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Sample records for adverse effects drug

  1. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  2. Adverse effects of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Onat, Filiz; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-04-01

    Starting with phenobarbital in the 1900s, it took almost 70-80 years to introduce old-generation agents for the treatment of epilepsy. Then, in eleven years, nine more new antiepileptic drugs were added to the armamentarium. These drugs produce a nearly 40-50% decrease in seizure incidence in refractory patients, but few patients have been able to achieve complete freedom from seizures. So the search for more effective drugs with minimal adverse effect profiles will continue. Although the new antiepileptic drugs do not demonstrate a superior efficacy compared to the older ones, they do offer some advantages in terms of tolerability, fewer drug interactions and simpler pharmacokinetics. However, our knowledge concerning their safety profiles can not yet be considered adequate due to the relatively short time these drugs have been on the market and to the limited number of patients exposed to them. The fact that the serious side effects of felbamate and vigabatrine appeared late after marketing should be taken as an important lesson because it implies the potential for unknown side effects at any time during treatment. Antiepileptic drug treatment should begin with diagnosis of the seizure and epileptic syndrome, followed by selection of the drug most appropriate for treatment of the individual patient, and continued with monitoring of not only the seizures but the adverse effect profile as well.

  3. Immunomodulatory drugs: Oral and systemic adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The main objectives are to present the different adverses effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosupressed patients and study the impact of immunomodualtion on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. Study Design: We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. Results: These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren´s syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. Conclusions: In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic. Key words:Immunomodulatory drugs, oral diseases, adverse effects, therapeutic action. PMID:23986016

  4. [Adverse drug effects in the community pharmacy].

    PubMed

    Arnet, Isabelle; Seidling, Hanna M; Hersberger, Kurt E

    2015-12-01

    Community pharmacists represent an important pillar for the identification and the reporting of adverse drug effects (ADE}. Thanks to their broad view on the pharmacotherapy, over-the-counter medication included, they contribute greatly to the improvement of drug safety. In principle, the community pharmacy will face three groups of ADE which require specific attention. This article deals with these specific ADE groups and presents some illustrative examples from daily practice. Furthermore, we suggest some solutions to identify potential relevant interactions - including herbal-drug interactions - and give tips for daily practice, along with some often overseen cutaneous ADE.

  5. Adverse immunologic effects of antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S S; Fantus, I G

    1987-01-01

    Propylthiouracil and methimazole are frequently used in the management of hyperthyroidism. Two patients in whom adverse immunologic effects other than isolated agranulocytosis developed during treatment with propylthiouracil are described. A review of the literature revealed 53 similar cases over a 35-year period. Rash, fever, arthralgias and granulocytopenia were the most common manifestations. Vasculitis, particularly with cutaneous manifestations, occurs and may be fatal. The clinical evidence suggests that an immunologic mechanism is involved. A number of different autoantibodies were reported, but antinuclear antibodies were infrequent, and none of the cases met the criteria for a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thus, the reactions do not represent a true drug-induced lupus syndrome. Current hypotheses and experimental data regarding the cause of the reactions are reviewed. No specific clinical subgroup at high risk can be identified, and manifestations may occur at any dosage and at any time during therapy. Cross-reactivity between the two antithyroid drugs can be expected. Except for minor symptoms (e.g., mild arthralgias or transient rash), such reactions are an indication for withdrawal of the drug and the use of alternative methods to control the hyperthyroidism. In rare cases of severe vasculitis a short course of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy may be helpful. PMID:3539299

  6. Using Literature-Based Discovery to Explain Adverse Drug Effects.

    PubMed

    Hristovski, Dimitar; Kastrin, Andrej; Dinevski, Dejan; Burgun, Anita; Žiberna, Lovro; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2016-08-01

    We report on our research in using literature-based discovery (LBD) to provide pharmacological and/or pharmacogenomic explanations for reported adverse drug effects. The goal of LBD is to generate novel and potentially useful hypotheses by analyzing the scientific literature and optionally some additional resources. Our assumption is that drugs have effects on some genes or proteins and that these genes or proteins are associated with the observed adverse effects. Therefore, by using LBD we try to find genes or proteins that link the drugs with the reported adverse effects. These genes or proteins can be used to provide insight into the processes causing the adverse effects. Initial results show that our method has the potential to assist in explaining reported adverse drug effects.

  7. Distinguishing hazards and harms, adverse drug effects and adverse drug reactions : implications for drug development, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance, biomarkers, and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2013-03-01

    The terms 'adverse drug effects' and 'adverse drug reactions' are commonly used interchangeably, but they have different implications. Adverse drug reactions arise when a compound (e.g. a drug or metabolite, a contaminant or adulterant) is distributed in the same place as a body tissue (e.g. a receptor, enzyme, or ion channel), and the encounter results in an adverse effect (a physiological or pathological change), which results in a clinically appreciable adverse reaction. Both the adverse effect and the adverse reaction have manifestations by which they can be recognized: adverse effects are usually detected by laboratory tests (e.g. biochemical, haematological, immunological, radiological, pathological) or by clinical investigations (e.g. endoscopy, cardiac catheterization), and adverse reactions by their clinical manifestations (symptoms and/or signs). This distinction suggests five scenarios: (i) adverse reactions can result directly from adverse effects; (ii) adverse effects may not lead to appreciable adverse reactions; (iii) adverse reactions can occur without preceding adverse effects; (iv) adverse effects and reactions may be dissociated; and (v) adverse effects and reactions can together constitute syndromes. Defining an adverse drug reaction as "an appreciably harmful or unpleasant reaction, resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product" suggests a definition of an adverse drug effect: "a potentially harmful effect resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product, which constitutes a hazard and may or may not be associated with a clinically appreciable adverse reaction and/or an abnormal laboratory test or clinical investigation, as a marker of an adverse reaction."

  8. Adverse effects of thyroid hormone preparations and antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed

    Bartalena, L; Bogazzi, F; Martino, E

    1996-07-01

    Thyroid hormone preparations, especially thyroxine, are widely used either at replacement doses to correct hypothyroidism or at suppressive doses to abolish thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) secretion in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy or with diffuse/ nodular nontoxic goitre. In order to suppress thyrotropin secretion, it is necessary to administer slightly supraphysiological doses of thyroxine. Possible adverse effects of this therapy include cardiovascular changes (shortening of systolic time intervals, increased frequency of atrial premature beats and, possibly, left ventricular hypertrophy) and bone changes (reduced bone density and bone mass), but the risk of these adverse effects can be minimised by carefully monitoring serum free thyroxine and free liothyronine (triiodothyronine) measurements and adjusting the dosage accordingly. Thionamides [thiamazole (methimazole), carbimazole, propylthiouracil] are the most widely used antithyroid drugs. They are given for long periods of time and cause adverse effects in 3 to 5% of patients. In most cases, adverse effects are minor and transient (e.g. skin rash, itching, mild leucopenia). The most dangerous effect is agranulocytosis, which occurs in 0.1 to 0.5% of patients. This life-threatening condition can now be effectively treated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration. Other major adverse effects (aplastic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, lupus erythematosus-like syndrome, vasculitis) are exceedingly rare.

  9. Adverse cognitive effects of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy: Each additional drug matters.

    PubMed

    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Elger, Christian E; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    The study was set up to evaluate the impact of the total drug load of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy on cognition. Retrospective analyses were based on 834 patients with epilepsy who underwent a brief routine assessment of executive function and verbal memory (EpiTrack Plus) at our department. The total drug load was quantified in two ways: (1) number of concurrent antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and (2) total drug load according to the defined daily dose (DDD) provided by the World Health Organization. The cognitive measures showed higher inverse correlations with the number of AEDs (executive function: r=-0.35, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.22, p<0.001) than with the total DDD (executive function: r=-0.27, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.17, p<0.001). Reanalysis with statistical control for disease severity hardly changed the aforementioned results. With each additional drug in polytherapy, we observed a significantly lower performance in executive function. In this regard an additional explorative approach revealed that regimens combining AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles were associated with higher cognitive performance. Correlations between indicators of disease severity and drug load indices were low: altogether explaining only up to 9% of the observed variance in drug load. The findings demonstrate a considerable adverse effect of a higher drug load on cognition, especially on executive functions. Simply counting the number of drugs may be sufficient as a rough estimate of the risk of side effects. However, the combination of AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles may attenuate the negative effect of the total drug load.

  10. Ziconotide: new drug. Limited analgesic efficacy, too many adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    (1) When oral morphine does not relieve severe pain and when there is no specific treatment for the underlying cause, the first option is to try subcutaneous or intravenous administration. If this standard treatment fails or is poorly tolerated, intrathecal injection is usually preferred as the direct route to the central nervous system. However, one-quarter to one-half of patients still do not achieve adequate pain relief, and adverse effects are relatively frequent; (2) Ziconotide is not an opiate and is not related to the usual classes of drugs that interfere with nervous transmission in the posterior horn of the spinal cord. Marketing authorization has been granted for "severe, chronic pain in patients who require intrathecal analgesia". The Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) recommends continuous infusion via an intrathecal catheter connected to a pump; (3) Clinical evaluation of ziconotide does not include any trials versus morphine in patients with nociceptive pain, or any trials versus tricyclic or antiepileptic drugs in patients with neurogenic pain; (4) In a trial in 220 patients in whom systemic morphine had failed, the mean pain score on a 100-mm visual analogue scale was 69.8 mm after three weeks on ziconotide, compared to 75.8 mm with placebo. This difference, although statistically significant, is clinically irrelevant. The proportion of "responders" (reduction of at least 30% in the initial pain score) was respectively 16.1% and 12.0% (no statistically significant difference); (5) The two other placebo-controlled trials included 112 patients with pain linked to cancer or HIV infection, and 257 patients with non-cancer pain. After a titration phase lasting 5 to 6 days, a combined analysis of the two trials showed that the mean pain score was 48.8 mm with ziconotide and 68.4 mm with placebo (statistically significant difference). However, many patients did not complete the titration phase. Efficacy also appeared to differ according to the type

  11. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  12. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  13. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  14. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  15. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  16. Adverse drug reactions: part II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must be effectively practiced by all health care providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  17. Adverse drug reactions: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  18. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Ashley M; Herxheimer, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs) may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis. PMID:11914150

  19. Evidence behind FDA alerts for drugs with adverse cardiovascular effects: implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Daniel M; C Herink, Megan; Stevens, Ian G; Cardoza, Natalie M; Singh, Harleen

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) periodically publishes Drug Safety Communications and Drug Alerts notifying health care practitioners and the general public of important information regarding drug therapies following FDA approval. These alerts can result in both positive and negative effects on patient care. Most clinical trials are not designed to detect long-term safety end points, and postmarketing surveillance along with patient reported events are often instrumental in signaling the potential harmful effect of a drug. Recently, many cardiovascular (CV) safety announcements have been released for FDA-approved drugs. Because a premature warning could discourage a much needed treatment or prompt a sudden discontinuation, it is essential to evaluate the evidence supporting these FDA alerts to provide effective patient care and to avoid unwarranted changes in therapy. Conversely, paying attention to these warnings in cases involving high-risk patients can prevent adverse effects and litigation. This article reviews the evidence behind recent FDA alerts for drugs with adverse CV effects and discusses the clinical practice implications.

  20. Assessment of adverse effects of neurotropic drugs in monkeys with the "drug effects on the nervous system" (DENS) scale.

    PubMed

    Uthayathas, Subramaniam; Shaffer, Christopher L; Menniti, Frank S; Schmidt, Christopher J; Papa, Stella M

    2013-04-30

    Research into therapeutics for neuropsychiatric disorders is increasingly focusing on drugs with new mechanisms of action, and such agents are often assessed in preclinical studies using nonhuman primates. However, researchers lack a standardised method to compare different drugs for common adverse effects on the nervous system. We have developed a new scale for this purpose, named "Drug Effects on the Nervous System" (DENS), and tested its utility in an analysis of the second-generation antipsychotic risperidone in monkeys. The behavioural effects of risperidone over a ten-fold clinically relevant exposure range were rated with the DENS scale and compared with a standard motor disability scale for primates. The ratings were correlated with projected D2 and 5-HT2A receptor occupancies over time. The DENS scale detected dose-dependent side effects of risperidone in addition to the motor effects detected with the motor disability scale, including cognitive, sensorimotor and autonomic functions. A consistent temporal association between the DENS scale changes and the projected D2 receptor occupancy was observed, and the DENS scale ratings demonstrated high inter-rater reliability. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the DENS scale as a highly sensitive, reliable and accurate method to identify common adverse effects of risperidone and potentially other neurotropics for translational studies in primates.

  1. Statistical Mining of Potential Drug Interaction Adverse Effects in FDA's Spontaneous Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Haerian, Krystl; Chase, Herbert S; Friedman, Carol

    2010-11-13

    Many adverse drug effects (ADEs) can be attributed to drug interactions. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) provide a rich opportunity to detect novel post-marketed drug interaction adverse effects (DIAEs), as they include populations not well represented in clinical trials. However, their identification in SRS is nontrivial. Most existing research have addressed the statistical issues used to test or verify DIAEs, but not their identification as part of a systematic large scale database-wide mining process as discussed in this work. This paper examines the application of a highly optimized and tailored implementation of the Apriori algorithm, as well as methods addressing data quality issues, to the identification of DIAEs in FDAs SRS.

  2. Adverse food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Alie; van Hunsel, Florence; Bast, Aalt

    2015-12-01

    Food supplements and herbal products are increasingly popular amongst consumers. This leads to increased risks of interactions between prescribed drugs and these products containing bioactive ingredients. From 1991 up to 2014, 55 cases of suspected adverse drug reactions due to concomitant intake of health-enhancing products and drugs were reported to Lareb, the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre. An overview of these suspected interactions is presented and their potential mechanisms of action are described. Mainly during the metabolism of xenobiotics and due to the pharmacodynamics effects interactions seem to occur, which may result in adverse drug reactions. Where legislation is seen to distinct food and medicine, legislation concerning these different bioactive products is less clear-cut. This can only be resolved by increasing the molecular knowledge on bioactive substances and their potential interactions. Thereby potential interactions can be better understood and prevented on an individual level. By considering the dietary pattern and use of bioactive substances with prescribed medication, both health professionals and consumers will be increasingly aware of interactions and these interactive adverse effects can be prevented.

  3. Oral adverse effects of gastrointestinal drugs and considerations for dental management in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karthik, Ramya; Karthik, K. S.; David, Chaya; Ameerunnisa; Keerthi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is associated with alterations in the mouth or influence the course of the dental diseases, and the dental health care workers are expected to recognize, diagnose, and treat oral conditions associated with gastrointestinal diseases and also provide safe and appropriate dental care for afflicted individuals. Drugs used in the management of these diseases result in oral adverse effects and also are known to interact with those prescribed during dental care. Hence, this article has reviewed the drug considerations and guidelines for drug use during dental management of patients with gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:23066260

  4. Mining multi-item drug adverse effect associations in spontaneous reporting systems

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multi-item adverse drug event (ADE) associations are associations relating multiple drugs to possibly multiple adverse events. The current standard in pharmacovigilance is bivariate association analysis, where each single drug-adverse effect combination is studied separately. The importance and difficulty in the detection of multi-item ADE associations was noted in several prominent pharmacovigilance studies. In this paper we examine the application of a well established data mining method known as association rule mining, which we tailored to the above problem, and demonstrate its value. The method was applied to the FDAs spontaneous adverse event reporting system (AERS) with minimal restrictions and expectations on its output, an experiment that has not been previously done on the scale and generality proposed in this work. Results Based on a set of 162,744 reports of suspected ADEs reported to AERS and published in the year 2008, our method identified 1167 multi-item ADE associations. A taxonomy that characterizes the associations was developed based on a representative sample. A significant number (67% of the total) of potential multi-item ADE associations identified were characterized and clinically validated by a domain expert as previously recognized ADE associations. Several potentially novel ADEs were also identified. A smaller proportion (4%) of associations were characterized and validated as known drug-drug interactions. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that multi-item ADEs are present and can be extracted from the FDA’s adverse effect reporting system using our methodology, suggesting that our method is a valid approach for the initial identification of multi-item ADEs. The study also revealed several limitations and challenges that can be attributed to both the method and quality of data. PMID:21044365

  5. Adverse effects of drugs used in the management of constipation and diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Gattuso, J M; Kamm, M A

    1994-01-01

    Most laxatives, if used intermittently in the absence of contraindications, are relatively safe. Bulking agents may diminish absorption of some minerals and drugs, but this is not usually clinically significant. Ispaghula can cause serious allergic reactions. The chronic ingestion of stimulant laxatives has been blamed for the development of the 'cathartic colon', but there are no definitive studies which have demonstrated this. Dantron (danthron) preparations should only be used in older patients and the terminally ill because of the risk of hepatotoxicity with this drug. Oral oxyphenisatine should no longer be used. Senna would appear to be the stimulant laxative of choice during pregnancy and lactation. Bisacodyl is the polyphenolic derivative of choice. Lactulose, sorbitol and lactilol rarely cause significant adverse effects. Magnesium salt laxatives and phosphate enemas can cause serious metabolic disturbances in babies and young children. Liquid paraffin is contraindicated if there is any risk of aspiration. Interference with the absorption of fat soluble vitamins would not appear to be clinically significant. Docusate sodium may potentiate the hepatotoxicity of other drugs, but reports of this are rare. The role of cisapride in constipation has not been established. Antidiarrhoeal drugs are second line drugs whose use is aimed at minimising inconvenience and discomfort. No antidiarrhoeals can be recommended for children under 4 years of age. Loperamide is the drug of choice in older children and adults. The atropine component of diphenoxylate/atropine combinations can cause significant adverse effects. Bismuth salicylate is an inconvenient treatment for travellers' diarrhoea as large frequent doses of the liquid formulation are needed. Some bismuth can be absorbed and there is the potential to cause encephalopathy. Octreotide, methysergide and cholestyramine have a role for specific causes of diarrhoea only. Octreotide is effective in high output states

  6. Epigenetics and transcriptomics to detect adverse drug effects in model systems of human development.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Nina V; Leist, Marcel

    2014-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals or drugs has been associated with functional or structural deficits and the development of diseases in later life. For example, developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) is triggered by lead, and this compound may predispose to neurodegenerative diseases in later life. The molecular memory for such late consequences of early exposure is not known, but epigenetic mechanisms (modification of the chromatin structure) could take this role. Examples and underlying mechanisms have been compiled here for the field of DNT. Moreover, we addressed the question as to what readout is suitable for addressing drug memory effects. We summarize how complex developmental processes can be modelled in vitro by using the differentiation of human stem cells. Although cellular models can never replicate the final human DNT phenotype, they can model the adverse effect that a chemical has on key biological processes essential for organ formation and function. Highly information-rich transcriptomics data may inform on these changes and form the bridge from in vitro models to human prediction. We compiled data showing that transcriptome analysis can indicate toxicity patterns of drugs. A crucial question to be answered in our systems is when and how transcriptome changes indicate adversity (as opposed to transient adaptive responses), and how drug-induced changes are perpetuated over time even after washout of the drug. We present evidence for the hypothesis that changes in the histone methylation pattern could represent the persistence detector of an early insult that is transformed to an adverse effect at later time-points in life.

  7. Adverse effects of drug therapies on male and female sexual function.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Th; Bader, M; Uckert, S; Staehler, M; Becker, A; Stief, C G

    2006-12-01

    Sexual dysfunctions (SD) are adverse effects of common drug therapies that have rarely been considered in investigations so far. Possibly it is barely known that many widespread and frequently prescribed medications and drug therapies can have significant impact on vascular and nerval processes as well as on endocrinologic and psychoneuroendocrinologic systems and therefore can influence sexual functions. Impotence and disorders of the erectile function can mainly be caused by antidopaminergic mechanisms, whereas ejaculatory disorders and anorgasmia often can be explained by antiserotoninergic effects. Anticholinergic and adrenoloytic agents can also cause a particular impairment of erectile functions. The following considerations will show that the detection and treatment of SD (also in women!) should be given much more attention since drug-induced SDs occur predominantly in indications where a SD itself can be a symptom of the disease.

  8. Adverse Health Effects Associated with Living in a Former Methamphetamine Drug Laboratory - Victoria, Australia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jackie; Kenneally, Michaela E; Edwards, John W; Walker, G Stewart

    2017-01-06

    The manufacture of methamphetamine in clandestine drug laboratories occurs in various locations, including residential houses and apartments. Unlike the controlled manufacture of chemicals and drugs, clandestine manufacture results in the uncontrolled storage, use, generation, and disposal of a wide range of chemicals and the deposit of methamphetamine drug residues on indoor surfaces (1). These residues have been found at high levels on porous and nonporous surfaces and have been shown to persist for months to years (1). Persons exposed to these environments often have poorly defined exposures and health effects. It is commonly assumed that these levels of exposure are low compared with those related to illicit drug use or therapeutic use of amphetamine-based drugs for managing behavioral issues such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (2). In 2015, a family that was unknowingly exposed to methamphetamine residues in a house in Australia was found to have adverse health effects and elevated methamphetamine levels in hair samples, highlighting the potential for public health risks for persons who might live in methamphetamine-contaminated dwellings. This case study highlights the importance of the identification and effective decontamination of former clandestine drug laboratories.

  9. [Pain as adverse drug reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Schaffarzick, Daniel; Nagano, Marietta; Janowitz, Susanne Melitta; Schweitzer, Ekkehard

    2012-09-01

    We present a multidisciplinary (anaesthesiology--clinical pharmacy--bioinformatics) analysis of pain as possible adverse drug reaction taking different manifestations of pain, indication groups, relevance to the Austrian drug market and possible mechanistic influence of drugs on development and apprehension of pain into consideration.We designed an overview that shows how transmitters that play a part in nociception and antinociception can be influenced by drugs. This allows conclusions to the dolorigene potential of therapeutics.

  10. Adverse Drug Effects and Preoperative Medication Factors Related to Perioperative Low-Dose Ketamine Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Goldberg, Stephen F; Patel, Ronak D; Zhou, Jon; Adams, Douglas R; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    High-dose opioid administration is associated with significant adverse events. Evidence suggests that low-dose ketamine infusions improve perioperative analgesia over conventional opioid management, but usage is highly variable. Ketamine's adverse drug effects (ADEs) are well known, but their prevalence during low-dose infusions in a clinical setting and how often they lead to infusion discontinuation are unknown. The purposes of this study were 3-fold: (1) to identify patient factors associated with initiation of ketamine infusions during spine surgery, (2) to identify specific spine procedures in which ketamine has been used most frequently, and (3) to identify ADEs associated with postoperative ketamine infusions and which ADEs most frequently led to discontinuation. Spine surgery was chosen because of its association with moderate to severe pain and a relatively high use of ketamine infusions in this population at our hospital.

  11. Recognizing and reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L. M.; Colley, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Although physicians in practice are most likely to see patients with adverse drug reactions, they may fail to recognize an adverse effect or to attribute it to a drug effect and, when recognized, they may fail to report serious reactions to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To recognize and attribute an adverse event to a drug effect, physicians should review the patient's clinical course, looking at patient risk factors, the known adverse reactions to the suspected drug, and the likelihood of a causal relationship between the drug and the adverse event-based on the temporal relationship, response to stopping or restarting the drug, and whether other factors could explain the reaction. Once an adverse drug reaction has been identified, the patient should be informed and appropriate documentation made in the patient's medical record. Serious known reactions and all reactions to newly released drugs or those not previously known to occur (even if the certainty is low) should be reported to the FDA. PMID:1536067

  12. Adverse drug effects attributed to phenylpropanolamine: a review of 142 case reports.

    PubMed

    Lake, C R; Gallant, S; Masson, E; Miller, P

    1990-08-01

    Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is contained in about 106 products, over half of which are available over-the-counter (OTC). Most are cough/cold remedies; nine are OTC diet aids. More than nine million Americans were using OTC diet aids in 1981, making PPA the fifth most used drug in the United States, responsible for over $200 million in revenues. The safety of PPA remains controversial. Although most controlled studies indicate minimal pressor effects with recommended doses, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) continue to be documented. Since 1965, 142 ADRs have been reported in 85 studies, 69% of these in North America. Many such cases may go unrecognized. About two thirds of all ADRs occurred in females and in patients under 30. Of ADRs attributed to legitimately sold PPA products, 85% occurred after consumption of OTC products versus only 15% after prescription drugs. The PPA product often contained combination ingredients, or PPA was consumed along with additional drugs. An overdose of PPA was taken in about a third of the cases. After ingestion of non-overdose amounts, 82% of the ADRs were severe. The most frequent side effects involved symptoms compatible with acute hypertension, with severe headache the most common complaint. Twenty-four intracranial hemorrhages, eight seizures, and eight deaths (most due to stroke) were associated with PPA ingestion. We have summarized these data in an effort to alert clinicians to the prevalence of usage of PPA products and the potential for adverse effects. In patients who present with elevated blood pressure or signs of acute hypertension, especially hypertensive encephalopathy of undetermined origin, we recommend inquiry about recent ingestion of PPA-containing diet aids and cough/cold products and suggest having such patients remain upright rather than supine.

  13. Modeling Liver-Related Adverse Effects of Drugs Using kNN QSAR Method

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Amie D.; Zhu, Hao; Fourches, Dennis; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Adverse effects of drugs (AEDs) continue to be a major cause of drug withdrawals both in development and post-marketing. While liver-related AEDs are a major concern for drug safety, there are few in silico models for predicting human liver toxicity for drug candidates. We have applied the Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) approach to model liver AEDs. In this study, we aimed to construct a QSAR model capable of binary classification (active vs. inactive) of drugs for liver AEDs based on chemical structure. To build QSAR models, we have employed an FDA spontaneous reporting database of human liver AEDs (elevations in activity of serum liver enzymes), which contains data on approximately 500 approved drugs. Approximately 200 compounds with wide clinical data coverage, structural similarity and balanced (40/60) active/inactive ratio were selected for modeling and divided into multiple training/test and external validation sets. QSAR models were developed using the k nearest neighbor method and validated using external datasets. Models with high sensitivity (>73%) and specificity (>94%) for prediction of liver AEDs in external validation sets were developed. To test applicability of the models, three chemical databases (World Drug Index, Prestwick Chemical Library, and Biowisdom Liver Intelligence Module) were screened in silico and the validity of predictions was determined, where possible, by comparing model-based classification with assertions in publicly available literature. Validated QSAR models of liver AEDs based on the data from the FDA spontaneous reporting system can be employed as sensitive and specific predictors of AEDs in pre-clinical screening of drug candidates for potential hepatotoxicity in humans. PMID:20192250

  14. Investigating clandestine drug laboratories: adverse medical effects in law enforcement personnel.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J L; Barnhart, S; Checkoway, H

    1996-10-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted among an international group of 46 law enforcement chemists and 13 Washington State clandestine drug laboratory investigation team members with more than 2,800 combined investigations. Each participant completed a questionnaire concerning previous drug laboratory investigations and adverse health effects during response activities. Methamphetamine laboratories accounted for 81-97% of all responses. Total illness incident rates varied between 0.75-3.4% of responses. Most exposures were through inhalation, and many occurred in the years prior to use of personal protective equipment. Symptoms were primarily those of headache and respiratory, mucous membrane, and skin irritation. Most illness episodes occurred during the processing phase of laboratory responses, and none occurred during the entry phase. A majority of illness episodes occurred in laboratories with leak/spills, fire/explosion, or uncontrolled reactions. Responding to an active laboratory was associated with a 7 to 15-fold risk of becoming ill as compared with setup, in-transit, or former (equipment removed) laboratory responses. No other laboratories characteristics were consistently associated with a significantly elevated relative risk of adverse health effects.

  15. Tramadol hydrochloride: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse side effects, co-administration of drugs and new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vazzana, M; Andreani, T; Fangueiro, J; Faggio, C; Silva, C; Santini, A; Garcia, M L; Silva, A M; Souto, E B

    2015-03-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride (TrHC) is a synthetic analgesic drug exhibiting opioid and non-opioid properties, acting mainly on the central nervous system. It has been mostly used to treat pain, although its use to treat anxiety and depression has also been documented. These properties arise from the fact that they inhibit serotonin (5-HT) reuptake augmenting 5-HT concentration on the synaptic cleft. Despite this, TrHC has also been described to have several side effects which are mainly due to its fast metabolization and excretion which in turn requires multiple doses per day. To surpass this limitation, new pharmaceutical formulations are being developed intending the protection, target and sustained delivery as well as a reduction on daily dose aiming a reduction on the side effects. In the present work we have revised the efficacy, safety, biological and adverse effects of TrHC, and the added value of developing a novel drug delivery system for topical administration.

  16. PERSYVE - Design and validation of a questionnaire about adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Silva, Daniela; Figueiras, Adolfo; Herdeiro, Maria T.; Teixeira Rodrigues, António; Silva Branco, Fábio; Polónia, Jorge; Figueiredo, Isabel V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to design and validate a questionnaire to measure perceived symptoms associated with antihypertensive drugs (PERSYVE). Methods The PERSYVE development and validation included four stages: 1) item development (bibliographic review and questionnaire elaboration); 2) face and content validation; 3) field testing (pre-test); and 4) test-retest validation, assessment of internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) and reproducibility over time (intraclass correlation coefficient and Cohen’s kappa coefficient). Results PERSYVE is divided into six sections according to results obtained from the literature review: (1) drug adherence, (2) perceived symptoms and how they affect quality of life (five-point Likert scale), (3) communication with health professionals, (4) perception of symptoms as adverse reactions, (5) influence on therapy compliance, and (6) adoption of non-pharmacological methods for blood pressure control. Content and face validation of the questionnaire led to some vocabulary changes and the introduction of section 2.1. Field-testing (n=26) revealed high comprehensibility of the questions. The Cronbach's alpha, calculated for section 2 (five-point Likert scale) was 0.850. PERSYVE was reproducible (n=167): kappa values presented fair to substantial reproducibility and, in section 2, ICC values resulted in good to excellent reproducibility. Conclusion Results showed that PERSYVE is a well-structured, objective, patient-friendly, valid and reliable questionnaire. PERSYVE can be a very useful instrument in hypertensive patients’ monitoring and in the screening of adverse effects. PMID:25035716

  17. CORAL: binary classifications (active/inactive) for Liver-Related Adverse Effects of Drugs.

    PubMed

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor F; Benfenati, Emilio; Gini, Giuseppina; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-09-01

    Classification data related to the Liver-Related Adverse Effects of Drugs have been studied with the CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). Two datasets which contain compounds with two serum enzyme markers of liver toxicity: alanine aminotransferase (ALT, n=187) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST, n=209) are analyzed. Statistical quality of the prediction for ALT activity is n=35, Sensitivity = 0.5556, Specificity = 0.8077, and Accuracy = 0.7429. In the case of AST activity the prediction is characterized by n=42, Sensitivity = 0.6875, Specificity = 0.7692, and Accuracy = 0.7381. A number of structural alerts which can be related to the studied activities are revealed. It is the first attempt to build up the classification QSAR model by means of the Monte Carlo technique based on representation of the molecular structure by SMILES using the CORAL software.

  18. Adverse endocrine and metabolic effects of psychotropic drugs: selective clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswar, Chaya G; Baldessarini, Ross J; Harsh, Veronica L; Alpert, Jonathan E

    2009-12-01

    The article critically reviews selected, clinically significant, adverse endocrine and metabolic effects associated with psychotropic drug treatments, including hyperprolactinaemia, hyponatraemia, diabetes insipidus, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, sexual dysfunction and virilization, weight loss, weight gain and metabolic syndrome (type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and hypertension). Such effects are prevalent and complex, but can be managed clinically when recognized. They encourage continued critical assessment of benefits versus risks of psychotropic drugs and underscore the importance of close coordination of psychiatric and general medical care to improve long-term health of psychiatric patients. Options for management of hyperprolactinaemia include lowering doses, switching to agents such as aripiprazole, clozapine or quetiapine, managing associated osteoporosis, carefully considering the use of dopamine receptor agonists and ruling out stress, oral contraceptive use and hypothyroidism as contributing factors. Disorders of water homeostasis may include syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), managed by water restriction or slow replacement by hypertonic saline along with drug discontinuation. Safe management of diabetes insipidus, commonly associated with lithium, involves switching mood stabilizer and consideration of potassium-sparing diuretics. Clinical hypothyroidism may be a more useful marker than absolute cut-offs of hormone values, and may be associated with quetiapine, antidepressant and lithium use, and managed by thyroxine replacement. Hyper-parathyroidism requires comprehensive medical evaluation for occult tumours. Hypocalcaemia, along with multiple other psychiatric and medical causes, may result in decreased bone density and require evaluation and management. Strategies for reducing sexual dysfunction with psychotropics remain largely unsatisfactory. Finally, management strategies for obesity and metabolic syndrome

  19. Cost-effectiveness of one-time genetic testing to minimize lifetime adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, O; Durham, D; Kasirajan, K

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of one-time pharmacogenomic testing for preventing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) over a patient's lifetime. We developed a Markov-based Monte Carlo microsimulation model to represent the ADR events in the lifetime of each patient. The base-case considered a 40-year-old patient. We measured health outcomes in life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted LYs (QALYs) and estimated costs using 2013 US$. In the base-case, one-time genetic testing had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $43,165 (95% confidence interval (CI) is ($42,769,$43,561)) per additional LY and $53,680 per additional QALY (95% CI is ($53,182,$54,179)), hence under the base-case one-time genetic testing is cost-effective. The ICER values were most sensitive to the average probability of death due to ADR, reduction in ADR rate due to genetic testing, mean ADR rate and cost of genetic testing.

  20. Charge is an important determinant of hemodynamic and adverse cardiovascular effects of cationic drugs.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, Michael K; Authier, Simon; Curtis, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Cationic compounds are diverse and atypical therapeutic substances. In the present study we examined whether a prototypical class effect of cationic drugs in the cardiovascular system exists and whether this might be predictable on the basis of chemistry. The dose-dependent effects of cationic compounds of varying molecular weights and charge were examined on the blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and the ECG in anesthetized rats. The compounds examined were protamine, hexadimethrine, tetraethylammonium (TEA), low molecular weight poly-L-lysine (LMW-PLL) and high molecular weight PLL (HMW-PLL). All of the compounds examined except TEA produced a dose-dependent reduction in BP. No changes occurred in HR even when high doses were administered. The ECG effects of these cationic compounds included a dose-dependent prolongation of the QT interval, especially at higher doses. All compounds transiently decreased the size of the P-wave after i.v. bolus administration whereas only protamine and hexadimethrine prolonged the PR and QRS intervals and only at the highest dose (32 mg/kg) administered. All cationic compounds, except TEA and saline, evoked ventricular premature beats (VPB), and protamine and HMW-PLL also evoked brief episodes of ventricular tachycardia (VT). The incidence and frequency of arrhythmias was not dose-dependent and no animals experienced protracted episodes of arrhythmia incidence. These dose dependent effects of the polycationic compounds tested suggest a collective mechanism of action that relates the effect of charge of the compound to the onset and persistence of observed cardiovascular toxicity, and adverse cardiovascular effect risk appears to be predictable on this basis.

  1. Characterization of a novel mechanism accounting for the adverse cholinergic effects of the anticancer drug irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Blandizzi, Corrado; De Paolis, Barbara; Colucci, Rocchina; Lazzeri, Gloria; Baschiera, Fabio; Del Tacca, Mario

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms accounting for the adverse cholinergic effects of the antitumour drug irinotecan. The activity of irinotecan and its active metabolite, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), was assayed in models suitable for pharmacological studies on cholinergic system. Irinotecan moderately inhibited human or electric eel acetylcholinesterase activity, SN-38 had no effect, whereas physostigmine blocked both the enzymes with high potency and efficacy. Irinotecan and SN-38 did not affect spontaneous or electrically-induced contractile activity of human colonic muscle. Acetylcholine and dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) caused phasic contractions or relaxations, respectively. Physostigmine enhanced the motor responses elicited by electrical stimulation. Although irinotecan and SN-38 did not modify the basal contractile activity of guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle strips, irinotecan 100 μM moderately enhanced cholinergic twitch contractions. Acetylcholine or DMPP caused phasic contractions, whereas physostigmine enhanced the twitch responses. Electrically-induced [3H]-acetylcholine release was reduced by irinotecan (100 μM) or physostigmine (0.1 μM). Intravenous irinotecan stimulated gastric acid secretion in rats, but no effects were obtained with SN-38, physostigmine or i.c.v. irinotecan. Hypersecretion induced by irinotecan was partly prevented by ondansetron, and unaffected by capsazepine. In the presence of atropine, vagotomy and systemic or vagal ablation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibres, irinotecan did not stimulate gastric secretion. The present results indicate that irinotecan and SN-38 do not act as specific acetylcholinesterase blockers or acetylcholine receptor agonists. It is rather suggested that irinotecan promotes a parasympathetic discharge to peripheral organs, mediated by capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent fibres, and that serotonin 5-HT3 receptors are implicated in the genesis of vago-vagal reflex

  2. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  3. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  4. Prediction of drug-induced eosinophilia adverse effect by using SVM and naïve Bayesian approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Yu, Peng; Xiang, Ming-Li; Li, Xi-Bo; Kong, Wei-Bao; Ma, Jun-Yi; Wang, Jun-Long; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Ji

    2016-03-01

    Drug-induced eosinophilia is a potentially life-threatening adverse effect; clinical manifestations, eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome, mainly include severe skin eruption, fever, hematologic abnormalities, and organ system dysfunction. Using experimental methods to evaluate drug-induced eosinophilia is very complicated, time-consuming, and costly in the early stage of drug development. Thus, in this investigation, we established computational prediction models of drug-induced eosinophilia using SVM and naïve Bayesian approaches. For the SVM modeling, the overall prediction accuracy for the training set by means of fivefold cross-validation is 91.6 and for the external test set is 82.9 %. For the naïve Bayesian modeling, the overall prediction accuracy for the training set is 92.5 and for the external test set is 85.4 %. Moreover, some molecular descriptors and substructures considered as important for drug-induced eosinophilia were identified. Thus, we hope the prediction models of drug-induced eosinophilia built in this work should be applied to filter early-stage molecules for potential eosinophilia adverse effect, and the selected molecular descriptors and substructures of toxic compounds should be taken into consideration in the design of new candidate drugs to help medicinal chemists rationally select the chemicals with the best prospects to be effective and safe.

  5. Making a bad thing worse: adverse effects of stress on drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Cleck, Jessica N; Blendy, Julie A

    2008-02-01

    Sustained exposure to various psychological stressors can exacerbate neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. Addiction is a chronic brain disease in which individuals cannot control their need for drugs, despite negative health and social consequences. The brains of addicted individuals are altered and respond very differently to stress than those of individuals who are not addicted. In this Review, we highlight some of the common effects of stress and drugs of abuse throughout the addiction cycle. We also discuss both animal and human studies that suggest treating the stress-related aspects of drug addiction is likely to be an important contributing factor to a long-lasting recovery from this disorder.

  6. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    PubMed

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P<0.001), older age (P<0.001), and uncontrolled seizures (P=0.045). The intraclass coefficient (test-retest reliability) for LAEP overall score was 0.848 (95% CI=0.782-0.895), with a range from 0.370 (unsteadiness) to 0.750 (memory problems). Cronbach's α coefficient (internal consistency) was 0.903. The LAEP was highly correlated with Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 inventory (r=-0.804, P>0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups.

  7. Standardizing drug adverse event reporting data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwei; Jiang, Guoqian; Li, Dingcheng; Liu, Hongfang

    2013-01-01

    Normalizing data in the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), an FDA database, would improve the mining capacity of AERS for drug safety signal detection. In this study, we aim to normalize AERS and build a publicly available normalized Adverse drug events (ADE) data source.he drug information in AERS is normalized to RxNorm, a standard terminology source for medication. Drug class information is then obtained from the National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Adverse drug events (ADE) are aggregated through mapping with the PT (Preferred Term) and SOC (System Organ Class) codes of MedDRA. Our study yields an aggregated knowledge-enhanced AERS data mining set (AERS-DM). The AERS-DM could provide more perspectives to mine AERS database for drug safety signal detection and could be used by research community in the data mining field.

  8. The Checkpoint Immunotherapy Revolution: What Started as a Trickle Has Become a Flood, Despite Some Daunting Adverse Effects; New Drugs, Indications, and Combinations Continue to Emerge.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Walter

    2016-03-01

    What started as a trickle of new agents that help the body's immune system fight cancer has now become a flood, despite some daunting adverse effects. This report discusses the new drugs, indications, and combinations that continue to emerge.

  9. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalized Colombian children

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Agudelo, Daniela; Burgos-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Vaca, Claudia; Serrano-Meriño, Dolores Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The occurrence of adverse drug reactions is an important issue due to the lack of drug safety data in children. Objective: To describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Methods: A prospective cohort study based on intensive pharmacovigilance was conducted during six months in order to monitor the emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatients children under 6 years of age with at least one medication prescribed. The study was conducted in two pediatric wards of two hospitals located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Naranjo´s Algorithm was used to evaluate imputability, the modified Hartwig and Siegel assessment scale to establish severity and the Schumock and Thornton criteria to determine preventability. Results: Of a total of 772 monitored patients, 156 Adverse Drug Reactions were detected on 147 children. The cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions was 19.0% (147/772); the incidence density was 37.6 Adverse Drug Reactions per 1,000 patients-days (147/3,913). The frequency was higher in children under 2 years of age (12.7%). Emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions was higher in male patients (RR= 1.66; 95% CI= 1.22-2.22, p= 0.001) and in those who used systemic antibiotics (RR= 1.82; 95% CI= 1.17-2.82, p= 0.005). Conclusions: Adverse Drug Reactions are common among hospitalized children and represent an additional burden of morbidity and risk, particularly in those who used several medicines, including antibiotics. PMID:27821893

  10. Investigation of adverse effects of interactions between herbal drugs and natural blood clotting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Adhyapak, M S; Kachole, M S

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the world, herbal medicines are consumed by most of the patients without considering their adverse effects. Many herbal medicines/plant extracts have been reported to interact with the natural blood clotting system. In continuation to this effort, thirty medicinal plant extracts were allowed to interact with citrated human blood and the clotting time was measured after re-calcification in vitro using Lee and White method. The aq. leaf ext. of Syzygium cumini and Camellia sinensis significantly prolonged the clotting time. In response to the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests, the ext. of C. sinensis showed normal APTT and marginally prolonged the PT to 16.7 s (control-15.2 s) while S. cumini showed normal PT but significantly prolonged the APTT to 66.9 s (control-20.7 s). This suggests that, C. sinensis acts on the extrinsic pathway while S. cumini on the intrinsic pathway. There are some common herbal formulations that are frequently used by the patients which contain above plant materials, like, Syzygium cumin in anti-diabetic formulations, while the ext. of C. sinensis is consumed frequently as beverage in many part of the world. Hence, patients having known bleeding tendency or haemophilia disease should take into account the interaction potential of these plants with the natural blood clotting system while taking herbal formulations containing above plants; specially, the patients suffering from intrinsic pathway factor deficiency should keep a limit on the consumption of S. cumini while extrinsic pathway factor deficiency patients should limit C. sinensis. Also, the medical practitioners should consider the patient's food consumption history before doing any major surgical procedures.

  11. Design of Adverse Drug Events-Scorecards.

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Chazard, Emmanuel; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Hackl, Werner; Băceanu, Adrian; Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of Adverse Drug Event-Scorecards. The scorecards described are innovative and novel, not having previously been reported in the literature. The Scorecards provide organizations (e.g. hospitals) with summary information about Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) using a Web-based platform. The data used in the Scorecards are routinely updated and report on ADEs detected through data mining processes. The development of the ADE Scorecards is ongoing and they are currently undergoing clinical testing.

  12. Current trends in the treatment of hepatitis C: interventions to avoid adverse effects and increase effectiveness of anti-HCV drugs

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Mushtaq, Muhammed Fahd; Saleem, Muhammad; Muhammad, Syed Taqi; Akhtar, Bushra; Sharif, Ali; Peerzada, Sohaib

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis, an inflammatory liver disease, is caused by various genotypes of hepatitis C viruses (HCV). Hepatitis C slowly sprouts into fibrosis, which progresses to cirrhosis. Over a prolonged period of time compensated cirrhosis can advance to decompensated cirrhosis culminating in hepatic failure and death. Conventional treatment of HCV involves the administration of interferons. However, association of interferon with the adverse drug reactions led to the development of novel anti-HCV drugs given as monotherapy or in combination with the other drugs. Advances in drug delivery systems (DDS) improved the pharmacokinetic profile and stability of drugs, ameliorated tissue damages on extravasation and increased the targeting of affected sites. Liposomes and lipid based vehicles have been employed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) so as to stabilize the formulations as PEG drug complex. Sofosbuvir, a novel anti-HCV drug, is administered as monotherapy or in combination with daclatasvir, ledipasivir, protease inhibitors, ribavirin and interferon for the treatment of HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3. These drug combinations are highly effective in eradicating the interferon resistance, recurrent HCV infection in liver transplant, concurrent HIV infection and preventing interferon related adverse effects. Further investigations to improve drug targeting and identification of new drug targets are highly warranted due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance in HCV. PMID:28096788

  13. Current trends in the treatment of hepatitis C: interventions to avoid adverse effects and increase effectiveness of anti-HCV drugs.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Mushtaq, Muhammed Fahd; Saleem, Muhammad; Muhammad, Syed Taqi; Akhtar, Bushra; Sharif, Ali; Peerzada, Sohaib

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis, an inflammatory liver disease, is caused by various genotypes of hepatitis C viruses (HCV). Hepatitis C slowly sprouts into fibrosis, which progresses to cirrhosis. Over a prolonged period of time compensated cirrhosis can advance to decompensated cirrhosis culminating in hepatic failure and death. Conventional treatment of HCV involves the administration of interferons. However, association of interferon with the adverse drug reactions led to the development of novel anti-HCV drugs given as monotherapy or in combination with the other drugs. Advances in drug delivery systems (DDS) improved the pharmacokinetic profile and stability of drugs, ameliorated tissue damages on extravasation and increased the targeting of affected sites. Liposomes and lipid based vehicles have been employed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) so as to stabilize the formulations as PEG drug complex. Sofosbuvir, a novel anti-HCV drug, is administered as monotherapy or in combination with daclatasvir, ledipasivir, protease inhibitors, ribavirin and interferon for the treatment of HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3. These drug combinations are highly effective in eradicating the interferon resistance, recurrent HCV infection in liver transplant, concurrent HIV infection and preventing interferon related adverse effects. Further investigations to improve drug targeting and identification of new drug targets are highly warranted due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance in HCV.

  14. [Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. Risks and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Voigt, N; Heijman, J; Dobrev, D

    2014-03-01

    Adverse side effects of drugs are a significantly underestimated problem in modern medicine. In this review article, we summarize common adverse side effects of cardiovascular drugs. In particular, we highlight the factors promoting these adverse side effects in patients, including reduced hepatic or renal clearance in elderly patients that often requires dosage adjustment. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs (e.g. through the cytochrome P450 system or P-glycoproteins) can modify the plasma concentration of many compounds, thereby also increasing the likelihood of unwanted side effects. The most prominent cardiac side effects include arrhythmias, e.g. atrioventricular (AV) block, drug-induced long-QT syndrome and torsade de pointes and altered inotropy. Non-cardiac side effects are subsequently discussed grouped by drug class. A better understanding of the risks and side effects of cardiovascular drugs is expected to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with adverse side effects.

  15. Adverse Drug Reactions and Expected Effects to Therapy with Subcutaneous Mistletoe Extracts (Viscum album L.) in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Steele, Megan L; Axtner, Jan; Happe, Antje; Kröz, Matthias; Matthes, Harald; Schad, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Background. In Europe, mistletoe extracts are widely used as a complementary cancer therapy. We assessed the safety of subcutaneous mistletoe as a conjunctive therapy in cancer patients within an anthroposophic medicine setting in Germany. Methods. A multicentre, observational study was performed within the Network Oncology. Suspected mistletoe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were described by frequency, causality, severity, and seriousness. Potential risk factors, dose relationships and drug-drug interactions were investigated. Results. Of 1923 cancer patients treated with subcutaneous mistletoe extracts, 283 patients (14.7%) reported 427 expected effects (local reactions <5 cm and increased body temperature <38°C). ADRs were documented in 162 (8.4%) patients who reported a total of 264 events. ADRs were mild (50.8%), moderate (45.1%), or severe (4.2%). All were nonserious. Logistic regression analysis revealed that expected effects were more common in females, while immunoreactivity decreased with increasing age and tumour stage. No risk factors were identified for ADRs. ADR frequency increased as mistletoe dose increased, while fewer ADRs occurred during mistletoe therapy received concurrent with conventional therapies. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that mistletoe therapy is safe. ADRs were mostly mild to moderate in intensity and appear to be dose-related and explained by the immune-stimulating, pharmacological activity of mistletoe.

  16. Adverse Drug Reactions and Expected Effects to Therapy with Subcutaneous Mistletoe Extracts (Viscum album L.) in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Megan L.; Happe, Antje; Kröz, Matthias; Matthes, Harald; Schad, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Background. In Europe, mistletoe extracts are widely used as a complementary cancer therapy. We assessed the safety of subcutaneous mistletoe as a conjunctive therapy in cancer patients within an anthroposophic medicine setting in Germany. Methods. A multicentre, observational study was performed within the Network Oncology. Suspected mistletoe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were described by frequency, causality, severity, and seriousness. Potential risk factors, dose relationships and drug-drug interactions were investigated. Results. Of 1923 cancer patients treated with subcutaneous mistletoe extracts, 283 patients (14.7%) reported 427 expected effects (local reactions <5 cm and increased body temperature <38°C). ADRs were documented in 162 (8.4%) patients who reported a total of 264 events. ADRs were mild (50.8%), moderate (45.1%), or severe (4.2%). All were nonserious. Logistic regression analysis revealed that expected effects were more common in females, while immunoreactivity decreased with increasing age and tumour stage. No risk factors were identified for ADRs. ADR frequency increased as mistletoe dose increased, while fewer ADRs occurred during mistletoe therapy received concurrent with conventional therapies. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that mistletoe therapy is safe. ADRs were mostly mild to moderate in intensity and appear to be dose-related and explained by the immune-stimulating, pharmacological activity of mistletoe. PMID:24672577

  17. Adverse effects of conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Langman, Michael J S

    2003-08-01

    This article reviews the clinical and epidemiological features of conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) related peptic ulcer complications, and the associated risk factors. The degree of gastrointestinal toxicity varies widely between the available drugs and with dose of each. The risk of ulcer complications can however be reduced, and perhaps completely removed, by using the lowest dose of the least toxic member of the class. Enteric coating and other delayed release formulations have not been shown to reduce risk. Estimates of the imposed disease burden have varied widely, in part through assuming that risks in selected patient groups will necessarily translate to the general population. Nevertheless, the imposed disease burden is one of the largest associated with current drug treatment. Associated risk factors such as prior ulcer, corticosteroid use and concurrent aspirin as well as general cardiovascular disease will raise the likelihood of an ulcer complication in NSAID takers and non-takers. Therefore, strategies dependent on substituting COX-selective drugs will then be only partially successful.

  18. Exposure to Prescription Drugs Labeled for Risk of Adverse Effects of Suicidal Behavior or Ideation among 100 Air Force Personnel Who Died by Suicide, 2006-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavigne, Jill E.; McCarthy, Michael; Chapman, Richard; Petrilla, Allison; Knox, Kerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Prescription drugs for many indications are labeled with warnings for potential risk of suicidal ideation or behavior. Exposures to prescription drugs labeled for adverse effects of suicidal behavior or ideation among 100 Air Force personnel who died by suicide between 2006 and 2009 are described. Air Force registry data were linked to…

  19. Promoting adverse drug reaction reporting: comparison of different approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Vaz, Inês; Santos, Cristina Costa; Cruz-Correia, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe different approaches to promote adverse drug reaction reporting among health care professionals, determining their cost-effectiveness. METHODS We analyzed and compared several approaches taken by the Northern Pharmacovigilance Centre (Portugal) to promote adverse drug reaction reporting. Approaches were compared regarding the number and relevance of adverse drug reaction reports obtained and costs involved. Costs by report were estimated by adding the initial costs and the running costs of each intervention. These costs were divided by the number of reports obtained with each intervention, to assess its cost-effectiveness. RESULTS All the approaches seem to have increased the number of adverse drug reaction reports. We noted the biggest increase with protocols (321 reports, costing 1.96 € each), followed by first educational approach (265 reports, 20.31 €/report) and by the hyperlink approach (136 reports, 15.59 €/report). Regarding the severity of adverse drug reactions, protocols were the most efficient approach, costing 2.29 €/report, followed by hyperlinks (30.28 €/report, having no running costs). Concerning unexpected adverse drug reactions, the best result was obtained with protocols (5.12 €/report), followed by first educational approach (38.79 €/report). CONCLUSIONS We recommend implementing protocols in other pharmacovigilance centers. They seem to be the most efficient intervention, allowing receiving adverse drug reactions reports at lower costs. The increase applied not only to the total number of reports, but also to the severity, unexpectedness and high degree of causality attributed to the adverse drug reactions. Still, hyperlinks have the advantage of not involving running costs, showing the second best performance in cost per adverse drug reactions report. PMID:27143614

  20. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  1. Minimizing Cardiovascular Adverse Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Khasawneh, Fadi T.; Shankar, Gollapudi S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of atypical antipsychotic agents has rapidly increased in the United States and worldwide in the last decade. Nonetheless, many health care practitioners do not appreciate the significance of the cardiovascular side effects that may be associated with their use and the means to minimize them. Thus, atypical antipsychotic medications can cause cardiovascular side effects such as arrhythmias and deviations in blood pressure. In rare cases, they may also cause congestive heart failure, myocarditis, and sudden death. Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality than healthy individuals, possibly because of excessive smoking, the underlying disorder itself, or a combination of both factors. Increased awareness of these potential complications can allow pharmacists and physicians to better manage and monitor high risk patients. Accurate assessments are very important to avoid medications from being given to patients inappropriately. Additionally, monitoring patients regularly via blood draws and checking blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram can help catch any clinical problems and prevent further complications. Finally, patient and family-member education, which pharmacists in particular can play key roles in, is central for the management and prevention of side effects, which is known to reflect positively on morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:24649390

  2. Cadec: A corpus of adverse drug event annotations.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Sarvnaz; Metke-Jimenez, Alejandro; Kemp, Madonna; Wang, Chen

    2015-06-01

    CSIRO Adverse Drug Event Corpus (Cadec) is a new rich annotated corpus of medical forum posts on patient-reported Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). The corpus is sourced from posts on social media, and contains text that is largely written in colloquial language and often deviates from formal English grammar and punctuation rules. Annotations contain mentions of concepts such as drugs, adverse effects, symptoms, and diseases linked to their corresponding concepts in controlled vocabularies, i.e., SNOMED Clinical Terms and MedDRA. The quality of the annotations is ensured by annotation guidelines, multi-stage annotations, measuring inter-annotator agreement, and final review of the annotations by a clinical terminologist. This corpus is useful for studies in the area of information extraction, or more generally text mining, from social media to detect possible adverse drug reactions from direct patient reports. The corpus is publicly available at https://data.csiro.au.(1).

  3. Adverse Events in Healthy Individuals and MDR-TB Contacts Treated with Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs Potentially Effective for Preventing Development of MDR-TB: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Langendam, Miranda W.; Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Sandgren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A recent systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness to support or reject preventive therapy for treatment of contacts of patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Whether preventive therapy is favorable depends both on the effectiveness and the adverse events of the drugs used. We performed a systematic review to assess adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other databases (August 2011). Record selection, data extraction, and study quality assessment were done in duplicate. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Of 6,901 identified references, 20 studies were eligible. Among the 16 studies in healthy volunteers (a total of 87 persons on either levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, or rifabutin, mostly for 1 week), serious adverse events and treatment discontinuation due to adverse events were rare (<1 and <5%, respectively), but mild adverse events frequently occurred. Due to small sample sizes of the levofloxacin and ofloxacin studies an increased frequency of mild adverse events compared to placebo could not be demonstrated or excluded. For moxifloxacin the comparative results were inconsistent. In four studies describing preventive therapy of MDR-TB contacts, therapy was stopped for 58–100% of the included persons because of the occurrence of adverse events ranging from mild adverse events such as nausea and dizziness to serious events requiring treatment. The quality of the evidence was very low. Although the number of publications and quality of evidence are low, the available evidence suggests that shortly after starting treatment the occurrence of serious adverse events is rare. Mild adverse events occur more frequently and may be of importance because these may provoke treatment interruption. PMID:23326464

  4. Adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Langendam, Miranda W; Tiemersma, Edine W; van der Werf, Marieke J; Sandgren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A recent systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness to support or reject preventive therapy for treatment of contacts of patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Whether preventive therapy is favorable depends both on the effectiveness and the adverse events of the drugs used. We performed a systematic review to assess adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other databases (August 2011). Record selection, data extraction, and study quality assessment were done in duplicate. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Of 6,901 identified references, 20 studies were eligible. Among the 16 studies in healthy volunteers (a total of 87 persons on either levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, or rifabutin, mostly for 1 week), serious adverse events and treatment discontinuation due to adverse events were rare (<1 and <5%, respectively), but mild adverse events frequently occurred. Due to small sample sizes of the levofloxacin and ofloxacin studies an increased frequency of mild adverse events compared to placebo could not be demonstrated or excluded. For moxifloxacin the comparative results were inconsistent. In four studies describing preventive therapy of MDR-TB contacts, therapy was stopped for 58-100% of the included persons because of the occurrence of adverse events ranging from mild adverse events such as nausea and dizziness to serious events requiring treatment. The quality of the evidence was very low. Although the number of publications and quality of evidence are low, the available evidence suggests that shortly after starting treatment the occurrence of serious adverse events is rare. Mild adverse events occur more frequently and may be of importance because these may provoke treatment interruption.

  5. Appropriate risk criteria for OATP inhibition at the drug discovery stage based on the clinical relevancy between OATP inhibitors and drug-induced adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Nakakariya, Masanori; Goto, Akihiko; Amano, Nobuyuki

    2016-10-01

    DDI could be caused by the inhibition of OATP-mediated hepatic uptakes. The aim of this study is to set the risk criteria for the compounds that would cause DDI via OATP inhibition at the drug discovery stage. The IC50 values of OATP inhibitors for human OATP-mediated atorvastatin uptake were evaluated in the expression system. In order to set the risk criteria for OATP inhibition, the relationship was clarified between OATP inhibitory effect and severe adverse effects of OATP substrates, rhabdomyolysis, hyperbilirubinemia and jaundice. Rhabdomyolysis would be caused in the atorvastatin AUC more than 9-fold of that at a minimum therapeutic dose. The atorvastatin AUC was 6- to 9-fold increased with the OATP inhibitors of which IC50 values were ≤1 μmol/L. Hyperbilirubinemia and jaundice would be caused with the OATP inhibitors of which IC50 values were ≤6 μmol/L. This investigation showed that the compounds with IC50 of ≤1 μmol/L would have high risk for OATP-mediated DDI that would cause severe side effects. Before the detailed analysis based on the dosage, unbound fraction in blood and effective concentration to evaluate the clinical DDI potency, this criteria enable high throughput screening and optimize lead compounds at the drug discovery stage.

