, Danny G.; Eliez, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood and combat trauma have been observed to interact to influence amygdala volume in a sample of U.S. military veterans with and without PTSD. This interaction was assessed in a second, functionally-related fear system component, the pregenual and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, using the same sample and modeling approach. Method Anterior cingulate cortical tissues (gray + white matter) were manually-delineated in 1.5 T MR images in 87 U.S. military veterans of the Vietnam and Persian Gulf wars. Hierarchical multiple regression modeling was used to assess associations between anterior cingulate volume and the following predictors, trauma prior to age 13, combat exposure, the interaction of early trauma and combat exposure, and PTSD diagnosis. Results As previously observed in the amygdala, unique variance in anterior cingulate cortical volume was associated with both the diagnosis of PTSD and with the interaction of childhood and combat trauma. The pattern of the latter interaction indicated that veterans with childhood trauma exhibited a significant inverse linear relationship between combat trauma and anterior cingulate volume while those without childhood trauma did not. Such associations were not observed in hippocampal or total cerebral tissue volumes. Conclusions In the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as in the amygdala, early trauma may confer excess sensitivity to later combat trauma. PMID:24179818

  9. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Zakia

    2008-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events. PMID:18928560

  10. Manufacturer's drug interaction and postmarketing adverse event data: what are appropriate uses?

    PubMed

    Kraft, W K; Waldman, S A

    2001-01-01

    Governmental agencies overseeing pharmaceutical products use a risk/benefit approach to analyse data and make regulatory decisions. Comprehensive public dissemination of the safety profile of pharmaceutical products is part of an overall strategy for reducing risk associated with the use of any medical product. In the US, reports of postmarketing surveillance of approved drugs are in the public domain. Some, but not all, of the information in drug interaction studies is available to the public through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). However, there are concerns over the misuse of these data for commercial or other gain. The need to protect intellectual property and foster innovation in drug development, and concerns of legal liability are often cited as reasons to limit full public access to data from drug development studies. In contrast, intellectual freedom. public safety, and a mandate for transparent decision-making processes by regulatory agencies are issues that support open access to these data. Ultimately. concern for the public safety justifies open access to postmarketing surveillance data, and to a lesser degree, data regarding drug interactions in marketed products, and should outweigh the potential loss of competitive advantage by pharmaceutical companies.

  11. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control In-flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; Vanzwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive augmenting control algorithm for the Space Launch System has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the launch vehicles baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a proposed manual steering mode were investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of twenty five constant pitch-rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control.

  12. Risk of Adverse Health Effects Due to Host-Microorganism Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Oubre, Cherie; Castro, Sarah; Mehta, Satish; Pierson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    While preventive measures limit the presence of many medically significant microorganisms during spaceflight missions, microbial infection of crewmembers cannot be completely prevented. Spaceflight experiments over the past 50 years have demonstrated a unique microbial response to spaceflight culture, although the mechanisms behind those responses and their operational relevance were unclear. In 2007, the operational importance of these microbial responses was emphasized as the results of an experiment aboard STS-115 demonstrated that the enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) increased in virulence in a murine model of infection. The experiment was reproduced in 2008 aboard STS-123 confirming this finding. In response to these findings, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies recommended that NASA investigate this risk and its potential impact on the health of the crew during spaceflight. NASA assigned this risk to the Human Research Program. To better understand this risk, evidence has been collected and reported from both spaceflight analog systems and actual spaceflight. Although the performance of virulence studies during spaceflight are challenging and often impractical, additional information has been and continues to be collected to better understand the risk to crew health. Still, the uncertainty concerning the extent and severity of these alterations in host-microorganism interactions is very large and requires more investigation.

  13. Early Psychosocial Neglect Adversely Impacts Developmental Trajectories of Brain Oscillations and Their Interactions.

    PubMed

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Vanderwert, Ross E; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A

    2015-12-01

    -alpha coupling was estimated in this group compared to the other two groups at 96 months, suggesting impaired suppression of alpha-theta and alpha-delta activity, which has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Age at foster care placement had a significant positive modulatory effect on alpha and beta trajectories and their mutual coupling, although by 96 months these trajectories remained distinct from those of never-institutionalized children. Overall, these findings suggest that early psychosocial neglect may profoundly impact neural maturation, particularly the evolution of neural oscillations and their interactions across a broad frequency range. These differences may result in widespread deficits across multiple cognitive domains.

  14. Early Psychosocial Neglect Adversely Impacts Developmental Trajectories of Brain Oscillations and Their Interactions.

    PubMed

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Vanderwert, Ross E; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A

    2015-12-01

    -alpha coupling was estimated in this group compared to the other two groups at 96 months, suggesting impaired suppression of alpha-theta and alpha-delta activity, which has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Age at foster care placement had a significant positive modulatory effect on alpha and beta trajectories and their mutual coupling, although by 96 months these trajectories remained distinct from those of never-institutionalized children. Overall, these findings suggest that early psychosocial neglect may profoundly impact neural maturation, particularly the evolution of neural oscillations and their interactions across a broad frequency range. These differences may result in widespread deficits across multiple cognitive domains. PMID:26351990

  15. Drug-drug co-crystallization presents a new opportunity for the development of stable vitamins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Rong; Yu, Qihui; Dai, Wenjuan; Mei, Xuefeng

    2016-02-28

    Drug-drug co-crystallization could realize combination drugs at a molecular level. Two polymorphic co-crystals between VD2 and VD3 were successfully designed and synthesized. These enantiotropic polymorphs exhibit significantly different physicochemical stabilities.

  16. Launch Vehicle Manual Steering with Adaptive Augmenting Control:In-Flight Evaluations of Adverse Interactions Using a Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Miller, Chris; Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    An Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm for the Space Launch System (SLS) has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as part of the launch vehicle's baseline flight control system. A prototype version of the SLS flight control software was hosted on a piloted aircraft at the Armstrong Flight Research Center to demonstrate the adaptive controller on a full-scale realistic application in a relevant flight environment. Concerns regarding adverse interactions between the adaptive controller and a potential manual steering mode were also investigated by giving the pilot trajectory deviation cues and pitch rate command authority, which is the subject of this paper. Two NASA research pilots flew a total of 25 constant pitch rate trajectories using a prototype manual steering mode with and without adaptive control, evaluating six different nominal and off-nominal test case scenarios. Pilot comments and PIO ratings were given following each trajectory and correlated with aircraft state data and internal controller signals post-flight.

  17. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes.

  18. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes. PMID:27270123

  19. Predictors of Illicit Drug/s Use Among University Students in Northern Ireland, Wales and England

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Walid El; Vallentin-Holbech, Lotte; Stock, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The use of illicit drug/s among university students is a public health concern. Nevertheless, many UK studies investigated a narrow spectrum of variables to explore their association/s with illicit drug/s use. Methods: We assessed the associations between a wide range of socio-demographic, health and wellbeing variables (independent variables) and having used illicit drug/s regularly, occasionally or never in life (dependent variables). Data (3706 students) were collected from seven universities in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: About 5% of the sample had regularly used illicit drug/s, 25% occasionally, and 70% never. Regular drug use (RDU) was significantly more likely among males aged 21-29 years, daily smokers, those with heavy episodic drinking or possible alcohol dependency (CAGE test), and those who perceived their academic performance better than their peers. RDU was less likely among students with high health awareness and those living with parents. The predictors of occasional drug use (ODU) were similar to those of RDU. However, in addition, students with higher perceived stress were less likely, and students who felt financial burden/s were more likely to report ODU, while no association with academic performance was found. Never use of illicit drug/s was inversely associated with most of the variables listed above, and was positively associated with religiosity. Illicit drug/s use goes along with other substance use (alcohol and smoking). The finding that illicit drug/s use was higher among students reporting good academic performance was surprising and raises the question of whether illicit drug/s may be used as performance enhancing drugs. Conclusion: The factors identified with illicit drug/s use in this study could be utilized to develop appropriate public health policies and preventive measures for the health of students. Multilevel, value based, comprehensive, and strategic long-term intervention plans are required. This could include social interventions aimed at generating recreations alternatives and opportunities for youth, and a critical review for current authorities’ interventions and services. Suggestions for coping with problems of campus illicit drug use/abuse also need to be offered. PMID:25946914

  20. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices.

  1. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices. PMID:23890239

  2. G × E interaction and neurodevelopment II. Focus on adversities in paediatric depression: the moderating role of serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Bellani, M; Nobile, M; Bianchi, V; van Os, J; Brambilla, P

    2013-03-01

    In a short series of articles, we will review the evidence for genotype by environment interaction (G × E) in developmental psychopathology. We will focus specifically on the characteristics of types of exposure assessed with respect to both their methods and findings. This article aims to review the studies exploring the moderating role of serotonin transporter on the effect of environmental adversities over time, particularly during childhood and adolescence, which is when level of internalizing symptoms and prevalence of mood disorders change substantially. Environmental adversities will not include abuse and maltreatment that have been reviewed before (see Bellani et al. 2012) and child's broader social ecology that will be reviewed in the next section.

  3. Elucidation of the biochemical basis for a clinical drug-drug interaction between atorvastatin and 5-(N-(4-((4-ethylbenzyl)thio)phenyl)sulfamoyl)-2-methyl benzoic acid (CP-778875), a subtype selective agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Kalgutkar, Amit S; Chen, Danny; Varma, Manthena V; Feng, Bo; Terra, Steven G; Scialis, Renato J; Rotter, Charles J; Frederick, Kosea S; West, Mark A; Goosen, Theunis C; Gosset, James R; Walsky, Robert L; Francone, Omar L

    2013-11-01

    1. 5-(N-(4-((4-ethylbenzyl)thio)phenyl)sulfamoyl)-2-methyl benzoic acid (CP-778875), an agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, has been evaluated in the clinic to treat dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Herein, we investigate the effect of CP-778875 on the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin acid and its metabolites in humans. 2. The study incorporated a fixed-sequence design conducted in two groups. Group A was designed to estimate the effects of multiple doses of CP-778875 on the single dose pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin. Subjects in group A (n = 26) received atorvastatin (40 mg) on days 1 and 9 and CP-778875 (1.0 mg QD) on days 5-12. Group B was designed to examine the effects of multiple doses of atorvastatin on the single dose pharmacokinetics of CP-778875. Subjects in group B (n = 29) received CP-778875 (0.3 mg) on days 1 and 9 and atorvastatin (40 mg QD) on days 5-12. 3. Mean maximum serum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve of atorvastatin were increased by 45% and 20%, respectively, upon co-administration with CP-778875. Statistically significant increases in the systemic exposure of ortho- and para-hydroxyatorvastatin were also observed upon concomitant dosing with CP-778875. CP-778875 pharmacokinetics, however, were not impacted upon concomitant dosing with atorvastatin. 4.  Inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 by CP-778875 (IC50 = 2.14 ± 0.40 μM) could be the dominant cause of the pharmacokinetic interaction as CP-778875 did not exhibit significant inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4/3A5, multidrug resistant protein 1 or breast cancer resistant protein, which are also involved in the hepatobiliary disposition of atorvastatin.

  4. Adverse Interaction between Capecitabine and Warfarin Resulting in Altered Coagulation Parameters: A Review of the Literature Starting from a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Capecitabine is an orally active prodrug of fluorouracil and is extensively used as an antineoplastic agent. It is converted to 5-Fluorouracil in the liver and tumor tissues. Warfarin is an anticoagulant agent for preventing and treating venous and arterial thrombosis and embolism and is metabolized by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes in the liver. Preclinical in vitro studies using human liver microsomes report no inhibitory effects between capecitabine and substrates of cytochrome P. However, the concomitant administration of capecitabine and warfarin resulted in INR elevation in the cases previously reported in the literature. The exact mechanism of this interaction is unknown but may be related to downregulation of cytochrome P450 2C9 by capecitabine or its metabolites. We report on the possible adverse interaction between capecitabine and warfarin in a patient with metastatic breast cancer and critically review the existing literature on this topic. Physicians should be aware of adverse reactions arising from the combined use of capecitabine and warfarin. In the light of the current data, INR levels should be closely monitored in patients using these drugs together. PMID:20671989

  5. Interaction of FKBP5 Gene Variants and Adverse Life Events in Predicting Depression Onset: Results From a 10-Year Prospective Community Study

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Petra; Brückl, Tanja; Nocon, Agnes; Pfister, Hildegard; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Uhr, Manfred; Lieb, Roselind; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom; Holsboer, Florian; Ising, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Objective The binding protein FKBP5 is an important modulator of the function of the glucocorticoid receptor, the main receptor of the stress horm one system. This turns the FKBP5 gene into a key candidate for gene-environment interactions, which are considered critical for pathogenesis of stress-related disorders. The authors explored gene-environment interactions between FKBP5 gene variants and adverse life events in predicting the first occurrence of a major depressive episode. Method The analyses were based on 884 Caucasians in a 10-year prospective community study. At baseline, they were 14–24 years old and did not fulfill criteria for a major depressive episode. The DSM-IV-based Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess adverse life events preceding baseline and major depressive episodes during follow-up. On the basis of previous findings, five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the FKBP5 gene were selected for genotyping. Results While the authors did not observe genetic main effects, they found interactions between the five SNPs and traumatic (but not separation) events, with the strongest effect for severe trauma. The effect of trauma on incident major depressive episodes was evident among subjects homozygous for the minor alleles but not subjects with other genotypes. The findings were replicated in the U.K. Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study. Conclusions These hypothesis-driven results suggest that an interaction between FKBP5 genotype and trauma is involved in the onset of depression. Subjects homozygous for the minor alleles of the investigated FKBP5 SNPs seem to be particularly sensitive to effects of trauma exposure in terms of triggering depression onset. PMID:21865530

  6. Monoacylglycerol lipase (MGLL) polymorphism rs604300 interacts with childhood adversity to predict cannabis dependence symptoms and amygdala habituation: Evidence from an endocannabinoid system-level analysis.

    PubMed

    Carey, Caitlin E; Agrawal, Arpana; Zhang, Bo; Conley, Emily D; Degenhardt, Louisa; Heath, Andrew C; Li, Daofeng; Lynskey, Michael T; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Wang, Ting; Bierut, Laura J; Hariri, Ahmad R; Nelson, Elliot C; Bogdan, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Despite evidence for heritable variation in cannabis involvement and the discovery of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, no consistent patterns have emerged from candidate endocannabinoid (eCB) genetic association studies of cannabis involvement. Given interactions between eCB and stress systems and associations between childhood stress and cannabis involvement, it may be important to consider childhood adversity in the context of eCB-related genetic variation. We employed a system-level gene-based analysis of data from the Comorbidity and Trauma Study (N = 1,558) to examine whether genetic variation in six eCB genes (anabolism: DAGLA, DAGLB, NAPEPLD; catabolism: MGLL, FAAH; binding: CNR1; SNPs N = 65) and childhood sexual abuse (CSA) predict cannabis dependence symptoms. Significant interactions with CSA emerged for MGLL at the gene level (p = .009), and for rs604300 within MGLL (ΔR2 = .007, p < .001), the latter of which survived SNP-level Bonferroni correction and was significant in an additional sample with similar directional effects (N = 859; ΔR2 = .005, p = .026). Furthermore, in a third sample (N = 312), there was evidence that rs604300 genotype interacts with early life adversity to predict threat-related basolateral amygdala habituation, a neural phenotype linked to the eCB system and addiction (ΔR2 = .013, p = .047). Rs604300 may be related to epigenetic modulation of MGLL expression. These results are consistent with rodent models implicating 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), an endogenous cannabinoid metabolized by the enzyme encoded by MGLL, in the etiology of stress adaptation related to cannabis dependence, but require further replication. PMID:26595473

  7. Metformin and cimetidine: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling to investigate transporter mediated drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Burt, H J; Neuhoff, S; Almond, L; Gaohua, L; Harwood, M D; Jamei, M; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Tucker, G T; Rowland-Yeo, K

    2016-06-10

    Metformin is used as a probe for OCT2 mediated transport when investigating possible DDIs with new chemical entities. The aim of the current study was to investigate the ability of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to simulate the effects of OCT and MATE inhibition by cimetidine on metformin kinetics. PBPK models were developed, incorporating mechanistic kidney and liver sub-models for metformin (OCT and MATE substrate) and a mechanistic kidney sub-model for cimetidine. The models were used to simulate inhibition of the MATE1, MATE2-K, OCT1 and OCT2 mediated transport of metformin by cimetidine. Assuming competitive inhibition and using cimetidine Ki values determined in vitro, the predicted metformin AUC ratio was 1.0 compared to an observed value of 1.46. The observed AUC ratio could only be recovered with this model when the cimetidine Ki for OCT2 was decreased 1000-fold or the Ki's for both OCT1 and OCT2 were decreased 500-fold. An alternative description of metformin renal transport by OCT1 and OCT2, incorporating electrochemical modulation of the rate of metformin uptake together with 8-18-fold decreases in cimetidine Ki's for OCTs and MATEs, allowed recovery of the extent of the observed effect of cimetidine on metformin AUC. While the final PBPK model has limitations, it demonstrates the benefit of allowing for the complexities of passive permeability combined with active cellular uptake modulated by an electrochemical gradient and active efflux. PMID:27019345

  8. Theoretical and experimental studies of the stability of drug-drug interact.

    PubMed

    Soares, Monica F R; Alves, Lariza D S; Nadvorny, Daniela; Soares-Sobrinho, José L; Rolim-Neto, Pedro J

    2016-11-01

    Several factors can intervene in the molecular properties and consequently in the stability of drugs. The molecular complexes formation often occur due to favor the formation of hydrogen bonds, leading the system to configuration more energy stable. This work we aim to investigate through theoretical and experimental methods the relation between stability and properties of molecular complexes the molecular complex formed between the drugs, efavirenz (EFV), lamivudine (3TC) and zidovudine (AZT). With this study was possible determining the most stable complex formed between the compounds evaluated. In addition the energy and structural properties of the complex formed in relation to its individual components allowed us to evaluate the stability of the same. PMID:27267283

  9. Synthesis of stable isotope labelled internal standards for drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, J; Blankenstein, J; Brasseur, D; Calvo-Vicente, S; Denoux, M; Derdau, V; Lavisse, M; Perard, S; Roy, S; Sandvoss, M; Schofield, J; Zimmermann, J

    2012-09-15

    The syntheses of stable isotope labelled internal standards of important CYP-isoform selective probes, like testosterone 1, diclofenac 3, midazolam 5, and dextromethorphan 7, as well as their corresponding hydroxylated metabolites 6β-hydroxytestosterone 2, 4'-hydroxydiclofenac 4, 1'-hydroxymidazolam 6 and dextrorphan 8 are reported. Microwave-enhanced H/D-exchange reactions applying either acid, base, or homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal catalysis, or combinations thereof proved to be highly efficient for direct deuterium labelling of the above mentioned probes. Compared to conventional stepwise synthetic approaches, the combination of H/D exchange and biotransformation provides the potential for considerable time- and cost savings, in particular for the synthesis of the stable isotope labelled internal standards of 4'-hydroxydiclofenac 4 and 1'-hydroxymidazolam 6. PMID:22890009

  10. Theoretical and experimental studies of the stability of drug-drug interact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Monica F. R.; Alves, Lariza D. S.; Nadvorny, Daniela; Soares-Sobrinho, José L.; Rolim-Neto, Pedro J.

    2016-11-01

    Several factors can intervene in the molecular properties and consequently in the stability of drugs. The molecular complexes formation often occur due to favor the formation of hydrogen bonds, leading the system to configuration more energy stable. This work we aim to investigate through theoretical and experimental methods the relation between stability and properties of molecular complexes the molecular complex formed between the drugs, efavirenz (EFV), lamivudine (3TC) and zidovudine (AZT). With this study was possible determining the most stable complex formed between the compounds evaluated. In addition the energy and structural properties of the complex formed in relation to its individual components allowed us to evaluate the stability of the same.

  11. Synthesis of stable isotope labelled internal standards for drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, J; Blankenstein, J; Brasseur, D; Calvo-Vicente, S; Denoux, M; Derdau, V; Lavisse, M; Perard, S; Roy, S; Sandvoss, M; Schofield, J; Zimmermann, J

    2012-09-15

    The syntheses of stable isotope labelled internal standards of important CYP-isoform selective probes, like testosterone 1, diclofenac 3, midazolam 5, and dextromethorphan 7, as well as their corresponding hydroxylated metabolites 6β-hydroxytestosterone 2, 4'-hydroxydiclofenac 4, 1'-hydroxymidazolam 6 and dextrorphan 8 are reported. Microwave-enhanced H/D-exchange reactions applying either acid, base, or homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal catalysis, or combinations thereof proved to be highly efficient for direct deuterium labelling of the above mentioned probes. Compared to conventional stepwise synthetic approaches, the combination of H/D exchange and biotransformation provides the potential for considerable time- and cost savings, in particular for the synthesis of the stable isotope labelled internal standards of 4'-hydroxydiclofenac 4 and 1'-hydroxymidazolam 6.

  12. Influence of gold(I) complexes involving adenine derivatives on major drug-drug interaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Zdeněk; Novotná, Aneta; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-12-01

    A series of considerably anti-inflammatory active gold(I) mixed-ligand complexes, involving the benzyl-substituted derivatives of N6-benzyladenine (HLn) and triphenylphosphine (PPh3) as ligands and having the general formula [Au(Ln)(PPh3)]·xH2O (1-4; n=1-4 and x=0-1), was evaluated for the ability to influence the expression of CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A4 and transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid (GR) and aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) receptors in primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. In both tests, evaluating the ability of the complexes to modulate the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in primary human hepatocytes and influence the transcriptional activity of AhR and GR in the reporter cell lines, no negative influence on the major drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and their signaling pathway (through GR and AhR receptors) was observed. These positive findings revealed another substantial evidence that could lead to utilization of the complexes as effective and relatively safe drugs for the treatment of hard-to-treat inflammation-related diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, comparable or even better than clinically used gold-containing drug Auranofin. PMID:24157406

  13. Early-Life Adversity Interacts with FKBP5 Genotypes: Altered Working Memory and Cardiac Stress Reactivity in the Oklahoma Family Health Patterns Project.

    PubMed

    Lovallo, William R; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Acheson, Ashley; Cohoon, Andrew J; Sorocco, Kristen H; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Vincent, Andrea S; Goldman, David

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to stress during critical periods of development can have adverse effects on adult health behaviors, and genetic vulnerabilities may enhance these stress effects. We carried out an exploratory examination of psychological, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of 252 healthy young adults for the impact of early-life adversity (ELA) in relation to the G-to-A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs9296158, of the FKBP5 gene. FKBP5 is a molecular cochaperone that contributes to the functional status of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and to the quality of corticosteroid signaling. FKBP5 expression is upregulated by cortisol exposure during stressful episodes, with greater upregulation seen in A-allele carriers. As such, FKBP5 expression and GR function may be environmentally sensitive in A-allele carriers and therefore suitable for the study of gene-by-environment (G × E) interactions. Compared with FKBP5, GG homozygotes (N=118), A-allele carriers (N = 132) without psychiatric morbidity had progressively worse performance on the Stroop color-word task with increasing levels of ELA exposure (Genotype × ELA, F=5.14, P=0.007), indicating a G × E interaction on working memory in early adulthood. In addition, heart rate response to mental stress was diminished overall in AA/AG-allele carriers (F=5.15, P=0.024). Diminished working memory and attenuated autonomic responses to stress are both associated with risk for alcoholism and other substance use disorders. The present data suggest that FKBP5 in the GR pathway may be a point of vulnerability to ELA, as seen in this group of non-traumatized young adults. FKBP5 is accordingly a potential target for more extensive studies of the impact of ELA on health and health behaviors in adulthood.

  14. Changes in Intensity of Serotonin Syndrome Caused by Adverse Interaction between Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors and Serotonin Reuptake Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Rudacille, Mary; Zhang, Gongliang; Ma, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Drug interaction between inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAOIs) and selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake (SSRIs) induces serotonin syndrome, which is usually mild but occasionally severe in intensity. However, little is known about neural mechanisms responsible for the syndrome induction and intensification. In this study, we hypothesized that the syndrome induction and intensity utilize two different but inter-related mechanisms. Serotonin syndrome is elicited by excessive 5-HT in the brain (presynaptic mechanism), whereas syndrome intensity is attributed to neural circuits involving 5-HT2A and NMDA receptors (postsynaptic mechanism). To test this hypothesis, basal 5-HT efflux and postsynaptic circuits were pharmacologically altered in rats by once daily pretreatment of the MAOI clorgyline for 3, 6, or 13 days. Syndrome intensity was estimated by measuring 5-HT efflux, neuromuscular activity, and body-core temperature in response to challenge injection of clorgyline combined with the SSRI paroxetine. Results showed that the onset of serotonin syndrome is caused by 5-HT efflux exceeding 10-fold above baseline, confirming the presynaptic hypothesis. The neuromuscular and body-core temperature abnormalities, which were otherwise mild in drug-naive rats, were significantly intensified to a severe level in rats pretreated with daily clorgyline for 3 and 6 days but not in rats pretreated for 13 days. The intensified effect was blocked by M100907 and MK-801, suggesting that variation in syndrome intensity was mediated through a 5-HT2A and NMDA receptor-engaged circuit. Therefore, we concluded that pretreatments of MAOI pharmacologically alter the activity of postsynaptic circuits, which is responsible for changes in syndrome intensity. PMID:24577320

  15. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s

    PubMed Central

    Shelate, Pragna; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients.

  16. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s

    PubMed Central

    Shelate, Pragna; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients. PMID:27610247

  17. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s.

    PubMed

    Patel, Apurv; Dodiya, Hitesh; Shelate, Pragna; Shastri, Divyesh; Dave, Divyang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients. PMID:27610247

  18. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2010-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  19. [Medication adverse events: Impact of pharmaceutical consultations during the hospitalization of patients].

