Science.gov

Sample records for adverse effects toxicology

  1. Identification and characterization of adverse effects in 21st century toxicology.

    PubMed

    Keller, Douglas A; Juberg, Daland R; Catlin, Natasha; Farland, William H; Hess, Frederick G; Wolf, Douglas C; Doerrer, Nancy G

    2012-04-01

    The practice of toxicology is changing rapidly, as demonstrated by the response to the 2007 NRC report on "Toxicity Testing in the 21(st) Century." New assays are being developed to replace animal testing; yet the use of data from these assays in decision making is not clear. A Health and Environmental Sciences Institute committee held a May 2011 workshop to discuss approaches to identifying adverse effects in the context of the NRC report. Scientists from industry, government, academia, and NGOs discussed two case studies and explored how information from new, high data content assays developed for screening can be used to differentiate adverse effects from adaptive responses. The terms "adverse effect" and "adaptive response" were defined, as well as two new terms, the relevant pathways of toxicological concern (RPTCs) and relevant responses for regulation (RRRs). RPTCs are biochemical pathways associated with adverse events and need to be elucidated before they are used in regulatory decision making. RRRs are endpoints that are the basis for risk assessment and may or may not be at the level of pathways. Workshop participants discussed the criteria for determining whether, at the RPTC level, an effect is potentially adverse or potentially indicative of adaptability, and how the use of prototypical, data-rich compounds could lead to a greater understanding of RPTCs and their use as RRRs. Also discussed was the use of RPTCs in a weight-of-evidence approach to risk assessment. Inclusion of data at this level could decrease uncertainty in risk assessments but will require the use of detailed dosimetry and consideration of exposure context and the time and dose continuum to yield scientifically based decisions. The results of this project point to the need for an extensive effort to characterize RPTCs and their use in risk assessment to make the vision of the 2007 NRC report a reality.

  2. Identification and Characterization of Adverse Effects in 21st Century Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute Project Committee on Distinguishing Adverse from Non-Adverse / Adaptive Effects held a workshop in May 2011 to discuss approaches to identifying adverse effects in the context of the 2007 NRC committee report titled “Toxicity T...

  3. Pharmacology, toxicology, clinical efficacy, and adverse effects of calcium polycarbophil, an enteral hydrosorptive agent.

    PubMed

    Danhof, I E

    1982-01-01

    Calcium polycarbophil is the calcium salt of polyacrylic acid crosslinked with divinyl glycol. It is chemically and physiologically inert. In dilute alkali it possesses marked hydrophilic capacity (60 to 100 times its weight), which is the basis for its therapeutic use. In daily dosages of 4 to 5 g in adults, it appears to be quite safe, is non-toxic, does not interfere with digestion or absorption, and does not cause gastrointestinal irritation. It appears to be effective in the treatment of both constipation and diarrhea due to functional or organic causes. Several days of continuous use are necessary before effectiveness becomes apparent. Clinical studies, of which there are relatively few, range from uncontrolled, unblinded evaluations of an almost anecdotal nature to well controlled, double-blind, crossover studies. Additional carefully controlled studies on dietary influences, exercise, and patient compliance would be helpful. Adverse effects, which are minimal, include epigastric fullness or heaviness, abdominal distention and bloating, and flatulence. As with all bulk-forming agents, calcium polycarbophil should not be used by persons who have stenotic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of baby aloe powder (BAP) for nutraceutical application based upon toxicological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kwack, Seung Jun; Do, Seon-Gil; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Gwak, Hyo-Min; Park, Hyun Jong; Roh, Taehyun; Shin, Min Kyung; Lim, Seong Kwang; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Aloe has been used in versatile herbal medications and nutraceuticals throughout history. Aloe is widely considered to be generally safe for humans and used globally. The effectiveness and pharmacological properties of aloe are dependent upon when the plant is collected. However, little is known about the toxicology of whole-body aloe collected within less than 1 yr. Based upon widespread exposure to aloe, it is important to determine a daily intake level of this chemical to ensure its safety for humans. To determine the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of baby aloe powder (BAP) for clinical application, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were treated orally for 4 wk with 4 different concentrations: 0, 0.125, 0.5, and 2 g/kg body weight (bw). In this study, no significant or dose-dependent toxicological effects of BAP were observed in biochemical or hematological parameters, urinalysis, clinical signs, body weight, and food and water consumption. There were changes in some biomarkers in certain treated groups compared to controls; however, all values were within their reference ranges and not dose-dependent. Based on these results, the NOAEL of BAP was estimated to be greater than 2 g/kg bw in male and 2 g/kg bw in female SD rats. Collectively, these data suggest that BAP used in this study did not produce any marked subacute toxic effects up to a maximum concentration of 2 g/kg bw, and thus use in nutraceuticals and in pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications at a concentration of >2 g/kg is warranted.

  5. The relationship of maternal and fetal toxicity in developmental toxicology bioassays with notes on the biological significance of the "no observed adverse effect level".

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard developmental toxicology bioassays are designed to identify agents with the potential to induce adverse effects and include dose levels that induce maternal toxicity. The work reported here was undertaken to evaluate the relationship of maternal and fetal toxicity. It co...

  6. Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs): A framework to support predictive toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput and in silico methods are providing the regulatory toxicology community with capacity to rapidly and cost effectively generate data concerning a chemical’s ability to initiate one or more biological perturbations that may culminate in an adverse ecological o...

  7. Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs): A framework to support predictive toxicology (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput and in silico methods are providing the regulatory toxicology community with capacity to rapidly and cost effectively generate data concerning a chemical’s ability to initiate one or more biological perturbations that may culminate in an adverse ecological o...

  8. Advancing adverse outcome pathways for integrated toxicology and regulatory applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent regulatory efforts in many countries have focused on a toxicological pathway-based vision for human health assessments relying on in vitro systems and predictive models to generate the toxicological data needed to evaluate chemical hazard. A pathway-based vision is equally...

  9. Systems Toxicology of Male Reproductive Development: Profiling 774 Chemicals for Molecular Targets and Adverse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Maxwell C.K.; Phuong, Jimmy; Baker, Nancy C.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Klinefelter, Gary R.; Martin, Matthew T.; McLaurin, Keith W.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Darney, Sally Perreault; Judson, Richard S.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumors, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias, which have been associated with prenatal environmental chemical exposure based on human and animal studies. Objective: In the present study we aimed to identify significant correlations between environmental chemicals, molecular targets, and adverse outcomes across a broad chemical landscape with emphasis on developmental toxicity of the male reproductive system. Methods: We used U.S. EPA’s animal study database (ToxRefDB) and a comprehensive literature analysis to identify 774 chemicals that have been evaluated for adverse effects on male reproductive parameters, and then used U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB) to profile their bioactivity across approximately 800 molecular and cellular features. Results: A phenotypic hierarchy of testicular atrophy, sperm effects, tumors, and malformations, a composite resembling the human testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) hypothesis, was observed in 281 chemicals. A subset of 54 chemicals with male developmental consequences had in vitro bioactivity on molecular targets that could be condensed into 156 gene annotations in a bipartite network. Conclusion: Computational modeling of available in vivo and in vitro data for chemicals that produce adverse effects on male reproductive end points revealed a phenotypic hierarchy across animal studies consistent with the human TDS hypothesis. We confirmed the known role of estrogen and androgen signaling pathways in rodent TDS, and importantly, broadened the list of molecular targets to include retinoic acid signaling, vascular remodeling proteins, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and cytochrome P450s. Citation: Leung MC, Phuong J, Baker NC, Sipes NS, Klinefelter GR, Martin MT, McLaurin KW, Setzer RW, Darney SP, Judson RS, Knudsen TB. 2016. Systems toxicology of male

  10. Towards the regulation of aerosol emissions by their potential health impact: Assessing adverse effects of aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine emissions by combining comprehensive data on the chemical composition and their toxicological effects on human lung cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, R.; Streibel, T.; Dittmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Paur, H. R.; Dilger, M.; Weiss, C.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Hirvonen, M. R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Sippula, O.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Rheda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Czech, H.; Tiita, P.; Jalava, P.; Kasurinen, S.; Schwemer, T.; Yli-Prilä, P.; Tissari, J.; Lamberg, H.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ship engine emissions are important regarding lung and cardiovascular diseases in coastal regions worldwide. Bio mass burning is made responsible for adverse health effects in many cities and rural regions. The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. Typical lung cell responses to combustion aerosols include inflammation and apoptosis, but a molecular link with the specific chemical composition in particular of ship emissions has not been established. Through an air-liquid interface exposure system (ALI), we exposed human lung cells at-site to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on common heavy fuel oil (HFO) and cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF) as well as to emissions of wood combustion compliances. A special field deployable ALI-exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for this study. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling to characterise the cellular responses. The HFO ship emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds (transition metals, organic toxicants) and particle masses. The cellular responses included inflammation and oxidative stress. Surprisingly, the DF ship emissions, which predominantly contain rather "pure" carbonaceous soot and much less known toxicants, induced significantly broader biological effects, affecting essential cellular pathways (e.g., mitochondrial function and intracellular transport). Therefore the use of distillate fuels for shipping (this is the current emission reduction strategy of the IMO) appears insufficient for diminishing health effects. The study suggests rather reducing the particle emissions

  11. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  12. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  13. Developmental Toxicology##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicology encompasses the study of developmental exposures, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms, pathogenesis, and outcomes potentially leading to adverse health effects. Manifestations of developmental toxicity include structural malformations, growth retardation, functi...

  14. Adverse Effects of Common Drugs: Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    Felix, Todd Matthew; Karpa, Kelly Dowhower; Lewis, Peter R

    2015-09-01

    Dietary supplement-induced adverse effects often resolve quickly after discontinuation of the offending product, especially in younger patients. The potential for unwanted outcomes can be amplified in elderly patients or those taking multiple prescription drugs, especially where interactions exist with drugs metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes. Attributing injury or illness to a specific supplement can be challenging, especially in light of multi-ingredient products, product variability, and variability in reporting, as well as the vast underreporting of adverse drug reactions. Clinicians prescribing a new drug or evaluating a patient with a new symptom complex should inquire about use of herbal and dietary supplements as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Clinicians should report suspected supplement-related adverse effects to the local or state health department, as well as the Food and Drug Administration's MedWatch program (available at https://www.safetyreporting.hhs.gov). Clinicians should consider discussing suspected adverse effects involving drugs, herbal products, or dietary supplements with their community- and hospital-based pharmacists, and explore patient management options with medical or clinical toxicology subspecialists.

  15. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Hickson, R C; Ball, K L; Falduto, M T

    1989-01-01

    Anabolic steroids are used therapeutically for various disorders and as ergogenic aids by athletes to augment strength, muscular development, and to enhance performance. There is a wide range of concomitant temporary and permanent adverse effects with steroid administration. Several well-documented adverse actions of these hormones may develop rapidly within several weeks or less (i.e. altered reproductive function) or require up to several years of steroid intake (i.e. liver carcinoma). More recent studies indicate that glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, increased cardiovascular disease risk profiles, cerebral dangers, musculoskeletal injuries, prostate cancer, psychosis and schizophrenic episodes, among others, accompany anabolic steroid intake. There is, at present, no evidence to support the claim that athletes are less susceptible to adverse effects than those individuals receiving hormone treatment in a clinical setting. Based on the available information which has accumulated primarily from cross-sectional, short term longitudinal, and case studies, there is a need: (a) to develop a comprehensive battery of specific and sensitive markers of adverse effects, particularly those that would be able to detect the onset of adverse actions; and (b) to conduct controlled long term longitudinal studies in order to fully understand the extensiveness and mechanisms involved in the occurrence of adverse effects.

  16. Green toxicology.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Alexandra; Anastas, Nicholas; Spencer, Pamela J; Stephens, Martin; Goldberg, Alan; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Historically, early identification and characterization of adverse effects of industrial chemicals was difficult because conventional toxicological test methods did not meet R&D needs for rapid, relatively inexpensive methods amenable to small amounts of test material. The pharmaceutical industry now front-loads toxicity testing, using in silico, in vitro, and less demanding animal tests at earlier stages of product development to identify and anticipate undesirable toxicological effects and optimize product development. The Green Chemistry movement embraces similar ideas for development of less toxic products, safer processes, and less waste and exposure. Further, the concept of benign design suggests ways to consider possible toxicities before the actual synthesis and to apply some structure/activity rules (SAR) and in silico methods. This requires not only scientific development but also a change in corporate culture in which synthetic chemists work with toxicologists. An emerging discipline called Green Toxicology (Anastas, 2012) provides a framework for integrating the principles of toxicology into the enterprise of designing safer chemicals, thereby minimizing potential toxicity as early in production as possible. Green Toxicology`s novel utility lies in driving innovation by moving safety considerations to the earliest stage in a chemical`s lifecycle, i.e., to molecular design. In principle, this field is no different than other subdisciplines of toxicology that endeavor to focus on a specific area - for example, clinical, environmental or forensic toxicology. We use the same principles and tools to evaluate an existing substance or to design a new one. The unique emphasis is in using 21st century toxicology tools as a preventative strategy to "design out" undesired human health and environmental effects, thereby increasing the likelihood of launching a successful, sustainable product. Starting with the formation of a steering group and a series of workshops

  17. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects.

  18. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects. PMID:27357302

  19. Adverse Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Arumugham, Shyam Sundar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment commonly used for depression and other major psychiatric disorders. We discuss potential adverse effects (AEs) associated with ECT and strategies for their prevention and management. Common acute AEs include headache, nausea, myalgia, and confusion; these are self-limiting and are managed symptomatically. Serious but uncommon AEs include cardiovascular, pulmonary, and cerebrovascular events; these may be minimized with screening for risk factors and by physiologic monitoring. Although most cognitive AEs of ECT are short-lasting, troublesome retrograde amnesia may rarely persist. Modifications of and improvements in treatment techniques minimize cognitive and other AEs. PMID:27514303

  20. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  1. Toxicological Effects of Fullerenes on Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomaker, Justin; Snook, Renee; Howell, Carina

    2014-03-01

    The nematode species Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful genetic model organism due to its simplicity and the substantial molecular, genetic, and developmental knowledge about the species. In this study, this species was used to test the toxicological effects of C60 fullerene nanoparticles. In previous studies using rats, a solution of C60 fullerenes in olive oil proved to extend the life of the subjects. The purpose of this experiment was to subject C. elegans to varying concentrations of C60 fullerenes and observe their toxicological effects. Initial findings indicate a link between fullerene exposure and enlargement of the vulva as well as the formation of a small nodule at the base of the tail in some individuals. While the fullerenes are not lethally toxic in C. elegans, results will be presented that pertain to changes in life span and progeny of the nematodes exposed to varying concentrations of fullerenes as well as the mechanisms of toxicity. High magnification imaging via SEM and/or AFM will be used to characterize the fullerene nanoparticles. Testing the toxicity of fullerenes in a wide variety of organisms will lead to a more complete understanding of the effects of fullerenes on living organisms to ultimately understand their effects in humans. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grants DUE-1058829, DMR-0923047, DUE-0806660 and Lock Haven FPDC grants.

  2. Developmental exposure to a mixture of two mechanistically distinct antiandrogens results in cumulative adverse reproductive effects in adult male rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Typically, toxicological studies have focused on the adverse effects from exposure to single chemicals. However, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are detected in the environment as mixtures. Empirical evidence suggests that mixtures of EDCs with the same mechanism of action...

  3. Adverse effects of general anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, M C; Reilly, C S

    1992-01-01

    This review deals with the adverse reactions associated with general anaesthetic agents in current use. These reactions fall into 2 categories; those which are more common, predictable and often closely related, and those which are rare, unpredictable and carry a high mortality. Both inhalational and intravenous anaesthetic agents affect the central nervous and cardio-respiratory systems in a dose-related manner. Neuronal inhibition results in decreasing levels of consciousness and depression of the medullary vital centres which can lead to cardiorespiratory failure. Both groups of agents have some depressant effect on the myocardium and vascular smooth muscle leading to a fall in cardiac output and hypotension. Centrally-mediated respiratory depression is common to both groups and the inhalational agents have a direct effect on lung physiology. The most important idiosyncratic reactions to the volatile agents are malignant hyperpyrexia and 'halothane hepatitis'. Malignant hyperpyrexia has an incidence of 1:12,000 with a mortality of about 24%. It is triggered most often by halothane together with suxamethonium. Post halothane hepatic necrosis is rare. Evidence points to 2 distinct syndromes; direct toxicity from the products of reductive metabolism, and a more serious illness, immunologically mediated via haptens formed by liver proteins and the products of oxidative metabolism. Prolonged nitrous oxide exposure can cause bone marrow depression and life-threatening pressure effects by expansion of air-filled spaces within the body. The idiosyncratic reactions to the intravenous agents include anaphylactoid reactions (which are rare) and triggering of acute porphyria. Etomidate is immunologically 'clean', but it inhibits cortisol synthesis. PMID:1418699

  4. Biosynthesis and toxicological effects of patulin.

    PubMed

    Puel, Olivier; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2010-04-01

    Patulin is a toxic chemical contaminant produced by several species of mold, especially within Aspergillus, Penicillium and Byssochlamys. It is the most common mycotoxin found in apples and apple-derived products such as juice, cider, compotes and other food intended for young children. Exposure to this mycotoxin is associated with immunological, neurological and gastrointestinal outcomes. Assessment of the health risks due to patulin consumption by humans has led many countries to regulate the quantity in food. A full understanding of the molecular genetics of patulin biosynthesis is incomplete, unlike other regulated mycotoxins (aflatoxins, trichothecenes and fumonisins), although the chemical structures of patulin precursors are now known. The biosynthetic pathway consists of approximately 10 steps, as suggested by biochemical studies. Recently, a cluster of 15 genes involved in patulin biosynthesis was reported, containing characterized enzymes, a regulation factor and transporter genes. This review includes information on the current understanding of the mechanisms of patulin toxinogenesis and summarizes its toxicological effects.

  5. Adverse Outcome Pathways-Organizing Toxicological Information to Improve Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stephen W; Tan, Yu-Mei; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Meek, M E; McQueen, Charlene A

    2016-01-01

    The number of chemicals for which environmental regulatory decisions are required far exceeds the current capacity for toxicity testing. High-throughput screening commonly used for drug discovery has the potential to increase this capacity. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept has emerged as a framework for connecting high-throughput toxicity testing (HTT) and other results to potential impacts on human and wildlife populations. As a result of international efforts, the AOP development process is now well-defined and efforts are underway to broaden the participation through outreach and training. One key principle is that AOPs represent the chemical-agnostic portions of pathways to increase the generalizability of their application from early key events to overt toxicity. The closely related mode of action framework extends the AOP as needed when evaluating the potential risk of a specific chemical. This in turn enables integrated approaches to testing and assessment (IATA), which incorporate results of assays at various levels of biologic organization such as in silico; HTT; chemical-specific aspects including absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME); and an AOP describing the biologic basis of toxicity. Thus, it is envisaged that provision of limited information regarding both the AOP for critical effects and the ADME for any chemical associated with any adverse outcome would allow for the development of IATA and permit more detailed AOP and ADME research, where higher precision is needed based on the decision context. PMID:26537250

  6. Adverse Outcome Pathways-Organizing Toxicological Information to Improve Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stephen W; Tan, Yu-Mei; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Meek, M E; McQueen, Charlene A

    2016-01-01

    The number of chemicals for which environmental regulatory decisions are required far exceeds the current capacity for toxicity testing. High-throughput screening commonly used for drug discovery has the potential to increase this capacity. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept has emerged as a framework for connecting high-throughput toxicity testing (HTT) and other results to potential impacts on human and wildlife populations. As a result of international efforts, the AOP development process is now well-defined and efforts are underway to broaden the participation through outreach and training. One key principle is that AOPs represent the chemical-agnostic portions of pathways to increase the generalizability of their application from early key events to overt toxicity. The closely related mode of action framework extends the AOP as needed when evaluating the potential risk of a specific chemical. This in turn enables integrated approaches to testing and assessment (IATA), which incorporate results of assays at various levels of biologic organization such as in silico; HTT; chemical-specific aspects including absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME); and an AOP describing the biologic basis of toxicity. Thus, it is envisaged that provision of limited information regarding both the AOP for critical effects and the ADME for any chemical associated with any adverse outcome would allow for the development of IATA and permit more detailed AOP and ADME research, where higher precision is needed based on the decision context.

  7. [Cutaneous adverse effects of TNFalpha antagonists].

    PubMed

    Failla, V; Sabatiello, M; Lebas, E; de Schaetzen, V; Dezfoulian, B; Nikkels, A F

    2012-01-01

    The TNFalpha antagonists, including adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab, represent a class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Although cutaneous adverse effects are uncommon, they are varied. There is no particular risk profile to develop cutaneous adverse effects. The principal acute side effects are injection site reactions and pruritus. The major long term cutaneous side effects are infectious and inflammatory conditions. Neoplastic skin diseases are exceptional. The association with other immunosuppressive agents can increase the risk of developing cutaneous adverse effects. Some adverse effects, such as lupus erythematosus, require immediate withdrawal of the biological treatment, while in other cases temporary withdrawal is sufficient. The majority of the other cutaneous adverse effects can be dealt without interrupting biologic treatment. Preclinical and clinical investigations revealed that the new biologics, aiming IL12/23, IL23 and IL17, present a similar profile of cutaneous adverse effects, although inflammatory skin reactions may be less often encountered compared to TNFalpha antagonists.

  8. Systems Toxicology of Male Reproductive Development: Profiling 774 Chemicals for Molecular Targets and Adverse Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumor, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias. An association with prenatal environmental exposure has been inferred from human and animal studies underlying male...

  9. TOXICOLOGY OF MALE REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT: PROFILING 774 CHEMICALS FOR MOLECULAR TARGETS AND ADVERSE OUTCOMES (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumor, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias. An association with prenatal environmental exposure has been inferred from human and animal studies underlying male...

  10. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kibble, M W; Ross, M B

    1987-09-01

    The effects of anabolic steroid use on athletic performance and the adverse effects associated with the use of anabolic steroids are reviewed. Anabolic steroids increase protein synthesis in skeletal muscles and reverse catabolic processes. Because of these properties, some athletes use anabolic steroids in an attempt to improve their athletic performance. However, studies indicate that increases in muscle mass and strength during anabolic steroid administration are observed only in athletes who already are weight-trained and who continue intensive training while maintaining high-protein, high-calorie diets. Adverse effects attributed to anabolic steroid use occur frequently. Serious adverse effects include hepatic and endocrine dysfunction; cardiovascular and behavioral changes also are reported. Some of the adverse effects associated with the use of these agents are irreversible, particularly in women. The use of anabolic steroids to improve athletic performance has become prevalent. However, the reported benefits are tempered by numerous adverse reactions.

  11. Deoxynivalenol: toxicology and potential effects on humans.

    PubMed

    Pestka, James J; Smolinski, Alexa T

    2005-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal-based foods worldwide. At the molecular level, DON disrupts normal cell function by inhibiting protein synthesis via binding to the ribosome and by activating critical cellular kinases involved in signal transduction related to proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Relative to toxicity, there are marked species differences, with the pig being most sensitive to DON, followed by rodent > dog > cat > poultry > ruminants. The physiologic parameter that is most sensitive to low-level DON exposure is the emetic response, with as little as 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg body weight (bw) inducing vomiting in swine and dogs. Chinese epidemiological studies suggest that DON may also produce emetic effects in humans. With respect to chronic effects, growth (anorexia and decreased nutritional efficiency), immune function, (enhancement and suppression), and reproduction (reduced litter size) are also adversely affected by DON in animals, whereas incidence of neoplasia is not affected. When hazard evaluations were conducted using existing chronic toxicity data and standard safety factors employed for anthropogenic additives/contaminants in foods, tolerable daily intakes (TDIs) ranging from 1 to 5 microg/kg bw have been generated. Given that critical data gaps still exist regarding the potential health effects of DON, additional research is needed to improve capacity for assessing adverse health effects of this mycotoxin. Critical areas for future DON research include molecular mechanisms underlying toxicity, sensitivity of human cells/tissues relative to other species, emetic effects in primates, epidemiological association with gastroenteritis and chronic disease in humans, and surveillance in cereal crops worldwide.