  6. Systematic Analysis of Adverse Event Reports for Sex Differences in Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Li, Dingcheng; Wang, Liwei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that sex differences exist in Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). Identifying those sex differences in ADEs could reduce the experience of ADEs for patients and could be conducive to the development of personalized medicine. In this study, we analyzed a normalized US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Chi-squared test was conducted to discover which treatment regimens or drugs had sex differences in adverse events. Moreover, reporting odds ratio (ROR) and P value were calculated to quantify the signals of sex differences for specific drug-event combinations. Logistic regression was applied to remove the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events. We detected among 668 drugs of the most frequent 20 treatment regimens in the United States, 307 drugs have sex differences in ADEs. In addition, we identified 736 unique drug-event combinations with significant sex differences. After removing the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events, there are 266 combinations remained. Drug labels or previous studies verified some of them while others warrant further investigation. PMID:27102014

  7. Adverse drug reactions and their measurement in the rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Day, R O; Quinn, D I; Conaghan, P G; Tett, S E

    1995-05-01

    Drugs administered as therapy for rheumatological disorders are a relatively common cause of adverse events. Important data regarding the effects of drugs on patients with rheumatological conditions is being lost or rendered inaccessible because of deficiencies in classification, measurement, and collection methods for adverse drug reactions. A significant number of adverse reactions to drugs will not be known before marketing, and hence vigilance on the part of clinicians and patients in observing and documenting these reactions is paramount in building our knowledge and modifying our practice accordingly. A variety of systems and methods for detecting adverse drug reactions are described, critically evaluated, and compared for cost, potential bias, ethical concerns, and subject recruitment required for necessary statistical power. Systems need to be developed to give access to the wealth of clinical experimental data available in the individual practices of a broad spectrum of clinicians. To facilitate this, representative organizations need to make adverse drug reactions a high priority as well as contributing expertise and finance to database formulation and accessibility.

  8. Idiosyncratic Adverse Drug Reactions: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Naisbitt, Dean J.

    2013-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for patients; they also markedly increase the uncertainty of drug development. The major targets are skin, liver, and bone marrow. Clinical characteristics suggest that IDRs are immune mediated, and there is substantive evidence that most, but not all, IDRs are caused by chemically reactive species. However, rigorous mechanistic studies are very difficult to perform, especially in the absence of valid animal models. Models to explain how drugs or reactive metabolites interact with the MHC/T-cell receptor complex include the hapten and P-I models, and most recently it was found that abacavir can interact reversibly with MHC to alter the endogenous peptides that are presented to T cells. The discovery of HLA molecules as important risk factors for some IDRs has also significantly contributed to our understanding of these adverse reactions, but it is not yet clear what fraction of IDRs have a strong HLA dependence. In addition, with the exception of abacavir, most patients who have the HLA that confers a higher IDR risk with a specific drug will not have an IDR when treated with that drug. Interindividual differences in T-cell receptors and other factors also presumably play a role in determining which patients will have an IDR. The immune response represents a delicate balance, and immune tolerance may be the dominant response to a drug that can cause IDRs. PMID:23476052

  9. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) postmarket reported side effects and adverse events associated with pulmonary hypertension therapy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Maxey, Dawn M; Ivy, D Dunbar; Ogawa, Michelle T; Feinstein, Jeffrey A

    2013-10-01

    Because most medications for pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH) are used off label and based on adult trials, little information is available on pediatric-specific adverse events (AEs). Although drug manufacturers are required to submit postmarket AE reports to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), this information is rarely transmitted to practitioners. In the setting of a recent FDA warning for sildenafil, the authors sought to give a better description of the AEs associated with current therapies in pediatric PH. In January 2010, a written request was made to the Food and Drug Administration for AE records of commonly used PH medications. Reports were screened for pediatric patients, analyzed in terms of AEs, and compared with the medical literature. Arbitrarily, AEs that could be attributed to concomitant medications were not attributed to the PH medication in question. Adverse events occurring in more than 5 % of events for each drug were assumed to be associated with the targeted PH medication. Between November 1997 and December 2009, 588 pediatric AE reports (death in 257 cases) were reported for the three most commonly used therapies: bosentan, epoprostenol, and sildenafil. Many of the AEs were similar to those reported previously. However, 27 AEs not previously reported in the literature (e.g., pulmonary hemorrhage, hemoptysis, and pneumonia) were found. The FDA postmarket records for PH medications in pediatric patients show a significant number of AEs. The discovery of AEs not previously reported will better inform those caring for these complex and critically ill children, and the large number of deaths suggest they may be underreported in current literature.

  10. [Clinical survey of tizanidine-induced adverse effects--impact of concomitant drugs providing cytochrome P450 1A2 modification--].

    PubMed

    Momo, Kenji; Homma, Masato; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Sasaki, Tadanori; Kohda, Yukinao

    2013-01-01

    The drug-drug interactions of tizanidine and cytochrome (CYP) P450 1A2 inhibitors, which potentially alter the hepatic metabolism of tizanidine, were investigated by retrospective survey of medical records with regard to prescription. One thousand five hundred sixty-three patients treated with tizanidine at University of Tsukuba Hospital were investigated. Of those, 713 patients (45.6%) were treated with coadministration of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors (37 drugs). The patients who received a combination of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors were characterized as elderly, having multiple diseases, and taking a large number of comedications (over 10 drugs) for a long period as compared with the patients who did not receive CYP1A2 inhibitors. Tizanidine-induced adverse effects were examined in 100 patients treated with coadministration of tizanidine and 8 CYP1A2 inhibitors. Adverse effects (e.g., drowsiness: 10 patients; low blood pressure: 9 patients; low heart rate: 9 patients) were observed in 23 patients (23%) 8±10 days after CYP1A2 inhibitors were coadministered. The patients with tizanidine-induced adverse effects were of older age (64.3±9.8 vs. 57.5±18.1 years, p<0.05) and received a higher daily dose of tizanidine (3.00±0.74 vs. 2.56±0.86 mg/day, p<0.05) than the patients without adverse effects. The present results suggest that coadministration of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors enhances tizanidine-induced adverse effects, especially in elderly patients treated with a higher dose of tizanidine.

  11. Drug switch because of treatment-related adverse side effects in endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy: how often and how often does it work?

    PubMed

    Güth, Uwe; Myrick, Mary Elizabeth; Schötzau, Andreas; Kilic, Nerbil; Schmid, Seraina Margaretha

    2011-10-01

    Therapy-related adverse side effects are a main reason for non-persistence to adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy. This study reports frequency of drug-related adverse side effects that were so severe that a modification of the therapy was necessary. We evaluated how many patients discontinued adjuvant endocrine therapy because of these side effects (non-persistence). Last, we analyzed how often a drug switch was undertaken for this reason and how often this measure led to the patient successfully continuing their endocrine therapy. Data concerning all postmenopausal breast cancer patients (≤ 80 years), who initiated endocrine adjuvant therapy between 1998 and 2008 in a Swiss breast center (n = 400), were analyzed. Out of these 400 women, 37 (9.3%) were defined as being non-persistent to the therapy; out of these, 24 (64.9%) because of therapy-related side effects. About 78 patients (19.5%) suffered from severe therapy-related side effects that made a modification of therapy necessary. Out of these 78 cases, 14 patients (17.9%) stopped the therapy without attempting a drug switch (non-persistence). In 64 patients (82.1%; 16% of all women who started endocrine therapy), a drug switch was undertaken. Out of these 64 cases, in 52 cases (81.3%) endocrine therapy was completed after therapy modification. Patients who reported one major adverse effect were more likely to continue the endocrine therapy after a drug switch (P = 0.048) compared with those who suffered from at least two different side effects. In 10 of the 64 cases (15.6%), modification of the therapy was not successful and the patients stopped the treatment prematurely (non-persistence) because of ongoing side effects. In cases when therapy-related side effects occur, a drug switch is a promising step to further improve persistence and, by doing so, the outcome of breast cancer patients.

  12. Mechanisms of adverse drug reactions to biologics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Janet B

    2010-01-01

    Biologics encompass a broad range of therapeutics that include proteins and other products derived from living systems. Although the multiplicity of target organs often seen with new chemical entities is generally not seen with biologics, they can produce significant adverse reactions. Examples include IL-12 and an anti-CD28 antibody that resulted in patient deaths and/or long stays in intensive care units. Mechanisms of toxicities can be categorized as pharmacological or nonpharmacological, with most, excepting hypersensitivity reactions, associated with the interaction of the agent with its planned target. Unexpected toxicities generally arise as a result of previously unknown biology. Manufacturing quality is a significant issue relative to the toxicity of biologics. The development of recombinant technology represented the single biggest advance leading to humanized products with minimal or no contaminants in comparison to products purified from animal tissues. Nevertheless, the type of manufacturing process including choice of cell type, culture medium, and purification method can result in changes to the protein. For example, a change to the closure system for erythropoietin led to an increase in aplastic anemia as a result of changing the immunogenicity characteristics of the protein. Monoclonal antibodies represent a major class of successful biologics. Toxicities associated with these agents include those associated with the binding of the complementary determining region (CDR) with the target. First dose reactions or infusion reactions are generally thought to be mediated via the Fc region of the antibody activating cytokine release, and have been observed with several antibodies. Usually, these effects (flu-like symptoms, etc.) are transient with subsequent dosing. Although biologics can have nonpharmacologic toxicities, these are less common than with small molecule drugs.

  13. Adverse drug events in hospital: pilot study with trigger tool

    PubMed Central

    Rozenfeld, Suely; Giordani, Fabiola; Coelho, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the frequency of and to characterize the adverse drug events at a terciary care hospital. METHODS A retrospective review was carried out of 128 medical records from a hospital in Rio de Janeiro in 2007, representing 2,092 patients. The instrument used was a list of triggers, such as antidotes, abnormal laboratory analysis results and sudden suspension of treatment, among others. A simple random sample of patients aged 15 and over was extracted. Oncologic and obstetric patients were excluded as were those hospitalized for less than 48 hours or in the emergency room. Social and demographic characteristics and those of the disease of patients who underwent adverse events were compared with those of patients who did not in order to test for differences between the groups. RESULTS Around 70.0% of the medical records assessed showed at least one trigger. Adverse drug events triggers had an overall positive predictive value of 14.4%. The incidence of adverse drug events was 26.6 per 100 patients and 15.6% patients suffered one or more event. The median length of stay for patients suffering an adverse drug event was 35.2 days as against 10.7 days for those who did not (p < 0.01). The pharmacological classes most commonly associated with an adverse drug event were related to the cardiovascular system, nervous system and alimentary tract and metabolism. The most common active substances associated with an adverse drug event were tramadol, dypirone, glibenclamide and furosemide. Over 80.0% of events provoked or contributed to temporary harm to the patient and required intervention and 6.0% may have contributed to the death of the patient. It was estimated that in the hospital, 131 events involving drowsiness or fainting 33 involving falls, and 33 episodes of hemorrhage related to adverse drug effects occur annually. CONCLUSIONS Almost one-sixth of in-patients (16,0%) suffered an adverse drug event. The instrument used may prove useful as a technique for

  14. Adverse drug events: database construction and in silico prediction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Li, Weihua; Wang, Xichuan; Zhou, Yadi; Wu, Zengrui; Shen, Jie; Tang, Yun

    2013-04-22

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are the harms associated with uses of given medications at normal dosages, which are crucial for a drug to be approved in clinical use or continue to stay on the market. Many ADEs are not identified in trials until the drug is approved for clinical use, which results in adverse morbidity and mortality. To date, millions of ADEs have been reported around the world. Methods to avoid or reduce ADEs are an important issue for drug discovery and development. Here, we reported a comprehensive database of adverse drug events (namely MetaADEDB), which included more than 520,000 drug-ADE associations among 3059 unique compounds (including 1330 drugs) and 13,200 ADE items by data integration and text mining. All compounds and ADEs were annotated with the most commonly used concepts defined in Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). Meanwhile, a computational method, namely the phenotypic network inference model (PNIM), was developed for prediction of potential ADEs based on the database. The area under the receive operating characteristic curve (AUC) is more than 0.9 by 10-fold cross validation, while the AUC value was 0.912 for an external validation set extracted from the US-FDA Adverse Events Reporting System, which indicated that the prediction capability of the method was reliable. MetaADEDB is accessible free of charge at http://www.lmmd.org/online_services/metaadedb/. The database and the method provide us a useful tool to search for known side effects or predict potential side effects for a given drug or compound.

  15. Using Drug Similarities for Discovery of Possible Adverse Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Emir; Nováček, Vít; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new computational method for discovery of possible adverse drug reactions. The method consists of two key steps. First we use openly available resources to semi-automatically compile a consolidated data set describing drugs and their features (e.g., chemical structure, related targets, indications or known adverse reaction). The data set is represented as a graph, which allows for definition of graph-based similarity metrics. The metrics can then be used for propagating known adverse reactions between similar drugs, which leads to weighted (i.e., ranked) predictions of previously unknown links between drugs and their possible side effects. We implemented the proposed method in the form of a software prototype and evaluated our approach by discarding known drug-side effect links from our data and checking whether our prototype is able to re-discover them. As this is an evaluation methodology used by several recent state of the art approaches, we could compare our results with them. Our approach scored best in all widely used metrics like precision, recall or the ratio of relevant predictions present among the top ranked results. The improvement was as much as 125.79% over the next best approach. For instance, the F1 score was 0.5606 (66.35% better than the next best method). Most importantly, in 95.32% of cases, the top five results contain at least one, but typically three correctly predicted side effect (36.05% better than the second best approach). PMID:28269889

  16. Risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs.

    PubMed

    Resende, Laíse Soares Oliveira; Santos-Neto, Edson Theodoro Dos

    2015-01-01

    This review sought to identify the available scientific evidence on risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs. We performed a systematic review of studies published in the 1965-2012 period and indexed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases. A total of 1,389 articles were initially selected. After reading their abstracts, we selected 85 studies. Of those 85 studies, 16 were included in the review. Risk factors for adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs included age > 60 years, treatment regimens, alcoholism, anemia, and HIV co-infection, as well as sodium, iron, and albumin deficiency. Protective factors against hepatic adverse effects of antituberculosis drugs included being male (combined OR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.20-0.72) and showing a rapid/intermediate N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator phenotype (combined OR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.18-0.90). There is evidence to support the need for management of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs at public health care facilities.

  17. Risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs*

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Laíse Soares Oliveira; dos Santos-Neto, Edson Theodoro

    2015-01-01

    This review sought to identify the available scientific evidence on risk factors associated with adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs. We performed a systematic review of studies published in the 1965-2012 period and indexed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases. A total of 1,389 articles were initially selected. After reading their abstracts, we selected 85 studies. Of those 85 studies, 16 were included in the review. Risk factors for adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs included age > 60 years, treatment regimens, alcoholism, anemia, and HIV co-infection, as well as sodium, iron, and albumin deficiency. Protective factors against hepatic adverse effects of antituberculosis drugs included being male (combined OR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.20-0.72) and showing a rapid/intermediate N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylator phenotype (combined OR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.18-0.90). There is evidence to support the need for management of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs at public health care facilities. PMID:25750677

  18. Learning Lessons from Adverse Drug Reactions in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Helen M.; Choonara, Imti

    2016-01-01

    Drug toxicity is, unfortunately, a significant problem in children both in the hospital and in the community. Drug toxicity in children is different to that seen in adults. At least one in 500 children will experience an adverse drug reaction each year. For children in hospital, the risk is far greater (one in ten). Additionally, different and sometimes unique adverse drug reactions are seen in the paediatric age groups. Some of the major cases of drug toxicity historically have occurred in neonates. It is important that we understand the mechanism of action of adverse drug reactions. Greater understanding alongside rational prescribing should hopefully reduce drug toxicity in children in the future. PMID:27417239

  19. From ultrasocial to antisocial: a role for oxytocin in the acute reinforcing effects and long-term adverse consequences of drug use?

    PubMed

    McGregor, I S; Callaghan, P D; Hunt, G E

    2008-05-01

    Addictive drugs can profoundly affect social behaviour both acutely and in the long-term. Effects range from the artificial sociability imbued by various intoxicating agents to the depressed and socially withdrawn state frequently observed in chronic drug users. Understanding such effects is of great potential significance in addiction neurobiology. In this review we focus on the 'social neuropeptide' oxytocin and its possible role in acute and long-term effects of commonly used drugs. Oxytocin regulates social affiliation and social recognition in many species and modulates anxiety, mood and aggression. Recent evidence suggests that popular party drugs such as MDMA and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) may preferentially activate brain oxytocin systems to produce their characteristic prosocial and prosexual effects. Oxytocin interacts with the mesolimbic dopamine system to facilitate sexual and social behaviour, and this oxytocin-dopamine interaction may also influence the acquisition and expression of drug-seeking behaviour. An increasing body of evidence from animal models suggests that even brief exposure to drugs such as MDMA, cannabinoids, methamphetamine and phencyclidine can cause long lasting deficits in social behaviour. We discuss preliminary evidence that these adverse effects may reflect long-term neuroadaptations in brain oxytocin systems. Laboratory studies and preliminary clinical studies also indicate that raising brain oxytocin levels may ameliorate acute drug withdrawal symptoms. It is concluded that oxytocin may play an important, yet largely unexplored, role in drug addiction. Greater understanding of this role may ultimately lead to novel therapeutics for addiction that can improve mood and facilitate the recovery of persons with drug use disorders.

  20. Critical thinking about adverse drug effects: lessons from the psychology of risk and medical decision-making for clinical psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Andrew A; Smoller, Jordan W; Eidelman, Polina; Wu, Yelena P; Tilley, Claire A

    2008-01-01

    Systematic biases in decision-making have been well characterized in medical and nonmedical fields but mostly ignored in clinical psychopharmacology. The purpose of this paper is to sensitize clinicians who prescribe psychiatric drugs to the issues of the psychology of risk, especially as they pertain to the risk of side effects. Specifically, the present analysis focuses on heuristic organization and framing effects that create cognitive biases in medical practice. Our purpose is to increase the awareness of how pharmaceutical companies may influence physicians by framing the risk of medication side effects to favor their products.

  1. Proposed Actions for the US Food and Drug Administration to Implement to Minimize Adverse Effects Associated With Energy Drink Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Colby, David A.; Devine, Paige

    2014-01-01

    Energy drink sales are expected to reach $52 billion by 2016. These products, often sold as dietary supplements, typically contain stimulants. The Dietary Supplement Protection Act claims an exemplary public health safety record. However, in 2011 the number of emergency department visits related to consumption of energy drinks exceeded 20 000. Nearly half of these visits involved adverse effects occurring from product misuse. Political, social, economic, practical, and legal factors shape the landscape surrounding this issue. In this policy analysis, we examine 3 options: capping energy drink caffeine levels, creating a public education campaign, and increasing regulatory scrutiny regarding the manufacture and labeling of energy drinks. Increased regulatory scrutiny may be in order, especially in light of wrongful death lawsuits related to caffeine toxicity resulting from energy drink consumption. PMID:24832439

  2. Proposed actions for the US Food and Drug Administration to implement to minimize adverse effects associated with energy drink consumption.

    PubMed

    Thorlton, Janet; Colby, David A; Devine, Paige

    2014-07-01

    Energy drink sales are expected to reach $52 billion by 2016. These products, often sold as dietary supplements, typically contain stimulants. The Dietary Supplement Protection Act claims an exemplary public health safety record. However, in 2011 the number of emergency department visits related to consumption of energy drinks exceeded 20,000. Nearly half of these visits involved adverse effects occurring from product misuse. Political, social, economic, practical, and legal factors shape the landscape surrounding this issue. In this policy analysis, we examine 3 options: capping energy drink caffeine levels, creating a public education campaign, and increasing regulatory scrutiny regarding the manufacture and labeling of energy drinks. Increased regulatory scrutiny may be in order, especially in light of wrongful death lawsuits related to caffeine toxicity resulting from energy drink consumption.

  3. Nonhemostatic adverse effects of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Walenga, Jeanine M; Thethi, Indermohan; Lewis, Bruce E

    2012-11-01

    The topic of adverse effects of drugs is now receiving due attention in both the lay and medical communities. For drugs of the coagulation disorder class, such as anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, the obvious adverse effects are bleeding from a dose too high and thrombosis from a dose too low. However, these drugs have other potential adverse effects that are not directly related to blood coagulation, yet cannot be dismissed due to their medical importance. There has been a recent advancement of several new drugs in this category and this number will soon grow as more drugs are reaching the end of their clinical trials. This article will discuss the nonhemostatic adverse effects of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. As the adverse effects of bleeding and thrombosis will be excluded, this article will be in contrast to the typical discussions on the anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug classes.

  4. Clinical applications of pharmacogenomics to adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Issa, Amalia M

    2008-03-01

    The problem of adverse drug reactions is a well-documented global public health problem. Recent withdrawals of several widely used prescription medications in the USA and other countries have raised concerns among patients, clinicians, scientists and policy makers. The increasing interest and concern regarding withdrawal of previously approved prescription medications and drug safety has prompted renewed research efforts aimed at improving surveillance of approved drugs and reducing adverse drug reactions. Pharmacogenomics research is increasingly directed at developing genomic diagnostics and tests with predictive ability for adverse drug reactions. This paper focuses on the problem of adverse drug reactions and reviews the evidence and the state of the science for the application of pharmacogenomics to adverse drug reactions.

  5. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: A Review of Its Antioxidant Activity, Protective Effects against Ischemia-reperfusion Injury and Drug Adverse Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Mai F; Omar, Hany A; Azab, Samar S; Khalifa, Amani E; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2016-10-02

    Propolis, a honey bee product, has been used in folk medicine for centuries for the treatment of abscesses, canker sores and for wound healing. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is one of the most extensively investigated active components of propolis which possess many biological activities, including antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects. CAPE is a polyphenolic compound characterized by potent antioxidant and cytoprotective activities and protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury in multiple tissues such as brain, retina, heart, skeletal muscles, testis, ovaries, intestine, colon, and liver. Furthermore, several studies indicated the protective effects of CAPE against chemotherapy-induced adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including several antibiotics (streptomycin, vancomycin, isoniazid, ethambutol) and chemotherapeutic agents (mitomycin, doxorubicin, cisplatin, methotrexate). Due to the broad spectrum of pharmacological activities of CAPE, this review makes a special focus on the recently published data about CAPE antioxidant activity as well as its protective effects against I/R-induced injury and many adverse drug reactions.

  6. Pattern of Adverse Drug Reactions Reported with Cardiovascular Drugs in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Muthiah; George, Melvin; Subramaniyan, Ganesan; Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; Jayaraman, Balachander; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are one of the leading causes of non-communicable disease related deaths globally. Patients with cardiovascular diseases are often prescribed multiple drugs and have higher risk for developing more adverse drug reactions due to polypharmacy. Aim To evaluate the pattern of adverse drug reactions reported with cardiovascular drugs in an adverse drug reaction monitoring centre (AMC) of a tertiary care hospital. Settings and Design Adverse drug reactions related to cardiovascular drugs reported to an AMC of a tertiary care hospital were included in this prospective observational study. Materials and Methods All cardiovascular drugs related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) received in AMC through spontaneous reporting system and active surveillance method from January 2011 to March 2013 were analysed for demographic profile, ADR pattern, severity and causality assessment. Statistical Analysis used The study used descriptive statistics and the values were expressed in numbers and percentages. Results During the study period, a total of 463 ADRs were reported from 397 patients which included 319 males (80.4%) and 78 females (19.6%). The cardiovascular drug related reports constituted 18.1% of the total 2188 ADR reports. In this study, the most common ADRs observed were cough (17.3%), gastritis (7.5%) and fatigue (6.5%). Assessment of ADRs using WHO-causality scale revealed that 62% of ADRs were possible, 28.2% certain and 6.8% probable. As per Naranjo’s scale most of the reports were possible (68.8%) followed by probable (29.7%). According to Hartwig severity scale majority of the reports were mild (95%) followed by moderate (4.5%). A system wise classification of ADRs showed that gastrointestinal system (20.7%) related reactions were the most frequently observed adverse reactions followed by respiratory system (18.4%) related adverse effects. From the reported ADRs, the drugs most commonly associated with ADRs were found to be

  7. Predicting adverse drug events from personal health messages.

    PubMed

    Chee, Brant W; Berlin, Richard; Schatz, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) remain a large problem in the United States, being the fourth leading cause of death, despite post market drug surveillance. Much post consumer drug surveillance relies on self-reported "spontaneous" patient data. Previous work has performed datamining over the FDA's Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) and other spontaneous reporting systems to identify drug interactions and drugs correlated with high rates of serious adverse events. However, safety problems have resulted from the lack of post marketing surveillance information about drugs, with underreporting rates of up to 98% within such systems. We explore the use of online health forums as a source of data to identify drugs for further FDA scrutiny. In this work we aggregate individuals' opinions and review of drugs similar to crowd intelligence3. We use natural language processing to group drugs discussed in similar ways and are able to successfully identify drugs withdrawn from the market based on messages discussing them before their removal.

  8. Differences between Drug-Induced and Contrast Media-Induced Adverse Reactions Based on Spontaneously Reported Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Suh, JinUk; Yang, MyungSuk; Kang, WonKu; Kim, EunYoung

    2015-01-01

    Objective We analyzed differences between spontaneously reported drug-induced (not including contrast media) and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Methods Adverse drug reactions reported by an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center (St. Mary’s teaching hospital, Daejeon, Korea) from 2010–2012 were classified as drug-induced or contrast media-induced. Clinical patterns, frequency, causality, severity, Schumock and Thornton’s preventability, and type A/B reactions were recorded. The trends among causality tools measuring drug and contrast-induced adverse reactions were analyzed. Results Of 1,335 reports, 636 drug-induced and contrast media-induced adverse reactions were identified. The prevalence of spontaneously reported adverse drug reaction-related admissions revealed a suspected adverse drug reaction-reporting rate of 20.9/100,000 (inpatient, 0.021%) and 3.9/100,000 (outpatients, 0.004%). The most common adverse drug reaction-associated drug classes included nervous system agents and anti-infectives. Dermatological and gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions were most frequently and similarly reported between drug and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Compared to contrast media-induced adverse reactions, drug-induced adverse reactions were milder, more likely to be preventable (9.8% vs. 1.1%, p < 0.001), and more likely to be type A reactions (73.5% vs. 18.8%, p < 0.001). Females were over-represented among drug-induced adverse reactions (68.1%, p < 0.001) but not among contrast media-induced adverse reactions (56.6%, p = 0.066). Causality patterns differed between the two adverse reaction classes. The World Health Organization–Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality evaluation and Naranjo algorithm results significantly differed from those of the Korean algorithm version II (p < 0.001). Conclusions We found differences in sex, preventability, severity, and type A/B reactions between spontaneously reported drug and contrast media-induced adverse

  9. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions (Review article)

    PubMed Central

    Alomar, Muaed Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To discuss the effect of certain factors on the occurrence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Data Sources A systematic review of the literature in the period between 1991 and 2012 was made based on PubMed, the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE and IDIS. Key words used were: medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease factors, ambulatory care, primary health care, side effects and treatment hazards. Summary Many factors play a crucial role in the occurrence of ADRs, some of these are patient related, drug related or socially related factors. Age for instance has a very critical impact on the occurrence of ADRs, both very young and very old patients are more vulnerable to these reactions than other age groups. Alcohol intake also has a crucial impact on ADRs. Other factors are gender, race, pregnancy, breast feeding, kidney problems, liver function, drug dose and frequency and many other factors. The effect of these factors on ADRs is well documented in the medical literature. Taking these factors into consideration during medical evaluation enables medical practitioners to choose the best drug regimen. Conclusion Many factors affect the occurrence of ADRs. Some of these factors can be changed like smoking or alcohol intake others cannot be changed like age, presence of other diseases or genetic factors. Understanding the different effects of these factors on ADRs enables healthcare professionals to choose the most appropriate medication for that particular patient. It also helps the healthcare professionals to give the best advice to patients. Pharmacogenomics is the most recent science which emphasizes the genetic predisposition of ADRs. This innovative science provides a new perspective in dealing with the decision making process of drug selection. PMID:24648818

  10. Vagus nerve stimulation in drug-resistant epilepsy: the efficacy and adverse effects in a 5-year follow-up study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pakdaman, Hossein; Amini Harandi, Ali; Abbasi, Mehdi; Karimi, Mohammad; Arami, Mohammad Ali; Mosavi, Seyed Ali; Haddadian, Karim; Rezaei, Omidvar; Sadeghi, Sohrab; Sharifi, Guive; Gharagozli, Koroush; Bahrami, Parviz; Ashrafi, Farzad; Kasmae, Hosein Delavar; Ghassemi, Amirhossein; Arabahmadi, Mehran; Behnam, Behdad

    2016-11-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy seems like a different disease compared with easy to control epilepsy, and new strategies are needed to help these patients. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy is the most frequently used neurostimulation modality for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy who are not eligible for seizure surgery. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of VNS in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy in an open-label, prospective, long-term study in Iran. We selected 48 patients with partial-onset drug-resistant epilepsy. Implantations were performed in the neurosurgery department of Loghman Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Follow-up visits were done on monthly bases for 5 years. Forty-four patients completed the study. Mean age of patients was 24.4 years. Mean years of epilepsy history was 14 years. The mean number of anti-epileptic drugs did not significantly change over five years (p = 0.15). There was no exacerbation of epilepsy; however, one patient discontinued his therapy due to unsatisfactory results. Five patient had more than 50 %, and 26 patients (59 %) had 25-49 % reduction in the frequency of monthly seizures persistently. Overall mean frequency of monthly seizures decreased by 57.8, 59.6, 65, 65.9, and 67 %, in 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th years of follow-up, respectively. Most common side effects were as follows: hoarseness (25 %) and throat discomfort (10 %). We found VNS as a safe and effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy, with an approximate long-term decrease in mean seizure frequency of 57.8-67 %. Thus, VNS is recommended for suitable patients in developing countries.

  11. Post-surgical analgesia in rainbow trout: is reduced cardioventilatory activity a sign of improved animal welfare or the adverse effects of an opioid drug?

    PubMed

    Gräns, Albin; Sandblom, Erik; Kiessling, Anders; Axelsson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The use of fish models in biomedical research is increasing. Since behavioural and physiological consequences of surgical procedures may affect experimental results, these effects should be defined and, if possible, ameliorated. Thus, the use of post-surgical analgesia should be considered after invasive procedures also in fish, but presently, little information exists on the effects of analgesics in fish. This study assessed the effects of an opioid drug, buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg IM), on resting ventilation and heart rates during 7 days of postsurgical recovery in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at 10°C by non-invasively recording bioelectric potentials from the fish via electrodes in the water. Baseline ventilation and heart rates were considerably lower compared to previously reported values for rainbow trout at 10°C, possibly due to the non-invasive recording technique. Buprenorphine significantly decreased both ventilation and heart rates further, and the effects were most pronounced at 4-7 days after anaesthesia, surgical procedures and administration of the drug. Somewhat surprisingly, the same effects of buprenorphine were seen in the two control groups that had not been subject to surgery. These results indicate that the reductions in ventilation and heart rates are not caused by an analgesic effect of the drug, but may instead reflect a general sedative effect acting on both behaviour as well as e.g. central control of ventilation in fishes. This resembles what has previously been demonstrated in mammals, although the duration of the drug effect is considerably longer in this ectothermic animal. Thus, before using buprenorphine for postoperative analgesic treatment in fish, these potentially adverse effects need further characterisation.

  12. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Dogs Treated with Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tina; Mueller, Ralf S.; Dobenecker, Britta; Fischer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders in dogs and life-long treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is frequently required. Adverse events of AED targeting the skin are only rarely reported in veterinary medicine and the true incidence and spectrum of cutaneous reactions in epileptic dogs remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that cutaneous reactions commonly occur in epileptic dogs and are related to AED treatment. A retrospective case review of 185 dogs treated for epilepsy identified 20.0% with simultaneous appearance of dermatologic signs. In a subsequent prospective case investigation (n = 137), we identified newly appearing or distinct worsening of skin lesions following initiation of AED therapy in 10.9% of dogs treated for epilepsy (95% CI 6.8–17.7%). Cutaneous lesions were classified as probably drug-induced in 40.0% of these cases. Patch testing and intradermal testing were further investigated as potential diagnostic methods to confirm AED hypersensitivity. They were of high specificity but sensitivity and positive predictive value appeared inappropriate to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:27148543

  13. Quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: the impact of socio-economic factors and adverse effects of atypical antipsychotics drugs.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; de Araújo Dantas, Diego; do Nascimento, Gemma Galgani; Ribeiro, Susana Barbosa; Chaves, Katarina Melo; de Lima Silva, Vanessa; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier

    2014-09-01

    This cross-sectional study compared the effects of treatment with atypical antipsychotic drugs on quality of life (QoL) and side effects in 218 patients with schizophrenia attending the ambulatory services of psychiatric in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Socio-economic variables were compared. The five-dimension EuroQoL (EQ-5D) was used to evaluate QoL, and side effects were assessed using the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) Side Effect Rating Scale and the Simpson-Angus Scale. Data were analysed using the χ (2) test and Student's t test, with a significance level of 5 %. Average monthly household incomes in the medication groups were 1.1-2.1 minimum wages ($339-$678). UKU Scale scores showed significant differences in side effects, mainly, clozapine, quetiapine and ziprasidone (p < 0.05). EQ-5D scores showed that all drugs except olanzapine significantly impacted mobility (p < 0.05), and proportions of individuals reporting problems in other dimensions were high: 63.6 % of clozapine users reported mobility problems, 63.7 and 56.3 % of clozapine and ziprasidone users, respectively, had difficulties with usual activities, 68.8 and 54.5 % of ziprasidone and clozapine users, respectively, experienced pain and/or discomfort, and 72.8 % of clozapine users reported anxiety and/or depression. Psychiatric, neurological, and autonomous adverse effects, as well as other side effects, were prevalent in users of atypical antipsychotic drugs, especially clozapine and ziprasidone. Olanzapine had the least side effects. QoL was impacted by side effects and economic conditions in all groups. Thus, the effects of these antipsychotic agents appear to have been masked by aggravating social and economic situations.

  14. Thiocolchicoside: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Thiocolchicoside has long been used as a muscle relaxant, despite a lack of proven efficacy beyond the placebo effect. Its chemical structure consists of colchicine, a sugar (ose) and a sulphur-containing radical (thio), and its adverse effects are therefore likely to be similar to those of colchicine. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we reviewed the available data on the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. Liver injury, pancreatitis, seizures, blood cell disorders, severe cutaneous disorders, rhabdomyolysis and reproductive disorders have all been recorded in the French and European pharmacovigilance databases and in the periodic updates that the companies concerned submit to regulatory agencies. These data do not specify the frequency of the disorders nor do they identify the most susceptible patient populations. Thiocolchicoside is teratogenic in experimental animals and also damages chromosomes. Human data are limited to a follow-up of about 30 pregnant women (no major malformations) and reports of altered spermatogenesis, including cases of azoospermia. In practice, there is no justification for exposing patients to the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. It is better to use an effective, well-known analgesic for patients complaining of muscle pain, starting with paracetamol.

  15. Toxins and adverse drug reactions affecting the equine nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Dominic R

    2011-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the more common toxins and adverse drug reactions, along with more rare toxins and reactions (Table 1), that result in neurologic dysfunction in horses. A wide variety of symptoms, treatments, and outcomes are seen with toxic neurologic disease in horses. An in-depth history and thorough physical examination are needed to determine if a toxin or adverse drug reaction is responsible for the clinical signs. Once a toxin or adverse drug reaction is identified, the specific antidote, if available, and supportive care should be administered promptly.

  16. Herbal medication: potential for adverse interactions with analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Abebe, W

    2002-12-01

    The use of herbal supplements in the US has increased dramatically in recent years. These products are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with the same scrutiny as conventional drugs. Patients who use herbal supplements often do so in conjunction with conventional drugs. This article is a review of potential adverse interactions between some of the commonly used herbal supplements and analgesic drugs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly aspirin, have the potential to interact with herbal supplements that are known to possess antiplatelet activity (ginkgo, garlic, ginger, bilberry, dong quai, feverfew, ginseng, turmeric, meadowsweet and willow), with those containing coumarin (chamomile, motherworth, horse chestnut, fenugreek and red clover) and with tamarind, enhancing the risk of bleeding. Acetaminophen may also interact with ginkgo and possibly with at least some of the above herbs to increase the risk of bleeding. Further, the incidences of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity may be augmented by acetaminophen when concomitantly used with the potentially hepatotoxic herbs Echinacea and kava, and with herbs containing salicylate (willow, meadowsweet), respectively. The concomitant use of opioid analgesics with the sedative herbal supplements, valerian, kava and chamomile, may lead to increased central nervous system (CNS) depression. The analgesic effect of opioids may also be inhibited by ginseng. It is suggested that health-care professionals should be more aware of the potential adverse interactions between herbal supplements and analgesic drugs, and take appropriate precautionary measures to avoid their possible occurrences. However, as most of the interaction information available is based on individual case reports, animal studies and in vitro data, further research is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions.

  17. Metabolic and adverse effects of diuretics.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C S

    1999-11-01

    Diuretics are among the most frequently prescribed drugs. They enjoy a very high clinical reputation for safety and efficacy. However, more than 3 decades of clinical investigation have disclosed a number of abnormalities in fluid electrolyte handling, metabolism, and other adverse effects that can complicate therapy with diuretic drugs. Some of these complications are a direct extension of the wanted action of the drug. These include extracellular fluid volume depletion, associated orthostatic hypotension, and prerenal azotemia. Others are not a direct action of the diuretic, but can be explained as an intranephronal compensation to the diuretic action. These include hypokalemia, in part to increased potassium secretion secondary to the enhanced tubular fluid flow and aldosterone secretion induced by diuretic administration. Metabolic abnormalities are usually mild. Hyperglycemia and carbohydrate intolerance have been related to diuretic-induced hypokalemia, which inhibits insulin secretion by the beta cells, and reductions in extracellular fluid volume and cardiac output. This is compounded by increases in catecholamines from sympathetic nerve activity which decrease peripheral glucose utilization. A mild increase in serum cholesterol concentration is seen frequently during initiation of diuretic therapy, but during steady state therapy after 6 to 12 months, values usually return to baseline. Knowledge of the more common adverse effects induced by diuretics helps the physician in predicting patients at risk and taking effective steps to anticipate or treat adverse responses.

  18. Antiepileptic drugs and adverse skin reactions: An update.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Barbara; Lasoń, Władysław; Czuczwar, Stanisław Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    This paper summarizes current views on clinical manifestation, pathogenesis, prognosis and management of antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced adverse skin reactions. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed) and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched. The recent classification, among drug-induced skin injuries, points to Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS), which may be also recognized as a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS). The use of aromatic AEDs, e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, primidone, zonisamide, and lamotrigine is more frequently associated with cutaneous eruption and other signs or symptoms of drug hypersensitivity. There is a high degree of cross-reactivity (40-80%) in patients with hypersensitivity or allergic reactions to AEDs. Pharmacogenetic variations in drug biotransformation may also play a role in inducing these undesired effects. It is suggested that avoidance of specific AEDs in populations at special risk, cautious dose titration and careful monitoring of clinical response and, if applicable, laboratory parameters can minimize the serious consequences of idiosyncratic reactions.

  19. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  20. (1)H-Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced adverse effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Um, So Young; Park, Jung Hyun; Chung, Myeon Woo; Choi, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hwa Jeong

    2016-09-10

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are globally prescribed, exhibit mainly anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects but also can cause adverse effects including gastrointestinal erosions, ulceration, bleeding, and perforation. The purpose of this study was to investigate surrogate biomarkers associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) damage caused by NSAID treatment using pattern recognition analysis of (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra of rat urine. Urine was collected for 5h after oral administration of the following NSAIDs at low or high doses: acetylsalicylic acid (10 or 200mgkg(-1)), diclofenac (0.5 or 15mgkg(-1)), piroxicam (1 or 10mgkg(-1)), indomethacin (1 or 25mgkg(-1)), or ibuprofen (10, or 150mgkg(-1)) as nonselective COX inhibitors and celecoxib (10 or 100mgkg(-1)) as a COX-2 selective inhibitor. The urine was analyzed using 500MHz (1)H NMR for spectral binning and targeted profiling and the level of gastric damage was examined. The nonselective COX inhibitors caused severe gastric damage while no lesions were observed in the celecoxib-treated rats. The (1)H NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04ppm) for global profiling, and a total of 44 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. Multivariate data analyses were performed to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to NSAIDs using partial least square-discrimination analysis (PLS-DA). The (1)H NMR spectra clustered differently according to gastric damage score in global profiling. In targeted profiling, the endogenous metabolites of citrate, allantoin, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, benzoate, glycine, and trimethylamine N-oxide were selected as putative biomarkers for gastric damage caused by NSAIDs. These putative biomarkers might be useful for predicting the risk of adverse effects caused by NSAIDs in the early stage of drug development process.

  1. The Relationship between Psychotropic Drug Use and Suicidal Behavior in Japan: Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Takenoshita, S; Taka, F; Nakao, M; Nomura, K

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Very few studies have explored the adverse effect of psychotropic drugs worldwide. Methods: This study analyzed 1 813 suicide-related drug reports involving 553 patients collected from the Japanese National Adverse Drug Report Database between October 2001 and January 2012 to investigate psychotropic drugs associated with completed suicide vs. other suicide-related behaviors, including ideation and self-injury. The drugs investigated included antidepressants, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, non-benzodiazepine hypnotic agents, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and other drugs. Results: These reports referenced 300 (54.2%) individuals who completed suicide. Adjusting for age, sex, and drugs used, the multivariate model revealed that participants who took antipsychotics were 1.70 times (95% CI, 1.11-2.61) more likely to complete suicide compared with those who did not. All other drugs became non-significant. Compared with those who took only one medication, those prescribed more than 4 drugs were more likely to complete suicide (OR 4.44, 95% CI, 2.40-8.20). Discussion: Antipsychotic drugs and polypharmacy may be regarded as predictors of completed suicide.

  2. Physician access to drug profiles to reduce adverse reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasnoff, William A.; Tomkins, Edward L.; Dunn, Louise M.

    1995-10-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major source of preventable morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly, who use more drugs and are more sensitive to them. The insurance industry has recently addressed this problem through the implementation of drug interaction alerts to pharmacists in conjunction with immediate online claims adjudication for almost 60% of prescriptions (expected to reach 90% within 5 years). These alerts are based on stored patient drug profiles maintained by pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) which are updated whenever prescriptions are filled. While these alerts are very helpful, the pharmacist does not prescribe, resulting in time-consuming and costly delays to contact the physician and remedy potential interactions. We have developed and demonstrated the feasibility of the PINPOINT (Pharmaceutical Information Network for prevention of interactions) system for making the drug profile and interaction information easily available to the physician before the prescription is written. We plan to test the cost-effectiveness of the system in a prospective controlled clinical trial.

  3. Adverse effects of statins - myths and reality.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Iveta; Reiner, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity as well as cardiovascular events in patients with a very high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and also in subjects with high or moderate risk by reducing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Although they are considered to be drugs with a very good safety profile, because of their wide use there are many concerns that their adverse effects might compromise their proven beneficial effects. Therefore this article reviews all the data and provides an evidence- based insight what are the proven adverse effects of statins and what are the "myths" about them. The most important side effects include myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Another side effect is increased activity of liver tests which occurs occasionally and is reversible. However, recent studies even suggest that statin therapy can improve hepatic steatosis. It is beyond any doubt that statins do slightly increase the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in people with two or more components of metabolic syndrome but the cardiovascular benefits of such a treatment by far exceed this risk. Statin therapy has also been associated with some adverse renal effects, eg. acute renal failure, but recent data suggest even a possible protective effect of these drugs on renal dysfunction. Concerns that statins might increase cancer have not been proven. On the contrary, several studies have indicated a possible benefit of these drugs in patients with different types of cancer. Early concerns about cognitive dysfunction and memory loss associated with statins use could not be proven and most recent data even suggest a possible beneficial effect of statins in the prevention of dementia. Systematic reviews and clinical guidelines suggest that the cardiovascular benefits of statins by far out-weight non-cardiovascular harms in patients with cardiovascular risk.

  4. A Survey of Adverse Drug Reactions in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, 232 Canadian family physicians recorded suspected adverse drug reactions (SADRs) in their practices for five months. Patients' age and sex, the drug(s) implicated, type of reaction and any disability were recorded on a card and sent to a central coordinating office each week. The number of SADRs in clinical practice seems to be small. An estimated 300,000 patients were involved in the study, and a total of 314 suspected adverse drug reactions in 314 patients were reported. A proposal is made for a surveillance system for new drugs. Family physicians would monitor all patients taking a drug or group of drugs and matched controls. The status of patients and controls would be recorded regularly and any SADRs reported to a central coordinating centre. PMID:21283495

  5. iADRs: towards online adverse drug reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Yang; Li, He-Yi; Du, Jhih-Wei; Feng, Wen-Yu; Lo, Chiao-Feng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2012-12-01

    Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) is one of the most important issues in the assessment of drug safety. In fact, many adverse drug reactions are not discovered during limited pre-marketing clinical trials; instead, they are only observed after long term post-marketing surveillance of drug usage. In light of this, the detection of adverse drug reactions, as early as possible, is an important topic of research for the pharmaceutical industry. Recently, large numbers of adverse events and the development of data mining technology have motivated the development of statistical and data mining methods for the detection of ADRs. These stand-alone methods, with no integration into knowledge discovery systems, are tedious and inconvenient for users and the processes for exploration are time-consuming. This paper proposes an interactive system platform for the detection of ADRs. By integrating an ADR data warehouse and innovative data mining techniques, the proposed system not only supports OLAP style multidimensional analysis of ADRs, but also allows the interactive discovery of associations between drugs and symptoms, called a drug-ADR association rule, which can be further developed using other factors of interest to the user, such as demographic information. The experiments indicate that interesting and valuable drug-ADR association rules can be efficiently mined.

  6. Medical marijuana patient counseling points for health care professionals based on trends in the medical uses, efficacy, and adverse effects of cannabis-based pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jayesh R; Forrest, Benjamin D; Freeman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a review of the medical uses, efficacy, and adverse effects of the three approved cannabis-based medications and ingested marijuana. A literature review was conducted utilizing key search terms: dronabinol, nabilone, nabiximols, cannabis, marijuana, smoke, efficacy, toxicity, cancer, multiple sclerosis, nausea, vomiting, appetite, pain, glaucoma, and side effects. Abstracts of the included literature were reviewed, analyzed, and organized to identify the strength of evidence in medical use, efficacy, and adverse effects of the approved cannabis-based medications and medical marijuana. A total of 68 abstracts were included for review. Dronabinol's (Marinol) most common medical uses include weight gain, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), and neuropathic pain. Nabiximol's (Sativex) most common medical uses include spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuropathic pain. Nabilone's (Cesamet) most common medical uses include CINV and neuropathic pain. Smoked marijuana's most common medical uses include neuropathic pain and glaucoma. Orally ingested marijuana's most common medical uses include improving sleep, reducing neuropathic pain, and seizure control in MS. In general, all of these agents share similar medical uses. The reported adverse effects of the three cannabis-based medications and marijuana show a major trend in central nervous system (CNS)-related adverse effects along with cardiovascular and respiratory related adverse effects. Marijuana shares similar medical uses with the approved cannabis-based medications dronabinol (Marinol), nabiximols (Sativex), and nabilone (Cesamet), but the efficacy of marijuana for these medical uses has not been fully determined due to limited and conflicting literature. Medical marijuana also has similar adverse effects as the FDA-approved cannabis-based medications mainly consisting of CNS related adverse effects but also including cardiovascular and respiratory

  7. Postmarketing surveillance of adverse drug reactions: problems and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Lortie, F M

    1986-01-01

    The surveillance of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is an unqualified must. However, the optimal means of surveillance is still unclear. Although anecdotal reports are the backbone of an ADR surveillance system, they are not enough. The pharmaceutical industry, academics and regulatory agencies need to expand their efforts in monitoring ADRs. The author discusses the various techniques for counting and evaluating adverse reactions and suggests ways in which the system could be improved. PMID:3719483

  8. [Reported adverse reactions of veterinary drugs and vaccines in 2005].

    PubMed

    Müntener, C R; Bruckner, L; Gassner, B; Demuth, D C; Althaus, F R; Zwahlen, R

    2007-02-01

    We received 105 reports of suspected adverse events (SARs) following the use of veterinary drugs for the year 2005. This corresponds to a 35% increase compared to 2004. Practicing veterinarians sent most of these declarations. 73% of these concerned drugs used on companion animals. Antiparasitic drugs approved for topical use were the most frequently represented group with 48%, followed by drugs used to treat gastrointestinal disorders (11%) and drugs used off-label (14%; other target species or other indication). For the first time 2 declarations concerning the application of permethrin containing spot-on preparations used by mistake on cats were received. An overview of 20 declarations about adverse reactions following application of different vaccines is also presented with emphasis on the problem of fibrosarcoma in cats. We are pleased by the growing interest shown by practicing veterinarians for the vigilance system and hope to further develop this collaboration in the future.

  9. Agomelatine: a review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    More pharmacovigilance data on agomelatine became available in 2012. The main sources of information were surveillance data from the French national monitoring system, EU periodic safety update reports (PSURs), and the European pharmacovigilance database. The principal adverse effects of agomelatine consist of hepatic, pancreatic, neuropsychiatric, muscular and cutaneous disorders. The harms associated with agomelatine, which has no proven efficacy in depression, clearly outweigh the benefits. Until regulatory agencies decide to withdraw agomelatine from the market, it is up to healthcare professionals to protect patients from this unnecessarily dangerous drug.

  10. Adverse Drug Reactions and quality deviations monitored by spontaneous reports

    PubMed Central

    Visacri, Marília Berlofa; de Souza, Cinthia Madeira; Sato, Catarina Miyako Shibata; Granja, Silvia; de Marialva, Mécia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Moriel, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and profile of spontaneous reports of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) and quality deviations in a Brazilian teaching hospital and propose a consistent classification to study quality deviations. Methods This is a descriptive and retrospective study involving the analysis of spontaneous reports of ADRs and quality deviations in 2010. ADRs were classified according to the reaction mechanism, severity, and causality. The drugs were classified according to their therapeutic classes and symptoms according to the affected organ. The quality deviations were classified according to the type of deviation and type of medicine available in the Brazilian market. Results A total of 68 forms were examined; ADRs accounted for 39.7% of the notifications, while quality deviations accounted for 60.3%. ADRs occurred more frequently in men (51.9%) and adults (63.0%). The skin (28.0%) was the most affected organ, while anti-infectives (40.7%) were the therapeutic class that caused the most ADRs. The most common ADRs were type B (74.0%), moderates (37.0%), and probables (55.6%). In relation to quality deviations, the most frequent notifications were breaks, splits and leaks (20.9%) and related to generic drugs (43.9%). Conclusion The classification system to study quality deviations was clear and consistent. This study demonstrated that practices and public policies related to more effective pharmacovigilance need to be implemented so that the number of spontaneous reports increases. PMID:25972731

  11. New concepts in the management of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Bahna, Sami L; Khalili, Barzin

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of drug reactions and their management has changed markedly in recent years with the development of several new concepts. Epidermal cell death seen in Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) may result from Fas-Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) contains anti-Fas antibodies that can abrogate apoptosis. Most studies on IVIG in SJS and TEN reported improvement in arresting disease progression and reduction in time to healing. Furthermore, several studies have dispelled the myth of sulfonamide cross-reactivity. Immune-mediated reactions against antibacterial sulfonamides are directed against two unique side chains that non-antibacterial sulfonamides do not contain. Certain patients seem to have a genetic predisposition for "multiple drug sensitivities." Hence, they may react to several drugs that are not necessarily cross-reacting. Also, multiple studies have shown that IgE-mediated nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cross-reactivity is uncommon. Rather, it is cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 inhibition that results in pseudoallergic reactions to multiple NSAIDs. Several studies have indicated that selective COX-2 inhibitors can be safely administered in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease and NSAID-induced cutaneous reactions, although their use has been curtailed by their cardiovascular side effects. Biological agents, such as infliximab, are being increasingly used for a variety of diseases and have caused adverse reactions in some patients. Studies differ as to whether concomitant immunosuppressive use with infliximab affects the development of drug-specific antibodies and infusion reactions. Successful desensitization protocols have been developed for reactions to some of these agents.

  12. Adverse event detection in drug development: recommendations and obligations beyond phase 3.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Jesse A; Glasser, Susan C; Ellenberg, Susan S

    2008-08-01

    Premarketing studies of drugs, although large enough to demonstrate efficacy and detect common adverse events, cannot reliably detect an increased incidence of rare adverse events or events with significant latency. For most drugs, only about 500 to 3000 participants are studied, for relatively short durations, before a drug is marketed. Systems for assessment of postmarketing adverse events include spontaneous reports, computerized claims or medical record databases, and formal postmarketing studies. We briefly review the strengths and limitations of each. Postmarketing surveillance is essential for developing a full understanding of the balance between benefits and adverse effects. More work is needed in analysis of data from spontaneous reports of adverse effects and automated databases, design of ad hoc studies, and design of economically feasible large randomized studies.

  13. Adverse drug reactions in neonates: could we be documenting more?

    PubMed

    Hawcutt, Daniel B; O'Connor, Olya; Turner, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    Neonates are vulnerable to adverse drug reactions but reports of these events are relatively infrequent. Reporting can be increased by adapting a number of standard techniques to the unique features of neonatal care and pathology. However, clinicians and parents will be reluctant to report information about harms in the absence of mechanisms to ensure that reports affect clinical practice. Improved reporting will depend on education and cultural change that are informed by research about pharmacovigilance in neonatal settings. The efficient use of neonatal adverse drug reaction reports will require harmonization of terminology and interoperable databases.

  14. Mining unexpected temporal associations: applications in detecting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huidong Warren; Chen, Jie; He, Hongxing; Williams, Graham J; Kelman, Chris; O'Keefe, Christine M

    2008-07-01

    In various real-world applications, it is very useful mining unanticipated episodes where certain event patterns unexpectedly lead to outcomes, e.g., taking two medicines together sometimes causing an adverse reaction. These unanticipated episodes are usually unexpected and infrequent, which makes existing data mining techniques, mainly designed to find frequent patterns, ineffective. In this paper, we propose unexpected temporal association rules (UTARs) to describe them. To handle the unexpectedness, we introduce a new interestingness measure, residual-leverage, and develop a novel case-based exclusion technique for its calculation. Combining it with an event-oriented data preparation technique to handle the infrequency, we develop a new algorithm MUTARC to find pairwise UTARs. The MUTARC is applied to generate adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from real-world healthcare administrative databases. It reliably shortlists not only six known ADRs, but also another ADR, flucloxacillin possibly causing hepatitis, which our algorithm designers and experiment runners have not known before the experiments. The MUTARC performs much more effectively than existing techniques. This paper clearly illustrates the great potential along the new direction of ADR signal generation from healthcare administrative databases.

  15. Effects of SULT1A1 Copy Number Variation on Estrogen Concentration and Tamoxifen-Associated Adverse Drug Reactions in Premenopausal Thai Breast Cancer Patients: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Charoenchokthavee, Wanaporn; Ayudhya, Duangchit Panomvana Na; Sriuranpong, Virote; Areepium, Nutthada

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a pharmacological estrogen inhibitor that binds to the estrogen receptor (ER) in breast cells. However, it shows an estrogenic effect in other organs, which causes adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) enzyme encoded by the SULT1A1 gene is involved in estrogen metabolism. Previous research has suggested that the SULT1A1 copy number is linked with the plasma estradiol (E2) concentration. Here, a total of 34 premenopausal breast cancer patients, selected from the Thai Tamoxifen (TTAM) Project, were screened for their SULT1A1 copy number, plasma E2 concentration and ADRs. The mean age was 44.3±11.1 years, and they were subtyped as ER+/ progesterone receptor (PR) + (28 patients), ER+/ PR- (5 patients) and ER-/PR- (1 patient). Three patients reported ADRs, which were irregular menstruation (2 patients) and vaginal discharge (1 patient). Most (33) patients had two SULT1A1 copies, with one patient having three copies. The median plasma E2 concentration was 1,575.6 (IQR 865.4) pg/ml. Patients with ADRs had significantly higher plasma E2 concentrations than those patients without ADRs (p = 0.014). The plasma E2 concentration was numerically higher in the patient with three SULT1A1 copies, but this lacked statistical significance.

  16. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    PubMed

    Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Park, Kyounghoon; Yang, Bo Ram; Lee, Joongyub; Jin, Xue Mei; Park, Byung Joo

    2016-09-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability.

  17. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  18. [Management of adverse effects with antituberculosis chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Wada, Masako

    2011-02-01

    Tuberculosis has now become a curable disease with chemotherapy. So it is natural that the present issues in tuberculosis management are focused on how to complete standard chemotherapy. In this context, management of adverse effects constitutes an essential part of antituberculosis chemotherapy, as well as directly observed therapy. In this symposium, discussions were held about three major subjects on this issue. First, hepatotoxicity develops frequently and has sometimes fatal outcome, which makes it the most problematic adverse effect. "Management of hepatotoxicity during antituberculosis chemotherapy" was published by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis (JST) in 2006. Dr. Shinsho Yoshiba evaluated this recommendation and pointed out that the criteria for discontinuation of drug based on AST, ALT and bilirubin levels is too sensitive and the concept of predicting fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is lacking. He stressed the importance of monitoring serum prothrombin time for predicting FHF. Next, allergic drug reaction such as fever or skin rash often causes distress, although rarely fatal. As isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP) are key drugs for the cure, readministration of these drugs is often attempted by desensitization therapy. "Recommendation about desensitization therapy of antituberculosis drugs" was also published by JST in 1997. Dr. Yoshihiro Kobashi reported high success rates of 79 percent for INH and 75 percent for RFP according to this recommendation. He also reported correlated factor with the success, such as the longer period from the discontinuation to the desensitization therapy and lower doses of drugs at starting desensitization. Finally, we sometimes experience transient worsening of radiographical findings and general symptoms during antituberculosis chemotherapy. This is presumed to be due to allergic reaction to dead bacilli without requiring discontinuation of the drug. Differential diagnosis includes drug-induced pneumonia requring

  19. Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions: A Clinicoepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Riyaz, Najeeba; Khader, Anza; Rajan, Uma; Binitha, Manikoth P; Sureshan, Deepthi N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Drug eruptions range from transient erythema to the life threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) that encompass Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms complex (DRESS). Aims and Objectives: To study the clinical and epidemiological aspects of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR). Materials and Methods: Ethical clearance was obtained from the institutional ethics committee. All patients admitted in the Dermatology ward of our tertiary care hospital with CADR (those who fit in the category of probable or possible drug reaction as per WHO casuality assessment) from first September 2011 to 31st August 2012 were included in this cross sectional study after obtaining written informed consent. The drug reaction patterns observed in the study population were determined and the common offending drugs were identified. Results: In the study, population of males outnumbered females and the majority were between 46 and 60 years of age. The commonest reaction pattern observed was SJS- TEN spectrum of illness and aromatic anticonvulsants were the common offending drugs. Prompt withdrawal of the culprit drug and administration of systemic steroids with or without I/V Ig reverted the adverse reaction in all except one. Conclusion: Severe drug reactions predominated as the study population was comprised of inpatients of a tertiary referral centre. Though; previous authors had reported a mortality rate of up to 20% in DRESS, all our patients with this reaction pattern, responded well to treatment. The mortality rate among TEN cases was much lower than the previous reports. Early diagnosis, prompt withdrawal of the suspected drug, careful monitoring for development of complications and immediate intervention can improve the prognosis of CADR. PMID:25657416

  20. [Photodegradation of chlorpromazine, a drug-related adverse event].