    PubMed

    Santucci, R; Levêque, D; Herbrecht, R; Fischbach, M; Gérout, A C; Untereiner, C; Bouayad-Agha, K; Couturier, F

    2014-11-01

    The medication iatrogenic events are responsible for nearly one iatrogenic event in five. The main purpose of this prospective multicenter study is to determine the effect of pharmaceutical consultations on the occurrence of medication adverse events during hospitalization (MAE). The other objectives are to study the impact of age, of the number of medications and pharmaceutical consultations on the risk of MAE. The pharmaceutical consultation is associated to a complete reassessment done by both a physician and a pharmacist for the home medication, the hospital treatment (3days after admission), the treatment during chemotherapy, and/or, the treatment when the patient goes back home. All MAE are subject to an advice for the patient, additional clinical-biological monitoring and/or prescription changes. Among the 318 patients, 217 (68%) had 1 or more clinically important MAE (89% drug-drug interaction, 8% dosing error, 2% indication error, 1% risk behavior). The patients have had 1121 pharmaceutical consultations (3.2±1.4/patient). Thus, the pharmaceutical consultations divided by 2.34 the risk of MAE (unadjusted incidence ratio, P≤0.05). Each consultation decreased by 24% the risk of MAE. Moreover, adding one medication increases from 14 to 30% as a risk of MAE on the population. Pharmaceutical consultations during the hospital stay could reduce significantly the number of medication adverse effects. PMID:25438655

  20. Food-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:22043389

  1. How experiences become data: the process of eliciting adverse event, medical history and concomitant medication reports in antimalarial and antiretroviral interaction trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurately characterizing a drug’s safety profile is essential. Trial harm and tolerability assessments rely, in part, on participants’ reports of medical histories, adverse events (AEs), and concomitant medications. Optimal methods for questioning participants are unclear, but different methods giving different results can undermine meta-analyses. This study compared methods for eliciting such data and explored reasons for dissimilar participant responses. Methods Participants from open-label antimalarial and antiretroviral interaction trials in two distinct sites (South Africa, n = 18 [all HIV positive]; Tanzania, n = 80 [86% HIV positive]) were asked about ill health and treatment use by sequential use of (1) general enquiries without reference to particular conditions, body systems or treatments, (2) checklists of potential health issues and treatments, (3) in-depth interviews. Participants’ experiences of illness and treatment and their reporting behaviour were explored qualitatively, as were trial clinicians’ experiences with obtaining participant reports. Outcomes were the number and nature of data by questioning method, themes from qualitative analyses and a theoretical interpretation of participants’ experiences. Results There was an overall cumulative increase in the number of reports from general enquiry through checklists to in-depth interview; in South Africa, an additional 12 medical histories, 21 AEs and 27 medications; in Tanzania an additional 260 medical histories, 1 AE and 11 medications. Checklists and interviews facilitated recognition of health issues and treatments, and consideration of what to report. Information was sometimes not reported because participants forgot, it was considered irrelevant or insignificant, or they feared reporting. Some medicine names were not known and answers to questions were considered inferior to blood tests for detecting ill health. South African inpatient volunteers exhibited a

  2. The Drug-Drug Effects of Rhein on the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Clozapine in Rat Brain Extracellular Fluid by In Vivo Microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mei-Ling; Lin, Chi-Hung; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-10-01

    Clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent, is highly effective in treatment-resistant schizophrenia; however, its major side effect is constipation. Instead of laxatives, rhein is a pharmacologically active component found in Rheum palmatum L., a medicinal herbal remedy for constipation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether rhein impacts the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of clozapine in brain when used to relieve clozapine-induced constipation. Here, we have investigated not only the PK of clozapine in blood but also the effects of rhein on the PK of clozapine in blood and in brain extracellular fluid together with the PD effects on neurotransmitters in extracellular fluid. The concentrations of clozapine and norclozapine in biologic samples were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The drug-drug effects of rhein on extracellular neurotransmitter efflux in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) produced by clozapine were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. The results demonstrate that the clozapine PK was nonlinear. Pretreatment with rhein for 7 days increased the total blood concentration of clozapine, but significantly reduced the unbound clozapine concentrations in the mPFC by approximately 3-fold. Furthermore, 7 days of rhein pretreatment thoroughly abolished the efflux of dopamine and its metabolite (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) and altered the profile of homovanillic acid, another metabolite of dopamine, in the mPFC. In conclusion, rhein was found to substantially decrease clozapine and norclozapine concentrations in the mPFC dialysate, and this is accompanied by lower concentrations in the neurotransmitters in the same biophase. These findings suggest that a detailed clinical study for drug-drug interactions is recommended.

  3. OpenVigil FDA – Inspection of U.S. American Adverse Drug Events Pharmacovigilance Data and Novel Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Ruwen; von Hehn, Leocadie; Herdegen, Thomas; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Bruhn, Oliver; Petri, Holger; Höcker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance contributes to health care. However, direct access to the underlying data for academic institutions and individual physicians or pharmacists is intricate, and easily employable analysis modes for everyday clinical situations are missing. This underlines the need for a tool to bring pharmacovigilance to the clinics. To address these issues, we have developed OpenVigil FDA, a novel web-based pharmacovigilance analysis tool which uses the openFDA online interface of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to access U.S. American and international pharmacovigilance data from the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). OpenVigil FDA provides disproportionality analyses to (i) identify the drug most likely evoking a new adverse event, (ii) compare two drugs concerning their safety profile, (iii) check arbitrary combinations of two drugs for unknown drug-drug interactions and (iv) enhance the relevance of results by identifying confounding factors and eliminating them using background correction. We present examples for these applications and discuss the promises and limits of pharmacovigilance, openFDA and OpenVigil FDA. OpenVigil FDA is the first public available tool to apply pharmacovigilance findings directly to real-life clinical problems. OpenVigil FDA does not require special licenses or statistical programs. PMID:27326858

  4. OpenVigil FDA - Inspection of U.S. American Adverse Drug Events Pharmacovigilance Data and Novel Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Ruwen; von Hehn, Leocadie; Herdegen, Thomas; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Bruhn, Oliver; Petri, Holger; Höcker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance contributes to health care. However, direct access to the underlying data for academic institutions and individual physicians or pharmacists is intricate, and easily employable analysis modes for everyday clinical situations are missing. This underlines the need for a tool to bring pharmacovigilance to the clinics. To address these issues, we have developed OpenVigil FDA, a novel web-based pharmacovigilance analysis tool which uses the openFDA online interface of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to access U.S. American and international pharmacovigilance data from the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). OpenVigil FDA provides disproportionality analyses to (i) identify the drug most likely evoking a new adverse event, (ii) compare two drugs concerning their safety profile, (iii) check arbitrary combinations of two drugs for unknown drug-drug interactions and (iv) enhance the relevance of results by identifying confounding factors and eliminating them using background correction. We present examples for these applications and discuss the promises and limits of pharmacovigilance, openFDA and OpenVigil FDA. OpenVigil FDA is the first public available tool to apply pharmacovigilance findings directly to real-life clinical problems. OpenVigil FDA does not require special licenses or statistical programs. PMID:27326858

  5. Epidemiology of adverse drug reactions in the elderly by drug class.

    PubMed

    Beyth, R J; Shorr, R I

    1999-03-01

    As the growth of the elderly population continues, the burden on the health care system and society will also increase. Since chronic diseases such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, arthritis, stroke, cancer and diabetes mellitus are more prevalent with age, the number of people with multiple chronic diseases will also increase. These patients are likely to be treated for some or all of their conditions with drug therapies. When used appropriately, drugs may be the single most important intervention in the care of an older patient, but when used inappropriately they no longer provide therapeutic benefit, and they may even endanger the health of an older patient by causing an adverse drug reaction (ADR). Factors believed to be responsible for increased adverse reactions in elderly patients are polypharmacy (including prescription and over-the-counter medications), increased drug-drug interaction, pharmacokinetic changes, pharmacodynamic changes, the pathology of aging and compliance. The exact role that age plays in ADRs is not clear. This is in part because few older patients are included in the large randomised trials, and so much of the information used to ascertain the age-associated risks of drugs comes from observational studies. Although the interactions of aging, concurrent comorbidities and polypharmacy are known, older patients do appear to be at increased risk. Improvements in the management of drug therapies of older patients can lead to improvements in their overall health, functioning and safety, as well as providing potential benefits to society by ameliorating some of the burden of their health care. PMID:10220106

  6. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  7. A Survey of Adverse Drug Reactions in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, 232 Canadian family physicians recorded suspected adverse drug reactions (SADRs) in their practices for five months. Patients' age and sex, the drug(s) implicated, type of reaction and any disability were recorded on a card and sent to a central coordinating office each week. The number of SADRs in clinical practice seems to be small. An estimated 300,000 patients were involved in the study, and a total of 314 suspected adverse drug reactions in 314 patients were reported. A proposal is made for a surveillance system for new drugs. Family physicians would monitor all patients taking a drug or group of drugs and matched controls. The status of patients and controls would be recorded regularly and any SADRs reported to a central coordinating centre. PMID:21283495

  8. Interaction network among functional drug groups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background More attention has been being paid to combinatorial effects of drugs to treat complex diseases or to avoid adverse combinations of drug cocktail. Although drug interaction information has been increasingly accumulated, a novel approach like network-based method is needed to analyse that information systematically and intuitively Results Beyond focussing on drug-drug interactions, we examined interactions between functional drug groups. In this work, functional drug groups were defined based on the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification System. We defined criteria whether two functional drug groups are related. Then we constructed the interaction network of drug groups. The resulting network provides intuitive interpretations. We further constructed another network based on interaction sharing ratio of the first network. Subsequent analysis of the networks showed that some features of drugs can be well described by this kind of interaction even for the case of structurally dissimilar drugs. Conclusion Our networks in this work provide intuitive insights into interactions among drug groups rather than those among single drugs. In addition, information on these interactions can be used as a useful source to describe mechanisms and features of drugs. PMID:24555875

  9. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  10. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  11. Hospitalizations Due to Adverse Drug Events in the Elderly—A Retrospective Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Laatikainen, Outi; Sneck, Sami; Bloigu, Risto; Lahtinen, Minna; Lauri, Timo; Turpeinen, Miia

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are more likely to affect geriatric patients due to physiological changes occurring with aging. Even though this is an internationally recognized problem, similar research data in Finland is still lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the number of geriatric medication-related hospitalizations in the Finnish patient population and to discover the potential means of recognizing patients particularly at risk of ADEs. The study was conducted retrospectively from the 2014 emergency department patient records in Oulu University Hospital. A total number of 290 admissions were screened for ADEs, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) by a multi-disciplinary research team. Customized Naranjo scale was used as a control method. All admissions were categorized into “probable,” “possible,” or “doubtful” by both assessment methods. In total, 23.1% of admissions were categorized as “probably” or “possibly” medication-related. Vertigo, falling, and fractures formed the largest group of ADEs. The most common ADEs were related to medicines from N class of the ATC-code system. Age, sex, residence, or specialty did not increase the risk for medication-related admission significantly (min p = 0.077). Polypharmacy was, however, found to increase the risk (OR 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5–6.9; p = 0.01). In conclusion, screening patients for specific demographics or symptoms would not significantly improve the recognition of ADEs. In addition, as ADE detection today is largely based on voluntary reporting systems and retrospective manual tracking of errors, it is evident that more effective methods for ADE detection are needed in the future. PMID:27761112

  12. [Clinical survey of tizanidine-induced adverse effects--impact of concomitant drugs providing cytochrome P450 1A2 modification--].

    PubMed

    Momo, Kenji; Homma, Masato; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Sasaki, Tadanori; Kohda, Yukinao

    2013-01-01

    The drug-drug interactions of tizanidine and cytochrome (CYP) P450 1A2 inhibitors, which potentially alter the hepatic metabolism of tizanidine, were investigated by retrospective survey of medical records with regard to prescription. One thousand five hundred sixty-three patients treated with tizanidine at University of Tsukuba Hospital were investigated. Of those, 713 patients (45.6%) were treated with coadministration of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors (37 drugs). The patients who received a combination of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors were characterized as elderly, having multiple diseases, and taking a large number of comedications (over 10 drugs) for a long period as compared with the patients who did not receive CYP1A2 inhibitors. Tizanidine-induced adverse effects were examined in 100 patients treated with coadministration of tizanidine and 8 CYP1A2 inhibitors. Adverse effects (e.g., drowsiness: 10 patients; low blood pressure: 9 patients; low heart rate: 9 patients) were observed in 23 patients (23%) 8±10 days after CYP1A2 inhibitors were coadministered. The patients with tizanidine-induced adverse effects were of older age (64.3±9.8 vs. 57.5±18.1 years, p<0.05) and received a higher daily dose of tizanidine (3.00±0.74 vs. 2.56±0.86 mg/day, p<0.05) than the patients without adverse effects. The present results suggest that coadministration of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors enhances tizanidine-induced adverse effects, especially in elderly patients treated with a higher dose of tizanidine.

  13. Early adversity, neural development, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jessica J; Taylor, Shelley E; Bower, Julienne E

    2015-12-01

    Early adversity is a risk factor for poor mental and physical health. Although altered neural development is believed to be one pathway linking early adversity to psychopathology, it has rarely been considered a pathway linking early adversity to poor physical health. However, this is a viable pathway because the central nervous system is known to interact with the immune system via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and autonomic nervous system (ANS). In support of this pathway, early adversity has been linked to changes in neural development (particularly of the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex), HPA axis and ANS dysregulation, and higher levels of inflammation. Inflammation, in turn, can be detrimental to physical health when prolonged. In this review, we present these studies and consider how altered neural development may be a pathway by which early adversity increases inflammation and thus risk for adverse physical health outcomes.

  14. Study of warfarin utilization in hospitalized patients: analysis of possible drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Guidoni, Camilo Molino; Camargo, Helen Palmira Miranda; Obreli-Neto, Paulo Roque; Girotto, Edmarlon; Pereira, Leonardo Regis Leira

    2016-10-01

    Background Drug-drug interactions in patients taking warfarin may contribute to a higher risk of adverse events. Objective To identify and evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of potential DDIs with warfarin. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a Brazilian tertiary hospital. The electronic prescriptions of the patients receiving warfarin between January 2004 and December 2010 were analyzed. Socio-demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables were collected. Warfarin drug-drug interactions were classified as either risk A, B, C, D, or X according to the Lexi-Interact™ Online database. Results A total of 3048 patients were identified who were prescribed warfarin. Of the 154,161 total drug prescriptions issued, 42,120 (27.3 %) were for warfarin. Evaluation of the prescriptions showed that 63.1 and 0.1 % of patients received concomitant drugs classified as having class D or X risk. It was found that 20,539 (48.7 %) prescriptions had at least one drug with a D or X risk. Patients were prescribed an average of 1.4 (±0.4) concomitant medications with a class D or X warfarin-DDI risk, the most frequent being acetylsalicylic acid and amiodarone. Conclusion The results demonstrate a high prevalence of concomitant drug prescriptions with the potential for clinically relevant DDIs with warfarin, the most frequent being acetylsalicylic acid and amiodarone. PMID:27365092

  15. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com . PMID:27167132

  16. Interactions between Transporters and Herbal Medicines/Drugs: A Focus on Hepatoprotective Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aijie; Li, Quansheng; He, Xin; Si, Duanyun; Liu, Changxiao

    2015-01-01

    Many herbal medicines and drugs are available in the clinic as potent hepatoprotective agents for the treatment of commonly occurring liver diseases. Recently, herbal medicines such as silymarin and curcumin have gained more attention and popularity for the treatment of various liver diseases because of their safety and efficacy profiles. Some of them are related to transporters for drug disposition processes, therapeutic efficacy and/or adverse drug reactions. Currently, herbal medicines and diet supplements made from natural products are widely used in patients who are being treated with conventional prescription medicines, which are related to an increasing risk of herbal-drug interactions (HDIs) and/or drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The purpose of present review is to summarize the contemporary knowledge of transporter-mediated HDIs or DDIs for herbal medicines/drugs focusing on hepatoprotective compounds. Several herbal medicines/drugs are discussed in detail in this review.

  17. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  18. Evaluation of CYP3A-mediated drug-drug interactions with romidepsin in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Laille, Eric; Patel, Manish; Jones, Suzanne F; Burris, Howard A; Infante, Jeffrey; Lemech, Charlotte; Liu, Liangang; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Two multicenter, single-arm, single-infusion, open-label studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of ketoconazole (a strong CYP3A inhibitor) or rifampin (a strong CYP3A inducer) daily for 5 days on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of romidepsin (8 mg/m(2) intravenous 4-hour infusion for the ketoconazole study or a 14 mg/m(2) intravenous 4-hour infusion for the rifampin study) in patients with advanced cancer. Romidepsin coadministered with ketoconazole (400 mg) or rifampin (600 mg) was not bioequivalent to romidepsin alone. With ketoconazole, the mean romidepsin AUC and Cmax were increased by approximately 25% and 10%, respectively. With rifampin, the mean romidepsin AUC and Cmax were unexpectedly increased by approximately 80% and 60%, respectively; this is likely because of inhibition of active liver uptake. For both studies, romidepsin clearance and volume of distribution were decreased, terminal half-life was comparable, and median Tmax was similar. Overall, the safety profile of romidepsin was not altered by coadministration with ketoconazole or rifampin, except that a higher incidence and greater severity of thrombocytopenia was observed when romidepsin was given with rifampin. The use of romidepsin with rifampin and strong CYP3A inducers should be avoided. Toxicity related to romidepsin exposure should be monitored when romidepsin is given with strong CYP3A inhibitors.

  19. Management of HIV/AIDS in older patients–drug/drug interactions and adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Mary J; Zeuli, John D; Kasten, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer with their disease, as HIV has become a chronic illness managed with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). This has led to an increasing number of patients greater than 50 years old living successfully with HIV. As the number of older adults with HIV has increased, there are special considerations for the management of HIV. Older adults with HIV must be monitored for drug side effects and toxicities. Their other non-HIV comorbidities should also be considered when choosing a cART regimen. Older adults with HIV have unique issues related to medication compliance. They are more likely than the younger HIV patients to have vision loss, cognitive impairment, and polypharmacy. They may have lower expectations of their overall health status. Depression and financial concerns, especially if they are on a fixed income, may also contribute to noncompliance in the aging HIV population. PMID:26604826

  20. Adverse Drug Reactions and Expected Effects to Therapy with Subcutaneous Mistletoe Extracts (Viscum album L.) in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Megan L.; Happe, Antje; Kröz, Matthias; Matthes, Harald; Schad, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Background. In Europe, mistletoe extracts are widely used as a complementary cancer therapy. We assessed the safety of subcutaneous mistletoe as a conjunctive therapy in cancer patients within an anthroposophic medicine setting in Germany. Methods. A multicentre, observational study was performed within the Network Oncology. Suspected mistletoe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were described by frequency, causality, severity, and seriousness. Potential risk factors, dose relationships and drug-drug interactions were investigated. Results. Of 1923 cancer patients treated with subcutaneous mistletoe extracts, 283 patients (14.7%) reported 427 expected effects (local reactions <5 cm and increased body temperature <38°C). ADRs were documented in 162 (8.4%) patients who reported a total of 264 events. ADRs were mild (50.8%), moderate (45.1%), or severe (4.2%). All were nonserious. Logistic regression analysis revealed that expected effects were more common in females, while immunoreactivity decreased with increasing age and tumour stage. No risk factors were identified for ADRs. ADR frequency increased as mistletoe dose increased, while fewer ADRs occurred during mistletoe therapy received concurrent with conventional therapies. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that mistletoe therapy is safe. ADRs were mostly mild to moderate in intensity and appear to be dose-related and explained by the immune-stimulating, pharmacological activity of mistletoe. PMID:24672577

  1. On-Chip Construction of Liver Lobule-like Microtissue and Its Application for Adverse Drug Reaction Assay.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, En-Min; Xu, Juan; Shen, Shaofei; Wang, Jinyi

    2016-02-01

    Engineering the liver in vitro is promising to provide functional replacement for patients with liver failure, or tissue models for drug metabolism and toxicity analysis. In this study, we describe a microfluidics-based biomimetic approach for the fabrication of an in vitro 3D liver lobule-like microtissue composed of a radially patterned hepatic cord-like network and an intrinsic hepatic sinusoid-like network. The hepatic enzyme assay showed that the 3D biomimetic microtissue maintained high basal CYP-1A1/2 and UGT activities, responded dynamically to enzyme induction/inhibition, and preserved great hepatic capacity of drug metabolism. Using the established biomimetic microtissue, the potential adverse drug reactions that induced liver injury were successfully analyzed via drug-drug interactions of clinical pharmaceuticals. The results showed that predosed pharmaceuticals which agitated CYP-1A1/2 and/or UGT activities would alter the toxic effect of the subsequently administrated drug. All the results validated the utility of the established biomimetic microtissue in toxicological studies in vitro. Also, we anticipate the microfluidics-based bioengineering strategy would benefit liver tissue engineering and liver physiology/pathophysiology studies, as well as in vitro assessment of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26743823

  2. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications on Sleep.

    PubMed

    Doghramji, Karl; Jangro, William C

    2016-09-01

    Psychotropic medications such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, stimulants, and benzodiazepines are widely prescribed. Most of these medications are thought to exert their effects through modulation of various monoamines as well as interactions with receptors such as histamine and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Through these interactions, psychotropics can also have a significant impact on sleep physiology, resulting in both beneficial and adverse effects on sleep. PMID:27514301

  3. Adverse reactions to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Gendler, E

    1987-06-01

    Adverse reactions to cosmetics can be irritant or allergic and are most often caused by fragrances or preservatives. Preservatives include formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers, and parabens. Other agents that cause allergy are paraphenylenediamine in hair dyes and toluene sulfonamide formaldehyde resin in nail polishes.

  4. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  5. Rifampicin-warfarin interaction leading to macroscopic hematuria: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rifampicin remains one of the first-line drugs used in tuberculosis therapy. This drug´s potential to induce the hepatic cytochrome P450 oxidative enzyme system increases the risk of drug-drug interactions. Thus, although the presence of comorbidities typically necessitates the use of multiple drugs, the co-administration of rifampicin and warfarin may lead to adverse drug events. We report a bleeding episode after termination of the co-administration of rifampicin and warfarin and detail the challenges related to international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring. Case presentation A 59-year-old Brazilian woman chronically treated with warfarin for atrial fibrillation (therapeutic INR range: 2.0-3.0) was referred to a multidisciplinary anticoagulation clinic at a university hospital. She showed anticoagulation resistance at the beginning of rifampicin therapy, as demonstrated by repeated subtherapeutic INR values. Three months of sequential increases in the warfarin dosage were necessary to reach a therapeutic INR, and frequent visits to the anticoagulation clinic were needed to educate the patient about her pharmacotherapy and to perform the warfarin dosage adjustments. The warfarin dosage also had to be doubled at the beginning of rifampicin therapy. However, four weeks after rifampicin discontinuation, an excessively high INR was observed (7.22), with three-day macroscopic hematuria and the need for an immediate reduction in the warfarin dosage. A therapeutic and stable INR was eventually attained at 50% of the warfarin dosage used by the patient during tuberculosis therapy. Conclusions The present case exemplifies the influence of rifampicin therapy on warfarin dosage requirements and the increased risk of bleeding after rifampicin discontinuation. Additionally, this case highlights the need for warfarin weekly monitoring after stopping rifampicin until the maintenance dose of warfarin has decreased to the amount administered before rifampicin use. In

  6. Adverse events in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: results from the DOTS-Plus initiative.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, E; Gupta, R; Huamani, P; Leimane, V; Pasechnikov, A D; Tupasi, T E; Vink, K; Jaramillo, E; Espinal, M A

    2004-11-01

    Adverse events associated with second-line drugs have been mentioned as obstacles in the management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Data on adverse events were collected from five DOTS-Plus sites in Estonia, Latvia, Peru (Lima), the Philippines (Manila) and the Russian Federation (Tomsk Oblast). The results show that among 818 patients enrolled on MDR-TB treatment only 2% of patients stopped treatment, but 30% required removal of the suspected drug(s) from the regimen due to adverse events. The study shows that adverse events are manageable in the treatment of MDR-TB in resource-limited settings provided that standard management strategies are applied. PMID:15581210

  7. Childhood adversities and psychosis: evidence, challenges, implications

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Craig; Gayer‐Anderson, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    There is a substantial body of research reporting evidence of associations between various forms of childhood adversity and psychosis, across the spectrum from experiences to disorder. This has been extended, more recently, to include studies of cumulative effects, of interactions with other factors, of specific effects, and of putative biological and psychological mechanisms. In this paper we evaluate this research and highlight the remaining methodological issues and gaps that temper, but do not dismiss, conclusions about the causal role of childhood adversity. We also consider the emerging work on cumulative, synergistic, and specific effects and on mechanisms; and discuss the broader implications of this line of research for our understanding of psychosis. We conclude that the current balance of evidence is that childhood adversities – particularly exposure to multiple adversities involving hostility and threat – do, in some people, contribute to the onset of psychotic experiences and psychotic disorders. PMID:27265690

  8. Adverse reactions to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Dogra, A; Minocha, Y C; Kaur, S

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reaction to cosmetics constitute a small but significant number of cases of contact dermatitis with varied appearances. These can present as contact allergic dermatitis, photodermatitis, contact irritant dermatitis, contact urticaria, hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation or depigmentation, hair and nail breakage. Fifty patients were included for the study to assess the role of commonly used cosmetics in causing adverse reactions. It was found that hair dyes, lipsticks and surprisingly shaving creams caused more reaction as compared to other cosmetics. Overall incidence of contact allergic dermatitis seen was 3.3% with patients own cosmetics. Patch testing was also done with the basic ingredients and showed positive results in few cases where casual link could be established. It is recommended that labeling of the cosmetics should be done to help the dermatologists and the patients to identify the causative allergen in cosmetic preparation.

  9. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  10. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  11. Vaccine adverse events.

    PubMed

    Follows, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Millions of adults are vaccinated annually against the seasonal influenza virus. An undetermined number of individuals will develop adverse events to the influenza vaccination. Those who suffer substantiated vaccine injuries, disabilities, and aggravated conditions may file a timely, no-fault and no-cost petition for financial compensation under the National Vaccine Act in the Vaccine Court. The elements of a successful vaccine injury claim are described in the context of a claim showing the seasonal influenza vaccination was the cause of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  12. [Adverse events prevention ability].

    PubMed

    Aparo, Ugo Luigi; Aparo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    The issue of how to address medical errors is the key to improve the health care system performances. Operational evidence collected in the last five years shows that the solution is only partially linked to future technological developments. Cultural and organisational changes are mandatory to help to manage and drastically reduce the adverse events in health care organisations. Classical management, merely based on coordination and control, is inadequate. Proactive, self-organising network based structures must be put in place and managed using adaptive, fast evolving management tools. PMID:17484160

  13. [Adverse events prevention ability].

    PubMed

    Aparo, Ugo Luigi; Aparo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    The issue of how to address medical errors is the key to improve the health care system performances. Operational evidence collected in the last five years shows that the solution is only partially linked to future technological developments. Cultural and organisational changes are mandatory to help to manage and drastically reduce the adverse events in health care organisations. Classical management, merely based on coordination and control, is inadequate. Proactive, self-organising network based structures must be put in place and managed using adaptive, fast evolving management tools.

  14. Screening for adverse events.

    PubMed

    Karson, A S; Bates, D W

    1999-02-01

    Adverse events (AEs) in medical patients are common, costly, and often preventable. Development of quality improvement programs to decrease the number and impact of AEs demands effective methods for screening for AEs on a routine basis. Here we describe the impact, types, and potential causes of AEs and review various techniques for identifying AEs. We evaluate the use of generic screening criteria in detail and describe a recent study of the sensitivity and specificity of individual generic screening criteria and combinations of these criteria. In general, the most sensitive screens were the least specific and no small sub-set of screens identified a large percentage of adverse events. Combinations of screens that were limited to administrative data were the least expensive, but none were particularly sensitive, although in practice they might be effective since routine screening is currently rarely done. As computer systems increase in sophistication sensitivity will improve. We also discuss recent studies that suggest that programs that screen for and identify AEs can be useful in reducing AE rates. While tools for identifying AEs have strengths and weaknesses, they can play an important role in organizations' quality improvement portfolios. PMID:10468381

  15. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  16. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  17. [Visualization and analysis of adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents using the self-organizing map (SOM)].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Tomoyuki; Serizawa, Ayaka; Ohtsuki, Kaori; Kawakami, Junko; Sato, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer agents cause a variety of adverse reactions compared with conventional anticancer agents because of their unique mechanisms of action. Sources of drug information such as package inserts (PIs) provide primarily document-based and numerical information. Therefore it is not easy to obtain a complete picture of drugs with similar effects, or to understand differences among drugs. In this study we used the self-organizing map (SOM) technique to visualize the adverse reactions indicated on PIs of 23 molecularly targeted anticancer agents as of March 2013. In both the presence/absence version and the frequency version, SOM was divided into domains according to mechanism of action, antibody drug or low-molecular weight drug, and molecular target. The component planes of the 753 adverse reaction items in the frequency version enabled us to grasp all available information and differences among the drugs. In some component planes in the presence/absence version, an adverse reaction that had not been reported for a drug but had already been reported for its proximally positioned drug(s) as of March 2013, was found to be reported thereafter by the Drug Safety Update (DSU) or the Adverse Event Report Search System "CzeekV," which is based on FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Our results suggest that visualization of the adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents by the SOM technique is useful not only to acquire all available information and differences among drugs, but also to predict the appearance of adverse reactions.