  12. Toxic effect onset and evaluations of medicinal drugs--horizon for Darwinian toxicological thought.

    PubMed

    Horii, Ikuo

    2010-08-01

    The theory of Darwinian Medicine linked to an extension of Darwin's evolutionary theory is based on the approach from the aspect of "why we become ill?".This theory enables us to understand the relationship between humans and diseases by thinking from evolutional perspective, shows an important help for preventive medicine, and is meaningful to consider the future human healthcare. Toxicology has been defined as a research of adverse effect of xenobiotic substances backed up by diverse-sciences. Toxic effects are basically responses to xenobiotic substances, and expressed as triggering or additional accelerating adverse effects toward abnormal condition. Toxic effects, biological adverse responses, are interpreted as protective responses of living body, and the adverse effects caused by drugs are also considered to be protective responses. This logic can be translated as "Darwinian Toxicology" corresponding to "Darwinian Medicine", replying to "why we get into toxic condition by xenobiotics exposure". This paper refers to the meaning of toxic effects based on mechanisms underlying and comprehensive drug safety evaluation from Darwinian Medicine perspectives.

  13. Encouraging spontaneous reporting of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    One priority when organising surveillance of health products is to remove barriers to reporting adverse effects. One way to encourage reporting is by providing regular feedback, as practised by the German drug bulletin arznei-telegramm, for example. PMID:25802925

  14. Managing adverse effects of glaucoma medications

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic, progressive disease in which retinal ganglion cells disappear and subsequent, gradual reductions in the visual field ensues. Glaucoma eye drops have hypotensive effects and like all other medications are associated with adverse effects. Adverse reactions may either result from the main agent or from preservatives used in the drug vehicle. The preservative benzalkonium chloride, is one such compound that causes frequent adverse reactions such as superficial punctate keratitis, corneal erosion, conjunctival allergy, and conjunctival injection. Adverse reactions related to main hypotensive agents have been divided into those affecting the eye and those affecting the entire body. In particular, β-blockers frequently cause systematic adverse reactions, including bradycardia, decrease in blood pressure, irregular pulse and asthma attacks. Prostaglandin analogs have distinctive local adverse reactions, including eyelash bristling/lengthening, eyelid pigmentation, iris pigmentation, and upper eyelid deepening. No systemic adverse reactions have been linked to prostaglandin analog eye drop usage. These adverse reactions may be minimized when they are detected early and prevented by reducing the number of different eye drops used (via fixed combination eye drops), reducing the number of times eye drops are administered, using benzalkonium chloride-free eye drops, using lower concentration eye drops, and providing proper drop instillation training. Additionally, a one-time topical medication can be given to patients to allow observation of any adverse reactions, thereafter the preparation of a topical medication with the fewest known adverse reactions can be prescribed. This does require precise patient monitoring and inquiries about patient symptoms following medication use. PMID:24872675

  15. Aloe vera: A review of toxicity and adverse clinical effects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mei, Nan

    2016-04-01

    The Aloe plant is employed as a dietary supplement in a variety of foods and as an ingredient in cosmetic products. The widespread human exposure and its potential toxic and carcinogenic activities raise safety concerns. Chemical analysis reveals that the Aloe plant contains various polysaccharides and phenolic chemicals, notably anthraquinones. Ingestion of Aloe preparations is associated with diarrhea, hypokalemia, pseudomelanosis coli, kidney failure, as well as phototoxicity and hypersensitive reactions. Recently, Aloe vera whole leaf extract showed clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in rats, and was classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a possible human carcinogen (Group 2B). This review presents updated information on the toxicological effects, including the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and adverse clinical effects of Aloe vera whole leaf extract, gel, and latex.

  16. Aloe vera: A review of toxicity and adverse clinical effects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mei, Nan

    2016-04-01

    The Aloe plant is employed as a dietary supplement in a variety of foods and as an ingredient in cosmetic products. The widespread human exposure and its potential toxic and carcinogenic activities raise safety concerns. Chemical analysis reveals that the Aloe plant contains various polysaccharides and phenolic chemicals, notably anthraquinones. Ingestion of Aloe preparations is associated with diarrhea, hypokalemia, pseudomelanosis coli, kidney failure, as well as phototoxicity and hypersensitive reactions. Recently, Aloe vera whole leaf extract showed clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in rats, and was classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a possible human carcinogen (Group 2B). This review presents updated information on the toxicological effects, including the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and adverse clinical effects of Aloe vera whole leaf extract, gel, and latex. PMID:26986231

  17. Perspective on Lithotripsy Adverse Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Thomas; Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar

    2008-09-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an effective and without any doubt the least invasive procedure to treat upper urinary tract calculi. Acute complications are rarely reported and do not require specific treatment in most cases. However, one should be aware that energy levels sufficient for stone breakage are capable of damaging tissue as well, and significant hematoma—not only in the kidney but as well in surrounding organs—has been observed. Furthermore, only little is known about the long-term effects of SWL. Some authors have reported an increased incidence of hypertension and possibly also diabetes mellitus. Such chronic diseases—if indeed related to prior SWL—may be a late result of acute SWL-related trauma but the discussion on the underlying pathogenesis is controversial. Many factors have to be considered, such as the natural history of recurrent stone formers, technical principles of SWL, and differences in treatment protocols. Promising studies are currently underway to optimize stone breakage while limiting potential collateral damage. With this progress, SWL remains a safe treatment option for most urinary calculi.

  18. The toxicological effects of heavy fuel oil category substances.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Reitman, Fred; Schreiner, Ceinwen; White, Russell; Charlap, Jeffrey H; O'Neill, Thomas P; Goyak, Katy Olsavsky

    2014-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) category substances are used to manufacture HFO, a product used in industrial boilers and marine diesel engines. Commercial HFOs and blending stream components are substances of complex and variable composition, composed of C20 to >C50 hydrocarbons, although lower molecular weight material may be added to reduce viscosity and improve flow characteristics. An HFO blending stream (catalytically cracked clarified oil [CCCO]) was tested for target organ and developmental toxicity in rats following repeated dermal administration at doses of 5, 25, or 50 mg/kg/d. In the repeated dose study, there was evidence of increased liver weights, reduced thymus weights, and reductions in hematological parameters with an overall no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 5 mg/kg/d. In the developmental toxicity test, there were significant reductions in fetal survival, significant increases in resorption frequency, and significantly reduced fetal weights with an overall NOAEL of 5 mg/kg/d. These target organ and developmental effects are associated with the types and levels of aromatic constituents in these substances. Among HFO blending streams, CCCOs have the highest levels of aromatics and, because they produce the characteristic toxicological effects at the lowest levels, are considered as "reasonable worst-case examples" for this group of substances. Other HFO category members with lower levels of aromatics produce similar effects but have higher NOAELs. The potential for target organ and developmental effects of other HFO category members can be predicted from information on the types and levels of the aromatic constituents present in these substances.

  19. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level in drug safety evaluations: use, issues, and definition(s).

    PubMed

    Dorato, Michael A; Engelhardt, Jeffery A

    2005-08-01

    The no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) is an important part of the non-clinical risk assessment. It is a professional opinion based on the design of the study, indication of the drug, expected pharmacology, and spectrum of off-target effects. There is no consistent standard definition of NOAEL. This is based, in part, on the varied definitions of what constitutes an adverse effect. Toxicologists, either investigating or reviewing, have not been consistent in defining an effect as either adverse or acceptable. The common definition of NOAEL, "the highest experimental point that is without adverse effect," serves us well in general discussions. It does not, however, address the interpretation of risk based on toxicologically relevant effects, nor does it consider the progression of effect with respect to duration and/or dose. This paper will discuss the issues and application of a functional definition of the NOAEL in toxicology evaluations.

  20. Quantification of toxicological effects for dichloromethane. Draft report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The source documents for background information used to develop the report on the quantification of toxicological effects for dichloromethane are the health assessment document (HAD) for dichloromethane and a subsequent addendum to the HAD (U.S. EPA, 1985b). In addition, some references published since 1985 are discussed. To summarize the results of the quantification of toxicological effects, a One-day Health Advisory of 10,000 ug/L for a 10-kg child was calculated, based on an acute oral study in rats reported by Kimura et al. (1971). No suitable data for the derivation of a Ten-day Health Advisory were found in the available literature.

  1. The multisystem adverse effects of NSAID therapy.

    PubMed

    James, D S

    1999-11-01

    The clinical utility of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to manage pain and inflammation is limited by adverse side effects. Although effective analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents, NSAIDs are associated with side effects that are a consequence of nonspecific inhibition of both cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The primary adverse events associated with NSAID therapy are upper gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration, perforation, or bleeding, all of which involve mucosal damage of varying severity and can be asymptomatic and occur with little warning. Clinicians who prescribe NSAIDs should be able to identify patients who are at risk of an NSAID-induced GI adverse event and to detect and manage the event should one occur. The use of COX-2-specific inhibitors to manage pain and inflammation may minimize the risks of NSAID-associated toxicities.

  2. Adverse effects of fillers and their histopathology.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2014-12-01

    Injectable fillers nowadays represent a pillar in facial rejuvenation and make a significant contribution to the success of the treatment. Despite their obvious benefits, a wide range of possible complications such as immediate, late, delayed, temporary, or irreversible adverse effects have to be respected. Differentiating the various filler materials, these effects are assigned to histopathology findings and currently available treatment options.

  3. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications on Sleep.

    PubMed

    Doghramji, Karl; Jangro, William C

    2016-09-01

    Psychotropic medications such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, stimulants, and benzodiazepines are widely prescribed. Most of these medications are thought to exert their effects through modulation of various monoamines as well as interactions with receptors such as histamine and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Through these interactions, psychotropics can also have a significant impact on sleep physiology, resulting in both beneficial and adverse effects on sleep. PMID:27514301

  4. Adverse effects of fillers and their histopathology.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2014-12-01

    Injectable fillers nowadays represent a pillar in facial rejuvenation and make a significant contribution to the success of the treatment. Despite their obvious benefits, a wide range of possible complications such as immediate, late, delayed, temporary, or irreversible adverse effects have to be respected. Differentiating the various filler materials, these effects are assigned to histopathology findings and currently available treatment options. PMID:25536126

  5. Toxicological effects of nanoparticles from photocopiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Madhu

    , potential in-vitro cytotoxicity and induction of cytokines of the collected NP generated during photocopying was studied. Furthermore, airborne fine PM collected from copy center was evaluated for their capability to induce in-vitro cytotoxicity and induction of cytokines. The research addresses one major knowledge gap between possible adverse effects on human health caused due to NP exposure. Additionally, this would help develop useful biomarkers for such exposures. These biomarkers could then assists in early detection of such effects and can potentially be used to assess human health risk from exposures to such NPs and device effective interventions if needed.

  6. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BENZENE (NONCANCER EFFECTS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene, also known as benzol, is widely used as an industrial solvent, as an intermediate in chemical syntheses, and as a component of gasoline; hence, the potential for human exposure is great. The emphasis of this document is a discussion of the noncancer adverse healt...

  7. Psychiatric adverse effects of pediatric corticosteroid use.

    PubMed

    Drozdowicz, Linda B; Bostwick, J Michael

    2014-06-01

    Corticosteroids, highly effective drugs for myriad disease states, have considerable neuropsychiatric adverse effects that can manifest in cognitive disorders, behavioral changes, and frank psychiatric disease. Recent reviews have summarized these effects in adults, but a comprehensive review on corticosteroid effects in children has not been published since 2005. Here, we systematically review articles published since then that, we find, naturally divide into 3 main areas: (1) chronic effects of acute prenatal and neonatal exposure associated with prematurity and congenital conditions; (2) immediate behavioral effects of acute exposure via oncological protocols; and (3) acute behavioral effects of sporadic use in children and adolescents with other conditions. PsycInfo, MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus were queried to identify articles reporting psychiatric adverse effects of corticosteroids in pediatric patients. Search terms included corticosteroids, adrenal cortex hormones, steroid psychosis, substance-induced psychoses, glucocorticoids, dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, prednisone, adverse effects, mood disorders, mental disorders, psychosis, psychotic, psychoses, side effect, chemically induced, emotions, affective symptoms, toxicity, behavior, behavioral symptoms, infant, child, adolescent, pediatric, paediatric, neonatal, children, teen, and teenager. Following guidelines for systematic reviews from the Potsdam Consultation on Meta-Analysis, we have found it difficult to draw specific conclusions that are more than general impressions owing to the quality of the available studies. We find a mixed picture with neonates exposed to dexamethasone, with some articles reporting eventual deficits in neuropsychiatric functioning and others reporting no effect. In pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, corticosteroid use appears to correlate with negative psychiatric and behavioral effects. In children treated with corticosteroids for noncancer conditions

  8. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  9. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence. PMID:23850228

  10. Biomarkers in Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomarkers are a means to evaluate chemical exposure and/or the subsequent impacts on toxicity pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Computational toxicology can integrate biomarker data with knowledge of exposure, chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and e...

  11. Lewisite: its chemistry, toxicology, and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M; Dacre, J C

    1989-01-01

    routes for inducing teratogenicity is also problematical. Recently, Lewisite has been shown not to be teratogenic in either rats or rabbits. A monograph on arsenic, succinctly states that "no human epidemiological investigations have been conducted on the carcinogenicity of organic arsenic compounds" (WHO 1981). Indeed, the lack of such evidence eminating from epidemiological sources or from animal studies is resounding. At present, there is no evidence that Lewisite is either carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic. A review of toxicological studies of other organic arsenicals has produced no evidence that they might be carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic. PMID:2692088

  12. Lewisite: its chemistry, toxicology, and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M; Dacre, J C

    1989-01-01

    routes for inducing teratogenicity is also problematical. Recently, Lewisite has been shown not to be teratogenic in either rats or rabbits. A monograph on arsenic, succinctly states that "no human epidemiological investigations have been conducted on the carcinogenicity of organic arsenic compounds" (WHO 1981). Indeed, the lack of such evidence eminating from epidemiological sources or from animal studies is resounding. At present, there is no evidence that Lewisite is either carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic. A review of toxicological studies of other organic arsenicals has produced no evidence that they might be carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic.

  13. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors.

  14. Toxicological effects of pyrethroids on non-target aquatic insects.

    PubMed

    Antwi, Frank B; Reddy, Gadi V P

    2015-11-01

    The toxicological effects of pyrethroids on non-target aquatic insects are mediated by several modes of entry of pyrethroids into aquatic ecosystems, as well as the toxicological characteristics of particular pyrethroids under field conditions. Toxicokinetics, movement across the integument of aquatic insects, and the toxicodynamics of pyrethroids are discussed, and their physiological, symptomatic and ecological effects evaluated. The relationship between pyrethroid toxicity and insecticide uptake is not fully defined. Based on laboratory and field data, it is likely that the susceptibility of aquatic insects (vector and non-vector) is related to biochemical and physiological constraints associated with life in aquatic ecosystems. Understanding factors that influence aquatic insects susceptibility to pyrethroids is critical for the effective and safe use of these compounds in areas adjacent to aquatic environments.

  15. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  16. Immunomodulatory drugs: Oral and systemic adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The main objectives are to present the different adverses effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosupressed patients and study the impact of immunomodualtion on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. Study Design: We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. Results: These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren´s syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. Conclusions: In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic. Key words:Immunomodulatory drugs, oral diseases, adverse effects, therapeutic action. PMID:23986016

  17. Agomelatine: a review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    More pharmacovigilance data on agomelatine became available in 2012. The main sources of information were surveillance data from the French national monitoring system, EU periodic safety update reports (PSURs), and the European pharmacovigilance database. The principal adverse effects of agomelatine consist of hepatic, pancreatic, neuropsychiatric, muscular and cutaneous disorders. The harms associated with agomelatine, which has no proven efficacy in depression, clearly outweigh the benefits. Until regulatory agencies decide to withdraw agomelatine from the market, it is up to healthcare professionals to protect patients from this unnecessarily dangerous drug.

  18. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Mago, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Adverse effects are common, bothersome, and a leading cause of discontinuation of treatment. The methodology for evaluating adverse effects of medications has been greatly neglected, however, especially in comparison to the methodology for assessment of efficacy of medications. Existing methods for assessment and reporting of adverse effects have important limitations leading to lack of much-needed data related to adverse effects. Lastly, there is little systematic research into management of most adverse effects. A series of recommendations are made in this article about how to improve identification, assessment, reporting, and management of adverse effects. PMID:27514294

  19. Assessment of the health effects of chemicals in humans: II. Construction of an adverse effects database for QSAR modeling.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Edwin J; Kruhlak, Naomi L; Weaver, James L; Benz, R Daniel; Contrera, Joseph F

    2004-12-01

    The FDA's Spontaneous Reporting System (SRS) database contains over 1.5 million adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports for 8620 drugs/biologics that are listed for 1191 Coding Symbols for Thesaurus of Adverse Reaction (COSTAR) terms of adverse effects. We have linked the trade names of the drugs to 1861 generic names and retrieved molecular structures for each chemical to obtain a set of 1515 organic chemicals that are suitable for modeling with commercially available QSAR software packages. ADR report data for 631 of these compounds were extracted and pooled for the first five years that each drug was marketed. Patient exposure was estimated during this period using pharmaceutical shipping units obtained from IMS Health. Significant drug effects were identified using a Reporting Index (RI), where RI = (# ADR reports / # shipping units) x 1,000,000. MCASE/MC4PC software was used to identify the optimal conditions for defining a significant adverse effect finding. Results suggest that a significant effect in our database is characterized by > or = 4 ADR reports and > or = 20,000 shipping units during five years of marketing, and an RI > or = 4.0. Furthermore, for a test chemical to be evaluated as active it must contain a statistically significant molecular structural alert, called a decision alert, in two or more toxicologically related endpoints. We also report the use of a composite module, which pools observations from two or more toxicologically related COSTAR term endpoints to provide signal enhancement for detecting adverse effects. PMID:16472241

  20. Enhancing high throughput toxicology - development of putative adverse outcome pathways linking US EPA ToxCast screening targets to relevant apical hazards.

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput toxicology programs, such as ToxCast and Tox21, have provided biological effects data for thousands of chemicals at multiple concentrations. Compared to traditional, whole-organism approaches, high throughput assays are rapid and cost-effective, yet they generall...

  1. Adverse effects of differential parental attention1

    PubMed Central

    Sajwaj, Thomas E.; Pinkston, Susan; Cordua, Glenn; Jackson, Carolyn; Herbert, Emily W.; Pinkston, Elsie M.; Hayden, M. Loeman

    1973-01-01

    In two independent parent training projects (Kansas and Mississippi), mothers of deviant young children were observed to follow almost all child behaviors with attention. The mothers were then trained to use differential attention procedures to increase their child's appropriate behaviors and to decrease deviant behaviors. Contrary to expectations, the differential attention procedure produced substantial increases in deviant behavior for four of the children. This adverse effect was maintained over many sessions and was replicated in single organism, reversal designs. A fifth child showed no change. A sixth child showed some improvement. However, this effect was not recovered in a second application of differential attention, and the child became worse. The results underline the importance of subject generality in applied behavior analysis and strongly suggest that service programs using operant techniques must carefully evaluate their effects on behavior. PMID:16795386

  2. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  3. Toxicological effects of aerial application of monocrotophos.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Quadros, F; Mazmudar, R M; Marathe, M R; Gangoli, S D

    1980-01-01

    Aerial application of the insecticide Nuvacron 40% (monocrotophos) had no significant effect on the cholinesterase level of plasma and erythrocytes of cattle, chicken, buffaloes, and human volunteers exposed to the spray. Contamination of canal water with the pesticide was completely eliminated within 24 hr, whereas that in the soil was reduced by 80% in 72 hr. The degradation of insecticide residue in grass was about 90% in seven days and in cotton leaves about 85% for the same period.

  4. Management of adverse effects of mood stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Murru, Andrea; Popovic, Dina; Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Hidalgo, Diego; León-Caballero, Jordi; Vieta, Eduard

    2015-08-01

    Mood stabilizers such as lithium and anticonvulsants are still standard-of-care for the acute and long-term treatment of bipolar disorder (BD). This systematic review aimed to assess the prevalence of their adverse effects (AEs) and to provide recommendations on their clinical management. We performed a systematic research for studies reporting the prevalence of AEs with lithium, valproate, lamotrigine, and carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine. Management recommendations were then developed. Mood stabilizers have different tolerability profiles and are eventually associated to cognitive, dermatological, endocrine, gastrointestinal, immunological, metabolic, nephrogenic, neurologic, sexual, and teratogenic AEs. Most of those can be transient or dose-related and can be managed by optimizing drug doses to the lowest effective dose. Some rare AEs can be serious and potentially lethal, and require abrupt discontinuation of medication. Integrated medical attention is warranted for complex somatic AEs. Functional remediation and psychoeducation may help to promote awareness on BD and better medication management.

  5. Adverse respiratory effects of outdoor air pollution in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bentayeb, M; Simoni, M; Baiz, N; Norback, D; Baldacci, S; Maio, S; Viegi, G; Annesi-Maesano, I

    2012-09-01

    Compared to the rest of the population, the elderly are potentially highly susceptible to the effects of outdoor air pollution due to normal and pathological ageing. The purpose of the present review was to gather data on the effects on respiratory health of outdoor air pollution in the elderly, on whom data are scarce. These show statistically significant short-term and chronic adverse effects of various outdoor air pollutants on cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality in the elderly. When exposed to air pollution, the elderly experience more hospital admissions for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and higher COPD mortality than others. Previous studies also indicate that research on the health effects of air pollution in the elderly has been affected by methodological problems in terms of exposure and health effect assessments. Few pollutants have been considered, and exposure assessment has been based mostly on background air pollution and more rarely on objective measurements and modelling. Significant progress needs to be made through the development of 'hybrid' models utilising the strengths of information on exposure in various environments to several air pollutants, coupled with daily activity exposure patterns. Investigations of chronic effects of air pollution and of multi-pollutant mixtures are needed to better understand the role of air pollution in the elderly. Lastly, smoking, occupation, comorbidities, treatment and the neighbourhood context should be considered as confounders or modifiers of such a role. In this context, the underlying biological, physiological and toxicological mechanisms need to be explored to better understand the phenomenon through a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:22871325

  6. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992

  7. Adverse skeletal effects of drugs - beyond Glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Susannah; Grey, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are an important public health problem with significant individual and societal costs. In addition to the major risk factors for osteoporotic fracture, low bone mineral density (BMD), age, low body weight and history of fracture or falls, some drugs are now considered to be important secondary risk factor for bone loss and fracture, particularly amongst predisposed individuals. Currently available data are often generated from small observational clinical studies, making risk assessment and development of management guidelines difficult. In many cases, the exposed population has a low baseline risk for fracture and additional assessment and treatment may not be necessary. In this review, we focus on drugs other than glucocorticoids identified as potentially causing adverse skeletal effects, summarizing the existing evidence from preclinical and clinical studies, and suggest recommendations for patient management. PMID:25039381

  8. 36 CFR 800.6 - Resolution of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resolution of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.6 Resolution of adverse effects. (a) Continue... the undertaking that could avoid, minimize, or mitigate adverse effects on historic properties....

  9. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adverse effect rate (computed pursuant to 20 CFR 655.207(b)(1), 43 FR 10317; March 10, 1978) by the... at 20 CFR 655.207(b)(2) (1985). (c) In no event shall an adverse effect rate for any year be lower... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate...