    PubMed

    Chabi, Yossounon; Brahim, Kheira; Da Costa, Maryline; Caffin, Anne-Gaëlle; Camus, Gisèle; Paillet, Michel; Bohand, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The photodegradation of an active substance during treatment is a rare drug-related adverse event which can sometimes have serious consequences. Health professionals must be aware of the specific storage and administration instructions with regard to chlorpromazine and ensure that they are respected.

  1. [Adverse drug reactions reporting is helping "non substituable" prescription!].

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Julien; Bagheri, Haleh; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In August 2012, general practitioners of Haute- Garonne received a letter from Health insurance system, informing that prescriptions could be endorsed by "not substituable" after reporting an adverse drug reactions (ADR). Compared to an equivalent period before this letter, we observed an increase of ADRs reports for generics, mainly concerning gastrointestinal ADR and lack of efficacy.

  2. An adverse drug interaction of haloperidol with levodopa.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Jisha M; Ramesh, Madhan; Parthasarathi, Gurumurthy; Raman, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Drug interactions are known to play a significant role in the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) both in the community and in hospitals. Both the newer atypical antipsychotics and their more traditional counterparts are subject to drug - drug interactions amongst themselves, with other psychotropics, and with the agents used in the treatment of various physical ailments. The most common interactions encountered in clinical practice are pharmacodynamic in nature. It is well established that antipsychotic drugs reduce the efficacy of levodopa in parkinson's disease by blockade of dopamine receptors in the corpus striatum. The case reported here illustrates a common pharmacodynamic drug interaction of haloperidol with levodopa in a 60-year-old female patient.

  3. A time-indexed reference standard of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Odgers, David; Gaskin, Greg; DuMouchel, William; Winnenburg, Rainer; Bodenreider, Olivier; Ripple, Anna; Szarfman, Ana; Sorbello, Alfred; Horvitz, Eric; White, Ryen W; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-11-11

    Undetected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) pose a major burden on the health system. Data mining methodologies designed to identify signals of novel ADRs are of deep importance for drug safety surveillance. The development and evaluation of these methodologies requires proper reference benchmarks. While progress has recently been made in developing such benchmarks, our understanding of the performance characteristics of the data mining methodologies is limited because existing benchmarks do not support prospective performance evaluations. We address this shortcoming by providing a reference standard to support prospective performance evaluations. The reference standard was systematically curated from drug labeling revisions, such as new warnings, which were issued and communicated by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2013. The reference standard includes 62 positive test cases and 75 negative controls, and covers 44 drugs and 38 events. We provide usage guidance and empirical support for the reference standard by applying it to analyze two data sources commonly mined for drug safety surveillance.

  4. A pipeline to extract drug-adverse event pairs from multiple data sources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacovigilance aims to uncover and understand harmful side-effects of drugs, termed adverse events (AEs). Although the current process of pharmacovigilance is very systematic, the increasing amount of information available in specialized health-related websites as well as the exponential growth in medical literature presents a unique opportunity to supplement traditional adverse event gathering mechanisms with new-age ones. Method We present a semi-automated pipeline to extract associations between drugs and side effects from traditional structured adverse event databases, enhanced by potential drug-adverse event pairs mined from user-comments from health-related websites and MEDLINE abstracts. The pipeline was tested using a set of 12 drugs representative of two previous studies of adverse event extraction from health-related websites and MEDLINE abstracts. Results Testing the pipeline shows that mining non-traditional sources helps substantiate the adverse event databases. The non-traditional sources not only contain the known AEs, but also suggest some unreported AEs for drugs which can then be analyzed further. Conclusion A semi-automated pipeline to extract the AE pairs from adverse event databases as well as potential AE pairs from non-traditional sources such as text from MEDLINE abstracts and user-comments from health-related websites is presented. PMID:24559132

  5. Successful Drug Development Despite Adverse Preclinical Findings Part 2: Examples

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Junji; Plassmann, Stephanie; Hayashi, Makoto; Prentice, David E.

    2010-01-01

    To illustrate the process of addressing adverse preclinical findings (APFs) as outlined in the first part of this review, a number of cases with unexpected APF in toxicity studies with drug candidates is discussed in this second part. The emphasis is on risk characterization, especially regarding the mode of action (MoA), and risk evaluation regarding relevance for man. While severe APFs such as retinal toxicity may turn out to be of little human relevance, minor findings particularly in early toxicity studies, such as vasculitis, may later pose a real problem. Rodents are imperfect models for endocrine APFs, non-rodents for human cardiac effects. Liver and kidney toxicities are frequent, but they can often be monitored in man and do not necessarily result in early termination of drug candidates. Novel findings such as the unusual lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and the bones presented in this review can be difficult to explain. It will be shown that well known issues such as phospholipidosis and carcinogenicity by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The latter is of particular interest because the new PPAR α and dual α/γ agonists resulted in a change of the safety paradigm established with the older PPAR α agonists. General toxicologists and pathologists need some understanding of the principles of genotoxicity and reproductive toxicity testing. Both types of preclinical toxicities are major APF and clinical monitoring is difficult, generally leading to permanent use restrictions. PMID:22272032

  6. The effectiveness of computerized order entry at reducing preventable adverse drug events and medication errors in hospital settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act subsidizes implementation by hospitals of electronic health records with computerized provider order entry (CPOE), which may reduce patient injuries caused by medication errors (preventable adverse drug events, pADEs). Effects on pADEs have not been rigorously quantified, and effects on medication errors have been variable. The objectives of this analysis were to assess the effectiveness of CPOE at reducing pADEs in hospital-related settings, and examine reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors. Methods Articles were identified using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Econlit, web-based databases, and bibliographies of previous systematic reviews (September 2013). Eligible studies compared CPOE with paper-order entry in acute care hospitals, and examined diverse pADEs or medication errors. Studies on children or with limited event-detection methods were excluded. Two investigators extracted data on events and factors potentially associated with effectiveness. We used random effects models to pool data. Results Sixteen studies addressing medication errors met pooling criteria; six also addressed pADEs. Thirteen studies used pre-post designs. Compared with paper-order entry, CPOE was associated with half as many pADEs (pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.47, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71) and medication errors (RR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.60). Regarding reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors, five intervention factors and two contextual factors were sufficiently reported to support subgroup analyses or meta-regression. Differences between commercial versus homegrown systems, presence and sophistication of clinical decision support, hospital-wide versus limited implementation, and US versus non-US studies were not significant, nor was timing of publication. Higher baseline rates of medication errors predicted greater reductions (P < 0.001). Other context and

  7. Comparing probabilistic and descriptive analyses of time-dose-toxicity relationship for determining no-observed-adverse-effect level in drug development.

    PubMed

    Glatard, Anaïs; Berges, Aliénor; Sahota, Tarjinder; Ambery, Claire; Osborne, Jan; Smith, Randall; Hénin, Emilie; Chen, Chao

    2015-10-15

    The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of a drug defined from animal studies is important for inferring a maximal safe dose in human. However, several issues are associated with its concept, determination and application. It is confined to the actual doses used in the study; becomes lower with increasing sample size or dose levels; and reflects the risk level seen in the experiment rather than what may be relevant for human. We explored a pharmacometric approach in an attempt to address these issues. We first used simulation to examine the behaviour of the NOAEL values as determined by current common practice; and then fitted the probability of toxicity as a function of treatment duration and dose to data collected from all applicable toxicology studies of a test compound. Our investigation was in the context of an irreversible toxicity that is detected at the end of the study. Simulations illustrated NOAEL's dependency on experimental factors such as dose and sample size, as well as the underlying uncertainty. Modelling the probability as a continuous function of treatment duration and dose simultaneously to data from multiple studies allowed the estimation of the dose, along with its confidence interval, for a maximal risk level that might be deemed as acceptable for human. The model-based data integration also reconciled between-study inconsistency and explicitly provided maximised estimation confidence. Such alternative NOAEL determination method should be explored for its more efficient data use, more quantifiable insight to toxic doses, and the potential for more relevant animal-to-human translation.

  8. Genetic predisposition to adverse drug reactions in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Empey, Philip E

    2010-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a significant public health problem that leads to mortality, hospital admissions, an increased length of stay, increasing healthcare costs, and withdrawal of drugs from market. Intensive care unit patients are particularly vulnerable and are at an elevated risk. Critical care practitioners, regulatory agencies, and the pharmaceutical industry aggressively seek biomarkers to mitigate patient risk. The rapidly expanding field of pharmacogenomics focuses on the genetic contributions to the variability in drug response. Polymorphisms may explain why some groups of patients have the expected response to pharmacotherapy whereas others experience adverse drug reactions. Historically, genetic association studies have focused on characterizing the effects of variation in drug metabolizing enzymes on pharmacokinetics. Recent work has investigated drug transporters and the variants of genes encoding drug targets, both intended and unintended, that comprise pharmacodynamics. This has led to an appreciation of the role that genetics plays in adverse drug reactions that are either predictable extensions of a drug's known therapeutic effect or idiosyncratic.This review presents the evidence for a genetic predisposition to adverse drug reactions, focusing on gene variants producing alterations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in intensive care unit patients. Genetic biomarkers with the strongest associations to adverse drug reaction risk in the intensive care unit are presented along with the medications involved. Variant genotypes and phenotypes, allelic frequencies in different populations, and clinical studies are discussed. The article also presents the current recommendations for pharmacogenetic testing in clinical practice and explores the drug, patient, research study design, regulatory, and practical issues that presently limit more widespread implementation.

  9. [Adverse Event Trends Associated with Over-the-counter Drugs: Data Mining of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    PubMed

    Umetsu, Ryogo; Abe, Junko; Ueda, Natsumi; Kato, Yamato; Nakayama, Yoko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs play an important role in self-medication. To ensure patient safety, pharmacists should ask patients to pay attention to possible adverse events (AE) associated with OTC drugs and educate patients about the symptoms related to those AEs. The aims of the present study were as follows: (1) to assess the tendency of AEs to occur with OTC drug use in Japan; (2) to detect a safety signal for OTC drugs using the reporting odds ratio (ROR); and (3) to evaluate clustery features, which include suspected drugs and therapeutic classifications, and safety signal indices (number of reports and the ROR), using cluster analysis. The number of reports of AEs following use of combination cold remedy, antipyretic and analgesic remedy, and herbal medicine was 1007, 566, and 221, respectively. We set the cluster number at five; clustery features obtained were as follows: (1) high reporting rate for skin and subcutaneous tissue disorder AEs was the largest group related to combination cold remedy; (2) high reporting rate for nervous system disorder AEs including dizziness was the second largest group. The same medicinal ingredient may demonstrate similar tendencies of the occurrence of AEs and similar clustery features in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database. Our analysis of AEs associated with OTC drugs may be useful for pharmacists and patients alike. Further studies are required to draw better-informed conclusions.

  10. Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2009-10-17

    For over two decades, cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, has been the most widely used illicit drug by young people in high-income countries, and has recently become popular on a global scale. Epidemiological research during the past 10 years suggests that regular use of cannabis during adolescence and into adulthood can have adverse effects. Epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies have established an association between cannabis use and adverse outcomes. We focus on adverse health effects of greatest potential public health interest-that is, those that are most likely to occur and to affect a large number of cannabis users. The most probable adverse effects include a dependence syndrome, increased risk of motor vehicle crashes, impaired respiratory function, cardiovascular disease, and adverse effects of regular use on adolescent psychosocial development and mental health.

  11. Patient knowledge on reporting adverse drug reactions in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Staniszewska, Anna; Dąbrowska-Bender, Marta; Olejniczak, Dominik; Duda-Zalewska, Aneta; Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to assess patient knowledge on reporting of adverse drug reactions. Materials and methods A prospective study was conducted among 200 patients. The study was based on an original survey composed of 15 single- and multiple-choice questions. The study involved individuals who have experienced adverse reactions as well as individuals who have never experienced any adverse reactions; people over the age of 18; literate; residing in Mazowieckie Voivodeship, who have not been diagnosed with any disease that could compromise their logical thinking skills. Results The respondents who lived in the city had a greater knowledge compared to the respondents who lived in the countryside (Pearson’s χ2=47.70, P=0.0013). The respondents who lived in the city were also more statistically likely to provide a correct answer to the question about the type of adverse reactions to be reported (Pearson’s χ2=50.66, P=0.012). Statistically significant associations were found between the place of residence of the respondents and the correct answer to the question about the data that must be included in the report on adverse reactions (Pearson’s χ2=11.7, P<0.0001). PMID:28096661

  12. Points of view on adverse drug reactions terminology.

    PubMed

    Benichou, C; Castle, W

    1998-01-01

    Global management of drug safety data is the best way to make the detection and validation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) earlier. Centralization needs a previous standardization, of which terminology is a crucial component. ADR terminology must be designed so as to enable users to know exactly what is covered by each term regarding the nature of the reaction and its significance for public health. A worldwide standardized terminology for all drug reporting purposes is currently being developed by the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. However, practical definitions of medical terms will be necessary and could be developed by specialists on drug safety in collaboration with specialists of different system organs, as has already been achieved for some of them.

  13. Mixed-effects Poisson regression analysis of adverse event reports

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Segawa, Eisuke; Karabatsos, George; Amatya, Anup K.; Bhaumik, Dulal K.; Brown, C. Hendricks; Kapur, Kush; Marcus, Sue M.; Hur, Kwan; Mann, J. John

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A new statistical methodology is developed for the analysis of spontaneous adverse event (AE) reports from post-marketing drug surveillance data. The method involves both empirical Bayes (EB) and fully Bayes estimation of rate multipliers for each drug within a class of drugs, for a particular AE, based on a mixed-effects Poisson regression model. Both parametric and semiparametric models for the random-effect distribution are examined. The method is applied to data from Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) on the relationship between antidepressants and suicide. We obtain point estimates and 95 per cent confidence (posterior) intervals for the rate multiplier for each drug (e.g. antidepressants), which can be used to determine whether a particular drug has an increased risk of association with a particular AE (e.g. suicide). Confidence (posterior) intervals that do not include 1.0 provide evidence for either significant protective or harmful associations of the drug and the adverse effect. We also examine EB, parametric Bayes, and semiparametric Bayes estimators of the rate multipliers and associated confidence (posterior) intervals. Results of our analysis of the FDA AERS data revealed that newer antidepressants are associated with lower rates of suicide adverse event reports compared with older antidepressants. We recommend improvements to the existing AERS system, which are likely to improve its public health value as an early warning system. PMID:18404622

  14. Rare and very rare adverse effects of clozapine

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Pasquale; Gaetano, Raffaele; Caroleo, Mariarita; Cerminara, Gregorio; Maida, Francesca; Bruno, Antonio; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria; Moreno, Maria Jose Jaén; Russo, Emilio; Segura-García, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine (CLZ) is the drug of choice for the treatment of resistant schizophrenia; however, its suitable use is limited by the complex adverse effects’ profile. The best-described adverse effects in the literature are represented by agranulocytosis, myocarditis, sedation, weight gain, hypotension, and drooling; nevertheless, there are other known adverse effects that psychiatrists should readily recognize and manage. This review covers the “rare” and “very rare” known adverse effects of CLZ, which have been accurately described in literature. An extensive search on the basis of predefined criteria was made using CLZ and its combination with adverse effects as keywords in electronic databases. Data show the association between the use of CLZ and uncommon adverse effects, including ischemic colitis, paralytic ileus, hematemesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, priapism, urinary incontinence, pityriasis rosea, intertriginous erythema, pulmonary thromboembolism, pseudo-pheochromocytoma, periorbital edema, and parotitis, which are influenced by other variables including age, early diagnosis, and previous/current pharmacological therapies. Some of these adverse effects, although unpredictable, are often manageable if promptly recognized and treated. Others are serious and potentially life-threatening. However, an adequate knowledge of the drug, clinical vigilance, and rapid intervention can drastically reduce the morbidity and mortality related to CLZ treatment. PMID:26273202

  15. Analysis of Adverse Drug Reactions of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Psychiatry OPD

    PubMed Central

    Piparva, Kiran G.; Buch, J. G.; Chandrani, Kalpesh V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Novel atypical antipsychotics are superior to conventional antipsychotics as they significantly reduce both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and have lower risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). However, these drugs have separate set of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Therefore, this study was carried out to assess these ADRs, which can have impact on long-term compliance and achieving successful treatment. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of analysis of ADR of atypical antipsychotic drugs was carried out in the psychiatry outpatient department. Patients of psychotic disorder (any age, either sex), who were prescribed atypical antipsychotic drugs, were included. Those who were prescribed conventional antipsychotics or combinations of antipsychotics were excluded from the study. Apart from spontaneously reported ADRs, a questionnaire related to the likely ADR was used and patients’ responses were recorded in the case record form. Results: Totally 93 ADRs were recorded from 84 prescriptions. Majority of the ADRs (82 out of 93) were seen with risperidone and olanzepine, as they were the commonly prescribed drugs. Weight gain, dizziness, sleep disturbance and appetite disturbance accounted for nearly 78% of the total events. With risperidone (at 4–6 mg/day) and olanzepine (at 10–15 mg/day), gastrointestinal and sleep disturbance were observed in the initial (within 7 days to 2–3 months after treatment) course of treatment, while EPS, fatigue, seizure, increased frequency of micturition and dizziness were observed after long-term (3–9 months) use. Conclusion: The present study adds to the existing information on the prevalence of adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Role of active surveillance in post-marketing phase is also emphasized. PMID:22345840

  16. Treatment with Tacrolimus and Sirolimus Reveals No Additional Adverse Effects on Human Islets In Vitro Compared to Each Drug Alone but They Are Reduced by Adding Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Kloster-Jensen, Kristine; Sahraoui, Afaf; Vethe, Nils Tore; Korsgren, Olle; Bergan, Stein; Foss, Aksel; Scholz, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Tacrolimus and sirolimus are important immunosuppressive drugs used in human islet transplantation; however, they are linked to detrimental effects on islets and reduction of long-term graft function. Few studies investigate the direct effects of these drugs combined in parallel with single drug exposure. Human islets were treated with or without tacrolimus (30 μg/L), sirolimus (30 μg/L), or a combination thereof for 24 hrs. Islet function as well as apoptosis was assessed by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and Cell Death ELISA. Proinflammatory cytokines were analysed by qRT-PCR and Bio-Plex. Islets exposed to the combination of sirolimus and tacrolimus were treated with or without methylprednisolone (1000 μg/L) and the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines was investigated. We found the following: (i) No additive reduction in function and viability in islets existed when tacrolimus and sirolimus were combined compared to the single drug. (ii) Increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines mRNA and protein levels in islets took place. (iii) Methylprednisolone significantly decreased the proinflammatory response in islets induced by the drug combination. Although human islets are prone to direct toxic effect of tacrolimus and sirolimus, we found no additive effects of the drug combination. Short-term exposure of glucocorticoids could effectively reduce the proinflammatory response in human islets induced by the combination of tacrolimus and sirolimus. PMID:26885529

  17. Improving the reporting of adverse drug reactions in the hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Richard; Frassetto, Lynda; Tsourounis, Candy; Segal, Eleanor S; Kim, Stephanie

    2010-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is perceived by the public as having a substantial responsibility to ensure drug safety; however, the FDA has limited resources for active surveillance and relies on voluntary reporting of adverse events and potential adverse drug reactions. Studies have shown that underreporting of adverse events and adverse drug reactions is widespread. Furthermore, a review of several studies demonstrates that most adverse drug reactions are reported by pharmacists and nurses, with physicians reporting the fewest. The hospital setting, with its clearly defined patient population observed around the clock, is an ideal setting in which to identify potential adverse drug reaction signals and to report them to either the drug manufacturer or the FDA. In this article we describe the present system for addressing adverse events, obstacles to reporting them, and the important role any hospital physician could play in reporting adverse events and potential adverse drug reactions.

  18. Ofloxacin Induced Angioedema: A Rare Adverse Drug Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Kumar, Raj; Wani, Umar Rasool

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) to a commonly prescribed anti-microbial can pose a major public health problem. The authors report a rare case of 24-year-old young lady who presented with angioedema of lips after ingestion of Ofloxacin, prescribed to her for treatment of loose motions. Fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed antibiotics for various disease conditions. The history, clinical examination and normal laboratory parameters led to the diagnosis of ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction and the patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids and antihistamines. The hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones are rare with an incidence of 0.4% to 2%. The pharmacovigilance program and self-reporting of all the ADR’s by the health care workers can help in ensuring the judicious use of the drug, drug safety and thus decrease the associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:28050397

  19. Adverse drug reactions in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Witcher, Robert; Dzierba, Amy L.; Kim, Catherine; Smithburger, Pamela L.; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves survival and neurologic function in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Many medications used to support TH have altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during this treatment. It is unknown if or at what frequency the medications used during TH cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac arrest and treated with TH from January 2009 to June 2012 at two urban, university-affiliated, tertiary-care medical centres. Medications commonly used during TH were screened for association with significant ADRs (grade 3 or greater per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) using three published ADR detection instruments. Results: A total of 229 patients were included, the majority being males with median age of 62 presenting with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pulseless electrical activity or asystole. The most common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. There were 670 possible ADRs and 69 probable ADRs identified. Of the 670 possible ADRs, propofol, fentanyl, and acetaminophen were the most common drugs associated with ADRs. Whereas fentanyl, insulin, and propofol were the most common drugs associated with a probable ADR. Patients were managed with TH for a median of 22 hours, with 38% of patients surviving to hospital discharge. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TH after cardiac arrest frequently experience possible adverse reactions associated with medications and the corresponding laboratory abnormalities are significant. There is a need for judicious use and close monitoring of drugs in the setting of TH until recommendations for dose adjustments are available to help prevent ADRs.

  20. Patient stratification and identification of adverse event correlations in the space of 1190 drug related adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Roitmann, Eva; Eriksson, Robert; Brunak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: New pharmacovigilance methods are needed as a consequence of the morbidity caused by drugs. We exploit fine-grained drug related adverse event information extracted by text mining from electronic medical records (EMRs) to stratify patients based on their adverse events and to determine adverse event co-occurrences. Methods: We analyzed the similarity of adverse event profiles of 2347 patients extracted from EMRs from a mental health center in Denmark. The patients were clustered based on their adverse event profiles and the similarities were presented as a network. The set of adverse events in each main patient cluster was evaluated. Co-occurrences of adverse events in patients (p-value < 0.01) were identified and presented as well. Results: We found that each cluster of patients typically had a most distinguishing adverse event. Examination of the co-occurrences of adverse events in patients led to the identification of potentially interesting adverse event correlations that may be further investigated as well as provide further patient stratification opportunities. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach in pharmacovigilance to stratify patients based on fine-grained adverse event profiles, which also makes it possible to identify adverse event correlations. Used on larger data sets, this data-driven method has the potential to reveal unknown patterns concerning adverse event occurrences. PMID:25249979

  1. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nicholas; Pollack, Charles; Butkerait, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. PMID:26203254

  2. Association between the insulin-induced gene 2 (INSIG2) and weight gain in a German sample of antipsychotic-treated schizophrenic patients: perturbation of SREBP-controlled lipogenesis in drug-related metabolic adverse effects?

    PubMed

    Le Hellard, S; Theisen, F M; Haberhausen, M; Raeder, M B; Fernø, J; Gebhardt, S; Hinney, A; Remschmidt, H; Krieg, J C; Mehler-Wex, C; Nöthen, M M; Hebebrand, J; Steen, V M

    2009-03-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are nowadays the most widely used drugs to treat schizophrenia and other psychosis. Unfortunately, some of them can cause major metabolic adverse effects, such as weight gain, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. The underlying lipogenic mechanisms of the antipsychotic drugs are not known, but several studies have focused on a central effect in the hypothalamic control of appetite regulation and energy expenditure. In a functional convergent genomic approach we recently used a cellular model and demonstrated that orexigenic antipsychotics that induce weight gain activate the expression of lipid biosynthesis genes controlled by the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors. We therefore hypothesized that the major genes involved in the SREBP activation of fatty acids and cholesterol production (SREBF1, SREBF2, SCAP, INSIG1 and INSIG2) would be strong candidate genes for interindividual variation in drug-induced weight gain. We genotyped a total of 44 HapMap-selected tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms in a sample of 160 German patients with schizophrenia that had been monitored with respect to changes in body mass index during antipsychotic drug treatment. We found a strong association (P=0.0003-0.00007) between three markers localized within or near the INSIG2 gene (rs17587100, rs10490624 and rs17047764) and antipsychotic-related weight gain. Our finding is supported by the recent involvement of the INSIG2 gene in obesity in the general population and implicates SREBP-controlled lipogenesis in drug-induced metabolic adverse effects.

  3. Pattern mining for extraction of mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions from user comments.

    PubMed

    Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela H

    2011-01-01

    Rapid growth of online health social networks has enabled patients to communicate more easily with each other. This way of exchange of opinions and experiences has provided a rich source of information about drugs and their effectiveness and more importantly, their possible adverse reactions. We developed a system to automatically extract mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) from user reviews about drugs in social network websites by mining a set of language patterns. The system applied association rule mining on a set of annotated comments to extract the underlying patterns of colloquial expressions about adverse effects. The patterns were tested on a set of unseen comments to evaluate their performance. We reached to precision of 70.01% and recall of 66.32% and F-measure of 67.96%.

  4. Pattern Mining for Extraction of mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions from User Comments

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela H.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid growth of online health social networks has enabled patients to communicate more easily with each other. This way of exchange of opinions and experiences has provided a rich source of information about drugs and their effectiveness and more importantly, their possible adverse reactions. We developed a system to automatically extract mentions of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) from user reviews about drugs in social network websites by mining a set of language patterns. The system applied association rule mining on a set of annotated comments to extract the underlying patterns of colloquial expressions about adverse effects. The patterns were tested on a set of unseen comments to evaluate their performance. We reached to precision of 70.01% and recall of 66.32% and F-measure of 67.96%. PMID:22195162

  5. Adverse drug reactions and off-label drug use in paediatric outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Horen, Benjamin; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lapeyre-mestre, Maryse

    2002-01-01

    Aims To investigate the potential relationship between off-label drug use and increased risk of adverse drug reactions in paediatric outpatients. Methods A prospective pharmacovigilance survey of drug prescribing in office based paediatricians was carried out in Haute-Garonne County (south west of France). Results The study involved a sample of 1419 children under 16 years old. Forty-two percent of patients were exposed to at least one off-label prescription. The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 1.41% (95% CI 0.79, 2.11). Off-label drug use was significantly associated with adverse drug reactions (relative risk 3.44; 95% CI 1.26, 9.38), particularly when it was due to an indication different than that defined in the Summary Product Characteristics (relative risk 4.42; 95% CI 1.60, 12.25). Conclusions Our data suggest an increasing risk of adverse drug reactions related to off-label drug use. This risk would be acceptable if further studies prove the potential benefit of such a drug use. PMID:12492616

  6. A prospective study of adverse drug reactions in hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Mir, Inocencia; García-López, Mercedes; Palop, Vicente; Ferrer, José M; Rubio, Elena; Morales-Olivas, Francisco J

    1999-01-01

    Aims There are few publications of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among paediatric patients, though ADR incidence is usually stated to be higher during the first year of life and in male patients. We have carried out a prospective study to assess the extent, pattern and profile risk for ADRs in hospitalized patients between 1 and 24 months of age. Methods An intensive events monitoring scheme was used. A total of 512 successive admissions to two medical paediatric wards (47 beds) were analysed. The hospital records were screened daily during two periods (summer, 105 days and winter, 99 days), and adverse clinical events observed were recorded. Results A total of 282 events were detected; of these, 112 were considered to be manifestations of ADRs. The cumulative incidence was 16.6%, no differences being observed between periods. Although there were no differences between patients under and over 12 months of age, risk was found to be significantly higher among girls compared with boys (RR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.03–2.52). The gastro-intestinal system was most frequently affected. The therapeutic group most commonly implicated was anti-infective drugs and vaccines (41.5%). The ADRs were mild or moderate in over 90% of cases. A consistent relationship was noted between the number of drugs administered and the incidence of ADRs. Conclusions Hospitalized patients exhibited an ADR risk profile that included female sex and the number of drugs administered. No particular age predisposition was observed. The most commonly prescribed drugs are those most often implicated in ADRs in paediatric patients. PMID:10383547

  7. Data-mining-based detection of adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Chazard, Emmanuel; Preda, Cristian; Merlin, Béatrice; Ficheur, Grégoire; Beuscart, Régis

    2009-01-01

    Every year adverse drug events (ADEs) are known to be responsible for 98,000 deaths in the USA. Classical methods rely on report statements, expert knowledge, and staff operated record review. One of our objectives, in the PSIP project framework, is to use data mining (e.g., decision trees) to electronically identify situations leading to risk of ADEs. 10,500 hospitalization records from Denmark and France were used. 500 rules were automatically obtained, which are currently being validated by experts. A decision support system to prevent ADEs is then to be developed. The article examines a decision tree and the rules in the field of vitamin K antagonists.

  8. Ayurvedic management of adverse drug reactions with Shvitrahara Varti

    PubMed Central

    Jadav, Hasmukh R.; Ghetiya, Hitesh; Prashanth, B.; Galib; Patgiri, B. J.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADR) are an expression that describes harm associated with the use of medications at therapeutic dose. Traditional medicines also can develop ADRs due to their improper use. Shvitrahara Varti, one of such medicines holds Bakuchi as a component and is to be used judiciously. Furanocoumarins like psoralen present in Bakuchi makes skin hypersensitive and causes phytophotodermatitis in few cases. Hence, one should be careful while using medicines that contain Bakuchi. One such case is observed, where extensive reactions with application of Shvitrahara Varti were noticed and managed with Ayurvedic treatment. PMID:24250129

  9. Automatic adverse drug events detection using letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    We present and test the intuition that letters to the editor in journals carry early signals of adverse drug events (ADEs). Surprisingly these letters have not yet been exploited for automatic ADE detection unlike for example, clinical records and PubMed. Part of the challenge is that it is not easy to access the full-text of letters (for the most part these do not appear in PubMed). Also letters are likely underrated in comparison with full articles. Besides demonstrating that this intuition holds we contribute techniques for post market drug surveillance. Specifically, we test an automatic approach for ADE detection from letters using off-the-shelf machine learning tools. We also involve natural language processing for feature definitions. Overall we achieve high accuracy in our experiments and our method also works well on a second new test set. Our results encourage us to further pursue this line of research.

  10. Adverse drug reactions: a hospital pharmacy-based reporting scheme.

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, P A; Irvin, L E; Smith, J C; Orme, M L; Breckenridge, A M

    1989-01-01

    A pharmacy-based adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting scheme, using pharmacists, nurses and medical practitioners as initiators of reports, was set up at the end of 1984 in the Royal Liverpool Hospital in order to encourage reporting. New reports were inspected at weekly intervals by a staff pharmacist, and a clinical pharmacologist. Reports were forwarded to the Committee on Safety of Medicines if the reaction was considered to be serious by the clinicians, or the ADR team or involved 'black triangle' drugs. The total number of ADR reports was increased eightfold by the introduction of the scheme (from 14 in 1984 to 76, 102 and 94 in 1985, 1986 and 1987 respectively), and this rate of reporting has been sustained. PMID:2775609

  11. [International reporting of adverse drug reactions. Final report of CIOMS ADR Working Group].

    PubMed

    Royer, R J; Benichou, C

    1991-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences, a working group composed of representatives of seven multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers and six regulatory authorities developed and implemented a standardized method for reporting post-approval adverse drug reactions (ADR). The method is based on a set of uniform definitions and procedures and a single reporting form, and has been demonstrated to be feasible and effective. Regulators and manufacturers, in establishing requirements and systems for reporting of adverse drug reactions, should consider adopting this method.

  12. Adverse drug reactions in special populations – the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E A; O’Mahony, M S

    2015-01-01

    The International Conference on Harmonization considers older people a ‘special population’, as they differ from younger adults in terms of comorbidity, polypharmacy, pharmacokinetics and greater vulnerability to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Medical practice is often based on single disease guidelines derived from clinical trials that have not included frail older people or those with multiple morbidities. This presents a challenge caring for older people, as drug doses in trials may not be achievable in real world patients and risks of ADRs are underestimated in clinical trial populations. The majority of ADRs in older people are Type A, potentially avoidable and associated with commonly prescribed medications. Several ADRs are particularly associated with major adverse consequences in the elderly and their reduction is therefore a clinical priority. Falls are strongly associated with benzodiazepines, neuroleptics, antidepressants and antihypertensives. There is good evidence for medication review as part of a multifactorial intervention to reduce falls risk in community dwelling elderly. Multiple medications also contribute to delirium, another multifactorial syndrome resulting in excess mortality particularly in frail older people. Clostridium difficile associated with use of broad spectrum antibiotics mainly affects frail older people and results in prolonged hospital stay with substantial morbidity and mortality. Antipsychotics increase the risk of stroke by more than three-fold in patients with dementia. Inappropriate prescribing can be reduced by adherence to prescribing guidelines, suitable monitoring and regular medication review. Given the heterogeneity within the older population, providing individualized care is pivotal to preventing ADRs. PMID:25619317

  13. The adverse effects of kava.

    PubMed

    Kava, R

    2001-03-01

    In Fiji, kava is also known as yaqona or grog. A convenient sample of 300 kava drinkers in Nadi, Lautoka, Ba and Sigatoka were studied to see whether local people in Fiji experienced side effects of kava use. Because males usually consume kava in Fiji, we approached specific groups of people and asked them to participate in the survey. To evaluate the side effects of kava consumption, we interviewed housewives of male kava drinkers regarding specific effects of kava. We interviewed these housewives during kava drinking sessions since they were usually not taking part in the kava drinking. We also interviewed employers of these kava drinkers and the market vendors in Nadi Town since they were closely involved with kava drinkers. Wives of kava users felt deprived of basic family needs due to the amount of money spent on kava. In Urban schools, 64% males and 46.2% had tried kava. The present study aims to assess the prevalence of side effects of kava usage among a community sample of kava drinkers in Fiji and to compare the result with some of the side effects provided by other studies. The questionnaire also asked how much kava was consumed and the reasons. Since kava use is very much part of our everyday culture and existence, convincing people to change their behavior and kava consumption is a major tasks. I hope that this study would emphasize the need at a national level to educate people on the harmful effects of kava and the need for the health ministry to view very heavy kava intake as contributing to morbidity in Fiji.

  14. Adverse effects of marijuana use.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Kathleen E; Kampman, Kyle M

    2016-05-01

    Marijuana has consistently been reported as the most commonly used illicit substance in the United States each year. Currently, the legalization of marijuana is up for debate across the nation. While marijuana use is prevalent among the adolescent population, research has shown that there can be devastating effects on health and well-being. A review of the literature shows that marijuana use can have a negative impact on physical health, psychological well-being, and multiple psychosocial outcomes. Adolescents who used marijuana more frequently and began using marijuana at an earlier age experienced worse outcomes and long-lasting effects.

  15. 3D Pharmacophoric Similarity improves Multi Adverse Drug Event Identification in Pharmacovigilance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Hripcsak, George

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining.

  16. 3D pharmacophoric similarity improves multi adverse drug event identification in pharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Hripcsak, George

    2015-03-06

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining.

  17. Predicting risk of adverse drug reactions in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lavan, Amanda Hanora; Gallagher, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common in older adults, with falls, orthostatic hypotension, delirium, renal failure, gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding being amongst the most common clinical manifestations. ADR risk increases with age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, increasing burden of comorbidity, polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing and suboptimal monitoring of drugs. ADRs are a preventable cause of harm to patients and an unnecessary waste of healthcare resources. Several ADR risk tools exist but none has sufficient predictive value for clinical practice. Good clinical practice for detecting and predicting ADRs in vulnerable patients includes detailed documentation and regular review of prescribed and over-the-counter medications through standardized medication reconciliation. New medications should be prescribed cautiously with clear therapeutic goals and recognition of the impact a drug can have on multiple organ systems. Prescribers should regularly review medication efficacy and be vigilant for ADRs and their contributory risk factors. Deprescribing should occur at an individual level when drugs are no longer efficacious or beneficial or when safer alternatives exist. Inappropriate prescribing and unnecessary polypharmacy should be minimized. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and the use of explicit prescribing criteria can be useful in this regard. PMID:26834959

  18. Natural Inhibitors of Cholinesterases: Implications for Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase are two closely related enzymes important in the metabolism of acetylcholine and anaesthetic drugs, including succinylcholine, mivacurium, and cocaine. The solanaceous glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are naturally occurring steroids in potatoes and related plants that inhibit both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. There are many clinical examples of direct SGA toxicity due to cholinesterase inhibition. The aim of this study was to review the hypotheses that (1) SGAs may be the evolutionary driving force for atypical butyrylcholinesterase alleles and that (2) SGAs may adversely influence the actions of anaesthetic drugs that metabolized by acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase. Source The information was obtained by Medline search and consultation with experts in the study of SGAs and cholinesterases. Principal findings The SGAs inhibit both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in numerous in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although accurate assays of SGA levels are difficult, published data indicate human serum SGA concentrations at least ten-fold lower than required to inhibit acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in vitro. However, we review evidence that suggests the dietary ingestion of SGAs can initiate a cholinergic syndrome in humans. This syndrome occurs at SGA levels lower than those which interfere with anaesthetic drug catabolism. The world distribution of solanaceous plants parallels the distribution of atypical alleles of butyrylcholinesterase and may explain the genetic diversity of the butyrylcholinesterase gene. Conclusion Correlative evidence suggests that dietary SGAs may be the driving force for atypical butyrylcholinesterase alleles. In addition, SGAs may influence the metabolism of anaesthetic drugs and this hypothesis warrants experimental investigation. PMID:9161749

  19. Data mining to generate adverse drug events detection rules.

    PubMed

    Chazard, Emmanuel; Ficheur, Grégoire; Bernonville, Stéphanie; Luyckx, Michel; Beuscart, Régis

    2011-11-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are a public health issue. Their detection usually relies on voluntary reporting or medical chart reviews. The objective of this paper is to automatically detect cases of ADEs by data mining. 115,447 complete past hospital stays are extracted from six French, Danish, and Bulgarian hospitals using a common data model including diagnoses, drug administrations, laboratory results, and free-text records. Different kinds of outcomes are traced, and supervised rule induction methods (decision trees and association rules) are used to discover ADE detection rules, with respect to time constraints. The rules are then filtered, validated, and reorganized by a committee of experts. The rules are described in a rule repository, and several statistics are automatically computed in every medical department, such as the confidence, relative risk, and median delay of outcome appearance. 236 validated ADE-detection rules are discovered; they enable to detect 27 different kinds of outcomes. The rules use a various number of conditions related to laboratory results, diseases, drug administration, and demographics. Some rules involve innovative conditions, such as drug discontinuations.

  20. A Synthesis of Current Surveillance Planning Methods for the Sequential Monitoring of Drug and Vaccine Adverse Effects Using Electronic Health Care Data

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jennifer C.; Wellman, Robert; Yu, Onchee; Cook, Andrea J.; Maro, Judith C.; Ouellet-Hellstrom, Rita; Boudreau, Denise; Floyd, James S.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Pinheiro, Simone; Reichman, Marsha; Shoaibi, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The large-scale assembly of electronic health care data combined with the use of sequential monitoring has made proactive postmarket drug- and vaccine-safety surveillance possible. Although sequential designs have been used extensively in randomized trials, less attention has been given to methods for applying them in observational electronic health care database settings. Existing Methods: We review current sequential-surveillance planning methods from randomized trials, and the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) and Mini-Sentinel Pilot projects—two national observational electronic health care database safety monitoring programs. Future Surveillance Planning: Based on this examination, we suggest three steps for future surveillance planning in health care databases: (1) prespecify the sequential design and analysis plan, using available feasibility data to reduce assumptions and minimize later changes to initial plans; (2) assess existing drug or vaccine uptake, to determine if there is adequate information to proceed with surveillance, before conducting more resource-intensive planning; and (3) statistically evaluate and clearly communicate the sequential design with all those designing and interpreting the safety-surveillance results prior to implementation. Plans should also be flexible enough to accommodate dynamic and often unpredictable changes to the database information made by the health plans for administrative purposes. Conclusions: This paper is intended to encourage dialogue about establishing a more systematic, scalable, and transparent sequential design-planning process for medical-product safety-surveillance systems utilizing observational electronic health care databases. Creating such a framework could yield improvements over existing practices, such as designs with increased power to assess serious adverse events. PMID:27713904

  1. Potential adverse effects of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Whitten, P L; Lewis, C; Russell, E; Naftolin, F

    1995-03-01

    Evaluation of the potential benefits and risks offered by naturally occurring plant estrogens requires investigation of their potency and sites of action when consumed at natural dietary concentrations. Our investigations have examined the effects of a range of natural dietary concentrations of the most potent plant isoflavonoid, coumestrol, using a rat model and a variety of estrogen-dependent tissues and endpoints. Treatments of immature females demonstrated agonistic action in the reproductive tract, brain, and pituitary at natural dietary concentrations. Experiments designed to test for estrogen antagonism demonstrated that coumestrol did not conform to the picture of a classic antiestrogen. However, coumestrol did suppress estrous cycles in adult females. Developmental actions were examined by neonatal exposure of pups through milk of rat dams fed a coumestrol, control, or commercial soy-based diet during the critical period of the first 10 postnatal days or throughout the 21 days of lactation. The 10-day treatment did not significantly alter adult estrous cyclicity, but the 21-day treatment produced in a persistent estrus state in coumestrol-treated females by 132 days of age. In contrast, the 10-day coumestrol treatments produced significant deficits in the sexual behavior of male offspring. These findings illustrate the broad range of actions of these natural estrogens and the variability in potency across endpoints. This variability argues for the importance of fully characterizing each phytoestrogen in terms of its sites of action, balance of agonistic and antagonistic properties, natural potency, and short-term and long-term effects.

  2. Perspective on Lithotripsy Adverse Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Thomas; Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar

    2008-09-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an effective and without any doubt the least invasive procedure to treat upper urinary tract calculi. Acute complications are rarely reported and do not require specific treatment in most cases. However, one should be aware that energy levels sufficient for stone breakage are capable of damaging tissue as well, and significant hematoma—not only in the kidney but as well in surrounding organs—has been observed. Furthermore, only little is known about the long-term effects of SWL. Some authors have reported an increased incidence of hypertension and possibly also diabetes mellitus. Such chronic diseases—if indeed related to prior SWL—may be a late result of acute SWL-related trauma but the discussion on the underlying pathogenesis is controversial. Many factors have to be considered, such as the natural history of recurrent stone formers, technical principles of SWL, and differences in treatment protocols. Promising studies are currently underway to optimize stone breakage while limiting potential collateral damage. With this progress, SWL remains a safe treatment option for most urinary calculi.

  3. Ocular Toxoplasmosis: Therapy-Related Adverse Drug Reactions and Their Management.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein, M; Zweifel, S; Barthelmes, D; Meier, F; Fehr, J; Böni, C

    2017-03-22

    Background There are different treatment options for ocular toxoplasmosis (OT). "Classic" therapy consists of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid combined with systemic steroids and is still widely used. However, potentially severe side effects of this therapy have been reported. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence and types of adverse drug reactions in patients treated for OT. Clinical management of each adverse drug reaction was assessed. Patients and Methods In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed data of patients with OT, who were consecutively examined between December 2011 and December 2015 at the Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich. Results In total, 49 patients had at least one episode of active OT. In 54 (83.0 %) of 65 treated episodes, the classic regimen was used. Of the 37 patients who received classic treatment, 9 (24.3 %) developed at least one adverse drug reaction which led to drug discontinuation, including elevated creatinine (5.4 %), elevated liver enzymes (5.4 %), vomiting (5.4 %), rash (5.4 %) and facial swelling (2.7 %). In 5 patients, treatment was switched to another drug, while in the other 4 patients, therapy was stopped. In these 9 patients, inflammation was well controlled 8 weeks after onset of therapy. No patient suffered from severe side effects, such as potentially life-threatening allergic reactions or pancytopenia. Conclusions In OT patients who were treated with classic therapy, adverse drug reactions are common. Therefore, clinical and laboratory monitoring is mandatory. Adverse drug reactions may require interdisciplinary management.

  4. Opportunities for Web-based Drug Repositioning: Searching for Potential Antihypertensive Agents with Hypotension Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Wan, Mei; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug repositioning refers to the process of developing new indications for existing drugs. As a phenotypic indicator of drug response in humans, clinical side effects may provide straightforward signals and unique opportunities for drug repositioning. Objective We aimed to identify drugs frequently associated with hypotension adverse reactions (ie, the opposite condition of hypertension), which could be potential candidates as antihypertensive agents. Methods We systematically searched the electronic records of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) through the openFDA platform to assess the association between hypotension incidence and antihypertensive therapeutic effect regarding a list of 683 drugs. Results Statistical analysis of FAERS data demonstrated that those drugs frequently co-occurring with hypotension events were more likely to have antihypertensive activity. Ranked by the statistical significance of frequent hypotension reporting, the well-known antihypertensive drugs were effectively distinguished from others (with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve > 0.80 and a normalized discounted cumulative gain of 0.77). In addition, we found a series of antihypertensive agents (particularly drugs originally developed for treating nervous system diseases) among the drugs with top significant reporting, suggesting the good potential of Web-based and data-driven drug repositioning. Conclusions We found several candidate agents among the hypotension-related drugs on our list that may be redirected for lowering blood pressure. More important, we showed that a pharmacovigilance system could alternatively be used to identify antihypertensive agents and sustainably create opportunities for drug repositioning. PMID:27036325

  5. Adverse Drug Events caused by Serious Medication Administration Errors

    PubMed Central

    Sawarkar, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A.; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how often serious or life-threatening medication administration errors with the potential to cause patient harm (or potential adverse drug events) result in actual patient harm (or adverse drug events (ADEs)) in the hospital setting. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of clinical events that transpired following observed medication administration errors. BACKGROUND Medication errors are common at the medication administration stage for hospitalized patients. While many of these errors are considered capable of causing patient harm, it is not clear how often patients are actually harmed by these errors. METHODS In a previous study where 14,041 medication administrations in an acute-care hospital were directly observed, investigators discovered 1271 medication administration errors, of which 133 had the potential to cause serious or life-threatening harm to patients and were considered serious or life-threatening potential ADEs. In the current study, clinical reviewers conducted detailed chart reviews of cases where a serious or life-threatening potential ADE occurred to determine if an actual ADE developed following the potential ADE. Reviewers further assessed the severity of the ADE and attribution to the administration error. RESULTS Ten (7.5% [95% C.I. 6.98, 8.01]) actual adverse drug events or ADEs resulted from the 133 serious and life-threatening potential ADEs, of which 6 resulted in significant, three in serious, and one life threatening injury. Therefore 4 (3% [95% C.I. 2.12, 3.6]) serious and life threatening potential ADEs led to serious or life threatening ADEs. Half of the ten actual ADEs were caused by dosage or monitoring errors for anti-hypertensives. The life threatening ADE was caused by an error that was both a transcription and a timing error. CONCLUSION Potential ADEs at the medication administration stage can cause serious patient harm. Given previous estimates of serious or life-threatening potential ADE of 1.33 per 100

  6. An overview on adverse drug reactions to traditional Chinese medicines

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kelvin; Zhang, Hongwei; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2015-01-01

    The safe use of Chinese materia medica (CMM) and products in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practice conventionally relies on correct pharmacognostic identification, good agricultural and manufacturing practices based on pharmacopoeia standards and rational/correct CMM combinations with TCM-guided clinical prescribing. These experience-based principles may not absolutely ensure safety without careful toxicological investigations when compared with development of new pharmaceutical drugs. Clinically observed toxicity reports remain as guidance for gathering toxicological evidence, though essential as pharmacovigilance, but are considered as late events for ensuring safety. The overview focuses on the following factors: global development of TCM that has affected conventional healthcare; examples of key toxic substances in CMM; reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) consequential to taking CMM and TCM products; and proposals on rational approaches to integrate the knowledge of biomedical science and the principles of TCM practice for detecting early ADRs if both TCM products and orthodox drugs are involved. It is envisaged that good control of the quality and standards of CMM and proprietary Chinese medicines can certainly reduce the incidence of ADRs in TCM practice when these medications are used. PMID:25619530

  7. Adverse drug reactions to herbal and synthetic expectorants.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Sieder, C; März, R

    1995-01-01

    Our knowledge relating to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of phytomedicines is highly fragmentary. The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of ADRs following medication with herbal or synthetic expectorants. In a multicentre, comparative post-marketing surveillance study of more than 3000 patients with acute bronchitis, about half were treated with a herbal remedy (SinupretR) and the other half with various other expectorants. In ascending order of incidence, ADRs were noted during mono-medication of SinupretR (0.8%), Ambroxol (1.0%) and acetylcysteine (4.3%). When concomitant drugs were used, this rank order was unchanged but incidence rates were markedly increased (3.4, 6.5 and 8.2%, respectively). The most frequent ADRs were gastrointestinal symptoms. It is concluded that expectorants are associated with ADRs in roughly 1-5% of cases undergoing single drug treatment and in 3-10% when more than one medication is being used. Amongst the expectorants used in this study, the herbal preparation SinupretR is associated with the lowest incidence of ADRs.

  8. Adverse drug reactions in older people: detection and prevention.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Mirko; van der Cammen, Tischa; Onder, Graziano

    2012-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in older adults are an important healthcare problem since they are frequently a cause of hospitalization, occur commonly during admission, and are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Older adults are particularly susceptible to ADRs because they are usually on multiple drug regimens and because age is associated with changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The presentation of an ADR in older adults is often atypical, which further complicates its recognition. One potential strategy for improving recognition of ADRs is to identify those patients who are at risk of an ADR. The recently developed GerontoNet ADR Risk Score is a practical tool for identification of older patients who are at increased risk for an ADR and who may represent a target for interventions aimed at reducing ADRs. Provision of adequate education in the domain of clinical geriatric pharmacology can improve recognition of ADRs. Besides formal surveillance systems, built-in computer programs with electronic prescribing databases and clinical pharmacist involvement in patient care within multidisciplinary geriatric teams might help to minimize the occurrence of ADRs. In addition, a number of actions can be taken in hospitals to stimulate appropriate prescribing and to assure adequate communication between primary and hospital care. In older adults with complex medical problems and needs, a global evaluation obtained through a comprehensive geriatric assessment may be helpful in simplifying drug prescription and prioritizing pharmacological and healthcare needs, resulting in an improvement in quality of prescribing.

  9. Adverse drug reaction profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs: A focused pharmacovigilance study in India

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Hasitha Diana; Adiga, Shalini; Thomas, Joseph; Sharma, Ajitha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to analyze the adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs (taxanes and vinca alkaloids) and to look for unexpected ADRs among the local population. Focused study on these drugs, rampantly used in oncology department for a wide variety of tumors including early and advanced malignancies, would enable better treatment care by physicians. Materials and Methods: Data on ADRs were collected from the cancer patients belonging to both gender and of all ages, on taxanes- or vinca-based cancer chemotherapy and reported in the Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission form. Causality was assessed using the WHO criteria and Naranjo's Algorithm. Preventability and severity of ADRs were also assessed. Results: A total of 97 ADRs were reported among 488 patients on microtubule-damaging anticancer drugs admitted over a period of 1 year. The incidence rate was 19.87%. Gastrointestinal system (40.2%) was the most affected followed by bone marrow (33%) and skin (8.2%). The highest incidence of ADRs was reported among paclitaxel (54.6%), and vincristine (39.2%). Most of the reported ADRs were of milder nature and preventable. The WHO causality assessment scale indicated 71.1% possible reactions. Conclusions: This study showed that most ADRs are preventable with effective ADR monitoring. There is a great need to create awareness among healthcare professionals regarding the importance of the pharmacovigilance system. Judicious use of the preventive measures will lead to a reduction in the incidence of ADRs due to the drug armamentarium, thereby enabling additional economic benefit to the patient and society. PMID:27721535

  10. Muscle spasms: an unexpected adverse drug reaction of pemetrexed?

    PubMed Central

    de Rouw, Hendrika J. A.; Jessurun, Naomi T.; Masen-Poos, Lucie J. P.; Derijks, Hieronymus J.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we describe a 53-year-old woman with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, treated with pemetrexed and cisplatin combination therapy, followed by pemetrexed monotherapy. The patient developed severe muscle spasms at least twice, shortly after administration of pemetrexed monotherapy. A possible explanation for this observation is that in combination with cisplatin therapy, the patient was hyperhydrated before administration to promote renal excretion and reduce toxicity. Pemetrexed is also renally excreted, which supports the finding that toxicity did not occur when the patient was hyperhydrated. After discontinuation of pemetrexed the symptoms did not reoccur. All aspects of this case point to a possible relationship between pemetrexed and an adverse drug reaction (ADR). We conclude that muscle spasms are a rare, but possibly dose-related ADR of pemetrexed-based therapy. PMID:28203304

  11. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes. A constant threat.

    PubMed

    Maravelias, C; Dona, A; Stefanidou, M; Spiliopoulou, C

    2005-09-15

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are used as ergogenic aids by athletes and non-athletes to enhance performance by augmenting muscular development and strength. AAS administration is often associated with various adverse effects that are generally dose related. High and multi-doses of AAS used for athletic enhancement can lead to serious and irreversible organ damage. Among the most common adverse effects of AAS are some degree of reduced fertility and gynecomastia in males and masculinization in women and children. Other adverse effects include hypertension and atherosclerosis, blood clotting, jaundice, hepatic neoplasms and carcinoma, tendon damage, psychiatric and behavioral disorders. More specifically, this article reviews the reproductive, hepatic, cardiovascular, hematological, cerebrovascular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, renal, immunologic and psychologic effects. Drug-prevention counseling to athletes is highlighted and the use of anabolic steroids is must be avoided, emphasizing that sports goals may be met within the framework of honest competition, free of doping substances.

  12. Early identification of adverse drug reactions from search log data.

    PubMed

    White, Ryen W; Wang, Sheng; Pant, Apurv; Harpaz, Rave; Shukla, Pushpraj; Sun, Walter; DuMouchel, William; Horvitz, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The timely and accurate identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) following drug approval is a persistent and serious public health challenge. Aggregated data drawn from anonymized logs of Web searchers has been shown to be a useful source of evidence for detecting ADRs. However, prior studies have been based on the analysis of established ADRs, the existence of which may already be known publically. Awareness of these ADRs can inject existing knowledge about the known ADRs into online content and online behavior, and thus raise questions about the ability of the behavioral log-based methods to detect new ADRs. In contrast to previous studies, we investigate the use of search logs for the early detection of known ADRs. We use a large set of recently labeled ADRs and negative controls to evaluate the ability of search logs to accurately detect ADRs in advance of their publication. We leverage the Internet Archive to estimate when evidence of an ADR first appeared in the public domain and adjust the index date in a backdated analysis. Our results demonstrate how search logs can be used to detect new ADRs, the central challenge in pharmacovigilance.

  13. Knowledge and attitudes to reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Pulford, Andrew; Malcolm, William

    The reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by health professionals forms an important component of ongoing surveillance of post-marketing drug safety. The extension of responsibility for all health professionals to report ADRs has coincided with national immunization programmes, such as the national childhood immunization, human papillomavirus (HPV), and seasonal and H1N1 influenza programmes. The study objective was to evaluate knowledge of, and attitudes to, reporting ADRs among the professional groups most likely to see suspected reactions to vaccines. This included nursing professionals, whose views have not been included in previous studies. A survey of 91 practice nurses, health visitors, school nurses and GPs working in Ayrshire and Arran during June, July and August 2007 was undertaken. The respondents' knowledge of ADR reporting varied considerably. Although the majority of respondents recognized that it is the responsibility of health professionals to report suspected ADRs, there were lower levels of knowledge about the purpose of the Yellow Card system specifically; less than 50% of the respondents reported good knowledge about the system. The study suggests implications for practice with regard to the implementation of large-scale immunization programmes and potential solutions to under-reporting among these professional groups.