  18. Putative adverse outcome pathways relevant to neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bal-Price, Anna; Crofton, Kevin M.; Sachana, Magdalini; Shafer, Timothy J.; Behl, Mamta; Forsby, Anna; Hargreaves, Alan; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lein, Pamela J.; Louisse, Jochem; Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne; Paini, Alicia; Rolaki, Alexandra; Schrattenholz, André; Suñol, Cristina; van Thriel, Christoph; Whelan, Maurice; Fritsche, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework provides a template that facilitates understanding of complex biological systems and the pathways of toxicity that result in adverse outcomes (AOs). The AOP starts with an molecular initiating event (MIE) in which a chemical interacts with a biological target(s), followed by a sequential series of KEs, which are cellular, anatomical, and/or functional changes in biological processes, that ultimately result in an AO manifest in individual organisms and populations. It has been developed as a tool for a knowledge-based safety assessment that relies on understanding mechanisms of toxicity, rather than simply observing its adverse outcome. A large number of cellular and molecular processes are known to be crucial to proper development and function of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). However, there are relatively few examples of well-documented pathways that include causally linked MIEs and KEs that result in adverse outcomes in the CNS or PNS. As a first step in applying the AOP framework to adverse health outcomes associated with exposure to exogenous neurotoxic substances, the EU Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM) organized a workshop (March 2013, Ispra, Italy) to identify potential AOPs relevant to neurotoxic and developmental neurotoxic outcomes. Although the AOPs outlined during the workshop are not fully described, they could serve as a basis for further, more detailed AOP development and evaluation that could be useful to support human health risk assessment in a variety of ways. PMID:25605028

  19. A pocket aide-memoire on drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Stockley, I H

    1975-04-01

    A pocket size "slide-rule" type device designed to be used by physicians, pharmacists and nurses as a memory aid on potential drug-drug interactions is described. Color-coded symbols on the device indicate both the type and clinical significance of the potential interactions involving 56 drugs or groups of drugs.

  20. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model linking plasma protein binding interactions with drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Buur, J L; Baynes, R E; Smith, G W; Riviere, J E

    2009-04-01

    Combination drug therapy increases the chance for an adverse drug reactions due to drug-drug interactions. Altered disposition for sulfamethazine (SMZ) when concurrently administered with flunixin meglumine (FLU) in swine could lead to increased tissue residues. There is a need for a pharmacokinetic modeling technique that can predict the consequences of possible drug interactions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed that links plasma protein binding interactions to drug disposition for SMZ and FLU in swine. The model predicted a sustained decrease in total drug and a temporary increase in free drug concentration. An in vivo study confirmed the presence of a drug interaction. Neither the model nor the in vivo study revealed clinically significant changes that alter tissue disposition. This novel linkage approach has use in the prediction of the clinical impact of plasma protein binding interactions. Ultimately it could be used in the design of dosing regimens and in the protection of the food supply through prediction and minimization of tissue residues. PMID:18721993

  1. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  2. Adverse Effects of Common Drugs: Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    Felix, Todd Matthew; Karpa, Kelly Dowhower; Lewis, Peter R

    2015-09-01

    Dietary supplement-induced adverse effects often resolve quickly after discontinuation of the offending product, especially in younger patients. The potential for unwanted outcomes can be amplified in elderly patients or those taking multiple prescription drugs, especially where interactions exist with drugs metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes. Attributing injury or illness to a specific supplement can be challenging, especially in light of multi-ingredient products, product variability, and variability in reporting, as well as the vast underreporting of adverse drug reactions. Clinicians prescribing a new drug or evaluating a patient with a new symptom complex should inquire about use of herbal and dietary supplements as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Clinicians should report suspected supplement-related adverse effects to the local or state health department, as well as the Food and Drug Administration's MedWatch program (available at https://www.safetyreporting.hhs.gov). Clinicians should consider discussing suspected adverse effects involving drugs, herbal products, or dietary supplements with their community- and hospital-based pharmacists, and explore patient management options with medical or clinical toxicology subspecialists.

  3. Efficacy of Adderall and methylphenidate in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a reanalysis using drug-placebo and drug-drug response curve methodology.

    PubMed

    Faraone, S V; Pliszka, S R; Olvera, R L; Skolnik, R; Biederman, J

    2001-01-01

    Because methylphenidate (MPH) is currently the most widely prescribed medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), several studies have used this as the touch-stone for evaluating the efficacy of a newer stimulant, Adderall. In a parallel-groups study of MPH (n = 20), Adderall (n = 20), and placebo (n = 18), Pliszka et al. (2000) reported that both medications were superior to placebo in improving parent, teacher, and clinician ratings of ADHD and associated behaviors. Compared with MPH, Adderall led to significantly more improvements in teacher and clinician ratings. The present study extends these results by addressing the issue of clinical significance using drug-placebo and drug-drug response curve analyses of the same data. The goal of this method is to answer the following questions about drug-placebo or drug-drug differences: Is the effect clinically meaningful? What does the effect tell us about individual responses? Is the effect due to symptom improvement, the prevention of worsening, or both? Our results show that the efficacy of Adderall to improve functioning is seen throughout the full range of improvement scores. In contrast, MPH showed a substantial effect for "mildly" and "much improved" but not for "very much improved." Our analyses also show that both Adderall and MPH prevent worsening of symptoms. They further suggest that, compared with the Conners Teacher Rating Scale, the Clinical Global Impressions scale may be more sensitive to improvements at the "well end" of the spectrum of functioning. PMID:11436957

  4. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Hickson, R C; Ball, K L; Falduto, M T

    1989-01-01

    Anabolic steroids are used therapeutically for various disorders and as ergogenic aids by athletes to augment strength, muscular development, and to enhance performance. There is a wide range of concomitant temporary and permanent adverse effects with steroid administration. Several well-documented adverse actions of these hormones may develop rapidly within several weeks or less (i.e. altered reproductive function) or require up to several years of steroid intake (i.e. liver carcinoma). More recent studies indicate that glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, increased cardiovascular disease risk profiles, cerebral dangers, musculoskeletal injuries, prostate cancer, psychosis and schizophrenic episodes, among others, accompany anabolic steroid intake. There is, at present, no evidence to support the claim that athletes are less susceptible to adverse effects than those individuals receiving hormone treatment in a clinical setting. Based on the available information which has accumulated primarily from cross-sectional, short term longitudinal, and case studies, there is a need: (a) to develop a comprehensive battery of specific and sensitive markers of adverse effects, particularly those that would be able to detect the onset of adverse actions; and (b) to conduct controlled long term longitudinal studies in order to fully understand the extensiveness and mechanisms involved in the occurrence of adverse effects.

  5. HIV/HCV Antiviral Drug Interactions in the Era of Direct-acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Donald P.; Faragon, John J.; Banks, Sarah; Chirch, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chronic hepatitis C has evolved over the past decade, resulting in better control of infection and clinical outcomes; however, drug-drug interactions remain a significant hazard. Joint recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America regarding drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretroviral agents and direct-acting antiviral agents for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are reviewed here. This review is oriented to facilitate appropriate selection of an antiviral therapy regimen for HCV infection based on the choice of antiretroviral therapy being administered and, if necessary, switching antiretroviral regimens. PMID:27777891

  6. In Silico Predictions of Drug - Drug Interactions Caused by CYP1A2, 2C9 and 3A4 Inhibition - a Comparative Study of Virtual Screening Performance.

    PubMed

    Kaserer, Teresa; Höferl, Martina; Müller, Klara; Elmer, Sebastian; Ganzera, Markus; Jäger, Walter; Schuster, Daniela

    2015-06-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily represents the major enzyme class responsible for the metabolism of exogenous compounds. Investigation of clearance pathways is therefore an integral part in early drug development, as any alteration of metabolic enzymes may markedly influence the toxicological profile and efficacy of novel compounds. In silico methods are widely applied in drug development to complement experimental approaches. Several different tools are available for that purpose, however, for CYP enzymes they have only been applied retrospectively so far. Within this study, pharmacophore- and shape-based models and a docking protocol were generated for the prediction of CYP1A2, 2C9, and 3A4 inhibition. All theoretically validated models, the validated docking workflow, and additional external bioactivity profiling tools were applied independently and in parallel to predict the CYP inhibition of 29 compounds from synthetic and natural origin. After subsequent experimental assessment of the in silico predictions, we analyzed and compared the prospective performance of all methods, thereby defining the suitability of the applied techniques for CYP enzymes. We observed quite substantial differences in the performances of the applied tools, suggesting that the rational selection of that virtual screening method that proved to perform best can largely improve the success rates when it comes to CYP inhibition prediction. PMID:27490388

  7. Pharmacokinetic characterization of the novel TAZ modulator TM-25659 using a multicompartment kinetic model in rats and a possibility of its drug-drug interactions in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Choi, Sung Heum; Song, Jin-Sook; Kwak, Eun-Young; Chae, Yoon-Jee; Im, So Hee; Lee, Byung Hoi; Seo, Hyewon; Cho, Woon-Ki; Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Nak Jeong; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Myung Ae

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of the novel TAZ modulator TM-25659 in rats following intravenous and oral administration at dose ranges of 0.5-5 mg/kg and 2-10 mg/kg, respectively. Plasma protein binding, plasma stability, liver microsomal stability, CYP inhibition, and transport in Caco-2 cells were also evaluated. After intravenous injection, systemic clearance, steady-state volumes of distribution, and half-life were dose-independent, with values ranging from 0.434-0.890 mL · h(-1) · kg(-1), 2.02-4.22 mL/kg, and 4.60-7.40 h, respectively. Mean absolute oral bioavailability was 50.9% and was not dose dependent. Recovery of TM-25659 was 43.6% in bile and <1% in urine. In pharmacokinetic modeling studies, the three-compartment (3C) model was appropriate for understanding these parameters in rats. TM-25659 was stable in plasma. Plasma protein binding was approximately 99.2%, and was concentration-independent. TM-25659 showed high permeation of Caco-2 cells and did not appear to inhibit CYP450. TM-25659 was metabolized in phase I and II steps in rat liver microsomes. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetics of TM-25659 was characterized for intravenous and oral administration at doses of 0.5-5 and 2-10 mg/kg, respectively. TM-25659 was eliminated primarily by hepatic metabolism and urinary excretion.

  8. Drug-Drug Interaction Studies of Paliperidone and Divalproex Sodium Extended-Release Tablets in Healthy Participants and Patients with Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Remmerie, Bart; Ariyawansa, Jay; De Meulder, Marc; Coppola, Danielle; Berwaerts, Joris

    2016-06-01

    The objective of these 2 phase 1, open-label, 2-treatment, single-sequence studies was to evaluate the effect of repeated oral doses of divalproex sodium extended-release (ER) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a single dose of paliperidone ER in healthy participants (study 1), and the effect of multiple doses of paliperidone ER on the steady-state PK of valproic acid (VPA) in patients with psychiatric disorders (study 2), respectively. In study 1 healthy participants received, in a fixed sequential order, treatment A, paliperidone ER 12 mg (day 1); treatment B, VPA 1000 mg (2 × 500 mg divalproex sodium ER) once daily (days 5 to 18) and paliperidone ER 12 mg (day 15). In study 2 patients received treatment A, VPA (days 1-7); treatment B, VPA + paliperidone ER 12 mg (days 8-12). Divalproex sodium ER doses (study 2) were individualized such that systemic therapeutic VPA exposure from prior treatment was maintained on entry into the study. PK assessments were performed at prespecified time points (paliperidone days 1 and 15 [study 1]; VPA days 7 and 12 [study 2]). The oral bioavailability of paliperidone was increased by an estimated 51% (Cmax ) and 51%-52% (AUCs) when coadministered with divalproex sodium ER. No effect on the steady-state plasma concentration of VPA was observed following repeated coadministration with paliperidone ER: the 90%CI around the VPA exposure ratios for the 2 treatments was within the 80%-125% bioequivalence criteria for Cmax,ss and AUCτ . Both VPA and paliperidone ER were well tolerated, and no new safety concerns were identified. PMID:26412032

  9. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  10. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  11. The direct and interactive effects of physical abuse severity and negative affectivity on length of psychiatric hospitalization: evidence of differential reactivity to adverse environments in psychiatrically high-risk youth.

    PubMed

    Comas, Michelle; Valentino, Kristin; Bridgett, David J; Hayden, Lisa C

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the interactive influence of multiple factors (i.e., physical abuse severity and negative affectivity) in predicting youth's inpatient psychiatric length of stay (LOS), extending previous research focused on identification of only single LOS predictors. Elevated physical abuse severity was hypothesized to predict longer youth LOS, and negative affectivity was anticipated to exacerbate this relationship. This study included 42 youth. Clinicians rated youth temperament, whereas physical abuse severity and LOS were coded from youth medical records. Controlling for other previously determined predictors of LOS (i.e., age, gender, and GAF), moderation analyses confirmed hypotheses, revealing a temperament by environment interaction. Specifically, physical abuse severity was positively associated with LOS only in the context of high negative affectivity. Findings highlighted the importance of disentangling the interactive effects of multiple factors in predicting LOS. Moreover, critical clinical implications involving prioritized trauma assessment and treatment for inpatient youth are discussed.

  12. Pharmacogenomics of adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in identifying genetic risk factors for idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions in the past 30 years. These reactions can affect various tissues and organs, including liver, skin, muscle and heart, in a drug-dependent manner. Using both candidate gene and genome-wide association studies, various genes that make contributions of varying extents to each of these forms of reactions have been identified. Many of the associations identified for reactions affecting the liver and skin involve human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes and for reactions relating to the drugs abacavir and carbamazepine, HLA genotyping is now in routine use prior to drug prescription. Other HLA associations are not sufficiently specific for translation but are still of interest in relation to underlying mechanisms for the reactions. Progress on non-HLA genes affecting adverse drug reactions has been less, but some important associations, such as those of SLCO1B1 and statin myopathy, KCNE1 and drug-induced QT prolongation and NAT2 and isoniazid-induced liver injury, are considered. Future prospects for identification of additional genetic risk factors for the various adverse drug reactions are discussed. PMID:23360680

  13. Overlapping of Serotonin Syndrome with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome due to Linezolid-Fluoxetine and Olanzapine-Metoclopramide Interactions: A Case Report of Two Serious Adverse Drug Effects Caused by Medication Reconciliation Failure on Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Shahzad; Haider, Nafis; Ahmed, Rafeeque

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic and antidepressant are often used in combination for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The concomitant use of antipsychotic and/or antidepressant with drugs that may interact can lead to rare, life-threatening conditions such as serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who has a history of taking two offending drugs that interact with drugs given during the course of hospital treatment which leads to the development of serotonin syndrome overlapped with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The physician should be aware that both NMS and SS can appear as overlapping syndrome especially when patients use a combination of both antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:27433163

  14. Overlapping of Serotonin Syndrome with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome due to Linezolid-Fluoxetine and Olanzapine-Metoclopramide Interactions: A Case Report of Two Serious Adverse Drug Effects Caused by Medication Reconciliation Failure on Hospital Admission.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Faizan; Akram, Shahzad; Haider, Nafis; Ahmed, Rafeeque

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic and antidepressant are often used in combination for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The concomitant use of antipsychotic and/or antidepressant with drugs that may interact can lead to rare, life-threatening conditions such as serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who has a history of taking two offending drugs that interact with drugs given during the course of hospital treatment which leads to the development of serotonin syndrome overlapped with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The physician should be aware that both NMS and SS can appear as overlapping syndrome especially when patients use a combination of both antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:27433163

  15. Application of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Study Theophylline Metabolism and Its Interactions With Ciprofloxacin and Caffeine.

    PubMed

    Navid, A; Ng, D M; Wong, S E; Lightstone, F C

    2016-02-01

    Theophylline is a commonly used bronchodilator. However, due to its narrow therapeutic range, moderate elevation of serum concentration can result in adverse drug reactions (ADRs). ADRs occur because of interhuman pharmacokinetic variability and interactions with coprescribed medicines. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of theophylline, caffeine, and ciprofloxacin metabolisms to: examine theophylline pharmacokinetic variability, and predict population-level outcomes of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A simulation-based equation for personalized dosing of theophylline was derived. Simulations of DDI show that calculated personalized doses are safe even after cotreatment with large doses of strong inhibitors. Simulations of adult populations indicate that the elderly are most susceptible to ADRs stemming from theophylline-ciprofloxacin and theophylline-caffeine interactions. Females, especially Asians, due to their smaller average size, are more susceptible to DDI-induced ADRs following typical dosing practices. Our simulations also show that the higher adipose and lower muscle fractions in females significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of theophylline or ciprofloxacin.

  16. ORAL ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS TO CARDIOVASCULAR DRUGS.

    PubMed

    Torpet, Lis Andersen; Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Nauntofte, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    A great many cardiovascular drugs (CVDs) have the potential to induce adverse reactions in the mouth. The prevalence of such reactions is not known, however, since many are asymptomatic and therefore are believed to go unreported. As more drugs are marketed and the population includes an increasing number of elderly, the number of drug prescriptions is also expected to increase. Accordingly, it can be predicted that the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including the oral ones (ODRs), will continue to increase. ODRs affect the oral mucous membrane, saliva production, and taste. The pathogenesis of these reactions, especially the mucosal ones, is largely unknown and appears to involve complex interactions among the drug in question, other medications, the patient's underlying disease, genetics, and life-style factors. Along this line, there is a growing interest in the association between pharmacogenetic polymorphism and ADRs. Research focusing on polymorphism of the cytochrome P450 system (CYPs) has become increasingly important and has highlighted the intra- and inter-individual responses to drug exposure. This system has recently been suggested to be an underlying candidate regarding the pathogenesis of ADRs in the oral mucous membrane. This review focuses on those CVDs reported to induce ODRs. In addition, it will provide data on specific drugs or drug classes, and outline and discuss recent research on possible mechanisms linking ADRs to drug metabolism patterns. Abbreviations used will be as follows: ACEI, ACE inhibitor; ADR, adverse drug reaction; ANA, antinuclear antigen; ARB, angiotensin II receptor blocker; BAB, beta-adrenergic blocker; CCB, calcium-channel blocker; CDR, cutaneous drug reaction; CVD, cardiovascular drug; CYP, cytochrome P450 enzyme; EM, erythema multiforme; FDE, fixed drug eruption; I, inhibitor of CYP isoform activity; HMG-CoA, hydroxymethyl-glutaryl coenzyme A; NAT, N-acetyltransferase; ODR, oral drug reaction; RDM, reactive

  17. Early adversity, immunity and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Avitsur, Ronit; Levy, Sigal; Goren, Naama; Grinshpahet, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between biological, behavioral and environmental factors are involved in mediating individual differences in health and disease. In this review, we present evidence suggesting that increased vulnerability to infectious disease may be at least, in part, due to long-lasting effects of early life psychosocial adversities. Studies have shown that maternal psychosocial stress during pregnancy is associated with long lasting changes in immune function and disease resistance in the offspring. Studies further indicated that harsh environmental conditions during the neonatal period may also cause lasting changes in host response to infectious disease. Although the mechanisms involved in these effects have not been fully examined, several potential mediators have been described, including changes in the development of the offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, alterations in epigenetic pathways, stress-related maternal health risk behavior and infection during pregnancy. Although there are ample literature indicating that perinatal psychosocial stress increases vulnerability to disease, other reports suggest that mild predictable stressors may benefit the organism and allow better coping with future stressors. Thus, understanding the possible consequences of perinatal adversities and the mechanisms that are involved in immune regulation is important for increasing awareness to the potential outcomes of early negative life events and providing insight into potential therapies to combat infection in vulnerable individuals.

  18. Immunomodulatory drugs: Oral and systemic adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The main objectives are to present the different adverses effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosupressed patients and study the impact of immunomodualtion on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. Study Design: We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. Results: These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren´s syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. Conclusions: In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic. Key words:Immunomodulatory drugs, oral diseases, adverse effects, therapeutic action. PMID:23986016

  19. Serenoa repens (saw palmetto): a systematic review of adverse events.

    PubMed

    Agbabiaka, Taofikat B; Pittler, Max H; Wider, Barbara; Ernst, Edzard

    2009-01-01

    Serenoa repens (W. Bartram) Small, also known as saw palmetto, is one of the most widely used herbal preparations for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Although a number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of the efficacy of S. repens for the treatment of LUTS and BPH have been published, no systematic review on its drug interactions or adverse events currently exists. This review assesses all available human safety data of S. repens monopreparations. Systematic literature searches were conducted from date of inception to February 2008 in five electronic databases; reference lists and our departmental files were checked for further relevant publications. Information was requested from spontaneous reporting schemes of the WHO and national safety bodies. Twenty-four manufacturers/distributors of S. repens preparations and four herbalist organizations were contacted for additional information. No language restrictions were imposed. Only reports of adverse events in humans from monopreparations of S. repens were included. Data from all articles, regardless of study design, reporting adverse events or interactions were independently extracted by the first author and validated by the second. Forty articles (26 randomized controlled trials, 4 non-randomized controlled trials, 6 uncontrolled trials and 4 case reports/series) were included. They suggest that adverse events associated with the use of S. repens are mild and similar to those with placebo. The most frequently reported adverse events are abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea, fatigue, headache, decreased libido and rhinitis. More serious adverse events such as death and cerebral haemorrhage are reported in isolated case reports and data from spontaneous reporting schemes, but causality is questionable. No drug interactions were reported. Currently available data suggest that S. repens is well tolerated by most users and is not

  20. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects.

  1. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects. PMID:27357302

  2. Adverse Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Arumugham, Shyam Sundar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment commonly used for depression and other major psychiatric disorders. We discuss potential adverse effects (AEs) associated with ECT and strategies for their prevention and management. Common acute AEs include headache, nausea, myalgia, and confusion; these are self-limiting and are managed symptomatically. Serious but uncommon AEs include cardiovascular, pulmonary, and cerebrovascular events; these may be minimized with screening for risk factors and by physiologic monitoring. Although most cognitive AEs of ECT are short-lasting, troublesome retrograde amnesia may rarely persist. Modifications of and improvements in treatment techniques minimize cognitive and other AEs. PMID:27514303

  3. Teratogenic drugs and their drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ahn, M R; Li, L; Shon, J; Bashaw, E D; Kim, M-J

    2016-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Guidance for Industry-Drug Interaction Studies, recommends that a potential human teratogen needs to be studied in vivo for effects on contraceptive steroids.(1) This article highlights the need to evaluate the drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between drugs with teratogenic potential and hormonal contraceptives (HCs) during drug development. It also addresses the FDA's effort of communicating DDI findings in product labels to mitigate the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:27090193

  4. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part I: introduction, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and acute treatments.

    PubMed

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the treatment of primary headaches has made available specific, effective and safe medications for these disorders, which are widely spread among the general population. One of the negative consequences of this undoubtedly positive progress is the risk of drug-drug interactions. This review is the first in a two-part series on pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of headache medications. Part I addresses acute treatments. Part II focuses on prophylactic treatments. The overall aim of this series is to increase the awareness of physicians, either primary care providers or specialists, regarding this topic. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of major severity involving acute medications are a minority among those reported in literature. The main drug combinations to avoid are: i) NSAIDs plus drugs with a narrow therapeutic range (i.e., digoxin, methotrexate, etc.); ii) sumatriptan, rizatriptan or zolmitriptan plus monoamine oxidase inhibitors; iii) substrates and inhibitors of CYP2D6 (i.e., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, etc.) and -3A4 (i.e., ergot derivatives, eletriptan, etc.), as well as other substrates or inhibitors of the same CYP isoenzymes. The risk of having clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions seems to be limited in patients with low frequency headaches, but could be higher in chronic headache sufferers with medication overuse. PMID:17125411

  5. [Adverse drug reactions in the elderly: What dermatologists should know].

    PubMed

    Kratzsch, D; Simon, J-C; Treudler, R

    2016-02-01

    Pharmacotherapy in the elderly represents a challenge for dermatologists in regard to comorbidities, drug interactions, and compliance. Age-associated multimorbidity often results in polypharmacy and elevates the risk of adverse drug reactions. Crucial age-related alterations in pharmacokinetics must be considered when selecting drugs, particularly decreased total body water, altered proportion between muscle mass and adipose tissue, as well as decreased renal function. The purpose of this review is to help the reader identify relevant adverse drug reactions of often prescribed systemic dermatological pharmacons in geriatric patients and makes recommendations for their adequate application. PMID:26643292

  6. Polytherapy and drug interactions in elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gujjarlamudi, Hima Bindu

    2016-01-01

    There is an increase in population of elderly above the age of 65. As age advances, more diseases develop resulting in use of more medications. Physiological changes, alterations in homeostatic regulation and diseases modify pharmacokinetics and drug response in older patients. The risk for drug interactions and drug-related problems increases along with multiple medications. Periodic evaluation of the patients’ drug regimen is essential to minimize polytherapy. Clinicians must be alert to the use of herbal and dietary supplements as they are prone to drug-drug interactions. This article focuses on the possible pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and herbal drug interactions occurring in the elderly. PMID:27721636

  7. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate.

  8. Coadministration of pioglitazone or glyburide and alogliptin: pharmacokinetic drug interaction assessment in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Karim, Aziz; Laurent, Aziz; Munsaka, Melvin; Wann, Elisabeth; Fleck, Penny; Mekki, Qais

    2009-10-01

    Alogliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor under investigation for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Potential pharmacokinetic (PK) drug-drug interactions of alogliptin with pioglitazone or glyburide were evaluated in healthy adults. In a randomized, 6-sequence, 3-period crossover study (study I), participants (n = 30 enrolled; n = 27 completed) received monotherapy with pioglitazone 45 mg once daily (qd), alogliptin 25 mg qd, or coadministration of the 2 agents. The 12-day treatment periods were separated by a > or =10-day washout interval. In a nonrandomized, single-sequence study (study II), participants (n = 24 completed) received a single 5-mg dose of the sulfonylurea glyburide, alone and after 8 days of dosing with alogliptin 25 mg qd. Sequential samples of blood (both studies) and urine (first study) were obtained for determination of PK parameters for alogliptin, pioglitazone, their metabolites, and glyburide. Minor changes in PK parameters between combination therapy and monotherapy were obtained but not judged to be clinically relevant. The combination treatments were well tolerated, although glyburide frequently caused hypoglycemia. Most adverse events were of mild intensity and occurred with a frequency similar to that with monotherapy. It is concluded that pioglitazone or glyburide can be administered with alogliptin without dose adjustment to any component of the combination therapy. PMID:19622714

  9. Idiosyncratic Adverse Drug Reactions: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Naisbitt, Dean J.

    2013-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for patients; they also markedly increase the uncertainty of drug development. The major targets are skin, liver, and bone marrow. Clinical characteristics suggest that IDRs are immune mediated, and there is substantive evidence that most, but not all, IDRs are caused by chemically reactive species. However, rigorous mechanistic studies are very difficult to perform, especially in the absence of valid animal models. Models to explain how drugs or reactive metabolites interact with the MHC/T-cell receptor complex include the hapten and P-I models, and most recently it was found that abacavir can interact reversibly with MHC to alter the endogenous peptides that are presented to T cells. The discovery of HLA molecules as important risk factors for some IDRs has also significantly contributed to our understanding of these adverse reactions, but it is not yet clear what fraction of IDRs have a strong HLA dependence. In addition, with the exception of abacavir, most patients who have the HLA that confers a higher IDR risk with a specific drug will not have an IDR when treated with that drug. Interindividual differences in T-cell receptors and other factors also presumably play a role in determining which patients will have an IDR. The immune response represents a delicate balance, and immune tolerance may be the dominant response to a drug that can cause IDRs. PMID:23476052

  10. Idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Uetrecht, Jack; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2013-04-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for patients; they also markedly increase the uncertainty of drug development. The major targets are skin, liver, and bone marrow. Clinical characteristics suggest that IDRs are immune mediated, and there is substantive evidence that most, but not all, IDRs are caused by chemically reactive species. However, rigorous mechanistic studies are very difficult to perform, especially in the absence of valid animal models. Models to explain how drugs or reactive metabolites interact with the MHC/T-cell receptor complex include the hapten and P-I models, and most recently it was found that abacavir can interact reversibly with MHC to alter the endogenous peptides that are presented to T cells. The discovery of HLA molecules as important risk factors for some IDRs has also significantly contributed to our understanding of these adverse reactions, but it is not yet clear what fraction of IDRs have a strong HLA dependence. In addition, with the exception of abacavir, most patients who have the HLA that confers a higher IDR risk with a specific drug will not have an IDR when treated with that drug. Interindividual differences in T-cell receptors and other factors also presumably play a role in determining which patients will have an IDR. The immune response represents a delicate balance, and immune tolerance may be the dominant response to a drug that can cause IDRs. PMID:23476052

  11. Pharmacokinetic interaction of riociguat with ketoconazole, clarithromycin, and midazolam

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Reiner; Unger, Sigrun; Thomas, Dirk; Reber, Michael; Weimann, Gerrit; Dietrich, Hartmut; Arens, Erich R.; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension that is principally metabolized via the cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathway. Three studies in healthy males investigated potential pharmacokinetic interactions between riociguat and CYP inhibitors (ketoconazole, clarithromycin, and midazolam). In two studies, subjects were pretreated with either once-daily ketoconazole 400 mg or twice-daily clarithromycin 500 mg for 4 days before cotreatment with either riociguat 0.5 mg ± ketoconazole 400 mg or riociguat 1.0 mg ± clarithromycin 500 mg. In the third study, subjects received riociguat 2.5 mg 3 times daily (tid) for 3 days, followed by cotreatment with riociguat 2.5 mg tid ± midazolam 7.5 mg. Pharmacokinetic parameters, the effect of smoking on riociguat pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability were assessed. Pre- and cotreatment with ketoconazole and clarithromycin led to increased riociguat exposure. Pre- and cotreatment with riociguat had no significant effect on midazolam plasma concentrations. In all studies, the bioavailability of riociguat was reduced in smokers because its clearance to the metabolite M1 increased. Riociguat ± ketoconazole, clarithromycin, or midazolam was generally well tolerated. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) across all studies were headache and dyspepsia. One serious TEAE was reported in the midazolam study. Owing to the potential for hypotension, concomitant use of riociguat with multipathway inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, should be approached with caution. Coadministration of riociguat with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors, for example, clarithromycin, does not require additional dose adjustment. No significant drug-drug interaction was revealed between riociguat and midazolam. PMID:27162627

  12. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    PubMed

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety.