  10. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adverse effect rate (computed pursuant to 20 CFR 655.207(b)(1), 43 FR 10317; March 10, 1978) by the... at 20 CFR 655.207(b)(2) (1985). (c) In no event shall an adverse effect rate for any year be lower... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate...

  11. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adverse effect rate (computed pursuant to 20 CFR 655.207(b)(1), 43 FR 10317; March 10, 1978) by the... at 20 CFR 655.207(b)(2) (1985). (c) In no event shall an adverse effect rate for any year be lower... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate...

  12. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adverse effect rate (computed pursuant to 20 CFR 655.207(b)(1), 43 FR 10317; March 10, 1978) by the... at 20 CFR 655.207(b)(2) (1985). (c) In no event shall an adverse effect rate for any year be lower... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate...

  13. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines, to avoid adverse effects. (c) Consulting party review. If the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assessment of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.5 Assessment of adverse effects. (a)...

  14. Space Toxicology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Safe breathing air for space faring crews is essential whether they are inside an Extravehicular Mobility Suit (EMU), a small capsule such as Soyuz, or the expansive International Space Station (ISS). Sources of air pollution can include entry of propellants, excess offgassing from polymeric materials, leakage of systems compounds, escape of payload compounds, over-use of utility compounds, microbial metabolism, and human metabolism. The toxicological risk posed by a compound is comprised of the probability of escaping to cause air pollution and the magnitude of adverse effects on human health if escape occurs. The risk from highly toxic compounds is controlled by requiring multiple levels of containment to greatly reduce the probability of escape; whereas compounds that are virtually non-toxic may require little or no containment. The potential for toxicity is determined by the inherent toxicity of the compound and the amount that could potentially escape into the breathing air.

  15. Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S.

    1990-12-31

    Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  16. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis'', December 1987.

  17. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-09-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their ``Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis``, December 1987.

  18. Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee: Recommended ("Best") Practices for Determining, Communicating, and Using Adverse Effect Data from Nonclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Kerlin, Roy; Bolon, Brad; Burkhardt, John; Francke, Sabine; Greaves, Peter; Meador, Vince; Popp, James

    2016-02-01

    Recommendations (best practices) are provided by the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's Adversity Working Group for making consistent interpretations of test article-related effects as "adverse" and assigning a "no observed adverse effect level" (NOAEL) in nonclinical toxicity studies. Adverse is a term indicating "harm" to the test animal, while nonadverse indicates lack of harm. Adverse findings in the study reports should be defined in relation to effects on the test species used and within the context of the given study. Test article-related effects should be described on their own merits, and decisions to consider them as adverse or nonadverse should be justified. Related effects may be discussed together; in particular, markers of toxicity that are not in and of themselves adverse ideally should be discussed in conjunction with the causal toxicity to determine adversity. Adverse findings should be identified in subreports (clinical data, pathology data, etc.) if sufficient information is available, and/or in the final study report as individual or grouped findings, but study NOAELs should be established at the level of the overall study report. Interpretations such as "not biologically relevant" or "not toxicologically important" should be avoided unless defined and supported by scientific rationale. Decisions defining adverse findings and the NOAEL in final study reports should combine the expertise of all contributing scientific disciplines. Where possible, use of NOAELs in data tables should be linked to explanatory text that places them in context. Ideally, in nonclinical summary documents, NOAELs from multiple studies are considered together in defining the most important adverse responses in the most sensitive species. These responses are then considered along with an understanding of their likely mechanisms, as well as other information such as variability in species sensitivity, comparative pathology, reversibility and progression, kinetics, and

  19. Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Neurologic Medications.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Eman; Nunneley, Chloe E; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-03-01

    Life-threatening and benign drug reactions occur frequently in the skin, affecting 8 % of the general population and 2-3 % of all hospitalized patients, emphasizing the need for physicians to effectively recognize and manage patients with drug-induced eruptions. Neurologic medications represent a vast array of drug classes with cutaneous side effects. Approximately 7 % of the United States (US) adult population is affected by adult-onset neurological disorders, reflecting a large number of patients on neurologic drug therapies. This review elucidates the cutaneous reactions associated with medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following neurologic pathologies: Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, epilepsy, Huntington disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and pseudobulbar affect. A search of the literature was performed using the specific FDA-approved drug or drug classes in combination with the terms 'dermatologic,' 'cutaneous,' 'skin,' or 'rash.' Both PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were utilized, with side effects ranging from those cited in randomized controlled trials to case reports. It behooves neurologists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians to be aware of the recorded cutaneous adverse reactions and their severity for proper management and potential need to withdraw the offending medication.

  20. Migraine treatment: a chain of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Veloso, Tiago Sousa; Cambão, Mariana Seixas

    2015-01-01

    This clinical vignette presents a 14 years old female, with a past medical history relevant only for migraine with typical aura of less than monthly frequency, complaining of a severe unilateral headache with rising intensity for the previous 4 h, associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. This episode of migraine with aura in a patient with recurrent migraine was complicated by side effects of medical diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (extrapyramidal symptoms, delirium, post-lumbar puncture headache, hospital admission) all of which could have been prevented-quaternary prevention. This case illustrates several important messages in migraine management: (1) use of acetaminophen is not based in high-quality evidence and better options exist; (2) among youngsters, domperidone should be preferred over metoclopramide because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier; (3) moderate to severe migraine crisis can be managed with triptans in teenagers over 12 years old; (4) it is important to recognize adverse drug effects; (5) harmful consequences of medical interventions do occur; (6) the school community must be informed about chronic diseases of the young.

  1. Toxicological effects of dietary nickel chloride on intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Pan, Kangcheng; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Huang, Jianying

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the toxicological effect of dietary nickel chloride (NiCl2) on the counts of intestinal bacteria and diversity of microorganisms in broilers. Plate counting and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) assays were used. A total of 240 one-day-old avian broilers chicks were divided into four equal groups and kept on corn-soybean basal diet along with supplementation of 0, 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg NiCl2 for 42 days. Samples were taken at 21 and 42 days of age during the experiment. The bacterial count results showed that dietary NiCl2 in the range of 300 to 900 mg/kg decreased the counts of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus, increased Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus spp. in the ileum and cecum. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that bacterial band numbers, profile similarity, and the Shannon index of the ileum and cecum were all decreased in the 300, 600, and 900 mg/kg groups at 21 and 42 days of age. In conclusion, dietary NiCl2 affected the amount and diversity of intestinal microbiota in the ileum and cecum of broilers. This finding implies that NiCl2 has toxicological effect on the intestinal ecosystem and, possibly functions. PMID:25164205

  2. Transformation of Air Quality Monitor Data from the International Space Station into Toxicological Effect Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Zalesak, Selina M.

    2011-01-01

    The primary reason for monitoring air quality aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is to determine whether air pollutants have collectively reached a concentration where the crew could experience adverse health effects. These effects could be near-real-time (e.g. headache, respiratory irritation) or occur late in the mission or even years later (e.g. cancer, liver toxicity). Secondary purposes for monitoring include discovery that a potentially harmful compound has leaked into the atmosphere or that air revitalization system performance has diminished. Typical ISS atmospheric trace pollutants consist of alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic compounds, halo-carbons, siloxanes, and silanols. Rarely, sulfur-containing compounds and alkanes are found at trace levels. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) have been set in cooperation with a subcommittee of the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology. For each compound and time of exposure, the limiting adverse effect(s) has been identified. By factoring the analytical data from the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), which is in use as a prototype instrument aboard the ISS, through the array of compounds and SMACs, the risk of 16 specific adverse effects can be estimated. Within each adverse-effect group, we have used an additive model proportioned to each applicable 180-day SMAC to estimate risk. In the recent past this conversion has been performed using archival data, which can be delayed for months after an air sample is taken because it must be returned to earth for analysis. But with the AQM gathering in situ data each week, NASA is in a position to follow toxic-effect groups and correlate these with any reported crew symptoms. The AQM data are supplemented with data from real-time CO2 instruments aboard the ISS and from archival measurements of formaldehyde, which the AQM cannot detect.

  3. Adverse immunologic effects of antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S S; Fantus, I G

    1987-01-01

    Propylthiouracil and methimazole are frequently used in the management of hyperthyroidism. Two patients in whom adverse immunologic effects other than isolated agranulocytosis developed during treatment with propylthiouracil are described. A review of the literature revealed 53 similar cases over a 35-year period. Rash, fever, arthralgias and granulocytopenia were the most common manifestations. Vasculitis, particularly with cutaneous manifestations, occurs and may be fatal. The clinical evidence suggests that an immunologic mechanism is involved. A number of different autoantibodies were reported, but antinuclear antibodies were infrequent, and none of the cases met the criteria for a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thus, the reactions do not represent a true drug-induced lupus syndrome. Current hypotheses and experimental data regarding the cause of the reactions are reviewed. No specific clinical subgroup at high risk can be identified, and manifestations may occur at any dosage and at any time during therapy. Cross-reactivity between the two antithyroid drugs can be expected. Except for minor symptoms (e.g., mild arthralgias or transient rash), such reactions are an indication for withdrawal of the drug and the use of alternative methods to control the hyperthyroidism. In rare cases of severe vasculitis a short course of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy may be helpful. PMID:3539299

  4. Diesel exhaust: current knowledge of adverse effects and underlying cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Sandro; Bisig, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Diesel engine emissions are among the most prevalent anthropogenic pollutants worldwide, and with the growing popularity of diesel-fueled engines in the private transportation sector, they are becoming increasingly widespread in densely populated urban regions. However, a large number of toxicological studies clearly show that diesel engine emissions profoundly affect human health. Thus the interest in the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these effects is large, especially concerning the nature of the components of diesel exhaust responsible for the effects and how they could be eliminated from the exhaust. This review describes the fundamental properties of diesel exhaust as well as the human respiratory tract and concludes that adverse health effects of diesel exhaust not only emerge from its chemical composition, but also from the interplay between its physical properties, the physiological and cellular properties, and function of the human respiratory tract. Furthermore, the primary molecular and cellular mechanisms triggered by diesel exhaust exposure, as well as the fundamentals of the methods for toxicological testing of diesel exhaust toxicity, are described. The key aspects of adverse effects induced by diesel exhaust exposure described herein will be important for regulators to support or ban certain technologies or to legitimate incentives for the development of promising new technologies such as catalytic diesel particle filters.

  5. Diesel exhaust: current knowledge of adverse effects and underlying cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Sandro; Bisig, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Diesel engine emissions are among the most prevalent anthropogenic pollutants worldwide, and with the growing popularity of diesel-fueled engines in the private transportation sector, they are becoming increasingly widespread in densely populated urban regions. However, a large number of toxicological studies clearly show that diesel engine emissions profoundly affect human health. Thus the interest in the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these effects is large, especially concerning the nature of the components of diesel exhaust responsible for the effects and how they could be eliminated from the exhaust. This review describes the fundamental properties of diesel exhaust as well as the human respiratory tract and concludes that adverse health effects of diesel exhaust not only emerge from its chemical composition, but also from the interplay between its physical properties, the physiological and cellular properties, and function of the human respiratory tract. Furthermore, the primary molecular and cellular mechanisms triggered by diesel exhaust exposure, as well as the fundamentals of the methods for toxicological testing of diesel exhaust toxicity, are described. The key aspects of adverse effects induced by diesel exhaust exposure described herein will be important for regulators to support or ban certain technologies or to legitimate incentives for the development of promising new technologies such as catalytic diesel particle filters. PMID:27165416

  6. Toxicological profile for selenium. (Update)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Each profile includes: (1) The examination, summary, and interpretation of available toxicologic information and epidemiologic evaluations on a hazardous substance to ascertain the levels of significant human exposure for the substance and the associated acute, subacute, and chronic health effects; (2) A determination of whether adequate information on the health effects of each substance is available or in the process of development to determine levels of exposure that present a significant risk to human health of acute, subacute, and chonic health effects; and (3) Where appropriate, identification of toxicologic testing needed to identify the types or levels of exposure that may present significant risk of adverse health effects in humans.

  7. Toxicological effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives on respiratory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Eiko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Takano, Hirohisa

    2014-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are found in ambient aerosols and particulate matter. Experimental studies have shown that PAHs and related chemicals can induce toxicological effects. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of PAHs and their derivatives on the respiratory and immune systems and the underlying mechanisms. The human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B was exposed to PAHs and their derivatives, and the cytotoxicity and proinflammatory protein expression were then investigated. A cytotoxic effect was observed in BEAS-2B exposed to PAH derivatives such as naphthoquinone (NQ), phenanthrenequinone (PQ), 1-nitropyrene (1-NP), and 1-aminopyrene (1-AP). In addition, 1,2-NQ and 9,10-PQ showed more effective cytotoxicity than 1,4-NQ and 1,4-PQ, respectively. Pyrene showed a weak cytotoxic effect. On the other hand, naphthalene and phenanthrene showed no significant effects. Pyrene, 1-NP, and 1-AP also increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression and interleukin-6 production in BEAS-2B. The increase was partly suppressed by protein kinase inhibitors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor and nuclear receptor antagonists such as the thyroid hormone receptor antagonist. The present study suggests that the toxicological effects of chemicals may be related to the different activities resulting from their structures, such as numbers of benzene rings and functional groups. Furthermore, the chemical-induced increase in proinflammatory protein expression in bronchial epithelial cells was possibly a result of the activation of protein kinase pathways and nuclear receptors. The increase may partly contribute to the adverse health effects of atmospheric PAHs.

  8. The adverse health effects of chronic cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the most probable of the adverse health effects of regular cannabis use sustained over years, as indicated by epidemiological studies that have established an association between cannabis use and adverse outcomes; ruled out reverse causation; and controlled for plausible alternative explanations. We have also focused on adverse outcomes for which there is good evidence of biological plausibility. The focus is on those adverse health effects of greatest potential public health significance--those that are most likely to occur and to affect a substantial proportion of regular cannabis users. These most probable adverse effects of regular use include a dependence syndrome, impaired respiratory function, cardiovascular disease, adverse effects on adolescent psychosocial development and mental health, and residual cognitive impairment.

  9. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines, to avoid adverse effects. (c) Consulting party review. If the... effects. Adverse effects on historic properties include, but are not limited to: (i) Physical destruction... (36 CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines; (iii) Removal of the property from its historic...

  10. Using Literature-Based Discovery to Explain Adverse Drug Effects.

    PubMed

    Hristovski, Dimitar; Kastrin, Andrej; Dinevski, Dejan; Burgun, Anita; Žiberna, Lovro; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2016-08-01

    We report on our research in using literature-based discovery (LBD) to provide pharmacological and/or pharmacogenomic explanations for reported adverse drug effects. The goal of LBD is to generate novel and potentially useful hypotheses by analyzing the scientific literature and optionally some additional resources. Our assumption is that drugs have effects on some genes or proteins and that these genes or proteins are associated with the observed adverse effects. Therefore, by using LBD we try to find genes or proteins that link the drugs with the reported adverse effects. These genes or proteins can be used to provide insight into the processes causing the adverse effects. Initial results show that our method has the potential to assist in explaining reported adverse drug effects. PMID:27318993

  11. Adverse effects of equine rabies immune gobulin.

    PubMed

    Wilde, H; Chomchey, P; Prakongsri, S; Puyaratabandhu, P; Chutivongse, S

    1989-02-01

    Following a recently published prospective study of 485 recipients of equine rabies immune globulin (ERIG) manufactured by Pasteur Vaccins (Paris), this paper reports a study of 323 postexposure rabies patients receiving ERIG manufactured by the Swiss Vaccine and Serum Institute (Berna). It is concluded that there may be significant differences in adverse reaction rates, reflecting differing manufacturing or purification processes and protein content. Further studies of different ERIG products and of different lots of the same product are needed while ERIG remains an essential component of postexposure rabies treatment in developing countries.

  12. 36 CFR 800.6 - Resolution of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resolution of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.6 Resolution of adverse effects. (a) Continue...—(1) Resolution without the Council. (i) The agency official shall consult with the SHPO/THPO...

  13. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  14. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  15. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  16. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  17. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  18. THE ADVERSE-EFFECT POLICY FOR AGRICULTURAL LABOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DELLON, HOWARD N.

    THE BASIC PHILOSOPHY UNDERLYING THE REGULATION OF FOREIGN WORKER IMPORTATIONS INTO THE UNITED STATES FOR AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT IS THAT EMPLOYMENT OF SUCH WORKERS WILL NOT BE PERMITTED IF IT WILL HAVE AN ADVERSE EFFECT ON DOMESTIC WORKERS. THE "ADVERSE-EFFECT" POLICY HAS BEEN FOLLOWED SINCE THE ENACTMENT OF PUBLIC LAW 78 IN 1951 WHICH GOVERNED…

  19. Multiple adverse effects of pyridium: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Charles; Dewar, James C

    2006-01-01

    Pyridium (phenazopyridine hydrochloride) is often prescribed as an analgesic in patients following trauma, surgery, or infections of the urinary tract. Pyridium toxicity has been previously reported, however, most cases result in a single adverse effect. Herein the authors describe an elderly patient who presented with simultaneous multiple adverse effects, including a previously undocumented myelosuppressive pancytopenia.

  20. Toxicologic evaluation of ofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Davis, G J; McKenzie, B E

    1989-12-29

    Results of studies conducted to characterize local, systemic, reproductive, and mutagenic effects indicate that ofloxacin is well tolerated within reasonable multiples of the intended clinical dose. Quinolone-associated arthropathic effects characterized by blister, erosion, and increased synovial fluid occurred in rats and dogs and appeared to be both age- and dose-related. Maternal toxicity and embryotoxicity were noted, but there was no teratogenicity in rats or rabbits. There was no impairment of fertility, and no adverse effects on late fetal development, labor, delivery, lactation, neonatal viability, or growth of offspring occurred. Target-organ studies revealed no evidence of ocular toxicity in rats, nephrotoxicity in rabbits, or antigenicity or ototoxicity in guinea pigs. Overall, the toxicologic evaluation of ofloxacin has shown this compound to be a drug with a low toxicologic potential.

  1. Pharmacological and Toxicological Effects of Lithium in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lithium is the paradigmatic treatment for bipolar disorder and has been widely used as a mood stabilizer due to its ability to reduce manic and depressive episodes, efficiency in long-term mood stabilization, and effectiveness in reducing suicide risks. Despite many decades of clinical use, the molecular targets of lithium are not completely understood. However, they are credited at least partially to glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibition, mimicking and exacerbating Wnt signaling pathway activation. There has been a great effort to characterize lithium cellular and system actions, aiming to improve treatment effectiveness and reduce side effects. There is also a growing concern about lithium’s impact as an environmental contaminant and its effects on development. In this scenario, zebrafish is a helpful model organism to gather more information on lithium’s effects in different systems and developmental stages. The rapid external development, initial transparency, capacity to easily absorb substances, and little space required for maintenance and experimentation, among other advantages, make zebrafish a suitable model. In addition, zebrafish has been established as an effective model organism in behavioral and neuropharmacological studies, reacting to a wide range of psychoactive drugs, including lithium. So far only a limited number of studies evaluated the toxicological impact of lithium on zebrafish development and demonstrated morphological, physiological, and behavioral effects that may be informative regarding human findings. Further studies dedicated to characterize and evaluate the underlying mechanisms of the toxic effects and the potential impact of exposure on developing and adult individuals are necessary to establish safe clinical management guidelines for women with bipolar disorder of childbearing age and safety disposal guidelines for pharmaceutical neuroactive compounds. PMID:24798681

  2. Pharmacological and toxicological effects of lithium in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Anna M; Vianna, Monica R; Bonan, Carla D

    2014-06-18

    Lithium is the paradigmatic treatment for bipolar disorder and has been widely used as a mood stabilizer due to its ability to reduce manic and depressive episodes, efficiency in long-term mood stabilization, and effectiveness in reducing suicide risks. Despite many decades of clinical use, the molecular targets of lithium are not completely understood. However, they are credited at least partially to glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibition, mimicking and exacerbating Wnt signaling pathway activation. There has been a great effort to characterize lithium cellular and system actions, aiming to improve treatment effectiveness and reduce side effects. There is also a growing concern about lithium's impact as an environmental contaminant and its effects on development. In this scenario, zebrafish is a helpful model organism to gather more information on lithium's effects in different systems and developmental stages. The rapid external development, initial transparency, capacity to easily absorb substances, and little space required for maintenance and experimentation, among other advantages, make zebrafish a suitable model. In addition, zebrafish has been established as an effective model organism in behavioral and neuropharmacological studies, reacting to a wide range of psychoactive drugs, including lithium. So far only a limited number of studies evaluated the toxicological impact of lithium on zebrafish development and demonstrated morphological, physiological, and behavioral effects that may be informative regarding human findings. Further studies dedicated to characterize and evaluate the underlying mechanisms of the toxic effects and the potential impact of exposure on developing and adult individuals are necessary to establish safe clinical management guidelines for women with bipolar disorder of childbearing age and safety disposal guidelines for pharmaceutical neuroactive compounds. PMID:24798681

  3. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines, to avoid adverse effects. (c) Consulting party review. If the... (36 CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines; (iii) Removal of the property from its historic location... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Assessment of adverse...

  4. [Adverse effects of antidepressive agents in hospitalized geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Korínková, V; Kolibás, E; Králová, M; Novotný, V; Konceoj, V A; Pjatnickij, A N; Andrusenkova, M P

    1992-11-01

    The frequency, intensity and profile of adverse effects of antidepressants was studied in elderly patients. The series consisted of 102 patients with depression admitted to hospitals in Bratislava and Moscow. The adverse effects of amitriptyline (Amitriptylin Spofa) and maprotiline (Ludiomil Ciba-Geigy) were compared. The assessment done on days 0, 7, and 28 of treatment showed that xerostomia had the highest occurrence rate with both preparations studied. In patients treated with amitriptyline adverse effects were more severe and were recorded more frequently, requiring treatment withdrawal in 3 patients. The overall intensity of adverse effects was significantly higher with amitriptyline (p < 0.05). In the group of patients treated with amitriptyline the adverse effects were more marked in those with severe somatic pathology. The risk of amitriptyline treatment in elderly patients is being emphasized along with the need for monitoring and correcting adverse effects of the treatment. Although maprotiline exhibited a lower occurrence rate of adverse effects, cardiac functions should be regularly checked in patients with preexisting cardiac pathology. (Tab. 2, Fig. 3, Ref. 6.).

  5. Rare and very rare adverse effects of clozapine

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Pasquale; Gaetano, Raffaele; Caroleo, Mariarita; Cerminara, Gregorio; Maida, Francesca; Bruno, Antonio; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria; Moreno, Maria Jose Jaén; Russo, Emilio; Segura-García, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine (CLZ) is the drug of choice for the treatment of resistant schizophrenia; however, its suitable use is limited by the complex adverse effects’ profile. The best-described adverse effects in the literature are represented by agranulocytosis, myocarditis, sedation, weight gain, hypotension, and drooling; nevertheless, there are other known adverse effects that psychiatrists should readily recognize and manage. This review covers the “rare” and “very rare” known adverse effects of CLZ, which have been accurately described in literature. An extensive search on the basis of predefined criteria was made using CLZ and its combination with adverse effects as keywords in electronic databases. Data show the association between the use of CLZ and uncommon adverse effects, including ischemic colitis, paralytic ileus, hematemesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, priapism, urinary incontinence, pityriasis rosea, intertriginous erythema, pulmonary thromboembolism, pseudo-pheochromocytoma, periorbital edema, and parotitis, which are influenced by other variables including age, early diagnosis, and previous/current pharmacological therapies. Some of these adverse effects, although unpredictable, are often manageable if promptly recognized and treated. Others are serious and potentially life-threatening. However, an adequate knowledge of the drug, clinical vigilance, and rapid intervention can drastically reduce the morbidity and mortality related to CLZ treatment. PMID:26273202

  6. Fewer adverse effects with doxycycline than with minocycline.

    PubMed

    2009-10-01

    (1) In mid-2008 the French National Pharmacovigilance Committee examined spontaneous reports of adverse effects observed during tetracycline therapy; (2) When sales figures are taken into account, reports were more frequent with minocycline than with doxycycline. The proportion of severe adverse effects was also higher with minocycline than with doxycycline; (3) Life-threatening hypersensitivity reactions and autoimmune adverse effects were more frequent with minocycline than with doxycycline; (4) In practice, minocycline has a less favourable risk-benefit balance than doxycycline, particularly in the treatment of acne.