  14. Pharmacovigilance on Twitter? Mining Tweets for Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Karen; Pimpalkhute, Pranoti; Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Ginn, Rachel; Smith, Karen L; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has shown that Twitter data analytics can have broad implications on public health research. However, its value for pharmacovigilance has been scantly studied – with health related forums and community support groups preferred for the task. We present a systematic study of tweets collected for 74 drugs to assess their value as sources of potential signals for adverse drug reactions (ADRs). We created an annotated corpus of 10,822 tweets. Each tweet was annotated for the presence or absence of ADR mentions, with the span and Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concept ID noted for each ADR present. Using Cohen’s kappa1, we calculated the inter-annotator agreement (IAA) for the binary annotations to be 0.69. To demonstrate the utility of the corpus, we attempted a lexicon-based approach for concept extraction, with promising success (54.1% precision, 62.1% recall, and 57.8% F-measure). A subset of the corpus is freely available at: http://diego.asu.edu/downloads. PMID:25954400

  15. Silicone gel breast implant adverse event reports to the Food and Drug Administration, 1984-1995.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S L; Parmentier, C M; Woo, E K; Vishnuvajjala, R L; Headrick, M L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize the adverse event reports on silicone gel breast implants (SGBIs), including death reports, submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 1984 through 1995 and to analyze changes in the type and complexity of reports following extensive media coverage of breast implants. METHODS: The authors analyzed mandatory and voluntary reports from the adverse events reporting system for medical devices at the FDA. RESULTS: In 1988, adverse event reports related to SGBIs accounted for 2.4% of the 14,473 mandatory reports entered into the FDA database on medical devices. In 1992, SGBI-related reports accounted for 30.3% of the total 66,476 mandatory reports of adverse events. The most frequently reported adverse event in 1988, before the widespread publicity on breast implants, was implant burst or rupture. In contrast, in 1992 the most frequently reported event was reaction, a term used to describe a range of adverse effects. CONCLUSIONS: The numbers of mandatory and voluntary reports of SGBI-related adverse events increased exponentially, as did the complexity of the reports, following publicity over the lack of safety data on breast implants and a short voluntary moratorium on their sale. A significant proportion of reports lacked information on specific medical symptoms or diagnoses. PMID:9847926

  16. SMARTS (Systematic Monitoring of Adverse events Related to TreatmentS): The development of a pragmatic patient-completed checklist to assess antipsychotic drug side effects

    PubMed Central

    Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Peuskens, Joseph; Cavallaro, Roberto; Lean, Michael EJ; Morozova, Margarita; Reynolds, Gavin; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Thomas, Pierre; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Antipsychotic drug side effects are common and can cause stigmatisation, decreased quality of life, poor adherence, and secondary morbidity and mortality. Systematic assessment of anticipated side effects is recommended as part of good clinical care, but is uncommon in practice and patients may not spontaneously report side effects. We aimed to develop a simple patient-completed checklist to screen systematically for potential antipsychotic side effects. Methods: The SMARTS checklist was developed over a series of group meetings by an international faculty of 12 experts (including psychiatrists, a general physician and a psychopharmacologist) based on their clinical experience and knowledge of the literature. The emphasis is on tolerability (i.e. assessment of side effects that ‘trouble’ the patient) as subjective impact of side effects is most relevant to medication adherence. The development took account of feedback from practising psychiatrists in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, a process that contributed to face validity. Results: The SMARTS checklist assesses whether patients are currently ‘troubled’ by 11 well-established potential antipsychotic side effects. Patients provide their responses to these questions by circling relevant side effects. An additional open question enquires about any other possible side effects. The checklist has been translated into Italian and Turkish. Conclusions: The SMARTS checklist aims to strike a balance between brevity and capturing the most common and important antipsychotic side effects. It is appropriate for completion by patients prior to a clinical consultation, for example, in the waiting room. It can then form the focus for a more detailed clinical discussion about side effects. It can be used alone or form part of a more comprehensive assessment of antipsychotic side effects including blood tests and a physical examination when appropriate. The checklist assesses current problems and can be used

  17. Drug-Related Adverse Events of Osteoporosis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moin; Cheung, Angela M; Khan, Aliya A

    2017-03-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is associated with microarchitectural deterioration and increased risk of fracture. Osteoporosis therapy effectively reduces the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fracture and has been associated with increased survival. Currently approved treatments for osteoporosis include bisphosphonates, denosumab, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and teriparatide. This article reviews the adverse events of therapy associated with these medical interventions. Hormone replacement therapy is not included, because it is no longer indicated for the treatment of osteoporosis in all countries. Calcitonin and strontium ranelate are also not included, because their indication for osteoporosis has recently been limited or withdrawn.

  18. The knowledge, attitude and behaviours of nurses about pharmacovigilance, adverse drug reaction and adverse event reporting in a state hospital

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Fisun; Ciftci, Seval; Vural, Birol

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: With the use of any drug comes the possibility of unintended consequences which when harmful are referred to as adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The development of national pharmacovigilance systems is the responsibility of all health workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge of nurses about pharmacovigilance and attitudes about ADR and adverse event reporting. METHODS: This descriptive-cross sectional study was performed in 112 nurses working in a public hospital. The questionnaire was applied about pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions. The knowledge, attitudes and practices about adverse drug reactions were asked. RESULTS: The 74.1% of the nurses definition of “severe adverse effect” of drug therapy. The ratio of participants who knew that ADRs are reported to contact person responsible from pharmacovigilance was 34.9%. Although 70.5% of nurses knew the necessity of ADR reporting, the 8% of the nurses knew Turkish Pharmacovigilance Center (TÜFAM). Only 8% of nurses reported ADRs in their professionality. CONCLUSION: Although most of the participants knew the importance of ADR event reporting, event reporting was low. Thiese results showed that there is a lack of knowledge about pharmacovigilance. Futher studies with different settings and healthcare staff are needed to improve awareness about pharmacovigilance. PMID:28058321

  19. Identifying plausible adverse drug reactions using knowledge extracted from the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ning; Xu, Hua; Rindflesch, Thomas C.; Cohen, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance involves continually monitoring drug safety after drugs are put to market. To aid this process; algorithms for the identification of strongly correlated drug/adverse drug reaction (ADR) pairs from data sources such as adverse event reporting systems or Electronic Health Records have been developed. These methods are generally statistical in nature, and do not draw upon the large volumes of knowledge embedded in the biomedical literature. In this paper, we investigate the ability of scalable Literature Based Discovery (LBD) methods to identify side effects of pharmaceutical agents. The advantage of LBD methods is that they can provide evidence from the literature to support the plausibility of a drug/ ADR association, thereby assisting human review to validate the signal, which is an essential component of pharmacovigilance. To do so, we draw upon vast repositories of knowledge that has been extracted from the biomedical literature by two Natural Language Processing tools, MetaMap and SemRep. We evaluate two LBD methods that scale comfortably to the volume of knowledge available in these repositories. Specifically, we evaluate Reflective Random Indexing (RRI), a model based on concept-level co-occurrence, and Predication-based Semantic Indexing (PSI), a model that encodes the nature of the relationship between concepts to support reasoning analogically about drug-effect relationships. An evaluation set was constructed from the Side Effect Resource 2 (SIDER2), which contains known drug/ADR relations, and models were evaluated for their ability to “rediscover” these relations. In this paper, we demonstrate that both RRI and PSI can recover known drug-adverse event associations. However, PSI performed better overall, and has the additional advantage of being able to recover the literature underlying the reasoning pathways it used to make its predictions. PMID:25046831

  20. [Laser trabeculoplasty: therapeutic options and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Wacker, T; Eckert, S

    2010-01-01

    Laser trabeculoplasty is a simple method for treating glaucoma and ocular hypertension and has few adverse effects. There are different laser systems for reducing the intraocular pressure of patients with glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Complications include transient intraocular pressure elevation, iritis, and anterior synechiae.

  1. The role of the clinical pharmacologist in the management of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Moore, N

    2001-01-01

    The classical definition of clinical pharmacology is the study or the knowledge of the effects of drugs in humans. The activities of a clinical pharmacologist can vary from country to country, usually ranging from involvement in clinical trials, especially fundamental pharmacodynamic studies, to studies of pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism, to pharmacogenetics. Most clinical pharmacologists outside industry are in hospitals or university hospitals and research centres. In addition to research, this implies teaching of clinical pharmacology, and interacting with other medical staff: in the field of research, giving advice on clinical trials methodology and often managing a therapeutic drug monitoring centre. Some clinical pharmacologists have clinical departments with beds or consulting offices. Can there be another role for the clinical pharmacologist that would increase his or her usefulness for the medical community? Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are remarkably complex events, related to drug effects, patient characteristics (background diseases, genetics), and drug/disease interactions. Evaluation of ADRs requires understanding of drug mechanisms and interactions, and of disease diagnostics, especially in the discussion of alternative diagnoses. This implies expertise as a pharmacologist and a clinician. In addition, because not all adverse reactions or interactions are in the Summary of Product Characteristics, and because problems arise long before they report in the literature, it is necessary for the clinical pharmacologist to have knowledge of ongoing regulatory processes, in addition to having access to the published literature. Helping clinicians cope with individual patient problems will also improve the clinical pharmacologist's integration into the healthcare process.

  2. [Evaluation of the Association of Hand-Foot Syndrome with Anticancer Drugs Using the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Databases].

    PubMed

    Sasaoka, Sayaka; Matsui, Toshinobu; Abe, Junko; Umetsu, Ryogo; Kato, Yamato; Ueda, Natsumi; Hane, Yuuki; Motooka, Yumi; Hatahira, Haruna; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare lists hand-foot syndrome as a serious adverse drug event. Therefore, we evaluated its association with anticancer drug therapy using case reports in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). In addition, we calculated the reporting odds ratio (ROR) of anticancer drugs potentially associated with hand-foot syndrome, and applied the Weibull shape parameter to time-to-event data from JADER. We found that JADER contained 338224 reports from April 2004 to November 2014, while FAERS contained 5821354 reports from January 2004 to June 2014. In JADER, the RORs [95% confidence interval (CI)] of hand-foot syndrome for capecitabine, tegafur-gimeracil-oteracil, fluorouracil, sorafenib, and regorafenib were 63.60 (95%CI, 56.19-71.99), 1.30 (95%CI, 0.89-1.89), 0.48 (95%CI, 0.30-0.77), 26.10 (95%CI, 22.86-29.80), and 133.27 (95%CI, 112.85-157.39), respectively. Adverse event symptoms of hand-foot syndrome were observed with most anticancer drugs, which carry warnings of the propensity to cause these effects in their drug information literature. The time-to-event analysis using the Weibull shape parameter revealed differences in the time-dependency of the adverse events of each drug. Therefore, anticancer drugs should be used carefully in clinical practice, and patients may require careful monitoring for symptoms of hand-foot syndrome.

  3. Development of the Liverpool Adverse Drug Reaction Avoidability Assessment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Louise E.; Nunn, Anthony J.; Kirkham, Jamie J.; Peak, Matthew; Arnott, Janine; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Turner, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim To develop and test a new tool to assess the avoidability of adverse drug reactions that is suitable for use in paediatrics but which is also applicable to a variety of other settings. Methods The study involved multiple phases. Preliminary work involved using the Hallas scale and a modification of the existing Hallas scale, to assess two different sets of adverse drug reaction (ADR) case reports. Phase 1 defined, modified and refined a new tool using multidisciplinary teams. Phase 2 involved the assessment of 50 ADR case reports from a prospective study of paediatric inpatients by individual assessors. Phase 3 compared assessments with the new tool for individuals and groups in comparison to the ‘gold standard’ (the avoidability outcome set by a panel of senior investigators: an experienced clinical pharmacologist, paediatrician and pharmacist). Main Outcome Measures Inter-rater reliability (IRR), measure of disagreement and utilization of avoidability categories. Results Preliminary work—Pilot phase: results for the original Hallas cases were fair and pairwise kappa scores ranged from 0.21 to 0.36. Results for the modified Hallas cases were poor, pairwise kappa scores ranged from 0.06 to 0.16. Phase 1: on initial use of the new tool, agreement between the two multidisciplinary groups was found on 13/20 cases with a kappa score of 0.29 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.62). Phase 2: the assessment of 50 ADR case reports by six individual reviewers yielded pairwise kappa scores ranging from poor to good 0.12 to 0.75 and percentage exact agreement (%EA) ranged from 52–90%. Phase 3: Percentage exact agreement ranged from 35–70%. Overall, individuals had better agreement with the ‘gold standard’. Conclusion Avoidability assessment is feasible but needs careful attention to methods. The Liverpool ADR avoidability assessment tool showed mixed IRR. We have developed and validated a method for assessing the avoidability of ADRs that is transparent, more objective than

  4. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Juan M.; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Ryan, Patrick B.; Shah, Nigam H.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies. PMID:27193236

  5. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research.

    PubMed

    Banda, Juan M; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Ryan, Patrick B; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-05-10

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies.

  6. Imputation of adverse drug reactions: Causality assessment in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives Different algorithms have been developed to standardize the causality assessment of adverse drug reactions (ADR). Although most share common characteristics, the results of the causality assessment are variable depending on the algorithm used. Therefore, using 10 different algorithms, the study aimed to compare inter-rater and multi-rater agreement for ADR causality assessment and identify the most consistent to hospitals. Methods Using ten causality algorithms, four judges independently assessed the first 44 cases of ADRs reported during the first year of implementation of a risk management service in a medium complexity hospital in the state of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Owing to variations in the terminology used for causality, the equivalent imputation terms were grouped into four categories: definite, probable, possible and unlikely. Inter-rater and multi-rater agreement analysis was performed by calculating the Cohen´s and Light´s kappa coefficients, respectively. Results None of the algorithms showed 100% reproducibility in the causal imputation. Fair inter-rater and multi-rater agreement was found. Emanuele (1984) and WHO-UMC (2010) algorithms showed a fair rate of agreement between the judges (k = 0.36). Interpretation & conclusions Although the ADR causality assessment algorithms were poorly reproducible, our data suggest that WHO-UMC algorithm is the most consistent for imputation in hospitals, since it allows evaluating the quality of the report. However, to improve the ability of assessing the causality using algorithms, it is necessary to include criteria for the evaluation of drug-related problems, which may be related to confounding variables that underestimate the causal association. PMID:28166274

  7. Adverse drug events and medication errors: detection and classification methods.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, T; Gandhi, T K; Seger, A C; Hsieh, T C; Bates, D W

    2004-08-01

    Investigating the incidence, type, and preventability of adverse drug events (ADEs) and medication errors is crucial to improving the quality of health care delivery. ADEs, potential ADEs, and medication errors can be collected by extraction from practice data, solicitation of incidents from health professionals, and patient surveys. Practice data include charts, laboratory, prescription data, and administrative databases, and can be reviewed manually or screened by computer systems to identify signals. Research nurses, pharmacists, or research assistants review these signals, and those that are likely to represent an ADE or medication error are presented to reviewers who independently categorize them into ADEs, potential ADEs, medication errors, or exclusions. These incidents are also classified according to preventability, ameliorability, disability, severity, stage, and responsible person. These classifications, as well as the initial selection of incidents, have been evaluated for agreement between reviewers and the level of agreement found ranged from satisfactory to excellent (kappa = 0.32-0.98). The method of ADE and medication error detection and classification described is feasible and has good reliability. It can be used in various clinical settings to measure and improve medication safety.

  8. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  9. Adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Montessori, Valentina; Press, Natasha; Harris, Marianne; Akagi, Linda; Montaner, Julio S G

    2004-01-20

    Long-term remission of HIV-1 disease can be readily achieved by combinations of antiretroviral agents. The suppression of plasma viral loads to less than the limit of quantification of the most sensitive commercially available assays (i.e., less than 50 copies/mL) and the coincident improvement in CD4 T cell counts is associated with resolution of established opportunistic infections and a decrease in the risk of new opportunistic infections. However, prolonged treatment with combination regimens can be difficult to sustain because of problems with adherence and toxic effects. All antiretroviral drugs can have both short-term and long-term adverse events. The risk of specific side effects varies from drug to drug, from drug class to drug class, and from patient to patient. A better understanding of the adverse effects of antiretroviral agents is of interest not only for HIV specialists as they try to optimize therapy, but also for other physicians who care for HIV-positive patients.

  10. International reporting on adverse drug reactions: the CIOMS project. CIOMS ADR Working Group.

    PubMed

    Faich, G A; Castle, W; Bankowski, Z

    1990-04-01

    A method for standardized postapproval adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting has been developed and implemented by seven multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers and six regulatory authorities. This is based on a set of uniform definitions, procedures and a single reporting form, and has been demonstrated to be useful and effective. When regulators and manufacturers develop requirements and systems for ADR reporting they should consider adapting this method.

  11. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors.

  12. Evaluation of Perioperative Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Karen C.; Patel, Amit; Shaikh, Sofia; Seger, Diane L.; Bates, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to assess the rates of perioperative medication errors (MEs) and adverse drug events (ADEs) as percentages of medication administrations, evaluate their root causes, and formulate targeted solutions to prevent them. Methods In this prospective observational study, anesthesia-trained study staff (anesthesiologists/nurse anesthetists) observed randomly selected operations at a 1,046 bed tertiary care academic medical center to identify MEs and ADEs over eight months. Retrospective chart abstraction was performed to flag events that were missed by observation. All events subsequently underwent review by two independent reviewers. Primary outcomes were the incidence of MEs and ADEs. Results A total of 277 operations were observed with 3,671 medication administrations of which 193 (5.3%, 95% CI 4.5 to 6.0) involved a ME and/or ADE. Of these, 153 (79.3%) were preventable and 40 (20.7%) were non-preventable. The events included 153 (79.3%) errors and 91 (47.2%) ADEs. While 32 (20.9%) of the errors had little potential for harm, 51 (33.3%) led to an observed ADE and an additional 70 (45.8%) had the potential for patient harm. Of the 153 errors, 99 (64.7%) were serious, 51 (33.3%) were significant and 3 (2.0%) were life-threatening. Conclusions One in twenty perioperative medication administrations included an ME and/or ADE. More than one third of the MEs led to observed ADEs, and the remaining two thirds had the potential for harm. These rates are markedly higher than those reported by retrospective surveys. Specific solutions exist which have the potential to decrease the incidence of perioperative MEs. PMID:26501385

  13. Adverse health effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Opperhuizen, Antoon; Hartgens, Fred

    2010-06-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic drugs derived from testosterone. Illegally, these drugs are regularly self-administered by body builders and power lifters to enhance their sportive performance. Adverse side effects of AAS include sexual dysfunction, alterations of the cardiovascular system, psyche and behavior, and liver toxicity. However, severe side effects appear only following prolonged use of AAS at high dose and their occurrence is limited. Occasionally, AAS abuse may be linked to certain social and psychological traits of the user, like low self-esteem, low self-confidence, suffered hostility, childhood conduct disorder, and tendency to high-risk behavior. The overwhelming stereotype about AAS is that these compounds cause aggressive behavior in males. However, the underlying personality traits of a specific subgroup of the AAS abusers, who show aggression and hostility, may be relevant, as well. Use of AAS in combination with alcohol largely increases the risk of violence and aggression. The dependence liability of AAS is very low, and withdrawal effects are relatively mild. Based on the scores for acute and chronic adverse health effects, the prevalence of use, social harm and criminality, AAS were ranked among 19 illicit drugs as a group of drugs with a relatively low harm.

  14. Minimizing AED adverse effects: improving quality of life in the interictal state in epilepsy care.

    PubMed

    St Louis, Erik K; Louis, Erik K

    2009-06-01

    The goals of epilepsy therapy are to achieve seizure freedom while minimizing adverse effects of treatment. However, producing seizure-freedom is often overemphasized, at the expense of inducing adverse effects of treatment. All antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have the potential to cause dose-related, "neurotoxic" adverse effects (i.e., drowsiness, fatigue, dizziness, blurry vision, and incoordination). Such adverse effects are common, especially when initiating AED therapy and with polytherapy. Dose-related adverse effects may be obviated in most patients by dose reduction of monotherapy, reduction or elimination of polytherapy, or substituting for a better tolerated AED. Additionally, all older and several newer AEDs have idiosyncratic adverse effects which usually require withdrawal in an affected patient, including serious rash (i.e., Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), hematologic dyscrasias, hepatotoxicity, teratogenesis in women of child bearing potential, bone density loss, neuropathy, and severe gingival hyperplasia. Unfortunately, occurrence of idiosyncratic AED adverse effects cannot be predicted or, in most cases, prevented in susceptible patients. This article reviews a practical approach for the definition and identification of adverse effects of epilepsy therapies, and reviews the literature demonstrating that adverse effects result in detrimental quality of life in epilepsy patients. Strategies for minimizing AED adverse effects by reduction or elimination of AED polytherapy, appropriately employing drug-sparing therapies, and optimally administering AEDs are outlined, including tenets of AED selection, titration, therapeutic AED laboratory monitoring, and avoidance of chronic idiosyncratic adverse effects.

  15. Symptomatic sinus bradycardia: A rare adverse effect of intravenous ondansetron

    PubMed Central

    Moazzam, Md Shahnawaz; Nasreen, Farah; Bano, Shahjahan; Amir, Syed Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Ondansetron is a serotonin receptor antagonist which has been used frequently to reduce the incidence of post-operative nausea and vomiting in laparoscopic surgery. It has become very popular drug for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting due to its superiority in-terms of efficacy as well as lack of side effects and drug interactions. Although cardiovascular adverse effects of this drug are rare, we found a case of symptomatic sinus bradycardia in a 43-year-old female patient, going for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, who developed the same after she was given intravenous ondansetron in operation theater during premedication. Hence, we report this case, as the rare possibility of encountering bradycardia effect after intravenous administration of ondansetron should be born in mind. PMID:21655029

  16. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  17. Adverse-drug-event surveillance using narrative nursing records in electronic nursing records.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee-Jung; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of adverse drug events can be extracted by analyzing narrative nursing statements documented in standardized terminology-based electronic nursing records. For this study, we reviewed the narrative nursing documentations of 487 admissions of 355 cancer patients who were treated with cisplatin at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea. Narrative nursing statements with the terms "adverse drug reaction," "allergy," "hypersensitivity," and other adverse drug events listed in the safety information were analyzed. In addition, nausea, one of the most frequent adverse drug events, was further examined. Narrative statements documenting the presence or absence of an "adverse drug reaction," "allergy," and "hypersensitivity" were found in 162 admissions (33.3%). The presence or absence of adverse drug events due to cisplatin was documented in 476 admissions (97.7%). At least one adverse drug event was noted in 258 admissions (53.0%). The presence of nausea was documented in 214 admissions (43.9%), and the mean duration of nausea was 5.2 days. The results of this study suggest that adverse drug events can be monitored using narrative nursing statements documented in standardized terminology-based electronic nursing records.

  18. Adverse Effects of Bisphosphonates: Implications for Osteoporosis Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennel, Kurt A.; Drake, Matthew T.

    2009-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely prescribed and highly effective at limiting the bone loss that occurs in many disorders characterized by increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, including senile osteoporosis in both men and women, glucocorticoid-associated osteoporosis, and malignancies metastatic to bone. Although they are generally well tolerated, potential adverse effects may limit bisphosphonate use in some patients. Optimal use of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis requires adequate calcium and vitamin D intake before and during therapy. The World Health Organization fracture risk assessment algorithm is currently available to determine absolute fracture risk in patients with low bone mass and is a useful tool for clinicians in identifying patients most likely to benefit from pharmacological intervention to limit fracture risk. This fracture risk estimate may facilitate shared decision making, especially when patients are wary of the rare but serious adverse effects that have recently been described for this class of drugs. PMID:19567717

  19. Knowledge-based extraction of adverse drug events from biomedical text

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many biomedical relation extraction systems are machine-learning based and have to be trained on large annotated corpora that are expensive and cumbersome to construct. We developed a knowledge-based relation extraction system that requires minimal training data, and applied the system for the extraction of adverse drug events from biomedical text. The system consists of a concept recognition module that identifies drugs and adverse effects in sentences, and a knowledge-base module that establishes whether a relation exists between the recognized concepts. The knowledge base was filled with information from the Unified Medical Language System. The performance of the system was evaluated on the ADE corpus, consisting of 1644 abstracts with manually annotated adverse drug events. Fifty abstracts were used for training, the remaining abstracts were used for testing. Results The knowledge-based system obtained an F-score of 50.5%, which was 34.4 percentage points better than the co-occurrence baseline. Increasing the training set to 400 abstracts improved the F-score to 54.3%. When the system was compared with a machine-learning system, jSRE, on a subset of the sentences in the ADE corpus, our knowledge-based system achieved an F-score that is 7 percentage points higher than the F-score of jSRE trained on 50 abstracts, and still 2 percentage points higher than jSRE trained on 90% of the corpus. Conclusion A knowledge-based approach can be successfully used to extract adverse drug events from biomedical text without need for a large training set. Whether use of a knowledge base is equally advantageous for other biomedical relation-extraction tasks remains to be investigated. PMID:24593054

  20. Epidemiology of drug exposure and adverse drug reactions in two Swiss departments of internal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fattinger, Karin; Roos, Malgorzata; Vergères, Patrice; Holenstein, Clemens; Kind, Brigitt; Masche, Urspeter; Stocker, David N; Braunschweig, Suzanne; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Galeazzi, Renato L; Follath, Ferenc; Gasser, Theo; Meier, Peter J

    2000-01-01

    Aims To explore drug exposure, frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), types of ADRs, predisposing risk factors and ADR-related excess hospital stay in medical inpatients. Methods Structured data regarding patient characteristics, ‘events’ (symptoms, laboratory results), diagnoses (ICD10) and drug therapy were collected using a computer-supported data entry system and an interface for data retrieval from electronic patient records. ADR data were collected by ‘event monitoring’ to minimize possible bias by the drug monitor. The causality of each event was assessed in relation to disease(s) and drug therapy. Results The analysis included 4331 (100%) hospitalizations. The median observation period was 8 days. The median number of different drugs administered per patient and day was 6 and varied between 4 (Q1) and 9 (Q3) different drugs in 50% of all hospital days. In 41% of all hospitalizations at least one disease-unrelated event could be possibly attributed to drug therapy. Clinically relevant ADRs occurred in 11% of all hospitalizations. In 3.3% of all hospitalizations ADRs were the cause of hospital admission. The incidence of possibly ADR-related deaths was 1.4. Factors predisposing for clinically relevant ADRs were female gender and polypharmacy. ADR-related excess hospital stay accounted for 8.6% of hospital days. Conclusions These data demonstrate the feasibility of the developed ‘event monitoring’ system for quantitative analysis of ADRs in medical inpatients. With increasing numbers of recorded patients the pharmacoepidemiological database provides a valuable tool to study specific questions regarding drug efficacy and safety in hospitalized patients. PMID:10671911

  1. Capture and documentation of coded data on adverse drug reactions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lindsay; Robinson, Kerin M

    2012-01-01

    Allergic responses to prescription drugs are largely preventable, and incur significant cost to the community both financially and in terms of healthcare outcomes. The capacity to minimise the effects of repeated events rests predominantly with the reliability of allergy documentation in medical records and computerised physician order entry systems (CPOES) with decision support such as allergy alerts. This paper presents an overview of the nature and extent of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in Australia and other developed countries, a discussion and evaluation of strategies which have been devised to address this issue, and a commentary on the role of coded data in informing this patient safety issue. It is not concerned with pharmacovigilance systems that monitor ADRs on a global scale. There are conflicting reports regarding the efficacy of these strategies. Although in many cases allergy alerts are effective, lack of sensitivity and contextual relevance can often induce doctors to override alerts. Human factors such as user fatigue and inadequate adverse drug event reporting, including ADRs, are commonplace. The quality of and response to allergy documentation can be enhanced by the participation of nurses and pharmacists, particularly in medication reconciliation. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding of drug allergies potentially yields valuable evidence, but the quality of local and national level coded data is hampered by under-documenting and under-coding.

  2. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Mago, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Adverse effects are common, bothersome, and a leading cause of discontinuation of treatment. The methodology for evaluating adverse effects of medications has been greatly neglected, however, especially in comparison to the methodology for assessment of efficacy of medications. Existing methods for assessment and reporting of adverse effects have important limitations leading to lack of much-needed data related to adverse effects. Lastly, there is little systematic research into management of most adverse effects. A series of recommendations are made in this article about how to improve identification, assessment, reporting, and management of adverse effects.

  3. Analysis of factors associated with hiccups based on the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database

    PubMed Central

    Hosoya, Ryuichiro; Ishii-Nozawa, Reiko; Kagaya, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Hiccups are occasionally experienced by most individuals. Although hiccups are not life-threatening, they may lead to a decline in quality of life. Previous studies showed that hiccups may occur as an adverse effect of certain medicines during chemotherapy. Furthermore, a male dominance in hiccups has been reported. However, due to the limited number of studies conducted on this phenomenon, debate still surrounds the few factors influencing hiccups. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of medicines and patient characteristics on hiccups using a large-sized adverse drug event report database and, specifically, the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. Cases of adverse effects associated with medications were extracted from JADER, and Fisher’s exact test was performed to assess the presence or absence of hiccups for each medication. In a multivariate analysis, we conducted a multiple logistic regression analysis using medication and patient characteristic variables exhibiting significance. We also examined the role of dexamethasone in inducing hiccups during chemotherapy. Medicines associated with hiccups included dexamethasone, levofolinate, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, carboplatin, and irinotecan. Patient characteristics associated with hiccups included a male gender and greater height. The combination of anti-cancer agent and dexamethasone use was noted in more than 95% of patients in the dexamethasone-use group. Hiccups also occurred in patients in the anti-cancer agent-use group who did not use dexamethasone. Most of the medications that induce hiccups are used in chemotherapy. The results of the present study suggest that it is possible to predict a high risk of hiccups using patient characteristics. We confirmed that dexamethasone was the drug that has the strongest influence on the induction of hiccups. However, the influence of anti-cancer agents on the induction of hiccups cannot be denied. We consider the results of the

  4. Adverse effects of differential parental attention1

    PubMed Central

    Sajwaj, Thomas E.; Pinkston, Susan; Cordua, Glenn; Jackson, Carolyn; Herbert, Emily W.; Pinkston, Elsie M.; Hayden, M. Loeman

    1973-01-01

    In two independent parent training projects (Kansas and Mississippi), mothers of deviant young children were observed to follow almost all child behaviors with attention. The mothers were then trained to use differential attention procedures to increase their child's appropriate behaviors and to decrease deviant behaviors. Contrary to expectations, the differential attention procedure produced substantial increases in deviant behavior for four of the children. This adverse effect was maintained over many sessions and was replicated in single organism, reversal designs. A fifth child showed no change. A sixth child showed some improvement. However, this effect was not recovered in a second application of differential attention, and the child became worse. The results underline the importance of subject generality in applied behavior analysis and strongly suggest that service programs using operant techniques must carefully evaluate their effects on behavior. PMID:16795386

  5. Adverse Health Consequences of Performance-Enhancing Drugs: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Harrison G.; Wood, Ruth I.; Rogol, Alan; Nyberg, Fred; Bowers, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, media attention has focused almost entirely on PED use by elite athletes to illicitly gain a competitive advantage in sports, and not on the health risks of PEDs. There is a widespread misperception that PED use is safe or that adverse effects are manageable. In reality, the vast majority of PED users are not athletes but rather nonathlete weightlifters, and the adverse health effects of PED use are greatly underappreciated. This scientific statement synthesizes available information on the medical consequences of PED use, identifies gaps in knowledge, and aims to focus the attention of the medical community and policymakers on PED use as an important public health problem. PED users frequently consume highly supraphysiologic doses of PEDs, combine them with other PEDs and/or other classical drugs of abuse, and display additional associated risk factors. PED use has been linked to an increased risk of death and a wide variety of cardiovascular, psychiatric, metabolic, endocrine, neurologic, infectious, hepatic, renal, and musculoskeletal disorders. Because randomized trials cannot ethically duplicate the large doses of PEDs and the many factors associated with PED use, we need observational studies to collect valid outcome data on the health risks associated with PEDs. In addition, we need studies regarding the prevalence of PED use, the mechanisms by which PEDs exert their adverse health effects, and the interactive effects of PEDs with sports injuries and other high-risk behaviors. We also need randomized trials to assess therapeutic interventions for treating the adverse effects of PEDs, such as the anabolic-androgen steroid withdrawal syndrome. Finally, we need to raise public awareness of the serious health consequences of PEDs. PMID:24423981

  6. Automated Summarization of Publications Associated with Adverse Drug Reactions from PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Chen, Qinlang; Adams, Hayden; Friedman, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Academic literature provides rich and up-to-date information concerning adverse drug reactions (ADR), but it is time consuming and labor intensive for physicians to obtain information of ADRs from academic literature because they would have to generate queries, review retrieved articles and summarize the results. In this study, a method is developed to automatically detect and summarize ADRs from journal articles, rank them and present them to physicians in a user-friendly interface. The method studied ADRs for 6 drugs and returned on average 4.8 ADRs that were correct. The results demonstrated this method was feasible and effective. This method can be applied in clinical practice for assisting physicians to efficiently obtain information about ADRs associated with specific drugs. Automated summarization of ADR information from recent publications may facilitate translation of academic research into actionable information at point of care. PMID:27570654

  7. Evaluation of adverse drug reactions in HIV positive patients in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Anshu Kumar; Gadgade, Akash; Shenoy, Ashok K.; Chowta, Mukta N.; Ramapuram, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advancement and development of new drugs and treatment strategies increase the risk of unusual Adverse Events (AEs) in HIV patients. Aims: The objective of our study was to assess the incidence, types and nature of AEs in HIV positive subjects. Settings and Design: Patients with WHO stage IV disease irrespective of the CD4 cell count, or WHO stage III disease with a CD4 cell count <350 cell/cu. Mm, or, WHO stage I or II disease with a CD4 cell count of <200 cells/cu. mm, and on prior anti-retroviral therapy for not more than six months preceding the observation date, were included in the study. After initiation of therapy, the patients were examined for the occurrence any adverse events including the type and severity, or any other abnormal laboratory findings. Causality assessment of the adverse events was done using the Naranjo's scale. Results: Out of 327 patients studied prospectively, 43 patients developed AEs. Out of these, 23 (53.5%) were males and 20 (46.5%) were females. A total of 53 (16.21%) AEs were reported. Antitubercular drugs caused the maximum AEs (28.3%) followed by zidovudine (20.7%), nevirapine (15.0%) and efavirenz (5.6%). Stavudine, ethambutol, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, and atazanavir were also responsible for 3.7% of AEs individually. Causality assessment done according to the Naranjo's scale revealed that 66.04% AEs were ‘probable’ and 33.96% were ‘possible’. Conclusions: Anemia, hepatitis and dermatological adverse effects are the most common AEs. Antitubercular drugs contributed significantly for the incidence of AEs in these patients. Frequency of AEs was slightly more in males compared to females. PMID:25657900

  8. Pharmacovigilance, risks and adverse effects of self-medication.

    PubMed

    Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Abadie, Delphine; Lacroix, Isabelle; Berreni, Aurélia; Pugnet, Grégory; Durrieu, Geneviève; Sailler, Laurent; Giroud, Jean-Paul; Damase-Michel, Christine; Montastruc, François

    2016-04-01

    Self-medication means resorting to one or more drugs in order to treat oneself without the help of a doctor. This phenomenon is developing fast. In this review, we will discuss the main definitions of self-medication; we will then present a few important characteristics of this therapeutic practice: prevalence, reasons, populations involved and drugs used. Whilst the theoretical risks of self-medication have been abundantly discussed in the literature (adverse effects, interactions, product, dosage or treatment duration errors, difficulty in self-diagnosis, risk of addiction or abuse…), there is in fact very little detailed pharmacovigilance data concerning the characteristics and the consequences of this usage in real life. This study therefore describes the all too rare data that is available: patients, clinical characteristics, "seriousness" and drugs involved in the adverse effects of self-medication. It also discusses leads to be followed in order to minimize medication risks, which are obviously not well known and clearly not sufficiently notified.

  9. Management of serious adverse drug reactions: proposals from a victims' organisation.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    Amalyste is a French patient-advocacy group for victims of two very serious adverse drug reactions: Lyell and Stevens-Johnson syndromes. The aims of this organisation are to represent the interests of patients who have experienced these syndromes; to better inform the public about these syndromes; to provide analyses of drug-related risks; and to demand collective compensation for victims of serious adverse drug reactions. The following text is our translation of an Amalyste position statement on drug-related risks. It provides valuable food for thought, both for healthcare professionals and for drug regulatory agencies, and has the potential to improve practice (a).

  10. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992

  11. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael J.; Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle; Resende, Mauricio G. C.

    2007-11-01

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions.

  12. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Michael J.; Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle; Resende, Mauricio G. C.

    2007-11-05

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions.

  13. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assessment of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.5 Assessment of adverse effects. (a) Apply criteria of adverse effect. In consultation with the SHPO/THPO and any Indian tribe or Native...

  14. 36 CFR 800.6 - Resolution of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resolution of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.6 Resolution of adverse effects. (a) Continue... the undertaking that could avoid, minimize, or mitigate adverse effects on historic properties....

  15. Adverse Psychiatric Effects Associated with Herbal Weight-Loss Products

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, F. Saverio; Coviello, Marialuce; Imperatori, Claudio; Francesconi, Marta; Hough, Christina M.; Valeriani, Giuseppe; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Bolzan Mariotti Posocco, Flaminia; Santacroce, Rita; Minichino, Amedeo; Corazza, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and overeating are among the most prevalent health concerns worldwide and individuals are increasingly using performance and image-enhancing drugs (PIEDs) as an easy and fast way to control their weight. Among these, herbal weight-loss products (HWLPs) often attract users due to their health claims, assumed safety, easy availability, affordable price, extensive marketing, and the perceived lack of need for professional oversight. Reports suggest that certain HWLPs may lead to onset or exacerbation of psychiatric disturbances. Here we review the available evidence on psychiatric adverse effects of HWLPs due to their intrinsic toxicity and potential for interaction with psychiatric medications. PMID:26457296

  16. Label-inconsistent use of sibutramine in spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports in Germany.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Wulf, F; Sachs, B

    2008-07-01

    In Germany, reports on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are centrally collected and analyzed by the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM). During routine analysis of ADR reports related to the antiobesity drug sibutramine, we repeatedly observed descriptions of its label*-inconsistent use (*European Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC)). In order to quantify this observation, we analyzed all sibutramine-related ADR reports received by the BfArM so far. Using the same data source, we further analyzed the effect of a Dear Doctor Letter (DDL) which was distributed in 2002 in order to reinforce the label-consistent use of sibutramine. Out of a total of 170 identified reports, 104 were considered as suitable for further analysis. Of these, applying a catalogue of 24 SmPC-derived criteria, 34% (35 reports) contained information indicative of label-inconsistent use. The individual SmPC-criteria most often violated were (% of total analyzed reports): the recommended starting dose of 10 mg/day (9%), the body mass index (BMI)-related threshold permitting drug therapy (6%), and the contraindicated "history of drug abuse" (6%). The DDL was ineffective. The observed percentage of ADR reports, indicating a label-inconsistent use of sibutramine, is considered a signal for a therapeutic risk. This signal should be addressed in a drug utilization study investigating the use of sibutramine by means of a representative patient sample.

  17. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Saini, V K; Sewal, R K; Ahmad, Yusra; Medhi, B

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and 73 patients of lung cancer were screened for occurrence of adverse drug reactions during their treatment with chemotherapy. About 87.36% patients experienced adverse drug reactions, 90.09% and 83.56% of breast and lung cancer patients experienced at least one adverse drug reaction respectively. In breast cancer patients, 41.58% patients were prescribed fluorouracil+doxorubicin+cyclophosphamide while paclitaxel was prescribed to 22.77% patients. Alopecia (54.94%), nail discolouration (43.96%), dysgeusia (38.46%), anorexia (30.77%), nausea (29.67%), and neuropathy (29.67%) were found to be very common in breast cancer patients treated with single/combined regimen. In lung cancer group of patients, cisplatin with docetaxel, cisplatin with pemetrexed and cisplatin with irinotecan were prescribed to 30.14, 24.65 and 17.81% patients, respectively. Dysgeusia (40.98%), diarrhoea (39.34%), anorexia (32.77%) and constipation (31.15%) and alopecia (31.15%) were commonly observed adverse drug reactions having lung cancer patients. Causality assessments using World Health Organization causality assessment scale showed that observed adverse drug reactions were of probable (64.67%) and possible (35.33%) categories. Alopecia, dysgeusia, anorexia, constipation diarrhoea, nausea, nail discoloration were more prevalent amongst the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  18. Pharmacogenomics of statins: understanding susceptibility to adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Mikulik, Eduard B; Dauki, Anees M; Murkherjee, Chandrama; Luzum, Jasmine A

    2016-01-01

    Statins are a cornerstone of the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerotic disease is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Statins are among the most commonly prescribed classes of medications, and their prescribing indications and target patient populations have been significantly expanded in the official guidelines recently published by the American and European expert panels. Adverse effects of statin pharmacotherapy, however, result in significant cost and morbidity and can lead to nonadherence and discontinuation of therapy. Statin-associated muscle symptoms occur in ~10% of patients on statins and constitute the most commonly reported adverse effect associated with statin pharmacotherapy. Substantial clinical and nonclinical research effort has been dedicated to determining whether genetics can provide meaningful insight regarding an individual patient’s risk of statin adverse effects. This contemporary review of the relevant clinical research on polymorphisms in several key genes that affect statin pharmacokinetics (eg, transporters and metabolizing enzymes), statin efficacy (eg, drug targets and pathways), and end-organ toxicity (eg, myopathy pathways) highlights several promising pharmacogenomic candidates. However, SLCO1B1 521C is currently the only clinically relevant pharmacogenetic test regarding statin toxicity, and its relevance is limited to simvastatin myopathy. PMID:27757045

  19. Adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Glauciene Santana; Guaraldo, Lusiele; Engstrom, Elyne Montenegro; Filha, Mariza Miranda Theme; Santos, Reinaldo Souza-; Vasconcelos, Ana Gloria Godoi; Rozenfeld, Suely

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to characterize and estimate the frequency of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in the population treated at the Centro de Saúde Escola Germano Sinval Faria, a primary health care clinic in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro City, and to explore the relationship between adverse drug reactions and some of the patients' demographic and health characteristics. METHODS: This descriptive study was conducted via patient record review of incident cases between 2004 and 2008. RESULTS: Of the 176 patients studied, 41.5% developed one or more adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, totaling 126 occurrences. The rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs was higher among women, patients aged 50 years or older, those with four or more comorbidities, and those who used five or more drugs. Of the total reactions, 71.4% were mild. The organ systems most affected were as follows: the gastrointestinal tract (29.4%), the skin and appendages (21.4%), and the central and peripheral nervous systems (14.3%). Of the patients who experienced adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, 65.8% received no drug treatment for their adverse reactions, and 4.1% had one of the antituberculosis drugs suspended because of adverse reactions. “Probable reactions” (75%) predominated over “possible reactions” (24%). In the study sample, 64.3% of the reactions occurred during the first two months of treatment, and most (92.6%) of the reactions were ascribed to the combination of rifampicin + isoniazid + pyrazinamide (Regimen I). A high dropout rate from tuberculosis treatment (24.4%) was also observed. CONCLUSION: This study suggests a high rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs. PMID:23644852

  20. A research framework for pharmacovigilance in health social media: Identification and evaluation of patient adverse drug event reports.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Hsinchun

    2015-12-01

    Social media offer insights of patients' medical problems such as drug side effects and treatment failures. Patient reports of adverse drug events from social media have great potential to improve current practice of pharmacovigilance. However, extracting patient adverse drug event reports from social media continues to be an important challenge for health informatics research. In this study, we develop a research framework with advanced natural language processing techniques for integrated and high-performance patient reported adverse drug event extraction. The framework consists of medical entity extraction for recognizing patient discussions of drug and events, adverse drug event extraction with shortest dependency path kernel based statistical learning method and semantic filtering with information from medical knowledge bases, and report source classification to tease out noise. To evaluate the proposed framework, a series of experiments were conducted on a test bed encompassing about postings from major diabetes and heart disease forums in the United States. The results reveal that each component of the framework significantly contributes to its overall effectiveness. Our framework significantly outperforms prior work.

  1. Paradoxical and bidirectional drug effects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Silas W; Hauben, Manfred; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2012-03-01

    A paradoxical drug reaction constitutes an outcome that is opposite from the outcome that would be expected from the drug's known actions. There are three types: 1. A paradoxical response in a condition for which the drug is being explicitly prescribed. 2. Paradoxical precipitation of a condition for which the drug is indicated, when the drug is being used for an alternative indication. 3. Effects that are paradoxical in relation to an aspect of the pharmacology of the drug but unrelated to the usual indication. In bidirectional drug reactions, a drug may produce opposite effects, either in the same or different individuals, the effects usually being different from the expected beneficial effect. Paradoxical and bidirectional drug effects can sometimes be harnessed for benefit; some may be adverse. Such reactions arise in a wide variety of drug classes. Some are common; others are reported in single case reports. Paradoxical effects are often adverse, since they are opposite the direction of the expected effect. They may complicate the assessment of adverse drug reactions, pharmacovigilance, and clinical management. Bidirectional effects may be clinically useful or adverse. From a clinical toxicological perspective, altered pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics in overdose may exacerbate paradoxical and bidirectional effects. Certain antidotes have paradoxical attributes, complicating management. Apparent clinical paradoxical or bidirectional effects and reactions ensue when conflicts arise at different levels in self-regulating biological systems, as complexity increases from subcellular components, such as receptors, to cells, tissues, organs, and the whole individual. These may be incompletely understood. Mechanisms of such effects include different actions at the same receptor, owing to changes with time and downstream effects; stereochemical effects; multiple receptor targets with or without associated temporal effects; antibody-mediated reactions; three

  2. Adverse effects of common medications on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Samplaski, Mary K; Nangia, Ajay K

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of patients require long-term medication regimens at a young age, but the adverse effects of medications on male reproduction are often inadequately considered, recognized and investigated. Medications can affect male reproduction through central hormonal effects, direct gonadotoxic effects, effects on sperm function or on sexual function. For example, exogenous testosterone inhibits spermatogenesis through central suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal hormonal axis. 5α-reductase inhibitors can impair sexual function, decrease semen volume and negatively affect sperm parameters, depending on dose and treatment duration. α-Blockers might decrease seminal emission and cause retrograde ejaculation, depending on the receptor specificity and dose of the agent. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors seem to have variable effects based on the isoform inhibited and evidence is conflicting. Antihypertensive and psychotropic agents can affect sperm, sexual function and hormonal parameters. For antibiotics, the literature on effects on sperm and sperm function is limited and dated. Many chemotherapeutic agents have a direct gonadotoxic effect, depending on agents used, dosing and number of treatment cycles. Overall, many medications commonly used in urology can have effects on male fertility (mostly reversible) but conclusive evidence in humans is often limited. Men should be counselled appropriately about potential drug-related adverse effects on their fertility.

  3. Improving drug safety: From adverse drug reaction knowledge discovery to clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yuxiang; Hu, Yong; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Yin, Zhinan; Chen, Xue-Wen; Liu, Mei

    2016-11-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern, causing over 100,000 fatalities in the United States every year with an annual cost of $136 billion. Early detection and accurate prediction of ADRs is thus vital for drug development and patient safety. Multiple scientific disciplines, namely pharmacology, pharmacovigilance, and pharmacoinformatics, have been addressing the ADR problem from different perspectives. With the same goal of improving drug safety, this article summarizes and links the research efforts in the multiple disciplines into a single framework from comprehensive understanding of the interactions between drugs and biological system and the identification of genetic and phenotypic predispositions of patients susceptible to higher ADR risks and finally to the current state of implementation of medication-related decision support systems. We start by describing available computational resources for building drug-target interaction networks with biological annotations, which provides a fundamental knowledge for ADR prediction. Databases are classified by functions to help users in selection. Post-marketing surveillance is then introduced where data-driven approach can not only enhance the prediction accuracy of ADRs but also enables the discovery of genetic and phenotypic risk factors of ADRs. Understanding genetic risk factors for ADR requires well organized patient genetics information and analysis by pharmacogenomic approaches. Finally, current state of clinical decision support systems is presented and described how clinicians can be assisted with the integrated knowledgebase to minimize the risk of ADR. This review ends with a discussion of existing challenges in each of disciplines with potential solutions and future directions.

  4. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: Myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kejian; Weng, Zuquan; Sun, Liya; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; He, Lin

    2015-02-13

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Drugs causing common toxicity lead to similar in vitro gene expression changes. • We built a model to predict drug toxicity with drug-specific expression profiles. • Drugs with FDA black box warnings were effectively identified by our model. • In vitro assay can detect severe toxicity in the early stage of drug development.

  5. Evaluation of neuroprotection by melatonin against adverse effects of prenatal exposure to a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug during peripheral nerve development.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Ilknur; Kaplan, Suleyman; Kalkan, Serpil; Sutcu, Mustafa; Ulkay, M Basak; Esener, O Burak

    2015-04-01

    The potential ability of melatonin to protect against impairment of the fetal peripheral nerve system due to maternal consumption of diclofenac sodium (DS) was investigated. Eighty-four pregnant rats were divided into seven groups: control (CONT), saline administered (PS), DS administered (DS), DS with low-dose melatonin administered (DS+MLT10), DS with high-dose melatonin administered (DS+MLT50), low-dose melatonin administered (MLT10), and high-dose melatonin administered (MLT50). After the pregnancy, six male newborn rats from each group were sacrificed at 4 and 20 weeks of age. Their right sciatic nerves were harvested, and nerve fibers were evaluated using stereological techniques. Mean numbers of myelinated axons, axon cross-section areas and the mean thickness of the myelin sheet were estimated. Four-week-old prenatally DS-exposed rats had significantly fewer axons, a smaller myelinated axonal area, and a thinner myelin sheath compared to CONT group (p<0.05). Although melatonin at both doses significantly increased axon numbers, only a high dose of melatonin increased the diameter of those axons (p<0.05). At 20-weeks of age, myelinated axon number in the DS group was not only significantly lower than all other groups (p<0.05) but also the cross-sectional area of these axons was smaller than all other groups (p<0.05). There were no differences between the groups regarding the mean thickness of the myelin sheet. The current study indicates that prenatal exposure to DS decreases the number and the diameter of sciatic nerve axons and that melatonin prophylaxis can prevent these effects.

  6. Energy drink use and adverse effects among emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Nordt, Sean Patrick; Vilke, Gary M; Clark, Richard F; Lee Cantrell, F; Chan, Theodore C; Galinato, Melissa; Nguyen, Vincent; Castillo, Edward M

    2012-10-01

    Energy drink usage is common and contains caffeine or other stimulants. We evaluated demographics, prevalence, reasons and adverse effects with consuming energy beverages. Cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of patients recruited from two San Diego Emergency Departments from January to December 2009. One-thousand-two-hundred-ninety-eight subjects participated of which 52.6% were male. Ethnicity: Caucasian 48.3%, African American 17%, Hispanic 18%, Other 16.7%. Age ranges: 18-29 years (38.4%), 30-54 years (49.6%) and greater than 55 years (12%). Reasons for use: 57% to "increase energy", 9.5% for studying/work projects, 2.4% while prolonged driving, improve sports performance 2%, with ethanol 6.3%, "other" reasons 22.1%. Adverse reactions reported by 33.5% (429) patients. Two-hundred-eighty report feeling "shaky/jittery", insomnia 136, palpitations 150, gastrointestinal upset 82, headache 68, chest pain 39, and seizures in 6. Eighty-five patients reported co-ingestion with illicit "stimulants" including cocaine and methamphetamine. We identified one-third of patients reported at least one adverse effect. Whilst most were not severe, a small number were serious e.g., seizures. In addition, some report purposely ingesting with illicit drugs.

  7. Differences in reproductive toxicology between alopecia drugs: an analysis on adverse events among female and male cases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia is a dermatological condition with limited therapeutic options. Only two drugs, finasteride and minoxidil, are approved by FDA for alopecia treatment. However, little is known about the differences in adverse effects between these two drugs. We examined the clinical reports submitted to the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) from 2004 to 2014. For both female and males, finasteride was found to be more associated with reproductive toxicity as compared to minoxidil. Among male alopecia cases, finasteride was significantly more concurrent with several forms of sexual dysfunction. Among female alopecia cases, finasteride was significantly more concurrent with harm to fetus and disorder of uterus. In addition, drug-gene network analysis indicated that finasteride could profoundly disturb pathways related to sex hormone signaling and oocyte maturation. These findings could provide clues for subsequent toxicological research. Taken together, this analysis suggested that finasteride could be more liable to various reproductive adverse effects. Some of these adverse effects have yet to be warned in FDA-approved drug label. This information can help improve the treatment regimen of alopecia and post-marketing regulation of drug products. PMID:27738338

  8. [Pharmacogenomic research for avoiding adverse reactions by anti-cancer drugs].

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro

    2011-02-01

    Anti-cancer drugs have relatively low effective rates and high frequencies of adverse reactions, occasionally leading to cessation of their treatments. Use of pharmacogenomic (PGx) information could be able to select the patients with high-response and less-adverse reactions, resulting in increase of patients' QOL and proper use of drugs. We have been collaborating with National Cancer Center for PGx analysis of anti-cancer drugs including irinotecan and gemcitabine in Japanese cancer patients. Irinotecan, now used for treatments of many cancers, is metabolically activated to SN-38 and then inactivated to SN-38 glucuronide by a UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGT1A1. In the UGT1A1 gene, two representative genetic polymorphisms, *28 and *6, were detected at 0.138 and 0.167, respectively in 177 Japanese cancer patients. When the patients were homozygotes of *28 or *6, or compound heterozygotes of them, statistically significant decreases were observed in the SN-38 glucuronidation activity and increases in the rate of severe neutropenia, compared to those in the patients without *28 or *6. Our results and papers were cited in the Japanese package inserts of irinotecan. Gemcitabine was inactivated by cytidine deaminase (CDA) into 2'-2'-difluorodeoxyuridine. A CDA polymorphism 208G>A (Ala70Thr) was detected at 0.037 frequency in 256 Japanese cancer patients and associated with reduced gemcitabine clearance as well as increased frequency of severe neutropenia. In the 4 patients suffered from very severe bone marrow toxicities, 3 patients were homozygous CDA*3, suggesting that this polymorphism is exquisite for predicting severe adverse reactions by gemcitabine in Japanese.

  9. A prospective study of adverse drug reactions as a cause of admission to a paediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    MARTÍNEZ-MIR, I.; GARCÍA-LÓPEZ, M.; PALOP, V.; FERRER, J. M.; ESTAÑ, L.; RUBIO, E.; MORALES-OLIVAS, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    1A total of 512 consecutive paediatric hospital admissions of children 2 years old or less were evaluated to assess the extent and pattern of admission caused by suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The proportion of suspected ADRs related to hospital admissions was 4.3%. 2The organ-systems most commonly implicated were the central nervous system (40.5%), digestive system (16.7%), and skin and appendages (14.3%). Together, they accounted for 71.5% of admissions attributed to ADRs. The most common clinical manifestations inducing admission were convulsions (4 cases), dizziness (4), vomiting (3), and tremor, fever, itching and apnoea (2 cases each). 3The four classes of drugs most frequently suspected in admissions due to ADRs were respiratory drugs (35%), anti-infective agents (25%), drugs active on the central nervous system (15%) and drugs used in dermatology (10%). The most common drugs related to ADRs were a combination of chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, phenylephrine, guaiphenesin and salicylic acid (4 cases), followed by fenoterol, adrenaline, paracetamol, DTP vaccine and antipolio vaccine (2 cases each). 4There were no significant differences between children older and younger than 1 year (odds ratio 0.89; 95% CI 0.37–2.17) or between the sexes as regards hospital admittance due to suspected ADRs (odds ratio 1.94; 95% CI 0.72–5.42). 5The results of this kind of study may be influenced by patterns of drug utilization. Nevertheless, the lack of specific studies of drug effects in young children makes it desirable to carry out pharmacoepidemiological studies in this age group. PMID:8877022

  10. Adverse effects of gentamicin in scarlet macaws and galahs.

    PubMed

    Flammer, K; Clark, C H; Drewes, L A; Wilson, R C; Fiorello-Barrett, J

    1990-03-01

    The adverse effects of administration of gentamicin (5 mg/kg of body weight, IM, q 12 h) for 7 days were studied in healthy scarlet macaws (Ara macao) and galahs (Eolophus roseicapillus; cockatoos). Polydipsia and polyuria developed in each species, but were greater and persisted longer in the cockatoos. Peak water intake in the cockatoos more than quadrupled, and remained increased for 23 days after cessation of gentamicin administration. Plasma aspartate transaminase activity increased significantly (P less than 0.05) after treatment in the macaws, and plasma aspartate transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase activities increased in the cockatoos. Single IM administration of gentamicin (5 mg/kg) resulted in mean (+/- SEM) plasma concentration of 20.6 (+/- 1.85) micrograms/ml at 0.5 hour for either species of birds. There were no significant differences between mean plasma gentamicin concentrations for cockatoos and macaws at any time after drug administration, except at 12 hours, when values for cockatoos were significantly (P less than 0.05) greater than those for macaws. The elimination half-life for gentamicin after IM administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg was 1.17 and 1.07 hours, respectively, for macaws and 1.23 and 1.44 hours, respectively, for cockatoos. Correlation between drug disposition and adverse side effects could not be detected.

  11. [Methodology for Estimating the Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions in Pregnant Women: Analysis of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takamasa; Ohtsu, Fumiko; Sekiya, Yasuaki; Mori, Chiyo; Sakata, Hiroshi; Goto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Safety information regarding drug use during pregnancy is insufficient. The present study aimed to establish an optimal signal detection method to identify adverse drug reactions in pregnant women and to evaluate information in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database between April 2004 and November 2014. We identified reports on pregnant women using the Standardised MedDRA Queries. We calculated the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) and reporting odds ratio (ROR) of the risk factors for the two known risks of antithyroid drugs and methimazole (MMI) embryopathy, and ritodrine and fetal/infant cardiovascular events. The PRR and ROR values differed between all reports in the JADER database and those on pregnant women, affecting whether signal detection criteria were met. Therefore we considered that reports on pregnant women should be used when risks associated with pregnancy were determined using signal detection. Analyses of MMI embryopathy revealed MMI signals [PRR, 159.7; ROR, 669.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 282.4-1588.7] but no propylthiouracil signals (PRR, 1.98; ROR, 2.0; 95%CI, 0.3-15.4). These findings were consistent with those of reported risks. Analyses of fetal/infant cardiovascular events revealed ritodrine signals (PRR, 2.1; ROR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.3). These findings were also consistent with reported risks. Mining the JADER database was helpful for analyzing adverse drug reactions in pregnant women.