  13. Adverse weather impacts on arable cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Damages due to extreme or adverse weather strongly depend on crop type, crop stage, soil conditions and management. The impact is largest during the sensitive periods of the farming calendar, and requires a modelling approach to capture the interactions between the crop, its environment and the occurrence of the meteorological event. The hypothesis is that extreme and adverse weather events can be quantified and subsequently incorporated in current crop models. Since crop development is driven by thermal time and photoperiod, a regional crop model was used to examine the likely frequency, magnitude and impacts of frost, drought, heat stress and waterlogging in relation to the cropping season and crop sensitive stages. Risk profiles and associated return levels were obtained by fitting generalized extreme value distributions to block maxima for air humidity, water balance and temperature variables. The risk profiles were subsequently confronted with yields and yield losses for the major arable crops in Belgium, notably winter wheat, winter barley, winter oilseed rape, sugar beet, potato and maize at the field (farm records) to regional scale (statistics). The average daily vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and reference evapotranspiration (ET0) during the growing season is significantly lower (p < 0.001) and has a higher variability before 1988 than after 1988. Distribution patterns of VPD and ET0 have relevant impacts on crop yields. The response to rising temperatures depends on the crop's capability to condition its microenvironment. Crops short of water close their stomata, lose their evaporative cooling potential and ultimately become susceptible to heat stress. Effects of heat stress therefore have to be combined with moisture availability such as the precipitation deficit or the soil water balance. Risks of combined heat and moisture deficit stress appear during the summer. These risks are subsequently related to crop damage. The methodology of defining

  14. Idiosyncratic adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Franciotta, Diego; Perucca, Emilio

    2007-07-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions may be defined as adverse effects that cannot be explained by the known mechanisms of action of the offending agent, do not occur at any dose in most patients, and develop mostly unpredictably in susceptible individuals only. These reactions are generally thought to account for up to 10% of all adverse drug reactions, but their frequency may be higher depending on the definition adopted. Idiosyncratic reactions are a major source of concern because they encompass most life-threatening effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), as well as many other reactions requiring discontinuation of treatment. Based on the underlying mechanisms, idiosyncratic reactions can be differentiated into (1) immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, which may range from benign skin rashes to serious conditions such as drug-related rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms; (2) reactions involving unusual nonimmune-mediated individual susceptibility, often related to abnormal production or defective detoxification of reactive cytotoxic metabolites (as in valproate-induced liver toxicity); and (3) off-target pharmacology, whereby a drug interacts directly with a system other than that for which it is intended, an example being some types of AED-induced dyskinesias. Although no AED is free from the potential of inducing idiosyncratic reactions, the magnitude of risk and the most common manifestations vary from one drug to another, a consideration that impacts on treatment choices. Serious consequences of idiosyncratic reactions can be minimized by knowledge of risk factors, avoidance of specific AEDs in subpopulations at risk, cautious dose titration, and careful monitoring of clinical response.

  15. Life adversity is associated with smoking relapse after a quit attempt.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Andrine; Olson, Leif; Nakajima, Motohiro; Schulberg, Lauren; al'Absi, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    Multiple cross-sectional studies have linked adverse childhood events and adult adversities to current smoking, lifetime smoking, and former smoking. To date, however, there have been no direct observational studies assessing the influence of adversities on smoking relapse. We prospectively followed 123 participants, 86 of whom were habitual smokers, from pre-quit ad libitum smoking to four weeks post-quit. Thirty-seven non-smokers were also tested in parallel as a comparison group. Subjects provided biological samples for confirmation of abstinence status and self-report history of adversities such as abuse, neglect, family dysfunction, incarceration, and child-parent separation. They also completed mood and smoking withdrawal symptom measures. The results indicated that within non-smokers and smokers who relapsed within the first month of a quit attempt, but not abstainers, females had significantly higher adversity scores than males. Cigarette craving, which was independent from depressive affect, increased for low adversity participants, but not those with no adversity nor high adversity. These results demonstrate that sex and relapse status interact to predict adversity and that craving for nicotine may be an important additional mediator of relapse. These results add further support to the previous cross-sectional evidence of an adversity and smoking relationship. Further studies to clarify how adversity complicates smoking cessation and impacts smoking behaviors are warranted. PMID:27100471

  16. Exercise hypertension: an adverse prognosis?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan G; Rubin, Stanley A; Ellestad, Myrvin H

    2009-01-01

    We sought to clarify the prognostic importance of an "exaggerated" or "hypertensive" systolic blood pressure response to exercise during an exercise test. Studies evaluating the prognosis for cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality in those with hypertension during exercise testing were systematically reviewed. Fourteen studies were identified. Six studies were of healthy volunteers or hypertensives. Eight studies were in subjects with known or suspected heart disease. Without established heart disease, exercise hypertension predicted cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. However, two of the six studies included a multivariate analysis; both demonstrated no independent association. Studies in subjects with known or suspected heart disease demonstrated that exercise hypertension predicted fewer cardiac events and lesser mortality or, after multivariate adjustment, no associated risk. In a healthy population, a higher exercise blood pressure may indicate hypertension or prehypertension, instead of normal vascular function, and an associated long-term adverse prognosis. In a population with a high burden of heart disease, the highest risk subjects with the most extensive cardiac disease may not be capable of generating pressure or workload to allow the manifestation of exercise systolic hypertension. By comparison, therefore, those with exercise hypertension have a better prognosis. PMID:20409979

  17. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  18. Adverse effects of general anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, M C; Reilly, C S

    1992-01-01

    This review deals with the adverse reactions associated with general anaesthetic agents in current use. These reactions fall into 2 categories; those which are more common, predictable and often closely related, and those which are rare, unpredictable and carry a high mortality. Both inhalational and intravenous anaesthetic agents affect the central nervous and cardio-respiratory systems in a dose-related manner. Neuronal inhibition results in decreasing levels of consciousness and depression of the medullary vital centres which can lead to cardiorespiratory failure. Both groups of agents have some depressant effect on the myocardium and vascular smooth muscle leading to a fall in cardiac output and hypotension. Centrally-mediated respiratory depression is common to both groups and the inhalational agents have a direct effect on lung physiology. The most important idiosyncratic reactions to the volatile agents are malignant hyperpyrexia and 'halothane hepatitis'. Malignant hyperpyrexia has an incidence of 1:12,000 with a mortality of about 24%. It is triggered most often by halothane together with suxamethonium. Post halothane hepatic necrosis is rare. Evidence points to 2 distinct syndromes; direct toxicity from the products of reductive metabolism, and a more serious illness, immunologically mediated via haptens formed by liver proteins and the products of oxidative metabolism. Prolonged nitrous oxide exposure can cause bone marrow depression and life-threatening pressure effects by expansion of air-filled spaces within the body. The idiosyncratic reactions to the intravenous agents include anaphylactoid reactions (which are rare) and triggering of acute porphyria. Etomidate is immunologically 'clean', but it inhibits cortisol synthesis. PMID:1418699

  19. [Cutaneous adverse effects of TNFalpha antagonists].

    PubMed

    Failla, V; Sabatiello, M; Lebas, E; de Schaetzen, V; Dezfoulian, B; Nikkels, A F

    2012-01-01

    The TNFalpha antagonists, including adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab, represent a class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Although cutaneous adverse effects are uncommon, they are varied. There is no particular risk profile to develop cutaneous adverse effects. The principal acute side effects are injection site reactions and pruritus. The major long term cutaneous side effects are infectious and inflammatory conditions. Neoplastic skin diseases are exceptional. The association with other immunosuppressive agents can increase the risk of developing cutaneous adverse effects. Some adverse effects, such as lupus erythematosus, require immediate withdrawal of the biological treatment, while in other cases temporary withdrawal is sufficient. The majority of the other cutaneous adverse effects can be dealt without interrupting biologic treatment. Preclinical and clinical investigations revealed that the new biologics, aiming IL12/23, IL23 and IL17, present a similar profile of cutaneous adverse effects, although inflammatory skin reactions may be less often encountered compared to TNFalpha antagonists.

  20. Mu opioid receptor polymorphism, early social adversity, and social traits.

    PubMed

    Carver, Charles S; Johnson, Sheri L; Kim, Youngmee

    2016-10-01

    A polymorphism in the mu opioid receptor gene OPRM1 (rs1799971) has been investigated for its role in sensitivity to social contexts. Evidence suggests that the G allele of this polymorphism is associated with higher levels of sensitivity. This study tested for main effects of the polymorphism and its interaction with a self-report measure of childhood adversity as an index of negative environment. Outcomes were several personality measures relevant to social connection. Significant interactions were obtained, such that the negative impact of childhood adversity on personality was greater among G carriers than among A homozygotes on measures of agreeableness, interdependence, anger proneness, hostility, authentic pride, life engagement, and an index of (mostly negative) feelings coloring one's world view. Findings support the role of OPRM1 in sensitivity to negative environments. Limitations are noted, including the lack of a measure of advantageous social environment to assess sensitivity to positive social contexts.

  1. Integrated Analysis of Genetic and Proteomic Data Identifies Biomarkers Associated with Adverse Events Following Smallpox Vaccination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Complex clinical outcomes, such as adverse reaction to vaccination, arise from the concerted interactions among the myriad components of a biological system. Therefore, comprehensive etiological models can be developed only through the integrated study of multiple types of experi...

  2. Human-Computer Interactions: Are There Adverse Health Consequences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emurian, Henry H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the hypothesis that similarities may exist between laboratory research paradigms evoking elevated blood pressure during task performance by normal subjects and video display terminal (VDT) work done by data clerks and college students. Type A behavior and the development of coronary heart disease are discussed, and further research needs…

  3. Strategic approaches to adverse outcome pathway development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are conceptual frameworks for organizing biological and toxicological knowledge in a manner that supports extrapolation of data pertaining to the initiation or early progression of toxicity to an apical adverse outcome that occurs at a level of org...

  4. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed Central

    Reason, J

    1995-01-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  5. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed

    Reason, J

    1995-06-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  6. Multiple adverse experiences and child cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Guinosso, Stephanie A; Johnson, Sara B; Riley, Anne W

    2016-01-01

    During childhood and adolescence, children's social environments shape their cognitive development. Children exposed to multiple adversities in their social environment are more likely to have poorer cognitive outcomes. These findings have prompted interest among pediatric and public health communities to screen and connect youth to appropriate interventions that ameliorate the detrimental effects of adverse exposures. Such intervention efforts can be improved with a stronger conceptual understanding of the relationship between multiple adverse exposures and child cognitive development. This includes disentangling adverse exposures from other risk factors or underlying mechanisms, specifying mechanisms of action, and determining when adverse exposures are most detrimental. This review summarizes findings from the literature on each of these areas and proposes a conceptual model to guide further research and intervention.

  7. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kibble, M W; Ross, M B

    1987-09-01

    The effects of anabolic steroid use on athletic performance and the adverse effects associated with the use of anabolic steroids are reviewed. Anabolic steroids increase protein synthesis in skeletal muscles and reverse catabolic processes. Because of these properties, some athletes use anabolic steroids in an attempt to improve their athletic performance. However, studies indicate that increases in muscle mass and strength during anabolic steroid administration are observed only in athletes who already are weight-trained and who continue intensive training while maintaining high-protein, high-calorie diets. Adverse effects attributed to anabolic steroid use occur frequently. Serious adverse effects include hepatic and endocrine dysfunction; cardiovascular and behavioral changes also are reported. Some of the adverse effects associated with the use of these agents are irreversible, particularly in women. The use of anabolic steroids to improve athletic performance has become prevalent. However, the reported benefits are tempered by numerous adverse reactions.

  8. Adulthood personality correlates of childhood adversity

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Johnson, Sheri L.; McCullough, Michael E.; Forster, Daniel E.; Joormann, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Childhood adversity has been linked to internalizing and externalizing disorders and personality disorders in adulthood. This study extends that research by examining several personality measures as correlates of childhood adversity. Method: In a college sample self-reports were collected of childhood adversity, several scales relating to personality, and current depression symptoms as a control variable. The personality-related scales were reduced to four latent variables, which we termed anger/aggression, extrinsic focus, agreeableness, and engagement. Results: Controlling for concurrent depressive symptoms and gender, higher levels of reported childhood adversity related to lower agreeableness and to higher anger/aggression and extrinsic focus. Conclusions: Findings suggest that early adversity is linked to personality variables relevant to the building of social connection. PMID:25484874

  9. Managing adverse effects of glaucoma medications

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic, progressive disease in which retinal ganglion cells disappear and subsequent, gradual reductions in the visual field ensues. Glaucoma eye drops have hypotensive effects and like all other medications are associated with adverse effects. Adverse reactions may either result from the main agent or from preservatives used in the drug vehicle. The preservative benzalkonium chloride, is one such compound that causes frequent adverse reactions such as superficial punctate keratitis, corneal erosion, conjunctival allergy, and conjunctival injection. Adverse reactions related to main hypotensive agents have been divided into those affecting the eye and those affecting the entire body. In particular, β-blockers frequently cause systematic adverse reactions, including bradycardia, decrease in blood pressure, irregular pulse and asthma attacks. Prostaglandin analogs have distinctive local adverse reactions, including eyelash bristling/lengthening, eyelid pigmentation, iris pigmentation, and upper eyelid deepening. No systemic adverse reactions have been linked to prostaglandin analog eye drop usage. These adverse reactions may be minimized when they are detected early and prevented by reducing the number of different eye drops used (via fixed combination eye drops), reducing the number of times eye drops are administered, using benzalkonium chloride-free eye drops, using lower concentration eye drops, and providing proper drop instillation training. Additionally, a one-time topical medication can be given to patients to allow observation of any adverse reactions, thereafter the preparation of a topical medication with the fewest known adverse reactions can be prescribed. This does require precise patient monitoring and inquiries about patient symptoms following medication use. PMID:24872675

  10. Childhood Adversities and Adult Headache in Poland and Germany

    PubMed Central

    Reuchlein, Bettina; Henn, Lea; Brian, Tamara; Schier, Katarzyna; Hardt, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Various childhood adversities have been found to be associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, associations were moderate in most studies, i.e. odds ratios (OR) were between one and two. Method An internet survey was performed in 508 Polish and 500 German subjects. A total of 19 childhood adversities were selected and their associations with headaches explored. Age, gender and country were included as potential confounders, as well as their two-way interaction with the risk factors. Results Two strong risk factors were identified. (1) A combined score for physical and emotional neglect showed an odds ratio (OR) of 2.78 (p < .002) to the frequency of headache in adulthood as a main effect. (2) Father having had chronic pain showed an OR of 4.36 (p < .001) with headache in adulthood for women, but not for men (OR = 0.86, p < .556). The majority of the examined childhood adversities were not associated with adult headache, neither when tested individually nor as a sum score. Conclusion This study confirms results from previous ones that childhood adversities may play a role in the development of adult headache, but it is a rather minor one. Contrary to other studies, neglect turned out to be one of the strongest predictors. PMID:26859500

  11. Collateral Adverse Outcomes After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Gundle, Kenneth; Hart, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Collateral adverse outcomes are the expected or unavoidable results of a procedure that is performed in a standard manner and typically experienced by the patient. Collateral adverse outcomes do not result from errors, nor are they rare. Collateral adverse outcomes occur as the direct result of a surgical procedure and must be accepted as a trade-off to attain the intended benefits of the surgical procedure. As such, collateral adverse outcomes do not fit into the traditional definition of a complication or adverse event. Examples of collateral adverse outcomes after lumbar spine arthrodesis include lumbar stiffness, postoperative psychological stress, postoperative pain, peri-incisional numbness, paraspinal muscle denervation, and adjacent-level degeneration. Ideally, a comparison of interventions for the treatment of a clinical condition should include information on both the negative consequences (expected and unexpected) and potential benefits of the treatment options. The objective evaluation and reporting of collateral adverse outcomes will provide surgeons with a more complete picture of invasive interventions and, thus, the improved ability to assess alternative treatment options. PMID:27049197

  12. [Hypothyroidism as the result of drug interaction between ferrous sulfate and levothyroxine].

    PubMed

    Fiaux, E; Kadri, K; Levasseur, C; Le Guillou, C; Chassagne, P

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of drug-drug interaction between ferrous sulfate and l-thyroxin. A 95-year-old woman treated successfully with l-thyroxin for many years received ferrous sulfate for anemia. This association led rapidly to recurrence of hypothyroidism with elevated serum than TSH level which completely resolved after withdrawal of iron therapy. Interaction was confirmed after both drugs were daily administrated separately without recurrence of hypothyroidism. PMID:20554088

  13. RACIAL RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION AND ADVERSE BIRTH OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION. The disparity between black and white women's adverse birth outcomes has been subject to much investigation, yet the factors underlying its persistence remain elusive, which has encouraged research on neighborhood-level influences, including racial residential segr...

  14. Encouraging spontaneous reporting of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    One priority when organising surveillance of health products is to remove barriers to reporting adverse effects. One way to encourage reporting is by providing regular feedback, as practised by the German drug bulletin arznei-telegramm, for example. PMID:25802925

  15. Adverse Outcome Pathways: From Definition to Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge for both human health and ecological toxicologists is the transparent application of mechanistic (e.g., molecular, biochemical, histological) data to risk assessments. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework designed to meet this need. Specifical...

  16. Assessment of the pharmacokinetic interaction between eltrombopag and lopinavir-ritonavir in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Wire, Mary B; McLean, Heidi B; Pendry, Carolyn; Theodore, Dickens; Park, Jung W; Peng, Bin

    2012-06-01

    Eltrombopag is an orally bioavailable thrombopoietin receptor agonist that is approved for the treatment of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. It is being developed for other medical disorders that are associated with thrombocytopenia. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may suffer from thrombocytopenia as a result of their HIV disease or coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). HIV medications, particularly ritonavir (RTV)-boosted HIV protease inhibitors, are involved in many drug interactions. This study evaluated the potential drug-drug interaction between eltrombopag and lopinavir (LPV)/RTV. Forty healthy adult subjects enrolled in this open-label, three-period, single-sequence crossover study received a single 100-mg dose of eltrombopag (period 1), LPV/RTV at 400/100 mg twice daily (BID) for 14 days (period 2), and LPV/RTV at 400/100 mg BID (2 doses) with a single 100-mg dose of eltrombopag administered with the morning LPV/RTV dose (period 3). There was a 3-day washout between periods 1 and 2 and no washout between periods 2 and 3. Serial pharmacokinetic samples were collected during 72 h in periods 1 and 3 and during 12 h in period 2. The coadministration of 400/100 mg LPV/RTV BID with a single dose of 100 mg eltrombopag decreased the plasma eltrombopag area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero extrapolated to infinity (AUC(0-∞)) by 17%, on average, with no change in plasma LPV/RTV exposure. Adverse events (AEs) reported in period 2 were consistent with known LPV/RTV AEs, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, rash, and fatigue. No subjects withdrew due to AEs, and no serious AEs were reported. These study results suggest that platelet counts should be monitored and the eltrombopag dose adjusted accordingly if LPV/RTV therapy is initiated or discontinued. PMID:22391553

  17. Assessment of the Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Eltrombopag and Lopinavir-Ritonavir in Healthy Adult Subjects

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Heidi B.; Pendry, Carolyn; Theodore, Dickens; Park, Jung W.; Peng, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Eltrombopag is an orally bioavailable thrombopoietin receptor agonist that is approved for the treatment of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. It is being developed for other medical disorders that are associated with thrombocytopenia. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may suffer from thrombocytopenia as a result of their HIV disease or coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). HIV medications, particularly ritonavir (RTV)-boosted HIV protease inhibitors, are involved in many drug interactions. This study evaluated the potential drug-drug interaction between eltrombopag and lopinavir (LPV)/RTV. Forty healthy adult subjects enrolled in this open-label, three-period, single-sequence crossover study received a single 100-mg dose of eltrombopag (period 1), LPV/RTV at 400/100 mg twice daily (BID) for 14 days (period 2), and LPV/RTV at 400/100 mg BID (2 doses) with a single 100-mg dose of eltrombopag administered with the morning LPV/RTV dose (period 3). There was a 3-day washout between periods 1 and 2 and no washout between periods 2 and 3. Serial pharmacokinetic samples were collected during 72 h in periods 1 and 3 and during 12 h in period 2. The coadministration of 400/100 mg LPV/RTV BID with a single dose of 100 mg eltrombopag decreased the plasma eltrombopag area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-∞) by 17%, on average, with no change in plasma LPV/RTV exposure. Adverse events (AEs) reported in period 2 were consistent with known LPV/RTV AEs, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, rash, and fatigue. No subjects withdrew due to AEs, and no serious AEs were reported. These study results suggest that platelet counts should be monitored and the eltrombopag dose adjusted accordingly if LPV/RTV therapy is initiated or discontinued. PMID:22391553

  18. Clinical nutrition and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ekincioğlu, Aygin Bayraktar; Demirkan, Kutay

    2013-01-01

    A drug's plasma level, pharmacological effects or side effects, elimination, physicochemical properties or stability could be changed by interactions of drug-drug or drug-nutrition products in patients who receive enteral or parenteral nutritional support. As a result, patients might experience ineffective outcomes or unexpected effects of therapy (such as drug toxicity, embolism). Stability or incompatibility problems between parenteral nutrition admixtures and drugs might lead to alterations in expected therapeutic responses from drug and/or parenteral nutrition, occlusion in venous catheter or symptoms or mortality due to infusion of composed particles. Compatibilities between parenteral nutrition and drugs are not always guaranteed in clinical practice. Although the list of compatibility or incompatibilities of drugs are published for the use of clinicians in their practices, factors such as composition of parenteral nutrition admixture, drug concentration, contact time in catheter, temperature of the environment and exposure to light could change the status of compatibilities between drugs and nutrition admixtures. There could be substantial clinical changes occurring in the patient's nutritional status and pharmacological effects of drugs due to interactions between enteral nutrition and drugs. Drug toxicity and ineffective nutritional support might occur as a result of those predictable interactions. Although administration of drugs via feeding tube is a complex and problematic route for drug usage, it is possible to minimise the risk of tube occlusion, decreased effects of drug and drug toxicity by using an appropriate technique. Therefore, it is important to consider pharmacological dosage forms of drugs while administering drugs via a feeding tube. In conclusion, since the pharmacists are well-experienced and more knowledgeable professionals in drugs and drug usage compared to other healthcare providers, it is suggested that provision of information and

  19. Adverse Psychiatric Effects Associated with Herbal Weight-Loss Products

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, F. Saverio; Coviello, Marialuce; Imperatori, Claudio; Francesconi, Marta; Hough, Christina M.; Valeriani, Giuseppe; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Bolzan Mariotti Posocco, Flaminia; Santacroce, Rita; Minichino, Amedeo; Corazza, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and overeating are among the most prevalent health concerns worldwide and individuals are increasingly using performance and image-enhancing drugs (PIEDs) as an easy and fast way to control their weight. Among these, herbal weight-loss products (HWLPs) often attract users due to their health claims, assumed safety, easy availability, affordable price, extensive marketing, and the perceived lack of need for professional oversight. Reports suggest that certain HWLPs may lead to onset or exacerbation of psychiatric disturbances. Here we review the available evidence on psychiatric adverse effects of HWLPs due to their intrinsic toxicity and potential for interaction with psychiatric medications. PMID:26457296

  20. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  1. ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS IN THE ORAL CAVITY.

    PubMed

    Boras, Vanja Vučićević; Andabak-Rogulj, Ana; Brailo, Vlaho; Šimunković, Sonja Kraljević; Gabrić, Dragana; Vrdoljak, Danko Velimir

    2015-06-01

    Every medication may lead to adverse effects, even when used in standard doses and mode of application. In the oral cavity, adverse effects may affect every part of oral mucosa and are the result of medications taken either locally or systemically. Oral adverse reactions to drugs are not typical and therefore sometimes not easy to recognize. On diagnosing adverse side effects in the oral cavity, experienced clinician will usually diagnose the condition on the basis of detailed medical history and clinical finding. However, the only objective evidence for the offending drug is 're-challenge', i.e. exposure to the drug after its discontinuation. It carries a huge risk of anaphylactic reaction; therefore it has to be performed in a controlled hospital setting. Therapy is based on immediate exclusion of the offending drug and, if lesions are present in the oral cavity, topical or systemic corticosteroid therapy is prescribed. This article gives a review of patients with oral adverse drug reactions referred to the Department of Oral Medicine in Zagreb.

  2. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child.

  3. Mismatch or allostatic load? Timing of life adversity differentially shapes gray matter volume and anxious temperament.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Scharfenort, Robert; Schümann, Dirk; Schiele, Miriam A; Münsterkötter, Anna L; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Haaker, Jan; Kalisch, Raffael; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Zwanzger, Peter; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, adversity was defined as the accumulation of environmental events (allostatic load). Recently however, a mismatch between the early and the later (adult) environment (mismatch) has been hypothesized to be critical for disease development, a hypothesis that has not yet been tested explicitly in humans. We explored the impact of timing of life adversity (childhood and past year) on anxiety and depression levels (N = 833) and brain morphology (N = 129). Both remote (childhood) and proximal (recent) adversities were differentially mirrored in morphometric changes in areas critically involved in emotional processing (i.e. amygdala/hippocampus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, respectively). The effect of adversity on affect acted in an additive way with no evidence for interactions (mismatch). Structural equation modeling demonstrated a direct effect of adversity on morphometric estimates and anxiety/depression without evidence of brain morphology functioning as a mediator. Our results highlight that adversity manifests as pronounced changes in brain morphometric and affective temperament even though these seem to represent distinct mechanistic pathways. A major goal of future studies should be to define critical time periods for the impact of adversity and strategies for intervening to prevent or reverse the effects of adverse childhood life experiences.