  7. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red-tailed hawk

  8. Computational Toxicology (S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emerging field of computational toxicology applies mathematical and computer models and molecular biological and chemical approaches to explore both qualitative and quantitative relationships between sources of environmental pollutant exposure and adverse health outcomes. Th...

  9. Selenomethionine protects against adverse biological effects induced by space radiation.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R; Ware, Jeffrey H; Guan, Jun; Donahue, Jeremiah J; Biaglow, John E; Zhou, Zhaozong; Stewart, Jelena; Vazquez, Marcelo; Wan, X Steven

    2004-01-15

    Ionizing radiation-induced adverse biological effects impose serious challenges to astronauts during extended space travel. Of particular concern is the radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The objective of the present study was to characterize HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects and evaluate the effect of D-selenomethionine (SeM) on the HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects. The results showed that HZE particle radiation can increase oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and cell transformation in vitro, and decrease the total antioxidant status in irradiated Sprague-Dawley rats. These adverse biological effects were all preventable by treatment with SeM, suggesting that SeM is potentially useful as a countermeasure against space radiation-induced adverse effects. Treatment with SeM was shown to enhance ATR and CHK2 gene expression in cultured human thyroid epithelial cells. As ionizing radiation is known to result in DNA damage and both ATR and CHK2 gene products are involved in DNA damage, it is possible that SeM may prevent HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects by enhancing the DNA repair machinery in irradiated cells.

  10. Selenomethionine protects against adverse biological effects induced by space radiation.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R; Ware, Jeffrey H; Guan, Jun; Donahue, Jeremiah J; Biaglow, John E; Zhou, Zhaozong; Stewart, Jelena; Vazquez, Marcelo; Wan, X Steven

    2004-01-15

    Ionizing radiation-induced adverse biological effects impose serious challenges to astronauts during extended space travel. Of particular concern is the radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The objective of the present study was to characterize HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects and evaluate the effect of D-selenomethionine (SeM) on the HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects. The results showed that HZE particle radiation can increase oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, and cell transformation in vitro, and decrease the total antioxidant status in irradiated Sprague-Dawley rats. These adverse biological effects were all preventable by treatment with SeM, suggesting that SeM is potentially useful as a countermeasure against space radiation-induced adverse effects. Treatment with SeM was shown to enhance ATR and CHK2 gene expression in cultured human thyroid epithelial cells. As ionizing radiation is known to result in DNA damage and both ATR and CHK2 gene products are involved in DNA damage, it is possible that SeM may prevent HZE particle radiation-induced adverse biological effects by enhancing the DNA repair machinery in irradiated cells. PMID:14744637

  11. Adverse effects of herbal medicines: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Posadzki, Paul; Watson, Leala K; Ernst, Edzard

    2013-02-01

    This overview of systematic reviews (SRs) aims to evaluate critically the evidence regarding the adverse effects of herbal medicines (HMs). Five electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant SRs, with 50 SRs of 50 different HMs meeting our inclusion criteria. Most had only minor weaknesses in methods. Serious adverse effects were noted only for four HMs: Herbae pulvis standardisatus, Larrea tridentate, Piper methysticum and Cassia senna. The most severe adverse effects were liver or kidney damage, colon perforation, carcinoma, coma and death. Moderately severe adverse effects were noted for 15 HMs: Pelargonium sidoides, Perna canaliculus, Aloe vera, Mentha piperita, Medicago sativa, Cimicifuga racemosa, Caulophyllum thalictroides, Serenoa repens, Taraxacum officinale, Camellia sinensis, Commifora mukul, Hoodia gordonii, Viscum album, Trifolium pratense and Stevia rebaudiana. Minor adverse effects were noted for 31 HMs: Thymus vulgaris, Lavandula angustifolia Miller, Boswellia serrata, Calendula officinalis, Harpagophytum procumbens, Panax ginseng, Vitex agnus-castus, Crataegus spp., Cinnamomum spp., Petasites hybridus, Agave americana, Hypericum perforatum, Echinacea spp., Silybum marianum, Capsicum spp., Genus phyllanthus, Ginkgo biloba, Valeriana officinalis, Hippocastanaceae, Melissa officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Cnicus benedictus, Salvia hispanica, Vaccinium myrtillus, Mentha spicata, Rosmarinus officinalis, Crocus sativus, Gymnema sylvestre, Morinda citrifolia and Curcuma longa. Most of the HMs evaluated in SRs were associated with only moderately severe or minor adverse effects. PMID:23472485

  12. Adverse effects of herbal medicines: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Posadzki, Paul; Watson, Leala K; Ernst, Edzard

    2013-02-01

    This overview of systematic reviews (SRs) aims to evaluate critically the evidence regarding the adverse effects of herbal medicines (HMs). Five electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant SRs, with 50 SRs of 50 different HMs meeting our inclusion criteria. Most had only minor weaknesses in methods. Serious adverse effects were noted only for four HMs: Herbae pulvis standardisatus, Larrea tridentate, Piper methysticum and Cassia senna. The most severe adverse effects were liver or kidney damage, colon perforation, carcinoma, coma and death. Moderately severe adverse effects were noted for 15 HMs: Pelargonium sidoides, Perna canaliculus, Aloe vera, Mentha piperita, Medicago sativa, Cimicifuga racemosa, Caulophyllum thalictroides, Serenoa repens, Taraxacum officinale, Camellia sinensis, Commifora mukul, Hoodia gordonii, Viscum album, Trifolium pratense and Stevia rebaudiana. Minor adverse effects were noted for 31 HMs: Thymus vulgaris, Lavandula angustifolia Miller, Boswellia serrata, Calendula officinalis, Harpagophytum procumbens, Panax ginseng, Vitex agnus-castus, Crataegus spp., Cinnamomum spp., Petasites hybridus, Agave americana, Hypericum perforatum, Echinacea spp., Silybum marianum, Capsicum spp., Genus phyllanthus, Ginkgo biloba, Valeriana officinalis, Hippocastanaceae, Melissa officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Cnicus benedictus, Salvia hispanica, Vaccinium myrtillus, Mentha spicata, Rosmarinus officinalis, Crocus sativus, Gymnema sylvestre, Morinda citrifolia and Curcuma longa. Most of the HMs evaluated in SRs were associated with only moderately severe or minor adverse effects.

  13. Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, M.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of poor lighting and glare on public safety are well-known, as are the harmful environmental effects on various species and the environment in general. What is less well-known is the potential harmful medical effects of excessive poor nighttime lighting. A significant body of research has been developed over the last few years regarding this problem. One of the most significant effects is the startling increased risk for breast cancer by excessive exposure to nighttime lighting. The mechanism is felt to be by disruption of the circadian rhythm and suppression of melatonin production from the pineal gland. Melatonin has an anticancer effect that is lost when its production is disrupted. I am in the process of developing a monograph that will summarize this important body of research, to be presented and endorsed by the American Medical Association, and its Council of Science and Public health. This paper is a brief overall summary of this little known potential harmful effect of poor and excessive nighttime lighting.

  14. Adverse health effects of outdoor air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Luke; Rea, William; Smith-Willis, Patricia; Fenyves, Ervin; Pan, Yaqin

    2006-08-01

    Much research on the health effects of outdoor air pollution has been published in the last decade. The goal of this review is to concisely summarize a wide range of the recent research on health effects of many types of outdoor air pollution. A review of the health effects of major outdoor air pollutants including particulates, carbon monoxide, sulfur and nitrogen oxides, acid gases, metals, volatile organics, solvents, pesticides, radiation and bioaerosols is presented. Numerous studies have linked atmospheric pollutants to many types of health problems of many body systems including the respiratory, cardiovascular, immunological, hematological, neurological and reproductive/ developmental systems. Some studies have found increases in respiratory and cardiovascular problems at outdoor pollutant levels well below standards set by such agencies as the US EPA and WHO. Air pollution is associated with large increases in medical expenses, morbidity and is estimated to cause about 800,000 annual premature deaths worldwide [Cohen, A.J., Ross Alexander, H., Ostro, B., Pandey, K.D., Kryzanowski, M., Kunzail, N., et al., 2005. The global burden of disease due to outdoor air pollution. J Toxicol Environ Health A. 68: 1-7.]. Further research on the health effects of air pollution and air pollutant abatement methods should be very helpful to physicians, public health officials, industrialists, politicians and the general public. PMID:16730796

  15. Teaching Toxicology as a Basic Medical Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gralla, Edward J.

    1976-01-01

    A 4-year effort at Yale University School of Medicine to teach toxicology as an elective basic science from the standpoint of organ-specific toxic effects is described. The objective of the successful multidisciplinary program is to prepare physicians to understand, recognize, and manage adverse effects from drugs and other environmental…

  16. [Endocrinologic adverse effects of psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Elenitza, Irene María

    2005-01-01

    Psychotropic drugs affect the regulatory mechanisms of different neuroendocrine axis. This chapter reviews the interactions between psychotropic drugs and prolactin, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Hyperprolactinemia can cause galactorrhea, amenorrhea, sexual disfunction, impaired spermatogenesis and increased risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Atypical antipsychotics cause less hyperprolactinemia than conventional antipsychotics. Lithium has important effects on thyroid function. During lithium treatment, affectively ill patients show, in varying degrees and combinations, reduced levels of thyroid hormones and clinical evidence of subclinical hypothyroidism, overt hypothyroidism and goiter. Recent literature reports suggest that valproic acid, may be associated with polycistic ovarian syndrome. Until additional data is available, women starting valproate therapy should be warned about the possibility of endocrinology side effects.

  17. Mirtazapine: pharmacology in relation to adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Nutt, D

    1997-01-01

    Mirtazapine is a new antidepressant that falls into the general class of receptor-blocking drugs rather than being an uptake or enzyme inhibitor. It can be described as a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA). The unique pharmacology of mirtazapine means that it has a very different side effect profile from the tricyclic antidepressants, producing less alpha 1 adrenergic and muscarinic blockade, and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), causing much less nausea and sexual dysfunction by virtue of its blockade of 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:9265949

  18. Adverse health effects of indoor moulds.

    PubMed

    Piecková, Elena

    2012-12-01

    Building associated illnesses - sick building syndrome (SBS) as a common example - are associated with staying in buildings with poor indoor air quality. The importance of indoor fungal growth in this phenomenon continues to be evident, even though no causative relation has been established so far. Indoor humidity is strongly associated with the symptoms of SBS. Fungal metabolites that may induce ill health in susceptible occupants comprise beta-D-glucan, mycotoxins, and volatile organic compounds as known irritants and/or immunomodulators. Indoor toxic fungal metabolites might be located in micromycetal propagules (endometabolites), in (bio-)aerosol, detritus, and house dust (exometabolites) as their particular carriers. It is highly probable that hyphal fragments, dust, and particles able to reach the alveoli have the strongest depository and toxic potential. Most fungal spores are entrapped by the upper respiratory tract and do not reach further than the bronchi because of their size, morphology, and the mode of propagation (such as slime heads and aggreggation). This is why studies of the toxic effects of fungal spores prefer directly applying metabolite mixtures over mimicking real exposure. Chronic low-level exposure to a mixture of fungal toxicants and other indoor stressors may have synergistic effects and lead to severe neuroendocrineimmune changes. PMID:23334050

  19. Chloroquine cardiomyopathy: beyond ocular adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ruiz, Nilson; Uribe, Carlos Esteban

    2014-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman who had received long-term treatment with chloroquine for systemic lupus erythematosus developed a third degree atrioventricular block and required a permanent pacemaker. Notably, left ventricular thickening and mild systolic dysfunction were noticed on echocardiography as well as on cardiac MRI. As there was no clear explanation for myocardial findings, the patient underwent an endomyocardial biopsy that demonstrated vacuolar degeneration of myocytes on light microscopy and curvilinear bodies on electron microscopy, both findings consistent with chloroquine toxicity. The drug was withheld and treatment with candesartan and carvedilol was prescribed. At 2-year follow-up, the patient remained asymptomatic and left ventricular systolic function had improved. Physicians who prescribe antimalarial drugs for rheumatic diseases should be aware of the potentially life-threatening effects of chloroquine on the heart. PMID:25225192

  20. Adverse effects of the radioprotector WR2721

    SciTech Connect

    Cairnie, A.B.

    1983-04-01

    S-2-(3-Aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) has radioprotective properties, but it is also toxic - in man it causes nausea and vomiting. Since radiation also causes nausea and vomiting it is important to know whether WR2721 would increase or decrease the likelihood of nausea and vomiting after radiation. This question was investigated in rats using the phenomenon of aversion to the taste of saccharin, which is readily inducible and is understood to be controlled in rats by the same pathways that control nausea and vomiting in man. The taste aversion was induced by giving 0.2 Gy /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. radiation 30 min after drinking 0.1% saccharin, or WR2721 immediately after the saccharin, or giving both radiation and WR2721. There were appropriate controls. In sham-irradiated rats, WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg, but not 8 mg/kg) produced a significant taste aversion. When WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg) was given immediately after the saccharin to irradiated rats it increased the taste aversion significantly, but it did not have any effect at 8 mg/kg. It was concluded that at doses which were optimal for radioprotection (approx.200 mg/kg) or lower, WR2721 increased in rats the taste aversion induced by radiation. By inference if conditioned taste aversion is an appropriate paradigm, WR2721 would increase nausea and vomiting in man induced by radiation.

  1. Probable Nootropicinduced Psychiatric Adverse Effects: A Series of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ajaltouni, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The misuse of nootropics—any substance that may alter, improve, or augment cognitive performance, mainly through the stimulation or inhibition of certain neurotransmitters—may potentially be dangerous and deleterious to the human brain, and certain individuals with a history of mental or substance use disorders might be particularly vulnerable to their adverse effects. We describe four cases of probable nootropic-induced psychiatric adverse effects to illustrate this theory. To the best of our knowledge this has not been previously reported in the formal medical literature. We briefly describe the most common classes of nootropics, including their postulated or proven methods of actions, their desired effects, and their adverse side effects, and provide a brief discussion of the cases. Our objective is to raise awareness among physicians in general and psychiatrists and addiction specialists in particular of the potentially dangerous phenomenon of unsupervised nootropic use among young adults who may be especially vulnerable to nootropics’ negative effects. PMID:27222762

  2. Ecological and toxicological effects of inorganic nitrogen pollution in aquatic ecosystems: A global assessment.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Julio A; Alonso, Alvaro

    2006-08-01

    We provide a global assessment, with detailed multi-scale data, of the ecological and toxicological effects generated by inorganic nitrogen pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Our synthesis of the published scientific literature shows three major environmental problems: (1) it can increase the concentration of hydrogen ions in freshwater ecosystems without much acid-neutralizing capacity, resulting in acidification of those systems; (2) it can stimulate or enhance the development, maintenance and proliferation of primary producers, resulting in eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems; (3) it can reach toxic levels that impair the ability of aquatic animals to survive, grow and reproduce. Inorganic nitrogen pollution of ground and surface waters can also induce adverse effects on human health and economy. Because reductions in SO2 emissions have reduced the atmospheric deposition of H2SO4 across large portions of North America and Europe, while emissions of NOx have gone unchecked, HNO3 is now playing an increasing role in the acidification of freshwater ecosystems. This acidification process has caused several adverse effects on primary and secondary producers, with significant biotic impoverishments, particularly concerning invertebrates and fishes, in many atmospherically acidified lakes and streams. The cultural eutrophication of freshwater, estuarine, and coastal marine ecosystems can cause ecological and toxicological effects that are either directly or indirectly related to the proliferation of primary producers. Extensive kills of both invertebrates and fishes are probably the most dramatic manifestation of hypoxia (or anoxia) in eutrophic and hypereutrophic aquatic ecosystems with low water turnover rates. The decline in dissolved oxygen concentrations can also promote the formation of reduced compounds, such as hydrogen sulphide, resulting in higher adverse (toxic) effects on aquatic animals. Additionally, the occurrence of toxic algae can significantly

  3. Specificity and dosimetry of toxicologic responses.

    PubMed

    Doull, J

    1996-08-01

    Toxicology has two goals. The first is to identify and characterize the adverse effects that can be produced in biological systems by exposure to chemicals and the second is to use this information to predict the type and severity of responses in other species and exposure situations. The tools that the toxicologist uses to detect and describe the adverse effects of chemical exposure include the traditional acute, subchronic, and chronic studies in animals plus a variety of special studies designed to demonstrate specific organ damage, reproductive and teratogenic effects, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, and other responses. These are often supplemented with studies of the kinetics and the mechanism of action and more recently with studies designed to elucidate the molecular basis for cancer and other effects. Theses studies together with the information on exposure provide the basis for subsequent toxicologic predictions. Although general effects such as weight loss and mortality are included in toxicity protocols, most of the toxicology tests are related to specific end-organ toxicity or to mechanism or behavioral studies. We do not have animal protocols to study individually the subjective symptoms described for multiple chemical sensitivity, such as depression, fatigue, headache, and memory loss, and our tests lack sufficient specificity to evaluate a syndrome which is composed primarily of such symptoms. Since all chemicals can produce adverse effects under some conditions of exposure, toxicologic predictions are most useful when they specify both the type of adverse effect anticipated and the dose required to produce the effect. Multiple chemical sensitivity does not appear to consistently involve specific chemicals or specific adverse effects and the effects observed are reported to lack evidence of a threshold and to occur at extremely low levels. It is difficult to include these parameters in any reasonable toxicologic prediction relating

  4. Specificity and dosimetry of toxicologic responses.

    PubMed

    Doull, J

    1996-08-01

    Toxicology has two goals. The first is to identify and characterize the adverse effects that can be produced in biological systems by exposure to chemicals and the second is to use this information to predict the type and severity of responses in other species and exposure situations. The tools that the toxicologist uses to detect and describe the adverse effects of chemical exposure include the traditional acute, subchronic, and chronic studies in animals plus a variety of special studies designed to demonstrate specific organ damage, reproductive and teratogenic effects, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, and other responses. These are often supplemented with studies of the kinetics and the mechanism of action and more recently with studies designed to elucidate the molecular basis for cancer and other effects. Theses studies together with the information on exposure provide the basis for subsequent toxicologic predictions. Although general effects such as weight loss and mortality are included in toxicity protocols, most of the toxicology tests are related to specific end-organ toxicity or to mechanism or behavioral studies. We do not have animal protocols to study individually the subjective symptoms described for multiple chemical sensitivity, such as depression, fatigue, headache, and memory loss, and our tests lack sufficient specificity to evaluate a syndrome which is composed primarily of such symptoms. Since all chemicals can produce adverse effects under some conditions of exposure, toxicologic predictions are most useful when they specify both the type of adverse effect anticipated and the dose required to produce the effect. Multiple chemical sensitivity does not appear to consistently involve specific chemicals or specific adverse effects and the effects observed are reported to lack evidence of a threshold and to occur at extremely low levels. It is difficult to include these parameters in any reasonable toxicologic prediction relating

  5. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes. A constant threat.

    PubMed

    Maravelias, C; Dona, A; Stefanidou, M; Spiliopoulou, C

    2005-09-15

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are used as ergogenic aids by athletes and non-athletes to enhance performance by augmenting muscular development and strength. AAS administration is often associated with various adverse effects that are generally dose related. High and multi-doses of AAS used for athletic enhancement can lead to serious and irreversible organ damage. Among the most common adverse effects of AAS are some degree of reduced fertility and gynecomastia in males and masculinization in women and children. Other adverse effects include hypertension and atherosclerosis, blood clotting, jaundice, hepatic neoplasms and carcinoma, tendon damage, psychiatric and behavioral disorders. More specifically, this article reviews the reproductive, hepatic, cardiovascular, hematological, cerebrovascular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, renal, immunologic and psychologic effects. Drug-prevention counseling to athletes is highlighted and the use of anabolic steroids is must be avoided, emphasizing that sports goals may be met within the framework of honest competition, free of doping substances.

  6. Assessment of the potential for long-term toxicological effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on birds and mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper assesses the potential for direct long-term toxicological effects of exposures to oils in birds and mammals by tracing exposures and effects form the initial cute phases through the sub-chronic to the eventual long-term exposures. The immediate effects of oil spills are physical, the oil acting on the plumage of birds or the fur of mammals. This causes a loss of entrained air and a concomitant reduction in buoyancy and thermal insulation. Animals that escape the immediate impacts may be isolated from their food supply and often ingest large amounts of oil while attempting to clean themselves. At the comparatively high dose levels involved, these exposures can result in toxicologically significant responses in many organ systems. In the course of an oil pollution incident, the amounts of biologically available oils decrease steadily, and simultaneously the composition of the oils shifts towards those components that have low volatility, and that resist photo- and bio-degradation. As this occurs, the primary pathways of exposure change from direct intakes to indirect routes involving the food supply. Although laboratory studies often report finding some adverse effects, the dose rates employed in many of these studies are extremely high when compared with those that are potentially available to animals in the wild, and very few actually use weathered oils. An assessment of the toxicological literature and of the available empirical data on the Exxon Valdez oil spill leads to the conclusion that long-term sub-lethal toxic effects of crude oils on wildlife in such marine spills appear to be very unlikely. 111 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Neurological adverse effects of methylphenidate may be misdiagnosed as meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Snell, Luke Blagdon; Bakshi, Dinkar

    2015-06-16

    We present a case of adverse neurological effects of methylphenidate therapy for attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A 7-year-old boy presented to the emergency department (ED) having developed ataxic gait, orofacial dyskinesias and choreoathetosis of the limbs. The results of all blood investigations, EEG and CT scan of the head were unremarkable. Subsequently, a detailed history revealed he was being treated for ADHD, being started on methylphenidate in the past 3 months. Discontinuation of methylphenidate led to significant and rapid amelioration of neurological adverse effects.

  8. Amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism and other adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Mary C

    2011-01-01

    Amiodarone is a class III antiarrhythmic agent that is frequently prescribed today for the treatment of ventricular and atrial arrhythmias. Amiodarone has many adverse effects, and one of them is thyroid dysfunction. Advanced practice and staff nurses need to be vigilant, recognizing early signs and symptoms of thyroid dysfunction to prevent adverse drug reactions. Often, the signs and symptoms of amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism are overlooked because of the complexity of the patient's condition. The purpose of this article was to review a case study, present differential diagnoses and testing, discuss risk factors associated with amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism, discuss its pathogenesis, and review clinical management. PMID:21307683

  9. 15 CFR 971.602 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS... significant adverse environmental effect or impact (for the purposes of sections 103(a)(2)(D), 105(a)(4), 106.... Determinations will be based upon the best information available, including relevant environmental...

  10. 15 CFR 971.602 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... significant adverse environmental effect or impact (for the purposes of sections 103(a)(2)(D), 105(a)(4), 106.... Determinations will be based upon the best information available, including relevant environmental impact... listed in the license regulations (15 CFR 970.701), require no further environmental assessment....

  11. 15 CFR 971.602 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... significant adverse environmental effect or impact (for the purposes of sections 103(a)(2)(D), 105(a)(4), 106.... Determinations will be based upon the best information available, including relevant environmental impact... listed in the license regulations (15 CFR 970.701), require no further environmental assessment....