  12. Identifying genomic and developmental causes of adverse drug reactions in children

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Mara L; Leeder, J Steven

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a concern for all clinicians who utilize medications to treat adults and children; however, the frequency of adult and pediatric adverse drug reactions is likely to be under-reported. In this age of genomics and personalized medicine, identifying genetic variation that results in differences in drug biotransformation and response has contributed to significant advances in the utilization of several commonly used medications in adults. In order to better understand the variability of drug response in children however, we must not only consider differences in genotype, but also variation in gene expression during growth and development, namely ontogeny. In this article, recommendations for systematically approaching pharmacogenomic studies in children are discussed, and several examples of studies that investigate the genomic and developmental contribution to adverse drug reactions in children are reviewed. PMID:21121777

  13. Reporting of adverse events for marketed drugs: Need for strengthening safety database

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Aditi Anand

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is an evolving discipline in the Indian context. However, there is limited regulatory guidance for adverse event reporting outside the purview of clinical trials. There are number of deficiencies in the framework for adverse event reporting from the perspective of pharma industry, health-care professional and general public due to which adverse events for marketed drugs are highly underreported. This article discusses the need to strengthen national safety database by promoting and mandating reporting of adverse events by all the stakeholders. PMID:27453826

  14. Denosumab. Limited efficacy in fracture prevention, too many adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    The standard drug for postmenopausal osteoporotic women with a high risk of fracture is alendronic acid, used in conjunction with non-drug measures. There are no drugs with demonstrated efficacy on the risk of fracture in castrated men with prostate cancer. Denosumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits a cytokine acting mainly on bone cells and lymphocytes, has been authorised in the European Union for use in both these settings. There are no trials comparing denosumab versus alendronic acid for symptomatic fracture prevention. In two trials involving 1189 and 504 women, the incidence of clinical fractures, recorded as simple adverse effects, did not differ significantly between the groups. In a placebo-controlled trial in about 7900 elderly osteoporotic women, denosumab significantly reduced the incidence of symptomatic vertebral fractures (0.8% versus 2.6% after 3 years) and hip fractures (0.7% versus 1.2%). An indirect comparison, providing weak evidence, suggests that denosumab is less effective than alendronic acid. In a placebo-controlled trial in 1468 castrated men with prostate cancer, denosumab did not reduce the incidence of symptomatic fractures after 3 years. Only the incidence of vertebral fractures, detected on routine radiographs, showed a statistically significant decline (1.5% versus 3.5%). Denosumab has numerous adverse effects. In placebo-controlled trials, this monoclonal antibody was associated with a higher incidence of deep-seated infections such as endocarditis, cancer, and skin rash. More data are needed on the risk of pancreatitis, long-term bone disorders (atypical fractures, delayed fracture healing, osteonecrosis of the jaw), hypocalcaemia and cataracts, all of which were reported in clinical trials. In practice, denosumab is not sufficiently effective to outweigh its established and potential risks in postmenopausal osteoporotic women or in castrated men with prostate cancer.

  15. The radiology of adverse drug reactions and toxic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Ansell, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dr. Ansell has produced a scholarly review of the radiology of drug reactions and toxic hazards in his latest book, which is based on over 1,200 articles in the world literature. About 800 of these articles are taken from outside the radiology literature, which indicates the need for this subject to be brought to the attention of the radiologist, particularly as concern about drug reactions and toxic hazards is always increasing. The book includes sections covering the chest, gastrointestinal tract, renal tract, skeletal system and soft tissues, and skull and central nervous system. Each section treats specific substances, such as steroids and heavy metals; specific radiologic signs, such as ureteric dilation; specific symptoms, such as dysphagia; industrial toxins; radiographic abnormalities are discussed; and numerous high-quality radiographs.

  16. Risk factors for adverse drug reactions--epidemiological approaches.

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R; Lawson, D H; Weber, E

    1990-01-01

    Age by itself is not an important risk factor for ADRs. Age-related changes are the consequence of a number of individual factors, for example morbidity associated with polypharmacy, decline in renal or liver function in the elderly, hypoalbuminaemia, reduced body weight, etc. The relationship between gastrointestinal bleeding and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be assessed globally in large cohort studies with access to computerized data, but complete accuracy requires access to the original patient records. The increase in the risk of GI bleeding in users of NSAIDs and aspirin was 50% above that in non-users. About a quarter of ADRs in hospitalized patients seem not to arise from purely pharmacological mechanisms. They are mainly due to allergic, anaphylactoid, or idiosyncratic reactions and to intolerance. In such non-pharmacological reactions, the time of exposure, reaction time, and even dosage may be important factors in identification of the causal drug. The use of benzodiazepines can be optimized by taking into account potency, time of action and the different syndromes encountered after withdrawal. Following long-term use problems of relapse and rebound are being increasingly recognized, in addition to organic withdrawal symptoms. In psychiatric patients extrapyramidal disorders due to neuroleptics are common. The rates of these ADRs differ markedly between various drugs, even after dosages and co-medications are taken into account. Epidemiological screening for potentially carcinogenic drugs can only be done in large cohorts of patients with pre-recorded full information sets as may be found in an HMO (Health Maintenance Organization). The findings of several such studies have been published in specialist cancer journals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. 21 CFR 310.305 - Records and reports concerning adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and reporting of postmarketing adverse drug experiences to FDA. (b) Definitions. The following... severity) if the labeling only referred to elevated hepatic enzymes or hepatitis. Similarly, cerebral... and Drug Administration, 5901-B Ammendale Rd., Beltsville, MD 20705-1266. (1) Postmarketing...

  18. Hospitalizations Due to Adverse Drug Events in the Elderly—A Retrospective Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Laatikainen, Outi; Sneck, Sami; Bloigu, Risto; Lahtinen, Minna; Lauri, Timo; Turpeinen, Miia

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are more likely to affect geriatric patients due to physiological changes occurring with aging. Even though this is an internationally recognized problem, similar research data in Finland is still lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the number of geriatric medication-related hospitalizations in the Finnish patient population and to discover the potential means of recognizing patients particularly at risk of ADEs. The study was conducted retrospectively from the 2014 emergency department patient records in Oulu University Hospital. A total number of 290 admissions were screened for ADEs, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) by a multi-disciplinary research team. Customized Naranjo scale was used as a control method. All admissions were categorized into “probable,” “possible,” or “doubtful” by both assessment methods. In total, 23.1% of admissions were categorized as “probably” or “possibly” medication-related. Vertigo, falling, and fractures formed the largest group of ADEs. The most common ADEs were related to medicines from N class of the ATC-code system. Age, sex, residence, or specialty did not increase the risk for medication-related admission significantly (min p = 0.077). Polypharmacy was, however, found to increase the risk (OR 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5–6.9; p = 0.01). In conclusion, screening patients for specific demographics or symptoms would not significantly improve the recognition of ADEs. In addition, as ADE detection today is largely based on voluntary reporting systems and retrospective manual tracking of errors, it is evident that more effective methods for ADE detection are needed in the future. PMID:27761112

  19. Adverse effects of cow's milk in infants.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2007-01-01

    The feeding of cow's milk has adverse effects on iron nutrition in infants and young children. Several different mechanisms have been identified that may act synergistically. Probably most important is the low iron content of cow's milk. It makes it difficult for the infant to obtain the amounts of iron needed for growth. A second mechanism is the occult intestinal blood loss, which occurs in about 40% of normal infants during feeding of cow's milk. Loss of iron in the form of blood diminishes with age and ceases after 1 year of age. A third factor is calcium and casein provided by cow's milk in high amounts. Calcium and casein both inhibit the absorption of dietary nonheme iron. Infants fed cow's milk receive much more protein and minerals than they need. The excess has to be excreted in the urine. The high renal solute load leads to higher urine concentration during the feeding of cow's milk than during the feeding of breast milk or formula. When fluid intakes are low and/or when extrarenal water losses are high, the renal concentrating ability of infants may be insufficient for maintaining water balance in the face of high water use for excretion of the high renal solute. The resulting negative water balance, if prolonged, can lead to serious dehydration. There is strong epidemiological evidence that the feeding of cow's milk or formulas with similarly high potential renal solute load places infants at an increased risk of serious dehydration. The feeding of cow's milk to infants is undesirable because of cow's milk's propensity to lead to iron deficiency and because it unduly increases the risk of severe dehydration.

  20. Stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of an electronic medication management system to reduce medication errors, adverse drug events and average length of stay at two paediatric hospitals: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, J I; Li, L; Raban, M Z; Baysari, M T; Prgomet, M; Georgiou, A; Kim, T; Lake, R; McCullagh, C; Dalla-Pozza, L; Karnon, J; O'Brien, T A; Ambler, G; Day, R; Cowell, C T; Gazarian, M; Worthington, R; Lehmann, C U; White, L; Barbaric, D; Gardo, A; Kelly, M; Kennedy, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Medication errors are the most frequent cause of preventable harm in hospitals. Medication management in paediatric patients is particularly complex and consequently potential for harms are greater than in adults. Electronic medication management (eMM) systems are heralded as a highly effective intervention to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs), yet internationally evidence of their effectiveness in paediatric populations is limited. This study will assess the effectiveness of an eMM system to reduce medication errors, ADEs and length of stay (LOS). The study will also investigate system impact on clinical work processes. Methods and analysis A stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial (SWCRCT) will measure changes pre-eMM and post-eMM system implementation in prescribing and medication administration error (MAE) rates, potential and actual ADEs, and average LOS. In stage 1, 8 wards within the first paediatric hospital will be randomised to receive the eMM system 1 week apart. In stage 2, the second paediatric hospital will randomise implementation of a modified eMM and outcomes will be assessed. Prescribing errors will be identified through record reviews, and MAEs through direct observation of nurses and record reviews. Actual and potential severity will be assigned. Outcomes will be assessed at the patient-level using mixed models, taking into account correlation of admissions within wards and multiple admissions for the same patient, with adjustment for potential confounders. Interviews and direct observation of clinicians will investigate the effects of the system on workflow. Data from site 1 will be used to develop improvements in the eMM and implemented at site 2, where the SWCRCT design will be repeated (stage 2). Ethics and dissemination The research has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Sydney Children's Hospitals Network and Macquarie University. Results will be reported through academic journals and

  1. Effect of thyroid hormone status and concomitant medication on statin induced adverse effects in hyperlipidemic patients.

    PubMed

    Berta, E; Harangi, M; Zsíros, N; Nagy, E V; Paragh, G; Bodor, M

    2014-06-01

    Statins are effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, adverse effects induced by statins are the major barrier of maximalizing cardiovascular risk reduction. Hypothyroidism and administration of drugs metabolized on the same cytochrome P450 (CYPP450) pathways where statin biotransformation occurs represent a significant risk factor for statin induced adverse effects including myopathy. Simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin are metabolized by CYP3A4, fluvastatin by CYP2C9, while rosuvastatin by CYP2C9 and 2C19. We investigated the levels of the free thyroid hormones and CYP metabolism of concomitant medication in 101 hyperlipidemic patients (age 61.3 +/- 9.9 ys) with statin induced adverse effects including myopathy (56 cases; 55.4%), hepatopathy (39 cases; 38.6%) and gastrointestinal adverse effects (24 cases; 23.8%). Abnormal thyroid hormone levels were found in 5 patients (4.95%); clinical hypothyroidism in 2 and hyperthyroidism in 3 cases. 11 patients had a positive history for hypothyroidism (10.9%). Myopathy occured in one patient with hypothyroidism and two patients with hyperthyroidism. There were no significant differences in the TSH, fT4 and fT3 levels between patients with statin induced myopathy and patients with other types of adverse effects. 78 patients (77.2%) were administered drugs metabolized by CYP isoforms also used by statins (3A4: 66 cases (65.3%); 2C9: 67 cases (66.3%); 2C19: 54 cases (53.5%)). Patients with myopathy took significantly more drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 compared to patients with other types of adverse effects (p < 0.05). More myopathy cases were found in patients on simvastatin treatment (52% vs. 38%, ns.), while significantly less patients with myopathy were on fluvastatin treatment (13% vs. 33%, p < 0.05) compared to patients with other types of statin induced adverse effects. Both abnormal thyroid hormone status and administration of drugs metabolized by CYP

  2. Adverse drug reactions in neonates and infants: a population-tailored approach is needed

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, Johannes N

    2015-01-01

    Drug therapy is a powerful tool to improve outcome, but there is an urgent need to improve pharmacotherapy in neonates through tailored prevention and management of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). At present, infants commonly receive off-label drugs, at dosages extrapolated from those in children or adults. Besides the lack of labelling, inappropriate formulations, (poly)pharmacy, immature organ function and multiple illnesses further raise the risk for ADRs in neonates and infants. Pharmacovigilance to improve the prevention and management of ADRs needs to be tailored to neonates and infants. We illustrate this using prevention strategies for drug prescription and administration errors (e.g. formulation, bedside manipulation, access), detection through laboratory signalling or clinical outlier data (e.g. reference laboratory values, overall high morbidity), assessment through algorithm scoring (e.g. Naranjo or population specific), as well as understanding of the developmental toxicology (e.g. covariates, developmental pharmacology) to avoid re-occurrence and for development of guidelines. Such tailored strategies need collaborative initiatives to combine the knowledge and expertise of different disciplines, but hold promise to become a very effective tool to improve pharmacotherapy and reduce ADRs in infants. PMID:24862557

  3. Adverse effects associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, E; Menon, D; Topfer, L A; Coloma, C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of antidepressant medications and the resulting costs have increased dramatically in recent years, partly because of the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). An assessment of the clinical and economic aspects of SSRIs compared with the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) was initiated to generate information for purchasers of these drugs as well as clinicians. One component of this study was an examination of the adverse effects associated with the use of these drugs. METHODS: Searches of bibliographic databases (for January 1980 through May 1996) and manual scanning of both peer-reviewed publications and other documents were used to identify double-blind, randomized controlled trials involving at least one SSRI and one TCA. For the study of adverse effects, only trials that had at least 20 patients in each trial arm and that reported rates of adverse effects in both arms were retained. In total 84 trials reporting on 18 adverse effects were available. Meta-analyses were undertaken to calculate pooled differences in rates of adverse effects. The question of whether the method of eliciting information from patients about adverse effects made a difference in the findings was also examined. Finally, differences in drop-out rates due to adverse effects were calculated. RESULTS: The crude rates of occurrence of adverse effects ranged from 4% (palpitations) to 26% (nausea) for SSRIs and from 4% (diarrhea) to 27% (dry mouth) for TCAs. The differences in the rates of adverse effects between the 2 types of drugs ranged from 14% more with SSRIs (for nausea) to 11% more with TCAs (for constipation). The results did not depend on the method of eliciting information from patients. There were no statistically significant differences between drug classes in terms of drop-outs due to adverse effects. INTERPRETATION: SSRIs and TCAs are both associated with adverse effects, although the key effects differ between the drug classes

  4. Does Cannabidiol Protect Against Adverse Psychological Effects of THC?

    PubMed

    Niesink, Raymond J M; van Laar, Margriet W

    2013-10-16

    The recreational use of cannabis can have persistent adverse effects on mental health. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, and most, if not all, of the effects associated with the use of cannabis are caused by THC. Recent studies have suggested a possible protective effect of another cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD). A literature search was performed in the bibliographic databases PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science using the keyword "cannabidiol." After removing duplicate entries, 1295 unique titles remained. Based on the titles and abstracts, an initial selection was made. The reference lists of the publications identified in this manner were examined for additional references. Cannabis is not a safe drug. Depending on how often someone uses, the age of onset, the potency of the cannabis that is used and someone's individual sensitivity, the recreational use of cannabis may cause permanent psychological disorders. Most recreational users will never be faced with such persistent mental illness, but in some individuals cannabis use leads to undesirable effects: cognitive impairment, anxiety, paranoia, and increased risks of developing chronic psychosis or drug addiction. Studies examining the protective effects of CBD have shown that CBD can counteract the negative effects of THC. However, the question remains of how the laboratory results translate to the types of cannabis that are encountered by real-world recreational users.

  5. Stimulant Treatment over Five Years: Adherence, Effectiveness, and Adverse Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charach, Alice; Ickowicz, Abel; Schachar, Russell

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of adherence and medication status on effectiveness and adverse effects of stimulant use in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) over 5 years. Method: Seventy-nine of 91 participants in a 12-month randomized controlled trial of methylphenidate and parent groups enrolled in a follow-up…

  6. Clinicians' recognition of the metabolic adverse effects of antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Peter F; Miller, Del D; Singer, Beth; Arena, John; Stirewalt, Edna M

    2005-11-15

    There is a growing concern regarding the propensity of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) to induce weight gain and metabolic adverse effects. Recent consensus guidelines have recommended assessment and monitoring procedures to appropriately detect and manage these adverse effects. This study addresses the appreciation and readiness of clinicians to implement management guidelines for these adverse effects. Respondents indicated awareness of the risks of treatment with SGAs. The extent of monitoring for metabolic adverse effects was low and inconsistent across measures and in frequency of evaluation. Ongoing efforts are needed to support and encourage change in clinician practice.

  7. [Understanding and reducing the risk of adverse drug reactions in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Gotta, Verena; van den Anker, Johannes; Pfister, Marc

    2015-12-01

    Developmental pharmacology influences the safety profile of drugs in pediatrics. Altered pharmacokinetics and/ or pharmacodynamics of drugs make pediatric patients susceptible to adverse drug reactions (ADRs), especially infants and newborns. Since the efficacy/ safety balance of most available drugs has not been formally evaluated in pediatric clinical trials, optimal dosing is rarely known in pediatrics. Suboptimal pediatric drug formulations make dose optimization even more difficult exposing pediatric patients to medication errors like overdosing and associated ADRs. We provide an overview of pediatric ADRs and discuss recent regulatory and pharmacological measures to understand and reduce risk of ADRs in pediatric patients.

  8. Using Temporal Patterns in Medical Records to Discern Adverse Drug Events from Indications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; LePendu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan; Shah, Nigam H.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers estimate that electronic health record systems record roughly 2-million ambulatory adverse drug events and that patients suffer from adverse drug events in roughly 30% of hospital stays. Some have used structured databases of patient medical records and health insurance claims recently—going beyond the current paradigm of using spontaneous reporting systems like AERS—to detect drug-safety signals. However, most efforts do not use the free-text from clinical notes in monitoring for drug-safety signals. We hypothesize that drug–disease co-occurrences, extracted from ontology-based annotations of the clinical notes, can be examined for statistical enrichment and used for drug safety surveillance. When analyzing such co-occurrences of drugs and diseases, one major challenge is to differentiate whether the disease in a drug–disease pair represents an indication or an adverse event. We demonstrate that it is possible to make this distinction by combining the frequency distribution of the drug, the disease, and the drug-disease pair as well as the temporal ordering of the drugs and diseases in each pair across more than one million patients. PMID:22779050

  9. The adverse health effects of chronic cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the most probable of the adverse health effects of regular cannabis use sustained over years, as indicated by epidemiological studies that have established an association between cannabis use and adverse outcomes; ruled out reverse causation; and controlled for plausible alternative explanations. We have also focused on adverse outcomes for which there is good evidence of biological plausibility. The focus is on those adverse health effects of greatest potential public health significance--those that are most likely to occur and to affect a substantial proportion of regular cannabis users. These most probable adverse effects of regular use include a dependence syndrome, impaired respiratory function, cardiovascular disease, adverse effects on adolescent psychosocial development and mental health, and residual cognitive impairment.

  10. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review 1

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; de Oliveira, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. PMID:27598380

  11. 36 CFR 800.7 - Failure to resolve adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... effects. 800.7 Section 800.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.7 Failure to resolve adverse effects. (a) Termination of consultation. After consulting to resolve adverse effects pursuant to § 800.6(b)(2), the...

  12. [Pharmacology of misoprostol (pharmacokinetic data, adverse effects and teratogenic effects)].

    PubMed

    Aubert, J; Bejan-Angoulvant, T; Jonville-Bera, A-P

    2014-02-01

    Misoprostol is a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1. It is used in gynaecology because of its properties of myometrium smooth muscle cells contraction and its effects on the cervix. Misoprostol oral bioavailability is low and several authors have assessed whether the administration by other routes increased its pharmacodynamic effects. This paper summarizes the pharmacokinetic studies after other routes of administration: vaginal, sublingual, buccal or rectal. It also provides an update on its adverse effects and teratogenic effects.

  13. Systematic drug repositioning through mining adverse event data in ClinicalTrials.gov

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Todd M.

    2017-01-01

    Drug repositioning (i.e., drug repurposing) is the process of discovering new uses for marketed drugs. Historically, such discoveries were serendipitous. However, the rapid growth in electronic clinical data and text mining tools makes it feasible to systematically identify drugs with the potential to be repurposed. Described here is a novel method of drug repositioning by mining ClinicalTrials.gov. The text mining tools I2E (Linguamatics) and PolyAnalyst (Megaputer) were utilized. An I2E query extracts “Serious Adverse Events” (SAE) data from randomized trials in ClinicalTrials.gov. Through a statistical algorithm, a PolyAnalyst workflow ranks the drugs where the treatment arm has fewer predefined SAEs than the control arm, indicating that potentially the drug is reducing the level of SAE. Hypotheses could then be generated for the new use of these drugs based on the predefined SAE that is indicative of disease (for example, cancer). PMID:28348935

  14. Biometrical issues in the analysis of adverse events within the benefit assessment of drugs.

    PubMed

    Bender, Ralf; Beckmann, Lars; Lange, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of adverse events plays an important role in the benefit assessment of drugs. Consequently, results on adverse events are an integral part of reimbursement dossiers submitted by pharmaceutical companies to health policy decision-makers. Methods applied in the analysis of adverse events commonly include simple standard methods for contingency tables. However, the results produced may be misleading if observations are censored at the time of discontinuation due to treatment switching or noncompliance, resulting in unequal follow-up periods. In this paper, we present examples to show that the application of inadequate methods for the analysis of adverse events in the reimbursement dossier can lead to a downgrading of the evidence on a drug's benefit in the subsequent assessment, as greater harm from the drug cannot be excluded with sufficient certainty. Legal regulations on the benefit assessment of drugs in Germany are presented, in particular, with regard to the analysis of adverse events. Differences in safety considerations between the drug approval process and the benefit assessment are discussed. We show that the naive application of simple proportions in reimbursement dossiers frequently leads to uninterpretable results if observations are censored and the average follow-up periods differ between treatment groups. Likewise, the application of incidence rates may be misleading in the case of recurrent events and unequal follow-up periods. To allow for an appropriate benefit assessment of drugs, adequate survival time methods accounting for time dependencies and duration of follow-up are required, not only for time-to-event efficacy endpoints but also for adverse events. © 2016 The Authors. Pharmaceutical Statistics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparative evaluation of adverse drug reaction reporting forms for introduction of a spontaneous generic ADR form

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anshi; Bhatt, Parloop

    2012-01-01

    Despite comprehensive and stringent phases of clinical trials and surveillance efforts, unexpected and serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) repeatedly occur after the drug is marketed. ADR reporting is an important aspect of an efficient and effective pharmacovigilance program. Although Medwatch, Yellow Card, CDSCO form, etc. are the protocol forms of ADR collection and reports, a number of countries design and use their respective ADR forms. This review compares similarities and dissimilarities of 13 ADR forms of countries representing their geographical location. This study extracted 73 data elements mentioned in 13 different ADR forms. Only 13 elements were common. An ADR form of Malaysia and Canada covers the highest number of data 43, while Brazil falls to the opposite end with a number of 17 data elements in lieu with the Generic ADR Form. The result of this review highlights 58 data elements of the proposed generic ADR form which ensures that requisite reporting information essential for correct causality assessment of ADRs are included. The proposed “Generic ADR form” could be adopted worldwide mandatorily for reporting any/all ADRs associated with marketed drugs. PMID:23129957

  16. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  17. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  18. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  19. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  20. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  1. Melasma: A rare adverse effect of clomipramine.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sujita Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Melasma is a hyperpigmented dermatological condition common in females. Drugs such as steroids, cosmetics, and photosensitizing agents are known to cause melasma. We report here a case of an adult male with obsessive-compulsive disorder, receiving clomipramine, who developed melasma.

  2. Melasma: A rare adverse effect of clomipramine

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Sujita Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Melasma is a hyperpigmented dermatological condition common in females. Drugs such as steroids, cosmetics, and photosensitizing agents are known to cause melasma. We report here a case of an adult male with obsessive-compulsive disorder, receiving clomipramine, who developed melasma. PMID:27756961

  3. Adverse drug reactions to self-medication: a study in a pharmacovigilance database.

    PubMed

    Berreni, Aurélia; Montastruc, François; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Vanessa; Abadie, Delphine; Durrieu, Geneviève; Chebane, Leila; Giroud, Jean-Paul; Bagheri, Haleh; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2015-10-01

    Although self-medication is widely developed, there are few detailed data about its adverse drug reactions (ADRs). This study investigated the main characteristics of ADRs with self-medication recorded in the Midi-Pyrénées PharmacoVigilance between 2008 and 2014. Self-medication included first OTC drugs and second formerly prescribed drugs later used without medical advice (reuse of previously prescribed drugs). Among the 12 365 notifications recorded, 160 (1.3%) were related to SM with 186 drugs. Around three-forth of the ADRs were 'serious'. Mean age was 48.8 years with 56.3% females. The most frequent ADRs were gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric and main drug classes involved NSAIDs, analgesics, and benzodiazepines. Phytotherapy-homeopathy accounted for 9.1% of drugs.

  4. A review of the adverse effects and safety of noradrenergic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Whiskey, Eromona; Taylor, David

    2013-08-01

    There are a variety of noradrenergic antidepressants available, most of which act by inhibiting neuronal noradrenaline re-uptake, although few drugs are specific for this action. Where drugs have numerous actions the adverse effects of noradrenaline reuptake may be difficult to isolate, although in this respect the adverse effects of reboxetine, a specific noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor, are illuminating. Noradrenergic antidepressants typically cause minor changes in blood and heart rate, sweating and insomnia. Other pharmacological actions shown by non-specific antidepressants may act to worsen or mitigate these adverse effects. Noradrenergic drugs are less likely than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to cause sexual dysfunction but more likely to cause urinary hesitancy. Doubts remain over the relative propensity for antidepressants with different modes of action to cause diabetes and hyponatraemia. Noradrenergic actions do not seem to confer a risk of death in overdose.

  5. Factors Affecting Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting of Healthcare Professionals and Their Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice towards ADR Reporting in Nekemte Town, West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gurmesa, Lense Temesgen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Adverse drug reactions are global problems of major concern. Adverse drug reaction reporting helps the drug monitoring system to detect the unwanted effects of those drugs which are already in the market. Aims. To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of health care professionals working in Nekemte town towards adverse drug reaction reporting. Methods and Materials. A cross-sectional study design was conducted on a total of 133 health care professionals by interview to assess their knowledge, attitude, and practice using structured questionnaire. Results. Of the total respondents, only 64 (48.2%), 56 (42.1%), and 13 (9.8%) health care professionals have correctly answered the knowledge, attitude, and practice assessment questions, respectively. Lack of awareness and knowledge on what, when, and to whom to report adverse drug reactions and lack of commitments of health care professionals were identified as the major discouraging factors against adverse drug reaction reporting. Conclusion. This study has revealed that the knowledge, attitude, and practice of the health care professionals working in Nekemte town towards spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting were low that we would like to recommend the concerned bodies to strive on the improvement of the knowledge, attitude, and practice status of health care professionals. PMID:28042569

  6. Evaluating the Capability of Information Technology to Prevent Adverse Drug Events: A Computer Simulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James G.; Jay, Stephen J.; Anderson, Marilyn; Hunt, Thaddeus J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: The annual cost of morbidity and mortality due to medication errors in the U.S. has been estimated at $76.6 billion. Information technology implemented systematically has the potential to significantly reduce medication errors that result in adverse drug events (ADEs). Objective: To develop a computer simulation model that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of information technology applications designed to detect and prevent medication errors that result in adverse drug effects. Methods: A computer simulation model was constructed representing the medication delivery system in a hospital. STELLA, a continuous simulation software package, was used to construct the model. Parameters of the model were estimated from a study of prescription errors on two hospital medical/surgical units and used in the baseline simulation. Five prevention strategies were simulated based on information obtained from the literature. Results: The model simulates the four stages of the medication delivery system: prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administering drugs. We simulated interventions that have been demonstrated in prior studies to decrease error rates. The results suggest that an integrated medication delivery system can save up to 1,226 days of excess hospitalization and $1.4 million in associated costs annually in a large hospital. The results of the analyses regarding the effects of the interventions on the additional hospital costs associated with ADEs are somewhat sensitive to the distribution of errors in the hospital, more sensitive to the costs of an ADE, and most sensitive to the proportion of medication errors resulting in ADEs. Conclusions: The results suggest that clinical information systems are potentially a cost-effective means of preventing ADEs in hospitals and demonstrate the importance of viewing medication errors from a systems perspective. Prevention efforts that focus on a single stage of the process had limited impact on the

  7. Ropinirole: new indication. Restless legs: disproportionate adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2006-10-01

    (1) The restless legs syndrome consists of unpleasant sensory and motor symptoms of varying intensity in the lower limbs. Symptoms occur at rest, seated or lying down, are more intense in the evening and at night, and are relieved by moving the limb. This syndrome does not cause serious physical complications. When sleep disturbances occur, non drug methods should be tried first. (2) Ropinirole is a dopaminergic agonist initially marketed for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. It is the first drug to be approved for restless legs syndrome in France. (3) Three double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trials with similar designs showed minimal differences on a composite rating scale. After 12 weeks of treatment, ropinirole led to an improvement of about 3 points on a 40-point scale compared with placebo. (4) A 12-week double-blind randomised controlled trial and including patients who had "responded" to ropinirole showed a lower relapse rate in the group that continued to use ropinirole (32.6%) instead of switching to placebo (57.8%). However, we do not know if this was because of continued drug efficacy or a rebound effect in the placebo group. (5) The adverse effects of ropinirole in patients with restless legs syndrome had already been observed in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and included nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, a sudden urge to sleep, syncope, hypotension, and hallucinations. (6) An increase in the severity of restless legs symptoms, typically seen with levodopa, was not evaluated in clinical trials of ropinirole. Some cases have nevertheless been reported. They describe the appearance of symptoms increasingly early in the evening, then in the afternoon, or as a rebound effect in the morning or the latter part of the night. Their intensity increases and can affect other parts of the body. (7) In practice, ropinirole has a negative risk-benefit balance in restless legs syndrome, which is a minor health disorder.

  8. Identifying adverse drug event information in clinical notes with distributional semantic representations of context.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Aron; Kvist, Maria; Dalianis, Hercules; Duneld, Martin

    2015-10-01

    For the purpose of post-marketing drug safety surveillance, which has traditionally relied on the voluntary reporting of individual cases of adverse drug events (ADEs), other sources of information are now being explored, including electronic health records (EHRs), which give us access to enormous amounts of longitudinal observations of the treatment of patients and their drug use. Adverse drug events, which can be encoded in EHRs with certain diagnosis codes, are, however, heavily underreported. It is therefore important to develop capabilities to process, by means of computational methods, the more unstructured EHR data in the form of clinical notes, where clinicians may describe and reason around suspected ADEs. In this study, we report on the creation of an annotated corpus of Swedish health records for the purpose of learning to identify information pertaining to ADEs present in clinical notes. To this end, three key tasks are tackled: recognizing relevant named entities (disorders, symptoms, drugs), labeling attributes of the recognized entities (negation, speculation, temporality), and relationships between them (indication, adverse drug event). For each of the three tasks, leveraging models of distributional semantics - i.e., unsupervised methods that exploit co-occurrence information to model, typically in vector space, the meaning of words - and, in particular, combinations of such models, is shown to improve the predictive performance. The ability to make use of such unsupervised methods is critical when faced with large amounts of sparse and high-dimensional data, especially in domains where annotated resources are scarce.

  9. In Silico Elucidation of the Molecular Mechanism Defining the Adverse Effect of Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lei; Wang, Jian; Bourne, Philip E

    2007-01-01

    Early identification of adverse effect of preclinical and commercial drugs is crucial in developing highly efficient therapeutics, since unexpected adverse drug effects account for one-third of all drug failures in drug development. To correlate protein–drug interactions at the molecule level with their clinical outcomes at the organism level, we have developed an integrated approach to studying protein–ligand interactions on a structural proteome-wide scale by combining protein functional site similarity search, small molecule screening, and protein–ligand binding affinity profile analysis. By applying this methodology, we have elucidated a possible molecular mechanism for the previously observed, but molecularly uncharacterized, side effect of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). The side effect involves the inhibition of the Sacroplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ ion channel ATPase protein (SERCA) transmembrane domain. The prediction provides molecular insight into reducing the adverse effect of SERMs and is supported by clinical and in vitro observations. The strategy used in this case study is being applied to discover off-targets for other commercially available pharmaceuticals. The process can be included in a drug discovery pipeline in an effort to optimize drug leads and reduce unwanted side effects. PMID:18052534

  10. Adverse event management in mass drug administration for neglected tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur; Zink, Amanda

    2014-03-01

    The ethical challenges of reporting and managing adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) in the context of mass drug administration (MDA) for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) require reassessment of domestic and international policies on a global scale. Although the World Health Organization has set forth AE/SAE guidelines specifically for NTD MDA that incorporate suspected causality, and recommends that only SAEs get reported in this setting, most regulatory agencies continue to require the reporting of all SAEs exhibiting even a merely temporal relationship to activities associated with an MDA program. This greatly increases the potential for excess "noise" and undue risk aversion and is not only impractical but arguably unethical where huge proportions of populations are being treated for devastating diseases, and no good baseline exists against which to compare possible AE/SAE reports. Other population-specific variables that might change the way drug safety ought to be assessed include differing efficacy rates of a drug, background morbidity/mortality rates of the target disease in question, the growth rate of the incidence of disease, the availability of rescue or salvage therapies, and the willingness of local populations to take risks that other populations might not. The fact that NTDs are controllable and potentially eradicable with well-tolerated, effective, existing drugs might further alter our assessment of MDA safety and AE/SAE tolerability. At the same time, diffuseness of population, communication barriers, lack of resources, and other difficult surveillance challenges may present in NTD-affected settings. These limitations could impair the ability to monitor an MDA program's success, as well as hinder efforts to obtain informed consent or provide rescue therapy. Denying beneficial research interventions and MDA programs intended to benefit millions requires sound ethical justification based on more than the identification of

  11. An analysis of serious adverse drug reactions at a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Kinjal; Desai, Mira; Shah, Samidh; Panchal, Jigar; Kapadia, Jigar; Dikshit, Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the various aspects of serious adverse drug reactions (serious ADRs) such as clinical presentation, causality, severity, and preventability occurring in a hospital setting. Materials and Methods: All serious ADRs reported from January 2010 to May 2015 at ADR Monitoring Centre, Department of Pharmacology, B. J. Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, were selected as per the World health Organization –Uppsala Monitoring Center (WHO-UMC) criteria. A retrospective analysis was carried out for clinical presentation, causality (as per the WHO-UMC scale and Naranjo's algorithm), severity (Hartwig and Siegel scale), and preventability (Schumock and Thornton criteria). Results: Out of 2977 ADRs reported, 375 were serious in nature. The most common clinical presentation involved was skin and appendageal disorders (71, 18.9%). The common causal drug group was antitubercular (129, 34.4%) followed by antiretroviral (76, 20.3%) agents. The criteria for the majority of serious ADRs were intervention to prevent permanent impairment or damage (164, 43.7%) followed by hospitalization (158, 42.1%). Majority of the serious ADRs were continuing (191, 50.9%) at the time of reporting, few recovered (101, 26.9%), and two were fatal. The majority of serious ADRs were categorized as possible (182, 48.8%) followed by probable (173, 46.1%) in nature. Conclusion: Antitubercular, antiretroviral, and antimicrobial drugs were the most common causal drug groups for serious ADRs. This calls for robust ADR monitoring system and education of patients and prescribers for identification and effective management. PMID:27843794

  12. Adverse event profile of tigecycline: data mining of the public version of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration adverse event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Kadoyama, Kaori; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki; Tamon, Akiko; Okuno, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and/or pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics considerations may result in off-label use of a certain class of antibacterials, including tigecycline. This study was performed to clarify the safety profile of tigecycline in the user-derived manner and to compare it with the prescribing information provided by the manufacturer. Numerous spontaneous adverse event reports (AERs) submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were analyzed after a revision of arbitrary drug names and the deletion of duplicated submissions. Standardized official pharmacovigilance tools were used for quantitative detection of signals, i.e., drug-associated adverse events, including the proportional reporting ratio, the reporting odds ratio, the information component given by a Bayesian confidence propagation neural network, and the empirical Bayes geometric mean. Based on 22017956 co-occurrences, i.e., drug-adverse event pairs, found in 1644220 AERs from 2004 to 2009, 248 adverse events were suggested as tigecycline-associated ones. Adverse events with a relatively high frequency included nausea, vomiting, pancreatitis, hepatic failure, hypoglycemia, and increase in levels of alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase. It is noted that cholestasis, jaundice, an increase in International Normalized Ratio, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome were also, although they were infrequent. The adverse events suggested were in agreement with information provided by the manufacturer, suggesting that off-label use hardly results in unexpected adverse events, presumably due to usage with extreme caution.

  13. Drug target prediction using adverse event report systems: a pharmacogenomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Takarabe, Masataka; Kotera, Masaaki; Nishimura, Yosuke; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Unexpected drug activities derived from off-targets are usually undesired and harmful; however, they can occasionally be beneficial for different therapeutic indications. There are many uncharacterized drugs whose target proteins (including the primary target and off-targets) remain unknown. The identification of all potential drug targets has become an important issue in drug repositioning to reuse known drugs for new therapeutic indications. Results: We defined pharmacological similarity for all possible drugs using the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) adverse event reporting system (AERS) and developed a new method to predict unknown drug–target interactions on a large scale from the integration of pharmacological similarity of drugs and genomic sequence similarity of target proteins in the framework of a pharmacogenomic approach. The proposed method was applicable to a large number of drugs and it was useful especially for predicting unknown drug–target interactions that could not be expected from drug chemical structures. We made a comprehensive prediction for potential off-targets of 1874 drugs with known targets and potential target profiles of 2519 drugs without known targets, which suggests many potential drug–target interactions that were not predicted by previous chemogenomic or pharmacogenomic approaches. Availability: Softwares are available upon request. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp Supplementary Information: Datasets and all results are available at http://cbio.ensmp.fr/~yyamanishi/aers/. PMID:22962489

  14. Enzymes approved for human therapy: indications, mechanisms and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2015-02-01

    Research and drug developments fostered under orphan drug product development programs have greatly assisted the introduction of efficient and safe enzyme-based therapies for a range of rare disorders. The introduction and regulatory approval of 20 different recombinant enzymes has enabled, often for the first time, effective enzyme-replacement therapy for some lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher (imiglucerase, taliglucerase, and velaglucerase), Fabry (agalsidase alfa and beta), and Pompe (alglucosidase alfa) diseases and mucopolysaccharidoses I (laronidase), II (idursulfase), IVA (elosulfase), and VI (galsulfase). Approved recombinant enzymes are also now used as therapy for myocardial infarction (alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase), cystic fibrosis (dornase alfa), chronic gout (pegloticase), tumor lysis syndrome (rasburicase), leukemia (L-asparaginase), some collagen-based disorders such as Dupuytren's contracture (collagenase), severe combined immunodeficiency disease (pegademase bovine), detoxification of methotrexate (glucarpidase), and vitreomacular adhesion (ocriplasmin). The development of these efficacious and safe enzyme-based therapies has occurred hand in hand with some remarkable advances in the preparation of the often specifically designed recombinant enzymes; the manufacturing expertise necessary for commercial production; our understanding of underlying mechanisms operative in the different diseases; and the mechanisms of action of the relevant recombinant enzymes. Together with information on these mechanisms, safety findings recorded so far on the various adverse events and problems of immunogenicity of the recombinant enzymes used for therapy are presented.

  15. Second-Generation Antipsychotics and Extrapyramidal Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Jakovcevski, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects are well recognized in the context of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. However, the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, with atypical mechanism of action, especially lower dopamine receptors affinity, was met with great expectations among clinicians regarding their potentially lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal syndrome. This review gives a brief summary of the recent literature relevant to second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal syndrome. Numerous studies have examined the incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. The majority of these studies clearly indicate that extrapyramidal syndrome does occur with second-generation agents, though in lower rates in comparison with first generation. Risk factors are the choice of a particular second-generation agent (with clozapine carrying the lowest risk and risperidone the highest), high doses, history of previous extrapyramidal symptoms, and comorbidity. Also, in comparative studies, the choice of a first-generation comparator significantly influences the results. Extrapyramidal syndrome remains clinically important even in the era of second-generation antipsychotics. The incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome differ amongst these antipsychotics, but the fact is that these drugs have not lived up to the expectation regarding their tolerability. PMID:24995318

  16. Adverse effects of public health interventions: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Theo; Oliver, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Public health interventions may have a range of adverse effects. However, there is limited guidance as to how evaluations should address the possibility of adverse effects. This discussion paper briefly presents a framework for thinking about the potential harms of public health interventions, focusing on the following categories: direct harms; psychological harms; equity harms; group and social harms; and opportunity harms. We conclude that the possibility of adverse effects needs to be taken into account by those implementing and evaluating interventions, and requires a broad perspective on the potential impacts of public health strategies.

  17. [Recomendations for the prevention of adverse drug reactions in older adults with dementia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pavón, Javier; González García, Paloma; Francés Román, Inés; Vidán Astiz, Maite; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, José; Jiménez Díaz, Gregorio; Montero Fernández, Nuria Pilar; Alvarez Fernández, Baldomero; Jiménez Páez, José María

    2010-01-01

    The elderly are one of the groups at greatest risk for adverse drugs reactions (ADR). The mean prevalence of these reactions in this population is 30%. Dementia is not an independent risk factor of ADR, but is the main condition that increases all risk factors (polypharmacy, comorbidity, inappropriate prescribing, drug-drug interactions, advanced age, and treatment adherence). The present article discusses revised and consensual recommendations for the prevention of ADR in the elderly, as well as recommendations specifically for dementia patients in relation to the management of comorbidity and cognitive, behavioral and psychological symptoms.

  18. Building a knowledge base of severe adverse drug events based on AERS reporting data using semantic web technologies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqian; Wang, Liwei; Liu, Hongfang; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    A semantically coded knowledge base of adverse drug events (ADEs) with severity information is critical for clinical decision support systems and translational research applications. However it remains challenging to measure and identify the severity information of ADEs. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a semantic web based approach for building a knowledge base of severe ADEs based on the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) reporting data. We utilized a normalized AERS reporting dataset and extracted putative drug-ADE pairs and their associated outcome codes in the domain of cardiac disorders. We validated the drug-ADE associations using ADE datasets from SIDe Effect Resource (SIDER) and the UMLS. We leveraged the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) grading system and classified the ADEs into the CTCAE in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). We identified and validated 2,444 unique Drug-ADE pairs in the domain of cardiac disorders, of which 760 pairs are in Grade 5, 775 pairs in Grade 4 and 2,196 pairs in Grade 3.

  19. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov/), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov. Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs. PMID:27631620

  20. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials.

    PubMed

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae; Tan, Aik Choon

    2016-12-01

    Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ ), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov . Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs.

  1. Potential Mechanisms of Hematological Adverse Drug Reactions in Patients Receiving Clozapine in Combination With Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wiciński, Michał; Węclewicz, Mateusz M; Miętkiewicz, Mateusz; Malinowski, Bartosz; Grześk, Elżbieta; Klonowska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    Clozapine is a second-generation antipsychotic which has proven efficacy in treating the symptoms of schizophrenia. Although clozapine therapy is associated with a number of adverse drug reactions, it is frequently used. One of the most common adverse drug reactions is gastroesophageal reflux disease which is an indication for treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Coadministration of clozapine and PPIs increases the risk of hematological adverse drug reactions, including neutropenia and agranulocytosis. The mechanism in idiosyncratic agranulocytosis is not dose related and involves either a direct toxic or an immune-allergic effect. It is suspected that the clozapine metabolites nitrenium ion and N-desmethylclozapine may cause apoptosis or impair growth of granulocytes. Formation of N-desmethylclozapine is correlated with activity of the cytochrome P450 enzymes 1A2 and 3A4 (CYP1A2 and CYP3A4). Nitrenium ion is produced by the flavin-containing monooxygenase system of leukocytes. A drug interaction between clozapine and a PPI is a consequence of the induction of common metabolic pathways either by the PPI or clozapine. Findings to date suggest that indirect induction of flavin-containing monooxygenase by omeprazole through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor increases the expression of the enzyme mRNA and in the long term may cause the increase in activity. Moreover, induction of CYP1A2, especially by omeprazole and lansoprazole, may increase the serum concentration of N-desmethylclozapine, which can accumulate in lymphocytes and may achieve toxic levels. Another hypothesis that may explain hematological adverse drug reactions is competitive inhibition of CYP2C19, which may contribute to increased serum concentrations of toxic metabolites.

  2. Misuse of the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale in toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Seger, Donna; BARKER, Kimberly; McNAUGHTON, Candace D.

    2014-01-01

    Context When an adverse event occurs in an overdose patient, it may be difficult to determine whether the event was caused by the ingested drug or by medical therapy. Naranjo and colleagues developed a probability scale, the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale (Naranjo Scale), to assess the probability that a drug administered in therapeutic doses caused an adverse event thereby classifying the event as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). Although Naranjo et al. specifically excluded the application of this scale to adverse events in overdose patients, case reports demonstrate that authors continue to apply the Naranjo Scale to events in these patients. Objective The World Health Organization defines an ADR as occurring only when drugs are administered in therapeutic doses. Yet ADRs continue to be reported in overdose patients. We sought to examine the use of the Naranjo scale in case reports of overdose patients to assess the potential consequences of that application. Methods A Medline search via PubMed without language limits, through September 2012, using the search terms “Naranjo” and “overdose” or “poisoning” yielded 146 publications. Additional searches were performed to find articles with keywords of the Naranjo Scale development, current applications and validity of application in specific populations such as critically ill and overdose patients. Results From the 146 publications, we identified 17 case reports or series of overdose patients in which the Naranjo Scale was applied to a clinical complication to support a causal relationship between an administered drug and the clinical complication and thereby classify the clinical complication as an ADR. We also identified a recent publication in which the Naranjo Scale was applied to a new treatment modality (lipid emulsion) that is currently administered to overdose patients. Conclusion Adverse events that occur in overdose patients are excluded from the definition of ADR. Yet in case

  3. Assessment of the expectancy, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions reported for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Guenka; Stoimenova, Assena; Dimitrova, Maria; Kamusheva, Maria; Petrova, Daniela; Georgiev, Ognian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Adverse drug reactions can cause increased morbidity and mortality, and therefore information needs to be studied systematically. Little is known about the adverse drug reactions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy. The goal of this study is to assess the expectedness, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy based on their reporting in the national pharmacovigilance system. Methods: This was a prospective, observational, 1-year, real-life study about the pharmacotherapy of a sample of 390 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Prescribed medicines were systematized and national pharmacovigilance databases were searched for reported adverse drug reactions. The expectedness was evaluated through the review of the summary of product characteristics, the seriousness was evaluated by the clinicians based on the life threatening nature of the adverse drug reactions, and the severity was evaluated through Hartwig’s Severity Assessment Scale. Descriptive statistics of the reported adverse drug reactions was performed and the relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction with all international non-proprietary names included in the analysis was calculated. Results: Results confirm that the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a disease with high appearance of adverse drug reactions, and causes many additional costs to the healthcare system. Unexpected and severe adverse drug reactions are frequent. A total of 4.8% of adverse drug reactions were evaluated as life threatening. Majority of adverse drug reactions are classified in Levels 1 (32.6%), 2 (26.4%) and 3 (19%) according to Hartwig’s Severity Assessment Scale. Approximately 22% of reported adverse drug reactions affect people’s everyday life to a greater extent and require additional therapy which might further increase the risk. The relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction was highest for

  4. Detecting adverse drug events in discharge summaries using variations on the simple Bayes model.

    PubMed

    Visweswaran, Shyam; Hanbury, Paul; Saul, Melissa; Cooper, Gregory F

    2003-01-01

    Detection and prevention of adverse events and, in particular, adverse drug events (ADEs), is an important problem in health care today. We describe the implementation and evaluation of four variations on the simple Bayes model for identifying ADE-related discharge summaries. Our results show that these probabilistic techniques achieve an ROC curve area of up to 0.77 in correctly determining which patient cases should be assigned an ADE-related ICD-9-CM code. These results suggest a potential for these techniques to contribute to the development of an automated system that helps identify ADEs, as a step toward further understanding and preventing them.

  5. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate for... sheepherding) in the following States, and for Florida sugarcane work, shall be computed by adjusting the...

  6. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate for... sheepherding) in the following States, and for Florida sugarcane work, shall be computed by adjusting the...

  7. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate for... sheepherding) in the following States, and for Florida sugarcane work, shall be computed by adjusting the...

  8. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate for... sheepherding) in the following States, and for Florida sugarcane work, shall be computed by adjusting the...

  9. Integrating Multiple Evidence Sources to Predict Adverse Drug Reactions Based on a Systems Pharmacology Model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, D-S; Xiao, N; Li, Y-J; Zeng, W-B; Liang, Y-Z; Lu, A-P; Xu, Q-S; Chen, AF

    2015-01-01

    Identifying potential adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is critically important for drug discovery and public health. Here we developed a multiple evidence fusion (MEF) method for the large-scale prediction of drug ADRs that can handle both approved drugs and novel molecules. MEF is based on the similarity reference by collaborative filtering, and integrates multiple similarity measures from various data types, taking advantage of the complementarity in the data. We used MEF to integrate drug-related and ADR-related data from multiple levels, including the network structural data formed by known drug–ADR relationships for predicting likely unknown ADRs. On cross-validation, it obtains high sensitivity and specificity, substantially outperforming existing methods that utilize single or a few data types. We validated our prediction by their overlap with drug–ADR associations that are known in databases. The proposed computational method could be used for complementary hypothesis generation and rapid analysis of potential drug–ADR interactions. PMID:26451329

  10. Pharmacovigilance and drug safety in Calabria (Italy): 2012 adverse events analysis

    PubMed Central

    Giofrè, Chiara; Scicchitano, Francesca; Palleria, Caterina; Mazzitello, Carmela; Ciriaco, Miriam; Gallelli, Luca; Paletta, Laura; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Leporini, Christian; Ventrice, Pasquale; Carbone, Claudia; Saullo, Francesca; Rende, Pierandrea; Menniti, Michele; Mumoli, Laura; Chimirri, Serafina; Patanè, Marinella; Esposito, Stefania; Cilurzo, Felisa; Staltari, Orietta; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Pharmacovigilance (PV) is designed to monitor drugs continuously after their commercialization, assessing and improving their safety profile. The main objective is to increase the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in order to have a wide variety of information. The Italian Drug Agency (Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco [AIFA]) is financing several projects to increase reporting. In Calabria, a PV information center has been created in 2010. Materials and Methods: We obtained data using the database of the National Health Information System AIFA relatively to Italy and Calabria in the year 2012. Descriptive statistics were performed to analyze the ADRs. Results: A total number of 461 ADRs have been reported in the year 2012 with an increase of 234% compared with 2011 (138 reports). Hospital doctors are the main source of this reporting (51.62%). Sorafenib (Nexavar®), the combination of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and ketoprofen represent the drugs most frequently reported causing adverse reactions. Adverse events in female patients (61.83%) were more frequently reported, whereas the age groups “41-65” (39.07%) and “over 65” (27.9%) were the most affected. Conclusions: Calabria has had a positive increase in the number of ADRs reported, although it has not yet reached the gold standard set by World Health Organization (about 600 reports), the data have shown that PV culture is making inroads in this region and that PV projects stimulating and increasing PV knowledge are needed. PMID:24347984

  11. Adverse effects of herbal medicines: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Posadzki, Paul; Watson, Leala K; Ernst, Edzard

    2013-02-01

    This overview of systematic reviews (SRs) aims to evaluate critically the evidence regarding the adverse effects of herbal medicines (HMs). Five electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant SRs, with 50 SRs of 50 different HMs meeting our inclusion criteria. Most had only minor weaknesses in methods. Serious adverse effects were noted only for four HMs: Herbae pulvis standardisatus, Larrea tridentate, Piper methysticum and Cassia senna. The most severe adverse effects were liver or kidney damage, colon perforation, carcinoma, coma and death. Moderately severe adverse effects were noted for 15 HMs: Pelargonium sidoides, Perna canaliculus, Aloe vera, Mentha piperita, Medicago sativa, Cimicifuga racemosa, Caulophyllum thalictroides, Serenoa repens, Taraxacum officinale, Camellia sinensis, Commifora mukul, Hoodia gordonii, Viscum album, Trifolium pratense and Stevia rebaudiana. Minor adverse effects were noted for 31 HMs: Thymus vulgaris, Lavandula angustifolia Miller, Boswellia serrata, Calendula officinalis, Harpagophytum procumbens, Panax ginseng, Vitex agnus-castus, Crataegus spp., Cinnamomum spp., Petasites hybridus, Agave americana, Hypericum perforatum, Echinacea spp., Silybum marianum, Capsicum spp., Genus phyllanthus, Ginkgo biloba, Valeriana officinalis, Hippocastanaceae, Melissa officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Cnicus benedictus, Salvia hispanica, Vaccinium myrtillus, Mentha spicata, Rosmarinus officinalis, Crocus sativus, Gymnema sylvestre, Morinda citrifolia and Curcuma longa. Most of the HMs evaluated in SRs were associated with only moderately severe or minor adverse effects.

  12. Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, M.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of poor lighting and glare on public safety are well-known, as are the harmful environmental effects on various species and the environment in general. What is less well-known is the potential harmful medical effects of excessive poor nighttime lighting. A significant body of research has been developed over the last few years regarding this problem. One of the most significant effects is the startling increased risk for breast cancer by excessive exposure to nighttime lighting. The mechanism is felt to be by disruption of the circadian rhythm and suppression of melatonin production from the pineal gland. Melatonin has an anticancer effect that is lost when its production is disrupted. I am in the process of developing a monograph that will summarize this important body of research, to be presented and endorsed by the American Medical Association, and its Council of Science and Public health. This paper is a brief overall summary of this little known potential harmful effect of poor and excessive nighttime lighting.

  13. Systematic investigation of time windows for adverse event data mining for recently approved drugs.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Alan M; Hauben, Manfred; Pearson, Ronald K; O'Hara, Donald J; Reisinger, Stephanie J

    2009-06-01

    The optimum timing of drug safety data mining for a new drug is uncertain. The objective of this study was to compare cumulative data mining versus mining with sliding time windows. Adverse Event Reporting System data (2001-2005) were studied for 27 drugs. A literature database was used to evaluate signals of disproportionate reporting (SDRs) from an urn model data-mining algorithm. Data mining was applied cumulatively and with sliding time windows from 1 to 4 years in width. Time from SDR generation to the appearance of a publication describing the corresponding adverse event was calculated. Cumulative data mining and 1- to 2-year sliding windows produced the most SDRs for recently approved drugs. In the first postmarketing year, data mining produced SDRs an average of 800 days in advance of publications regarding the corresponding drug-event combination. However, this timing advantage reduced to zero by year 4. The optimum window width for sliding windows should increase with time on the market. Data mining may be most useful for early signal detection during the first 3 years of a drug's postmarketing life. Beyond that, it may be most useful for supporting or weakening hypotheses.

  14. Adverse drug reaction monitoring: support for pharmacovigilance at a tertiary care hospital in Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are recognised as a common cause of hospital admissions, and they constitute a significant economic burden for hospitals. Hospital-based ADR monitoring and reporting programmes aim to identify and quantify the risks associated with the use of drugs provided in a hospital setting. This information may be useful for identifying and minimising preventable ADRs and may enhance the ability of prescribers to manage ADRs more effectively. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate ADRs that occurred during inpatient stays at the Hospital Geral de Palmas (HGP) in Tocantins, Brazil, and to facilitate the development of a pharmacovigilance service. Methods A prospective study was conducted at HGP over a period of 8 months, from January 2009 to August 2009. This observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study was based on an analysis of medical records. Several parameters were utilised in the data evaluation, including patient demographics, drug and reaction characteristics, and reaction outcomes. The reaction severity and predisposing factors were also assessed. Results The overall incidence of ADRs in the patient population was 3.1%, and gender was not found to be a risk factor. The highest ADR rate (75.8%) was found in the adult age group 15 to 50 years, and the lowest ADR rate was found in children aged 3 to 13 years (7.4%). Because of the high frequency of ADRs in orthopaedic (25%), general medicine (22%), and oncology (16%) patients, improved control of the drugs used in these specialties is required. Additionally, the nurse team (52.7%) registered the most ADRs in medical records, most likely due to the job responsibilities of nurses. As expected, the most noticeable ADRs occurred in skin tissues, with such ADRs are more obvious to medical staff, with rashes being the most common reactions. Metamizole, tramadol, and vancomycin were responsible for 21, 11.6, and 8.4% of ADRs, respectively. The majority of ADRs had

  15. Torsadogenic Risk of Antipsychotics: Combining Adverse Event Reports with Drug Utilization Data across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Raschi, Emanuel; Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Godman, Brian; Koci, Ariola; Moretti, Ugo; Kalaba, Marija; Bennie, Marion; Barbui, Corrado; Wettermark, Bjorn; Sturkenboom, Miriam; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Background Antipsychotics (APs) have been associated with risk of torsade de Pointes (TdP). This has important public health implications. Therefore, (a) we exploited the public FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) to characterize their torsadogenic profile; (b) we collected drug utilization data from 12 European Countries to assess the population exposure over the 2005-2010 period. Methods FAERS data (2004-2010) were analyzed based on the following criteria: (1) ≥4 cases of TdP/QT abnormalities; (2) Significant Reporting Odds Ratio, ROR [Lower Limit of the 95% confidence interval>1], for TdP/QT abnormalities, adjusted and stratified (Arizona CERT drugs as effect modifiers); (3) ≥4 cases of ventricular arrhythmia/sudden cardiac death (VA/SCD); (4) Significant ROR for VA/SCD; (5) Significant ROR, combined by aggregating TdP/QT abnormalities with VA and SCD. Torsadogenic signals were characterized in terms of signal strength: from Group A (very strong torsadogenic signal: all criteria fulfilled) to group E (unclear/uncertain signal: only 2/5 criteria). Consumption data were retrieved from 12 European Countries and expressed as defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DID). Results Thirty-five antipsychotics met at least one criterium: 9 agents were classified in Group A (amisulpride, chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyamemazine, haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone). In 2010, the overall exposure to antipsychotics varied from 5.94 DID (Estonia) to 13.99 (France, 2009). Considerable increment of Group A agents was found in several Countries (+3.47 in France): the exposure to olanzapine increased across all Countries (+1.84 in France) and peaked 2.96 in Norway; cyamemazine was typically used only in France (2.81 in 2009). Among Group B drugs, levomepromazine peaked 3.78 (Serbia); fluphenazine 1.61 (Slovenia). Conclusions This parallel approach through spontaneous reporting and drug utilization analyses highlighted drug- and

  16. Adverse drug reactions – examples of detection of rare events using databases

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Esther W; Liu, Kirin Q L; Chui, Celine S L; Sing, Chor-Wing; Wong, Lisa Y L; Wong, Ian C K

    2015-01-01

    It is recognised that randomised controlled trials are not feasible for capturing rare adverse events. There is an increasing trend towards observational research methodologies using large population-based health databases. These databases offer more scope for adequate sample sizes, allowing for comprehensive patient characterisation and assessment of the associated factors. While direct causality cannot be established and confounders cannot be ignored, databases present an opportunity to explore and quantify rare events. The use of databases for the detection of rare adverse events in the following conditions, sudden death associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment, retinal detachment associated with the use of fluoroquinolones and toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with drug exposure, are discussed as examples. In general, rare adverse events tend to have immediate and important clinical implications and may be life-threatening. An understanding of the causative factors is therefore important, in addition to the research methodologies and database platforms that enable the undertaking of the research. PMID:25060360

  17. Adverse effects of stress on microbiota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonize the gastrointestinal tract impact the health status of an animal. The health of an animal as well as production traits are also affected by exposure to stress. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of dehorning stress on the gut ...