  4. Mismatch or allostatic load? Timing of life adversity differentially shapes gray matter volume and anxious temperament.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Scharfenort, Robert; Schümann, Dirk; Schiele, Miriam A; Münsterkötter, Anna L; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Haaker, Jan; Kalisch, Raffael; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Zwanzger, Peter; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, adversity was defined as the accumulation of environmental events (allostatic load). Recently however, a mismatch between the early and the later (adult) environment (mismatch) has been hypothesized to be critical for disease development, a hypothesis that has not yet been tested explicitly in humans. We explored the impact of timing of life adversity (childhood and past year) on anxiety and depression levels (N = 833) and brain morphology (N = 129). Both remote (childhood) and proximal (recent) adversities were differentially mirrored in morphometric changes in areas critically involved in emotional processing (i.e. amygdala/hippocampus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, respectively). The effect of adversity on affect acted in an additive way with no evidence for interactions (mismatch). Structural equation modeling demonstrated a direct effect of adversity on morphometric estimates and anxiety/depression without evidence of brain morphology functioning as a mediator. Our results highlight that adversity manifests as pronounced changes in brain morphometric and affective temperament even though these seem to represent distinct mechanistic pathways. A major goal of future studies should be to define critical time periods for the impact of adversity and strategies for intervening to prevent or reverse the effects of adverse childhood life experiences. PMID:26568620

  5. Mismatch or allostatic load? Timing of life adversity differentially shapes gray matter volume and anxious temperament

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Manuel; Scharfenort, Robert; Schümann, Dirk; Schiele, Miriam A.; Münsterkötter, Anna L.; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Haaker, Jan; Kalisch, Raffael; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Zwanzger, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, adversity was defined as the accumulation of environmental events (allostatic load). Recently however, a mismatch between the early and the later (adult) environment (mismatch) has been hypothesized to be critical for disease development, a hypothesis that has not yet been tested explicitly in humans. We explored the impact of timing of life adversity (childhood and past year) on anxiety and depression levels (N = 833) and brain morphology (N = 129). Both remote (childhood) and proximal (recent) adversities were differentially mirrored in morphometric changes in areas critically involved in emotional processing (i.e. amygdala/hippocampus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, respectively). The effect of adversity on affect acted in an additive way with no evidence for interactions (mismatch). Structural equation modeling demonstrated a direct effect of adversity on morphometric estimates and anxiety/depression without evidence of brain morphology functioning as a mediator. Our results highlight that adversity manifests as pronounced changes in brain morphometric and affective temperament even though these seem to represent distinct mechanistic pathways. A major goal of future studies should be to define critical time periods for the impact of adversity and strategies for intervening to prevent or reverse the effects of adverse childhood life experiences. PMID:26568620

  6. Predicting Adverse Drug Events from Personal Health Messages

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Brant W.; Berlin, Richard; Schatz, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) remain a large problem in the United States, being the fourth leading cause of death, despite post market drug surveillance. Much post consumer drug surveillance relies on self-reported “spontaneous” patient data. Previous work has performed datamining over the FDA’s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) and other spontaneous reporting systems to identify drug interactions and drugs correlated with high rates of serious adverse events. However, safety problems have resulted from the lack of post marketing surveillance information about drugs, with underreporting rates of up to 98% within such systems1,2. We explore the use of online health forums as a source of data to identify drugs for further FDA scrutiny. In this work we aggregate individuals’ opinions and review of drugs similar to crowd intelligence3. We use natural language processing to group drugs discussed in similar ways and are able to successfully identify drugs withdrawn from the market based on messages discussing them before their removal. PMID:22195073

  7. Adverse reaction; patent blue turning patient blue.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Meera; Hart, Matthew; Ahmed, Farid; McPherson, Sandy

    2012-11-30

    The authors report a severe anaphylactic reaction to Patent Blue V dye used in sentinel node biopsy for lymphatic mapping during breast cancer surgery to stage the axilla. Patent Blue dye is the most widely used in the UK; however, adverse reactions have been reported with the blue dye previously. This case highlights that reactions may not always be immediately evident and to be vigilant in all patients that have undergone procedures using blue dye. If the patients are not responding appropriately particularly during an anaesthetic, one must always think of a possible adverse reaction to the dye. All surgical patients should give consent for adverse reactions to patent blue dye preoperatively. Alternative agents such as methylene blue are considered.

  8. The multisystem adverse effects of NSAID therapy.

    PubMed

    James, D S

    1999-11-01

    The clinical utility of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to manage pain and inflammation is limited by adverse side effects. Although effective analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents, NSAIDs are associated with side effects that are a consequence of nonspecific inhibition of both cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The primary adverse events associated with NSAID therapy are upper gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration, perforation, or bleeding, all of which involve mucosal damage of varying severity and can be asymptomatic and occur with little warning. Clinicians who prescribe NSAIDs should be able to identify patients who are at risk of an NSAID-induced GI adverse event and to detect and manage the event should one occur. The use of COX-2-specific inhibitors to manage pain and inflammation may minimize the risks of NSAID-associated toxicities.

  9. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided. PMID:25535415

  10. Adverse health consequences of the Iraq War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2013-03-16

    The adverse health consequences of the Iraq War (2003-11) were profound. We conclude that at least 116,903 Iraqi non-combatants and more than 4800 coalition military personnel died over the 8-year course. Many Iraqi civilians were injured or became ill because of damage to the health-supporting infrastructure of the country, and about 5 million were displaced. More than 31,000 US military personnel were injured and a substantial percentage of those deployed suffered post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other neuropsychological disorders and their concomitant psychosocial problems. Many family members of military personnel had psychological problems. Further review of the adverse health consequences of this war could help to minimise the adverse health consequences of, and help to prevent, future wars.

  11. Identifying Adverse Drug Events by Relational Learning.

    PubMed

    Page, David; Costa, Vítor Santos; Natarajan, Sriraam; Barnard, Aubrey; Peissig, Peggy; Caldwell, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The pharmaceutical industry, consumer protection groups, users of medications and government oversight agencies are all strongly interested in identifying adverse reactions to drugs. While a clinical trial of a drug may use only a thousand patients, once a drug is released on the market it may be taken by millions of patients. As a result, in many cases adverse drug events (ADEs) are observed in the broader population that were not identified during clinical trials. Therefore, there is a need for continued, post-marketing surveillance of drugs to identify previously-unanticipated ADEs. This paper casts this problem as a reverse machine learning task, related to relational subgroup discovery and provides an initial evaluation of this approach based on experiments with an actual EMR/EHR and known adverse drug events. PMID:24955289

  12. Adolescent Family Adversity and Mental Health Problems: The Role of Adaptive Self-Regulation Capacities. The TRAILS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Martin Paul; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent family adversity is a considerable adaptive challenge in an increasingly turbulent developmental period. Using data from a prospective population cohort of 2230 Dutch adolescents, we tested risk-buffering interactions between adolescent family adversity and self-regulation capacities on mental health. We used two adaptive…

  13. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development and evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway provides a construct for assembling mechanistic information at different levels of biological organization in a form designed to support regulatory decision making. In particular, it frames the link between molecular and cellular events that can be mea...

  14. The adverse outcome pathway knowledge base

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid advancement of the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework has been paralleled by the development of tools to store, analyse, and explore AOPs. The AOP Knowledge Base (AOP-KB) project has brought three independently developed platforms (Effectopedia, AOP-Wiki, and AOP-X...

  15. Linezolid Induced Adverse Drug Reactions - An Update.

    PubMed

    Kishor, Kamal; Dhasmana, Neha; Kamble, Shashank Shivaji; Sahu, Roshan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimen recommended for resistant tuberculosis consists of various drugs and these drugs are prescribed for at least 12-15 months. Such a long duration therapy and high dose of antibiotics result in adverse drug reactions (ADRs). ADRs may lead to various complications in disease management like replacement of drugs, dose increment, therapy withdrawal, etc. Linezolid is one of those drugs, practiced as an anti-mycobacterial agent and it is an important member of drug regimen for MDR and XDR tuberculosis. Linezolid is a broad spectrum antibiotic known for its unique mechanism of inhibition of resistant pathogenic strains. However, it causes serious adverse effects like thrombocytopenia, optic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, lactic acidosis, etc. Literature suggests that Linezolid can cause severe ADRs which affect patient compliance and hinder in therapy to a larger extent. Recent studies confirm the possibility of ADRs to be predicted with genetic make-up of individuals. To effectively deliver the available treatment regimen and ensure patient compliance, it is important to manage ADRs more efficiently. The role of pharmacogenomics in reducing adverse drug effects has been recently explored. In the present review, we discussed about Linezolid induced adverse drug reactions, mechanisms and genetic associations. PMID:26424176

  16. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  17. Pharmacogenomics and adverse drug reactions in children

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Michael J.; Carleton, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a common and important complication of drug therapy in children. Over the past decade it has become increasingly apparent that genetically controlled variations in drug disposition and response are important determinants of adverse events for many important adverse events associated with drug therapy in children. While this research has been difficult to conduct over the past decade technical and ethical evolution has greatly facilitated the ability of investigators to conduct pharmacogenomic studies in children. Some of this research has already resulted in changes in public policy and clinical practice, for example in the case of codeine use by mothers and children. It is likely that the use of pharmacogenomics to enhance drug safety will first be realized among selected groups of children with high rates of drug use such as children with cancer, but it also likely that this research will be extended to other groups of children who have high rates of drug utilization and as well as providing insights into the mechanisms and pathophysiology of adverse drug reactions in children. PMID:24795743

  18. Adverse Stress, Hippocampal Networks, and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Sarah M.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent clinical data have implicated chronic adverse stress as a potential risk factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and data also suggest that normal, physiological stress responses may be impaired in AD. It is possible that pathology associated with AD causes aberrant responses to chronic stress, due to potential alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Recent work in rodent models of AD suggests that chronic adverse stress exacerbates the cognitive deficits and hippocampal pathology that are present in the AD brain. This review summarizes recent findings obtained in experimental AD models regarding the influence of chronic adverse stress on the underlying cellular and molecular disease processes including the potential role of glucocorticoids. Emerging findings suggest that both AD and chronic adverse stress affect hippocampal neural networks in a similar fashion. We describe alterations in hippocampal plasticity that occur in both chronic stress and AD including dendritic remodeling, neurogenesis and long-term potentiation. Finally, we outline potential roles for oxidative stress and neurotrophic factor signaling as key determinants of the impact of chronic stress on the plasticity of neural networks and AD pathogenesis. PMID:19943124

  19. Reducing Adverse Impact: One City's Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Jeff

    Following a workshop on "Innovations in Employment Testing that Improve Validity and Reduce Adverse Impact," the City of Louisville (Kentucky) implemented a strategy to develop a comprehensive testing and recruiting program for police recruits. To improve candidate expectations and preparation, the following activities were undertaken: intense…

  20. Helping Student Teachers Avoid Adverse Legal Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peach, Larry; Reddick, Thomas L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses five areas of the school environment lending themselves to the possibility of teacher and student teacher liability: negligence, malpractice, rights to privacy, field trips, and search of students and school property. Suggests specific guidelines for decreasing the possibility of adverse legal action. (NEC)

  1. Adverse effects of fillers and their histopathology.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2014-12-01

    Injectable fillers nowadays represent a pillar in facial rejuvenation and make a significant contribution to the success of the treatment. Despite their obvious benefits, a wide range of possible complications such as immediate, late, delayed, temporary, or irreversible adverse effects have to be respected. Differentiating the various filler materials, these effects are assigned to histopathology findings and currently available treatment options.

  2. Resilience in the Face of Adversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    "Resilience" is the capacity for moving ahead under adverse circumstances. School superintendents are advised to stay upbeat and mindful of "both-and" opportunities; stay focused on what they care about; remain flexible and tolerant of ambiguity; be proactive, not reactive; and apply resilience-conserving strategies during tough times. (MLH)

  3. [Analysis of Spontaneously Reported Adverse Events].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Observational study is necessary for the evaluation of drug effectiveness in clinical practice. In recent years, the use of spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) for adverse drug reactions has increased and they have become an important resource for regulatory science. SRS, being the largest and most well-known databases worldwide, are one of the primary tools used for postmarketing surveillance and pharmacovigilance. To analyze SRS, the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER) are reviewed. Authorized pharmacovigilance algorithms were used for signal detection, including the reporting odds ratio. An SRS is a passive reporting database and is therefore subject to numerous sources of selection bias, including overreporting, underreporting, and a lack of a denominator. Despite the inherent limitations of spontaneous reporting, SRS databases are a rich resource and data mining index that provide powerful means of identifying potential associations between drugs and their adverse effects. Our results, which are based on the evaluation of SRS databases, provide essential knowledge that could improve our understanding of clinical issues.

  4. Adverse effects of fillers and their histopathology.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2014-12-01

    Injectable fillers nowadays represent a pillar in facial rejuvenation and make a significant contribution to the success of the treatment. Despite their obvious benefits, a wide range of possible complications such as immediate, late, delayed, temporary, or irreversible adverse effects have to be respected. Differentiating the various filler materials, these effects are assigned to histopathology findings and currently available treatment options. PMID:25536126

  5. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence. PMID:23850228

  6. Adverse drug reactions in an elderly outpatient population.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J K; Mion, L C; Frengley, J D

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in elderly outpatients was investigated, along with factors that might be associated with their occurrence. The medical records of elderly patients attending an interdisciplinary geriatric clinic and a general medical clinic during 1988 were audited to collect a variety of demographic and treatment data and to detect documentation of first-time ADRs. Subjects were classified as having had an ADR if a physician documented this or if a relevant symptom was noted in the record and a score of 1 or above was obtained on the Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale. The presence of potential drug interactions was also assessed. The sample size was 463 patients, of whom 332 attended the medical clinic and 131 attended the geriatric clinic. Potential drug interactions were identified in the records of 143 subjects (31%). There were 107 documented ADRs in 97 patients (21%). Of these patients, 86 were noted by the physicians as having had an ADR. Twelve patients were hospitalized as a direct result of an ADR. Significant risk factors for ADRs were attendance in the geriatric clinic, the use of potentially harmful drug combinations, and the use of drugs that require therapeutic monitoring. Patient age and the number of drugs had no association with ADRs. In the elderly population studied, patients with frailty arising from multiple pathologies were more likely to have ADRs than the more robust elderly, even when their therapeutic regimens were simplified. PMID:1570873

  7. Risk identification and possible countermeasures for muscle adverse effects during statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Magni, Paolo; Macchi, Chiara; Morlotti, Beatrice; Sirtori, Cesare R; Ruscica, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    The use of statins for cardiovascular disease prevention is clearly supported by clinical evidence. However, in January 2014 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released an advice on statin risk reporting that "statin benefit is indisputable, but they need to be taken with care and knowledge of their side effects". Among them the by far most common complication is myopathy, ranging from common but clinically benign myalgia to rare but life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. This class side effect appears to be dose dependent, with more lipophilic statin (i.e., simvastatin) carrying a higher overall risk. Hence, to minimize statin-associated myopathy, clinicians should take into consideration a series of factors that potentially increase this risk (i.e., drug-drug interactions, female gender, advanced age, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and vitamin D deficiency). Whenever it is appropriate to stop statin treatment, the recommendations are to stay off statin until resolution of symptoms or normalization of creatine kinase values. Afterwards, clinicians have several options to treat dyslipidemia, including the use of a lower dose of the same statin, intermittent non-daily dosing of statin, initiation of a different statin, alone or in combination with nonstatin lipid-lowering agents, and substitution with red yeast rice.

  8. Gender differences, polypharmacy, and potential pharmacological interactions in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Venturini, Carina Duarte; Engroff, Paula; Ely, Luísa Scheer; de Araújo Zago, Luísa Faria; Schroeter, Guilherme; Gomes, Irenio; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to analyze pharmacological interactions among drugs taken by elderly patients and their age and gender differences in a population from Porto Alegre, Brazil. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the database provided by the Institute of Geriatric and Gerontology, Porto Alegre, Brazil. The database was composed of 438 elderly and includes information about the patients' disease, therapy regimens, utilized drugs. All drugs reported by the elderly patients were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic and Chemical Classification System. The drug-drug interactions and their severity were assessed using the Micromedex® Healthcare Series. RESULTS: Of the 438 elderly patients in the data base, 376 (85.8%) used pharmacotherapy, 274 were female, and 90.4% of females used drugs. The average number of drugs used by each individual younger than 80 years was 3.2±2.6. Women younger than 80 years old used more drugs than men in the same age group whereas men older than 80 years increased their use of drugs in relation to other age groups. Therefore, 32.6% of men and 49.2% of women described at least one interaction, and 8.1% of men and 10.6% of women described four or more potential drug-drug interactions. Two-thirds of drug-drug interactions were moderate in both genders, and most of them involved angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, loop and thiazide diuretics, and β-blockers. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients should be closely monitored, based on drug class, gender, age group and nutritional status. PMID:22086515

  9. Childhood adversity, attachment and personality styles as predictors of anxiety among elderly caregivers.

    PubMed

    Prigerson, H G; Shear, M K; Bierhals, A J; Zonarich, D L; Reynolds, C F

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the ways in which childhood adversity, attachment and personality styles influenced the likelihood of having an anxiety disorder among aged caregivers for terminally ill spouses. We also sought to determine how childhood adversity and attachment/personality styles jointly influenced the likelihood of developing an anxiety disorder among aged caregivers. Data were derived from semistructured interviews with 50 spouses (aged 60 and above) of terminally ill patients. The Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse (CECA) record provided retrospective, behaviorally based information on childhood adversity. Measures of attachment and personality styles were obtained from self-report questionnaires, and the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-III-R (SCID) was used to determine diagnoses for anxiety disorders. Logistic regression models estimated the effects of childhood adversity, attachment/personality disturbances, and the interaction between the two on the likelihood of having an anxiety disorder. Results indicated that childhood adversity and paranoid, histrionic and self-defeating styles all directly increase the odds of having an anxiety disorder as an elderly spousal caregiver. In addition, childhood adversity in conjunction with borderline, antisocial and excessively dependent styles increased the likelihood of having an anxiety disorder. The results indicate the need to investigate further the interaction between childhood experiences and current attachment/personality styles in their effects on the development of anxiety disorders.

  10. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions... thorough investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of...

  11. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions... thorough investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of...

  12. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions... thorough investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of...

  13. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of the selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024(Enobosarm) with itraconazole, rifampin, probenecid, celecoxib and rosuvastatin.

    PubMed

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2016-08-01

    GTx-024 (also known as enobosarm) is a first in class selective androgen receptor modulator being developed for diverse indications in oncology. Preclinical studies of GTx-024 supported the evaluation of several potential drug-drug interactions in a clinical setting. A series of open-label Phase I GTx-024 drug-drug interaction studies were designed to interrogate potential interactions with CYP3A4 inhibitor (itraconazole), a CYP3A4 inducer (rifampin), a pan-UGT inhibitor (probenecid), a CYP2C9 substrate (celecoxib) and a BCRP substrate (rosuvastatin). The plasma pharmacokinetics of GTx-024, its major metabolite (GTx-024 glucuronide), and each substrate were characterized in detail. Itraconazole administration had no effect on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics. Likewise, GTx-024 administration did not significantly change the pharmacokinetics of celecoxib or rosuvastatin. Rifampin administration had the largest impact on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics of any co-administered agent and reduced the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) by 23 % and the area under the curve (AUC∞) by 43 %. Probenecid had a complex interaction with GTx-024 whereby both GTx-024 plasma levels and GTx-024 glucuronide plasma levels (AUC∞) were increased by co-administration of the UGT inhibitor (50 and 112 %, respectively). Overall, GTx-024 was well tolerated and poses very little risk of generating clinically relevant drug-drug interactions.

  14. Monoamine oxidase A and childhood adversity as risk factors for conduct disorder in females

    PubMed Central

    Prom-Wormley, E. C.; Eaves, L. J.; Foley, D. L.; Gardner, C. O.; Archer, K. J.; Wormley, B. K.; Maes, H. H.; Riley, B. P.; Silberg, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies among males have reported a genotype-environment interaction (G × E) in which low-activity alleles at the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) locus conferred greater sensitivity to the effects of childhood adversity on risk for conduct disorder (CD). So far, few studies of females have controlled for gene-environment correlation or used females heterozygous for this X-linked gene. Method Logistic regression analysis of a sample of 721 females ages 8-17 years from the longitudinal Virginia Twin Study of Adolescent Behavioral Development (VTSABD) assessed the additive effects of MAOA genotypes on risk for CD, together with the main effect of childhood adversity and parental antisocial personality disorder (ASP), as well as the interaction of MAOA with childhood adversity on risk for CD. Results A significant main effect of genotype on risk for CD was detected, where low-activity MAOA imparted the greatest risk to CD in girls while controlling for the significant effects of maternal ASP and childhood adversity. Significant G × E with weak effect was detected when environmental exposure was untransformed, indicating a higher sensitivity to childhood adversity in the presence of the high-activity MAOA allele. The interaction was no longer statistically significant after applying a ridit transformation to reflect the sample sizes exposed at each level of childhood adversity. Conclusions The main effect of MAOA on risk for CD in females, its absence in males and directional difference of interaction is suggestive of genotype-sex interaction. As the effect of G × E on risk for CD was weak, its inclusion is not justified. PMID:18752729

  15. Glaucoma eye drops adverse skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Ambrifi, Marina; Frascani, Federica; Fazia, Gilda; Paolino, Giovanni; Lisi, Roberto; Calvieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The term "Glaucoma" is used to describe a number of diseases of the eye characterized by a particular form of optic nerve damage that is often associated with high intraocular pressure (IOP). The open-angle glaucoma is the most common form that is also referred to as chronic glaucoma. This is described as an optic neuropathy with multifactorial nature in which there is a loss of characteristics of the optic nerve fibers. Therapeutic options for the treatment of this disease are different, you can take advantage of eye drops, laser therapy and conventional surgery or more combined treatments. Medicated eye drops are the most common way to treat glaucoma. Although eye drops are widely used, adverse reactions are not frequently observed and described. In particular, the adverse skin reactions are not frequently described in the literature, but often seen in dermatologic clinic, we reported their skin reactions and possible alternative treatments described in literature and their patent applications. PMID:25487259

  16. Adverse reactions to injectable soft tissue fillers.

    PubMed

    Requena, Luis; Requena, Celia; Christensen, Lise; Zimmermann, Ute S; Kutzner, Heinz; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, injections with filler agents are often used for wrinkle-treatment and soft tissue augmentation by dermatologists and plastic surgeons. Unfortunately, the ideal filler has not yet been discovered and all of them may induce adverse reactions. Quickly biodegradable or resorbable agents may induce severe complications, but they will normally disappear spontaneously in a few months. Slowly biodegradable or nonresorbable fillers may give rise to severe reactions that show little or no tendency to spontaneous improvement. They may appear several years after the injection, when the patient does not remember which product was injected, and treatment is often insufficient. In this review, we discuss the most commonly used fillers, their most frequent adverse reactions as well as the characteristic histopathologic findings that allow the identification of the injected filler agent. In conclusion, histopathologic study remains as the gold standard technique to identify the responsible filler.

  17. Adverse events occurring after smallpox vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lane, J Michael; Goldstein, Joel

    2003-07-01

    We reviewed the literature on adverse events reported to occur after smallpox vaccination. Nearly one-half of the United States population is vaccinia-naïve and may be at risk for development of serious adverse events. We describe the clinical features of postvaccinial central nervous system disease, progressive vaccinia, eczema vaccinatum, accidental implantations, "generalized vaccinia," and the common erythematous and/or urticarial rashes. In the 1960s, death occurred approximately once in every million primary vaccinations, with fatalities resulting from progressive vaccinia, postvaccinial encephalitis, and eczema vaccinatum. Death in revaccinees occurred less commonly and almost entirely from progressive vaccinia. In today's population, death rates might be higher because of the increased prevalence of immune deficiency and atopic dermatitis.

  18. An Ss Model with Adverse Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Christopher L.; Leahy, John V.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model of the market for a used durable in which agents face fixed costs of adjustment, the magnitude of which depends on the degree of adverse selection in the secondary market. We find that, unlike typical models, the sS bands in our model contract as the variance of the shock increases. We also analyze a dynamic version of the model…

  19. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors.

  20. Major adverse cardiac events during endurance sports.

    PubMed

    Belonje, Anne; Nangrahary, Mary; de Swart, Hans; Umans, Victor

    2007-03-15

    Major adverse cardiac events in endurance exercise are usually due to underlying and unsuspected heart disease. The investigators present an analysis of major adverse cardiac events that occurred during 2 consecutive annual long distance races (a 36-km beach cycling race and a 21-km half marathon) over the past 5 years. All patients with events were transported to the hospital. Most of the 62,862 participants were men (77%; mean age 40 years). Of these, 4 men (3 runners, 1 cyclist; mean age 48 years) collapsed during (n = 2) or shortly after the races, rendering a prevalence of 0.006%. Two patients collapsed after developing chest pain, 1 of whom needed resuscitation at the event site, which was successful. These patients had acute myocardial infarctions and underwent primary angioplasty. The third patient was resuscitated at the site but did not have coronary disease or inducible ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation and collapsed presumably because of catecholamine-induced ventricular fibrillation. The fourth patient experienced heat stroke and had elevated creatine kinase-MB and troponins in the absence of electrocardiographic changes. In conclusion, the risk for major adverse cardiac events during endurance sports in well-trained athletes is very low.

  1. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) interacts with therapeutic drugs on CYP3A by inhibition of pregnane X receptor (PXR) activation and catalytic enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Antolino-Lobo, Irene; Meulenbelt, Jan; Nijmeijer, Sandra M; Maas-Bakker, Roel F; Meijerman, Irma; van den Berg, Martin; van Duursen, Majorie B M

    2011-05-30

    Metabolism of MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, Ecstasy) by the major hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A), plays an important role in MDMA-induced liver toxicity. In the present study, we investigated interactions between MDMA and several therapeutic and recreational drugs on CYP3A and its regulator pregnane X receptor (PXR), using a human PXR-mediated CYP3A4-reporter gene assay, rat primary hepatocytes and microsomes. MDMA significantly inhibited hPXR-mediated CYP3A4-reporter gene expression induced by the human PXR activator rifampicin (IC₅₀ 1.26 ± 0.36 mM) or the therapeutic drugs paroxetine, fluoxetine, clozapine, diazepam and risperidone. All these drugs concentration-dependently inhibited CYP3A activity in rat liver microsomes, but in combination with MDMA this inhibition became more efficient for clozapine and risperidone. In rat primary hepatocytes that were pretreated with or without the rodent PXR activator pregnenolone 16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), MDMA inhibited CYP3A catalytic activity with IC₅₀ values of 0.06 ± 0.12 and 0.09 ± 0.13 mM MDMA, respectively. This decrease appeared to be due to decreased activation of PXR and subsequent decreased CYP3A gene expression, and catalytic inhibition of CYP3A activity. These data suggest that in situations of repeated MDMA use in combination with other (therapeutic) drugs, adverse drug-drug interactions through interactions with PXR and/or CYP3A cannot be excluded.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  3. Psychiatric adverse effects of pediatric corticosteroid use.