  12. Skin-lightening cosmetics: frequent, potentially severe adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Skin-lightening cosmetics are used by many women and men around the world. The products contain a variety of substances, which are often unknown to the users. Most of these products include topical corticosteroids, hydroquinone and mercury salts. Many other substances may be added. Several surveys and cohort studies, including several thousand individuals, have shown that regular application of skin-lightening cosmetics to large surface areas can have irreversible cutaneous adverse effects, such as patchy hyper- or hypopigmentation, skin atrophy, stretch marks and delayed wound healing, and can also mask or, on the contrary, promote or reactivate skin infections. Cases of skin cancer have been attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics. A Senegalese cohort study of 147 women showed a statistically significant increase in the risk of hypertension and diabetes linked to the use of skin-lightening agents. Other systemic adverse effects attributed to skin-lightening cosmetics include Cushing's syndrome, adrenal insufficiency, nephrotic syndrome, neurological disorders, and ocular disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have also been attributed to these products. Many skin-lightening cosmetics contain substances that can harm the unborn child. For example, tretinoin is teratogenic while salicylic acid is feto-toxic. In practice, users are often unaware of the risk of severe adverse effects associated with skin-lightening cosmetics. Users should be informed of these adverse effects and encouraged to stop using these products, especially when skin disorders appear.

  13. [Study progress of adverse effects of arsenic on health].

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiaqi; Jin, Yinlong

    2004-05-01

    Adverse effects on health of high arsenic in drinking water and contaminated environment are currently of great concern. This review focuses on metabolism of arsenic and it's impairments to skin, blood circle system, nervous system, reproductive-and-urinary system, digestive system, respiratory system and immune system.

  14. Translational toxicology: a developmental focus for integrated research strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given that toxicology studies the potential adverse effects of environmental exposures on various forms of life and that clinical toxicology typically focuses on human health effects, what can and should the relatively new term of "translational toxicology" be taken to mean? Discussion Our assertion is that the core concept of translational toxicology must incorporate existing principles of toxicology and epidemiology, but be driven by the aim of developing safe and effective interventions beyond simple reduction or avoidance of exposure to prevent, mitigate or reverse adverse human health effects of exposures. The field of toxicology has now reached a point where advances in multiple areas of biomedical research and information technologies empower us to make fundamental transitions in directly impacting human health. Translational toxicology must encompass four action elements as follows: 1) Assessing human exposures in critical windows across the lifespan 2) Defining modes of action and relevance of data from animal models 3) Use of mathematical models to develop plausible predictions as the basis for 4) Protective and restorative human health interventions. The discussion focuses on the critical window of in-utero development. Summary Exposure assessment, basic toxicology and development of certain categories of mathematical models are not new areas of research; however overtly integrating these in order to conceive, assess and validate effective interventions to mitigate or reverse adverse effects of environmental exposures is our novel opportunity. This is what we should do in translational toxicology so that we have a portfolio of interventional options to improve human health that include both minimizing exposures and specific preventative/restorative/mitigative therapeutics. PMID:24079609

  15. Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology Also Govern Effects of Chemicals on the Endocrine System.

    PubMed

    Autrup, Herman; Barile, Frank A; Blaauboer, Bas J; Degen, Gisela H; Dekant, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Daniel; Domingo, Jose L; Gori, Gio Batta; Greim, Helmuth; Hengstler, Jan G; Kacew, Sam; Marquardt, Hans; Pelkonen, Olavi; Savolainen, Kai; Vermeulen, Nico P

    2015-07-01

    The present debate on chemicals with Hormonal activity, often termed 'endocrine disruptors', is highly controversial and includes challenges of the present paradigms used in toxicology and in hazard identification and risk characterization. In our opinion, chemicals with hormonal activity can be subjected to the well-evaluated health risk characterization approach used for many years including adverse outcome pathways. Many of the points arguing for a specific approach for risk characterization of chemicals with hormonal activity are based on highly speculative conclusions. These conclusions are not well supported when evaluating the available information.

  16. Mixed-effects Poisson regression analysis of adverse event reports

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Segawa, Eisuke; Karabatsos, George; Amatya, Anup K.; Bhaumik, Dulal K.; Brown, C. Hendricks; Kapur, Kush; Marcus, Sue M.; Hur, Kwan; Mann, J. John

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A new statistical methodology is developed for the analysis of spontaneous adverse event (AE) reports from post-marketing drug surveillance data. The method involves both empirical Bayes (EB) and fully Bayes estimation of rate multipliers for each drug within a class of drugs, for a particular AE, based on a mixed-effects Poisson regression model. Both parametric and semiparametric models for the random-effect distribution are examined. The method is applied to data from Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) on the relationship between antidepressants and suicide. We obtain point estimates and 95 per cent confidence (posterior) intervals for the rate multiplier for each drug (e.g. antidepressants), which can be used to determine whether a particular drug has an increased risk of association with a particular AE (e.g. suicide). Confidence (posterior) intervals that do not include 1.0 provide evidence for either significant protective or harmful associations of the drug and the adverse effect. We also examine EB, parametric Bayes, and semiparametric Bayes estimators of the rate multipliers and associated confidence (posterior) intervals. Results of our analysis of the FDA AERS data revealed that newer antidepressants are associated with lower rates of suicide adverse event reports compared with older antidepressants. We recommend improvements to the existing AERS system, which are likely to improve its public health value as an early warning system. PMID:18404622

  17. Indoor air pollution: Acute adverse health effects and host susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zummo, S.M.; Karol, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Increased awareness of the poor quality of indoor air compared with outdoor air has resulted in a significant amount of research on the adverse health effects and mechanisms of action of indoor air pollutants. Common indoor air agents are identified, along with resultant adverse health effects, mechanisms of action, and likely susceptible populations. Indoor air pollutants range from biological agents (such as dust mites) to chemical irritants (such as nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, and isocyanates). These agents may exert their effects through allergic as well as nonallergic mechanisms. While the public does not generally perceive poor indoor air quality as a significant health risk, increasing reports of illness related to indoor air and an expanding base of knowledge on the health effects of indoor air pollution are likely to continue pushing the issue to the forefront.

  18. Effect of wettability on adverse mobility immiscible floods

    SciTech Connect

    Vives, M.T.; Chang, Y.C.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Many immiscible displacements in reservoirs occur at adverse mobility. Effect of wettability on these displacements is not well understood and often ignored in reservoir simulation. Recent macroscopic theories of viscous fingering treat adverse immiscible flows similar to miscible flows, the mixing in the fingered region being controlled by a Todd-Longstaff-type functional form. The wettability of the medium is taken into account only through the use of appropriate relative permeabilities. The goal of this paper is to understand the macroscopic bypassing in adverse mobility immiscible floods. Immiscible displacements are conducted in a quarter 5-spot model in both drainage and imbibition modes at similar effective mobility ratios and viscous-to-gravity numbers. The level of bypassing and gravity override is visualized and measured. Tertiary water-alternating-gas (WAG) displacements are also conducted at various WAG ratios and viscosity ratios. Fractional flow analysis and numerical simulation are used to understand these displacements. Experiments show that macroscopic viscous fingering is present in adverse viscosity immiscible displacements where no saturation shock is expected from 1-D fractional flow theory. Bypassing due to both fingering and gravity override is higher in the drainage mode than in the imbibition mode, with other key parameters being the same. Optimum WAG ratio in water-wet rock is a function of oil/solvent viscosity ratio. The macroscopic flow theory needs to include capillarity and viscous fingering to match these experimental findings.

  19. Thai traditional massage: Issues causing possible adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2015-01-01

    Thai traditional massage is a widely used massage technique in Thailand and is presently accepted by local Thai Ministry of Public Health. The technique is promoted but not well accepted internationally. There is a concern about the effectiveness as well as safety of this local wisdom. After a recent episode of concurrent acute heart attack and Thai traditional massage in a patient, the issue of possible adverse effects of Thai traditional massage is being widely discussed. PMID:26865746

  20. Energy Drink Consumption: Beneficial and Adverse Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Alsunni, Ahmed Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of energy drinks has been increasing dramatically in the last two decades, particularly amongst adolescents and young adults. Energy drinks are aggressively marketed with the claim that these products give an energy boost to improve physical and cognitive performance. However, studies supporting these claims are limited. In fact, several adverse health effects have been related to energy drink; this has raised the question of whether these beverages are safe. This review was carried out to identify and discuss the published articles that examined the beneficial and adverse health effects related to energy drink. It is concluded that although energy drink may have beneficial effects on physical performance, these products also have possible detrimental health consequences. Marketing of energy drinks should be limited or forbidden until independent research confirms their safety, particularly among adolescents. PMID:26715927

  1. Optimising the retrieval of information on adverse drug effects.

    PubMed

    Golder, Su

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical interventions have brought about many benefits to health, improving the population's well-being and life expectancy. However, these interventions are not without potential harmful side-effects and yet searching for the evidence on adverse effects is challenging. This article summarises a PhD whose main aim was to develop a better understanding of the implications of using different sources and approaches to identifying relevant data on adverse effects. The author is Su Golder, who has recently completed her PhD at the University of York and who has already published several articles on specific aspects of her research, including this journal. This article is the first in the Dissertations into Practice series to report on a PhD study, and it summarises her research in a way which emphasises the implications for practice.

  2. Energy Drink Consumption: Beneficial and Adverse Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Alsunni, Ahmed Abdulrahman

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of energy drinks has been increasing dramatically in the last two decades, particularly amongst adolescents and young adults. Energy drinks are aggressively marketed with the claim that these products give an energy boost to improve physical and cognitive performance. However, studies supporting these claims are limited. In fact, several adverse health effects have been related to energy drink; this has raised the question of whether these beverages are safe. This review was carried out to identify and discuss the published articles that examined the beneficial and adverse health effects related to energy drink. It is concluded that although energy drink may have beneficial effects on physical performance, these products also have possible detrimental health consequences. Marketing of energy drinks should be limited or forbidden until independent research confirms their safety, particularly among adolescents. PMID:26715927

  3. TOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER DERIVED FROM THE DESTRUCTION OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    May 15, 2002
    Abstract submitted by Stephen H. Gavett for American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) annual meeting October 7-11, 2002 in Charlotte, NC.

    TOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER DERIVED FROM THE DESTRUCTION OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER
    Stephen H ...

  4. Ocular surface adverse effects of ambient levels of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, André Augusto Miranda; Novaes, Priscila; Matsuda, Monique; Alves, Milton Ruiz; Monteiro, Mário Luiz Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized today that outdoor air pollution can affect human health. Various chemical components that are present in ambient pollution may have an irritant effect on the mucous membranes of the body, particularly those of the respiratory tract. Much less attention has been focused on the adverse effect on the ocular surface, despite the fact that this structure is even more exposed to air pollution than the respiratory mucosa since only a very thin tear film separates the corneal and conjunctival epithelia from the air pollutants. So far, clinical data are the more widespread tools used by ophthalmologists for assessing possible aggression to the ocular surface; however, clinical findings alone appears not to correlate properly with the complaints presented by the patients pointing out the need for further clinical and laboratory studies on the subject. The purpose of this study is to review signs and symptoms associated with chronic long-term exposure to environmental air pollutants on the ocular structures currently defined as the ocular surface and to review clinical and laboratory tests used to investigate the adverse effects of air pollutants on such structures. We also review previous studies that investigated the adverse effects of air pollution on the ocular surface and discuss the need for further investigation on the subject.

  5. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers.

  6. The adverse effects of sorafenib in patients with advanced cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Gao, Zu-Hua; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Sorafenib is the first multi-kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular cancer (HCC) and metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) and is increasingly being used to treat patients with well-differentiated radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer (DTC). Sorafenib demonstrates targeted activity on several families of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases that are involved in angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastatic progression of cancer. Sorafenib treatment results in long-term efficacy and low incidence of life-threatening toxicities. Although sorafenib has demonstrated many benefits in patients, the adverse effects cannot be ignored. The most common treatment-related toxicities include diarrhoea, fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction and hypertension. Most of these toxicities are considered mild to moderate and manageable to varying degrees; however, cardiovascular events might lead to death. In this MiniReview, we summarize the adverse effects of sorafenib that commonly occur in patients with advanced cancers. PMID:25495944

  7. Psychological adverse effects of cannabis smoking: a tentative classification.

    PubMed

    Nigrete, J C

    1973-01-20

    This paper stresses the need for an early definition and description of the "deviant" cannabis smoker in North America. Attention is called to the fact that on this continent heavy smokers have not yet been separated as "problem" users from other smokers.A comprehensive review of possible psychological adverse effects of the drug is made. The following classification is suggested: a) Severe intoxications, b) Pathological intoxications, c) Acute cannabis psychoses, d) Subacute and chronic cannabis psychoses and e) Residual conditions.

  8. Psychological adverse effects of cannabis smoking: a tentative classification.

    PubMed

    Nigrete, J C

    1973-01-20

    This paper stresses the need for an early definition and description of the "deviant" cannabis smoker in North America. Attention is called to the fact that on this continent heavy smokers have not yet been separated as "problem" users from other smokers.A comprehensive review of possible psychological adverse effects of the drug is made. The following classification is suggested: a) Severe intoxications, b) Pathological intoxications, c) Acute cannabis psychoses, d) Subacute and chronic cannabis psychoses and e) Residual conditions. PMID:4569453

  9. Pharmacogenomics of statins: understanding susceptibility to adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Mikulik, Eduard B; Dauki, Anees M; Murkherjee, Chandrama; Luzum, Jasmine A

    2016-01-01

    Statins are a cornerstone of the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerotic disease is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Statins are among the most commonly prescribed classes of medications, and their prescribing indications and target patient populations have been significantly expanded in the official guidelines recently published by the American and European expert panels. Adverse effects of statin pharmacotherapy, however, result in significant cost and morbidity and can lead to nonadherence and discontinuation of therapy. Statin-associated muscle symptoms occur in ~10% of patients on statins and constitute the most commonly reported adverse effect associated with statin pharmacotherapy. Substantial clinical and nonclinical research effort has been dedicated to determining whether genetics can provide meaningful insight regarding an individual patient’s risk of statin adverse effects. This contemporary review of the relevant clinical research on polymorphisms in several key genes that affect statin pharmacokinetics (eg, transporters and metabolizing enzymes), statin efficacy (eg, drug targets and pathways), and end-organ toxicity (eg, myopathy pathways) highlights several promising pharmacogenomic candidates. However, SLCO1B1 521C is currently the only clinically relevant pharmacogenetic test regarding statin toxicity, and its relevance is limited to simvastatin myopathy. PMID:27757045

  10. Do recent data from the Seychelles Islands alter the conclusions of the NRC Report on the toxicological effects of methylmercury?

    PubMed

    Stern, Alan H; Jacobson, Joseph L; Ryan, Louise; Burke, Thomas A

    2004-01-30

    In 2000, the National Research Council (NRC), an arm of the National Academy of Sciences, released a report entitled, "Toxicological Effects of Methylmercury." The overall conclusion of that report was that, at levels of exposure in some fish- and marine mammal-consuming communities (including those in the Faroe Islands and New Zealand), subtle but significant adverse effects on neuropsychological development were occurring as a result of in utero exposure. Since the release of that report, there has been continuing discussion of the public health relevance of current levels of exposure to Methylmercury. Much of this discussion has been linked to the release of the most recent longitudinal update of the Seychelles Island study. It has recently been posited that these findings supercede those of the NRC committee, and that based on the Seychelles findings, there is little or no risk of adverse neurodevelopmental effects at current levels of exposure. In this commentary, members of the NRC committee address the conclusions from the NRC report in light of the recent Seychelles data. We conclude that no evidence has emerged since the publication of the NRC report that alters the findings of that report. PMID:14754462

  11. Ecological and toxicological effects of inorganic nitrogen pollution in aquatic ecosystems: A global assessment.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Julio A; Alonso, Alvaro

    2006-08-01

    We provide a global assessment, with detailed multi-scale data, of the ecological and toxicological effects generated by inorganic nitrogen pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Our synthesis of the published scientific literature shows three major environmental problems: (1) it can increase the concentration of hydrogen ions in freshwater ecosystems without much acid-neutralizing capacity, resulting in acidification of those systems; (2) it can stimulate or enhance the development, maintenance and proliferation of primary producers, resulting in eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems; (3) it can reach toxic levels that impair the ability of aquatic animals to survive, grow and reproduce. Inorganic nitrogen pollution of ground and surface waters can also induce adverse effects on human health and economy. Because reductions in SO2 emissions have reduced the atmospheric deposition of H2SO4 across large portions of North America and Europe, while emissions of NOx have gone unchecked, HNO3 is now playing an increasing role in the acidification of freshwater ecosystems. This acidification process has caused several adverse effects on primary and secondary producers, with significant biotic impoverishments, particularly concerning invertebrates and fishes, in many atmospherically acidified lakes and streams. The cultural eutrophication of freshwater, estuarine, and coastal marine ecosystems can cause ecological and toxicological effects that are either directly or indirectly related to the proliferation of primary producers. Extensive kills of both invertebrates and fishes are probably the most dramatic manifestation of hypoxia (or anoxia) in eutrophic and hypereutrophic aquatic ecosystems with low water turnover rates. The decline in dissolved oxygen concentrations can also promote the formation of reduced compounds, such as hydrogen sulphide, resulting in higher adverse (toxic) effects on aquatic animals. Additionally, the occurrence of toxic algae can significantly

  12. Adverse effects of common medications on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Samplaski, Mary K; Nangia, Ajay K

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of patients require long-term medication regimens at a young age, but the adverse effects of medications on male reproduction are often inadequately considered, recognized and investigated. Medications can affect male reproduction through central hormonal effects, direct gonadotoxic effects, effects on sperm function or on sexual function. For example, exogenous testosterone inhibits spermatogenesis through central suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal hormonal axis. 5α-reductase inhibitors can impair sexual function, decrease semen volume and negatively affect sperm parameters, depending on dose and treatment duration. α-Blockers might decrease seminal emission and cause retrograde ejaculation, depending on the receptor specificity and dose of the agent. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors seem to have variable effects based on the isoform inhibited and evidence is conflicting. Antihypertensive and psychotropic agents can affect sperm, sexual function and hormonal parameters. For antibiotics, the literature on effects on sperm and sperm function is limited and dated. Many chemotherapeutic agents have a direct gonadotoxic effect, depending on agents used, dosing and number of treatment cycles. Overall, many medications commonly used in urology can have effects on male fertility (mostly reversible) but conclusive evidence in humans is often limited. Men should be counselled appropriately about potential drug-related adverse effects on their fertility.

  13. Adverse effects of creatine supplementation: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Poortmans, J R; Francaux, M

    2000-09-01

    The consumption of oral creatine monohydrate has become increasingly common among professional and amateur athletes. Despite numerous publications on the ergogenic effects of this naturally occurring substance, there is little information on the possible adverse effects of this supplement. The objectives of this review are to identify the scientific facts and contrast them with reports in the news media, which have repeatedly emphasised the health risks of creatine supplementation and do not hesitate to draw broad conclusions from individual case reports. Exogenous creatine supplements are often consumed by athletes in amounts of up to 20 g/day for a few days, followed by 1 to 10 g/day for weeks, months and even years. Usually, consumers do not report any adverse effects, but body mass increases. There are few reports that creatine supplementation has protective effects in heart, muscle and neurological diseases. Gastrointestinal disturbances and muscle cramps have been reported occasionally in healthy individuals, but the effects are anecdotal. Liver and kidney dysfunction have also been suggested on the basis of small changes in markers of organ function and of occasional case reports, but well controlled studies on the adverse effects of exogenous creatine supplementation are almost nonexistent. We have investigated liver changes during medium term (4 weeks) creatine supplementation in young athletes. None showed any evidence of dysfunction on the basis of serum enzymes and urea production. Short term (5 days), medium term (9 weeks) and long term (up to 5 years) oral creatine supplementation has been studied in small cohorts of athletes whose kidney function was monitored by clearance methods and urine protein excretion rate. We did not find any adverse effects on renal function. The present review is not intended to reach conclusions on the effect of creatine supplementation on sport performance, but we believe that there is no evidence for deleterious effects

  14. A Review of Epidemiological Research on Adverse Neurological Effects of Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Ha, Sandie Uyen; Basnet, Rakshya

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of epidemiological research reporting the neurological effects of ambient air pollution. We examined current evidence, identified the strengths and weaknesses of published epidemiological studies, and suggest future directions for research in this area. Studies were identified through a systematic search of online scientific databases, in addition to a manual search of the reference lists from the identified papers. Despite being a relatively new area of investigation, overall, there is mounting evidence implicating adverse effects of air pollution on neurobehavioral function in both adults and children. Further research is needed to expand our understanding of these relationships, including improvement in the accuracy of exposure assessments; focusing on specific toxicants and their relationships to specific health endpoints, such as neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases; investigating the combined neurological effects of multiple air pollutants; and further exploration of genetic susceptibility for neurotoxicity of air pollution. In order to achieve these goals collaborative efforts are needed from multidisciplinary teams, including experts in toxicology, biostatistics, geographical science, epidemiology, and neurology.

  15. A Review of Epidemiological Research on Adverse Neurological Effects of Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohui; Ha, Sandie Uyen; Basnet, Rakshya

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of epidemiological research reporting the neurological effects of ambient air pollution. We examined current evidence, identified the strengths and weaknesses of published epidemiological studies, and suggest future directions for research in this area. Studies were identified through a systematic search of online scientific databases, in addition to a manual search of the reference lists from the identified papers. Despite being a relatively new area of investigation, overall, there is mounting evidence implicating adverse effects of air pollution on neurobehavioral function in both adults and children. Further research is needed to expand our understanding of these relationships, including improvement in the accuracy of exposure assessments; focusing on specific toxicants and their relationships to specific health endpoints, such as neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases; investigating the combined neurological effects of multiple air pollutants; and further exploration of genetic susceptibility for neurotoxicity of air pollution. In order to achieve these goals collaborative efforts are needed from multidisciplinary teams, including experts in toxicology, biostatistics, geographical science, epidemiology, and neurology. PMID:27547751

  16. A Review of Epidemiological Research on Adverse Neurological Effects of Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Ha, Sandie Uyen; Basnet, Rakshya

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of epidemiological research reporting the neurological effects of ambient air pollution. We examined current evidence, identified the strengths and weaknesses of published epidemiological studies, and suggest future directions for research in this area. Studies were identified through a systematic search of online scientific databases, in addition to a manual search of the reference lists from the identified papers. Despite being a relatively new area of investigation, overall, there is mounting evidence implicating adverse effects of air pollution on neurobehavioral function in both adults and children. Further research is needed to expand our understanding of these relationships, including improvement in the accuracy of exposure assessments; focusing on specific toxicants and their relationships to specific health endpoints, such as neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases; investigating the combined neurological effects of multiple air pollutants; and further exploration of genetic susceptibility for neurotoxicity of air pollution. In order to achieve these goals collaborative efforts are needed from multidisciplinary teams, including experts in toxicology, biostatistics, geographical science, epidemiology, and neurology. PMID:27547751

  17. Moving Upstream: Evaluating Adverse Upstream Endpoints for Improved Risk Assessment and Decision-Making

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Assessing adverse effects from environmental chemical exposure is integral to public health policies. Toxicology assays identifying early biological changes from chemical exposure are increasing our ability to evaluate links between early biological disturbances and ...