  18. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, W.E.; Koenig, J.Q.; Bardana, E.J. Jr.

    1989-09-01

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo(a)pyrene and formaldehyde--are possible human carcinogens. Fine particulate matter has been associated with decreased pulmonary function in children and with increased chronic lung disease in Nepal, where exposure to very high amounts of wood smoke occurs in residences. Wood smoke fumes, taken from both outdoor and indoor samples, have shown mutagenic activity in short-term bioassay tests. Because of the potential health effects of wood smoke, exposure to this source of air pollution should be minimal.29 references.

  19. Adverse Effect of Child Abuse Victimization among Substance-Using Women in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sung-Yeon; Magura, Stephen; Laudet, Alexandre; Whitney, Shirley

    1999-01-01

    Study examined adverse effects of childhood sexual/physical abuse among substance-abusing women with children. Several significant differences between abused and nonabused women were found in service outcomes. Abused women had more problems relating to drug use and psychiatric/psychological adjustment at follow-up. Findings support a need for…

  20. Recent Literature on Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Semla, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are common in older adults, but locating literature addressing these issues is often challenging. The objective of this article was to summarize recent studies addressing medication errors and adverse drug events in a single location to improve accessibility for individuals working with older adults. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature search for studies published in 2014 and identified 51 potential articles. After critical review, 17 studies were selected for inclusion based on innovation, rigorous observational or experimental study designs, and use of reliable, valid measures. Four articles characterizing potentially inappropriate prescribing and interventions to optimize medication regimens were annotated and critiqued in detail. We hope that health policy makers and clinicians find this information helpful in improving the quality of care for older adults. PMID:26804210

  1. [Statin-induced adverse effects -- facts and genes].

    PubMed

    Harangi, Mariann; Zsíros, Noémi; Juhász, Lilla; Paragh, György

    2013-01-20

    Statin therapy is considered to be safe and rarely associated with serious adverse events. However, a significant proportion of patients on statin therapy show some degree of intolerance which can lead to decreased adherence to statin therapy. The authors summarize the symptoms, signs and frequencies of the most common statin-induced adverse effects and their most important risk factors including some single nucleotide polymorphisms and gene mutations. Also, they review the available approaches to detect and manage the statin-intolerant patients.

  2. The Impact of Herbal Drug Use on Adverse Drug Reaction Profiles of Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mudzviti, Tinashe; Maponga, Charles C.; Khoza, Star; Ma, Qing; Morse, Gene D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The main objective was to determine the impact of herbal drug use on adverse drug reactions in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methodology. Patients receiving first-line ART from the national roll-out program participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were interviewed and a data collection sheet was used to collect information from the corresponding medical record. Results. The majority (98.2%) of participants were using at least one herbal drug together with ART. The most common herbal remedies used were Allium Sativum (72.7%), Bidens pilosa (66.0%), Eucalyptus globulus (52.3%), Moringa oleifera (44.1%), Lippia javanica (36.3%), and Peltoforum africanum (34.3%). Two indigenous herbs, Musakavakadzi (OR = 0.25; 95% CI 0.076–0.828) and Peltoforum africanum (OR = 0.495; 95% CI 0.292–0.839) reduced the occurrence of adverse drug events. Conclusions. The use of herbal drugs is high in the HIV-infected population and there is need for pharmacovigilance programs to recognize the role they play in altering ADR profiles. PMID:22506106

  3. Novel data-mining methodologies for adverse drug event discovery and analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, R; DuMouchel, W; Shah, N H; Madigan, D; Ryan, P; Friedman, C

    2012-06-01

    An important goal of the health system is to identify new adverse drug events (ADEs) in the postapproval period. Datamining methods that can transform data into meaningful knowledge to inform patient safety have proven essential for this purpose. New opportunities have emerged to harness data sources that have not been used within the traditional framework. This article provides an overview of recent methodological innovations and data sources used to support ADE discovery and analysis.

  4. Novel Data Mining Methodologies for Adverse Drug Event Discovery and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Rave; DuMouchel, William; Shah, Nigam H.; Madigan, David; Ryan, Patrick; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of new adverse drug events (ADEs) in the post-approval period is an important goal of the health system. Data mining methods that can transform data into meaningful knowledge to inform patient safety have proven to be essential. New opportunities have emerged to harness data sources that have not been used within the traditional framework. This article provides an overview of recent methodological innovations and data sources used in support of ADE discovery and analysis. PMID:22549283

  5. Nature of preventable adverse drug events in hospitals: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kanjanarat, Penkarn; Winterstein, Almut G; Johns, Thomas E; Hatton, Randy C; Gonzalez-Rothi, Ricardo; Segal, Richard

    2003-09-01

    A literature review was conducted to identify the drug classes, types of errors, and types of adverse outcomes related to preventable adverse drug events (pADEs). Studies were identified by keyword search of MEDLINE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts and by a manual search. The search was limited to peer-reviewed literature reporting pADEs in hospitalized patients and the frequencies of at least one pADE characteristic. The frequencies of pADEs and their characteristics were summarized using median and range. Ten studies published between 1994 and 2001 were included in the review. The reported median frequency of pADEs was 1.8% (range, 1.3-7.8%), and the median preventability rate of ADEs in the hospitals was 35.2% (range, 18.7-73.2%). Cardiovascular drugs were implicated for 17.9% of pADEs (range, 4.3-28.1%). Most pADEs occurred in the prescribing stage of the medication-use process and were dose related. Inappropriate prescribing decisions and patient monitoring were the most frequently identified causes of pADEs. The most common adverse outcomes were allergic reactions, hepatic or renal problems, cardiovascular problems, hematologic problems and bleeding, and central nervous system problems. Frequently reported examples of pADEs included antihypertensive overdose associated with bradycardia or hypotension, antiinfectives prescribed despite a history of allergy, warfarin overdose and inappropriate monitoring resulting in hemorrhage, and opioid overdose or underdose associated with respiratory depression or poor pain control, respectively. Despite the heterogeneity of pADEs, the results of this literature review suggest that a few types of drugs, errors, and adverse outcomes constitute a substantial proportion of pADEs. Targeting these high-priority areas could significantly reduce the overall frequency of pADEs.

  6. High-Performance Signal Detection for Adverse Drug Events using MapReduce Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xingzhi; Tao, Ying; Xu, Linhao; Wang, Chen; Mao, Xianling; Peng, Bo; Pan, Yue

    2010-11-13

    Post-marketing pharmacovigilance is important for public health, as many Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) are unknown when those drugs were approved for marketing. However, due to the large number of reported drugs and drug combinations, detecting ADE signals by mining these reports is becoming a challenging task in terms of computational complexity. Recently, a parallel programming model, MapReduce has been introduced by Google to support large-scale data intensive applications. In this study, we proposed a MapReduce-based algorithm, for common ADE detection approach, Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), and tested it in mining spontaneous ADE reports from FDA. The purpose is to investigate the possibility of using MapReduce principle to speed up biomedical data mining tasks using this pharmacovigilance case as one specific example. The results demonstrated that MapReduce programming model could improve the performance of common signal detection algorithm for pharmacovigilance in a distributed computation environment at approximately liner speedup rates.

  7. Adverse effects of isolation in hospitalised patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Abad, C; Fearday, A; Safdar, N

    2010-10-01

    The use of transmission precautions such as contact isolation in patients known to be colonised or infected with multidrug-resistant organisms is recommended in healthcare institutions. Although essential for infection control, contact isolation has recently been associated with adverse effects in patients. We undertook a systematic review to determine whether contact isolation leads to psychological or physical problems for patients. Studies were included if (1) hospitalised patients were placed under isolation precautions for an underlying medical indication, and (2) any adverse events related to the isolation were evaluated. We found 16 studies that reported data regarding the impact of isolation on patient mental well-being, patient satisfaction, patient safety or time spent by healthcare workers in direct patient care. The majority showed a negative impact on patient mental well-being and behaviour, including higher scores for depression, anxiety and anger among isolated patients. A few studies also found that healthcare workers spent less time with patients in isolation. Patient satisfaction was adversely affected by isolation if patients were kept uninformed of their healthcare. Patient safety was also negatively affected, leading to an eight-fold increase in adverse events related to supportive care failures. We found that contact isolation may negatively impact several dimensions of patient care. Well-validated tools are necessary to investigate these results further. Large studies examining a number of safety indicators to assess the adverse effects of isolation are needed. Patient education may be an important step to mitigate the adverse psychological effects of isolation and is recommended.

  8. Adverse effects of the radioprotector WR2721

    SciTech Connect

    Cairnie, A.B.

    1983-04-01

    S-2-(3-Aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) has radioprotective properties, but it is also toxic - in man it causes nausea and vomiting. Since radiation also causes nausea and vomiting it is important to know whether WR2721 would increase or decrease the likelihood of nausea and vomiting after radiation. This question was investigated in rats using the phenomenon of aversion to the taste of saccharin, which is readily inducible and is understood to be controlled in rats by the same pathways that control nausea and vomiting in man. The taste aversion was induced by giving 0.2 Gy /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. radiation 30 min after drinking 0.1% saccharin, or WR2721 immediately after the saccharin, or giving both radiation and WR2721. There were appropriate controls. In sham-irradiated rats, WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg, but not 8 mg/kg) produced a significant taste aversion. When WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg) was given immediately after the saccharin to irradiated rats it increased the taste aversion significantly, but it did not have any effect at 8 mg/kg. It was concluded that at doses which were optimal for radioprotection (approx.200 mg/kg) or lower, WR2721 increased in rats the taste aversion induced by radiation. By inference if conditioned taste aversion is an appropriate paradigm, WR2721 would increase nausea and vomiting in man induced by radiation.

  9. A Structure-Based Approach for Mapping Adverse Drug Reactions to the Perturbation of Underlying Biological Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wallach, Izhar; Jaitly, Navdeep; Lilien, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADR), also known as side-effects, are complex undesired physiologic phenomena observed secondary to the administration of pharmaceuticals. Several phenomena underlie the emergence of each ADR; however, a dominant factor is the drug's ability to modulate one or more biological pathways. Understanding the biological processes behind the occurrence of ADRs would lead to the development of safer and more effective drugs. At present, no method exists to discover these ADR-pathway associations. In this paper we introduce a computational framework for identifying a subset of these associations based on the assumption that drugs capable of modulating the same pathway may induce similar ADRs. Our model exploits multiple information resources. First, we utilize a publicly available dataset pairing drugs with their observed ADRs. Second, we identify putative protein targets for each drug using the protein structure database and in-silico virtual docking. Third, we label each protein target with its known involvement in one or more biological pathways. Finally, the relationships among these information sources are mined using multiple stages of logistic-regression while controlling for over-fitting and multiple-hypothesis testing. As proof-of-concept, we examined a dataset of 506 ADRs, 730 drugs, and 830 human protein targets. Our method yielded 185 ADR-pathway associations of which 45 were selected to undergo a manual literature review. We found 32 associations to be supported by the scientific literature. PMID:20808786

  10. [Desired effects and adverse effects of cannabis use].

    PubMed

    Drewe, J

    2003-06-01

    Although the use of cannabis shows no pronounced acute toxicity, acute psychological and psychomotor disturbances are observed occasionally after intake of single doses. Cannabis use can result in relevant impairment of driving ability. The risk is enhanced by concomitant use of alcohol. This augments the effect of cannabis significantly. After chronic use, significantly more psychotic symptoms become manifest, and there is a risk for developing psychological and physical dependence. Young age and pre-existing psychological disturbances increase the risk of these adverse effects. Chronic marijuana smoking is associated with increased toxicity and the risk of cancer of the respiratory tract. There is evidence of disturbance of the immune system and teratogenic effects of chronic cannabis use.

  11. Probable Nootropicinduced Psychiatric Adverse Effects: A Series of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ajaltouni, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The misuse of nootropics—any substance that may alter, improve, or augment cognitive performance, mainly through the stimulation or inhibition of certain neurotransmitters—may potentially be dangerous and deleterious to the human brain, and certain individuals with a history of mental or substance use disorders might be particularly vulnerable to their adverse effects. We describe four cases of probable nootropic-induced psychiatric adverse effects to illustrate this theory. To the best of our knowledge this has not been previously reported in the formal medical literature. We briefly describe the most common classes of nootropics, including their postulated or proven methods of actions, their desired effects, and their adverse side effects, and provide a brief discussion of the cases. Our objective is to raise awareness among physicians in general and psychiatrists and addiction specialists in particular of the potentially dangerous phenomenon of unsupervised nootropic use among young adults who may be especially vulnerable to nootropics’ negative effects. PMID:27222762

  12. Misuse of topical corticosteroids: A clinical study of adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Vivek Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Misuse of topical corticosteroids is a widespread phenomenon among young people in India, especially women. The practice is associated with significant adverse effects and poor awareness of these effects among the general public. Aim: This study was conducted to examine the misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids among the people in Bastar region in Chhattisgarh state of India. Materials and Methods: Data collected from patients presenting with at least one of the adverse effects of topical corticosteroids as the chief complaint, from November 2010 to October 2011. Results: Out of the 6723 new patients, 379 (5.63%) had presented with misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids, of whom 78.89% were females. More than 65% of the patients were in the age group 10-29 years. The main reason for using the topical corticosteroids was to lighten skin colour and treat melasma and suntan. Acne (37.99%) and telangiectasia (18.99%) were the most common adverse effects noted. Conclusions: Misuse of topical corticosteroids has a huge impact on dermatological practice, leading to a significant proportion of visits to the dermatologist. This hydra-headed problem needs multi-dimensional interventions, involving educational, legal and managerial approaches with cooperation from different sectors of society. PMID:25396124

  13. Systems Biology Approaches for Identifying Adverse Drug Reactions and Elucidating Their Underlying Biological Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Mary Regina; Jacunski, Alexandra; Lorberbaum, Tal; Romano, Joseph; Moskovitch, Robert; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules are indispensable to modern medical therapy. However, their use may lead to unintended, negative medical outcomes commonly referred to as adverse drug reactions (ADRs). These effects vary widely in mechanism, severity, and populations affected, making ADR prediction and identification important public health concerns. Current methods rely on clinical trials and post-market surveillance programs to find novel ADRs; however, clinical trials are limited by small sample size, while post-market surveillance methods may be biased and inherently leave patients at risk until sufficient clinical evidence has been gathered. Systems pharmacology, an emerging interdisciplinary field combining network and chemical biology, provides important tools to uncover and understand ADRs and may mitigate the drawbacks of traditional methods. In particular, network analysis allows researchers to integrate heterogeneous data sources and quantify the interactions between biological and chemical entities. Recent work in this area has combined chemical, biological, and large-scale observational health data to predict ADRs in both individual patients and global populations. In this review, we explore the rapid expansion of systems pharmacology in the study of ADRs. We enumerate the existing methods and strategies and illustrate progress in the field with a model framework that incorporates crucial data elements, such as diet and comorbidities, known to modulate ADR risk. Using this framework, we highlight avenues of research that may currently be underexplored, representing opportunities for future work. PMID:26559926

  14. Medication reconciliation: a tool to prevent adverse drug events in geriatrics medicine.

    PubMed

    Berthe, Anaïs; Fronteau, Clémentine; Le Fur, Éloïse; Morin, Caroline; Huon, Jean-François; Rouiller-Furic, Isabelle; Berlioz-Thibal, Marielle; Berrut, Gilles; Lepelletier, Aline

    2017-03-01

    Iatrogenic effects represent a large part of emergency admissions among elderly people. Throughout the care pathway of a patient, whether he is at home or hospitalized, many different health professionals are involved regarding the patient's medication. Medication reconciliation is one way to prevent adverse drug events at all care transitions for every patient by eliminating undocumented intentional discrepancies and unintentional discrepancies in the patient's medication. The aim of this article is to present the different activities of clinical pharmacy developed since 2011 in a follow up and rehabilitation geriatric care service, including medication reconciliation activity. Monitoring of this activity started in March 2014, indicators show that almost 90% of patients were reconciled at admission and discharge from the geriatric unit. Physicians and pharmacists play an active role in reviewing, managing and monitoring a patient's medication. Care coordination and communication among the many members of the medical care team have become one of the greatest challenges healthcare professionals face. At the time of discharge, the patient also plays a key role in medication reconciliation and should be educated when it's possible on the importance of managing medication information. Finally, the hospital pharmacist's role is to keep the primary care physicians and community pharmacists informed about medication changes.

  15. Systems biology approaches for identifying adverse drug reactions and elucidating their underlying biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Boland, Mary Regina; Jacunski, Alexandra; Lorberbaum, Tal; Romano, Joseph D; Moskovitch, Robert; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Small molecules are indispensable to modern medical therapy. However, their use may lead to unintended, negative medical outcomes commonly referred to as adverse drug reactions (ADRs). These effects vary widely in mechanism, severity, and populations affected, making ADR prediction and identification important public health concerns. Current methods rely on clinical trials and postmarket surveillance programs to find novel ADRs; however, clinical trials are limited by small sample size, whereas postmarket surveillance methods may be biased and inherently leave patients at risk until sufficient clinical evidence has been gathered. Systems pharmacology, an emerging interdisciplinary field combining network and chemical biology, provides important tools to uncover and understand ADRs and may mitigate the drawbacks of traditional methods. In particular, network analysis allows researchers to integrate heterogeneous data sources and quantify the interactions between biological and chemical entities. Recent work in this area has combined chemical, biological, and large-scale observational health data to predict ADRs in both individual patients and global populations. In this review, we explore the rapid expansion of systems pharmacology in the study of ADRs. We enumerate the existing methods and strategies and illustrate progress in the field with a model framework that incorporates crucial data elements, such as diet and comorbidities, known to modulate ADR risk. Using this framework, we highlight avenues of research that may currently be underexplored, representing opportunities for future work.

  16. Relationship between dose of antithyroid drugs and adverse events in pediatric patients with Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Kie; Miyoshi, Yoko; Tachibana, Makiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Miki, Kazunori; Nakata, Yukiko; Takano, Toru; Ozono, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Graves’ disease (GD) accounts for a large proportion of pediatric hyperthyroidism, and the first-line treatment is antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy. Methimazole (MMI) is effective in most patients but is associated with significant adverse events (AEs). We reviewed the medical records of GD patients (n = 56) with onset age of <15 yr and investigated the relationship between MMI dose and AEs. The study population comprised 11 male and 45 female patients and the median age at diagnosis was 11 yr. All patients were initially treated with ATDs. Among the 52 patients initially treated with MMI, 20 received a low dose, and 32 received a high dose of MMI (< 0.7 vs ≥ 0.7 mg/kg/day, respectively). AEs occurred in 20% of the patients in the low-dose MMI group, and in 50% patients in the high-dose MMI group (p = 0.031). A greater variety of AEs was observed in the high-dose group. Neutropenia and rash were observed in both groups. With treatment transition to low-dose MMI according to the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology guidelines, we expect a decrease in the incidence of AEs in future. However, we should be careful as neutropenia and rash can occur independently of the MMI dose. PMID:28203042

  17. Adverse effects of oral antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kayaaslan, Bircan; Guner, Rahmet

    2017-01-01

    Oral nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NAs) are currently the backbone of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection treatment. They are generally well-tolerated by patients and safe to use. To date, a significant number of patients have been treated with NAs. Safety data has accumulated over the years. The aim of this article is to review and update the adverse effects of oral NAs. NAs can cause class adverse effects (i.e., myopathy, neuropathy, lactic acidosis) and dissimilar adverse effects. All NAs carry a “Black Box” warning because of the potential risk for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, these adverse effects are rarely reported. The majority of cases are associated with lamivudine and telbivudine. Adefovir can lead to dose- and time-dependent nephrotoxicity, even at low doses. Tenofovir has significant renal and bone toxicity in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, bone and renal toxicity in patients with CHB are not as prominent as in HIV infection. Entecavir and lamivudine are not generally associated with renal adverse events. Entecavir has been claimed to increase the risk of lactic acidosis in decompensated liver disease and high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores. However, current studies reported that entecavir could be safely used in decompensated cirrhosis. An increase in fetal adverse events has not been reported with lamivudine, telbivudine and tenofovir use in pregnant women, while there is no adequate data regarding entecavir and adefovir. Further long-term experience is required to highlight the adverse effects of NAs, especially in special patient populations, including pregnant women, elderly and patients with renal impairment. PMID:28261380

  18. The adverse effects profile of levetiracetam in epilepsy: a more detailed look.

    PubMed

    Mbizvo, Gashirai K; Dixon, Pete; Hutton, Jane L; Marson, Anthony G

    2014-09-01

    The adverse effects profile of levetiracetam in epilepsy is still being fully described. We recently published a Cochrane Review evaluating the effectiveness of levetiracetam, added on to usual care, in treating drug-resistant focal epilepsy. The five most common adverse effects were reported and analysed with no scope for reporting any less common adverse effects than those. Here, we report and analyse the remaining adverse effects (including the five most common). These were (in decreasing order of frequency) somnolence; headache; asthenia; accidental injury; dizziness; infection; pharyngitis; pain; rhinitis; abdominal pain; flu syndrome; vomiting; diarrhoea; convulsion; nausea; increased cough; anorexia; upper respiratory tract infection; hostility; personality disorder; urinary tract infection; nervousness; depression; aggression; back pain; agitation; emotional liability; psychomotor hyperactivity; pyrexia; rash; ECG abnormalities; decreased appetite; nasal congestion; irritability; abnormal behaviour; epistaxis; insomnia; altered mood; anxiety; bloody urine; diplopia; dissociation; memory impairment; pruritis; increased appetite; acne; and stomach discomfort. Only somnolence and infection were significantly associated with levetiracetam. When adverse effects pertaining to infection were combined, these affected 19.7% and 15.1% of participants on levetiracetam and placebo (relative risk 1.16, CI 0.89-1.50, Chi(2) heterogeneity p = 0.13). Somnolence and infection further retained significance in adults while no single adverse effect was significant in children. This review updates the adverse effects profile data on levetiracetam use by empirically reporting its common and uncommon adverse effects and analysing their relative importance statistically using data from a group of trials that possess low Risk of Bias and high Quality of Evidence GRADE scores.

  19. Incidence of adverse cutaneous drug reactions in 22,866 Chinese inpatients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao-Yin; Liu, Bing; Shi, Hao; Zhao, Zi-Ran; Zhou, Xi-Ping; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Qiu-Ning; Zuo, Ya-Gang

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common. However, no prospective study assessing cutaneous ADRs is available for Chinese populations. This study aimed to assess the incidence, manifestations, causative drugs, and other factors related to cutaneous ADRs. A total of 22,866 inpatients were surveyed prospectively from January to April 2012 at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Only cutaneous ADRs induced by systemic drugs were considered. Fifty cases were confirmed as cutaneous ADRs, for an estimated incidence of 2.2 per 1000 during this period (95 % confidence interval 1.6-2.8). Cases of cutaneous ADRs comprised 69 % females, while 63 % of all inpatients were female (χ (2) = 0.641, P = 0.427). The department of infectious diseases was the most frequently involved department. Morbilliform exanthema (40 %) was the most frequent cutaneous ADR, followed by urticaria (23.1 %). Anti-infection drugs (36.9 %) caused most cases of cutaneous ADRs, followed by iodinated contrast media (ICM, 18.5 %) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, 18.5 %). The most frequently associated disorders were cancer (24 %), infection (22 %), cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases (20 %), and autoimmune diseases (18 %). In this first prospective study assessing the incidence of cutaneous ADRs in China, anti-infection drugs were the most commonly involved drugs, followed by ICM and NSAIDs. No evidence of increased cutaneous ADR incidence in AIDS or SLE patients was observed. Our findings indicate that cancer and its treatments were often related to cutaneous ADRs in China.

  20. Prospective observational study protocol to investigate long-term adverse effects of methylphenidate in children and adolescents with ADHD: the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Drugs Use Chronic Effects (ADDUCE) study

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, S K; Carucci, S; Garas, P; Häge, A; Banaschewski, T; Buitelaar, J K; Dittmann, R W; Falissard, B; Hollis, C; Kovshoff, H; Liddle, E; McCarthy, S; Nagy, P; Neubert, A; Rosenthal, E; Sonuga-Barke, E; Wong, I; Zuddas, A; Coghill, D C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Methylphenidate is the most frequently used medication for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Europe. Following concerns about its safety, the European Commission called for research into the long-term effects of methylphenidate on children and adolescents with ADHD. The Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Drugs Use Chronic Effects (ADDUCE) research programme was designed to address this call. At the heart of this programme is a 2-year longitudinal naturalistic pharmacovigilance study being conducted in 27 European sites. Methods and analysis 3 cohorts of children and adolescents (aged 6–17) living in the UK, Germany, Italy and Hungary are being recruited: Group 1 (Medicated ADHD): 800 ADHD medication-naive children and adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD about to start methylphenidate treatment for the first time. Group 2 (Unmedicated ADHD): 400 children and adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD who have never been treated with ADHD medication and have no intention of beginning medication. Group 3 (Non-ADHD): 400 children and adolescents without ADHD who are siblings of individuals in either group 1 or 2. All participants will be assessed 5 times during their 2-year follow-up period for growth and development, psychiatric, neurological and cardiovascular health. The primary outcome measure will be the height velocity SD score. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for the study has been granted by the East of Scotland Research Ethics Service. Following this approval, patient information leaflets and consent forms were translated as necessary and submissions made by lead sites in each of the other 3 countries to their own ethics committees. Following ethical approval in each country, local ethical permissions at each site were sought and obtained as needed. The study's website (http://www.adhd-adduce.org/page/view/2/Home) provides information for researchers, participants and the general

  1. Adverse effects of orthodontic treatment: A clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Talic, Nabeel F.

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment is associated with a number of adverse effects, such as root resorption, pain, pulpal changes, periodontal disease, and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Orthodontists should be aware of these effects and associated risk factors. Risk factors linked to root resorption include the duration of treatment, length, and shape of the root, trauma history, habits, and genetic predisposition. PMID:24151415

  2. Wheeze as an Adverse Event in Pediatric Vaccine and Drug Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Marangu, Diana; Kovacs, Stephanie; Walson, Judd; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Ortiz, Justin R.; John-Stewart, Grace; Horne, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wheeze is an important sign indicating a potentially severe adverse event in vaccine and drug trials, particularly in children. However, there are currently no consensus definitions of wheeze or associated respiratory compromise in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Objective To identify definitions and severity grading scales of wheeze as an adverse event in vaccine and drug RCTs enrolling children <5 years and to determine their diagnostic performance based on sensitivity, specificity and inter-observer agreement. Methods We performed a systematic review of electronic databases and reference lists with restrictions for trial settings, English language and publication date ≥ 1970. Wheeze definitions and severity grading were abstracted and ranked by a diagnostic certainty score based on sensitivity, specificity and inter-observer agreement. Results Of 1,205 articles identified using our broad search terms, we identified 58 eligible trials conducted in 38 countries, mainly in high-income settings. Vaccines made up the majority (90%) of interventions, particularly influenza vaccines (65%). Only 15 trials provided explicit definitions of wheeze. Of 24 studies that described severity, 11 described wheeze severity in the context of an explicit wheeze definition. The remaining 13 studies described wheeze severity where wheeze was defined as part of a respiratory illness or a wheeze equivalent. Wheeze descriptions were elicited from caregiver reports (14%), physical examination by a health worker (45%) or a combination (41%). There were 21/58 studies in which wheeze definitions included combined caregiver report and healthcare worker assessment. The use of these two methods appeared to have the highest combined sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion Standardized wheeze definitions and severity grading scales for use in pediatric vaccine or drug trials are lacking. Standardized definitions of wheeze are needed for assessment of possible adverse events as

  3. Drug adverse events and drop-out risk: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Scoyni, R M; Aiello, L; Trani, I; Felli, B; Masin, A M R; Camponi, V; Dignazio, L; Cortese, M; Pacitti, M T; Carratelli, D; Morocutti, C

    2007-01-01

    We report a brief discussion on a clinical case of a female patient, 85 years old, affected by severe cognitive impairment and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The patient was not taking drugs at home (apart from promazine: 10 drops when necessary to control her behavioral diseases). A previous neuropsychological evaluation had shown a severe cognitive impairment MMSE=16/30; ADL=3/6; IADL=0/8) due to multiple brain ischemic areas (confirmed in 2003 by MRI neuroimaging). When the patient was admitted to our center she was able to perform some basic activities of daily living such as eating and walking and was not too confused. She was included in cognitive rehabilitation groups. Since she showed signs of Parkinsonism, a therapy based on omeprazol 20mg, acetylsalicylic acid, donepezil 10mg, pramipexol 0.18 mg, nimodipine 10 drops, levodopa+carbidopa 100/25mg was started. A few days later she became sleepy during daytime and, once, she lost her balance and fell. She was not self-sufficient any more. At first this was attributed to a lung infection that the patient had, but her state continue after the infection was completely cured with appropriate antibiotics therapy. At that point an adverse drug reaction was suspected and therapy with pramipexol 0.18 mg was interrupted. In a few days the patient regained her previous level of consciousness and self-sufficiency. We consider this a typical case of complex management in a patient with dementia and comorbidity in which adverse drug reactions can play an important role in lowering the level of cognitive functions. In this case the relationship with the family of the patient was made difficult by the attitude of the patient's daughter who decided, after the onset of the adverse drug reaction, to interrupt her mother's stay in our center even at risk of the worst consequences.

  4. Limitations and obstacles of the spontaneous adverse drugs reactions reporting: Two “challenging” case reports

    PubMed Central

    Palleria, Caterina; Leporini, Christian; Chimirri, Serafina; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Sacchetta, Sabrina; Bruno, Lucrezia; Lista, Rosaria M.; Staltari, Orietta; Scuteri, Antonio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Russo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, based on several epidemiological data, iatrogenic disease is an emerging public health problem, especially in industrialized countries. Adverse drugs reactions (ADRs) are extremely common and, therefore, clinically, socially, and economically worthy of attention. Spontaneous reporting system for suspected ADRs represents the cornerstone of the pharmacovigilance, because it allows rapid detection of potential alarm signals related to drugs use. However, spontaneous reporting system shows several limitations, which are mainly related to under-reporting. In this paper, we describe two particular case reports, which emphasize some reasons of under-reporting and other common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems. Materials and Methods: We performed a computer-aided search of Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library databases, national and international databases of suspected ADRs reports in order to identify previous published case reports and spontaneous reports about the ADRs reviewed in this paper, and to examine the role of suspected drugs in the pathogenesis of the described adverse reactions. Results: First, we reported a case of tizanidine-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. In the second case report, we presented an episode of asthma exacerbation after taking bimatoprost. Through the review of these two cases, we highlighted some common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems: under-reporting and false causality attribution. Discussion and Conclusion: Healthcare workers sometimes do not report ADRs because it is challenging to establish with certainty the causal relationship between drug and adverse reaction; however, according to a key principle of pharmacovigilance, it is always better to report even a suspicion to generate an alarm in the interest of protecting public health. PMID:24347986

  5. Quality of Reporting of Serious Adverse Drug Events to an Institutional Review Board

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Burdon, Rachel; West, Dennis P.; Lagman, Jennifer; Georgopoulos, Christina; Belknap, Steven M.; McKoy, June M.; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Weitzman, Sigmund A.; Boyle, Simone; Tallman, Martin S.; Talpaz, Moshe; Sartor, Oliver; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Serious adverse drug event (sADE) reporting to Institutional Review Boards (IRB) is essential to ensure pharmaceutical safety. However, the quality of these reports has not been studied. Safety reports are especially important for cancer drugs that receive accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval, like imatinib, as preapproval experience with these drugs is limited. We evaluated the quality, accuracy, and completeness of sADE reports submitted to an IRB. Experimental Design sADE reports submitted to an IRB from 14 clinical trials with imatinib were reviewed. Structured case report forms, containing detailed clinical data fields and a validated causality assessment instrument, were developed. Two forms were generated for each ADE, the first populated with data abstracted from the IRB reports, and the second populated with data from the corresponding clinical record. Completeness and causality assessments were evaluated for each of the two sources, and then compared. Accuracy (concordance between sources) was also assessed. Results Of 115 sADEs reported for 177 cancer patients to the IRB, overall completeness of adverse event descriptions was 2.4-fold greater for structured case report forms populated with information from the clinical record versus the corresponding forms from IRB reports (95.0% versus 40.3%, P < 0.05). Information supporting causality assessments was recorded 3.5-fold more often in primary data sources versus IRB adverse event descriptions (93% versus 26%, P < 0.05). Some key clinical information was discrepant between the two sources. Conclusions The use of structured syndrome-specific case report forms could enhance the quality of reporting to IRBs, thereby improving the safety of pharmaceuticals administered to cancer patients. PMID:19458059

  6. Neurological adverse effects of methylphenidate may be misdiagnosed as meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Snell, Luke Blagdon; Bakshi, Dinkar

    2015-06-16

    We present a case of adverse neurological effects of methylphenidate therapy for attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A 7-year-old boy presented to the emergency department (ED) having developed ataxic gait, orofacial dyskinesias and choreoathetosis of the limbs. The results of all blood investigations, EEG and CT scan of the head were unremarkable. Subsequently, a detailed history revealed he was being treated for ADHD, being started on methylphenidate in the past 3 months. Discontinuation of methylphenidate led to significant and rapid amelioration of neurological adverse effects.

  7. Application of quantitative signal detection in the Dutch spontaneous reporting system for adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Diemont, Willem; van Grootheest, Kees

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) is the timely detection of unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs), or signal detection. Generally this is carried out by a systematic manual review of every report sent to an SRS. Statistical analysis of the data sets of an SRS, or quantitative signal detection, can provide additional information concerning a possible relationship between a drug and an ADR. We describe the role of quantitative signal detection and the way it is applied at the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb. Results of the statistical analysis are implemented in the traditional case-by-case analysis. In addition, for data-mining purposes, a list of associations of ADRs and suspected drugs that are disproportionally present in the database is periodically generated. Finally, quantitative signal generation can be used to study more complex relationships, such as drug-drug interactions and syndromes. The results of quantitative signal detection should be considered as an additional source of information, complementary to the traditional analysis. Techniques for the detection of drug interactions and syndromes offer a new challenge for pharmacovigilance in the near future.

  8. Recognizing Severe Adverse Drug Reactions: Two Case Reports After Switching Therapies to the Same Generic Company.

    PubMed

    Gallelli, Luca; Gallelli, Giuseppe; Codamo, Giuseppe; Argentieri, Angela; Michniewicz, Andzelika; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Stefanelli, Roberta; Cione, Erika; Caroleo, Maria C; Longo, Paola; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2016-01-01

    Generic formulations represent a way to reduce the costs of brand compounds when their patent is expired. While, the bio-equivalence in generic drugs is guaranteed, some excipients as well as dyes could be different and this could reduce the drug safety. Herein, we report the development of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) in two patients after the switch from brand to generic formulations. We have tested cytochrome P450 enzymes expression as well as drug serum levels. None of these markers were altered. Checking deeply into both patient's medical history, they harbored poly-sensitivity or allergy to pollen and graminacea and used different active ingredients for different health problems coming from the same generic company Almus(®). This company used different dyes and excipients compared to the branded drugs made by distinguished companies. In conclusion, we strongly suggest to both pharmacists and physicians to be careful in giving the advice to change the drug, thinking to reduce health sanitary costs without considering the personal clinical history of each one. Paradoxically this behavior is causing other health issues, bringing to an increase of the overall costs for patients as well as for National Health System.

  9. Knowledge discovery of drug data on the example of adverse reaction prediction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are the widely prescribed drugs for children and most likely to be related with adverse reactions. Record on adverse reactions and allergies from antibiotics considerably affect the prescription choices. We consider this a biomedical decision-making problem and explore hidden knowledge in survey results on data extracted from a big data pool of health records of children, from the Health Center of Osijek, Eastern Croatia. Results We applied and evaluated a k-means algorithm to the dataset to generate some clusters which have similar features. Our results highlight that some type of antibiotics form different clusters, which insight is most helpful for the clinician to support better decision-making. Conclusions Medical professionals can investigate the clusters which our study revealed, thus gaining useful knowledge and insight into this data for their clinical studies. PMID:25079450

  10. Clinically Inconsequential Alerts: The Characteristics of Opioid Drug Alerts and Their Utility in Preventing Adverse Drug Events in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Genco, Emma K.; Forster, Jeri E.; Flaten, Hanna; Goss, Foster; Heard, Kennon J.; Hoppe, Jason; Monte, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Study objective We examine the characteristics of clinical decision support alerts triggered when opioids are prescribed, including alert type, override rates, adverse drug events associated with opioids, and preventable adverse drug events. Methods This was a retrospective chart review study assessing adverse drug event occurrences for emergency department (ED) visits in a large urban academic medical center using a commercial electronic health record system with clinical decision support. Participants include those aged 18 to 89 years who arrived to the ED every fifth day between September 2012 and January 2013. The main outcome was characteristics of opioid drug alerts, including alert type, override rates, opioid-related adverse drug events, and adverse drug event preventability by clinical decision support. Results Opioid drug alerts were more likely to be overridden than nonopioid alerts (relative risk 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21 to 1.50). Opioid drug-allergy alerts were twice as likely to be overridden (relative risk 2.24; 95% CI 1.74 to 2.89). Opioid duplicate therapy alerts were 1.57 times as likely to be overridden (95% CI 1.30 to 1.89). Fourteen of 4,581 patients experienced an adverse drug event (0.31%; 95% CI 0.15% to 0.47%), and 8 were due to opioids (57.1%). None of the adverse drug events were preventable by clinical decision support. However, 46 alerts were accepted for 38 patients that averted a potential adverse drug event. Overall, 98.9% of opioid alerts did not result in an actual or averted adverse drug event, and 96.3% of opioid alerts were overridden. Conclusion Overridden opioid alerts did not result in adverse drug events. Clinical decision support successfully prevented adverse drug events at the expense of generating a large volume of inconsequential alerts. To prevent 1 adverse drug event, providers dealt with more than 123 unnecessary alerts. It is essential to refine clinical decision support alerting systems to eliminate

  11. Detecting Drug Interactions From Adverse-Event Reports: Interaction Between Paroxetine and Pravastatin Increases Blood Glucose Levels

    PubMed Central

    Tatonetti, NP; Denny, JC; Murphy, SN; Fernald, GH; Krishnan, G; Castro, V; Yue, P; Tsau, PS; Kohane, I; Roden, DM; Altman, RB

    2011-01-01

    The lipid-lowering agent pravastatin and the antidepressant paroxetine are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the world. Unexpected interactions between them could have important public health implications. We mined the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) for side-effect profiles involving glucose homeostasis and found a surprisingly strong signal for comedication with pravastatin and paroxetine. We retrospectively evaluated changes in blood glucose in 104 patients with diabetes and 135 without diabetes who had received comedication with these two drugs, using data in electronic medical record (EMR) systems of three geographically distinct sites. We assessed the mean random blood glucose levels before and after treatment with the drugs. We found that pravastatin and paroxetine, when administered together, had a synergistic effect on blood glucose. The average increase was 19 mg/dl (1.0 mmol/l) overall, and in those with diabetes it was 48 mg/dl (2.7 mmol/l). In contrast, neither drug administered singly was associated with such changes in glucose levels. An increase in glucose levels is not a general effect of combined therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and statins. PMID:21613990

  12. [Adverse effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors use during the third trimester of pregnancy and prevention guidelines].

    PubMed

    Mejías, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Pinilla, Elvira; Fernández Martín, Paloma; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa

    2007-04-21

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) have become the drug of choice for the treatment of depression and have shown to be effective in the treatment for other mental disorders. Recently, several articles have reported about the adverse effects observed in newborns after maternal exposure to these drugs during the last trimester of pregnancy. In this work, a review of literature is presented, regarding the above mentioned adverse effects. Moreover, some guidelines for the rational use of these drugs during the last trimester of pregnancy and for the management of prenatally exposed newborns are provided.

  13. On the creation of a clinical gold standard corpus in Spanish: Mining adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Oronoz, Maite; Gojenola, Koldo; Pérez, Alicia; de Ilarraza, Arantza Díaz; Casillas, Arantza

    2015-08-01

    The advances achieved in Natural Language Processing make it possible to automatically mine information from electronically created documents. Many Natural Language Processing methods that extract information from texts make use of annotated corpora, but these are scarce in the clinical domain due to legal and ethical issues. In this paper we present the creation of the IxaMed-GS gold standard composed of real electronic health records written in Spanish and manually annotated by experts in pharmacology and pharmacovigilance. The experts mainly annotated entities related to diseases and drugs, but also relationships between entities indicating adverse drug reaction events. To help the experts in the annotation task, we adapted a general corpus linguistic analyzer to the medical domain. The quality of the annotation process in the IxaMed-GS corpus has been assessed by measuring the inter-annotator agreement, which was 90.53% for entities and 82.86% for events. In addition, the corpus has been used for the automatic extraction of adverse drug reaction events using machine learning.

  14. Potentially inappropriate prescribing andthe risk of adverse drug reactions in critically ill older adults

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Thamires B.; Reis, Wálleri C.; Andrzejevski, Vânia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) use in the elderly is associated with increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), but there is limited information regarding PIM use in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Objective: The aim of the study is to describe the prevalence and factors associated with the use of PIM and the occurrence of PIM-related adverse reactions in the critically ill elderly. Methods: This study enrolled all critically ill older adults (60 years or more) admitted to medical or cardiovascular ICUs between January and December 2013, in a large tertiary teaching hospital. For all patients, clinical pharmacists listed the medications given during the ICU stay and data on drugs were analyzed using 2012 Beers Criteria, to identify the prevalence of PIM. For each identified PIM the medical records were analyzed to evaluate factors associated with its use. The frequency of ADRs and, the causal relationship between PIM and the ADRs identified were also evaluated through review of medical records. Results: According to 2012 Beers Criteria, 98.2% of elderly patients used at least one PIM (n=599), of which 24.8% were newly started in the ICUs. In 29.6% of PIMs, there was a clinical circumstance that justified their prescription. The number of PIMs was associated with ICU length of stay and total number of medications. There was at least one ADR identified in 17.8% of patients; more than 40% were attributed to PIM, but there was no statistical association. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of PIM used in acutely ill older people, but they do not seem to be the major cause of adverse drug reactions in this population. Although many PIMs had a clinical circumstance that led to their prescription during the course of ICU hospitalization, many were still present upon hospital discharge. Therefore, prescription of PIMs should be minimized to improve the safety of elderly patients. PMID:28042352

  15. Patterns of Adverse Drug Reactions in Different Age Groups: Analysis of Spontaneous Reports by Community Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yun Mi; Shin, Wan Gyoon; Lee, Ju-Yeun; Choi, Soo An; Jo, Yun Hee; Youn, So Jung; Lee, Mo Se; Choi, Kwang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical manifestations and causative drugs associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) spontaneously reported by community pharmacists and to compare the ADRs by age. Methods ADRs reported to the Regional Pharmacovigilance Center of the Korean Pharmaceutical Association by community pharmacists from January 2013 to June 2014 were included. Causality was assessed using the WHO-Uppsala Monitoring Centre system. The patient population was classified into three age groups. We analyzed 31,398 (74.9%) ADRs from 9,705 patients, identified as having a causal relationship, from a total pool of 41,930 ADRs from 9,873 patients. Median patient age was 58.0 years; 66.9% were female. Results Gastrointestinal system (34.4%), nervous system (14.4%), and psychiatric (12.1%) disorders were the most frequent symptoms. Prevalent causative drugs were those for acid-related disorders (11.4%), anti-inflammatory products (10.5%), analgesics (7.2%), and antibacterials (7.1%). Comparisons by age revealed diarrhea and antibacterials to be most commonly associated with ADRs in children (p < 0.001), whereas dizziness was prevalent in the elderly (p < 0.001). Anaphylactic reaction was the most frequent serious event (19.7%), mainly associated with cephalosporins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Among 612 ADRs caused by nonprescription drugs, the leading symptoms and causative drugs were skin disorders (29.6%) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (16.2%), respectively. Conclusions According to the community pharmacist reports, the leading clinical manifestations and causative drugs associated with ADRs in outpatients differed among age groups. PMID:26172050

  16. Use and Perceived Benefits of Mobile Devices by Physicians in Preventing Adverse Drug Events in the Nursing Home

    PubMed Central

    Handler, Steven M.; Boyce, Richard D.; Ligons, Frank; Perera, Subashan; Nace, David A.; Hochheiser, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although mobile devices equipped with drug reference software may help prevent adverse drug events (ADEs) in the nursing home (NH) by providing medication information at the point-of-care, little is known about their use and perceived benefits. The goal of this study was to conduct a survey of a nationally representative sample of NH physicians to quantify the use and perceived benefits of mobile devices in preventing ADEs in the NH setting. Design/Setting/Participants We surveyed physicians who attended the 2010 the AMDA Annual Symposium about their use of mobile devices and beliefs about the effectiveness of drug reference software in preventing ADEs. Results The overall net valid response rate was 70% (558/800) with 42% (236/558) using mobile devices to assist with prescribing in the NH. Physicians with ≤15 years clinical experience were 67% more likely to be mobile device users, compared to those with >15 years of clinical experience (odds ratio=1.68; 95% confidence interval=1.17-2.41; p=0.005). For those who used a mobile device to assist with prescribing, almost all (98%) reported performing an average of one or more drug look-ups per day, performed an average of 1-2 lookups per day for potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and most (88%) believed that drug reference software had helped to prevent at least one potential ADE in the preceding four-week period. Conclusions The proportion of NH physicians who use mobile devices with drug reference software, while significant, is lower than in other clinical environments. Our results suggest that NH physicians who use mobile devices equipped with drug reference software believe they are helpful for reducing ADEs. Further research is needed to better characterize the facilitators and barriers to adoption of the technology in the NH and its precise impact on NH ADEs. PMID:24094901

  17. Genetics or environment in drug transport: the case of organic anion transporting polypeptides and adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, John D; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) uptake transporters are important for the disposition of many drugs and perturbed OATP activity can contribute to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). It is well documented that both genetic and environmental factors can alter OATP expression and activity. Genetic factors include single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that change OATP activity and epigenetic regulation that modify OATP expression levels. SNPs in OATPs contribute to ADRs. Environmental factors include the pharmacological context of drug--drug interactions and the physiological context of liver diseases. Liver diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cholestasis and hepatocellular carcinoma change the expression of multiple OATP isoforms. The role of liver diseases in the occurrence of ADRs is unknown. Areas covered This article covers the roles OATPs play in ADRs when considered in the context of genetic or environmental factors. The reader will gain a greater appreciation for the current evidence regarding the salience and importance of each factor in OATP-mediated ADRs. Expert opinion A SNP in a single OATP transporter can cause changes in drug pharmacokinetics and contribute to ADRs but, because of overlap in substrate specificities, there is potential for compensatory transport by other OATP isoforms. By contrast, the expression of multiple OATP isoforms is decreased in liver diseases, reducing compensatory transport and thereby increasing the probability of ADRs. To date, most research has focused on the genetic factors in OATP-mediated ADRs while the impact of environmental factors has largely been ignored. PMID:22280100

  18. 15 CFR 971.602 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS... significant adverse environmental effect or impact (for the purposes of sections 103(a)(2)(D), 105(a)(4), 106.... Determinations will be based upon the best information available, including relevant environmental...

  19. 15 CFR 971.602 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS... significant adverse environmental effect or impact (for the purposes of sections 103(a)(2)(D), 105(a)(4), 106.... Determinations will be based upon the best information available, including relevant environmental...

  20. 15 CFR 971.602 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS... significant adverse environmental effect or impact (for the purposes of sections 103(a)(2)(D), 105(a)(4), 106.... Determinations will be based upon the best information available, including relevant environmental...

  1. 15 CFR 971.602 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS... significant adverse environmental effect or impact (for the purposes of sections 103(a)(2)(D), 105(a)(4), 106.... Determinations will be based upon the best information available, including relevant environmental...

  2. 10 CFR 1017.10 - Adverse effect test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adverse effect test. 1017.10 Section 1017.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information §...

  3. 10 CFR 1017.10 - Adverse effect test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adverse effect test. 1017.10 Section 1017.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information §...

  4. 10 CFR 1017.10 - Adverse effect test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adverse effect test. 1017.10 Section 1017.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information §...

  5. 10 CFR 1017.10 - Adverse effect test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adverse effect test. 1017.10 Section 1017.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information §...

  6. 10 CFR 1017.10 - Adverse effect test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adverse effect test. 1017.10 Section 1017.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION OF UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION Initially Determining What Information Is Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information §...

  7. Skin-lightening cosmetics: frequent, potentially severe adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Skin-lightening cosmetics are used by many women and men around the world. The products contain a variety of substances, which are often unknown to the users. Most of these products include topical corticosteroids, hydroquinone and mercury salts. Many other substances may be added. Several surveys and cohort studies, including several thousand individuals, have shown that regular application of skin-lightening cosmetics to large surface areas can have irreversible cutaneous adverse effects, such as patchy hyper- or hypopigmentation, skin atrophy, stretch marks and delayed wound healing, and can also mask or, on the contrary, promote or reactivate skin infections. Cases of skin cancer have been attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics. A Senegalese cohort study of 147 women showed a statistically significant increase in the risk of hypertension and diabetes linked to the use of skin-lightening agents. Other systemic adverse effects attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics include Cushing's syndrome, adrenal insufficiency, nephrotic syndrome, neurological disorders, and ocular disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have also been attributed to these products. Many skin-lightening cosmetics contain substances that can harm the unborn child. For example, tretinoin is teratogenic while salicylic acid is feto-toxic. In practice, users are often unaware of the risk of severe adverse effects associated with skin-lightening cosmetics. Users should be informed of these adverse effects and encouraged to stop using these products, especially when skin disorders appear.

  8. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.5 Assessment of adverse effects. (a) Apply... have been identified subsequent to the original evaluation of the property's eligibility for the... qualities of a property of religious and cultural significance to an Indian tribe or Native...

  9. [Nalmefene and Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome: Analysis of the Global Pharmacovigilance Database for Adverse Drug Reactions].

    PubMed

    Dahmke, Hendrike; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Weiler, Stefan

    2015-10-14

    Nalmefene (Selincro®) is a selective opioid receptor antagonist, licensed in April 2014 in Switzerland for the reduction of alcohol consumption in adults with a high drinking risk level. 200 reports of adverse drug reactions of nalmefene have been documented worldwide in the WHO global pharmacovigilance database between 7th March 1997 to 1st March 2015. In 21 cases (10,5%) nalmefene and an opioid were administered concomitantly, causing withdrawal symptoms. Until now, the regional pharmacovigilance center in Zurich received four cases of nalmefene combined with opioids. This combination should be avoided.

  10. Adverse Drug Event Causality Analysis (ADECA): A Process for Evaluating Evidence and Assigning Drugs to Risk Categories for Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Woosley, Raymond L; Romero, Klaus; Heise, Craig W; Gallo, Tyler; Tate, Jared; Woosley, Raymond David; Ward, Sophie

    2017-03-08

    Growing evidence indicates that many drugs have the ability to cause a potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia, torsades de pointes (TdP). This necessitates the development of a compilation of drugs that have this potential toxicity. Such a list is helpful in identifying the etiology of TdP in patients taking multiple drugs and assists decision making by those caring for patients at high risk of TdP. The Arizona Center for Education and Research on Therapeutics (AZCERT) has developed a process to standardize the identification of drugs and place them in risk categories for their clinical ability to cause TdP and QT prolongation. AZCERT's Adverse Drug Event Causality Analysis (ADECA) utilizes 16 types of data drawn from four sources to compile an open-source knowledge base, QTdrugs, which is maintained on the CredibleMeds.org website. Because the evidence for most drugs is incomplete, the ADECA process is used to place drugs into one of three categories that represent different levels of certainty: known TdP risk, possible TdP risk, and conditional TdP risk. Each category has strict evidentiary requirements for clinical evidence of TdP and/or QT prolongation. These are described in this paper. Because evidence can evolve over time, the ADECA process includes the continuous gathering and analysis of newly emerging evidence to revise the lists. The QTdrugs lists have proven to be a valued, readily available, commercial influence-free resource for healthcare providers, patients, researchers, and authors of consensus guidelines for the safe use of medicines.

  11. Information Systems Developments to Detect and Analyze Chemotherapy-associated Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Mark G.; Livshits, Alice; Carozzoni, Carol; McMenamin, Erin; Gibson, Gene; Loren, Alison W.; Hennessy, Sean

    2002-01-01

    A difficult balance exists in the use of cancer chemotherapy in which the cytotoxic medicine must act on the cancer without causing neutropenic fever, a condition that is caused by over-suppression of the immune system. An improved understanding of dosing strategies as well as the use of medications to support the immune system has helped to reduce the likelihood of an admission for neutropenic fever following cancer chemotherapy. Therefore, as with any drug therapy, chemotherapy administration that is temporally associated with an unexpected hospitalization for neutropenia is an adverse drug event (ADE). Analogous to other informatics research to monitor and address the occurrence of ADEs, this work develops and validates the information systems infrastructure necessary to detect the occurrence of and analyze the factors contributing to chemotherapy associated ADEs.

  12. ADEpedia: a scalable and standardized knowledge base of Adverse Drug Events using semantic web technology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqian; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    A source of semantically coded Adverse Drug Event (ADE) data can be useful for identifying common phenotypes related to ADEs. We proposed a comprehensive framework for building a standardized ADE knowledge base (called ADEpedia) through combining ontology-based approach with semantic web technology. The framework comprises four primary modules: 1) an XML2RDF transformation module; 2) a data normalization module based on NCBO Open Biomedical Annotator; 3) a RDF store based persistence module; and 4) a front-end module based on a Semantic Wiki for the review and curation. A prototype is successfully implemented to demonstrate the capability of the system to integrate multiple drug data and ontology resources and open web services for the ADE data standardization. A preliminary evaluation is performed to demonstrate the usefulness of the system, including the performance of the NCBO annotator. In conclusion, the semantic web technology provides a highly scalable framework for ADE data source integration and standard query service.

  13. A drug-adverse event extraction algorithm to support pharmacovigilance knowledge mining from PubMed citations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Haerian, Krystl; Salmasian, Hojjat; Harpaz, Rave; Chase, Herbert; Friedman, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) create a serious problem causing substantial harm to patients. An executable standardized knowledgebase of drug-ADE relations which is publicly available would be valuable so that it could be used for ADE detection. The literature is an important source that could be used to generate a knowledgebase of drug-ADE pairs. In this paper, we report on a method that automatically determines whether a specific adverse event (AE) is caused by a specific drug based on the content of PubMed citations. A drug-ADE classification method was initially developed to detect neutropenia based on a pre-selected set of drugs. This method was then applied to a different set of 76 drugs to determine if they caused neutropenia. For further proof of concept this method was applied to 48 drugs to determine whether they caused another AE, myocardial infarction. Results showed that AUROC was 0.93 and 0.86 respectively.

  14. Adverse psychosocial outcomes associated with drug use among US high school seniors: a comparison of alcohol and marijuana

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Fenstermaker, Michael; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Ompad, Danielle C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Weitzman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is debate about whether marijuana (cannabis) use is more dangerous than alcohol use. Although difficult to make objective comparisons, research is needed to compare relative dangers in order to help inform preventive efforts and policy. Methods Data were analyzed from a nationally representative sample of high school seniors in the Monitoring the Future study (2007–2011; Weighted n = 7437; modal age: 18) who reported lifetime use of alcohol or marijuana. Students were asked to indicate whether they experienced various adverse psychosocial outcomes resulting from use of each substance. We examined which outcomes were more prevalent for each substance. Results Compared to alcohol use, marijuana use was more commonly reported to compromise relationships with teachers or supervisors, result in less energy or interest, and result in lower school or job performance. Compared to marijuana use, alcohol was more commonly reported to compromise relationships with friends and significant others; it was also reported to lead to more regret (particularly among females), and driving unsafely. Marijuana users were more likely to report no adverse outcomes. Females and white students were more likely to report various adverse outcomes and higher frequency use of each substance also increased occurrences of reported adverse outcomes. Conclusions Marijuana and alcohol are associated with unique adverse psychosocial outcomes. Outcomes differ by sex and race/ethnicity, and perception or experience of outcomes may also be related to legal status and associated stigma. Public health interventions may be more effective by focusing on harm reduction strategies for these drug-specific outcomes. PMID:25169838

  15. Surveillance of methadone-related adverse drug events using multiple public health data sources.

    PubMed

    Sims, Shannon A; Snow, Laverne A; Porucznik, Christina A

    2007-08-01

    Healthcare safety and quality surveillance is increasingly conducted by public health agencies. We describe a biomedical informatics method that uses multiple public health data sources to perform surveillance of methadone-related adverse drug events. Data from Utah medical examiner records, vital statistics, emergency department encounter administrative data and a database of controlled substances prescriptions are used to examine trends in state-wide adverse events related to methadone. From 1997 to 2004, population-adjusted methadone prescriptions increased 727%, with evidence to suggest the rise in the methadone prescription rate is for treatment of pain, not addiction therapy. During the same period of time, population adjusted, accidental methadone-related deaths in medical examiner data increased 1770%. Population adjusted methadone-related emergency department encounters rose 612% from 1997 to 2003. Our results suggest that the increase in methadone prescription rates from 1997 to 2004 was accompanied by a concurrent increase in methadone-related morbidity and mortality. Although patient data is not linked between data sources, our results demonstrate that utilizing multiple public health data sources captures more cases and provides more clinical detail than individual data sources alone. Our approach is a successful biomedical informatics approach for surveillance of adverse events and utilizes widely available public health data sources, as well as an emerging source of public health data, controlled substance prescription registries.