    PubMed

    Drozdowicz, Linda B; Bostwick, J Michael

    2014-06-01

    Corticosteroids, highly effective drugs for myriad disease states, have considerable neuropsychiatric adverse effects that can manifest in cognitive disorders, behavioral changes, and frank psychiatric disease. Recent reviews have summarized these effects in adults, but a comprehensive review on corticosteroid effects in children has not been published since 2005. Here, we systematically review articles published since then that, we find, naturally divide into 3 main areas: (1) chronic effects of acute prenatal and neonatal exposure associated with prematurity and congenital conditions; (2) immediate behavioral effects of acute exposure via oncological protocols; and (3) acute behavioral effects of sporadic use in children and adolescents with other conditions. PsycInfo, MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus were queried to identify articles reporting psychiatric adverse effects of corticosteroids in pediatric patients. Search terms included corticosteroids, adrenal cortex hormones, steroid psychosis, substance-induced psychoses, glucocorticoids, dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, prednisone, adverse effects, mood disorders, mental disorders, psychosis, psychotic, psychoses, side effect, chemically induced, emotions, affective symptoms, toxicity, behavior, behavioral symptoms, infant, child, adolescent, pediatric, paediatric, neonatal, children, teen, and teenager. Following guidelines for systematic reviews from the Potsdam Consultation on Meta-Analysis, we have found it difficult to draw specific conclusions that are more than general impressions owing to the quality of the available studies. We find a mixed picture with neonates exposed to dexamethasone, with some articles reporting eventual deficits in neuropsychiatric functioning and others reporting no effect. In pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, corticosteroid use appears to correlate with negative psychiatric and behavioral effects. In children treated with corticosteroids for noncancer conditions

  4. Validation of a transparent decision model to rate drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple databases provide ratings of drug-drug interactions. The ratings are often based on different criteria and lack background information on the decision making process. User acceptance of rating systems could be improved by providing a transparent decision path for each category. Methods We rated 200 randomly selected potential drug-drug interactions by a transparent decision model developed by our team. The cases were generated from ward round observations and physicians’ queries from an outpatient setting. We compared our ratings to those assigned by a senior clinical pharmacologist and by a standard interaction database, and thus validated the model. Results The decision model rated consistently with the standard database and the pharmacologist in 94 and 156 cases, respectively. In two cases the model decision required correction. Following removal of systematic model construction differences, the DM was fully consistent with other rating systems. Conclusion The decision model reproducibly rates interactions and elucidates systematic differences. We propose to supply validated decision paths alongside the interaction rating to improve comprehensibility and to enable physicians to interpret the ratings in a clinical context. PMID:22950884

  5. Prediction of adverse drug reactions using decision tree modeling.

    PubMed

    Hammann, F; Gutmann, H; Vogt, N; Helma, C; Drewe, J

    2010-07-01

    Drug safety is of great importance to public health. The detrimental effects of drugs not only limit their application but also cause suffering in individual patients and evoke distrust of pharmacotherapy. For the purpose of identifying drugs that could be suspected of causing adverse reactions, we present a structure-activity relationship analysis of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the central nervous system (CNS), liver, and kidney, and also of allergic reactions, for a broad variety of drugs (n = 507) from the Swiss drug registry. Using decision tree induction, a machine learning method, we determined the chemical, physical, and structural properties of compounds that predispose them to causing ADRs. The models had high predictive accuracies (78.9-90.2%) for allergic, renal, CNS, and hepatic ADRs. We show the feasibility of predicting complex end-organ effects using simple models that involve no expensive computations and that can be used (i) in the selection of the compound during the drug discovery stage, (ii) to understand how drugs interact with the target organ systems, and (iii) for generating alerts in postmarketing drug surveillance and pharmacovigilance.

  6. Pharmacovigilance, risks and adverse effects of self-medication.

    PubMed

    Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Abadie, Delphine; Lacroix, Isabelle; Berreni, Aurélia; Pugnet, Grégory; Durrieu, Geneviève; Sailler, Laurent; Giroud, Jean-Paul; Damase-Michel, Christine; Montastruc, François

    2016-04-01

    Self-medication means resorting to one or more drugs in order to treat oneself without the help of a doctor. This phenomenon is developing fast. In this review, we will discuss the main definitions of self-medication; we will then present a few important characteristics of this therapeutic practice: prevalence, reasons, populations involved and drugs used. Whilst the theoretical risks of self-medication have been abundantly discussed in the literature (adverse effects, interactions, product, dosage or treatment duration errors, difficulty in self-diagnosis, risk of addiction or abuse…), there is in fact very little detailed pharmacovigilance data concerning the characteristics and the consequences of this usage in real life. This study therefore describes the all too rare data that is available: patients, clinical characteristics, "seriousness" and drugs involved in the adverse effects of self-medication. It also discusses leads to be followed in order to minimize medication risks, which are obviously not well known and clearly not sufficiently notified.

  7. The Influence of Perinatal Complications and Environmental Adversity on Boys' Antisocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Joy E.; Shaw, Daniel S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to test components of Raine's (2002) biosocial model, specifically the interactive effects of perinatal complications, rejecting parenting, and family adversity on the development of early-onset antisocial behavior (ASB). Boys' internalizing problems were also tested to investigate the specificity…

  8. Defining Adverse Outcome Pathways for Effects of the Fungicide Propiconazole of Fish Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are used to describe the linkage of chemical interactions in terms of molecular initiating events to whole organism responses suitable for risk assessment. This study was conducted to develop AOPs for the model fungicide propiconazole relative to r...

  9. Anticoagulation-associated adverse drug events

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Nguyen, Thanh Nha; Cios, Deborah; Labreche, Matthew; Hohlfelder, Benjamin; Fanikos, John; Fiumara, Karen; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anticoagulant drugs are among the most common medications that cause adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitalized patients. We performed a five-year retrospective study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital to determine clinical characteristics, types, root causes, and outcomes of anticoagulant-associated adverse drug events (ADEs). Methods We reviewed all inpatient anticoagulant-associated ADEs, including adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and medication errors, reported at Brigham and Women’s Hospital through the Safety Reporting System from May 2004 to May 2009. We also collected data regarding the cost associated with hospitalizations in which ADRs occurred. Results Of 463 anticoagulant-associated ADEs, 226 were MEs (48.8%), 141 were ADRs (30.5%), and 96 (20.7%) involved both a medication error and ADR. Seventy percent of anticoagulant-associated ADEs were potentially preventable. Transcription errors (48%) were the most frequent root cause of anticoagulant-associated medication errors, while medication errors (40%) were a common root cause of anticoagulant-associated ADRs. Death within 30 days of anticoagulant-associated ADEs occurred in 11% of patients. After an anticoagulant-associated ADR, most hospitalization expenditures were attributable to nursing costs (mean $33,189 per ADR) followed by pharmacy costs (mean $7,451 per ADR). Conclusion Most anticoagulant-associated ADEs among inpatients result from medication errors and are therefore potentially preventable. We observed an elevated 30-day mortality rate among patients who suffered an anticoagulant-associated ADE and high hospitalization costs following ADRs. Further Quality Improvement efforts to reduce anticoagulant-associated medication errors are warranted to improve patient safety and decrease health care expenditures. PMID:22114827

  10. Adverse reactions to fragrances. A clinical review.

    PubMed

    de Groot, A C; Frosch, P J

    1997-02-01

    This article reviews side-effects of fragrance materials present in cosmetics with emphasis on clinical aspects: epidemiology, types of adverse reactions, clinical picture, diagnostic procedures, and the sensitizers. Considering the ubiquitous occurrence of fragrance materials, the risk of side-effects is small. In absolute numbers, however, fragrance allergy is common, affecting approximately 1% of the general population. Although a detailed profile of patients sensitized to fragrances needs to be elucidated, common features of contact allergy are: axillary dermatitis, dermatitis of the face (including the eyelids) and neck, well-circumscribed patches in areas of "dabbing-on" perfumes (wrists, behind the ears) and (aggravation of) hand eczema. Depending on the degree of sensitivity, the severity of dermatitis may range from mild to severe with dissemination and even erythroderma. Airborne or "connubial" contact dermatitis should always be suspected. Other less frequent adverse reactions to fragrances are photocontact dermatitis, immediate contact reactions and pigmentary changes. The fragrance mix, although very useful for the detection of sensitive patients, both causes false-positive and false-negative reactions, and detects only 70% of perfume-allergic patients. Therefore, future research should be directed at increasing the sensitivity and the specificity of the mix. Relevance is said to be established in 50-65% of positive reactions, but accurate criteria are needed. Suggestions are made for large-scale investigation of several fragrances on the basis of literature data and frequency of use in cosmetics. The literature on adverse reactions to balsam of Peru (an indicator for fragrance sensitivity), essential oils (which currently appear to be used more in aromatherapy than in perfumery) and on fragrances used as flavours and spices in foods and beverages is not discussed in detail, but pertinent side-effects data are tabulated and relevant literature is

  11. Genomic architecture of pharmacological efficacy and adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Chhibber, Aparna; Kroetz, Deanna L; Tantisira, Kelan G; McGeachie, Michael; Cheng, Cheng; Plenge, Robert; Stahl, Eli; Sadee, Wolfgang; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Pendergrass, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic disciplines address pharmacological traits, including efficacy and adverse events. Pharmacogenomics studies have identified pervasive genetic effects on treatment outcomes, resulting in the development of genetic biomarkers for optimization of drug therapy. Pharmacogenomics-based tests are already being applied in clinical decision making. However, despite substantial progress in identifying the genetic etiology of pharmacological response, current biomarker panels still largely rely on single gene tests with a large portion of the genetic effects remaining to be discovered. Future research must account for the combined effects of multiple genetic variants, incorporate pathway-based approaches, explore gene-gene interactions and nonprotein coding functional genetic variants, extend studies across ancestral populations, and prioritize laboratory characterization of molecular mechanisms. Because genetic factors can play a key role in drug response, accurate biomarker tests capturing the main genetic factors determining treatment outcomes have substantial potential for improving individual clinical care. PMID:25521360

  12. Symptomatic sinus bradycardia: A rare adverse effect of intravenous ondansetron

    PubMed Central

    Moazzam, Md Shahnawaz; Nasreen, Farah; Bano, Shahjahan; Amir, Syed Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Ondansetron is a serotonin receptor antagonist which has been used frequently to reduce the incidence of post-operative nausea and vomiting in laparoscopic surgery. It has become very popular drug for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting due to its superiority in-terms of efficacy as well as lack of side effects and drug interactions. Although cardiovascular adverse effects of this drug are rare, we found a case of symptomatic sinus bradycardia in a 43-year-old female patient, going for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, who developed the same after she was given intravenous ondansetron in operation theater during premedication. Hence, we report this case, as the rare possibility of encountering bradycardia effect after intravenous administration of ondansetron should be born in mind. PMID:21655029

  13. Reducing medical errors and adverse events.

    PubMed

    Pham, Julius Cuong; Aswani, Monica S; Rosen, Michael; Lee, HeeWon; Huddle, Matthew; Weeks, Kristina; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Medical errors account for ∼98,000 deaths per year in the United States. They increase disability and costs and decrease confidence in the health care system. We review several important types of medical errors and adverse events. We discuss medication errors, healthcare-acquired infections, falls, handoff errors, diagnostic errors, and surgical errors. We describe the impact of these errors, review causes and contributing factors, and provide an overview of strategies to reduce these events. We also discuss teamwork/safety culture, an important aspect in reducing medical errors.

  14. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  15. Adverse effects of equine rabies immune gobulin.

    PubMed

    Wilde, H; Chomchey, P; Prakongsri, S; Puyaratabandhu, P; Chutivongse, S

    1989-02-01

    Following a recently published prospective study of 485 recipients of equine rabies immune globulin (ERIG) manufactured by Pasteur Vaccins (Paris), this paper reports a study of 323 postexposure rabies patients receiving ERIG manufactured by the Swiss Vaccine and Serum Institute (Berna). It is concluded that there may be significant differences in adverse reaction rates, reflecting differing manufacturing or purification processes and protein content. Further studies of different ERIG products and of different lots of the same product are needed while ERIG remains an essential component of postexposure rabies treatment in developing countries.

  16. Agomelatine: a review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    More pharmacovigilance data on agomelatine became available in 2012. The main sources of information were surveillance data from the French national monitoring system, EU periodic safety update reports (PSURs), and the European pharmacovigilance database. The principal adverse effects of agomelatine consist of hepatic, pancreatic, neuropsychiatric, muscular and cutaneous disorders. The harms associated with agomelatine, which has no proven efficacy in depression, clearly outweigh the benefits. Until regulatory agencies decide to withdraw agomelatine from the market, it is up to healthcare professionals to protect patients from this unnecessarily dangerous drug.

  17. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Mago, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Adverse effects are common, bothersome, and a leading cause of discontinuation of treatment. The methodology for evaluating adverse effects of medications has been greatly neglected, however, especially in comparison to the methodology for assessment of efficacy of medications. Existing methods for assessment and reporting of adverse effects have important limitations leading to lack of much-needed data related to adverse effects. Lastly, there is little systematic research into management of most adverse effects. A series of recommendations are made in this article about how to improve identification, assessment, reporting, and management of adverse effects. PMID:27514294

  18. The Effect of Lifetime Cumulative Adversity and Depressive Symptoms on Functional Status

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The study aimed to examine whether lifetime cumulative adversity (LCA) and depressive symptoms moderate time-related trajectories of functional status. Method. A total of 15,073 older adults (mean age = 63.91 at Wave 1) who participated in the first four waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe reported on exposure to negative life events, depressive symptoms and three measures of functional status—difficulty in performing daily and instrumental activities, and functional limitation. Results. Growth–curve models showed that time-related increase in disability and functional limitation was steeper among those exposed to higher levels of lifetime adversity. Moreover, a three-way interaction between time, lifetime adversity, and depressive symptoms emerged across measures of functional status, so that when exposure to lifetime adversity was accompanied by high level of depressive symptoms, the time-related increase in disability and functional limitation was the steepest. Discussion. LCA is associated with a hastening of the disablement process, especially under conditions of high distress. Although the overall modest effects imply that resilience to lifetime adversity is widespread among older adults, prevention and intervention programs should consider that distressed older adults previously exposed to high levels of lifetime adversity are at risk for more rapid impairment in functional status. PMID:24898028

  19. Adverse effects of psychological therapy: An exploratory study of practitioners' experiences from child and adolescent psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Ulf; Johanson, Josefin; Nilsson, Elin; Lindblad, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The scientific knowledge about adverse effects of psychological therapies and how such effects should be detected is limited. It is possible that children and adolescents are particularly vulnerable and need specific support in order to express adverse effects. In this exploratory study, we used a qualitative approach to explore practitioners' experiences of this phenomenon. Fourteen practitioners providing psychological therapy within the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was applied to the data. Four overarching categories brought up by the practitioners were identified: vagueness of the concept (reflecting that the concept was novel and hard to define), psychotherapist-client interaction (encompassing aspects of the interaction possibly related to adverse effects), consequences for the young person (including a range of emotional, behavioural and social consequences) and family effects (e.g. professional complications and decreased autonomy for the parent). Professional discussions on these issues could improve psychological therapy for children and adolescents. Based on our findings and previous research, we propose three basic aspects to consider when adverse effects are detected and managed in this context: typology (form, severity and duration), aetiology (hypothesis about the causes) and perspective (adverse effects seen from the points of view of different interested parties).

  20. Adverse reaction to lupine-fortified pasta.

    PubMed

    Hefle, S L; Lemanske, R F; Bush, R K

    1994-08-01

    A 5-year-old girl with peanut sensitivity experienced urticaria and angioedema after ingesting a spaghetti-like pasta fortified with sweet lupine seed flour. The pasta was extracted and used in immunologic studies in patients with peanut sensitivity to determine whether such individuals are at similar risk. Results of skin prick tests with the lupine pasta extract were positive in five of seven subjects; these patients also reported a history of adverse reactions to green peas. In direct RAST studies IgE binding from pooled sera from patients with peanut sensitivity to the lupine pasta extract was 7 times that of a nonallergic control serum, and individual serum samples demonstrated binding from 1 to 6 times that of the negative control. Direct RAST studies of lupine seed flour with serum samples from patients with peanut allergy demonstrated IgE binding 1 to 11 times that of the negative control. Immunoblotting studies of electrophoretically separated pasta extract and lupine seed flour proteins showed IgE-binding protein bands at approximately 21 kd and in the range of 35 to 55 kd molecular weight. We conclude that some peanut-sensitive patients may be at risk for adverse reactions to lupine.

  1. Adverse reactions to food: allergies and intolerances.

    PubMed

    Montalto, Massimo; Santoro, Luca; D'Onofrio, Ferruccio; Curigliano, Valentina; Gallo, Antonella; Visca, Dina; Cammarota, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    All the anomalous reactions secondary to food ingestion are defined as 'adverse reactions to food'. In 1995 the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology suggested a classification on the basis of the responsible pathogenetic mechanism; according to this classification, non-toxic reactions can be divided into 'food allergies' when they recognize immunological mechanisms, and 'food intolerances' when there are no immunological implications. The diagnostic approach to adverse reactions to food is based on accurate clinical history and objective examination, and further execution of specific tests when allergy or intolerance is suspected. The therapy for food allergies is the elimination of the food to which hypersensibility has been found; this strategy can lead, especially in pediatric age, to tolerance. If elimination diets cannot be completely performed, or if it is not possible to identify the food to eliminate, some drugs (e.g. antihistaminics, steroids, etc.) can be administered. Specific allergen immunotherapy has been recently introduced. Fundamental is food allergy prevention, especially in high-risk subjects. The therapeutic approach to secondary food intolerances is based principally on primitive disease resolution; on the other hand, some specific treatments (e.g. beta-galactosidases in lactose malabsorption) are available in case of primary intolerance. PMID:18431058

  2. Consumer reporting of adverse events following immunization

    PubMed Central

    Clothier, Hazel J; Selvaraj, Gowri; Easton, Mee Lee; Lewis, Georgina; Crawford, Nigel W; Buttery, Jim P

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance of adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) is an essential component of vaccine safety monitoring. The most commonly utilized passive surveillance systems rely predominantly on reporting by health care providers (HCP). We reviewed adverse event reports received in Victoria, Australia since surveillance commencement in July 2007, to June 2013 (6 years) to ascertain the contribution of consumer (vaccinee or their parent/guardian) reporting to vaccine safety monitoring and to inform future surveillance system development directions. Categorical data included were: reporter type; serious and non-serious AEFI category; and, vaccinee age group. Chi-square test and 2-sample test of proportions were used to compare categories; trend changes were assessed using linear regression. Consumer reporting increased over the 6 years, reaching 21% of reports received in 2013 (P <0.001), most commonly for children aged less than 7 years. Consumer reports were 5% more likely to describe serious AEFI than HCP (P = 0.018) and 10% more likely to result in specialist clinic attendance (P <0.001). Although online reporting increased to 32% of all report since its introduction in 2010, 85% of consumers continued to report by phone. Consumer reporting of AEFI is a valuable component of vaccine safety surveillance in addition to HCP reporting. Changes are required to AEFI reporting systems to implement efficient consumer AEFI reporting, but may be justified for their potential impact on signal detection sensitivity. PMID:25483686

  3. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. Objective The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. Methods We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. Results There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. Conclusions ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making. PMID:25800813

  4. Adverse outcome pathway development II: best practices.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Daniel L; Crump, Doug; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hecker, Markus; Hutchinson, Thomas H; LaLone, Carlie A; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lettieri, Teresa; Munn, Sharon; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Vergauwen, Lucia; Whelan, Maurice

    2014-12-01

    Organization of existing and emerging toxicological knowledge into adverse outcome pathway (AOP) descriptions can facilitate greater application of mechanistic data, including those derived through high-throughput in vitro, high content omics and imaging, and biomarker approaches, in risk-based decision making. The previously ad hoc process of AOP development is being formalized through development of internationally harmonized guidance and principles. The goal of this article was to outline the information content desired for formal AOP description and some rules of thumb and best practices intended to facilitate reuse and connectivity of elements of an AOP description in a knowledgebase and network context. For example, key events (KEs) are measurements of change in biological state that are indicative of progression of a perturbation toward a specified adverse outcome. Best practices for KE description suggest that each KE should be defined as an independent measurement made at a particular level of biological organization. The concept of "functional equivalence" can help guide both decisions about how many KEs to include in an AOP and the specificity with which they are defined. Likewise, in describing both KEs and evidence that supports a causal linkage or statistical association between them (ie, a key event relationship; KER), best practice is to build from and contribute to existing KE or KER descriptions in the AOP knowledgebase rather than creating redundant descriptions. The best practices proposed address many of the challenges and uncertainties related to AOP development and help promote a consistent and reliable, yet flexible approach. PMID:25466379

  5. Adverse outcome pathway development II: best practices.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Daniel L; Crump, Doug; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hecker, Markus; Hutchinson, Thomas H; LaLone, Carlie A; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lettieri, Teresa; Munn, Sharon; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Vergauwen, Lucia; Whelan, Maurice

    2014-12-01

    Organization of existing and emerging toxicological knowledge into adverse outcome pathway (AOP) descriptions can facilitate greater application of mechanistic data, including those derived through high-throughput in vitro, high content omics and imaging, and biomarker approaches, in risk-based decision making. The previously ad hoc process of AOP development is being formalized through development of internationally harmonized guidance and principles. The goal of this article was to outline the information content desired for formal AOP description and some rules of thumb and best practices intended to facilitate reuse and connectivity of elements of an AOP description in a knowledgebase and network context. For example, key events (KEs) are measurements of change in biological state that are indicative of progression of a perturbation toward a specified adverse outcome. Best practices for KE description suggest that each KE should be defined as an independent measurement made at a particular level of biological organization. The concept of "functional equivalence" can help guide both decisions about how many KEs to include in an AOP and the specificity with which they are defined. Likewise, in describing both KEs and evidence that supports a causal linkage or statistical association between them (ie, a key event relationship; KER), best practice is to build from and contribute to existing KE or KER descriptions in the AOP knowledgebase rather than creating redundant descriptions. The best practices proposed address many of the challenges and uncertainties related to AOP development and help promote a consistent and reliable, yet flexible approach.

  6. Adverse Outcome Pathway Development II: Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Crump, Doug; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hecker, Markus; Hutchinson, Thomas H.; LaLone, Carlie A.; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lettieri, Teresa; Munn, Sharon; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Vergauwen, Lucia; Whelan, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Organization of existing and emerging toxicological knowledge into adverse outcome pathway (AOP) descriptions can facilitate greater application of mechanistic data, including those derived through high-throughput in vitro, high content omics and imaging, and biomarker approaches, in risk-based decision making. The previously ad hoc process of AOP development is being formalized through development of internationally harmonized guidance and principles. The goal of this article was to outline the information content desired for formal AOP description and some rules of thumb and best practices intended to facilitate reuse and connectivity of elements of an AOP description in a knowledgebase and network context. For example, key events (KEs) are measurements of change in biological state that are indicative of progression of a perturbation toward a specified adverse outcome. Best practices for KE description suggest that each KE should be defined as an independent measurement made at a particular level of biological organization. The concept of “functional equivalence” can help guide both decisions about how many KEs to include in an AOP and the specificity with which they are defined. Likewise, in describing both KEs and evidence that supports a causal linkage or statistical association between them (ie, a key event relationship; KER), best practice is to build from and contribute to existing KE or KER descriptions in the AOP knowledgebase rather than creating redundant descriptions. The best practices proposed address many of the challenges and uncertainties related to AOP development and help promote a consistent and reliable, yet flexible approach. PMID:25466379

  7. [Adverse drug reactions in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Isabelle; Cabou, Cendrine; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Damase-Michel, Christine

    2007-01-01

    A Prospective pharmacovigilance survey of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in pregnant women was performed in collaboration with gynaecologists and obstetricians of Midi-Pyrenees area (south west of france). The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of adverse drug reactions in pregnant women. The incidence of ADRs in pregnant women was low: 0.3%. Moreover, a retrospective pharmacoepidemiological study was conducted to characterize ADRs in pregnant women. Reports of ADRs collected in the Midi-Pyrenees pharmacovigilance centre from 1982 to 2002 were used: type of ADRs, drugs involved and potential risk factors were compared for pregnant women and for age-matched non pregnant women. Forty seven and 94 reports of ADRs were collected in pregnant and non-pregnant women respectively. Anaphylactic reactions were only observed in pregnant women (3 cases, p = 0.04). We observed 1 ADR related stillbirth (due to anaphylactic reaction) in pregnant women. Drugs for gynaecological and cardiovascular systems were more frequently involved in ADRs in pregnant women than in controls. ADRs mainly occurred during the third trimester of pregnancy. The incidence of ADRs is very low in pregnant women. However, one must pay attention on the risk of anaphylactic reactions in pregnant women. PMID:18206108

  8. Adverse allergic reaction to Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, J.A.; Preston, D.F.; Stephens, R.L.

    1985-04-01

    Adverse allergic reactions to radiopharmaceuticals are rare but have been documented in the literature. This report presents data consistent with a definite adverse reaction to the radiopharmaceutical (/sup 99m/Tc)MDP.

  9. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development I: Strategies and principles

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework that organizes existing knowledge concerning biologically plausible, and empirically-supported, links between molecular-level perturbation of a biological system and an adverse outcome at a level of biological organizatio...

  10. Adverse Outcome Pathways – Tailoring Development to Support Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) represent an ideal framework for connecting high-throughput screening (HTS) data and other toxicity testing results to adverse outcomes of regulatory importance. The AOP Knowledgebase (AOP-KB) captures AOP information to facilitate the development,...

  11. Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Network Development for Fatty Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are descriptive biological sequences that start from a molecular initiating event (MIE) and end with an adverse health outcome. AOPs provide biological context for high throughput chemical testing and further prioritize environmental health risk re...

  12. COMT Val158Met modulates the effect of childhood adverse experiences on the risk of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Arnt F A; Franke, Barbara; Ellenbroek, Bart; Cools, Alexander; de Jong, Cor A J; Buitelaar, Jan K; Verkes, Robbert-Jan

    2013-03-01

    Genetic factors and childhood adverse experiences contribute to the vulnerability to alcohol dependence. However, empirical data on the interplay between specific genes and adverse experiences are few. The COMT Val158Met and DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A genotypes have been suggested to affect both stress sensitivity and the risk for alcohol dependence. This study tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in COMT Val158Met and DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A interacts with childhood adverse experiences to predict alcohol dependence. Male abstinent alcohol-dependent patients (n = 110) and age-matched healthy male controls (n = 99) were genotyped for the COMT Val158Met and the DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A genotypes. Childhood adverse events were measured using three self-report questionnaires. Alcohol dependence severity, age of onset and duration of alcohol dependence were analyzed as secondary outcome measures. Statistical analysis involved logistic regression analysis and analysis of variance. Alcohol-dependent patients reported increased childhood adversity. The interaction between childhood adversity and the COMT Val158Met genotype added significantly to the prediction model. This gene-environment interaction was confirmed in the analysis of the secondary outcome measures, i.e. alcohol dependence severity, age of onset and duration of alcohol dependence. The DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A genotype was not related to alcohol dependence, nor did it interact with childhood adversity in predicting alcohol dependence. This study provides evidence for a gene-environment interaction in alcohol dependence, in which an individual's sensitivity to childhood adverse experience is moderated by the COMT genotype. Exposed carriers of a low-activity Met allele have a higher risk to develop severe alcohol dependence than individuals homozygous for the Val allele.

  13. Pharmacokinetic interactions with thiazolidinediones.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex disease combining defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. New compounds called thiazolidinediones or glitazones have been developed for reducing insulin resistance. After the withdrawal of troglitazone because of liver toxicity, two compounds are currently used in clinical practice, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. These compounds are generally used in combination with other pharmacological agents. Because they are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP), glitazones are exposed to numerous pharmacokinetic interactions. CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 are the main isoenzymes catalysing biotransformation of pioglitazone (as with troglitazone), whereas rosiglitazone is metabolised by CYP2C9 and CYP2C8. For both rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, the most relevant interactions have been described in healthy volunteers with rifampicin (rifampin), which results in a significant decrease of area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC] (54-65% for rosiglitazone, p<0.001; 54% for pioglitazone, p<0.001), and with gemfibrozil, which results in a significant increase of AUC (130% for rosiglitazone, p<0.001; 220-240% for pioglitazone, p<0.001). The relevance of such drug-drug interactions in patients with type 2 diabetes remains to be evaluated. However, in the absence of clinical data, it is prudent to reduce the dosage of each glitazone by half in patients treated with gemfibrozil. Conversely, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone do not seem to significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of other compounds. Although some food components have also been shown to potentially interfere with drugs metabolised with the CYP system, no published study deals specifically with these possible CYP-mediated food-drug interactions with glitazones.