  18. Genetic toxicology: web resources.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert R

    2002-04-25

    Genetic toxicology is the scientific discipline dealing with the effects of chemical, physical and biological agents on the heredity of living organisms. The Internet offers a wide range of online digital resources for the field of Genetic Toxicology. The history of genetic toxicology and electronic data collections are reviewed. Web-based resources at US National Library of Medicine (NLM), including MEDLINE, PUBMED, Gateway, Entrez, and TOXNET, are discussed. Search strategies and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) are reviewed in the context of genetic toxicology. The TOXNET group of databases are discussed with emphasis on those databases with genetic toxicology content including GENE-TOX, TOXLINE, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, Integrated Risk Information System, and Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System. Location of chemical information including chemical structure and linkage to health and regulatory information using CHEMIDPLUS at NLM and other databases is reviewed. Various government agencies have active genetic toxicology research programs or use genetic toxicology data to assist fulfilling the agency's mission. Online resources at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) are outlined. Much of the genetic toxicology for pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals and pesticides that is performed in the world is regulatory-driven. Regulatory web resources are presented for the laws mandating testing, guidelines on study design, Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, and requirements for electronic data collection and reporting. The Internet provides a range of other supporting resources to the field of genetic toxicology. The web links for key professional societies and journals in genetic toxicology are listed. Distance education, educational media resources, and job placement services are also

  19. Subchronic dispositional and toxicological effects of arsenate administered in drinking water to mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.F.; Thompson, D.J.

    1996-10-11

    Exposure to the drinking water contaminant arsenate is a daily occurrence and there are concerns that this exposure may lead to cancer. Although the acute dispositional effects of arsenate have been studied in detail, there is minimal information on the disposition and toxicological effects of it after continuous exposure. The objective of this study was to examine in mice the effect of a 4-wk treatment with arsenate administered in drinking water. Female B6C3F1 mice were housed in metabolism cages and given water and food ad libitum. Two groups (A,B) of mice were treated with distilled water or water containing 0.025 mg/L (L) or 2.5 mg/L (H) arsenate. Several toxicological effects were observed in animals administered arsenate in drinking water, but no changes in the disposition of this arsenical were detected at the doses used in this study. 86 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Analytical toxicology.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, R J; Widdop, B; Ramsey, J D; Loveland, M

    1988-09-01

    1. Major advances in analytical toxicology followed the introduction of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques in the 1940s and early 1950s and thin layer chromatography remains important together with some spectrophotometric and other tests. However, gas- and high performance-liquid chromatography together with a variety of immunoassay techniques are now widely used. 2. The scope and complexity of forensic and clinical toxicology continues to increase, although the compounds for which emergency analyses are needed to guide therapy are few. Exclusion of the presence of hypnotic drugs can be important in suspected 'brain death' cases. 3. Screening for drugs of abuse has assumed greater importance not only for the management of the habituated patient, but also in 'pre-employment' and 'employment' screening. The detection of illicit drug administration in sport is also an area of increasing importance. 4. In industrial toxicology, the range of compounds for which blood or urine measurements (so called 'biological monitoring') can indicate the degree of exposure is increasing. The monitoring of environmental contaminants (lead, chlorinated pesticides) in biological samples has also proved valuable. 5. In the near future a consensus as to the units of measurement to be used is urgently required and more emphasis will be placed on interpretation, especially as regards possible behavioural effects of drugs or other poisons. Despite many advances in analytical techniques there remains a need for reliable, simple tests to detect poisons for use in smaller hospital and other laboratories.

  1. Adverse Outcome Pathways and Ecological Risk Assessment: Bridging to Population-Level Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Vincent J.; Etterson, Matthew A.; Hecker, Markus; Murphy, Cheryl A.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Spade, Daniel J.; Spromberg, Julann A.; Wang, Magnus; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2010-11-24

    The viability of populations of plants and animals is a key focus for environmental regulation. Population-level responses integrate the cumulative effects of chemical stressors on individuals as those individuals interact with and are affected by their con-specifics, competitors, predators, prey, habitat and other biotic and abiotic factors. Models of population-level effects of contaminants can integrate information from lower levels of biological organization and feed that information into higher-level community and ecosystem models. As individual-level endpoints are utilized to predict population responses, this requires that biological responses at lower levels of organization be translated into a form that is useable by the population modeler. In this paper we describe how mechanistic data, as captured in adverse outcome pathways, can be translated into modeling focused on population-level risk assessments. First, we present a succinct overview of different approaches to population modeling, and discuss the types of data needed for these models. Then we discuss how toxicity data are used currently for population modeling, and provide recommendations as to how testing might be modified to better generate information to support modeling. From this we describe how different key processes measured at the level of the individual serve as the bridge between mechanistic toxicology data and predictions of population status, and provide case examples of how this linkage has been/can be achieved.

  2. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  3. Genetics of Common Antipsychotic-Induced Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Raymond R; Müller, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs is limited due to accompanying adverse effects which can pose considerable health risks and lead to patient noncompliance. Pharmacogenetics (PGx) offers a means to identify genetic biomarkers that can predict individual susceptibility to antipsychotic-induced adverse effects (AAEs), thereby improving clinical outcomes. We reviewed the literature on the PGx of common AAEs from 2010 to 2015, placing emphasis on findings that have been independently replicated and which have additionally been listed to be of interest by PGx expert panels. Gene-drug associations meeting these criteria primarily pertain to metabolic dysregulation, extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), and tardive dyskinesia (TD). Regarding metabolic dysregulation, results have reaffirmed HTR2C as a strong candidate with potential clinical utility, while MC4R and OGFR1 gene loci have emerged as new and promising biomarkers for the prediction of weight gain. As for EPS and TD, additional evidence has accumulated in support of an association with CYP2D6 metabolizer status. Furthermore, HSPG2 and DPP6 have been identified as candidate genes with the potential to predict differential susceptibility to TD. Overall, considerable progress has been made within the field of psychiatric PGx, with inroads toward the development of clinical tools that can mitigate AAEs. Going forward, studies placing a greater emphasis on multilocus effects will need to be conducted. PMID:27606321

  4. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  5. Psychological adverse effects of cannabis smoking: a tentative classification

    PubMed Central

    Negrete, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    This paper stresses the need for an early definition and description of the “deviant” cannabis smoker in North America. Attention is called to the fact that on this continent heavy smokers have not yet been separated as “problem” users from other smokers. A comprehensive review of possible psychological adverse effects of the drug is made. The following classification is suggested: a) Severe intoxications, b) Pathological intoxications, c) Acute cannabis psychoses, d) Subacute and chronic cannabis psychoses and e) Residual conditions. PMID:4569453

  6. Adverse Psychiatric Effects Associated with Herbal Weight-Loss Products

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, F. Saverio; Coviello, Marialuce; Imperatori, Claudio; Francesconi, Marta; Hough, Christina M.; Valeriani, Giuseppe; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Bolzan Mariotti Posocco, Flaminia; Santacroce, Rita; Minichino, Amedeo; Corazza, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and overeating are among the most prevalent health concerns worldwide and individuals are increasingly using performance and image-enhancing drugs (PIEDs) as an easy and fast way to control their weight. Among these, herbal weight-loss products (HWLPs) often attract users due to their health claims, assumed safety, easy availability, affordable price, extensive marketing, and the perceived lack of need for professional oversight. Reports suggest that certain HWLPs may lead to onset or exacerbation of psychiatric disturbances. Here we review the available evidence on psychiatric adverse effects of HWLPs due to their intrinsic toxicity and potential for interaction with psychiatric medications. PMID:26457296

  7. CN-15ADVERSE EFFECTS OF BEVACIZUMAB IN BRAIN TUMOR PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Tushar; Ladha, Harshad; Mandel, Jacob; Gilbert, Mark; O'Brien, Barbara; Hamza, Mohamed; Armstrong, Terri

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bevacizumab is humanized monoclonal antibody inhibiting angiogenesis and the only FDA approved treatment for recurrent glioblastoma. The aim of this study was to look at the occurrence of various adverse effects associated with use of bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma. METHODS: In this retrospective chart review, we studied 280 patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with Bevacizumab between 2005-2011 to characterize the known adverse effects of bevacizumab including hypertension, grade 3-4 myelosuppression, wound healing complications, thrombo-embolic events, stroke, hemorrhage and gastrointestinal complications. RESULTS: The study population included 168 males and 112 females. The median age was 53.5 years(range 8.1-81.3). TREATMENT: Bevacizumab only(58), Bevacizumab + CPT(11), Bevacizumab + TMZ(32) or Bevacizumab + Other(34). Patients were treated at recurrence(1st = 96; 2nd = 126, 3rd = 58). Hypertension was the most common adverse effect occurring in 131(49%). The median duration from treatment start to development was 82 days (Range 7-1143). However, only 33(25%) were started on antihypertensive medication. Grade 3-4 Myelosuppression occurred in 52(19%)causing treatment discontinuation in 8. Thrombo-embolic events were reported in 5%(15) patients including DVT(9), PE(2), Central venous thrombosis(1) and Stroke(3). Thirty-six patients (13%) were on anti-coagulant medication at bevacizumab initiation. Median time to a thromboembolic complication was 113 days (Range 8-1145). Wound healing complications were noted in 7(3%) patients, 3 craniotomy dehiscence and 4 at soft tissue sites. Five patients (2%) developed GI complications, including perforations(3), pancreatitis(1), and diverticulitis(1). Median time to development was 92 days(Range 10-651). There was a high rate 46%(129) of grade 3-4 lymphocytopenia; median time to develop lymphocytopenia was 50 days(Range = 3-564). CONCLUSION: The range of toxicities was similar to other reports

  8. Behavioral toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Needleman, H.L.

    1995-09-01

    The new fields of behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology investigate the outcome of specific toxic exposures in humans and animals on learning, memory, and behavioral characteristics. Three important classes of behavioral neurotoxicants are metals, solvents, and pesticides. The clearest data on the deleterious effects of prenatal exposure to toxicants comes from the study of two metals, lead and mercury, and form epidemiological investigations of the effects of alcohol taken during pregnancy. Less complete data are available for two other groups of agents, solvents, and pesticides. What we do know about their effects on the fetal brain is convincing enough to make us demand caution in their distribution. 15 refs.

  9. The combined toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and bisphenol A on zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Lin, Bencheng; Hu, Chuanlu; Zhang, Huashan; Lin, Zhiqing; Xi, Zhuge

    2014-08-01

    Environmental pollutants co-exist and exhibit interaction effects that are different from those associated with a single pollutant. As one of the more commonly manufactured nanomaterials, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are most likely to bind to other contaminants in water. In this paper, we aimed to study the combined toxicological effects of TiO2-NPs and bisphenol A (BPA) on organism. First, in vitro adsorption experiments were conducted to determine the adsorptive interaction between TiO2-NPs and BPA. Second, zebrafish embryo toxicity tests were performed to monitor for changes in the toxicological effects associated with the two chemicals. The study results demonstrated that adsorptive interactions exist between the two chemicals and increased toxicity effects which included an advanced toxicological effect time, decreased survival, increased morphological abnormalities, and delayed embryo hatching. Also, we suggest that the mode of combined action has a synergistic effect. Based on this, we postulate that concomitant exposure to TiO2-NPs and BPA increased BPA bioavailability and uptake into cells and organisms. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of interactions of this mixture.

  10. Adverse effects of bisphenol A on male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Manfo, Faustin Pascal Tsagué; Jubendradass, Rajamanickam; Nantia, Edouard Akono; Moundipa, Paul Fewou; Mathur, Premendu Prakash

    2014-01-01

    BPA is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, resulting mainly from manufacturing,use or disposal of plastics of which it is a component, and the degradation of industrial plastic-related wastes. Growing evidence from research on laboratory animals, wildlife, and humans supports the view that BPA produces an endocrine disrupting effect and adversely affects male reproductive function. To better understand the adverse effects caused by exposure to BPA, we performed an up-to-date literature review on the topic, with particular emphasis on in utero exposure, and associated effects on spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis, and accessory organs.BPA studies on experimental animals show that effects are generally more detrimental during in utero exposure, a critical developmental stage for the embryo. BPA has been found to produce several defects in the embryo, such as feminization of male fetuses, atrophy of the testes and epididymides, increased prostate size, shortening of AGD, disruption of BTB, and alteration of adult sperm parameters (e.g.,sperm count, motility, and density). BPA also affects embryo thyroid development.During the postnatal and pubertal periods and adulthood, BPA affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis by modulating hormone (e.g., LH and FSH,androgen and estrogen) synthesis, expression and function of respective receptors(ER, AR). These effects alter sperm parameters. BPA also induces oxidative stress in the testis and epididymis, by inhibiting antioxidant enzymes and stimulating lipid peroxidation. This suggests that employing antioxidants may be a promising strategy to relieve BPA-induced disturbances.Epidemiological studies have also provided data indicating that BPA alters male reproductive function in humans. These investigations revealed that men occupationally exposed to BPA had high blood/urinary BPA levels, and abnormal semen parameters. BPA-exposed men also showed reduced libido and erectile ejaculatory difficulties; moreover, the

  11. Adverse effects of outdoor pollution in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Baldacci, Sandra; Maio, Sara; Cerrai, Sonia; Sarno, Giuseppe; Viegi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    With fewer newborns and people living longer, older people are making up an increasing fraction of the total population. Epidemiological evidence shows that older-age-related health problems affect a wide and expanding proportion of the world population. One of the major epidemiological trends of this century is the rise of chronic diseases that affect more elderly than younger people. A total of 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012 are attributable to outdoor air pollution; the susceptibility to adverse effects of air pollution is expected to differ widely between people and within the same person, and also over time. Frailty history, a measure of multi-system decline, modifies cumulative associations between air pollution and lung function. Moreover, pre-existing diseases may determine susceptibility. In the elderly, due to comorbidity, exposure to air pollutants may even be fatal. Rapid and not-well-planned urbanization is associated with high level of ambient air pollution, mainly caused by vehicular exhausts. In general, there is sufficient evidence of the adverse effects related to short-term exposure, while fewer studies have addressed the longer-term health effects. Increased pollution exposures have been associated with increased mortality, hospital admissions/emergency-room visits, mainly due to exacerbations of chronic diseases or to respiratory tract infections (e.g., pneumonia). These effects may also be modulated by ambient temperature and many studies show that the elderly are mostly vulnerable to heat waves. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well-documented, while less is known regarding the associations with hospital admissions. Chronic exposure to elevated levels of air pollution has been related to the incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis (CB), asthma, and emphysema. There is also growing evidence suggesting adverse effects on lung function related to long-term exposure

  12. Adverse effects of outdoor pollution in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Marzia; Baldacci, Sandra; Maio, Sara; Cerrai, Sonia; Sarno, Giuseppe; Viegi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    With fewer newborns and people living longer, older people are making up an increasing fraction of the total population. Epidemiological evidence shows that older-age-related health problems affect a wide and expanding proportion of the world population. One of the major epidemiological trends of this century is the rise of chronic diseases that affect more elderly than younger people. A total of 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012 are attributable to outdoor air pollution; the susceptibility to adverse effects of air pollution is expected to differ widely between people and within the same person, and also over time. Frailty history, a measure of multi-system decline, modifies cumulative associations between air pollution and lung function. Moreover, pre-existing diseases may determine susceptibility. In the elderly, due to comorbidity, exposure to air pollutants may even be fatal. Rapid and not-well-planned urbanization is associated with high level of ambient air pollution, mainly caused by vehicular exhausts. In general, there is sufficient evidence of the adverse effects related to short-term exposure, while fewer studies have addressed the longer-term health effects. Increased pollution exposures have been associated with increased mortality, hospital admissions/emergency-room visits, mainly due to exacerbations of chronic diseases or to respiratory tract infections (e.g., pneumonia). These effects may also be modulated by ambient temperature and many studies show that the elderly are mostly vulnerable to heat waves. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well-documented, while less is known regarding the associations with hospital admissions. Chronic exposure to elevated levels of air pollution has been related to the incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis (CB), asthma, and emphysema. There is also growing evidence suggesting adverse effects on lung function related to long-term exposure

  13. Adverse effects of outdoor pollution in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Marzia; Baldacci, Sandra; Maio, Sara; Cerrai, Sonia; Sarno, Giuseppe; Viegi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    With fewer newborns and people living longer, older people are making up an increasing fraction of the total population. Epidemiological evidence shows that older-age-related health problems affect a wide and expanding proportion of the world population. One of the major epidemiological trends of this century is the rise of chronic diseases that affect more elderly than younger people. A total of 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012 are attributable to outdoor air pollution; the susceptibility to adverse effects of air pollution is expected to differ widely between people and within the same person, and also over time. Frailty history, a measure of multi-system decline, modifies cumulative associations between air pollution and lung function. Moreover, pre-existing diseases may determine susceptibility. In the elderly, due to comorbidity, exposure to air pollutants may even be fatal. Rapid and not-well-planned urbanization is associated with high level of ambient air pollution, mainly caused by vehicular exhausts. In general, there is sufficient evidence of the adverse effects related to short-term exposure, while fewer studies have addressed the longer-term health effects. Increased pollution exposures have been associated with increased mortality, hospital admissions/emergency-room visits, mainly due to exacerbations of chronic diseases or to respiratory tract infections (e.g., pneumonia). These effects may also be modulated by ambient temperature and many studies show that the elderly are mostly vulnerable to heat waves. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well-documented, while less is known regarding the associations with hospital admissions. Chronic exposure to elevated levels of air pollution has been related to the incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis (CB), asthma, and emphysema. There is also growing evidence suggesting adverse effects on lung function related to long-term exposure

  14. [Eco-toxicological effect of metal-based nanoparticles on plants: Research progress].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai; Peng, Cheng; Yang, Jian-Jun; Shi, Ji-yan

    2013-03-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology and the potential environmental risk of wide application of artificial nanoparticles (NPs) have raised considerable concerns. Metal-based nanoparticles (MB NPs) have dual-toxicity of metal and NPs, and thus, their bio-toxicity and ecological risk are the hotspots in the studies of nanotoxicology. Plant, as a main component of ecosystem, is a potential pathway for NPs bioaccumulation and entering into food chain. This paper discussed the MB NPs absorption, translocation, and accumulation by plants, and summarized the eco-toxicological effect of MB NPs on plants and related mechanisms. The factors affecting the phytotoxicity of MB NPs were approached, and the research progress on the eco-toxicological effect of MB NPs on plants, especially on food crops, was reviewed. Also, the existing problems in present MB NPs phytotoxicity studies were analyzed, and the future research directions were proposed.

  15. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers. PMID:25069381

  16. Pharmacovigilance, risks and adverse effects of self-medication.

    PubMed

    Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Abadie, Delphine; Lacroix, Isabelle; Berreni, Aurélia; Pugnet, Grégory; Durrieu, Geneviève; Sailler, Laurent; Giroud, Jean-Paul; Damase-Michel, Christine; Montastruc, François

    2016-04-01

    Self-medication means resorting to one or more drugs in order to treat oneself without the help of a doctor. This phenomenon is developing fast. In this review, we will discuss the main definitions of self-medication; we will then present a few important characteristics of this therapeutic practice: prevalence, reasons, populations involved and drugs used. Whilst the theoretical risks of self-medication have been abundantly discussed in the literature (adverse effects, interactions, product, dosage or treatment duration errors, difficulty in self-diagnosis, risk of addiction or abuse…), there is in fact very little detailed pharmacovigilance data concerning the characteristics and the consequences of this usage in real life. This study therefore describes the all too rare data that is available: patients, clinical characteristics, "seriousness" and drugs involved in the adverse effects of self-medication. It also discusses leads to be followed in order to minimize medication risks, which are obviously not well known and clearly not sufficiently notified.

  17. Possible adverse effects of frying with vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Dobarganes, Carmen; Márquez-Ruiz, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    The question of whether heated fats in the diet may be detrimental to health is nowadays of the upmost concern, but finding an answer is not easy and requires careful consideration of different aspects of lipid oxidation. This review is divided into two sections. The first part deals with the nature of the new compounds formed at high temperature in the frying process as well as their occurrence in the diet while the second part focuses on their possible nutritional and physiological effects. Oxidation products present in abused frying fats and oils are the compounds most suspected of impairing the nutritional properties of the oils or involving adverse physiological effects. The recent studies on their health implications include those related to their fate and those focused on their effects in metabolic pathways and the most prevalent diseases.

  18. Symptomatic sinus bradycardia: A rare adverse effect of intravenous ondansetron

    PubMed Central

    Moazzam, Md Shahnawaz; Nasreen, Farah; Bano, Shahjahan; Amir, Syed Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Ondansetron is a serotonin receptor antagonist which has been used frequently to reduce the incidence of post-operative nausea and vomiting in laparoscopic surgery. It has become very popular drug for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting due to its superiority in-terms of efficacy as well as lack of side effects and drug interactions. Although cardiovascular adverse effects of this drug are rare, we found a case of symptomatic sinus bradycardia in a 43-year-old female patient, going for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, who developed the same after she was given intravenous ondansetron in operation theater during premedication. Hence, we report this case, as the rare possibility of encountering bradycardia effect after intravenous administration of ondansetron should be born in mind. PMID:21655029

  19. Clinical outcomes and adverse effect monitoring in allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Juniper, Elizabeth F; Ståhl, Elisabeth; Doty, Richard L; Simons, F Estelle R; Allen, David B; Howarth, Peter H

    2005-03-01

    The subjective recording in diary cards of symptoms of itch, sneeze, nose running, and blockage, with the use of a rating scale to indicate the level of severity, is usual for clinical trials in allergic rhinitis. The primary outcome measure is usually a composite score that enables a single total symptoms score endpoint. It is appreciated, however, that rhinitis has a greater effect on the individual than is reflected purely by the recording of anterior nasal symptoms. Nasal obstruction is troublesome and may lead to sleep disturbance in addition to impaired daytime concentration and daytime sleepiness. These impairments affect school and work performance. Individuals with rhinitis find it socially embarrassing to be seen sneezing, sniffing, or blowing their nose. To capture these and other aspects of the disease-specific health-related quality of life, questionnaires such as the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire have been developed and validated for clinical trial use. The adoption of health-related quality of life questionnaires into clinical trials broadens the information obtained regarding the effect of the therapeutic intervention and helps focus on issues relevant to the individual patient. It must be appreciated that it is not only the disease that may adversely affect health-related quality of life; administered therapy, although intended to be beneficial, may also cause health impairment. Adverse-event monitoring is thus essential in clinical trials. The first-generation H 1 -histamines, because of their effect on central H 1 -receptors, are classically associated with central nervous system (CNS) effects such as sedation. Although this is not always perceived by the patient, it is clearly evident with objective performance testing, and positron emission tomography scanning has directly demonstrated the central H 1 -receptor occupancy. The second-generation H 1 -antihistamines have reduced central H 1 -receptor occupancy and considerably

  20. Adverse testicular effects of Botox® in mature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Breikaa, Randa M.; Mosli, Hisham A.; Nagy, Ayman A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2014-03-01

    Botox® injections are taking a consistently increasing place in urology. Intracremasteric injections, particularly, have been applied for cryptorchidism and painful testicular spasms. Studies outlining their safety for this use are, however, scanty. Thus, the present study aimed at evaluating possible testicular toxicity of Botox® injections and their effect on male fertility. Mature rats were given intracremasteric Botox® injections (10, 20 and 40 U/kg) three times in a two-week interval. Changes in body and testes weights were examined and gonadosomatic index compared to control group. Semen quality, sperm parameters, fructose, protein, cholesterol and triglycerides contents were assessed. Effects on normal testicular function were investigated by measuring testosterone levels and changes in enzyme activities (lactate dehydrogenase-X and acid phosphatase). To draw a complete picture, changes in oxidative and inflammatory states were examined, in addition to the extent of connective tissue deposition between seminiferous tubules. In an attempt to have more accurate information about possible spermatotoxic effects of Botox®, flowcytometric analysis and histopathological examination were carried out. Botox®-injected rats showed altered testicular physiology and function. Seminiferous tubules were separated by dense fibers, especially with the highest dose. Flowcytometric analysis showed a decrease in mature sperms and histopathology confirmed the findings. The oxidative state was, however, comparable to control group. This study is the first to show that intracremasteric injections of Botox® induce adverse testicular effects evidenced by inhibited spermatogenesis and initiation of histopathological changes. In conclusion, decreased fertility may be a serious problem Botox® injections could cause. - Highlights: • Botox® injections are the trend nowadays, for both medical and non-medical uses. • They were recently suggested for cryptorchidism and

  1. European guidelines on managing adverse effects of medication for ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Banaschewski, T.; Buitelaar, J.; Coghill, D.; Danckaerts, M.; Dittmann, R. W.; Döpfner, M.; Hamilton, R.; Hollis, C.; Holtmann, M.; Hulpke-Wette, M.; Lecendreux, M.; Rosenthal, E.; Rothenberger, A.; Santosh, P.; Sergeant, J.; Simonoff, E.; Sonuga-Barke, E.; Wong, I. C. K.; Zuddas, A.; Steinhausen, H.-C.; Taylor, E.