  16. Retrospective Analysis of Pattern of Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Tertiary Hospital of Pauri Garhwal

    PubMed Central

    Dimri, Deepak; Thapliyal, Swati; Thawani, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions (CADR) are the common drug induced adverse reactions which usually have wide range of manifestations and severity. Aim To describe the prevalence and clinical spectrum of CADR’s in a tertiary hospital of the Garhwal region in Uttarakhand, India. Materials and Methods All patients suspected of having CADRs reported in the various out-patient departments, and in-patients of HNB Base & Teaching Hospital, from 1st January 2012 to 31st December 2014 were retrospectively analysed. Drug history was recorded in a format specified in Indian National Pharmacovigilance Programme. Results Total 111 cases of CADRs were reported from Jan 2012 to Dec 2014. Mean age of patients was 33.34±18.7 years and maximum ADRs were reported in the age group of 20-39 years (36.9%). Female were affected more than male (W:M :: 66:45). Most of the ADRs were exanthematous eruptions (EE) type (33.3%). Medicine department reported maximum cases of CADRs (47.7%), followed by Dermatology. Most of the CADRs were reported with antimicrobial agents (69.4%). Significant associations of different types of various cutaneous reactions were observed in relation to the duration (in days) of ADRs (p = 0.038), types of outcome (p= 0.006), different departments (p= 0.014) and between different groups of medicines (p = 0.008). Conclusion CADRs have proved a significant problem in healthcare for decades. Major bulk of CADR result from physician prescribed drugs. Hence, awareness on part of the physician can help in timely detection of cutaneous reactions, thereby restricting damage from them. PMID:27437240

  17. Implementing a pharmacovigilance program to evaluate cutaneous adverse drug reactions in an antiretroviral access program

    PubMed Central

    Mudzviti, Tinashe; Sibanda, Marvelous; Gavi, Samuel; Maponga, Charles Chiedza; Morse, Gene D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs) can cause significant morbidity and distress in patients especially in the HIV infected population on antiretroviral therapy. Adverse Drug Reaction monitoring and ascertaining causality in resource limited settings still remains a challenge. This study was carried out to evaluate causality and measure incidence of cADRs in HIV infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy. The study was also designed to test a 3-step approach in the monitoring and evaluation of ADRs in resource limited settings. Methodology A retrospective patient medical records review was carried out at the Parirenyatwa Family Care Centre, (Harare, Zimbabwe). Cases of cADRs were reported to the Medicines Control Authority of Zimbabwe (Drug regulating body in Zimbabwe) for assessment and causality classification. Results Two hundred and twenty-one patient records were randomly selected and reviewed to determine if any diagnosis of cADRs was made by clinicians. Causality assessment revealed 13.1% of cADRs which were due to an offending agent in the antiretroviral therapy against an initial incidence of 17.6% which had been determined by the physicians. Conclusions cADRs had an incidence of 13.1% within the population under study due to non nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Most reactions were due to the NNRTIs which contributed 72.4 % of all cADRs. A panel of experts from the drug regulatory authority can be used as an implementation based mechanism in ascertaining causality objectively in settings where resources are constrained. PMID:23277506

  18. Reported Adverse Drug Reactions in Infants: A Nationwide Analysis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Rosliana; Dali, Ahmad Fauzi; Aziz, Noorizan Abd; Ming, Long Chiau; Manan, Mohamed Mansor

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reporting is a useful source of drug safety information in infants as only adult patients are routinely tested in clinical trials. This study was aimed to evaluate the spontaneously reported ADRs using WHO Adverse Reaction Terminology and to identify the common drugs associated with ADRs in children under 2 years of age. A retrospective analysis of ADR data for children below 2 years old from 2000 to 2013 was conducted using the data extracted from Malaysia's national pharmacovigilance database, QUEST2 System. From 2000 to 2013, Malaysia's National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau received a total of 11,932 reports for children from various healthcare facilities in Malaysia. 14.0% (n = 1667) of the ADRs reported for those children were related to children under 2 years old. The data retrieved was analyzed in terms of age, gender, source of reporting, type of reporters, suspected medicines and characteristics of ADRs (category, onset, severity, and outcomes). A total of 1312 ADRs reported in 907 ADR reports were analyzed. The most common ADRs reported were skin appendage disorders (60.1%), and the most frequently reported symptoms were rash (n = 215), maculopapular rash (n = 206), urticaria (n = 169), erythematous rash (n = 76), and pruritus (n = 58). In general, drugs from antibacterials for systemic use (58.8%) appeared to be the most common contributors to ADRs in children below 2 years old. Penicillins and other β-Lactam Antibacterials accounted for more than 40% of all drugs implicated in ADRs. The majority of ADRs were subacute reactions that occurred within 24 h of exposure to the drug. A high proportion of ADRs was classified as mild, and most victims had no sequela. Only one fatality was seen. There were 10 cases for each symptom, namely erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, observed in this study. A large proportion of ADRs in children under 2 years old were mainly caused by drugs from antibacterial for

  19. Reported Adverse Drug Reactions in Infants: A Nationwide Analysis in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Rosli, Rosliana; Dali, Ahmad Fauzi; Aziz, Noorizan Abd.; Ming, Long Chiau; Manan, Mohamed Mansor

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reporting is a useful source of drug safety information in infants as only adult patients are routinely tested in clinical trials. This study was aimed to evaluate the spontaneously reported ADRs using WHO Adverse Reaction Terminology and to identify the common drugs associated with ADRs in children under 2 years of age. A retrospective analysis of ADR data for children below 2 years old from 2000 to 2013 was conducted using the data extracted from Malaysia’s national pharmacovigilance database, QUEST2 System. From 2000 to 2013, Malaysia’s National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau received a total of 11,932 reports for children from various healthcare facilities in Malaysia. 14.0% (n = 1667) of the ADRs reported for those children were related to children under 2 years old. The data retrieved was analyzed in terms of age, gender, source of reporting, type of reporters, suspected medicines and characteristics of ADRs (category, onset, severity, and outcomes). A total of 1312 ADRs reported in 907 ADR reports were analyzed. The most common ADRs reported were skin appendage disorders (60.1%), and the most frequently reported symptoms were rash (n = 215), maculopapular rash (n = 206), urticaria (n = 169), erythematous rash (n = 76), and pruritus (n = 58). In general, drugs from antibacterials for systemic use (58.8%) appeared to be the most common contributors to ADRs in children below 2 years old. Penicillins and other β-Lactam Antibacterials accounted for more than 40% of all drugs implicated in ADRs. The majority of ADRs were subacute reactions that occurred within 24 h of exposure to the drug. A high proportion of ADRs was classified as mild, and most victims had no sequela. Only one fatality was seen. There were 10 cases for each symptom, namely erythema multiforme and Stevens–Johnson Syndrome, observed in this study. A large proportion of ADRs in children under 2 years old were mainly caused by drugs from antibacterial

  20. Indoor air pollution: Acute adverse health effects and host susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zummo, S.M.; Karol, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Increased awareness of the poor quality of indoor air compared with outdoor air has resulted in a significant amount of research on the adverse health effects and mechanisms of action of indoor air pollutants. Common indoor air agents are identified, along with resultant adverse health effects, mechanisms of action, and likely susceptible populations. Indoor air pollutants range from biological agents (such as dust mites) to chemical irritants (such as nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, and isocyanates). These agents may exert their effects through allergic as well as nonallergic mechanisms. While the public does not generally perceive poor indoor air quality as a significant health risk, increasing reports of illness related to indoor air and an expanding base of knowledge on the health effects of indoor air pollution are likely to continue pushing the issue to the forefront.

  1. Effect of wettability on adverse mobility immiscible floods

    SciTech Connect

    Vives, M.T.; Chang, Y.C.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Many immiscible displacements in reservoirs occur at adverse mobility. Effect of wettability on these displacements is not well understood and often ignored in reservoir simulation. Recent macroscopic theories of viscous fingering treat adverse immiscible flows similar to miscible flows, the mixing in the fingered region being controlled by a Todd-Longstaff-type functional form. The wettability of the medium is taken into account only through the use of appropriate relative permeabilities. The goal of this paper is to understand the macroscopic bypassing in adverse mobility immiscible floods. Immiscible displacements are conducted in a quarter 5-spot model in both drainage and imbibition modes at similar effective mobility ratios and viscous-to-gravity numbers. The level of bypassing and gravity override is visualized and measured. Tertiary water-alternating-gas (WAG) displacements are also conducted at various WAG ratios and viscosity ratios. Fractional flow analysis and numerical simulation are used to understand these displacements. Experiments show that macroscopic viscous fingering is present in adverse viscosity immiscible displacements where no saturation shock is expected from 1-D fractional flow theory. Bypassing due to both fingering and gravity override is higher in the drainage mode than in the imbibition mode, with other key parameters being the same. Optimum WAG ratio in water-wet rock is a function of oil/solvent viscosity ratio. The macroscopic flow theory needs to include capillarity and viscous fingering to match these experimental findings.

  2. Discrepancies in listed adverse drug reactions in pharmaceutical product information supplied by the regulatory authorities in Denmark and the USA.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Robert; Aagaard, Lise; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Borisova, Liza; Hørlück, Dorte; Brunak, Søren; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical product information (PI) supplied by the regulatory authorities serves as a source of information on safe and effective use of drugs. The objectives of this study were to qualitatively and quantitatively compare PIs for selected drugs marketed in both Denmark and the USA with respect to consistency and discrepancy of listed adverse drug reaction (ADR) information. We compared individual ADRs listed in PIs from Denmark and the USA with respect to type and frequency. Consistency was defined as match of ADRs and of ADR frequency or match could not be ruled out. Discrepancies were defined as ADRs listed only in one country or listed with different frequencies. We analyzed PIs for 40 separate drugs from ten therapeutic groups and assigned the 4003 identified ADRs to System Organ Classes (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities [MedDRA] terminology). Less than half of listed ADRs (n = 1874; 47%) showed consistency. Discrepancies (n = 2129; 53%) were split into ADRs listed only in the USA (n = 1558; 39%), ADRs listed only in Denmark (n = 325; 8%) and ADRs listed with different frequencies (n = 246; 6%). The majority of listed ADRs were of the type "gastrointestinal disorders" and "nervous system disorders". Our results show great differences in PIs for drugs approved in both Denmark and the USA illuminating concerns about the credibility of the publicly available PIs. The results also represent an argument for further harmonization across borders to improve consistency between authority-supplied information.

  3. Adjustable silicone gastric banding adverse events reported to the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Brown, S Lori; Reid, Marie H; Duggirala, Hesha Jani

    2003-01-01

    A silicone adjustable gastric banding system was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in June, 2001. The purpose of this report is to review and characterize the reports on silicone adjustable gastric banding systems received by the FDA through August 8, 2002. We also review medical literature on adverse events with silicone adjustable gastric banding systems. Manufacturers of regulated medical devices, such as adjustable silicone gastric bands, are required to report adverse events, including deaths and serious injuries, to the FDA. We reviewed all such reports received by the FDA through August 8, 2002, for adjustable silicone gastric bands and summarize the data by type of adverse event, reported device problems, and reported patient problems. The FDA received 556 reports of adverse events related to the use of adjustable silicone gastric bands. Two of these reports were for deaths, one during surgery and the other as a result of an erosion of the gastric band into the stomach 9 weeks after implantation. Forty-four reports were for injuries including band erosions, slippage, and infection. The most common type of report (499) was for device malfunction, and of these, 485 (97.2%) described a leak at or near the port. Of the 485 leaks reported as malfunctions, 99.4% were treated surgically. The majority of reports were related to disconnection, breakage, and leakage at or near the access port. Physicians and potential patients should be aware of these problems and recognize the possibility that additional surgery(ies) may be required for leaking access port/connections. The loose connection may cause pain and the device no longer performs as intended when there is a leak.

  4. Sulfites--a food and drug administration review of recalls and reported adverse events.

    PubMed

    Timbo, Babgaleh; Koehler, Kathleen M; Wolyniak, Cecilia; Klontz, Karl C

    2004-08-01

    Sulfite-sensitive individuals can experience adverse reactions after consuming foods containing sulfiting agents (sulfites), and some of these reactions may be severe. In the 1980s and 1990s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acted to reduce the likelihood that sulfite-sensitive individuals would unknowingly consume foods containing sulfites. The FDA prohibited the use of sulfites on fruits and vegetables (except potatoes) to be served or presented fresh to the public and required that the presence of detectable levels of sulfites be declared on food labels, even when these sulfites are used as a processing aid or are a component of another ingredient in the food. In the present study, data from FDA recall records and adverse event reports were used to examine the current status of problems of sensitivity to sulfites in foods. From 1996 through 1999, the FDA processed a total of 59 recalls of foods containing undeclared sulfites; these 59 recalls involved 93 different food products. Fifty (55%) of the recalled products were classified as class I, a designation indicating that a consumer reasonably could have ingested > or = 10 mg of undeclared sulfites on a single occasion, a level that could potentially cause a serious adverse reaction in a susceptible person. From 1996 through mid-1999, the FDA received a total of 34 reports of adverse reactions allegedly due to eating foods containing undeclared sulfites. The average of 10 reports per year, although derived from a passive surveillance system, was lower than the average of 111 reports per year that the FDA received from 1980 to 1987, a decrease that may have resulted in part from FDA regulatory action.

  5. Large-scale identification of adverse drug reaction-related proteins through a random walk model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shi, Hongbo; Yang, Feng; Yang, Lei; Lv, Yingli; Wang, Shuyuan; Dai, Enyu; Sun, Dianjun; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are responsible for drug failure in clinical trials and affect life quality of patients. The identification of ADRs during the early phases of drug development is an important task. Therefore, predicting potential protein targets eliciting ADRs is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of ADRs. In this study, we proposed a computational algorithm,Integrated Network for Protein-ADR relations (INPADR), to infer potential protein-ADR relations based on an integrated network. First, the integrated network was constructed by connecting the protein-protein interaction network and the ADR similarity network using known protein-ADR relations. Then, candidate protein-ADR relations were further prioritized by performing a random walk with restart on this integrated network. Leave-one-out cross validation was used to evaluate the ability of the INPADR. An AUC of 0.8486 was obtained, which was a significant improvement compared to previous methods. We also applied the INPADR to two ADRs to evaluate its accuracy. The results suggested that the INPADR is capable of finding novel protein-ADR relations. This study provides new insight to our understanding of ADRs. The predicted ADR-related proteins will provide a reference for preclinical safety pharmacology studies and facilitate the identification of ADRs during the early phases of drug development. PMID:27805066

  6. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Imai, Shungo; Uehara, Keiko; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs) submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline) were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release.

  7. Drug therapy and adverse drug reactions to terbutaline in obstetric patients: a prospective cohort study in hospitalized women

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Hernández, Dulce María; Vargas-Rivera, María Josefa E; Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A; Palma-Aguirre, José Antonio; Sumano-López, Héctor

    2002-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADR's) could be expected more frequently in pregnant women. This study was performed in order to identify ADR's to tocolytic drugs in hospitalised pregnant women. Methods A prospective cohort study was performed in two General Hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) in Mexico City. Two hundred and seven women undergoing labor, premature labor, threatened abortion or suffering any obstetric related disease were included. Drug prescription and signs and symptoms of any potential ADR were registered daily during the hospital stay. Any potential ADR to tocolytic drugs was evaluated and classified by three of the authors using the Kramer's algorithm. Results Of the 207 patients, an ADR was positively classified in 25 cases (12.1%, CI95% 8.1 to 17.5%). All ADR's were classified as minor reactions. Grouping patients with diagnosis of threatened abortion, premature labor or under labor (n= 114), 24 ADR's were related to terbutaline, accounting for a rate of 21.1 ADR's per 100 obstetric patients. Obstetric patients suffering an ADR were older than obstetric patients without any ADR. However, the former received less drugs/day × patient-1 and had a shorter hospital stay (p < 0.05) whereas the dose of terbutaline was similar between the two groups. Terbutaline inhibited uterine motility in women with and without any ADR at a similar rate, 70 and 76% respectively (x2 = 0.07; p = 0.8). Conclusion Terbutaline, used as a tocolytic drug, was related to a high frequency of minor ADRs and to a high rate of effcicacy. PMID:11934352

  8. Acute drug prescribing to children on chronic antiepilepsy therapy and the potential for adverse drug interactions in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Philipp H; Ekins-Daukes, Suzie; Simpson, Colin R; Milne, Robert M; Helms, Peter; McLay, James S

    2005-01-01

    Aims To investigate the extent of acute coprescribing in primary care to children on chronic antiepileptic therapy, which could give rise to potentially harmful drug–drug interactions. Design Acute coprescribing to children on chronic antiepileptic drug therapy in primary care was assessed in 178 324 children aged 0–17 years for the year 1 November 1999 to 31 October 2000. Computerized prescribing data were retrieved from 161 representative general practices in Scotland. Setting One hundred and sixty-one general practices throughout Scotland. Results During the study year 723 (0.41%) children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy were identified. Fourteen antiepileptic agents were prescribed, with carbamazepine, sodium valproate and lamotrigine accounting for 80% of the total. During the year children on chronic antiepileptic therapy were prescribed 4895 acute coprescriptions for 269 different medicines. The average number of acute coprescriptions for non-epileptic drug therapy were eight, 11, six, and six for the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-olds, respectively. Of these acute coprescriptions 72 (1.5%) prescribed to 22 (3.0%) children were identified as a potential source of clinically serious interactions. The age-adjusted prevalence rates for potentially serious coprescribing were 86, 26, 22, and 33/1000 children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy in the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-old age groups, respectively. The drugs most commonly coprescribed which could give rise to such interactions were antacids, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, theophylline and the low-dose oral contraceptive. For 10 (45.5%0 of the 20 children identified at risk of a potentially clinically serious adverse drug interaction, the acute coprescription was prescribed off label because of age or specific contraindication/warning. Conclusions In primary care, 3.0% of children on chronic antiepileptic therapy are coprescribed therapeutic agents, which could

  9. Energy Drink Consumption: Beneficial and Adverse Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Alsunni, Ahmed Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of energy drinks has been increasing dramatically in the last two decades, particularly amongst adolescents and young adults. Energy drinks are aggressively marketed with the claim that these products give an energy boost to improve physical and cognitive performance. However, studies supporting these claims are limited. In fact, several adverse health effects have been related to energy drink; this has raised the question of whether these beverages are safe. This review was carried out to identify and discuss the published articles that examined the beneficial and adverse health effects related to energy drink. It is concluded that although energy drink may have beneficial effects on physical performance, these products also have possible detrimental health consequences. Marketing of energy drinks should be limited or forbidden until independent research confirms their safety, particularly among adolescents. PMID:26715927

  10. Energy Drink Consumption: Beneficial and Adverse Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Alsunni, Ahmed Abdulrahman

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of energy drinks has been increasing dramatically in the last two decades, particularly amongst adolescents and young adults. Energy drinks are aggressively marketed with the claim that these products give an energy boost to improve physical and cognitive performance. However, studies supporting these claims are limited. In fact, several adverse health effects have been related to energy drink; this has raised the question of whether these beverages are safe. This review was carried out to identify and discuss the published articles that examined the beneficial and adverse health effects related to energy drink. It is concluded that although energy drink may have beneficial effects on physical performance, these products also have possible detrimental health consequences. Marketing of energy drinks should be limited or forbidden until independent research confirms their safety, particularly among adolescents.

  11. Comparative analysis of pharmacovigilance methods in the detection of adverse drug reactions using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei; McPeek Hinz, Eugenia Renne; Matheny, Michael Edwin; Denny, Joshua C; Schildcrout, Jonathan Scott; Miller, Randolph A; Xu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Objective Medication  safety requires that each drug be monitored throughout its market life as early detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) can lead to alerts that prevent patient harm. Recently, electronic medical records (EMRs) have emerged as a valuable resource for pharmacovigilance. This study examines the use of retrospective medication orders and inpatient laboratory results documented in the EMR to identify ADRs. Methods Using 12 years of EMR data from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), we designed a study to correlate abnormal laboratory results with specific drug administrations by comparing the outcomes of a drug-exposed group and a matched unexposed group. We assessed the relative merits of six pharmacovigilance measures used in spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs): proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting OR (ROR), Yule's Q (YULE), the χ2 test (CHI), Bayesian confidence propagation neural networks (BCPNN), and a gamma Poisson shrinker (GPS). Results We systematically evaluated the methods on two independently constructed reference standard datasets of drug–event pairs. The dataset of Yoon et al contained 470 drug–event pairs (10 drugs and 47 laboratory abnormalities). Using VUMC's EMR, we created another dataset of 378 drug–event pairs (nine drugs and 42 laboratory abnormalities). Evaluation on our reference standard showed that CHI, ROR, PRR, and YULE all had the same F score (62%). When the reference standard of Yoon et al was used, ROR had the best F score of 68%, with 77% precision and 61% recall. Conclusions Results suggest that EMR-derived laboratory measurements and medication orders can help to validate previously reported ADRs, and detect new ADRs. PMID:23161894

  12. Topiramate-induced somnambulism in a migraineur: a probable idiosyncratic adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Thomas; Sarma, G R K; Nadig, Raghunandan; Varghese, Raji

    2012-04-15

    Somnambulism (sleepwalking) is a disorder of arousal that falls under "parasomnia" group and is more common in children. These phenomena occur as primary sleep events or secondary to systemic disease or can be drug induced. Medications that can cause sleepwalking include neuroleptics, hypnotics, lithium, amitriptyline, and β-blockers. This report presents an unusual adverse effect of topiramate on sleep in a patient with migraine.

  13. Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique; Ruiz, Andrés Felipe; Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique

    2014-12-01

    This study describes the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and their incidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated in the Colombian health system. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using information from all patients who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and attended specialized health care centers in the cities of Bogotá, Cali, Manizales, Medellin, and Pereira between 1 December 2009 and 30 August 2013. The ADRs were obtained from medical records and the pharmacovigilance system registry and sorted by frequency and affected tissue according to World Health Organization Adverse Reaction Terminology (WHO-ART). A total of 949 reports of ADRs were obtained from 419 patients (32.8 ADRs per 100 patient-years); these patients were from a cohort of 1,364 patients being treated for rheumatoid arthritis and followed up for an average of 23.8 months (± 12.9). The cohort was mostly female (366, 87.4%) and had a mean age of 52.7 years (± 13.1). The highest numbers of ADRs were reported following the use of tocilizumab, rituximab, and infliximab (28.8, 23.1, and 13.3 reports per 100 patient-years respectively). The most frequently reported ADRs were elevated transaminase levels and dyspepsia. Overall, 87.7% of ADRs were classified as type A, 36.6% as mild, 40.7% as moderate, and 22.7% as severe. As a result, 73.2% of patients who experienced an ADR stopped taking their drugs. The occurrence of ADRs in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis is common, especially in those associated with the use of biotechnologically produced anti-rheumatic drugs. This outcome should be studied in future research and monitoring is needed to reduce the risks in these patients.

  14. Effect of drugs on intrauterine growth.

    PubMed

    Redmond, G P

    1979-03-01

    Although the teratogenic potential of maternally administered drugs is well known, their stimulation of intrauterine growth retardation may be equally deleterious. Possible adverse effects of propranolol, steroids, anticonvulsants, tranquilizers, and maternal smoking and drinking are discussed. Questions of fetal development and maternal management are considered in light of their interference with the mechanism of growth regulation.

  15. [Side effects of drugs on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Cristina

    2015-02-02

    Although drugs are the most powerful therapeutic tools we have for improving the quality of life of the population, their use is not free of adverse effects. Today there are many polymedicated patients, and it is difficult to find the cause of their adverse effects that increase exponentially when more than 4 drugs are combined. There are a large number of drugs that can result in numerous adverse effects in the oral cavity. The most common are xerostomia, altered taste, gingival enlargement and mucositis caused by cancer treatment. We also review other disorders of the salivary glands, oral mucosal changes, pigmentations, halitosis, osteonecrosis, opportunistic infections and bleeding diathesis.

  16. Adverse drug reactions due to cancer chemotherapy in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Julie Birdie; Laishram, Purnima Devi; Brahma, Dhriti Kumar; Sarkar, Chayna; Lahon, Joonmoni; Nongkynrih, Banylla Shisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: An adverse drug reaction (ADR) is defined by World Health Organization (WHO) as ‘Any response to a drug which is noxious, unintended and occurs at doses used in man for prophylaxis, diagnosis or therapy’. ADRs associated with cancer chemotherapy warrant analysis on their severity and preventability. The outcome would create awareness among health care providers and prevent their recurrence. We have performed a hospital-based prospective observational study designed to analyze the pattern of ADRs to chemotherapeutic agents in cancer patients of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: A total of 119 cancer patients were monitored for suspected ADRs during the course of chemotherapy from November 2014 to December 2015. Clinical events were recorded and analyzed with regard to the demographics and drug details of the patients. Results: A total of 106 ADRs were recorded from 119 cases. The ADRs commonly encountered included constipation, nausea, vomiting, alopecia and hematological changes. Cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel and 5-FU were used for the treatment of commonly found cancers in this region affecting the lungs, esophagus and lymphomas. Naranjo’s causality assessment showed 86.7% possible (score 4) and 13.2% probable (score 5–6). Severity of adverse reactions showed 77.4% mild, 18.9% moderate and 3.8% severe. A total of 45.3% of ADRs were preventable reactions such as nausea, vomiting and constipation. Conclusions: This study highlights the role of active monitoring as an important tool for early detection, assessment and timely management of ADRs in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. The observed ADRs were preventable although ADRs such as hiccough, anemia, neutropenia and alopecia were not preventable.

  17. Adverse drug reaction prediction using scores produced by large-scale drug-protein target docking on high-performance computing machines.

    PubMed

    LaBute, Montiago X; Zhang, Xiaohua; Lenderman, Jason; Bennion, Brian J; Wong, Sergio E; Lightstone, Felice C

    2014-01-01

    Late-stage or post-market identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is a significant public health issue and a source of major economic liability for drug development. Thus, reliable in silico screening of drug candidates for possible ADRs would be advantageous. In this work, we introduce a computational approach that predicts ADRs by combining the results of molecular docking and leverages known ADR information from DrugBank and SIDER. We employed a recently parallelized version of AutoDock Vina (VinaLC) to dock 906 small molecule drugs to a virtual panel of 409 DrugBank protein targets. L1-regularized logistic regression models were trained on the resulting docking scores of a 560 compound subset from the initial 906 compounds to predict 85 side effects, grouped into 10 ADR phenotype groups. Only 21% (87 out of 409) of the drug-protein binding features involve known targets of the drug subset, providing a significant probe of off-target effects. As a control, associations of this drug subset with the 555 annotated targets of these compounds, as reported in DrugBank, were used as features to train a separate group of models. The Vina off-target models and the DrugBank on-target models yielded comparable median area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic-curves (AUCs) during 10-fold cross-validation (0.60-0.69 and 0.61-0.74, respectively). Evidence was found in the PubMed literature to support several putative ADR-protein associations identified by our analysis. Among them, several associations between neoplasm-related ADRs and known tumor suppressor and tumor invasiveness marker proteins were found. A dual role for interstitial collagenase in both neoplasms and aneurysm formation was also identified. These associations all involve off-target proteins and could not have been found using available drug/on-target interaction data. This study illustrates a path forward to comprehensive ADR virtual screening that can potentially scale with increasing number

  18. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers.

  19. Quality of life and adverse effects of olanzapine versus risperidone therapy in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Katarina Melo; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Ribeiro, Susana Barbosa; Soares, Luiz Alberto Lira; Guerra, Gerlane Coelho Bernardo; do Socorro Costa Feitosa Alves, Maria; de Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes; de Paula Soares Rachetti, Vanessa; Filgueira Júnior, Antônio; de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes

    2013-03-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to compare the effects of treatment with an atypical antipsychotic drug (olanzapine or risperidone) on quality of life (QoL) and to document adverse effects in 115 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia who attended the ambulatory service of Hospital Dr. João Machado, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Socioeconomic, sociodemographic, and clinical variables were compared. The QoL Scale validated for Brazil (QLS-BR) was used to evaluate QoL, and adverse effects were assessed using the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser Side Effect Rating Scale. Data were analyzed using the χ(2) test and Student's t test, with a significance level of 5 %. Patients in both drug groups showed severe impairment in the occupational domain of the QLS-BR. Global QLS-BR scores indicated impairment among risperidone users and severe impairment among olanzapine users. The most significant side effects were associated with risperidone, including asthenia/lassitude/fatigue, somnolence/sedation, paresthesia, change in visual accommodation, increased salivation, diarrhea, orthostatic posture, palpitations/tachycardia, erythema, photosensitivity, weight loss, galactorrhea, decreased sexual desire, erectile/orgasmic dysfunction, vaginal dryness, headache, and physical dependence. QoL was impaired in patients using olanzapine and in those using risperidone. Risperidone use was associated with psychic, neurological, and autonomous adverse effects and other side effects.

  20. Prevalence and characteristics of adverse drug reactions at admission to hospital: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sze Ling; Ang, Xiaohui; Sani, Levana L.; Ng, Hong Yen; Winther, Michael D.; Liu, Jian Jun; Brunham, Liam R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) contribute to poorer patient outcomes and additional burden to the healthcare system. However, data on the true burden, relevant types and drugs causing ADRs are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of ADR‐related hospitalization in the general adult population in Singapore and to investigate their characteristics. Methods We prospectively recruited 1000 adult patients with unplanned admission to a large tertiary‐care hospital. Two independent reviewers evaluated all suspected ADRs for causality, type, severity and avoidability. The prevalence of ADR‐related hospitalization was calculated based on ‘definite’ and ‘probable’ ADRs. Logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors for having an ADR at admission. Results The prevalence of all ADRs at admission was 12.4% (95% CI: 10.5–14.6%) and ADRs causing admission was 8.1% (95% CI: 6.5–10.0%). The most common ADRs were gastrointestinal‐related. The most common drug category causing ADRs were cardiovascular drugs. Patients with ADRs had a longer length of stay than those who did not (median 4 vs. 3 days, P = 1.70 × 10−3). About 30% of ADRs at admission were caused by at least one drug with a clinical annotation in the Pharmacogenomics KnowledgeBase (PharmGKB), suggesting that some of these ADRs may have been predicted by pharmacogenetic testing. Conclusions We have quantified the burden and characteristics of clinically impactful ADRs in the Singaporean general adult population. Our results will provide vital information for efforts in reducing ADRs through targeted vigilance, patient education and pharmacogenomics in Singapore. PMID:27640819

  1. Ascertainment of risk of serious adverse reactions associated with chemoprophylactic antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Howard, P. A.; Bjorkman, A. B.

    1990-01-01

    Serious adverse reactions during malaria chemoprophylaxis are reviewed. Three drugs considered to have caused serious reactions in recent years are pyrimethamine/sulfadoxine (Fansidar), pyrimethamine/dapsone (Maloprim) and amodiaquine. These reactions are principally independent of dose and cannot be determined during screening for optimal doses. However, host factors may precipitate dose-dependent reactions, some of which could be avoided with improvements in drug licensing. Since serious and life-threatening reactions are relatively rare (between 1:1000 and 1:20,000), Phase I to III trials cannot identify them. Reliance must therefore be placed on Phase IV post-marketing studies, including ongoing reviews of national registers, and specially tailored studies to identify the risk using prescription-event monitoring in high-risk populations. Occasionally, medical-record linkage, case-control and cohort studies may provide supportive data. Although large numbers of travellers must, of necessity, be exposed to a drug before relatively rare reactions are identified, the ascertainment of risk using post-marketing surveillance was prevented by the following five deficiencies: lack of awareness of early alerts, inadequate use of national registers, poor attention to epidemiological and statistical rigour, inadequate verification of denominators, and inadequacy of data records. Recommendations are given for minimizing such errors in the future. PMID:2208562

  2. Risk factors for adverse life outcomes in fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects.

    PubMed

    Streissguth, Ann P; Bookstein, Fred L; Barr, Helen M; Sampson, Paul D; O'Malley, Kieran; Young, Julia Kogan

    2004-08-01

    Clinical descriptions of patients with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) suggest major problems with adaptive behavior. Five operationally defined adverse outcomes and 18 associated risk/protective factors were examined using a Life History Interview with knowledgeable informants of 415 patients with FAS or FAE (median age 14 years, range 6-51; median IQ 86, range 29-126). Eighty percent of these patients were not raised by their biological mothers. For adolescents and adults, the life span prevalence was 61% for Disrupted School Experiences, 60% for Trouble with the Law, 50% for Confinement (in detention, jail, prison, or a psychiatric or alcohol/drug inpatient setting), 49% for Inappropriate Sexual Behaviors on repeated occasions, and 35% for Alcohol/Drug Problems. The odds of escaping these adverse life outcomes are increased 2- to 4-fold by receiving the diagnosis of FAS or FAE at an earlier age and by being reared in good stable environments.

  3. Cytogenetic Risks and Possible Adverse Health Effects by Narcotic Substances Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Movafagh, Abolfazl; Haeri, Ali; Kolahi, Ali Asghar; Hassani-Moghadam, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Illicit drug abuse has crossed social, economic, and geographical borders, and remains one of the major health problems that modern society is facing worldwide. The role of multiple drug abuse as a basic for chromosome damage has been overlooked and it is important to determine its possible adverse health effects. This study aimed to compare the frequency of chromosomal damages between drug addicts and free drug controls. Methods: Cytogenetic study was obtained from 146 illicit drug-users and 200 free drug controls. Subjects were grouped into three categories depending on main drug of dependence. Results: Cytogenetic studies on cultured lymphocytes showed an increase the frequency of chromosomal damages among addicts including opiate (5.89%), heroin (7.65%), and crystal (4.9%) when compared with drug free controls (1.45%). The frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was breaks, gaps, marker, and acentric, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings are also important as they are among the first to suggest here, illicit drug addiction continue to be significant public health problems in Iran. PMID:23024848

  4. Injected nanoparticles: the combination of experimental systems to assess cardiovascular adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Maria A; Tarasova, Olga S; Riikonen, Joakim; Raula, Janne; Lobach, Anatoly S; Borzykh, Anna A; Smirin, Boris V; Kauppinen, Esko I; Eletskii, Alexander V; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Salonen, Jarno; Tavi, Pasi; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2014-05-01

    When nanocarriers are used for drug delivery they can often achieve superior therapeutic outcomes over standard drug formulations. However, concerns about their adverse effects are growing due to the association between exposure to certain nanosized particles and cardiovascular events. Here we examine the impact of intravenously injected drug-free nanocarriers on the cardiovasculature at both the systemic and organ levels. We combine in vivo and in vitro methods to enable monitoring of hemodynamic parameters in conscious rats, assessments of the function of the vessels after sub-chronic systemic exposure to nanocarriers and evaluation of the direct effect of nanocarriers on vascular tone. We demonstrate that nanocarriers can decrease blood pressure and increase heart rate in vivo via various mechanisms. Depending on the type, nanocarriers induce the dilation of the resistance arteries and/or change the responses induced by vasoconstrictor or vasodilator drugs. No direct correlation between physicochemical properties and cardiovascular effects of nanoparticles was observed. The proposed combination of methods empowers the studies of cardiovascular adverse effects of the nanocarriers.

  5. Using trigger phrases to detect adverse drug reactions in ambulatory care notes

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Michael N; Feldman, Henry J; Triola, Marc M

    2007-01-01

    Background As medical care moves towards an outpatient focus, monitoring systems for ambulatory patients are increasingly important. Because adverse outcomes due to medications are an important problem in outpatients, the authors developed an automated monitoring system for detecting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in ambulatory patients. Methods The authors obtained a set of approximately 110 000 ambulatory care notes from the medicine clinic at Bellevue Hospital Centre for 2003–4, and manually analysed a representative sample of 1250 notes to obtain a gold standard. To detect ADRs in the text of electronic ambulatory notes, the authors used a “trigger phrases” methodology, based on a simple grammar populated with a limited set of keywords. Results Under current functionality, this system detected 38 of 54 cases in the authors' gold standard set, of which 17 were true positives, for a sensitivity of 31%, a specificity of 98%, and a positive predictive value of 45%. Their proxy measure correlated with 70% of the ADRs in the gold standard. These values are comparable or superior to other systems described in the literature. Conclusions These results show that an automated system can detect ADRs with moderate sensitivity and high specificity, and has the potential to serve as the basis for a larger scale reporting system. PMID:17403760

  6. Text mining for adverse drug events: the promise, challenges, and state of the art.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Rave; Callahan, Alison; Tamang, Suzanne; Low, Yen; Odgers, David; Finlayson, Sam; Jung, Kenneth; LePendu, Paea; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-10-01

    Text mining is the computational process of extracting meaningful information from large amounts of unstructured text. It is emerging as a tool to leverage underutilized data sources that can improve pharmacovigilance, including the objective of adverse drug event (ADE) detection and assessment. This article provides an overview of recent advances in pharmacovigilance driven by the application of text mining, and discusses several data sources-such as biomedical literature, clinical narratives, product labeling, social media, and Web search logs-that are amenable to text mining for pharmacovigilance. Given the state of the art, it appears text mining can be applied to extract useful ADE-related information from multiple textual sources. Nonetheless, further research is required to address remaining technical challenges associated with the text mining methodologies, and to conclusively determine the relative contribution of each textual source to improving pharmacovigilance.

  7. [Current movements of four serious adverse events induced by medicinal drugs based on spontaneous reports in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sudo, Chie; Azuma, Yu-ichiro; Maekawa, Keiko; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Sai, Kimie; Saito, Yoshiro

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous reports on suspected serious adverse events caused by medicines from manufacturing/distributing pharmaceutical companies or medical institutions/pharmacies are regulated by the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law of Japan, and this system is important for post-marketing safety features. Although causal relationship between the medicine and the adverse event is not evaluated, and one incidence may be redundantly reported, this information would be useful to roughly grasp the current movements of drug-related serious adverse events, We searched open-source data of the spontaneous reports publicized by Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency for 4 serious adverse events (interstitial lung disease, rhabdomyolysis, anaphylaxis, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis) from 2004 to 2010 fiscal year (for 2010, from April 1 st to January 31th). Major drug-classes suspected to the adverse events were antineoplastics for interstitial lung disease, hyperlipidemia agents and psychotropics for rhabdomyolysis, antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antineoplastics and intracorporeal diagnostic agents for anaphylaxis (anaphylactic shock, anaphylactic reactions, anaphylactoid shock and anaphylactoid reactions), and antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antipyretics and analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents/common cold drugs, and antiepileptics for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. These results would help understanding of current situations of the 4 drug-related serious adverse events in Japan.

  8. Pattern of adverse drug reactions reported by the community pharmacists in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Palaian, Subish; Ibrahim, Mohamed I.M.; Mishra, Pranaya

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacovigilance program in Nepal is less than a decade old, and is hospital centered. This study highlights the findings of a community based pharmacovigilance program involving the community pharmacists. Objectives: To collect the demographic details of the patients experiencing adverse drug reactions (ADR) reported by the community pharmacists; to identify the common drugs causing the ADRs, the common types of ADRs; and to carry out the causality, severity and preventability assessments of the reported ADRs. Methods: The baseline Knowledge-Attitude-Practices (KAP) of 116 community pharmacists from Pokhara valley towards drug safety was evaluated using a validated (Cronbach alpha=0.61) KAP questionnaire having 20 questions [(knowledge 11, attitude 5 and practice 4) maximum possible score 40]. Thirty community pharmacists with high scores were selected for three training sessions, each session lasting for one to two hours, covering the basic knowledge required for the community pharmacists for ADR reporting. Pharmacist from the regional pharmacovigilance center visited the trained community pharmacists every alternate day and collected the filled ADR reporting forms. Results: Altogether 71 ADRs, from 71 patients (37 males) were reported. Antibiotics/ antibacterials caused 42% (n=37) of the total ADRs followed by non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [25% (n=22)]. Ibuprofen/paracetamol combination accounted for ten ADRs. The most common type of ADR was itching [17.2 % (n=20), followed by generalized edema [8.6 % (n=10)]. In order to manage the ADRs, the patients needed medical treatment in 69% (n=49) of the cases. Over two third (69%) of the ADRs had a ‘possible’ association with the suspected drugs and a high percentage (70.4%) were of ‘mild (level 2)’ type. Nearly two third [64.7 % (n=46)] of the ADRs were ‘definitely preventable’. Conclusion: The common class of drugs known to cause ADRs was antibacterial/ antibiotics. Ibuprofen/ Paracetamol

  9. Evaluating the risk of patient re-identification from adverse drug event reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our objective was to develop a model for measuring re-identification risk that more closely mimics the behaviour of an adversary by accounting for repeated attempts at matching and verification of matches, and apply it to evaluate the risk of re-identification for Canada’s post-marketing adverse drug event database (ADE).Re-identification is only demonstrably plausible for deaths in ADE. A matching experiment between ADE records and virtual obituaries constructed from Statistics Canada vital statistics was simulated. A new re-identification risk is considered, it assumes that after gathering all the potential matches for a patient record (all records in the obituaries that are potential matches for an ADE record), an adversary tries to verify these potential matches. Two adversary scenarios were considered: (a) a mildly motivated adversary who will stop after one verification attempt, and (b) a highly motivated adversary who will attempt to verify all the potential matches and is only limited by practical or financial considerations. Methods The mean percentage of records in ADE that had a high probability of being re-identified was computed. Results Under scenario (a), the risk of re-identification from disclosing the province, age at death, gender, and exact date of the report is quite high, but the removal of province brings down the risk significantly. By only generalizing the date of reporting to month and year and including all other variables, the risk is always low. All ADE records have a high risk of re-identification under scenario (b), but the plausibility of that scenario is limited because of the financial and practical deterrent even for highly motivated adversaries. Conclusions It is possible to disclose Canada’s adverse drug event database while ensuring that plausible re-identification risks are acceptably low. Our new re-identification risk model is suitable for such risk assessments. PMID:24094134

  10. Patient Characteristics Associated with Adverse Drug Events in Hospital: An Overview of Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Silvija; Gauthier, Jeremie; MacDonald, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug events (ADEs) occurring in hospital inpatients can have serious implications. The ability to identify and prioritize patients at higher risk of ADEs could help pharmacists to optimize their impact as members of the patient care team. Objective: To identify risk factors, patient characteristics, and medications associated with a higher likelihood of ADEs in adult inpatients through an overview of reviews on this topic. Data Sources: Systematic reviews and narrative reviews or guidelines identified through a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (limited to articles published from 1995 to June 4, 2015), as well as a grey literature search. Study Selection and Data Extraction: For inclusion in this overview, a review had to discuss patient characteristics or risk factors associated with ADEs, medications associated with ADEs, or drug–drug interactions associated with ADEs, in adult inpatients. Articles retrieved by the literature search were screened for eligibility by a single reviewer. Data Synthesis: Eleven articles were deemed eligible for inclusion in this overview: 4 systematic reviews and 7 narrative reviews or guidelines. Their results were described narratively. Older age and polypharmacy were the most frequently cited risk factors associated with ADEs in hospital inpatients. Renal impairment, female sex, and decline in cognition were also frequently reported as being associated with ADEs. Medication classes reported to be associated with ADEs during the hospital stay included anticoagulants, anti-infectives/antibiotics, antidiabetic agents, analgesics (including opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), and cardiovascular drugs (including antihypertensive agents, diuretics, and digoxin). Two publications reported on preventable ADEs in hospital inpatients; the medications associated with preventable ADEs were consistent with those reported above. Conclusions: The risk factors, patient

  11. Adverse Drug Reactions in a Tertiary Care Emergency Medicine Ward - Prevalence, Preventability and Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Rydberg, Diana M.; Holm, Lennart; Engqvist, Ida; Fryckstedt, Jessica; Lindh, Jonatan D.; Stiller, Carl-Olav; Asker-Hagelberg, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the prevalence and preventability of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in an emergency ward setting in a tertiary hospital in Sweden and to what extent the detected ADRs were reported to the Medical Product Agency (MPA). Methods In this prospective cross sectional observational study, 706 patients admitted to one of the Emergency Wards, at the Karolinska University Hospital in Solna, Stockholm during September 2008 –September 2009, were included. The electronic patient records were reviewed for patients’ demographic parameters, prevalence of possible ADRs and assessment of their preventability. In addition, the extent of formal and required ADR reporting to national registers was studied. Results Approximately 40 percent of the patient population had at least one possible ADR (n = 284). In the multivariable regression model, age and number of drugs were significantly associated with risk of presenting with an ADR (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). Sex was not identified as a significant predictor of ADRs (p = 0.27). The most common ADRs were cardiovascular, followed by electrolyte disturbances, and hemorrhage. In 18 percent of the patient population ADRs were the reason for admission or had contributed to admission and 24% of these ADRs were assessed as preventable. The under-reporting of ADRs to the MPA was 99%. Conclusions ADRs are common in Emergency Medicine in tertiary care in Sweden, but under-reporting of ADRs is substantial. The most frequent ADRs are caused by cardiovascular drugs, and significantly associated with age and number of drugs. However, only a minority of the detected serious ADRs contributing to admission could have been avoided by increased risk awareness. PMID:27622270

  12. Trends of adverse drug reactions related-hospitalizations in Spain (2001-2006)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Adverse drug reactions (ADR) are a substantial cause of hospital admissions. We conducted a nationwide study to estimate the burden of hospital admissions for ADRs in Spain during a six-year period (2001-2006) along with the associated total health cost. Methods Data were obtained from the national surveillance system for hospital data (Minimum Basic Data Set) maintained by the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs, and covering more than 95% of Spanish hospitals. From these admissions we selected all hospitalization that were code as drug-related (ICD-9-CM codes E), but intended forms of overdoses, errors in administration and therapeutics failure were excluded. The average number of hospitalizations per year, annual incidence of hospital admissions, average length of stay in the hospital, and case-fatality rate, were calculated. Results During the 2001-2006 periods, the total number of hospitalized patients with ADR diagnosis was 350,835 subjects, 1.69% of all acute hospital admissions in Spain. The estimated incidence of admissions due to ADR decreased during the period 2001-2006 (p < 0.05). More than five percent of patients (n = 19,734) died during an ADR-related hospitalization. The drugs most commonly associated with ADR-related hospitalization were antineoplastic and immunosuppressive drugs (n = 75,760), adrenal cortical steroids (n = 47,539), anticoagulants (n = 26,546) and antibiotics (n = 22,144). The costs generated by patients in our study increased by 19.05% between 2001 and 2006. Conclusions Approximately 1.69% of all acute hospital admissions were associated with ADRs. The rates were much higher for elderly patients. The total cost of ADR-related hospitalization to the Spanish health system is high and has increased between 2001 and 2006. ADRs are an important cause of admission, resulting in considerable use of national health system beds and a significant number of deaths. PMID:20942906

  13. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  14. Potential adverse effects of oseltamivir in rats: males are more vulnerable than females.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Wael M; Al-Kahtani, Mohamed Ali

    2011-09-01

    Oseltamivir is the most widely used antiviral drug for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. However, not much is known about its adverse effects. The potential side effects were investigated in male and female rats (140-170 g). Oseltamivir was administered at 2.2 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) for 5 days. For both genders, treatment with oseltamivir resulted in significant reductions in the hepatic activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase. Also for both genders, oseltamivir produced modest reductions in the hepatic activities of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, quinone oxidoreductase, thioredoxin reductase, CYP1A1/2, and CYP3A, as well as hepatic glutathione content. For both genders, neither the kidney functions nor protein profile was affected by oseltamivir. Oseltamivir also caused significant elevation in serum levels of both triacylglycerols and LDL-cholesterol and in the activity of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, in both genders. For male animals only, oseltamivir treatment elevated the serum level of total cholesterol as well as the activity of serum alanine aminotransferase, and reduced the hepatic activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Oseltamivir caused oxidative stress and acute toxicity in the liver, and disrupted the cholesterol and lipid metabolism but was less likely to cause serious drug interactions. There was a sexual differentiation in these adverse effects, with adverse effects being more evident in male rats.

  15. Multicentric survey on dose reduction/interruption of cancer drug therapy in 12.472 patients: indicators of suspected adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Tenti, Elena; Masini, Carla; Nanni, Oriana; Scarpi, Emanuela; Valgiusti, Martina; Restuccia, Silvia; Gallani, Maria Laura; Palazzini, Simonetta; Bianchini, Erica; Menozzi, Silvia; Maugeri, Antonio; Amadori, Dino; Minguzzi, Martina; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca

    2016-06-28

    Antiblastic drugs have a high number of potential side-effects. Paradoxically, according to the National Network of Pharmacovigilance, the number of reported adverse reactions to these agents is proportionally lower than that registered for non antiblastic drugs. Critical phenomena such as treatment interruptions and significant dose reductions within the first two months of use may be indicators of adverse drug reactions. The aim of the present study was to increase our knowledge of pharmacovigilance to facilitate the actions taken to improve the risk-benefit profile of cancer drugs and, consequently, their safety. This retrospective observational survey was carried out on prescriptions from 1st January 2012 to 31st December 2012.Dose reductions of more than 10% during the first 90 days of therapy were considered as a surrogate indicator of an adverse reaction. Dose interruptions during the first 60 days of therapy were taken into consideration. Of the12,472 patients 1,248 underwent a dose reduction. The drugs that most often required a dose reduction were paclitaxel and oxaliplatin (17.4% and 17.3%, respectively), docetaxel (14.8%), carboplatin (15%), fluorouracil (10.7%) and, among oral medications, capecitabine (6.9%). Of the 1896 patients treated with the same drugs, 9.7% interrupted treatment. Patients required a lower dose reduction than that reported by other authors. Around 15% of cases underwent a 30% dose reduction within three months of starting therapy, indicating a possible adverse reaction. Constant monitoring of dose prescription and continuous training of medical and nursing staff are clearly needed to increase awareness of the importance of reporting adverse events.

  16. Overlapping of Serotonin Syndrome with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome due to Linezolid-Fluoxetine and Olanzapine-Metoclopramide Interactions: A Case Report of Two Serious Adverse Drug Effects Caused by Medication Reconciliation Failure on Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Shahzad; Haider, Nafis; Ahmed, Rafeeque

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic and antidepressant are often used in combination for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The concomitant use of antipsychotic and/or antidepressant with drugs that may interact can lead to rare, life-threatening conditions such as serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who has a history of taking two offending drugs that interact with drugs given during the course of hospital treatment which leads to the development of serotonin syndrome overlapped with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The physician should be aware that both NMS and SS can appear as overlapping syndrome especially when patients use a combination of both antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:27433163

  17. A web resource for mining HLA associations with adverse drug reactions: HLA-ADR.

    PubMed

    Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Dundar, Yenal; González-Galarza, Faviel F; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; Santos, Eduardo José Melo; da Silva, Andréa Luciana Soares; McCabe, Antony; Middleton, Derek; Alfirevic, Ana; Dickson, Rumona; Jones, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are an important family of genes involved in the immune system. Their primary function is to allow the host immune system to be able to distinguish between self and non-self peptides-e.g. derived from invading pathogens. However, these genes have also been implicated in immune-mediated adverse drug reactions (ADRs), presenting a problem to patients, clinicians and pharmaceutical companies. We have previously developed the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) that captures the allelic and haplotype frequencies for these HLA genes across many healthy populations from around the world. Here, we report the development and release of the HLA-ADR database that captures data from publications where HLA alleles and haplotypes have been associated with ADRs (e.g. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis and drug-induced liver injury). HLA-ADR was created by using data obtained through systematic review of the literature and semi-automated literature mining. The database also draws on data already present in AFND allowing users to compare and analyze allele frequencies in both ADR patients and healthy populations. The HLA-ADR database provides clinicians and researchers with a centralized resource from which to investigate immune-mediated ADRs.Database URL: http://www.allelefrequencies.net/hla-adr/.

  18. Assessment of three systems to empower the patient and decrease the risk of adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Kitta; Skjoet, Peter

    2011-01-01

    One way to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs) is to empower the patient to participate in the control of medication. This empowerment can be supported in different ways by making knowledge and information available to the patient. This study examines the usefulness and safety of two different systems on the background of a paper-based medication list presenting prescribed medicine presently used in hospitals in Copenhagen. Each of the systems examined aims to reduce ADEs but presents information in different levels of detail, and anticipates different level of prior knowledge from the patient: a Web-based prototype presenting medication, lab-results and alerts, and a cell phone-based prototype presenting alerts. Six patients were introduced to each of the systems by performing small tasks and subsequently interviewed. The patients found the paper-based medication list useful and comprehensive for control of own prescribed medication. The Web-based prototype also proved to be useful, but drug and lab values were hard to correlate, and the alerts were hard to understand. The cell phone-based prototype proved less useful as the patients were challenged to vision the applicability of the system. Furthermore, it is a safety issue that the information the alert is based upon, stems from the patient alone. We conclude that, in order for the Web-based system as well as the cell phone system to empower patient and increase patient safety, further development of the systems is necessary.

  19. Ocular Adverse Events Associated with Antibody–Drug Conjugates in Human Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul E.; Mannis, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article reviews ocular adverse events (AEs) reported in association with administration of antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) in human clinical trials. References reporting ocular toxicity or AEs associated with ADCs were collected using online publication searches. Articles, abstracts, or citations were included if they cited ocular toxicities or vision-impairing AEs with a confirmed or suspected association with ADC administration. Twenty-two references were found citing ocular or vision-impairing AEs in association with ADC administration. All references reported use of ADCs in human clinical trials for treatment of various malignancies. The molecular target and cytotoxic agent varied depending on the ADC used. Ocular AEs affected a diversity of ocular tissues. The most commonly reported AEs involved the ocular surface and included blurred vision, dry eye, and corneal abnormalities (including microcystic corneal disease). Most ocular AEs were not severe (≤ grade 2) or dose limiting. Clinical outcomes were not consistently reported, but when specified, most AEs improved or resolved with cessation of treatment or with ameliorative therapy. A diverse range of ocular AEs are reported in association with administration of ADCs for the treatment of cancer. The toxicologic mechanism(s) and pathogenesis of such events are not well understood, but most are mild in severity and reversible. Drug development and medical professionals should be aware of the clinical features of these events to facilitate early recognition and intervention in the assessment of preclinical development programs and in human clinical trials. PMID:26539624

  20. Rational therapy for diabetes: early recognition of adverse effects and avoidance of disruptive false alarms.

    PubMed

    Raz, Itamar; Eldor, Roy

    2012-05-01

    Corresponding to the uncontrolled diabetes pandemic, significant effort has been invested in developing new therapeutic options. Nevertheless, all medicines have possible adverse effects. Recently, a trend of 'scrutinizing' novel hypoglycaemic drug side effects based on scant scientific data has emerged. With recent publications highlighting possible dangers of rosiglitazone, insulin glargine, sitagliptin, exenatide and, most recently, pioglitazone, it seems that all means are valid and that every database is suitable, even if specifically defined as inadequate for the purpose of data analysis. The use of such data may lead authors to draw erroneous conclusions that may be granted unwarranted impact upon publication in leading scientific journals and eventually lead patients and misinformed physicians to wrongly change beneficial medication regimes. Adherence to strict scientific methodology, ongoing large clinical trials and creating adjudicated patient databases may facilitate early recognition of adverse effects while avoiding disruptive false alarms.

  1. Macrophages are involved in hexachlorobenzene-induced adverse immune effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ezendam, Janine . E-mail: Janine.Ezendam@rivm.nl; Kosterman, Kevin; Spijkerboer, Henneke; Bleumink, Rob; Hassing, Ine; Rooijen, Nico van; Vos, Joseph G.; Pieters, Raymond

    2005-11-15

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a persistent environmental pollutant that causes adverse immune effects in man and rat. The Brown Norway (BN) rat is very susceptible to HCB-induced immunopathology and oral exposure causes inflammatory skin and lung lesions, splenomegaly, lymph node (LN) enlargement, and increased serum levels of IgE and anti-ssDNA IgM. T cells play an important role but do not account for all adverse effects induced by HCB. Macrophages are probably also important and the relationship between macrophages and T cells was further investigated. To eliminate macrophages clodronate-liposomes were used. Furthermore, a kinetic study was performed to obtain insight in the early phase of the HCB-induced immune response. Also, experiments were performed to detect specific memory T cells. Therefore, an adoptive transfer study was performed. Our results indicate that macrophages are indeed involved in HCB-induced skin lesions, lung eosinophilia, and elevation of IgM against ssDNA. Kinetics showed that both skin and lung lesions appeared early after exposure. Moreover, immune effects could not be adaptively transferred. Thus, both macrophages and T cells are involved in HCB-induced immune effects but HCB exposure does not lead to specific T cell sensitization. Presumably, HCB exposure induces macrophage activation, thereby generating adjuvant signals that polyclonally stimulate T cells. Together, these events may lead to the observed immunopathology in BN rats.

  2. A strategy for regulatory action when new adverse effects of a licensed product emerge.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K; Price, Deirdre; Ferner, Robin E

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory agencies grant product licences (marketing authorizations) for medicinal products in the light of evidence that the balance between benefit and harm in the population is favourable. Here we consider a framework for allowing regulatory agencies to make rational decisions when reviewing product licences in the light of new information about harms that change that balance. The regulator can revoke the product licence, restrict the product's availability or change the 'label' in different ways. We examine the features of the adverse effect that may be relevant in making the decision: namely, individual differences in susceptibility; the possibility of monitoring; and the availability of protective strategies. The balance of benefit and harm, and the time-course and dose relation of the adverse effect play important roles in the decision-making process. We set out how these factors can help determine the logical response to new information on the balance between benefit and harm, and provide a series of relevant examples. We believe that when regulatory agencies have to decide how to amend the product licence of a drug when new serious adverse effects cause concern, they would find it useful to adopt a framework of this kind, using different strategies for different cases. Our proposed framework could also be useful in risk management planning during drug development.

  3. The Effects of a Web Application and Medical Monitoring on the Quality of Medication, Adverse Drug Events and Adherence in the Elderly Living at Home: a Protocol of the Study

    PubMed Central

    Selic, Polona; Gorup, Eva Cedilnik; Gorup, Savin; Ster, Marija Petek; Rifel, Janez; Ketis, Zalika Klemenc

    2016-01-01

    Background: In more than half of elderly chronically-ill family clinic attendees, drug prescribing deviates from the internationally acknowledged STOPP/START recommendations. Our study will determine whether it is possible to improve the quality of drug prescriptions in chronically-ill elderly people living at home by regularly monitoring the prescribed drugs according to STOPP/START criteria. Methods: The project started in 2014 and will run until 2017. Forty general practitioners (GPs) are participating in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial. From the patient register, GPs randomly selected 20 patients older than 65 years who regularly receive at least one drug and invited them to participate in the study. We will use the START/STOPP criteria to determine the (in)adequacy of drug prescribing in the elderly by a web application (WA). Expected Results: The use of the WA will be the basis of the implementation of the final version of the application into the regular family medicine practice, thereby reducing the problems of inappropriate prescribing, correct medication, polypharmacy and adherence; we will identify the stability of the factors of drug prescribing in the elderly. By comparing the test and control groups, it will be possible to distinguish which are related to the WA and which act independently. PMID:28144194

  4. [Progresses on adverse health effects of automobile exhaust].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yibin; Jin, Yinlong; Liu, Yingchun

    2003-09-01

    The progresses on the latest studies at home and abroad on adverse health effects of automobile exhaust were reviewed in this paper. Particulates and poisonous gases from automobile exhaust were considered to be harmful to respiratory system, immune system and reproductive system. It showed that increased prevalence of respiratory disease (e.g. chronic bronchitis and asthma), and decreased lung function, immunity were associated with automobile exhaust. The carcinogenic potential from the exposure to automobile exhausts needs to be further explored because the carcinogenesis is multifactorial.