  14. In Silico Predictions and In Vivo Results of Drug-Drug Interactions by Ketoconazole and Verapamil on AZD1305, a Combined Ion Channel Blocker and a Sensitive CYP3A4 Substrate.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Susanne; Löfberg, Boel; Aunes, Maria; Lunde, Helen; Frison, Lars; Edvardsson, Nils; Cullberg, Marie

    2016-09-01

    The objectives were to estimate and compare, in silico and in vivo, the effects of a strong and a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor on AZD1305 pharmacokinetics. In silico, simulations were performed with the computer software Simcyp, and the predicted outcome was compared with the results observed in healthy male subjects. In silico, the geometric mean plasma exposure of AZD1305 + ketoconazole showed a 7.1-fold higher AUC and a 4.4-fold higher Cmax compared with AZD1305 alone. Coadministration with verapamil gave a 1.9-fold higher AUC and a 1.7-fold higher Cmax compared with AZD1305 alone. In vivo, the plasma exposure of AZD1305 + ketoconazole showed a 7.7-fold higher AUC and a 4.8 -fold higher Cmax compared with AZD1305 alone. Coadministration with verapamil gave a 2.2-fold higher AUC and a 2.0-fold higher Cmax compared with AZD1305 alone. The mean maximum QTcF increase from baseline was 407, 487, and 437 milliseconds for AZD1305, alone and in combination with verapamil or ketoconazole, respectively. Simcyp predicted the effects of ketoconazole and verapamil on the sensitive CYP3A4 substrate AZD1305 pharmacokinetics well. Both the in vivo study and the Simcyp predictions suggest a contraindication for strong CYP3A4 inhibitors and AZD1305 when given in combination. PMID:27627192

  15. Lack of clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction between the thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag and hepatitis C virus protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir.

    PubMed

    Wire, Mary Beth; Fang, Lei; Hussaini, Azra; Kleha, Joseph F; Theodore, Dickens

    2014-11-01

    Eltrombopag is an orally bioavailable thrombopoietin receptor agonist approved for the treatment of thrombocytopenia associated with chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This study evaluated the potential drug-drug interactions between eltrombopag and the HCV protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir. In this open-label, 3-period, single-sequence, and crossover study, 56 healthy adult subjects were randomized 1:1 to cohort 1 (boceprevir) or 2 (telaprevir). The dosing was as follows: period 1, single 200-mg dose of eltrombopag; period 2, 800 mg boceprevir or 750 mg telaprevir every 8 hours (q8h) for 10 days; and period 3, single 200-mg dose of eltrombopag with either 800 mg boceprevir or 750 mg telaprevir q8h (3 doses). All doses were administered with food, and eltrombopag was administered specifically with low-calcium food. There was a 3-day washout between periods 1 and 2 and no washout between periods 2 and 3. Serial pharmacokinetic samples were collected for 72 h in periods 1 and 3 and for 8 h in period 2. The coadministration of eltrombopag increased the rate of boceprevir absorption, resulting in a 20% increase in the maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax), a 1-h-earlier time to Cmax (Tmax) for boceprevir, a 32% decrease in the concentration at the end of the dosing interval (Cτ), and no change in the area under the concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUC0-τ). The coadministration of eltrombopag did not alter telaprevir pharmacokinetics, and the coadministration of boceprevir or telaprevir did not alter eltrombopag pharmacokinetics. Dysgeusia, headache, and somnolence occurred in ≥2 subjects. One subject withdrew because of nausea, headache, dizziness, sinus pressure, and vomiting. There were no severe or serious adverse events. Dose adjustment is not required when eltrombopag is coadministered with boceprevir or telaprevir given the lack of clinically significant

  16. Lack of Clinically Significant Pharmacokinetic Interaction between the Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonist Eltrombopag and Hepatitis C Virus Protease Inhibitors Boceprevir and Telaprevir

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lei; Hussaini, Azra; Kleha, Joseph F.; Theodore, Dickens

    2014-01-01

    Eltrombopag is an orally bioavailable thrombopoietin receptor agonist approved for the treatment of thrombocytopenia associated with chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This study evaluated the potential drug-drug interactions between eltrombopag and the HCV protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir. In this open-label, 3-period, single-sequence, and crossover study, 56 healthy adult subjects were randomized 1:1 to cohort 1 (boceprevir) or 2 (telaprevir). The dosing was as follows: period 1, single 200-mg dose of eltrombopag; period 2, 800 mg boceprevir or 750 mg telaprevir every 8 hours (q8h) for 10 days; and period 3, single 200-mg dose of eltrombopag with either 800 mg boceprevir or 750 mg telaprevir q8h (3 doses). All doses were administered with food, and eltrombopag was administered specifically with low-calcium food. There was a 3-day washout between periods 1 and 2 and no washout between periods 2 and 3. Serial pharmacokinetic samples were collected for 72 h in periods 1 and 3 and for 8 h in period 2. The coadministration of eltrombopag increased the rate of boceprevir absorption, resulting in a 20% increase in the maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax), a 1-h-earlier time to Cmax (Tmax) for boceprevir, a 32% decrease in the concentration at the end of the dosing interval (Cτ), and no change in the area under the concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUC0-τ). The coadministration of eltrombopag did not alter telaprevir pharmacokinetics, and the coadministration of boceprevir or telaprevir did not alter eltrombopag pharmacokinetics. Dysgeusia, headache, and somnolence occurred in ≥2 subjects. One subject withdrew because of nausea, headache, dizziness, sinus pressure, and vomiting. There were no severe or serious adverse events. Dose adjustment is not required when eltrombopag is coadministered with boceprevir or telaprevir given the lack of clinically significant

  17. Patient stratification and identification of adverse event correlations in the space of 1190 drug related adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Roitmann, Eva; Eriksson, Robert; Brunak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: New pharmacovigilance methods are needed as a consequence of the morbidity caused by drugs. We exploit fine-grained drug related adverse event information extracted by text mining from electronic medical records (EMRs) to stratify patients based on their adverse events and to determine adverse event co-occurrences. Methods: We analyzed the similarity of adverse event profiles of 2347 patients extracted from EMRs from a mental health center in Denmark. The patients were clustered based on their adverse event profiles and the similarities were presented as a network. The set of adverse events in each main patient cluster was evaluated. Co-occurrences of adverse events in patients (p-value < 0.01) were identified and presented as well. Results: We found that each cluster of patients typically had a most distinguishing adverse event. Examination of the co-occurrences of adverse events in patients led to the identification of potentially interesting adverse event correlations that may be further investigated as well as provide further patient stratification opportunities. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach in pharmacovigilance to stratify patients based on fine-grained adverse event profiles, which also makes it possible to identify adverse event correlations. Used on larger data sets, this data-driven method has the potential to reveal unknown patterns concerning adverse event occurrences. PMID:25249979

  18. Adherence to Drug Label Recommendations for Avoiding Drug Interactions Causing Statin-Induced Myopathy–A Nationwide Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Settergren, Jennifer; Eiermann, Birgit; Mannheimer, Buster

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the extent to which clinicians avoid well-established drug-drug interactions that cause statin-induced myopathy. We hypothesised that clinicians would avoid combining erythromycin or verapamil/diltiazem respectively with atorvastatin or simvastatin. In patients with statin-fibrate combination therapy, we hypothesised that gemfibrozil was avoided to the preference of bezafibrate or fenofibrate. When combined with verapamil/diltiazem or fibrates, we hypothesized that the dispensed doses of atorvastatin/simvastatin would be decreased. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of nationwide dispensing data. Odds ratios of interacting erythromycin, verapamil/diltiazem versus respective prevalence of comparator drugs doxycycline, amlodipine/felodipine in patients co-dispensed interacting statins simvastatin/atorvastatin versus patients unexposed (pravastatin/fluvastatin/rosuvastatin) was calculated. For fibrates, OR of gemfibrozil versus fenofibrate/bezafibrate in patients co-dispensed any statin was assessed. Results OR of interacting erythromycin versus comparator doxycycline did not differ between patients on interacting and comparator statins either in patients dispensed high or low statin doses (adjusted OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.60–1.25 and 0.92; 95% CI 0.69–1.23). Interacting statins were less common among patients dispensed verapamil/diltiazem as compared to patients on amlodipine/felodipine (OR high dose 0.62; CI 0.56–0.68 and low dose 0.63; CI 0.58–0.68). Patients on any statin were to a lesser extent dispensed gemfibrozil compared to patients not dispensed a statin (OR high dose 0.65; CI 0.55–0.76 and low dose 0.70; CI 0.63–0.78). Mean DDD (SD) for any statin was substantially higher in patients co-dispensed gemfibrozil 178 (149) compared to patients on statin monotherapy 127 (93), (p<0.001). Conclusions Prescribers may to some extent avoid co-prescription of statins with calcium blockers and fibrates with an increased risk of myopathy. We

  19. Early life adversity and the epigenetic programming of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function.

    PubMed

    Anacker, Christoph; O'Donnell, Kieran J; Meaney, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    We review studies with human and nonhuman species that examine the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms, particularly those affecting the expression of genes implicated in stress responses, mediate the association between early childhood adversity and later risk of depression. The resulting studies provide evidence consistent with the idea that social adversity, particularly that involving parent-offspring interactions, alters the epigenetic state and expression of a wide range of genes, the products of which regulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function. We also address the challenges for future studies, including that of the translation of epigenetic studies towards improvements in treatments.

  20. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  1. System interactions of air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, W.E. )

    1992-06-01

    The impact of system interactions and simultaneous or sequential exposure to various air pollutants, both man-made and natural ones, requires greater concern in the interpretation of the total adverse impact of various air pollutants. It is clear that there are highly significant system interactions with exposure to various air pollutants, and these must be considered very carefully in the evaluation of their adverse health effects.

  2. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170 Food... reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions regarding... investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of the investigation of...

  3. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. Link to an amendment published at 77 FR 18, Jan. 3, 2012. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions regarding each unit of blood or blood...

  4. 36 CFR 800.6 - Resolution of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resolution of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.6 Resolution of adverse effects. (a) Continue... the undertaking that could avoid, minimize, or mitigate adverse effects on historic properties....

  5. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adverse effect rate (computed pursuant to 20 CFR 655.207(b)(1), 43 FR 10317; March 10, 1978) by the... at 20 CFR 655.207(b)(2) (1985). (c) In no event shall an adverse effect rate for any year be lower... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate...

  6. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adverse effect rate (computed pursuant to 20 CFR 655.207(b)(1), 43 FR 10317; March 10, 1978) by the... at 20 CFR 655.207(b)(2) (1985). (c) In no event shall an adverse effect rate for any year be lower... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate...

  7. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adverse effect rate (computed pursuant to 20 CFR 655.207(b)(1), 43 FR 10317; March 10, 1978) by the... at 20 CFR 655.207(b)(2) (1985). (c) In no event shall an adverse effect rate for any year be lower... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate...

  8. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adverse effect rate (computed pursuant to 20 CFR 655.207(b)(1), 43 FR 10317; March 10, 1978) by the... at 20 CFR 655.207(b)(2) (1985). (c) In no event shall an adverse effect rate for any year be lower... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate...

  9. Adversity and Resilience: A Synthesis of International Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noltemeyer, Amity L.; Bush, Kevin R.

    2013-01-01

    Children and adolescents worldwide experience a variety of adversities that have the potential to disrupt typical development. However, some of these individuals exhibit resilience, evidencing normal development in the face of adversity. Here we review research on these constructs of risk, adversity, and resilience; synthesize international…

  10. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines, to avoid adverse effects. (c) Consulting party review. If the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assessment of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.5 Assessment of adverse effects. (a)...

  11. Nature and nurture predispose to violent behavior: serotonergic genes and adverse childhood environment.

    PubMed

    Reif, Andreas; Rösler, Michael; Freitag, Christine M; Schneider, Marc; Eujen, Andrea; Kissling, Christian; Wenzler, Denise; Jacob, Christian P; Retz-Junginger, Petra; Thome, Johannes; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Retz, Wolfgang

    2007-11-01

    Aggressive behavior is influenced by variation in genes of the serotonergic circuitry and early-life experience alike. The present study aimed at investigating the contribution of polymorphisms shown to moderate transcription of two genes involved in serotonergic neurotransmission (serotonin transporter, 5HTT, and monoamine oxidase A, MAOA) to the development of violence and to test for gene-environment interactions relating to adverse childhood environment. A cohort of 184 adult male volunteers referred for forensic assessment participated in the study. Each individual was assigned to either a violent or a nonviolent group. Logistic regression was performed and the best-fitting model, with a predictive power of 74%, revealed independent effects of adverse childhood environment and MAOA genotype. High environmental adversity during childhood was associated significantly with violent behavior. Forty-five percent of violent, but only 30% of nonviolent individuals carried the low-activity, short MAOA allele. Most interestingly, an interaction effect between childhood environment and 5HTT genotype on violent behavior was found in that high adversity during childhood impacted only the later-life violence if the short promoter alleles were present. These findings indicate complex interactions between genetic variation of the serotonergic circuitry and environmental factors arguing against simplistic, mono-causal explanations of violent behavior.

  12. Monitoring Adverse Drug Reactions: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of family physicians functioning as monitors of adverse drug reactions (ADR) was examined over one month in ten practices. This was done as a preliminary trial, before attempting to use the 200 family physicians of the National Reporting System of the College of Family Physicians of Canada to monitor ADRs on a national basis. Both of these trials were designed to examine the feasibility of family physicians acting as prospective monitors of ADRs in newly marketed drugs and to identify a drug group suitable for monitoring. This study examined the detection of ADRs, prescribing and practice profiles. No firm conclusion could be reached as to the value of family doctors monitoring ADRs. This study supports the evidence that older patients receive more drugs and are at even greater risk of an ADR. Antibiotics, cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory or antidepressant drugs are suggested as those most suitable for prospective monitoring in a family practice setting. PMID:21289786

  13. Adverse reactions to the sulphite additives

    PubMed Central

    Misso, Neil LA

    2012-01-01

    Sulphites are widely used as preservative and antioxidant additives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Exposure to sulphites has been reported to induce a range of adverse clinical effects in sensitive individuals, ranging from dermatitis, urticaria, flushing, hypotension, abdominal pain and diarrhoea to life-threatening anaphylactic and asthmatic reactions. Exposure to the sulphites arises mainly from the consumption of foods and drinks that contain these additives; however exposure may also occur through the use of pharmaceutical products, as well as in occupational settings. Most studies report a prevalence of sulphite sensitivity of 3 to 10% among asthmatic subjects who ingest these additives. However, the severity of these reactions varies, and steroid-dependent asthmatics, those with marked airway hyperresponsiveness, and children with chronic asthma, appear to be at greater risk. Although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed, the precise mechanisms underlying sulphite sensitivity remain unclear. PMID:24834193

  14. Adverse skeletal effects of drugs - beyond Glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Susannah; Grey, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are an important public health problem with significant individual and societal costs. In addition to the major risk factors for osteoporotic fracture, low bone mineral density (BMD), age, low body weight and history of fracture or falls, some drugs are now considered to be important secondary risk factor for bone loss and fracture, particularly amongst predisposed individuals. Currently available data are often generated from small observational clinical studies, making risk assessment and development of management guidelines difficult. In many cases, the exposed population has a low baseline risk for fracture and additional assessment and treatment may not be necessary. In this review, we focus on drugs other than glucocorticoids identified as potentially causing adverse skeletal effects, summarizing the existing evidence from preclinical and clinical studies, and suggest recommendations for patient management. PMID:25039381

  15. Management of adverse effects of mood stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Murru, Andrea; Popovic, Dina; Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Hidalgo, Diego; León-Caballero, Jordi; Vieta, Eduard

    2015-08-01

    Mood stabilizers such as lithium and anticonvulsants are still standard-of-care for the acute and long-term treatment of bipolar disorder (BD). This systematic review aimed to assess the prevalence of their adverse effects (AEs) and to provide recommendations on their clinical management. We performed a systematic research for studies reporting the prevalence of AEs with lithium, valproate, lamotrigine, and carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine. Management recommendations were then developed. Mood stabilizers have different tolerability profiles and are eventually associated to cognitive, dermatological, endocrine, gastrointestinal, immunological, metabolic, nephrogenic, neurologic, sexual, and teratogenic AEs. Most of those can be transient or dose-related and can be managed by optimizing drug doses to the lowest effective dose. Some rare AEs can be serious and potentially lethal, and require abrupt discontinuation of medication. Integrated medical attention is warranted for complex somatic AEs. Functional remediation and psychoeducation may help to promote awareness on BD and better medication management.

  16. Adverse drug reactions: classification, susceptibility and reporting.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Gerri

    2016-08-10

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are increasingly common and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Historically, ADRs have been classified as type A or type B. Type A reactions are predictable from the known pharmacology of a drug and are associated with high morbidity and low mortality. Type B reactions are idiosyncratic, bizarre or novel responses that cannot be predicted from the known pharmacology of a drug and are associated with low morbidity and high mortality. Not all ADRs fit into type A and type B categories; therefore, additional categories have been developed. These include type C (continuing), type D (delayed use), and type E (end of use) reactions. Susceptibility to ADRs is influenced by age, gender, disease states, pregnancy, ethnicity and polypharmacy. Drug safety is reliant on nurses and other healthcare professionals being alert to the possibility of ADRs, working with patients to optimise medicine use and exercising vigilance in the reporting of ADRs through the Yellow Card Scheme. PMID:27507394

  17. Early Childhood Adversity and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Megan V.; Gotman, Nathan; Yonkers, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and pregnancy outcomes; to explore mediators of this association including psychiatric illness and health habits. Methods Exposure to ACEs was determined by the Early Trauma Inventory Self Report Short Form; psychiatric diagnoses were generated by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview administered in a cohort of 2303 pregnant women. Linear regression and structural equation modeling bootstrapping approaches tested for multiple mediators. Results Each additional ACE decreased birth weight by 16.33 g and decreased gestational age by 0.063. Smoking was the strongest mediator of the effect on gestational age. Conclusions ACEs have an enduring effect on maternal reproductive health, as manifested by mothers’ delivery of offspring that were of reduced birth weight and shorter gestational age. PMID:26762511

  18. Adverse effects of differential parental attention1

    PubMed Central

    Sajwaj, Thomas E.; Pinkston, Susan; Cordua, Glenn; Jackson, Carolyn; Herbert, Emily W.; Pinkston, Elsie M.; Hayden, M. Loeman

    1973-01-01

    In two independent parent training projects (Kansas and Mississippi), mothers of deviant young children were observed to follow almost all child behaviors with attention. The mothers were then trained to use differential attention procedures to increase their child's appropriate behaviors and to decrease deviant behaviors. Contrary to expectations, the differential attention procedure produced substantial increases in deviant behavior for four of the children. This adverse effect was maintained over many sessions and was replicated in single organism, reversal designs. A fifth child showed no change. A sixth child showed some improvement. However, this effect was not recovered in a second application of differential attention, and the child became worse. The results underline the importance of subject generality in applied behavior analysis and strongly suggest that service programs using operant techniques must carefully evaluate their effects on behavior. PMID:16795386

  19. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  20. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992

  1. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways in Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, meabolic, signaling) t...

  2. Adverse reactions triggered by dental local anesthetics: a clinical survey.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, E.; Goharian, S.; Katz, Y.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine patients completed a questionnaire focusing on adverse reactions to dental local anesthetics as manifested by 16 signs and symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the participants reported having at least 1 adverse reaction. It was found that most of the adverse reactions occurred within the first 2 hours following the injection of local anesthetics. Pallor, palpitations, diaphoresis, and dizziness were the most common adverse reactions reported in the study. The results pointed to a significant relationship between anxiety, gender, injection technique, and procedure with a higher incidence of adverse reactions. PMID:11432179

  3. Baby on board: do responses to stress in the maternal brain mediate adverse pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Douglas, Alison J

    2010-07-01

    Stress and adverse environmental surroundings result in suboptimal conditions in a pregnant mother such that she may experience poor pregnancy outcome including complete pregnancy failure and preterm labor. Furthermore her developing baby is at risk of adverse programming, which confers susceptibility to long term ill health. While some mechanisms at the feto-maternal interface underlying these conditions are understood, the underlying cause for their adverse adaptation is often not clear. Progesterone plays a key role at many levels, including control of neuroendocrine responses to stress, procuring the required immune balance and controlling placental and decidual function, and lack of progesterone can explain many of the unwanted consequences of stress. How stress that is perceived by the mother inhibits progesterone secretion and action is beginning to be investigated. This overview of maternal neuroendocrine responses to stress throughout pregnancy analyses how they interact to compromise progesterone secretion and precipitate undesirable effects in mother and offspring.

  4. Broken or maladaptive? Altered trajectories in neuroinflammation and behavior after early life adversity

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Prabarna; Brenhouse, Heather C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to adversity and stress early in development yields vulnerability to mental illnesses throughout the lifespan. Growing evidence suggests that this vulnerability has mechanistic origins involving aberrant development of both neurocircuitry and neuro-immune activity. Here we review the current understanding of when and how stress exposure initiates neuroinflammatory events that interact with brain development. We first review how early life adversity has been associated with various psychopathologies, and how neuroinflammation plays a role in these pathologies. We then summarize data and resultant hypotheses describing how early life adversity may particularly alter neuro-immune development with psychiatric consequences. Finally, we review how sex differences contribute to individualistic vulnerabilities across the lifespan. We submit the importance of understanding how stress during early development might cause outright neural or glial damage, as well as experience-dependent plasticity that may insufficiently prepare an individual for sex-specific or life-stage specific challenges. PMID:25081071

  5. Potential adverse effects of omega-3 Fatty acids in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Lenox, C E; Bauer, J E

    2013-01-01

    Fish oil omega-3 fatty acids, mainly eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, are used in the management of several diseases in companion animal medicine, many of which are inflammatory in nature. This review describes metabolic differences among omega-3 fatty acids and outlines potential adverse effects that may occur with their supplementation in dogs and cats with a special focus on omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil. Important potential adverse effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation include altered platelet function, gastrointestinal adverse effects, detrimental effects on wound healing, lipid peroxidation, potential for nutrient excess and toxin exposure, weight gain, altered immune function, effects on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity, and nutrient-drug interactions.

  6. Environmental Adversity Increases Genetic Risk for Externalizing Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Brian M.; South, Susan C.; DiRago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies of gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of psychiatric and substance use disorders are rapidly accumulating. However, few attempts have been made to integrate findings and articulate general mechanisms of G-E influence in the emergence of psychopathology. Objective Identify patterns of G-E interplay between externalizing (EXT; antisocial behavior and substance use) disorders and several environmental risk factors. Design We used quantitative genetic models to examine how genetic and environmental risk for EXT disorders changes as a function of environmental context. Setting Participants were recruited from the community and took part in a day-long assessment at a university laboratory. Participants The sample consisted of 1315 male and female twin pairs participating in the age 17 assessment of the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Main Outcome Measures Multiple measures and informants were employed to construct a composite of EXT disorders and composite measures of 6 environmental risk factors including academic achievement and engagement, antisocial and prosocial peer affiliation, mother-child and father-child relationship problems, and stressful life events. Results A significant G × E interaction was detected between each environmental risk factor and EXT such that greater environmental adversity was associated with increased genetic risk in EXT. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that in the context of environmental adversity, genetic factors become more important in the etiology of EXT disorders. The consistency of the results further suggests a general mechanism of environmental influence on EXT disorders regardless of the specific form of the environmental risk. PMID:19487629

  7. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A.; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations. PMID:27091302

  8. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2016-01-01

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations.

  9. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2016-01-01

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations. PMID:27091302

  10. Association between Adverse Life Events and Addictive Behaviors among Male and Female Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Grace P.; Storr, Carla L.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.; Martins, Silvia S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Adverse life events have been associated with gambling and substance use as they can serve as forms of escapism. Involvement in gambling and substance use can also place individuals in adversely stressful situations. Objectives To explore potential male-female differences in the association between addictive behavior and adverse life events among an urban cohort of adolescents. Methods The study sample comprised of 515 adolescent participants in a randomized prevention trial. With self-reported data, four addictive behavior groups were created: Non-Substance Users and Non-Gamblers, Substance Users Only, Gamblers Only, and Substance Users and Gamblers. Multinomial logistic regression analyses with interaction terms of sex and adverse life events were conducted. Results Adverse life events and engaging in at least one addictive behavior were common for both sexes. Substance Users and Gamblers had more than twice the likelihood of Non-Substance Users and Non-Gamblers to experience any event as well as events of various domains (i.e., relationship, violence, and instability). Neither relationship nor instability events’ associations with the co-occurrence of substance use and gambling significantly differed between sexes. Conversely, females exposed to violence events were significantly more likely than similarly exposed males to report the co-occurrence of substance use and gambling. Conclusion Findings from the current study prompt future studies to devote more attention to the development of effective programs that teach adaptive coping strategies to adolescents, particularly to females upon exposure to violence. PMID:23082829

  11. Adverse health consequences of the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2015-01-01

    The 40th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War is a useful time to review the adverse health consequences of that war and to identify and address serious problems related to armed conflict, such as the protection of noncombatant civilians. More than 58,000 U.S. servicemembers died during the war and more than 150,000 were wounded. Many suffered from posttraumatic stress disorders and other mental disorders and from the long-term consequences of physical injuries. However, morbidity and mortality, although difficult to determine precisely, was substantially higher among the Vietnamese people, with at least two million of them dying during the course of the war. In addition, more than one million Vietnamese were forced to migrate during the war and its aftermath, including many "boat people" who died at sea during attempts to flee. Wars continue to kill and injure large numbers of noncombatant civilians and continue to damage the health-supporting infrastructure of society, expose civilians to toxic chemicals, forcibly displace many people, and divert resources away from services to benefit noncombatant civilians. Health professionals can play important roles in promoting the protection of noncombatant civilians during war and helping to prevent war and create a culture of peace.

  12. Adverse health consequences of the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2015-01-01

    The 40th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War is a useful time to review the adverse health consequences of that war and to identify and address serious problems related to armed conflict, such as the protection of noncombatant civilians. More than 58,000 U.S. servicemembers died during the war and more than 150,000 were wounded. Many suffered from posttraumatic stress disorders and other mental disorders and from the long-term consequences of physical injuries. However, morbidity and mortality, although difficult to determine precisely, was substantially higher among the Vietnamese people, with at least two million of them dying during the course of the war. In addition, more than one million Vietnamese were forced to migrate during the war and its aftermath, including many "boat people" who died at sea during attempts to flee. Wars continue to kill and injure large numbers of noncombatant civilians and continue to damage the health-supporting infrastructure of society, expose civilians to toxic chemicals, forcibly displace many people, and divert resources away from services to benefit noncombatant civilians. Health professionals can play important roles in promoting the protection of noncombatant civilians during war and helping to prevent war and create a culture of peace. PMID:26754766

  13. Migraine treatment: a chain of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Veloso, Tiago Sousa; Cambão, Mariana Seixas

    2015-01-01

    This clinical vignette presents a 14 years old female, with a past medical history relevant only for migraine with typical aura of less than monthly frequency, complaining of a severe unilateral headache with rising intensity for the previous 4 h, associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. This episode of migraine with aura in a patient with recurrent migraine was complicated by side effects of medical diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (extrapyramidal symptoms, delirium, post-lumbar puncture headache, hospital admission) all of which could have been prevented-quaternary prevention. This case illustrates several important messages in migraine management: (1) use of acetaminophen is not based in high-quality evidence and better options exist; (2) among youngsters, domperidone should be preferred over metoclopramide because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier; (3) moderate to severe migraine crisis can be managed with triptans in teenagers over 12 years old; (4) it is important to recognize adverse drug effects; (5) harmful consequences of medical interventions do occur; (6) the school community must be informed about chronic diseases of the young.