    2010-01-01

    The safety of ADHD medications is not fully known. Concerns have arisen about both a lack of contemporary-standard information about medications first licensed several decades ago, and signals of possible harm arising from more recently developed medications. These relate to both relatively minor adverse effects and extremely serious issues such as sudden cardiac death and suicidality. A guidelines group of the European Network for Hyperkinetic Disorders (EUNETHYDIS) has therefore reviewed the literature, recruited renowned clinical subspecialists and consulted as a group to examine these concerns. Some of the effects examined appeared to be minimal in impact or difficult to distinguish from risk to untreated populations. However, several areas require further study to allow a more precise understanding of these risks. PMID:21042924

  2. An argument for the chicken embryo as a model for the developmental toxicological effects of the polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs)

    SciTech Connect

    Henshel, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    This article will present the argument that the chicken embryo is especially appropriate as an animal model for studying the mechanism of the developmental toxicological effects of the polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs). The PHAHs are a group of toxicologically related compounds including, in part, the polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans and biphenyls. The chicken (Gallus gallus) embryo is relatively sensitive to the toxicological effects of the PHAHs being approximately two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the mature bird. The chicken embryo has been used to demonstrate general toxicological teratogeneicity, hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Many of these effects, or analogous effects, have also been observed in mammals and fish. Thus, most animals appear to respond to the PHAHs with a similar toxicological profile, indicating that many of the biomarkers used for the PHAHs are valid across a number of species, including the chicken. Furthermore, the chicken embryo is relatively inexpensive to use for toxicity testing. In addition, all effects detected are due to direct effects on the embryo and are not complicated by maternal interactions. In short, for sensitivity, ease of use, cost and applicability of results to other animals, the chicken embryo is an excellent animal model for evaluation of the mechanism underlying the developmental toxicological effects of the PHAHs.

  3. Potential health effects of gasoline and its constituents: A review of current literature (1990-1997) on toxicological data.

    PubMed Central

    Caprino, L; Togna, G I

    1998-01-01

    We reviewed toxicological studies, both experimental and epidemiological, that appeared in international literature in the period 1990-1997 and included both leaded and unleaded gasolines as well as their components and additives. The aim of this overview was to select, arrange, and present references of scientific papers published during the period under consideration and to summarize the data in order to give a comprehensive picture of the results of toxicological studies performed in laboratory animals (including carcinogenic, teratogenic, or embryotoxic activity), mutagenicity and genotoxic aspects in mammalian and bacterial systems, and epidemiological results obtained in humans in relation to gasoline exposure. This paper draws attention to the inherent difficulties in assessing with precision any potential adverse effects on health, that is, the risk of possible damage to man and his environment from gasoline. The difficulty of risk assessment still exists despite the fact that the studies examined are definitely more technically valid than those of earlier years. The uncertainty in overall risk determination from gasoline exposure also derives from the conflicting results of different studies, from the lack of a correct scientific approach in some studies, from the variable characteristics of the different gasoline mixtures, and from the difficulties of correctly handling potentially confounding variables related to lifestyle (e.g., cigarette smoking, drug use) or to preexisting pathological conditions. In this respect, this paper highlights the need for accurately assessing the conclusive explanations reported in scientific papers so as to avoid the spread of inaccurate or misleading information on gasoline toxicity in nonscientific papers and in mass-media messages. PMID:9452413

  4. Updated weight of evidence for an association between adverse reproductive and developmental effects and exposure to disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Tardiff, Robert G; Carson, M Leigh; Ginevan, Michael E

    2006-07-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBP) are produced when water is treated with chemical disinfectants. Some toxicological and epidemiological studies suggest an association between DBP exposure and adverse reproductive and developmental effects. In a previous critical review, [Graves, C.G., Matanoski, G.M., Tardiff, R.G., 2001. Weight of evidence for an association between adverse reproductive and developmental effects and exposure to disinfection by-products: a critical review. Regul. Toxicol. Pharmacol. 34, (2) 103-124] evaluated the weight of evidence for this exposure and these effects. This investigation updates the previous evaluation and considers all toxicological and epidemiological evidence since the earlier review and reassesses the weight-of-evidence for all of the data on the various effects, outcome by outcome. The updated toxicity weight of evidence found little indication of previously unreported reproductive or developmental toxicity. In particular, the recently published findings of an exceptionally well conducted cohort study of broad scope found no impact of chlorination by-products on the highly controversial outcome of spontaneous abortion, unlike predecessor studies of more limited methodology, leading the authors to recommend no further epidemiologic pursuit for this hypothesis since the cohort was scrutinized very closely and dispelled any concern of such an association. The updated epidemiologic weight of evidence demonstrated that no association with DBP exposure exists for over a dozen outcomes including low and very low birth weight, preterm delivery, some specific congenital anomalies, and neonatal death. The analysis found inconsistent or very weak results for all congenital anomalies/birth defects, all central nervous system anomalies, neural tube defects, and spontaneous abortion. As in the previous article, the updated weight of evidence suggested a positive association with DBP exposure and some measure of growth retardation such as

  5. Adverse Biological Effect of TiO2 and Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles Used in Bone Repair and Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiangxue; Wang, Liting; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    The adverse biological effect of nanoparticles is an unavoidable scientific problem because of their small size and high surface activity. In this review, we focus on nano-hydroxyapatite and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) to clarify the potential systemic toxicological effect and cytotoxic response of wear nanoparticles because they are attractive materials for bone implants and are widely investigated to promote the repair and reconstruction of bone. The wear nanoparticles would be prone to binding with proteins to form protein-particle complexes, to interacting with visible components in the blood including erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets, and to being phagocytosed by macrophages or fibroblasts to deposit in the local tissue, leading to the formation of fibrous local pseudocapsules. These particles would also be translocated to and disseminated into the main organs such as the lung, liver and spleen via blood circulation. The inflammatory response, oxidative stress, and signaling pathway are elaborated to analyze the potential toxicological mechanism. Inhibition of the oxidative stress response and signaling transduction may be a new therapeutic strategy for wear debris–mediated osteolysis. Developing biomimetic materials with better biocompatibility is our goal for orthopedic implants. PMID:27231896

  6. Comprehensive approach for predicting toxicological effects of ionic liquids on several biological systems using unified descriptors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Stolte, Stefan; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-01-01

    The challenge and opportunity for design of environmentally-benign ionic liquids (ILs) would start from prediction of their toxicological effects on several endpoints solely based on the structural formulas. Especially, a comprehensive yet simple equation able to predict several biological responses to IL toxicity is of much advantage. Therefore, based on 50 toxicity testing systems on ILs a comprehensively approachable prediction method was developed. For the modelling, approximately 1600 toxicity values measured by several biological systems and an amended linear free energy relationship (LFER) model were used. Since the toxicological activities of an IL could be differently described according to sensitivity of toxicity testing systems, the sensitivity of each of toxicity testing systems was also estimated in the modelling. By statistical analysis with the calculated descriptors, a LFER model was built. Also the sensitivity value of each system on the basis of the comprehensively approachable model was numerically estimated. In results, it was observed that the combination of single model and sensitivity terms was able to predict each of 50 toxicological effects of ILs with R(2) of 0.593~0.978, and SE of 0.098~0.699 log unit, and the total data set with R(2) of 0.901 and SE of 0.426 log unit. PMID:27624396

  7. Comprehensive approach for predicting toxicological effects of ionic liquids on several biological systems using unified descriptors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Stolte, Stefan; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-09-14

    The challenge and opportunity for design of environmentally-benign ionic liquids (ILs) would start from prediction of their toxicological effects on several endpoints solely based on the structural formulas. Especially, a comprehensive yet simple equation able to predict several biological responses to IL toxicity is of much advantage. Therefore, based on 50 toxicity testing systems on ILs a comprehensively approachable prediction method was developed. For the modelling, approximately 1600 toxicity values measured by several biological systems and an amended linear free energy relationship (LFER) model were used. Since the toxicological activities of an IL could be differently described according to sensitivity of toxicity testing systems, the sensitivity of each of toxicity testing systems was also estimated in the modelling. By statistical analysis with the calculated descriptors, a LFER model was built. Also the sensitivity value of each system on the basis of the comprehensively approachable model was numerically estimated. In results, it was observed that the combination of single model and sensitivity terms was able to predict each of 50 toxicological effects of ILs with R(2) of 0.593~0.978, and SE of 0.098~0.699 log unit, and the total data set with R(2) of 0.901 and SE of 0.426 log unit.

  8. Toxicological effects of chlorpyrifos on growth, enzyme activity and chlorophyll a synthesis of freshwater microalgae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shangchao; Chen, Mindong; Wang, Zhuang; Qiu, Weijian; Wang, Junfeng; Shen, Yafei; Wang, Yajun; Ge, Shun

    2016-07-01

    This paper aims to acquire the experimental data on the eco-toxicological effects of agricultural pollutants on the aquatic plants and the data can support the assessment of toxicity on the phytoplankton. The pesticide of Chlorpyrifos used as a good model to investigate its eco-toxicological effect on the different microalgae in freshwater. In order to address the pollutants derived from forestry and agricultural applications, freshwater microalgae were considered as a good sample to investigate the impact of pesticides such as Chlorpyrifos on aquatic life species. Two microalgae of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Merismopedia sp. were employed to evaluate toxicity of Chlorpyrifos in short time and long time by means of measuring the growth inhibition rate, the redox system and the content of chlorophyll a, respectively. In this study, the results showed that EC50 values ranging from 7.63 to 19.64mg/L, indicating the Chlorpyrifos had a relatively limited to the growth of algae during the period of the acute toxicity experiment. Moreover, when two kinds of algae were exposed to a medium level of Chlorpyrifos, SOD and CAT activities were importantly advanced. Therefore, the growth rate and SOD and CAT activities can be highly recommended for the eco-toxicological assessment. In addition, chlorophyll a also could be used as a targeted parameter for assessing the eco-toxicity of Chlorpyrifos on both Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Merismopedia sp. PMID:27314761

  9. Comprehensive approach for predicting toxicological effects of ionic liquids on several biological systems using unified descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Stolte, Stefan; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-09-01

    The challenge and opportunity for design of environmentally-benign ionic liquids (ILs) would start from prediction of their toxicological effects on several endpoints solely based on the structural formulas. Especially, a comprehensive yet simple equation able to predict several biological responses to IL toxicity is of much advantage. Therefore, based on 50 toxicity testing systems on ILs a comprehensively approachable prediction method was developed. For the modelling, approximately 1600 toxicity values measured by several biological systems and an amended linear free energy relationship (LFER) model were used. Since the toxicological activities of an IL could be differently described according to sensitivity of toxicity testing systems, the sensitivity of each of toxicity testing systems was also estimated in the modelling. By statistical analysis with the calculated descriptors, a LFER model was built. Also the sensitivity value of each system on the basis of the comprehensively approachable model was numerically estimated. In results, it was observed that the combination of single model and sensitivity terms was able to predict each of 50 toxicological effects of ILs with R2 of 0.593~0.978, and SE of 0.098~0.699 log unit, and the total data set with R2 of 0.901 and SE of 0.426 log unit.

  10. Comprehensive approach for predicting toxicological effects of ionic liquids on several biological systems using unified descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Stolte, Stefan; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-01-01

    The challenge and opportunity for design of environmentally-benign ionic liquids (ILs) would start from prediction of their toxicological effects on several endpoints solely based on the structural formulas. Especially, a comprehensive yet simple equation able to predict several biological responses to IL toxicity is of much advantage. Therefore, based on 50 toxicity testing systems on ILs a comprehensively approachable prediction method was developed. For the modelling, approximately 1600 toxicity values measured by several biological systems and an amended linear free energy relationship (LFER) model were used. Since the toxicological activities of an IL could be differently described according to sensitivity of toxicity testing systems, the sensitivity of each of toxicity testing systems was also estimated in the modelling. By statistical analysis with the calculated descriptors, a LFER model was built. Also the sensitivity value of each system on the basis of the comprehensively approachable model was numerically estimated. In results, it was observed that the combination of single model and sensitivity terms was able to predict each of 50 toxicological effects of ILs with R2 of 0.593~0.978, and SE of 0.098~0.699 log unit, and the total data set with R2 of 0.901 and SE of 0.426 log unit. PMID:27624396

  11. Quantification of toxicological effects for dichloromethane. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The document discusses the quantification of non-carcinogenic effects and carcinogenic effects for dichloromethane. The evaluation of non-carcinogenic effects includes a study of short and long term effects in animals and humans, as well as the development of the one-day, ten-day, and long term health advisories. The evaluation of carcinogenic effects includes a categorization of carcinogenic potential and risks estimates. There is a brief discussion on existing guidelines or standards and special considerations such as high risk groups.

  12. Adverse effects of sucrose-rich diets on uraemic rats.

    PubMed

    Laouari, D; Kleinknecht, C; Burtin, M; Hinglais, N; Lacour, B; Landais, P; Broyer, M

    1990-01-01

    The nature of carbohydrate may affect the tolerance and progression of uraemia. The effects of three diets differing only in their carbohydrate source: namely corn starch (C), glucose (G) or sucrose (S) were examined. Study 1 examined the effects of the three carbohydrate diets on unilaterally nephrectomised control rats and severely uraemic rats. The three carbohydrates produced similar nutritional effects in uninephrectomised rats, whereas sucrose rapidly induced anorexia, stunting and slightly accelerated renal damage in uraemia. Study 2 examined the long-term effects of the three carbohydrates in moderate uraemia under conditions of high and identical carbohydrate intakes. Hyperphagic Zucker uraemic rats (F rats) received a daily allotment of each diet plus pure carbohydrate. Lean uraemic rats (L rats) received the same dietary allotment without the carbohydrate supplement. The F rats fed sucrose showed greater morbidity and mortality but little renal deterioration. Their plasma triglycerides increased dramatically. The L rats fed sucrose had the greatest urinary protein, the least creatinine clearance and the most severe renal damage. Thus, sucrose-rich but not glucose-rich diets have two adverse effects in uraemia: a deterioration in nutritional status, perhaps related to abnormal fructose utilisation, and a long-term effect on the kidney, resulting in accelerated renal deterioration.

  13. Identifying and managing adverse environmental health effects: 3. Lead exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, Margaret D.; Abelsohn, Alan; Campbell, Monica; Weir, Erica

    2002-01-01

    LEAD LEVELS IN NORTH AMERICAN CHILDREN AND ADULTS have declined in the past 3 decades, but lead persists in the environment in lead paint, old plumbing and contaminated soil. There are also a number of occupations and hobbies that carry a high risk of lead exposure. There is no evidence for a threshold below which lead has no adverse health effects. Blood lead levels previously considered safe are now known to cause subtle, chronic health effects. The health effects of lead exposure include developmental neurotoxicity, reproductive dysfunction and toxicity to the kidneys, blood and endocrine systems. Most lead exposures are preventable, and diagnosing lead poisoning is relatively simple compared with diagnosing health effects of exposures to other environmental toxins. Accurate assessment of lead poisoning requires specific knowledge of the sources, high-risk groups and relevant laboratory tests. In this article we review the multiple, systemic toxic effects of lead and provide current information on groups at risk, prevention, diagnosis and clinical treatment. We illustrate how the CH2OPD2 mnemonic (Community, Home, Hobbies, Occupation, Personal habits, Diet and Drugs) and specific screening questions are useful tools for physicians to quickly obtain an environmental exposure history and identify patients at high risk of lead exposure. By applying effective primary prevention, case-finding and treatment interventions for lead exposure, both the individual patient and the larger community reap the benefits of better health. PMID:12041847

  14. The dark side of the light: Phototherapy adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Valejo Coelho, Margarida Moura; Apetato, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Phototherapy is a valuable therapeutic tool in Dermatology, but there may be drawbacks. Acute and long-term adverse effects, of variable severity, include skin erythema, xerosis, pruritus, blistering, altered pigmentation, photoaging, and photocarcinogenesis. Despite concerns over the carcinogenic potential of ultraviolet radiation, most studies have not found an increased risk of non-melanoma or melanoma skin cancer in patients treated with ultraviolet B (broadband and narrowband) and ultraviolet A1 phototherapy. These are therefore considered reasonably safe treatment modalities concerning the development of skin neoplasms, although caution and further investigation are warranted. Photoprotective measures, such as avoidance of concurrent sunlight exposure and covering skin areas not afflicted with disease, or more modern strategies, including phytochemical antioxidants and exogenous DNA repair enzymes, can minimize the hazards of phototherapy. Patients submitted to phototherapeutic regimens should undergo complete, careful dermatologic examination regularly and lifelong. PMID:27638433

  15. Discovery of thiazolylpyridinone SCD1 inhibitors with preferential liver distribution and reduced mechanism-based adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoyi; Zhang, Zaihui; Raina, Vandna; Pokrovskaia, Natalia; Hou, Duanjie; Namdari, Rostam; Khakh, Kuldip; Ratkay, Leslie G; McLaren, David G; Mork, Monica; Fu, Jianmin; Ferreira, Suzie; Hubbard, Brian; Winther, Michael D; Dales, Natalie

    2014-01-15

    We discovered a series of novel and potent thiazolylpyridinone-based SCD1 inhibitors based on a 2-aminothiazole HTS hit by replacing the amide bond with a pyridinone moiety. Compound 19 demonstrated good potency against SCD1 in vitro and in vivo. The mouse liver microsomal SCD1 in vitro potency for 19 was improved by more than 240-fold compared to the original HTS hit. Furthermore, 19 demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction of plasma desaturation index with an ED50 of 6.3 mg/kg. Compound 19 demonstrated high liver to plasma and liver to eyelid exposures, indicating preferential liver distribution. The preliminary toxicology study with compound 19 did not demonstrate adverse effects related to SCD1 inhibition, suggesting a wide safety margin with respect to other known SCD1 inhibitors with wider distribution profiles.

  16. Discovery of thiazolylpyridinone SCD1 inhibitors with preferential liver distribution and reduced mechanism-based adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoyi; Zhang, Zaihui; Raina, Vandna; Pokrovskaia, Natalia; Hou, Duanjie; Namdari, Rostam; Khakh, Kuldip; Ratkay, Leslie G; McLaren, David G; Mork, Monica; Fu, Jianmin; Ferreira, Suzie; Hubbard, Brian; Winther, Michael D; Dales, Natalie

    2014-01-15

    We discovered a series of novel and potent thiazolylpyridinone-based SCD1 inhibitors based on a 2-aminothiazole HTS hit by replacing the amide bond with a pyridinone moiety. Compound 19 demonstrated good potency against SCD1 in vitro and in vivo. The mouse liver microsomal SCD1 in vitro potency for 19 was improved by more than 240-fold compared to the original HTS hit. Furthermore, 19 demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction of plasma desaturation index with an ED50 of 6.3 mg/kg. Compound 19 demonstrated high liver to plasma and liver to eyelid exposures, indicating preferential liver distribution. The preliminary toxicology study with compound 19 did not demonstrate adverse effects related to SCD1 inhibition, suggesting a wide safety margin with respect to other known SCD1 inhibitors with wider distribution profiles. PMID:24370012

  17. New insights into the pharmacological and toxicological effects of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Meierhofer, Christian; Wiedermann, Christian J

    2003-01-01

    The molecular activity of thalidomide comprises a wide range of mechanisms. Alteration of cytokine synthesis and release may be as important as changes in lymphocyte trafficking and leukocyte migration. Since endothelial cells play an important role in leukocyte extravasation and maintenance of inflammatory processes in the affected tissue, thalidomide-induced alterations of cellular adhesion molecules, and consequently changes of interaction of leukocytes with the endothelial cell layer, will result in modulation of the response in inflammation and immunity. Thalidomide mainly reduces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production by macrophages, and its TNF alpha antagonist properties explain the beneficial effects in several TNF alpha-associated complications of severe diseases. Pathophysiologically relevant alterations most likely include gene regulatory effects, with interference in growth factor-dependent pathways known to be involved in teratogenesis, and effects on the transcriptional control of the inflammatory response via nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B. The effects of thalidomide, its enantiomers and analogs, on a broad range of diseases, and their differential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, give the scope for ongoing investigations in the search for analogs with better selectivity but without thalidomide-related side effects and teratogenicity.

  18. Characterization of Soy Biodiesel Exhaust and Toxicological Effects in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although biofuel use across the world is increasing, very little is known about possible health effects resulting from biofuel exhaust (BE) from this relatively new source of transportation fuel. The U.S. EPA has instigated an in vivo screening approach in rodents to examine whet...