  5. Incidence of hospital admissions due to adverse drug reactions in France: the EMIR study.

    PubMed

    Bénard-Laribière, Anne; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Pérault-Pochat, Marie-Christine; Noize, Pernelle; Haramburu, Françoise

    2015-02-01

    To assess the incidence of hospital admissions related to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in France and the frequency of preventable ADRs in France, a prospective study was conducted among a representative randomly selected sample of medical wards in public hospitals between December 2006 and June 2007; all patients admitted during a 2-week period were included. An ADR-related hospitalization case was defined as a hospital admission because of an ADR, and an independent committee reviewed and validated all potential cases. Preventability was assessed using the French ADR preventability scale. Data were extrapolated to the population of France. Among 2692 admissions, 97 were related to an ADR (incidence 3.6%, 95% confidence interval, CI [2.8-4.4]). Patients admitted for an ADR were significantly older than those admitted for other reasons (P < 0.001). A third (32.0%) of ADR-related hospitalizations were 'preventable', 16.5% 'potentially preventable'. Drug interactions accounted for 29.9% of ADR-related hospitalizations. The most frequent causes of ADR-related hospitalizations were vascular disorders (20.6%), mainly bleeding complications, central nervous system disorders (11.3%), gastrointestinal disorders, and general disorders (9.3%). Antithrombotic and antineoplastic agents were the most frequently involved (12.6% each), followed by diuretics and analgesics (9.0% each). Vitamin-K-antagonists (VKAs) were the most common drugs associated with admission. The estimated annual number of ADR-related hospitalizations in France was 143 915 (95% CI [112 063-175 766]). ADRs were a significant cause of hospital admission in 2006-2007, in particular those due to VKAs. As new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been marketed, more attention needs to be paid to ensure a safe use of antithrombotic agents.

  6. Can Utilizing a Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) System Prevent Hospital Medical Errors and Adverse Drug Events?

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians’ resistance to change. PMID:25593568

  7. Association between Selective Beta-adrenergic Drugs and Blood Pressure Elevation: Data Mining of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Database.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Selective beta-adrenergic drugs are used clinically to treat various diseases. Because of imperfect receptor selectivity, beta-adrenergic drugs cause some adverse drug events by stimulating other adrenergic receptors. To examine the association between selective beta-adrenergic drugs and blood pressure elevation, we reviewed the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Reports (JADERs) submitted to the Japan Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency. We used the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) Preferred Terms extracted from Standardized MedDRA queries for hypertension to identify events related to blood pressure elevation. Spontaneous adverse event reports from April 2004 through May 2015 in JADERs, a data mining algorithm, and the reporting odds ratio (ROR) were used for quantitative signal detection, and assessed by the case/non-case method. Safety signals are considered significant if the ROR estimates and lower bound of the 95% confidence interval (CI) exceed 1. A total of 2021 reports were included in this study. Among the nine drugs examined, significant signals were found, based on the 95%CI for salbutamol (ROR: 9.94, 95%CI: 3.09-31.93) and mirabegron (ROR: 7.52, 95%CI: 4.89-11.55). The results of this study indicate that some selective beta-adrenergic drugs are associated with blood pressure elevation. Considering the frequency of their indications, attention should be paid to their use in elderly patients to avoid adverse events.

  8. Predicting adverse drug reactions in older adults; a systematic review of the risk prediction models.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jennifer M; Williams, Josceline L; Burnham, Thomas G; Prevost, A Toby; Schiff, Rebekah; Erskine, S David; Davies, J Graham

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) risk-prediction models for use in older adults have been developed, but it is not clear if they are suitable for use in clinical practice. This systematic review aimed to identify and investigate the quality of validated ADR risk-prediction models for use in older adults. Standard computerized databases, the gray literature, bibliographies, and citations were searched (2012) to identify relevant peer-reviewed studies. Studies that developed and validated an ADR prediction model for use in patients over 65 years old, using a multivariable approach in the design and analysis, were included. Data were extracted and their quality assessed by independent reviewers using a standard approach. Of the 13,423 titles identified, only 549 were associated with adverse outcomes of medicines use. Four met the inclusion criteria. All were conducted in inpatient cohorts in Western Europe. None of the models satisfied the four key stages in the creation of a quality risk prediction model; development and validation were completed, but impact and implementation were not assessed. Model performance was modest; area under the receiver operator curve ranged from 0.623 to 0.73. Study quality was difficult to assess due to poor reporting, but inappropriate methods were apparent. Further work needs to be conducted concerning the existing models to enable the development of a robust ADR risk-prediction model that is externally validated, with practical design and good performance. Only then can implementation and impact be assessed with the aim of generating a model of high enough quality to be considered for use in clinical care to prioritize older people at high risk of suffering an ADR.

  9. Predicting adverse drug reactions in older adults; a systematic review of the risk prediction models

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Jennifer M; Williams, Josceline L; Burnham, Thomas G; Prevost, A Toby; Schiff, Rebekah; Erskine, S David; Davies, J Graham

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) risk-prediction models for use in older adults have been developed, but it is not clear if they are suitable for use in clinical practice. This systematic review aimed to identify and investigate the quality of validated ADR risk-prediction models for use in older adults. Standard computerized databases, the gray literature, bibliographies, and citations were searched (2012) to identify relevant peer-reviewed studies. Studies that developed and validated an ADR prediction model for use in patients over 65 years old, using a multivariable approach in the design and analysis, were included. Data were extracted and their quality assessed by independent reviewers using a standard approach. Of the 13,423 titles identified, only 549 were associated with adverse outcomes of medicines use. Four met the inclusion criteria. All were conducted in inpatient cohorts in Western Europe. None of the models satisfied the four key stages in the creation of a quality risk prediction model; development and validation were completed, but impact and implementation were not assessed. Model performance was modest; area under the receiver operator curve ranged from 0.623 to 0.73. Study quality was difficult to assess due to poor reporting, but inappropriate methods were apparent. Further work needs to be conducted concerning the existing models to enable the development of a robust ADR risk-prediction model that is externally validated, with practical design and good performance. Only then can implementation and impact be assessed with the aim of generating a model of high enough quality to be considered for use in clinical care to prioritize older people at high risk of suffering an ADR. PMID:25278750

  10. Adverse effects of bisphenol A on male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Manfo, Faustin Pascal Tsagué; Jubendradass, Rajamanickam; Nantia, Edouard Akono; Moundipa, Paul Fewou; Mathur, Premendu Prakash

    2014-01-01

    BPA is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, resulting mainly from manufacturing,use or disposal of plastics of which it is a component, and the degradation of industrial plastic-related wastes. Growing evidence from research on laboratory animals, wildlife, and humans supports the view that BPA produces an endocrine disrupting effect and adversely affects male reproductive function. To better understand the adverse effects caused by exposure to BPA, we performed an up-to-date literature review on the topic, with particular emphasis on in utero exposure, and associated effects on spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis, and accessory organs.BPA studies on experimental animals show that effects are generally more detrimental during in utero exposure, a critical developmental stage for the embryo. BPA has been found to produce several defects in the embryo, such as feminization of male fetuses, atrophy of the testes and epididymides, increased prostate size, shortening of AGD, disruption of BTB, and alteration of adult sperm parameters (e.g.,sperm count, motility, and density). BPA also affects embryo thyroid development.During the postnatal and pubertal periods and adulthood, BPA affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis by modulating hormone (e.g., LH and FSH,androgen and estrogen) synthesis, expression and function of respective receptors(ER, AR). These effects alter sperm parameters. BPA also induces oxidative stress in the testis and epididymis, by inhibiting antioxidant enzymes and stimulating lipid peroxidation. This suggests that employing antioxidants may be a promising strategy to relieve BPA-induced disturbances.Epidemiological studies have also provided data indicating that BPA alters male reproductive function in humans. These investigations revealed that men occupationally exposed to BPA had high blood/urinary BPA levels, and abnormal semen parameters. BPA-exposed men also showed reduced libido and erectile ejaculatory difficulties; moreover, the

  11. Penicillamine revisited: historic overview and review of the clinical uses and cutaneous adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Rim; Abbas, Ossama

    2013-06-01

    Penicillamine is a well-known heavy metal chelator, classically used in the treatment of Wilson disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and cystinuria. From a dermatologic standpoint, penicillamine was found to be useful in the treatment of systemic sclerosis. The successful therapeutic uses of penicillamine have been hindered by its numerous adverse effects, both cutaneous and extra-cutaneous. It is a unique drug since it provokes a diversity of dermatologic manifestations that include (1) acute hypersensitivity reactions, (2) dermopathies characterized by elastic fiber abnormalities including elastosis perforans serpiginosa and pseudo-pseudoxanthoma elasticum, (3) autoimmune disorders such as pemphigus and penicillamine-induced lupus erythematosus-like syndrome, and (4) miscellaneous dermatoses that result from undefined mechanisms. These cutaneous adverse effects may correlate with the dosage and duration of penicillamine therapy as well as the disease being treated.

  12. Adverse effects of outdoor pollution in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Marzia; Baldacci, Sandra; Maio, Sara; Cerrai, Sonia; Sarno, Giuseppe; Viegi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    With fewer newborns and people living longer, older people are making up an increasing fraction of the total population. Epidemiological evidence shows that older-age-related health problems affect a wide and expanding proportion of the world population. One of the major epidemiological trends of this century is the rise of chronic diseases that affect more elderly than younger people. A total of 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012 are attributable to outdoor air pollution; the susceptibility to adverse effects of air pollution is expected to differ widely between people and within the same person, and also over time. Frailty history, a measure of multi-system decline, modifies cumulative associations between air pollution and lung function. Moreover, pre-existing diseases may determine susceptibility. In the elderly, due to comorbidity, exposure to air pollutants may even be fatal. Rapid and not-well-planned urbanization is associated with high level of ambient air pollution, mainly caused by vehicular exhausts. In general, there is sufficient evidence of the adverse effects related to short-term exposure, while fewer studies have addressed the longer-term health effects. Increased pollution exposures have been associated with increased mortality, hospital admissions/emergency-room visits, mainly due to exacerbations of chronic diseases or to respiratory tract infections (e.g., pneumonia). These effects may also be modulated by ambient temperature and many studies show that the elderly are mostly vulnerable to heat waves. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well-documented, while less is known regarding the associations with hospital admissions. Chronic exposure to elevated levels of air pollution has been related to the incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis (CB), asthma, and emphysema. There is also growing evidence suggesting adverse effects on lung function related to long-term exposure

  13. Adverse effects of outdoor pollution in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Baldacci, Sandra; Maio, Sara; Cerrai, Sonia; Sarno, Giuseppe; Viegi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    With fewer newborns and people living longer, older people are making up an increasing fraction of the total population. Epidemiological evidence shows that older-age-related health problems affect a wide and expanding proportion of the world population. One of the major epidemiological trends of this century is the rise of chronic diseases that affect more elderly than younger people. A total of 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012 are attributable to outdoor air pollution; the susceptibility to adverse effects of air pollution is expected to differ widely between people and within the same person, and also over time. Frailty history, a measure of multi-system decline, modifies cumulative associations between air pollution and lung function. Moreover, pre-existing diseases may determine susceptibility. In the elderly, due to comorbidity, exposure to air pollutants may even be fatal. Rapid and not-well-planned urbanization is associated with high level of ambient air pollution, mainly caused by vehicular exhausts. In general, there is sufficient evidence of the adverse effects related to short-term exposure, while fewer studies have addressed the longer-term health effects. Increased pollution exposures have been associated with increased mortality, hospital admissions/emergency-room visits, mainly due to exacerbations of chronic diseases or to respiratory tract infections (e.g., pneumonia). These effects may also be modulated by ambient temperature and many studies show that the elderly are mostly vulnerable to heat waves. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well-documented, while less is known regarding the associations with hospital admissions. Chronic exposure to elevated levels of air pollution has been related to the incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis (CB), asthma, and emphysema. There is also growing evidence suggesting adverse effects on lung function related to long-term exposure

  14. Adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, J

    1996-01-01

    In addition to the person-environment fit model (J. R. French, R. D. Caplan, & R. V. Harrison, 1982) and the demand-control model (R. A. Karasek & T. Theorell, 1990), a third theoretical concept is proposed to assess adverse health effects of stressful experience at work: the effort-reward imbalance model. The focus of this model is on reciprocity of exchange in occupational life where high-cost/low-gain conditions are considered particularly stressful. Variables measuring low reward in terms of low status control (e.g., lack of promotion prospects, job insecurity) in association with high extrinsic (e.g., work pressure) or intrinsic (personal coping pattern, e.g., high need for control) effort independently predict new cardiovascular events in a prospective study on blue-collar men. Furthermore, these variables partly explain prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, atherogenic lipids) in 2 independent studies. Studying adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions seems well justified, especially in view of recent developments of the labor market.

  15. Possible adverse effects of frying with vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Dobarganes, Carmen; Márquez-Ruiz, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    The question of whether heated fats in the diet may be detrimental to health is nowadays of the upmost concern, but finding an answer is not easy and requires careful consideration of different aspects of lipid oxidation. This review is divided into two sections. The first part deals with the nature of the new compounds formed at high temperature in the frying process as well as their occurrence in the diet while the second part focuses on their possible nutritional and physiological effects. Oxidation products present in abused frying fats and oils are the compounds most suspected of impairing the nutritional properties of the oils or involving adverse physiological effects. The recent studies on their health implications include those related to their fate and those focused on their effects in metabolic pathways and the most prevalent diseases.

  16. Review for carrageenan-based pharmaceutical biomaterials: favourable physical features versus adverse biological effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Zhan, Xiudan; Wan, Jianbo; Wang, Yitao; Wang, Chunming

    2015-05-05

    Carrageenan (CRG) is a family of natural polysaccharides derived from seaweeds and has widely been used as food additives. In the past decade, owing to its attractive physicochemical properties, CRG has been developed into versatile biomaterials vehicles for drug delivery. Nevertheless, studies also emerged to reveal its adverse effects on the biological system. In this review, we critically appraise the latest literature (two thirds since 2008) on the development of CRG-based pharmaceutical vehicles and the perspective of using CRG for broader biomedical applications. We focus on how current strategies exploit the unique gelling mechanisms, strong water absorption and abundant functional groups of the three major CRG varieties. Notably, CRG-based matrices are demonstrated to increase drug loading and drug solubility, enabling release of orally administrated drugs in zero-order or in a significantly prolonged period. Other amazing features, such as pH-sensitivity and adhesive property, of CRG-based formulations are also introduced. Finally, we discuss the adverse influence of CRG on the human body and then suggest some future directions for the development of CRG-based biomaterials for broader applications in biomedicine.

  17. A Retrospective Analysis of Spontaneous Adverse Drug Reactions Reports Relating to Paediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosli, Rosliana; Abd Aziz, Noorizan; Manan, Mohamed Mansor

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous reporting on adverse drug reactions (ADR) has been established in Malaysia since 1987, and although these reports are monitored by the Malaysia drug monitoring authority, the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau, information about ADRs in the paediatric patient population still remains unexplored. The aims of this study, therefore, were to characterize the ADRs reported in respect to the Malaysian paediatric population and to relate the data to specific paediatric age groups. Methods Data on all ADRs reported to the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau between 2000 and 2013 for individuals aged from birth to 17 years old were analysed with respect to age and gender, type of reporter, suspected medicines (using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification), category of ADR (according to system organ class) as well as the severity of the ADR. Results In total, 11,523 ADR reports corresponding to 22,237 ADRs were analysed, with half of these reporting one ADR per report. Vaccines comprised 55.7% of the 11,523 ADR reports with the remaining being drug related ADRs. Overall, 63.9% of ADRs were reported for paediatric patients between 12 and 17 years of age, with the majority of ADRs reported in females (70.7%). The most common ADRs reported were from the following system organ classes: application site disorders (32.2%), skin and appendages disorders (20.6%), body as a whole general disorders (12.8%) and central and peripheral nervous system disorders (11.2%). Meanwhile, ADRs in respect to anti-infectives for systemic use (2194/5106; 43.0%) were the most frequently reported across all age groups, followed by drugs from the nervous system (1095/5106; 21.4%). Only 0.28% of the ADR cases were reported as fatal. A large proportion of the reports were received from healthcare providers in government health facilities. Discussion ADR reports concerning vaccines and anti-infectives were the most commonly reported in children, and are mainly

  18. Second-generation antipsychotics: is there evidence for sex differences in pharmacokinetic and adverse effect profiles?

    PubMed

    Aichhorn, Wolfgang; Whitworth, Alexandra B; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Marksteiner, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Six second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone, are currently US FDA approved. The aim of this review is to investigate whether sex differences exist for efficacy and adverse effects of these drugs.Sex-related differences have been shown in the pharmacokinetics of cytochrome P450 (CYP), with a higher activity in females for CYP3A4 and CYP2D6. However, even if there are pharmacokinetic differences between females and males, significantly higher plasma concentrations in women have been demonstrated only for olanzapine and clozapine. To date, sex differences in adverse effects have not been well studied, but some adverse effects such as weight gain, hyperprolactinaemia and cardiac effects are reported to be particularly problematic for women. Most of the studies reviewed indicate that clozapine and olanzapine are associated with greater bodyweight gain than the other atypical antipsychotics, and that serious adverse effects such as metabolic syndrome, which includes increased visceral adiposity, hyperglycaemia, hypertension and dyslipidaemia induced by SGAs, are more frequent in females. According to most studies, the risk for cardiac adverse effects induced by SGAs is the same in male and female patients. Although women are at a lower risk of sudden cardiac death, they have a higher risk of induced long QT syndrome from antiarrhythmic and, probably, antipsychotic drugs. The propensity of sexual dysfunctions is higher with conventional antipsychotics than with SGAs. Additionally, there is some evidence that female sexual dysfunction is associated with high prolactin levels; however, whether the degree of prolactin level elevation is different between female and male patients remains controversial. There is no evidence for sex differences for any of the SGAs to cause a higher rate of extrapyramidal symptoms, acute dystonia or any other movement disturbance. Knowledge of the risks and benefits

  19. Azathioprine therapy and adverse drug reactions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: impact of thiopurine S-methyltransferase polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Matthias; Schäffeler, Elke; Marx, Claudia; Fischer, Christine; Lang, Thomas; Behrens, Christoph; Gregor, Michael; Eichelbaum, Michel; Zanger, Ulrich M; Kaskas, Bernd A

    2002-08-01

    The efficacy of the immunosuppressants azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine has been well established in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, its use has been complicated by a high incidence of serious adverse drug reactions such as hematotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, pancreatitis and gastrointestinal disturbances. Whereas azathioprine-related pancytopenia has been clearly linked to thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) polymorphism limited data are available to explain gastrointestinal side effects. In a retrospective analysis of 93 adults with IBD and azathioprine therapy both phenotyping and genotyping was used to explore systematically the relationship between TPMT and azathioprine-related adverse reactions. At time of inclusion, 69 patients were still receiving azathioprine therapy and had never experienced side effects. Azathioprine had been withdrawn in 10 patients for non-medical reasons or lack of response and 14 patients (15%) had stopped medication or were on reduced dose due to severe azathioprine-related side effects. Nine of these 14 patients had developed gastrointestinal side effects (hepatotoxicity, n = 3; pancreatitis, n = 3; others, n = 3), but their normal red blood cell TPMT activities were in accordance to TPMT wild-type. TPMT deficiency in one patient had led to pancytopenia whereas only two of the remaining four patients with hematotoxicity displayed an intermediate phenotype of TPMT. This study demonstrates that azathioprine-related gastrointestinal side effects are independent of the TPMT polymorphism. Nevertheless pharmacogenetic testing for TPMT prior to commencing thiopurine therapy should become routine practice in order to avoid severe hematotoxicity in TPMT deficient patients and lowering the incidence of hematological side effects in individuals heterozygous for TPMT.

  20. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), genetic polymorphisms and neurochemical correlates in experimentation with psychotropic drugs among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Somaini, L; Donnini, C; Manfredini, M; Raggi, M A; Saracino, M A; Gerra, M L; Amore, M; Leonardi, C; Serpelloni, G; Gerra, G

    2011-08-01

    Epidemiological and clinical data show frequent associations between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and substance abuse susceptibility particularly in adolescents. A large body of evidences suggests that the possible dysregulation of neuroendocrine responses as well as neurotransmitters function induced by childhood traumatic experiences and emotional neglect could constitute one of the essential biological changes implementing substance abuse vulnerability. Moreover, genotype variables and its environment interactions have been associated with an increased risk for early onset substance abuse. In this paper we present several data that support the hypothesis of the involvement of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in mediating the combined effect of early adverse experiences and gene variants affecting neurotransmission. The presented data also confirm the relationship between basal plasma levels of cortisol and ACTH, on the one hand, and retrospective measures of neglect during childhood on the other hand: the higher the mother and father neglect (CECA-Q) scores are, the higher the plasma levels of the two HPA hormones are. Furthermore, such positive relationship has been proved to be particularly effective and important when associated with the "S" promoter polymorphism of the gene encoding the 5-HTT transporter, both in homozygote and heterozygote individuals.

  1. Adverse testicular effects of Botox® in mature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Breikaa, Randa M.; Mosli, Hisham A.; Nagy, Ayman A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2014-03-01

    Botox® injections are taking a consistently increasing place in urology. Intracremasteric injections, particularly, have been applied for cryptorchidism and painful testicular spasms. Studies outlining their safety for this use are, however, scanty. Thus, the present study aimed at evaluating possible testicular toxicity of Botox® injections and their effect on male fertility. Mature rats were given intracremasteric Botox® injections (10, 20 and 40 U/kg) three times in a two-week interval. Changes in body and testes weights were examined and gonadosomatic index compared to control group. Semen quality, sperm parameters, fructose, protein, cholesterol and triglycerides contents were assessed. Effects on normal testicular function were investigated by measuring testosterone levels and changes in enzyme activities (lactate dehydrogenase-X and acid phosphatase). To draw a complete picture, changes in oxidative and inflammatory states were examined, in addition to the extent of connective tissue deposition between seminiferous tubules. In an attempt to have more accurate information about possible spermatotoxic effects of Botox®, flowcytometric analysis and histopathological examination were carried out. Botox®-injected rats showed altered testicular physiology and function. Seminiferous tubules were separated by dense fibers, especially with the highest dose. Flowcytometric analysis showed a decrease in mature sperms and histopathology confirmed the findings. The oxidative state was, however, comparable to control group. This study is the first to show that intracremasteric injections of Botox® induce adverse testicular effects evidenced by inhibited spermatogenesis and initiation of histopathological changes. In conclusion, decreased fertility may be a serious problem Botox® injections could cause. - Highlights: • Botox® injections are the trend nowadays, for both medical and non-medical uses. • They were recently suggested for cryptorchidism and

  2. Evolution of pharmacological obesity treatments: focus on adverse side-effect profiles.

    PubMed

    Krentz, A J; Fujioka, K; Hompesch, M

    2016-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy directed toward reducing body weight may provide benefits for both curbing obesity and lowering the risk of obesity-associated comorbidities; however, many weight loss medications have been withdrawn from the market because of serious adverse effects. Examples include pulmonary hypertension (aminorex), cardiovascular toxicity, e.g. flenfluramine-induced valvopathy, stroke [phenylpropanolamine (PPA)], excess non-fatal cardiovascular events (sibutramine), and neuro-psychiatric issues (rimonabant; approved in Europe, but not in the USA). This negative experience has helped mould the current drug development and approval process for new anti-obesity drugs. Differences between the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency, however, in perceptions of risk-benefit considerations for individual drugs have resulted in discrepancies in approval and/or withdrawal of weight-reducing medications. Thus, two drugs recently approved by the FDA, i.e. lorcaserin and phentermine + topiramate extended release, are not available in Europe. In contrast, naltrexone sustained release (SR)/bupropion SR received FDA approval, and liraglutide 3.0 mg was recently approved in both the USA and Europe. Regulatory strategies adopted by the FDA to manage the potential for uncommon but potentially serious post-marketing toxicity include: (i) risk evaluation and mitigation strategy programmes; (ii) stipulating post-marketing safety trials; (iii) considering responder rates and limiting cumulative exposure by discontinuation if weight loss is not attained within a reasonable timeframe; and (iv) requiring large cardiovascular outcome trials before or after approval. We chronicle the adverse effects of anti-obesity pharmacotherapy and consider how the history of high-profile toxicity issues has shaped the current regulatory landscape for new and future weight-reducing drugs.

  3. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  4. Human experiences related to adverse drug reactions to the fetus or neonate from some maternally administered drugs.

    PubMed

    Shirkey, H C

    1972-01-01

    This is a review of known periods in utero during which drugs alter the process of growth; effects may be shown on the fetus or the newborn and vary with the stage of development of the fetus when exposed. Other variables are the mother and the placenta. There is no safe animal screening mechanism, the human test is by ordeal, and more clinical monitoring and reporting are needed. Cancer chemotherapeutic agents exert their maximal effects on rapidly dividing cells and are therefore hazardous during pregnancy; the greatest risk is in the 1st trimester. In the thalidomide experience the critical days were the 22nd and 23rd days after conception. Masculinizing drugs such as testosterone and other androgenic steroids have been implicated as affecting the female fetus when given early in pregnancy. Oral contraceptives taken by an already pregnant woman are a hazard because of these progestational agents. Progesterone alone is unlikely to cause masculinization but other progestins may cause such changes. Carcinogenesis may develop later in females born of mothers who are treated with diethylstilbestrol to prevent miscarriage. Many antithyroid drugs have caused neonatal goiter. Maternal ingestion of iodides during pregnancy (preparations for treating asthma, cough syrups, radio-contrast media used in diagnoses) is the most frequent cause. Goiter is relatively common in infants whose mothers were treated with propylthiouracil and other antithyroid drugs, yet they usually show normal thyroid function. However, hypothyroidism with cretinism can occur. Lithium, used in psychiatry and as a salt substitute, may alter iodine metabolism and thyroid gland function. It also passes into the milk to continue the potential toxicity. Teratogenic effects in experimental animals suggest other possible effects on infants from lithium and similar drugs.

  5. [Parkinson syndrome, a possible adverse effect of calcium inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Malaterre, H R; Lauribe, P; Paganelli, F; Ramond, B; Lévy, S

    1992-09-01

    The effects of calcium inhibitors are not limited to the muscles and may affect other systems and cause varied side effects. Two cases of Parkinsonian syndrome occurring after starting therapy with calcium inhibitors (verapamil in one case and diltiazem in the other) are reported. Complete regression of the symptoms after withdrawing the drugs was strongly in favour of a causal relationship. The condition could be due to inhibition of the calcium channels in the central nervous system disturbing neurotransmission. This seems to be a rare side effect as there have only been three other reported cases of secondary extrapyramidal syndromes in the literature. However, a Parkinsonian syndrome is very invalidating and clinicians using this family of drugs should be aware of this possible complication.

  6. Pharmacovigilance in children: detecting adverse drug reactions in routine electronic healthcare records. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Black, Corri; Tagiyeva-Milne, Nara; Helms, Peter; Moir, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Aims A systematic review of the literature published in English over 10 years was undertaken in order to describe the use of electronic healthcare data in the identification of potential adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched using MESH headings and text words. Titles, keywords and abstracts were checked for age <18 years, potential ADRs and electronic healthcare data. Information extracted included age, data source, pharmacovigilance method, medicines and ADRs. Studies were quality assessed. Results From 14 804 titles, 314 had a full text review and 71 were included in the final review. Fifty were published in North America, 10 in Scandinavia. Study size ranged from less than 1000 children to more than 10 million. Sixty per cent of studies used data from one source. Comparative observational studies were most commonly reported (66.2%) with 15% using passive surveillance. Electronic healthcare data set linkage and the quality of the data source were poorly reported. ADRs were classified using the International Classification of Disease (ICD10). Multi-system reactions were most commonly studied, followed by central nervous system and mental and behavioural disorders. Vaccines were most frequently prescribed followed by corticosteroids, general anaesthetics and antidepressants. Conclusions Routine electronic healthcare records were increasingly reported to be used for pharmacovigilance in children. This growing and important health protection activity could be enhanced by consistent reporting of studies to improve the identification, interpretation and generalizability of the evidence base. PMID:25819310

  7. Formalizing MedDRA to support semantic reasoning on adverse drug reaction terms.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Cédric; Sadou, Éric; Souvignet, Julien; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Declerck, Gunnar

    2014-06-01

    Although MedDRA has obvious advantages over previous terminologies for coding adverse drug reactions and discovering potential signals using data mining techniques, its terminological organization constrains users to search terms according to predefined categories. Adding formal definitions to MedDRA would allow retrieval of terms according to a case definition that may correspond to novel categories that are not currently available in the terminology. To achieve semantic reasoning with MedDRA, we have associated formal definitions to MedDRA terms in an OWL file named OntoADR that is the result of our first step for providing an "ontologized" version of MedDRA. MedDRA five-levels original hierarchy was converted into a subsumption tree and formal definitions of MedDRA terms were designed using several methods: mappings to SNOMED-CT, semi-automatic definition algorithms or a fully manual way. This article presents the main steps of OntoADR conception process, its structure and content, and discusses problems and limits raised by this attempt to "ontologize" MedDRA.

  8. Adverse Drug Reactions in a Complementary Medicine Hospital: A Prospective, Intensified Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Süsskind, M.; Thürmann, P. A.; Lüke, C.; Jeschke, E.; Tabali, M.; Matthes, H.; Ostermann, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anthroposophic medicine is one of the widely used approaches of complementary and alternative medicine. However, few prospective studies have generated safety data on its use. Objectives. We aimed to assess adverse drug reactions (ADRs) caused by anthroposophical medicines (AMEDs) in the anthroposophical Community Hospital Havelhoehe, GERMANY. Study Design and Methods. Between May and November 2007, patients of six medical wards were prospectively assessed for ADRs. Suspected ADRs occurring during hospitalization were documented and classified in terms of organ manifestation (WHO SOC-code), causality (according to the Uppsala Monitoring Centre WHO criteria), and severity. Only those ADRs with a severity of grade 2 and higher according to the CTCAE classification system are described here. Results. Of the 3,813 patients hospitalized, 174 patients (4.6%) experienced 211 ADRs (CTCAE grade 2/3 n = 191, 90.5%, CTCAE grade 4/5 n = 20, 9.5%) of which 57 ADRs (27.0%) were serious. The median age of patients with ADRs (62.1% females) was 72.0 (IQR: 61.0; 80.0). Six patients (0.2%) experienced six ADRs (2.8% of ADRs) caused by eight suspected AMEDs, all of which were mild reactions (grade 2). Conclusion. Our data show that ADRs caused by AMEDs occur rarely and are limited to mild symptoms. PMID:22315630

  9. Adverse Drug Reactions in HIV/AIDS Patients at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kashifullah; Khan, Amer Hayat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Soo, Chow Ting; Akhtar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In the current study we explored the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to antiretroviral therapy among human immune-deficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients. We concluded an observational retrospective study in all patients who were diagnosed with HIV infection and were receiving highly active antiviral therapy from Jan. 2007 to Dec. 2012 at Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Patient socio-demographic details along with clinical features and susceptible ADRs were observed during the study period. Out of 743 patients, 571 (76.9%) were men, and 172 (23.1%) were women. Overall 314 (42.2%) patients experienced ADRs. A total of 425 ADRs were reported, with 311 (73.1%) occurring in men and 114 (26.8%) in women, with a significant statistical relationship (P value (P) = 0.02, OR = 1.21). Overall 239 (56.2%) ADRs were recorded among Chinese, 94 (22.1%) in Malay, and 71 (16.7%) in Indian patients, which had a statistically significant association with ADRs (P = 0.05, OR = 1.50). Out of a total 425 among ADRs, lipodystrophy was recorded in 151 (35.5%) followed by skin rashes in 80 (18.8%), anemia in 74 (17.4%), and peripheral neuropathy in 27 (6.3%) patients. These findings suggest a need of intensive monitoring of ADRs in HIV treatment centres across Malaysia.

  10. Adverse drug reaction profile of anti-snake venom in a rural tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rushikesh Prabhakar; Motghare, Vijay Motiram; Padwal, Sudhir Laxman; Pore, Rakesh Ramkrishna; Bhamare, Chetanraj Ghanshyam; Deshmukh, Vinod Shivaji; Pise, Harshal Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study was carried out with the aim of evaluation of the adverse drug reaction profile of anti-snake venom serum (ASV) in a rural tertiary care hospital. Methods An observational study was conducted in SRTR Medical College, Ambajogai, Maharashtra, India. A total number of 296 indoor case papers of snake bite from February to September 2011 and June to August 2012 were retrieved from the record section and the antivenom reactions were assessed. In addition, basic epidemiological data and prescribing practices of ASV were also analyzed. Results Vasculotoxic snake bites were more common (50.61%) than neuroparalytic ones (22.56%). Mild envenomation was the commonest presentation. A total of 92 (56.10%) patients who received ASV suffered from antivenom reactions. The most common nature of reaction was chills, rigors (69.56%) followed by nausea and vomiting (34.8%). 10-15% patients suffered from moderate to severe reactions like hypotension and sudden respiratory arrest. We did not find any dose response relationship of ASV to risk of reactions (odds ratio 0.37). Intradermal sensitivity test was performed in about 72% cases. Conclusion Our study showed a higher incidence of reactions to ASV at our institute. PMID:24396245

  11. Obstacles and solutions for spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions in the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Vallano, A; Cereza, G; Pedròs, C; Agustí, A; Danés, I; Aguilera, C; Arnau, J M

    2005-01-01

    Aim To describe the opinions of hospital physicians concerning problems regarding the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and ways to solve them. Methods A qualitative study was carried out. Fifteen focus groups were conducted among physicians working in a tertiary teaching hospital. A total of 208 physicians from different medical specialities participated. The focus group discussions were recorded by three different observers and the transcripts of each session were analysed for issues and themes emerging from the text. Results Four types of obstacles to spontaneous reporting were considered particularly important: (i) problems with the ADRs diagnosis; (ii) problems with the usual workload and lack of time; (iii) problems related to the organization and activities of the pharmacovigilance system; (iv) and problems related to potential conflicts. The potential solutions suggested for improving spontaneous reporting were to define the kind of ADRs which should be reported, to facilitate an easy contact and quick access to the hospital pharmacovigilance system, to facilitate information and support for reporting and feedback of pharmacovigilance activities. Conclusions The perception of the different obstacles by the hospital physicians is an important factor in determining the causes of the underreporting of ADRs and addressing these obstacles could lead to an improvement in spontaneous reporting. A closer relationship between the doctors and the pharmacovigilance centre is suggested as a means of solving these problems. More information is needed to improve the spontaneous reporting of ADRs in specialized healthcare. PMID:16305591

  12. Designing a national combined reporting form for adverse drug reactions and medication errors.

    PubMed

    Tanti, A; Serracino-Inglott, A; Borg, J J

    2015-06-09

    The Maltese Medicines Authority was tasked with developing a reporting form that captures high-quality case information on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and medication errors in order to fulfil its public-health obligations set by the European Union (EU) legislation on pharmacovigilance. This paper describes the process of introducing the first combined ADR/medication error reporting form in the EU for health-care professionals, the analysis of reports generated by it and the promotion of the system. A review of existing ADR forms was carried out and recommendations from the European Medicines Agency and World Health Organization audits integrated. A new, combined ADR/medication error reporting form was developed and pilot tested based on case studies. The Authority's quality system (ISO 9001 certified) was redesigned and a promotion strategy was deployed. The process used in Malta can be useful for countries that need to develop systems relative to ADR/medication error reporting and to improve the quality of data capture within their systems.

  13. An algorithm to detect adverse drug reactions in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Lehr, Victoria Tutag; Lieh-Lai, Mary; Koo, Winston; Ward, Robert M; Rieder, Michael J; Van Den Anker, John N; Reeves, Jaxk H; Mathew, Merene; Lulic-Botica, Mirjana; Aranda, Jacob V

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are at greater risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Differentiation of ADRs from reactions associated with organ dysfunction/immaturity is difficult. Current ADR algorithm scoring was established arbitrarily without validation in infants. The study objective was to develop a valid and reliable algorithm to identify ADRs in the NICU. Algorithm development began with a 24-item questionnaire for data collection on 100 previously suspected ADRs. Five pediatric pharmacologists independently rated cases as definite, probable, possible, and unlikely ADRs. Consensus "gold standard" was reached via teleconference. Logistic regression and iterative C programs were used to derive the scoring system. For validation, 50 prospectively collected ADR cases were assessed by 3 clinicians using the new algorithm and the Naranjo algorithm. Weighted kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to compare validity and reliability of algorithms. The new algorithm consists of 13 items. Kappa and ICC of the new algorithm were 0.76 and 0.62 versus 0.31 and 0.43 for the Naranjo algorithm. The new algorithm developed using actual patient data is more valid and reliable than the Naranjo algorithm for identifying ADRs in the NICU population. Because of the relatively small and nonrandom samples, further refinement and additional testing are needed.

  14. Effects of Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search ... and the brain , sometimes forever. Learn more about: how drug use and mental health problems often happen together the link between drug use ...

  15. AOP: An R Package For Sufficient Causal Analysis in Pathway-based Screening of Drugs and Chemicals for Adversity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summary: How can I quickly find the key events in a pathway that I need to monitor to predict that a/an beneficial/adverse event/outcome will occur? This is a key question when using signaling pathways for drug/chemical screening in pharma-cology, toxicology and risk assessment. ...

  16. Olfactory drug effects approached from human-derived data.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Knothe, Claudia; Lippmann, Catharina; Ultsch, Alfred; Hummel, Thomas; Walter, Carmen

    2015-11-01

    The complexity of the sense of smell makes adverse olfactory effects of drugs highly likely, which can impact a patient's quality of life. Here, we present a bioinformatics approach that identifies drugs with potential olfactory effects by connecting drug target expression patterns in human olfactory tissue with drug-related information and the underlying molecular drug targets taken from publically available databases. We identified 71 drugs with listed olfactory effects and 147 different targets. Taking the target-based approach further, we found additional drugs with potential olfactory effects, including 152 different substances interacting with genes expressed in the human olfactory bulb. Our proposed bioinformatics approach provides plausible hypotheses about mechanistic drug effects for drug discovery and repurposing and, thus, would be appropriate for use during drug development.

  17. Adverse Drug Reaction Identification and Extraction in Social Media: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Bellet, Florelle; Asfari, Hadyl; Souvignet, Julien; Texier, Nathalie; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Beyens, Marie-Noëlle; Burgun, Anita; Bousquet, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Background The underreporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) through traditional reporting channels is a limitation in the efficiency of the current pharmacovigilance system. Patients’ experiences with drugs that they report on social media represent a new source of data that may have some value in postmarketing safety surveillance. Objective A scoping review was undertaken to explore the breadth of evidence about the use of social media as a new source of knowledge for pharmacovigilance. Methods Daubt et al’s recommendations for scoping reviews were followed. The research questions were as follows: How can social media be used as a data source for postmarketing drug surveillance? What are the available methods for extracting data? What are the different ways to use these data? We queried PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar to extract relevant articles that were published before June 2014 and with no lower date limit. Two pairs of reviewers independently screened the selected studies and proposed two themes of review: manual ADR identification (theme 1) and automated ADR extraction from social media (theme 2). Descriptive characteristics were collected from the publications to create a database for themes 1 and 2. Results Of the 1032 citations from PubMed and Embase, 11 were relevant to the research question. An additional 13 citations were added after further research on the Internet and in reference lists. Themes 1 and 2 explored 11 and 13 articles, respectively. Ways of approaching the use of social media as a pharmacovigilance data source were identified. Conclusions This scoping review noted multiple methods for identifying target data, extracting them, and evaluating the quality of medical information from social media. It also showed some remaining gaps in the field. Studies related to the identification theme usually failed to accurately assess the completeness, quality, and reliability of the data that were analyzed from social media. Regarding

  18. [Validation of a measurement scale: example of a French Adverse Drug Reactions Preventability Scale].

    PubMed

    Olivier, Pascale; Caron, Jacques; Haramburu, Françoise; Imbs, Jean-Louis; Jonville-Béra, Annie-Pierre; Lagier, Georges; Sgro, Catherine; Vial, Thierry; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lapeyr-Mestre, Maryse

    2005-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) have been recognised as an important cause of hospital admission. Most of these drug-related admissions were expected ADRs and, thus, partly preventable. However, as far as we know, the assessment of the preventability of ADRs was addressed in only two studies performed in France. In contrast, several other studies have been performed, mainly in the USA, and using different methods of assessing preventability. None of these methods were clearly evaluated with regard to reproducibility, validity or relevance. The purpose of this study was to initiate the validation of a French preventability scale. Here, we propose the first two phases of validation: the content validity and reliability of the scale. A working group of pharmacovigilance experts has been specifically established for this purpose. The content validity was assessed by collecting items representative of preventability. The choice and the formulation of items and a proposal of a score (global and for each item) were adopted after the consensus of the experts. A definitive version of the ADR preventability scale was used for the assessment of reliability. During the second phase, experts independently tested the new scale from observations of ADRs (49 central nervous system haemorrhages with antivitamine K). The concordance of the experts' judgements was calculated using two statistical methods (Kappa statistic and correlation coefficient). The content validity phase was performed during several workshops where experts discussed the choice and formulation of the best items. We decided to construct a scale with a small number of items, allowing a rapid evaluation of the preventability of ADRs. On the basis of a global score, four categories of preventability of ADRs ("preventable", "potentially preventable", "unclassable", "not preventable" ADRs) were proposed. The agreement of experts regarding the global score was low, with a poor correlation coefficient value (coefficient

  19. Measuring Adverse Drug Events on Hospital Medicine Units with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Trigger Tool: A Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Iris; Kirkwood, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Background: An adverse drug event (ADE) is a noxious, unintended response to a drug, occurring at doses used in humans for prophylaxis, diagnosis, or treatment of disease or for modification of physiological function. ADEs account for about one-quarter of all adverse events in Canadian hospitals. Canadian data on specific types of ADEs and commonly implicated drugs are lacking. In particular, there is a paucity of data on ADEs that occur during hospital admissions. Objectives: The primary objective was to identify the incidence of ADEs in a sample of adult general medicine inpatients over a 1-year period. The secondary objective was to identify the 5 drugs most frequently responsible for ADEs in this setting. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted for general medicine patients discharged from St Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, from January to December 2011. ADEs were identified using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Trigger Tool for Measuring Adverse Drug Events. The Naranjo criteria were applied to assess causality, and a physician independently authenticated the ADEs for preventability and harm using the categories of harm set out by the US National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention. Results: Of the 204 patient encounters reviewed, 15 involved ADEs, which represented an incidence of 7% over the 1-year study period. The 5 drugs most frequently implicated in ADEs were vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, piperacillin–tazobactam, and moxifloxacin. Conclusions: The rate of ADEs during hospital admissions was substantial. These events may necessitate additional investigations and interventions and may prolong the hospital stay. The authors do not recommend the IHI Trigger Tool for Measuring Adverse Drug Events for efficient prospective detection of ADEs in manual chart reviews. Possible modifications to improve the utility of this tool might include incorporating it into a compatible

  20. Adverse events of sacral neuromodulation for fecal incontinence reported to the federal drug administration

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the nature and severity of AE related to sacral neurostimulation (SNS). METHODS: Based on Pubmed and Embase searches, we identified published trials and case series of SNS for fecal incontinence (FI) and extracted data on adverse events, requiring an active intervention. Those problems were operationally defined as infection, device removal explant or need for lead and/or generator replacement. In addition, we analyzed the Manufacturer and User Device Experience registry of the Federal Drug Administration for the months of August - October of 2015. Events were included if the report specifically mentioned gastrointestinal (GI), bowel and FI as indication and if the narrative did not focus on bladder symptoms. The classification, reporter, the date of the recorded complaint, time between initial implant and report, the type of AE, steps taken and outcome were extracted from the report. In cases of device removal or replacement, we looked for confirmatory comments by healthcare providers or the manufacturer. RESULTS: Published studies reported adverse events and reoperation rates for 1954 patients, followed for 27 (1-117) mo. Reoperation rates were 18.6% (14.2-23.9) with device explants accounting for 10.0% (7.8-12.7) of secondary surgeries; rates of device replacement or explant or pocket site and electrode revisions increased with longer follow up. During the period examined, the FDA received 1684 reports of AE related to SNS with FI or GI listed as indication. A total of 652 reports met the inclusion criteria, with 52.7% specifically listing FI. Lack or loss of benefit (48.9%), pain or dysesthesia (27.8%) and complication at the generator implantation site (8.7%) were most commonly listed. Complaints led to secondary surgeries in 29.7% of the AE. Reoperations were performed to explant (38.2%) or replace (46.5%) the device or a lead, or revise the generator pocket (14.6%). Conservative management changes mostly involved changes in stimulation

  1. A side effect resource to capture phenotypic effects of drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Michael; Campillos, Monica; Letunic, Ivica; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Bork, Peer

    2010-01-01

    The molecular understanding of phenotypes caused by drugs in humans is essential for elucidating mechanisms of action and for developing personalized medicines. Side effects of drugs (also known as adverse drug reactions) are an important source of human phenotypic information, but so far research on this topic has been hampered by insufficient accessibility of data. Consequently, we have developed a public, computer-readable side effect resource (SIDER) that connects 888 drugs to 1450 side effect terms. It contains information on frequency in patients for one-third of the drug–side effect pairs. For 199 drugs, the side effect frequency of placebo administration could also be extracted. We illustrate the potential of SIDER with a number of analyses. The resource is freely available for academic research at http://sideeffects.embl.de. PMID:20087340

  2. Effects of naltrexone are influenced by childhood adversity during negative emotional processing in addiction recovery.

    PubMed

    Savulich, G; Riccelli, R; Passamonti, L; Correia, M; Deakin, J F W; Elliott, R; Flechais, R S A; Lingford-Hughes, A R; McGonigle, J; Murphy, A; Nutt, D J; Orban, C; Paterson, L M; Reed, L J; Smith, D G; Suckling, J; Tait, R; Taylor, E M; Sahakian, B J; Robbins, T W; Ersche, K D

    2017-03-07

    Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used in the management of alcohol dependence. Although the endogenous opioid system has been implicated in emotion regulation, the effects of mu-opioid receptor blockade on brain systems underlying negative emotional processing are not clear in addiction. Individuals meeting criteria for alcohol dependence alone (n=18, alcohol) and in combination with cocaine and/or opioid dependence (n=21, alcohol/drugs) and healthy individuals without a history of alcohol or drug dependence (n=21) were recruited. Participants were alcohol and drug abstinent before entered into this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover study. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate brain response while viewing aversive and neutral images relative to baseline on 50 mg of naltrexone and placebo. We found that naltrexone modulated task-related activation in the medial prefrontal cortex and functional connectivity between the anterior cingulate cortex and the hippocampus as a function of childhood adversity (for aversive versus neutral images) in all groups. Furthermore, there was a group-by-treatment-by-condition interaction in the right amygdala, which was mainly driven by a normalization of response for aversive relative to neutral images under naltrexone in the alcohol/drugs group. We conclude that early childhood adversity is one environmental factor that influences pharmacological response to naltrexone. Pharmacotherapy with naltrexone may also have some ameliorative effects on negative emotional processing in combined alcohol and drug dependence, possibly due to alterations in endogenous opioid transmission or the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist actions of naltrexone.

  3. [Active surveillance of adverse drug reaction in the era of big data: challenge and opportunity for control selection].

    PubMed

    Wang, S F; Zhan, S Y

    2016-07-01

    Electronic healthcare databases have become an important source for active surveillance of drug safety in the era of big data. The traditional epidemiology research designs are needed to confirm the association between drug use and adverse events based on these datasets, and the selection of the comparative control is essential to each design. This article aims to explain the principle and application of each type of control selection, introduce the methods and parameters for method comparison, and describe the latest achievements in the batch processing of control selection, which would provide important methodological reference for the use of electronic healthcare databases to conduct post-marketing drug safety surveillance in China.

  4. The Adverse Effect of Hypertension in the Treatment of Thyroid Cancer with Multi-Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ancker, Ole Vincent; Wehland, Markus; Bauer, Johann; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of thyroid cancer has promising prospects, mostly through the use of surgical or radioactive iodine therapy. However, some thyroid cancers, such as progressive radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinoma, are not remediable with conventional types of treatment. In these cases, a treatment regimen with multi-kinase inhibitors is advisable. Unfortunately, clinical trials have shown a large number of patients, treated with multi-kinase inhibitors, being adversely affected by hypertension. This means that treatment of thyroid cancer with multi-kinase inhibitors prolongs progression-free and overall survival of patients, but a large number of patients experience hypertension as an adverse effect of the treatment. Whether the prolonged lifetime is sufficient to develop sequelae from hypertension is unclear, but late-stage cancer patients often have additional diseases, which can be complicated by the presence of hypertension. Since the exact mechanisms of the rise of hypertension in these patients are still unknown, the only available strategy is treating the symptoms. More studies determining the pathogenesis of hypertension as a side effect to cancer treatment as well as outcomes of dose management of cancer drugs are necessary to improve future therapy options for hypertension as an adverse effect to cancer therapy with multi-kinase inhibitors. PMID:28335429

  5. Antiepileptic drug teratogenesis: what are the risks for congenital malformations and adverse cognitive outcomes?

    PubMed

    Harden, Cynthia L

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure in utero has been associated with major congenital malformations (MCMs) and adverse cognitive outcomes in the offspring of women with epilepsy (WWE). However, determining the exact risk and the relative risks of AEDs for these outcomes has been challenging, and only in recent years has improved study designs enabled us to get a clearer picture of the risks. Still, there is a startling lack of information for many of the newer and widely used AEDs. At this point of time, studies clearly show that valproate (VPA) as a part of polytherapy or when used as a monotherapy is associated with an increased risk of MCMs, and that it poses about threefold the risk of carbamazepine (CBZ). It is unclear if any other AEDs studied pose an increased risk of MCM occurrence; in the best available large study the absolute rates of MCMs with other several other AEDs were not different from untreated WWE. The absolute risks have been reported as CBZ 2.2%, lamotrigine (LTG) 3.2%, phenytoin (PHT) 3.7%, untreated WWE 3.5%, with VPA as the outlier at 6.2%. In utero VPA exposure is also associated with a risk of lower verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) in children, at approximately 10 points lower than controls. CBZ appears to pose no risk to cognitive outcome, and there is some evidence that PHT and phenobarbital (PB) may be associated with risk of reduced cognitive outcome. Polytherapy is associated with greater risk than monotherapy for both MCMs and cognitive outcome. Although more information is needed and hopefully will be obtained from ongoing prospective studies, it is clear that WWE taking VPA and planning pregnancy should have a discussion with their physician about considering changing to another AED before pregnancy, if possible.

  6. Adverse drug reactions reported by consumers for nervous system medications in Europe 2007 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. In the European Union, more countries have allowed consumers to report ADRs directly to the regulatory agencies. The aim of this study was to characterize ADRs reported by European consumer for nervous system medications. Methods ADRs reported by consumers for nervous system medications (ATC group N) from 2007 to 2011 and located in the European ADR database, EudraVigilance, were analysed. Data were categorized with respect to age and sex, category and seriousness of reported ADRs and medications. The unit of analysis was one ADR. Results We located 4766 ADRs reported for nervous system medications, and one half of these were serious including 19 deaths. Less than 5% of ADRs were reported in children. Totally, 58% of ADRs were reported for women, 42% for men. The majority of reported ADRs were of the types “nervous system disorders” (18% of total ADRs) followed by “psychiatric disorders” (18% of total ADRs) and “general disorders” (15% of total ADRs) which also were the system organ classes in which the majority of serious ADRs were found. ADR reports encompassed medicines from the therapeutic groups: antiepileptics (ATC group N03) (36% of total ADRs), parasympathomimetics (ATC group N07) (22% of total ADRs) and antidepressants ATC group N06A (9% of total ADRs). Antiepileptics were the therapeutic group with the highest share of serious ADRs (60%) followed by antidepressants (15%). Many serious ADRs were reported for pregabalin and varenicline. Conclusions The majority of ADRs from nervous system mediations reported by consumers that were identified from the EudraVigilance database were serious. The value of consumer reports in pharmacovigilance still remains unclarified. PMID:23763896

  7. Antibiotic-associated suspected adverse drug reactions among hospitalized patients in Uganda: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kiguba, Ronald; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M

    2017-04-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence at admission and incidence during hospitalization of antibiotic-associated suspected adverse drug reactions (aa-ADRs) among Ugandan inpatients; and to characterize these aa-ADRs. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 762 consented adults admitted on medical and gynecological wards of the 1790-bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Thirty percent were known HIV-seropositive (232/762). Nineteen percent (148/762; 95% CI: 17-22%) of inpatients experienced at least one aa-ADR. At hospital admission, 6% (45/762; 95% CI: 4-8%) of patients had at least one aa-ADR; and 15% (45/300; 11-20%) of those who had received antibiotics in the 4-weeks preadmission. Twenty-four (53%) of these 45 patients had serious aa-ADRs. The incidence of aa-ADRs was 19% (117/629; 95% CI: 16-22%) of patients who received antibiotics [community-acquired: 9% (27/300; 95% CI: 6-13%); hospital-acquired: 16% (94/603; 95% CI: 13-19%)]: 39 (33%) of 117 patients had serious aa-ADRs. Of 269 aa-ADRs, 115 (43%) were community-acquired, 66 (25%) probable/definite, 171 (64%) preventable, 86 (32%) serious, and 24 (9%) rare. Ceftriaxone was the most frequently implicated for serious hospital-acquired aa-ADRs. Cotrimoxazole, isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide were the most frequently linked to serious community-acquired aa-ADRs. Fatal jaundice (isoniazid), life-threatening difficulty in breathing with shortness of breath (rifampicin) and disabling itchy skin rash with numbness of lower swollen legs (ethambutol, isoniazid) were observed. Pharmaceutical quality testing of implicated antibiotics could be worthwhile. Periodic on-ward collection and analysis of antibiotic-safety-data standardized by consumption is an efficient method of tracking antibiotics with 1%-risk for serious aa-ADRs.

  8. Implementation of a module to promote competency in adverse drug reaction reporting in undergraduate medical students

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Raakhi Kaliprasad; Jalgaonkar, Sharmila Vinayak; Sarkate, Pankaj V.; Rege, Nirmala Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Underreporting and poor quality of adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports pose a challenge for the Pharmacovigilance Program of India. A module to impart knowledge and skills of ADR reporting to MBBS students was developed and evaluated. Materials and Methods: The module consisted of (a) e-mailing an ADR narrative and online filling of the “suspected ADR reporting form” (SARF) and (b) a week later, practical on ADR reporting was conducted followed by online filling of SARF postpractical at 1 and 6 months. SARF was an 18-item form with a total score of 36. The module was implemented in the year 2012–2013. Feedback from students and faculty was taken using 15-item prevalidated feedback questionnaires. The module was modified based on the feedback and implemented for the subsequent batch in the year 2013–2014. The evaluation consisted of recording the number of students responding and the scores achieved. Results: A total of 171 students in 2012–2013 batch and 179 in 2013–2014 batch participated. In the 2012–2013 batch, the number of students filling the SARF decreased from basal: 171; 1 month: 122; 6 months: 17. The average scores showed improvement from basal 16.2 (45%) to 26.4 (73%) at 1 month and to 27.3 (76%) at 6 months. For the 2013–2014 batch, the number (n = 179) remained constant throughout and the average score progressively increased from basal 10.5 (30%) to 27.8 (77%) at 1 month and 30.3 (84%) at 6 months. Conclusion: This module improved the accuracy of filling SARF by students and this subsequently will led to better ADR reporting. Hence, this module can be used to inculcate better ADR reporting practices in budding physicians. PMID:28031613

  9. Immune-mediated Adverse Effects of Anti-CTLA-4 Antibody Therapy in Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Shannon K.; Shure, Anna K.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Ipilimumab, an antibody that blocks cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4; CD152), was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 for the treatment of unresectable stage III or IV malignant melanoma. Although the addition of this particular immunotherapy has broadened treatment options, immune-related adverse events (irAEs) are associated with ipilimumab therapy, including dermatologic effects, colitis and diarrhea, endocrine effects, hepatotoxicity, ocular effects, renal effects, neurologic effects, and others. In this article, a critical evaluation of the underlying mechanisms of irAEs associated with anti-CTLA-4 therapy is presented. Additionally, potentially beneficial effects of combinational therapies to alleviate ipilimumab-induced irAEs in malignant melanoma are discussed. Future research is warranted to elucidate the efficacy of such combination therapies as well as specific biomarkers that would help to predict a clinical response to ipilimumab in patients with malignant melanoma. PMID:26118951

  10. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Sermin; Zadeoglulari, Zeynep; Fuss, Stefan H.; Genc, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health. PMID:22523490

  11. Osteoblasts mediate the adverse effects of glucocorticoids on fuel metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Brennan-Speranza, Tara C.; Henneicke, Holger; Gasparini, Sylvia J.; Blankenstein, Katharina I.; Heinevetter, Uta; Cogger, Victoria C.; Svistounov, Dmitri; Zhang, Yaqing; Cooney, Gregory J.; Buttgereit, Frank; Dunstan, Colin R.; Gundberg, Caren; Zhou, Hong; Seibel, Markus J.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term glucocorticoid treatment is associated with numerous adverse outcomes, including weight gain, insulin resistance, and diabetes; however, the pathogenesis of these side effects remains obscure. Glucocorticoids also suppress osteoblast function, including osteocalcin synthesis. Osteocalcin is an osteoblast-specific peptide that is reported to be involved in normal murine fuel metabolism. We now demonstrate that osteoblasts play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced dysmetabolism. Osteoblast-targeted disruption of glucocorticoid signaling significantly attenuated the suppression of osteocalcin synthesis and prevented the development of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and abnormal weight gain in corticosterone-treated mice. Nearly identical effects were observed in glucocorticoid-treated animals following heterotopic (hepatic) expression of both carboxylated and uncarboxylated osteocalcin through gene therapy, which additionally led to a reduction in hepatic lipid deposition and improved phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. These data suggest that the effects of exogenous high-dose glucocorticoids on insulin target tissues and systemic energy metabolism are mediated, at least in part, through the skeleton. PMID:23093779

  12. Parenteral Lipid Tolerance and Adverse Effects: Fat Chance for Trouble?

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A

    2015-09-01

    Lipid emulsions (LEs) are indispensable sources of fuel calories and (essential) fatty acids (FAs) in modern parenteral nutrition formulations. The use of LE, however, also remains associated with the development of adverse effects. Intolerance for LE mostly becomes apparent upon the development of patient complaints or disturbed blood function tests, mainly of the liver. These issues may be associated with the composition, stability, or the infusion rate of the emulsion. Also, altered balances of (anti)oxidants or the presence or absence of protective or toxic bioactive agents such as phytosterols and tocopherol in LE may lead to complications, especially in already vulnerable patients with an inflammatory condition. While the oldest available LEs are based on pure soybean oil (SO-LE), rich in the proinflammatory ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid, more recent next-generation LEs where alternative FA sources such as olive and fish oil (partially) replace soybean oil to lower the content of linoleic acid seem safe and effective. E