  14. Adverse immunologic effects of antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S S; Fantus, I G

    1987-01-01

    Propylthiouracil and methimazole are frequently used in the management of hyperthyroidism. Two patients in whom adverse immunologic effects other than isolated agranulocytosis developed during treatment with propylthiouracil are described. A review of the literature revealed 53 similar cases over a 35-year period. Rash, fever, arthralgias and granulocytopenia were the most common manifestations. Vasculitis, particularly with cutaneous manifestations, occurs and may be fatal. The clinical evidence suggests that an immunologic mechanism is involved. A number of different autoantibodies were reported, but antinuclear antibodies were infrequent, and none of the cases met the criteria for a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thus, the reactions do not represent a true drug-induced lupus syndrome. Current hypotheses and experimental data regarding the cause of the reactions are reviewed. No specific clinical subgroup at high risk can be identified, and manifestations may occur at any dosage and at any time during therapy. Cross-reactivity between the two antithyroid drugs can be expected. Except for minor symptoms (e.g., mild arthralgias or transient rash), such reactions are an indication for withdrawal of the drug and the use of alternative methods to control the hyperthyroidism. In rare cases of severe vasculitis a short course of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy may be helpful. PMID:3539299

  15. Reporting vaccine-associated adverse events.

    PubMed Central

    Duclos, P.; Hockin, J.; Pless, R.; Lawlor, B.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine family physicians' awareness of the need to monitor and report vaccine-associated adverse events (VAAE) in Canada and to identify mechanisms that could facilitate reporting. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: Canadian family practices. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of 747 family physicians. Overall response rate was 32% (226 of 717 eligible physicians). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Access to education on VAAE; knowledge about VAAE monitoring systems, reporting criteria, and reporting forms; method of reporting VAAEs and reasons for not reporting them; and current experience with VAAEs. RESULTS: Of 226 respondents, 55% reported observing VAAEs, and 42% reported the event. Fewer than 50% were aware of a monitoring system for VAAE, and only 39% had had VAAE-related education during medical training. Only 28% knew the reporting criteria. Reporting was significantly associated with knowledge of VAAE monitoring systems and reporting criteria (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Physicians need more feedback and education on VAAE reporting and more information about the importance of reporting and about reporting criteria and methods. PMID:9303234

  16. Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Neurologic Medications.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Eman; Nunneley, Chloe E; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-03-01

    Life-threatening and benign drug reactions occur frequently in the skin, affecting 8 % of the general population and 2-3 % of all hospitalized patients, emphasizing the need for physicians to effectively recognize and manage patients with drug-induced eruptions. Neurologic medications represent a vast array of drug classes with cutaneous side effects. Approximately 7 % of the United States (US) adult population is affected by adult-onset neurological disorders, reflecting a large number of patients on neurologic drug therapies. This review elucidates the cutaneous reactions associated with medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following neurologic pathologies: Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, epilepsy, Huntington disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and pseudobulbar affect. A search of the literature was performed using the specific FDA-approved drug or drug classes in combination with the terms 'dermatologic,' 'cutaneous,' 'skin,' or 'rash.' Both PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were utilized, with side effects ranging from those cited in randomized controlled trials to case reports. It behooves neurologists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians to be aware of the recorded cutaneous adverse reactions and their severity for proper management and potential need to withdraw the offending medication.

  17. [Cutaneous adverse reactions to tattoos and piercings].

    PubMed

    Mataix, J; Silvestre, J F

    2009-10-01

    Piercings and tattoos have become very popular in western society in recent decades, particularly among younger generations. Reports of medical complications associated with these decorative techniques have increased in parallel with the rise in their popularity. Due to their high frequency, adverse cutaneous reactions are particularly important among these potential complications. Tattoo-related complications include a number of cutaneous and systemic infections secondary to breach of the epidermal barrier, acute and delayed inflammatory reactions with different histopathological patterns, the appearance of benign and malignant tumors on tattooed areas of skin, and certain dermatoses triggered by isomorphic phenomena. Piercing-related complications are similar, though some, such as pyogenic skin infections, are much more common due to the delayed wound healing after piercing in certain sites. We must differentiate between complications that are independent of the site of piercing, and specific complications, which are closely related to the body area pierced. The rate of complications after performing piercings or tattoos depends on the experience of the artist, the hygiene techniques applied, and the postprocedural care by the customer. However, some of these complications are unpredictable and depend on factors intrinsic to the patient. In this article, we review the most common decorative techniques of body art, with particular focus on the potential cutaneous complications and their management. PMID:19775542

  18. Adverse perinatal outcome in the older primipara.

    PubMed

    Dollberg, S; Seidman, D S; Armon, Y; Stevenson, D K; Gale, R

    1996-01-01

    Delayed childbearing has become common and has raised the awareness of the possible risks for the mother and the newborn infant. The increased maternal and neonatal risks have been attributed largely to the lack of proper prenatal care. The aim of this study was to assess whether advanced maternal age is a significant risk factor in mothers who receive good prenatal care. We matched 161 cases 1:1 according to the following criteria: maternal and paternal ethnic origin, chronic diseases, marital status, and smoking during pregnancy. Our results show that the older women had babies with a significantly higher incidence of low birth weight (< 2500 gm, p = 0.001), prematurity (< 37 weeks, p = 0.02), intrauterine growth retardation (p = 0.001), abruptio placentae (p = 0.002), and cesarean section (p < 0.001). The average hospital stay for the babies of the older mothers was longer than that for babies of the younger mothers (8.4 vs 6.1 days, p = 0.003), and the incidence of hospitalization for more than 3 days in the neonatal intensive care unit was increased (10.3% vs 2.2%). Logistic regression did not support maternal age of 35 years and older as being the single significant risk factor for adverse neonatal and maternal outcome. We conclude that maternal age older than 35 years entails a higher risk for the mother and her newborn infant, even when good prenatal care is taken.

  19. Systematic Analysis of Adverse Event Reports for Sex Differences in Adverse Drug Events.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Li, Dingcheng; Wang, Liwei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-04-22

    Increasing evidence has shown that sex differences exist in Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). Identifying those sex differences in ADEs could reduce the experience of ADEs for patients and could be conducive to the development of personalized medicine. In this study, we analyzed a normalized US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Chi-squared test was conducted to discover which treatment regimens or drugs had sex differences in adverse events. Moreover, reporting odds ratio (ROR) and P value were calculated to quantify the signals of sex differences for specific drug-event combinations. Logistic regression was applied to remove the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events. We detected among 668 drugs of the most frequent 20 treatment regimens in the United States, 307 drugs have sex differences in ADEs. In addition, we identified 736 unique drug-event combinations with significant sex differences. After removing the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events, there are 266 combinations remained. Drug labels or previous studies verified some of them while others warrant further investigation.

  20. Systematic Analysis of Adverse Event Reports for Sex Differences in Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Li, Dingcheng; Wang, Liwei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that sex differences exist in Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). Identifying those sex differences in ADEs could reduce the experience of ADEs for patients and could be conducive to the development of personalized medicine. In this study, we analyzed a normalized US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Chi-squared test was conducted to discover which treatment regimens or drugs had sex differences in adverse events. Moreover, reporting odds ratio (ROR) and P value were calculated to quantify the signals of sex differences for specific drug-event combinations. Logistic regression was applied to remove the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events. We detected among 668 drugs of the most frequent 20 treatment regimens in the United States, 307 drugs have sex differences in ADEs. In addition, we identified 736 unique drug-event combinations with significant sex differences. After removing the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events, there are 266 combinations remained. Drug labels or previous studies verified some of them while others warrant further investigation. PMID:27102014

  1. Future Directions in Childhood Adversity and Youth Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katie A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite long-standing interest in the influence of adverse early experiences on mental health, systematic scientific inquiry into childhood adversity and developmental outcomes has emerged only recently. Existing research has amply demonstrated that exposure to childhood adversity is associated with elevated risk for multiple forms of youth psychopathology. In contrast, knowledge of developmental mechanisms linking childhood adversity to the onset of psychopathology—and whether those mechanisms are general or specific to particular kinds of adversity—remains cursory. Greater understanding of these pathways and identification of protective factors that buffer children from developmental disruptions following exposure to adversity is essential to guide the development of interventions to prevent the onset of psychopathology following adverse childhood experiences. This article provides recommendations for future research in this area. In particular, use of a consistent definition of childhood adversity, integration of studies of typical development with those focused on childhood adversity, and identification of distinct dimensions of environmental experience that differentially influence development are required to uncover mechanisms that explain how childhood adversity is associated with numerous psychopathology outcomes (i.e., multifinality) and identify moderators that shape divergent trajectories following adverse childhood experiences. A transdiagnostic model that highlights disruptions in emotional processing and poor executive functioning as key mechanisms linking childhood adversity with multiple forms of psychopathology is presented as a starting point in this endeavour. Distinguishing between general and specific mechanisms linking childhood adversity with psychopathology is needed to generate empirically informed interventions to prevent the long-term consequences of adverse early environments on children’s development. PMID:26849071

  2. Assessing Adverse Events of Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Outcomes in the Regione Emilia-Romagna, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Hegarty, Sarah E.; Rabinowitz, Carol; Maio, Vittorio; Hyslop, Terry; Dicker, Adam P.; Louis, Daniel Z.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Although the likelihood of radiation-related adverse events influences treatment decisions regarding radiation therapy after prostatectomy for eligible patients, the data available to inform decisions are limited. This study was designed to evaluate the genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events associated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiation timing on the risk of adverse events. Methods: The Regione Emilia-Romagna Italian Longitudinal Health Care Utilization Database was queried to identify a cohort of men who received radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2009, including patients who received postprostatectomy radiation therapy. Patients with prior radiation therapy were excluded. Outcome measures were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events after prostatectomy. Rates of adverse events were compared between the cohorts who did and did not receive postoperative radiation therapy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed for each class of adverse events, including models with radiation therapy as a time-varying covariate. Results: A total of 9876 men were included in the analyses: 2176 (22%) who received radiation therapy and 7700 (78%) treated with prostatectomy alone. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, the additional exposure to radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal (rate ratio [RR] 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-2.27; P<.001) and urinary nonincontinence events (RR 1.83; 95% CI 1.83-2.80; P<.001) but not urinary incontinence events or erectile dysfunction. The addition of the time from prostatectomy to radiation therapy interaction term was not significant for any of the adverse event outcomes (P>.1 for all outcomes). Conclusion: Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with an increase in gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events. However

  3. Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine associations of neonatal adiposity with maternal glucose levels and cord serum C-peptide in a multicenter multinational study, the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study, thereby assessing the Pederson hypothesis linking maternal glycemia and fetal hyperinsulinemia to neonatal adiposity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Eligible pregnant women underwent a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test between 24 and 32 weeks gestation (as close to 28 weeks as possible). Neonatal anthropometrics and cord serum C-peptide were measured. Associations of maternal glucose and cord serum C-peptide with neonatal adiposity (sum of skin folds >90th percentile or percent body fat >90th percentile) were assessed using multiple logistic regression analyses, with adjustment for potential confounders, including maternal age, parity, BMI, mean arterial pressure, height, gestational age at delivery, and the baby's sex. RESULTS—Among 23,316 HAPO Study participants with glucose levels blinded to caregivers, cord serum C-peptide results were available for 19,885 babies and skin fold measurements for 19,389. For measures of neonatal adiposity, there were strong statistically significant gradients across increasing levels of maternal glucose and cord serum C-peptide, which persisted after adjustment for potential confounders. In fully adjusted continuous variable models, odds ratios ranged from 1.35 to 1.44 for the two measures of adiposity for fasting, 1-h, and 2-h plasma glucose higher by 1 SD. CONCLUSIONS—These findings confirm the link between maternal glucose and neonatal adiposity and suggest that the relationship is mediated by fetal insulin production and that the Pedersen hypothesis describes a basic biological relationship influencing fetal growth. PMID:19011170

  4. The adverse health effects of chronic cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the most probable of the adverse health effects of regular cannabis use sustained over years, as indicated by epidemiological studies that have established an association between cannabis use and adverse outcomes; ruled out reverse causation; and controlled for plausible alternative explanations. We have also focused on adverse outcomes for which there is good evidence of biological plausibility. The focus is on those adverse health effects of greatest potential public health significance--those that are most likely to occur and to affect a substantial proportion of regular cannabis users. These most probable adverse effects of regular use include a dependence syndrome, impaired respiratory function, cardiovascular disease, adverse effects on adolescent psychosocial development and mental health, and residual cognitive impairment.

  5. DRD4-exonIII-VNTR moderates the effect of childhood adversities on emotional resilience in young-adults.

    PubMed

    Das, Debjani; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Tan, Xiaoyun; Anstey, Kaarin J; Easteal, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Most individuals successfully maintain psychological well-being even when exposed to trauma or adversity. Emotional resilience or the ability to thrive in the face of adversity is determined by complex interactions between genetic makeup, previous exposure to stress, personality, coping style, availability of social support, etc. Recent studies have demonstrated that childhood trauma diminishes resilience in adults and affects mental health. The Dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) exon III variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism was reported to moderate the impact of adverse childhood environment on behaviour, mood and other health-related outcomes. In this study we investigated whether DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype moderates the effect of childhood adversities (CA) on resilience. In a representative population sample (n = 1148) aged 30-34 years, we observed an interactive effect of DRD4 genotype and CA (β = 0.132; p = 0.003) on resilience despite no main effect of the genotype when effects of age, gender and education were controlled for. The 7-repeat allele appears to protect against the adverse effect of CA since the decline in resilience associated with increased adversity was evident only in individuals without the 7-repeat allele. Resilience was also significantly associated with approach-/avoidance-related personality measures (behavioural inhibition/activation system; BIS/BAS) measures and an interactive effect of DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype and CA on BAS was observed. Hence it is possible that approach-related personality traits could be mediating the effect of the DRD4 gene and childhood environment interaction on resilience such that when stressors are present, the 7-repeat allele influences the development of personality in a way that provides protection against adverse outcomes.

  6. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related adverse events: general overview.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) represents a monumental advance in the management of patients with pancreaticobiliary diseases, but is a complex and technically demanding procedure with the highest inherent risk of adverse events of all routine endoscopic procedures. Overall adverse event rates for ERCP are typically reported as 5-10%. The most commonly reported adverse events include post-ERCP pancreatitis, bleeding, perforation, infection (cholangitis), and cardiopulomary or "sedation related" events. This article evaluates patient-related and procedure-related risk factors for ERCP-related adverse events, and discusses strategies for the prevention, diagnosis and management of these events.

  7. 21 CFR 600.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... substantial disruption of a person's ability to conduct normal life functions. Life-threatening adverse... only referred to elevated hepatic enzymes or hepatitis. Similarly, cerebral thromboembolism...

  8. 21 CFR 600.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... substantial disruption of a person's ability to conduct normal life functions. Life-threatening adverse... only referred to elevated hepatic enzymes or hepatitis. Similarly, cerebral thromboembolism...

  9. 21 CFR 600.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse experiences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... substantial disruption of a person's ability to conduct normal life functions. Life-threatening adverse... only referred to elevated hepatic enzymes or hepatitis. Similarly, cerebral thromboembolism...

  10. Linking systemic arterial stiffness among adolescents to adverse childhood experiences.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; O'Leary, Deborah D; Cairney, John; Wade, Terrance J

    2016-06-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been linked with cardiovascular disease and early mortality among adults. Most research examines this relationship retrospectively. Examining the association between ACEs and children's cardiovascular health is required to understand the time course of this association. We examined the relationship between ACEs exposure and ECG-to-toe pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of systemic arterial stiffness that is strongly related to cardiovascular mortality among adults. PWV (distance/transit time; m/s) was calculated using transit times from the ECG R-wave to the pulse wave contour at the toe. Transit times were collected over 15 heartbeats and the distance from the sternal notch to the left middle toe was used. A total of 221 children (119 females) aged 10-14 years participated in data collection of PWV, hemodynamic and anthropometric variables. Parents of these children completed a modified inventory of ACEs taken from the Childhood Trust Events Survey. Multivariable regression assessed the relationship between ACEs group (<4 ACEs versus ≥4 ACEs) and PWV. Analyses yielded an ACEs group by sex interaction, with males who experienced four or more ACEs having higher PWV (p<0.01). This association was independent of hemodynamic, anthropometric and sociodemographic variables (R(2)=0.346; p<0.01). Four or more ACEs is associated with greater arterial stiffness in male children aged 10-14 years. Addressing stress and trauma exposure in childhood is an important target for public health interventions to reduce early cardiovascular risk. PMID:27107504

  11. Does Ramadan Fasting Adversely Affect Cognitive Function in Young Females?

    PubMed Central

    Ghayour Najafabadi, Mahboubeh; Rahbar Nikoukar, Laya; Memari, Amir; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Beygi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of Ramadan fasting on cognitive function in 17 female athletes. Data were obtained from participants of two fasting (n = 9) and nonfasting (n = 8) groups at three periods of the study (before Ramadan, at the third week in Ramadan, and after Ramadan). Digit span test (DST) and Stroop color test were employed to assess short-term memory and inhibition/cognitive flexibility at each time point. There were no significant changes for DST and Stroop task 1 in both groups, whereas Stroop task 2 and task 3 showed significant improvements in Ramadan condition (p < 0.05). Interference indices did not change significantly across the study except in post-Ramadan period of fasting group (p < 0.05). Group × week interaction was significant only for error numbers (p < 0.05). Athletes in nonfasting showed a significant decrease in number of errors in Ramadan compared to baseline (p < 0.05). The results suggest that Ramadan fasting may not adversely affect cognitive function in female athletes. PMID:26697263

  12. Adverse Events Associated with Prolonged Antibiotic Use

    PubMed Central

    Meropol, Sharon B.; Chan, K. Arnold; Chen, Zhen; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Hennessy, Sean; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Platt, Richard; Schech, Stephanie D.; Shatin, Deborah; Metlay, Joshua P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Infectious Diseases Society of America and US CDC recommend 60 days of ciprofloxacin, doxycycline or amoxicillin for anthrax prophylaxis. It is not possible to determine severe adverse drug event (ADE) risks from the few people thus far exposed to anthrax prophylaxis. This study’s objective was to estimate risks of severe ADEs associated with long-term ciprofloxacin, doxycycline and amoxicillin exposure using 3 large databases: one electronic medical record (General Practice Research Database) and two claims databases (UnitedHealthcare, HMO Research Network). Methods We include office visit, hospital admission and prescription data for 1/1/1999–6/30/2001. Exposure variable was oral antibiotic person-days (pds). Primary outcome was hospitalization during exposure with ADE diagnoses: anaphylaxis, phototoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, seizures, ventricular arrhythmia or infectious colitis. Results We randomly sampled 999,773, 1,047,496 and 1,819,004 patients from Databases A, B and C respectively. 33,183 amoxicillin, 15,250 ciprofloxacin and 50,171 doxycycline prescriptions continued ≥30 days. ADE hospitalizations during long-term exposure were not observed in Database A. ADEs during long-term amoxicillin were seen only in Database C with 5 ADEs or 1.2(0.4–2.7) ADEs/100,000 pds exposure. Long-term ciprofloxacin showed 3 and 4 ADEs with 5.7(1.2–16.6) and 3.5(1.0–9.0) ADEs/100,000 pds in Databases B and C, respectively. Only Database B had ADEs during long-term doxycycline with 3 ADEs or 0.9(0.2–2.6) ADEs/100,000 pds. For most events, the incidence rate ratio, comparing >28 vs.1–28 pds exposure was <1, showing limited evidence for cumulative dose-related ADEs from long-term exposure. Conclusions Long-term amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin and doxycycline appears safe, supporting use of these medications if needed for large-scale post-exposure anthrax prophylaxis. PMID:18215001

  13. The Maternal Adversity, Vulnerability and Neurodevelopment Project: Theory and Methodology

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Katherine A; Gaudreau, Hélène; Colalillo, Sara; Steiner, Meir; Atkinson, Leslie; Moss, Ellen; Goldberg, Susan; Karama, Sherif; Matthews, Stephen G; Lydon, John E; Silveira, Patricia P; Wazana, Ashley D; Levitan, Robert D; Sokolowski, Marla B; Kennedy, James L; Fleming, Alison; Meaney, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the theory and methodology of the multi-wave, prospective Maternal Adversity, Vulnerability and Neurodevelopment (MAVAN) study. The goal of MAVAN is to examine the pre- and postnatal influences, and their interaction, in determining individual differences in mental health. Method: MAVAN is a community-based, birth cohort study of pregnant Canadian mothers and their offspring. Dyads are assessed longitudinally, with multiple assessments of both mother and child in home and laboratory across the child’s development. Study measures, including assessments of cognitive and emotional function, are described. The study uses a candidate gene approach to examine gene–environment interdependence in specific developmental outcomes. Finally, the study includes measures of both brain-based phenotypes and metabolism to explore comorbidities associated with child obesity. One of the unique features of the MAVAN protocol is the extensive measures of the mother–child interaction. The relation between these measures will be discussed. Results: Evidence from the MAVAN project shows interesting results about maternal care, families, and child outcomes. In our review, preliminary analyses showing the correlations between measures of maternal care are reported. As predicted, early evidence suggests that maternal care measures are positively correlated, over time. Conclusions: This review provides evidence for the feasibility and value of laboratory-based measures embedded within a longitudinal birth cohort study. Though retention of the samples has been a challenge of MAVAN, they are within a comparable range to other studies of this nature. Indeed, the trade-off of somewhat greater participant burden has allowed for a rich database. The results yielded from the MAVAN project will not only describe typical development but also possible targets for intervention. Understanding certain endophenotypes will shed light on the pathogenesis of various mental and

  14. Drug interactions in dermatology: what the dermatologist should know.

    PubMed

    Coondoo, Arijit; Chattopadhyay, Chandan

    2013-07-01

    A drug interaction is a process by which a drug or any other substance interacts with another drug and affects its activity by increasing or decreasing its effect, causing a side effect or producing a new effect unrelated to the effect of either. Interactions may be of various types-drug-drug interactions, drug-food interactions, drug-medical condition interactions, or drug-herb interactions. Interactions may occur by single or multiple mechanisms. They may occur in vivo or in vitro (pharmaceutical reactions). In vivo interactions may be further subdivided into pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic reactions. Topical drug interactions which may be agonistic or antagonistic may occur between two drugs applied topically or between a topical and a systemic drug. Topical drug-food interaction (for example, grape fruit juice and cyclosporine) and drug-disease interactions (for example, topical corticosteroid and aloe vera) may also occur. It is important for the dermatologist to be aware of such interactions to avoid complications of therapy in day-to-day practice.

  15. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    PubMed

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  16. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    PubMed

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  17. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES

    PubMed Central

    CORREIA, RION BRATTIG; LI, LANG; ROCHA, LUIS M.

    2015-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this “Bibliome”, the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products—including cannabis—which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015. We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that

  18. Acute-onset rhabdomyolysis secondary to sitagliptin and atorvastatin interaction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Waqas; Kurian, Saji; Bishnoi, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a serious medical condition in which the skeletal muscle tissue gets damaged and breaks down at rapid rates, potentially leading to death if not managed early on. Rhabdomyolysis in adults has several etiologies such as crush injuries, prolonged immobilization, strenuous exercise, hormonal or metabolic causes, infections, and drug-drug interactions. We present a case report of the interaction of two drugs that are used commonly in the general population. We here discuss a case of a 60-year-old female who presented to the hospital with complaints of generalized weakness, muscle aches, and atypical chest pain for a week after her primary care physician started her on sitagliptin while she was already on atorvastatin. After review of literature, this is the second known case of such an interaction causing acute breakdown of skeletal musculature. PMID:27199569

  19. Nevirapine: Most Common Cause of Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in an Outpatient Department of a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Mayur Popat; Pore, Shraddha Milind; Pradhan, Shekhar Nana; Bhoi, Umesh Yedu; Ramanand, Sunita Jaiprakash

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Skin is the most commonly involved organ in adverse drug reactions. Most of the cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs) being of mild to moderate severity are likely to be diagnosed and treated in an outpatient setting. Consequently, knowledge regarding morphological pattern, severity and drugs implicated in causation of these CADRs has important implications for healthcare personnel. Aim To determine the current clinical pattern of CADRs and to assess their causality and severity with the help of standard scales. Study design and setting A prospective, observational study was conducted in the outpatient department of skin and venereal disease in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods Patients with suspected CADR after consumption of systemic drug(s) were enrolled in the study. Data regarding demographics, clinical manifestations of CADR, drug history preceding the reaction, concomitant illness, relevant laboratory investigations etc was obtained. This data was then analysed for morphological pattern, causality and severity. CADRs with causality assessment possible and above on the basis of World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality assessment system were considered for analysis. Statistics Descriptive statistics were used to express results of pattern, severity and causality of CADRs. Results Ninety patients were enrolled in the study. Male to female ratio for CADRs was 1:2.33. Maculopapular rash was most commonly encountered CADR in 76.67% cases followed by urticaria (8.89%), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (4.4%) and fixed dose eruptions (3.33%). Antiretrovirals were implicated in 75.56% (68/90) of CADRs. Nevirapine was suspected in 52 out of 90 (57.77%) cases of CADRs which included 39 cases of maculopapular rash, five cases of urticaria, four cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and two cases each of pustular rash and angioedema respectively. Antimicrobials, antiepileptics and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) were

  20. Adversity Quotient and Defense Mechanism of Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikam, Vibhawari B.; Uplane, Megha M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the relationship between Adversity Quotient (AQ) and Defense Mechanism (DM) of secondary school students. The aim of the study was to ascertain relationship between Adversity Quotient and Defense mechanism i. e. Turning against object (TAO), Projection (PRO), Turning against self (TAS), Principalisation…

  1. Reducing Adverse Impact Via a Measure of Applicant Disadvantagedness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Walter G.

    Recent attempts to reduce the adverse impact of examinations have focused on alternatives to written tests. The present report, however, demonstrates how the adverse impact of written tests can be reduced by correcting for the degree to which a job applicant had been educationally and/or economically disadvantaged or deprived. A measure of…

  2. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines, to avoid adverse effects. (c) Consulting party review. If the... effects. Adverse effects on historic properties include, but are not limited to: (i) Physical destruction... (36 CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines; (iii) Removal of the property from its historic...

  3. 36 CFR 800.6 - Resolution of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resolution of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.6 Resolution of adverse effects. (a) Continue...—(1) Resolution without the Council. (i) The agency official shall consult with the SHPO/THPO...

  4. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  5. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  6. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  7. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  8. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  9. FACTORS ADVERSELY AFFECTING AMPHIBIAN POPULATIONS IN THE US

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors known or suspected to be adversely affecting native amphibian populations in the US were identified using information from species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors in a forthcoming book. Specific adverse factors were identified for 53 (58%) of...

  10. Adverse Selection in Health Insurance Markets: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Adverse selection as it relates to health care policy will be a key economic issue in many upcoming elections. In this article, the author lays out a 30-minute classroom experiment designed for students to experience the kind of elevated prices and market collapse that can result from adverse selection in health insurance markets. The students…

  11. Adverse Outcome Pathways: From Research to Regulation - Scientific Workshop Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) organizes existing knowledge on chemical mode of action, starting with a molecular initiating event such as receptor binding, continuing through key events, and ending with an adverse outcome such as reproductive impairment. AOPs can help identify...

  12. Adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Sarah J; McMillan, Katherine A; Wright, Kristi D; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2014-03-01

    Childhood experiences are thought to predispose a person to the development of health anxiety later in life. However, there is a lack of research investigating the influence of specific adverse experiences (e.g., childhood abuse, household dysfunction) on this condition. The current study examined the cumulative influence of multiple types of childhood adversities on health anxiety in adulthood. Adults 18-59 years of age (N=264) completed a battery of measures to assess adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs (i.e., negative affect and trait anxiety). Significant associations were observed between adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that adverse childhood experiences were predictive of health anxiety in adulthood; however, the unique contribution of these experience were no longer significant following the inclusion of the other variables of interest. Subsequently, mediation analyses indicated that both negative affect and trait anxiety independently mediated the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood. Increased exposure to adverse childhood experiences is associated with higher levels of health anxiety in adulthood; this relationship is mediated through negative affect and trait anxiety. Findings support the long-term negative impact of cumulative adverse childhood experiences and emphasize the importance of addressing negative affect and trait anxiety in efforts to prevent and treat health anxiety. PMID:24011493

  13. 18 CFR 701.309 - Appeal of initial adverse determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appeal of initial adverse determination. 701.309 Section 701.309 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.309 Appeal of initial adverse determination....

  14. 18 CFR 701.309 - Appeal of initial adverse determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Appeal of initial adverse determination. 701.309 Section 701.309 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.309 Appeal of