  19. What are the toxicological effects of mercury in Arctic biota?

    PubMed

    Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Basu, Niladri; Braune, Birgit; O'Hara, Todd; Letcher, Robert J; Scheuhammer, Tony; Andersen, Magnus; Andreasen, Claus; Andriashek, Dennis; Asmund, Gert; Aubail, Aurore; Baagøe, Hans; Born, Erik W; Chan, Hing M; Derocher, Andrew E; Grandjean, Philippe; Knott, Katrina; Kirkegaard, Maja; Krey, Anke; Lunn, Nick; Messier, Francoise; Obbard, Marty; Olsen, Morten T; Ostertag, Sonja; Peacock, Elizabeth; Renzoni, Aristeo; Rigét, Frank F; Skaare, Janneche Utne; Stern, Gary; Stirling, Ian; Taylor, Mitch; Wiig, Øystein; Wilson, Simon; Aars, Jon

    2013-01-15

    This review critically evaluates the available mercury (Hg) data in Arctic marine biota and the Inuit population against toxicity threshold values. In particular marine top predators exhibit concentrations of mercury in their tissues and organs that are believed to exceed thresholds for biological effects. Species whose concentrations exceed threshold values include the polar bears (Ursus maritimus), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), pilot whale (Globicephala melas), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), a few seabird species, and landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). Toothed whales appear to be one of the most vulnerable groups, with high concentrations of mercury recorded in brain tissue with associated signs of neurochemical effects. Evidence of increasing concentrations in mercury in some biota in Arctic Canada and Greenland is therefore a concern with respect to ecosystem health. PMID:23231888

  20. Exposures of children to organophosphate pesticides and their potential adverse health effects.

    PubMed Central

    Eskenazi, B; Bradman, A; Castorina, R

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies show that young children can be exposed to pesticides during normal oral exploration of their environment and their level of dermal contact with floors and other surfaces. Children living in agricultural areas may be exposed to higher pesticide levels than other children because of pesticides tracked into their homes by household members, by pesticide drift, by breast milk from their farmworker mother, or by playing in nearby fields. Nevertheless, few studies have assessed the extent of children's pesticide exposure, and no studies have examined whether there are adverse health effects of chronic exposure. There is substantial toxicologic evidence that repeated low-level exposure to organophosphate (OP) pesticides may affect neurodevelopment and growth in developing animals. For example, animal studies have reported neurobehavorial effects such as impairment on maze performance, locomotion, and balance in neonates exposed (italic)in utero(/italic) and during early postnatal life. Possible mechanisms for these effects include inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase, downregulation of muscarinic receptors, decreased brain DNA synthesis, and reduced brain weight in offspring. Research findings also suggest that it is biologically plausible that OP exposure may be related to respiratory disease in children through dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. The University of California Berkeley Center for Children's Environmental Health Research is working to build a community-university partnership to study the environmental health of rural children. This Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas, or CHAMACOS in Monterey County, California, will assess (italic)in utero(/italic) and postnatal OP pesticide exposure and the relationship of exposure to neurodevelopment, growth, and symptoms of respiratory illness in children. The ultimate goal of the center is to translate research findings into a reduction of children

  1. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Sermin; Zadeoglulari, Zeynep; Fuss, Stefan H.; Genc, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health. PMID:22523490

  2. Core Concepts Involving Adverse Psychotropic Drug Effects: Assessment, Implications, and Management.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joseph F; Ernst, Carrie L

    2016-09-01

    Adverse effects from psychiatric drugs can profoundly influence treatment adherence and outcomes. Good care involves addressing adverse effects no differently than any other component of treatment. Knowledge about adverse effect assessment and management fosters a proper context that helps clinicians not sacrifice a drug's potential therapeutic benefits because of greater concerns about its tolerability. This article provides an overview of basic concepts related to the assessment and management of suspected adverse effects from psychotropic drugs. Key points are discussed regarding clinical, pharmacogenetic, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic risk factors for treatment-emergent adverse effects, alongside recommendations for their systematic assessment. PMID:27514295

  3. Toxicological effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The uptake kinetics and mechanisms and the toxic responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Song; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Aiguo; Hu, Yang; Wang, Gaoxue; Ling, Fei

    2016-11-15

    Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an experimental model, the potential toxicological effects of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were investigated following exposure to 0-600mg/L for 24h. Results indicated that MWCNTs (>100mg/L) had adverse effects on the cell proliferation. MWCNTs were clearly visible in lysosome, vacuole, endosome, mitochondria, multivesicular body and localization in the perinuclear region. The uptake kinetics data demonstrated that the maximum MWCNTs content (209.61mg/g) was reached at 3h, and a steady state was reached after 18h. Based on the combined results of transmission electron microscope, endocytosis inhibition experiments and endocytosis-related genes (END3, END6, Sla2 and Rsp5) expression analysis, we elucidated MWCNTs uptake mechanism: (i) via a direct penetration of single MWCNTs; (ii) via endocytosis of single MWCNTs; and (iii) via endocytosis of MWCNTs aggregates. The percentage of apoptosis was significant increased at 600mg/L. The decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c shown dose-dependent manners. Interestingly, there was no significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The apoptosis-related genes (SOD1, SOD2, Yca1, Nma111 and Nuc1) were significant changed. These results obtained in our study demonstrated that oxidized MWCNTs induce Saccharomyces cerevisiae apoptosis via mitochondrial impairment pathway. PMID:27475463

  4. Agricultural sources of contaminants of emerging concern and adverse health effects on freshwater fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, Donald E.; Buxton, Herbert T.

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) are generally thought of as certain classes of chemicals associated with animal feeding and production facilities. Veterinary pharmaceuticals used in animal food production systems represent one of the largest groups of CECs. In our review, we discuss the extensive increase in use of antibiotics in animal feeding operations (AFOs) around the world. AFOs are a major consumer of antibiotics and other veterinary pharmaceuticals and over the past decade there has been growing information on the occurrence, release, and fate of CECs from animal food production operations, including the application of pharmaceutical-containing manure to agricultural fields and releases from waste lagoons. Concentrations of CECs in surface and ground water in proximity to AFOs correspond to their presence in the AFO wastes. In many cases, the environmental concentrations of agriculturally-derived CECs are below toxicity thresholds. Hormones and hormone replacement compounds are a notable exception, where chemical concentrations near AFOs can exceed concentrations known to cause adverse effects on endocrine-related functions in fish. In addition, some agricultural pesticides, once thought to be safe to non-target organisms, have demonstrated endocrine-related effects that may pose threats to fish populations in agricultural regions. That is, we have pesticides with emerging concerns, thus, the concern is emerging and not necessarily the chemical. In this light, one must consider certain agricultural pesticides to be included in the list of CECs. Even though agricultural pesticides are routinely evaluated in regulatory testing schemes which have been used for decades, the potential hazards of some pesticides have only recently been emerging. Emerging concerns of pesticides in fish include interference with hormone signaling pathways; additive (or more than additive) effects from pesticide mixtures; and adverse population-level effects at

  5. Genetic toxicology of phthalate esters: mutagenic and other genotoxic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, G R; Hugenholtz, A P; Blakey, D H

    1986-01-01

    The effects of DEHP on sperm morphology and on peripheral blood micronuclei were studied for 12 weeks following five subacute IP injections of DEHP at 1/6, 1/12, and 1/60 of the LD50 per day. Sperm morphology was examined in both adult mice and rats, while peripheral blood micronuclei were scored in mice up to 4 weeks after treatment. In mice, DEHP at 1/6 LD50 significantly depressed body weight gain for up to 12 weeks after treatment, and reduced epididymal sperm number by 4 weeks. Numbers of morphologically abnormal sperm did not differ from controls in the 12 weeks following treatment. In addition, DEHP did not increase the numbers of peripheral blood micronuclei. Studies in the rat indicated that exposure to doses of 1/6 and 1/12 of the LD50 per day of DEHP resulted in a reduced gain in body weight compared to controls. Testis weight, sperm number, and numbers of morphologically abnormal sperm were unaffected by DEHP following treatment. In separate experiments, DEHP did not induce sister chromatid exchange (SCE) or DNA damage in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Although DEHP is known to cause testicular atrophy in rats and to a lesser extent in mice, it did not cause an increase in abnormal sperm in either species. Together with the CHO and micronucleus data, these findings suggest that DEHP has a low probability of causing genetic damage capable of being transmitted through the male germ line. PMID:3709450

  6. Toxicological profile for methyl t-butyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Each profile includes: (1) The examination, summary, and interpretation of available toxicologic information and epidemiologic evaluations on a hazardous substance to ascertain the levels of significant human exposure for the substance and the associated acute, subacute, and chronic health effects; (2) A determination of whether adequate information on the health effects of each substance is available or in the process of development to determine levels of exposure that present a significant risk to human health of acute, subacute, and chonic health effects; and (3) Where appropriate, identification of toxicologic testing needed to identify the types or levels of exposure that may present significant risk of adverse health effects in humans.

  7. Adverse effects of perinatal nicotine exposure on reproductive outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael K; Barra, Nicole G; Alfaidy, Nadia; Hardy, Daniel B; Holloway, Alison C

    2015-12-01

    Nicotine exposure during pregnancy through cigarette smoking, nicotine replacement therapies or e-cigarette use continues to be a widespread public health problem, impacting both fetal and postnatal health. Yet, at this time, there remains limited data regarding the safety and efficacy in using these nicotine products during pregnancy. Notably, reports assessing the effect of nicotine exposure on postnatal health outcomes in humans, including reproductive health, are severely lacking. Our current understanding regarding the consequences of nicotine exposure during pregnancy is limited to a few animal studies, which do not comprehensively address the underlying cellular mechanisms involved. This paper aims to critically review the current knowledge from human and animal studies regarding the direct and indirect effects (e.g. obesity) of maternal nicotine exposure, regardless of its source, on reproductive outcomes in pregnancy and postnatal life. Furthermore, this review highlights several key cellular mechanisms involved in these adverse reproductive deficits including oxidative stress, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. By understanding the interplay of the cellular mechanisms involved, further strategies could be developed to prevent the reproductive abnormalities resulting from exposure to nicotine in utero and influence informed clinical guidelines for pregnant women.

  8. Second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Divac, Nevena; Prostran, Milica; Jakovcevski, Igor; Cerovac, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects are well recognized in the context of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. However, the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, with atypical mechanism of action, especially lower dopamine receptors affinity, was met with great expectations among clinicians regarding their potentially lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal syndrome. This review gives a brief summary of the recent literature relevant to second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal syndrome. Numerous studies have examined the incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. The majority of these studies clearly indicate that extrapyramidal syndrome does occur with second-generation agents, though in lower rates in comparison with first generation. Risk factors are the choice of a particular second-generation agent (with clozapine carrying the lowest risk and risperidone the highest), high doses, history of previous extrapyramidal symptoms, and comorbidity. Also, in comparative studies, the choice of a first-generation comparator significantly influences the results. Extrapyramidal syndrome remains clinically important even in the era of second-generation antipsychotics. The incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome differ amongst these antipsychotics, but the fact is that these drugs have not lived up to the expectation regarding their tolerability. PMID:24995318

  9. Enzymes approved for human therapy: indications, mechanisms and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2015-02-01

    Research and drug developments fostered under orphan drug product development programs have greatly assisted the introduction of efficient and safe enzyme-based therapies for a range of rare disorders. The introduction and regulatory approval of 20 different recombinant enzymes has enabled, often for the first time, effective enzyme-replacement therapy for some lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher (imiglucerase, taliglucerase, and velaglucerase), Fabry (agalsidase alfa and beta), and Pompe (alglucosidase alfa) diseases and mucopolysaccharidoses I (laronidase), II (idursulfase), IVA (elosulfase), and VI (galsulfase). Approved recombinant enzymes are also now used as therapy for myocardial infarction (alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase), cystic fibrosis (dornase alfa), chronic gout (pegloticase), tumor lysis syndrome (rasburicase), leukemia (L-asparaginase), some collagen-based disorders such as Dupuytren's contracture (collagenase), severe combined immunodeficiency disease (pegademase bovine), detoxification of methotrexate (glucarpidase), and vitreomacular adhesion (ocriplasmin). The development of these efficacious and safe enzyme-based therapies has occurred hand in hand with some remarkable advances in the preparation of the often specifically designed recombinant enzymes; the manufacturing expertise necessary for commercial production; our understanding of underlying mechanisms operative in the different diseases; and the mechanisms of action of the relevant recombinant enzymes. Together with information on these mechanisms, safety findings recorded so far on the various adverse events and problems of immunogenicity of the recombinant enzymes used for therapy are presented. PMID:25648140

  10. Lowest adverse effects concentrations (LOAECs) for formaldehyde exposure.

    PubMed

    Gelbke, Heinz-Peter; Gröters, Sibylle; Morfeld, Peter

    2014-10-01

    In 2012 the Committee for Risk Assessment (RAC) of the European Chemicals Agency concluded that 2ppm formaldehyde represent a Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Concentration (LOAEC) for polypoid adenomas, histopathological lesions and cell proliferation. An analysis of all data shows that a LOAEC of 2ppm it is not justified for cell proliferation and polypoid adenomas. Higher values are also supported by a new statistical analysis. For histopathological lesions a NOAEC of 1ppm may be defined but the lesions at 2ppm cannot be regarded as pre-stages for tumour development. One major uncertainty exists: the description of polypoid adenomas and the lesions at 2ppm often is insufficient and diagnostic uncertainties can only be resolved by a re-evaluation according to modern histomorphological standards. Although the discrepancy between our assessment and that of RAC may seem rather small we feel the LOAECs proposed by RAC must be challenged taking into consideration the broad data base for formaldehyde and the potential impact of any published RAC opinion on the present discussions about appropriate occupational and indoor exposure limits.

  11. Enzymes approved for human therapy: indications, mechanisms and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2015-02-01

    Research and drug developments fostered under orphan drug product development programs have greatly assisted the introduction of efficient and safe enzyme-based therapies for a range of rare disorders. The introduction and regulatory approval of 20 different recombinant enzymes has enabled, often for the first time, effective enzyme-replacement therapy for some lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher (imiglucerase, taliglucerase, and velaglucerase), Fabry (agalsidase alfa and beta), and Pompe (alglucosidase alfa) diseases and mucopolysaccharidoses I (laronidase), II (idursulfase), IVA (elosulfase), and VI (galsulfase). Approved recombinant enzymes are also now used as therapy for myocardial infarction (alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase), cystic fibrosis (dornase alfa), chronic gout (pegloticase), tumor lysis syndrome (rasburicase), leukemia (L-asparaginase), some collagen-based disorders such as Dupuytren's contracture (collagenase), severe combined immunodeficiency disease (pegademase bovine), detoxification of methotrexate (glucarpidase), and vitreomacular adhesion (ocriplasmin). The development of these efficacious and safe enzyme-based therapies has occurred hand in hand with some remarkable advances in the preparation of the often specifically designed recombinant enzymes; the manufacturing expertise necessary for commercial production; our understanding of underlying mechanisms operative in the different diseases; and the mechanisms of action of the relevant recombinant enzymes. Together with information on these mechanisms, safety findings recorded so far on the various adverse events and problems of immunogenicity of the recombinant enzymes used for therapy are presented.

  12. Iron deficiency anemia: adverse effects on infant psychomotor development.

    PubMed

    Walter, T; De Andraca, I; Chadud, P; Perales, C G

    1989-07-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-control prospective cohort study of 196 infants from birth to 15 months of age, assessment was made at 12 months of age of the relationship between iron status and psychomotor development, the effect of a short-term (10-day) trial of oral iron vs placebo, and the effect of long-term (3 months) oral iron therapy. Development was assessed with the mental and psychomotor indices and the infant behavior record of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development in 39 anemic, 30 control, and 127 nonanemic iron-deficient children. Anemic infants had significantly lower Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Index scores than control infants or nonanemic iron-deficient infants (one-way analysis of variance, P less than .0001). Control infants and nonanemic iron-deficient infants performed comparably. No difference was noted between the effect of oral administration of iron or placebo after 10 days or after 3 months of iron therapy. Among anemic infants a hemoglobin concentration less than 10.5 g/dL and duration of anemia of greater than 3 months were correlated with significantly lower motor and mental scores (P less than .05). Anemic infants failed specifically in language capabilities and body balance-coordination skills when compared with controls. These results, in a design in which intervening variables were closely controlled, suggest that when iron deficiency progresses to anemia, but not before, adverse influences in the performance of developmental tests appear and persist for at least 3 months despite correction of anemia with iron therapy. If these impairments prove to be long standing, prevention of iron deficiency anemia in early infancy becomes the only way to avoid them.

  13. Ziconotide: new drug. Limited analgesic efficacy, too many adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    (1) When oral morphine does not relieve severe pain and when there is no specific treatment for the underlying cause, the first option is to try subcutaneous or intravenous administration. If this standard treatment fails or is poorly tolerated, intrathecal injection is usually preferred as the direct route to the central nervous system. However, one-quarter to one-half of patients still do not achieve adequate pain relief, and adverse effects are relatively frequent; (2) Ziconotide is not an opiate and is not related to the usual classes of drugs that interfere with nervous transmission in the posterior horn of the spinal cord. Marketing authorization has been granted for "severe, chronic pain in patients who require intrathecal analgesia". The Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) recommends continuous infusion via an intrathecal catheter connected to a pump; (3) Clinical evaluation of ziconotide does not include any trials versus morphine in patients with nociceptive pain, or any trials versus tricyclic or antiepileptic drugs in patients with neurogenic pain; (4) In a trial in 220 patients in whom systemic morphine had failed, the mean pain score on a 100-mm visual analogue scale was 69.8 mm after three weeks on ziconotide, compared to 75.8 mm with placebo. This difference, although statistically significant, is clinically irrelevant. The proportion of "responders" (reduction of at least 30% in the initial pain score) was respectively 16.1% and 12.0% (no statistically significant difference); (5) The two other placebo-controlled trials included 112 patients with pain linked to cancer or HIV infection, and 257 patients with non-cancer pain. After a titration phase lasting 5 to 6 days, a combined analysis of the two trials showed that the mean pain score was 48.8 mm with ziconotide and 68.4 mm with placebo (statistically significant difference). However, many patients did not complete the titration phase. Efficacy also appeared to differ according to the type

  14. Adverse effects of acupuncture. Which are clinically significant?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ainee; Bui, Luke; Mills, Edward

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review potentially serious adverse events associated with acupuncture. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Studies in the medical literature primarily provide level II evidence from retrospective reviews, case reports, and prospective surveys of practitioners. MAIN MESSAGE: Both the general public and physicians are becoming more interested in the ancient Chinese medical practice of acupuncture. This paper discusses the basic philosophy of acupuncture and describes adverse events that might be associated with acupuncture treatment. Some events, such as nausea and syncope, can be mild and transient, but rare events, such as septicemia and hepatitis C infection, can be fatal. As the role of acupuncture in today's multidisciplinary clinics increases, the complications of acupuncture, although infrequent, cannot be overlooked. CONCLUSION: Responsible clinicians practising acupuncture and seeing patients who use acupuncture should be aware of the adverse events associated with it. PMID:12943357

  15. Toxicological effects of acrylamide on the reproductive system of weaning male rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuxin; Shi, Jing; Zheng, Meige; Liu, Jing; Tian, Sumin; He, Xinhong; Zhang, Dexing; Li, Guoying; Zhu, Jiayong

    2011-08-01

    It has been reported that acrylamide can be detected in starchy food treated by high temperature (120 °C). People could be exposed to acrylamide in factory, laboratory, or even in daily life via diet and drinking water. Recently, the toxicity of acrylamide receives more attention. In addition to the neurotoxicity in humans, other toxic effects of acrylamide are worth further investigation. In this study, we investigated whether acrylamide affected the male reproductive system using high-performance liquid chromatography. In this study, the reproductive toxicity of acrylamide was observed in 3-week-old weaning male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with acrylamide at various doses (0, 5, 15 or 30 mg/kg/day). The results showed that food availability and reproductive organ indexes of the weaning male rats decreased. Levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone in serum increased while luteinizing hormone in serum decreased. The histopathological lesions and abnormal sperms presented in weaning rats after acrylamide treatment. The results suggested that there is a toxicological effect of acrylamide on the reproductive system of weaning male rats. Based on the findings above, we suggested that more attention should be paid to the toxicological study of acrylamide on weaning male rats or human beings, rather than just on adult male animals.

  16. Eco-toxicological effects of the avermectin family with a focus on abamectin and ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shahla Hosseini; Ogbourne, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Avermectin family members are categorised as highly effective but toxic natural products that are used as pharmaceuticals in both humans and animals and for crop protection. Abamectin and ivermectin are the two most commonly used compounds from this family with abamectin the only compound to be used for both crop protection and pharmaceutical purposes. Avermectins are produced by the soil dwelling actinomycetes Streptomyces avermitilis and despite having complex chemical structures, they are manufactured via synthesis in large scales for commercial use. Although the extent of the eco-toxicological effects of avermectins is not well documented, reports of eco-toxicity exist. Avermectins have short half-lives and their residues can be eliminated through different food processing methods. However, avermectins can persist in water, sediment, soil and food products and therefore management practices that reduce the potential risks associated with eco-toxicity of these highly toxic compounds need to be further developed. This manuscript provides a critical review of the eco-toxicological risks and the potential for food contamination associated with avermectin use. PMID:27058912

  17. Eco-toxicological effects of the avermectin family with a focus on abamectin and ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shahla Hosseini; Ogbourne, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Avermectin family members are categorised as highly effective but toxic natural products that are used as pharmaceuticals in both humans and animals and for crop protection. Abamectin and ivermectin are the two most commonly used compounds from this family with abamectin the only compound to be used for both crop protection and pharmaceutical purposes. Avermectins are produced by the soil dwelling actinomycetes Streptomyces avermitilis and despite having complex chemical structures, they are manufactured via synthesis in large scales for commercial use. Although the extent of the eco-toxicological effects of avermectins is not well documented, reports of eco-toxicity exist. Avermectins have short half-lives and their residues can be eliminated through different food processing methods. However, avermectins can persist in water, sediment, soil and food products and therefore management practices that reduce the potential risks associated with eco-toxicity of these highly toxic compounds need to be further developed. This manuscript provides a critical review of the eco-toxicological risks and the potential for food contamination associated with avermectin use.

  18. Dispersant use as a response to oil spills: toxicological effects on fish cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Milinkovitch, Thomas; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène; Lefrançois, Christel; Imbert, Nathalie

    2013-04-01

    Dispersant use is a controversial technique used to respond to oil spills in nearshore areas. In order to assess the toxicity of this technique, this study evaluated the cardiac toxicological effects on juvenile golden grey mullets Liza aurata exposed for 48 h to either dispersant alone, chemically dispersed oil, mechanically dispersed oil, the water-soluble fraction of oil or a control condition. Following exposure, the positive inotropic effects of adrenaline were assessed in order to evaluate a potential impairment on the cardiac performance. The results revealed an impairment of the positive inotropic effects of adrenaline for all the contaminants (single dispersant, dispersed and undispersed oil, water-soluble fraction of oil). This suggests that: (1) cardiac performance is a valuable parameter to study the physiopathological effects of dispersed oil; (2) dispersant application is likely to impair cardiac performance.

  19. Toxicological and histopathological effects of boric acid on Atta sexdens rubropilosa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) workers.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Simone; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine C M; Decio, Pâmela; Malaspina, Osmar; Bueno, Fabiana C; Bueno, Odair C

    2010-06-01

    The current study compared the toxicity of different concentrations of boric acid in adult workers of Atta sexdens rubropilosa Forel (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), with toxicological bioassays, and examining the dose-dependent and time-dependent histopathological changes, of the midgut, Malpighian tubules, and postpharyngeal glands. Our results revealed the importance of conducting toxicological bioassays combined with morphological analyses of the organs of ants chronically exposed to insecticides used in commercial ant baits. In vitro bioassays showed that boric acid significantly decreases the survivorship of workers regardless of concentration, whereas the morphological data suggested progressive dose-dependent and time-dependent changes in the organs examined, which were evident in the midgut. The midgut is the first organ to be affected, followed by the postpharyngeal gland and Malpighian tubules. This sequence is in agreement with the absorption pathway of this chemical compound in the midgut, its transference to the hemolymph, possibly reaching the postpharyngeal glands, and excretion by the Malpighian tubules. These progressive changes might be due to the cumulative and delayed effect of boric acid. Our findings provide important information for the understanding of the action of boric acid in ant baits in direct and indirect target organs.

  20. Handbook of toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, T.J.; Berndt, W.O.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the ongoing battle against the effects of pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, and other toxic agents. It points out gaps in present-day research, illustrate other diseases that can mimic chemical toxicity, and emphasize thorough consideration of all aspects in a given incident prior to administering an antidote. The book offers a compiled data on target organ toxicity involving the liver, kidneys, and lungs - detailing the rapid, recent progress in this area. The coverage also highlights reproductive toxicology, food additives, asphixiant gases, and pulmonary toxicology. The partial contents are: Absorption, distribution, Biotransformation, Conjugation, and Excretion of Xenobiotics, Hepatotoxicity, Pulmonary Toxiology, Reproductive and Perinatal toxicology, Toxicology of Insecticides, Rodenticides, Herbicides, and Fungicides, Mechanisms of Metal-Induced Cell Injury, Food Additives: A Benefit/Risk Dilemma, Animal Toxins, and Toxic Effects of Chemicals on the Immune System.

  1. Adverse effects of serotonin depletion in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Airhart, Mark J; Lee, Deborah H; Wilson, Tracy D; Miller, Barney E; Miller, Merry N; Skalko, Richard G; Monaco, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    remained unaffected in brain, they were decreased in spinal cord. Five days subsequent to pCPA rescue, 5HT(1A) transcript concentrations remained decreased in brain while SERT transcript levels were elevated in both regions. These findings suggest that reduction of 5HT during early zebrafish development may have an adverse effect on body length, notochordal morphology, locomotor behavior, and serotonin message-related expression.

  2. Somatic and heritable effects of environmental genotoxins and the emergence of evolutionary toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Bickham, J.W.; Smolen, M.J.

    1994-12-01

    The genetic effects of environmental pollutants include mutations in somatic cells or germinal cells that are the direct result of exposure to toxicants. Biomarkers that detect such mutagenic effects have been developed and tested in field studies on wildlife populations. However, another class of genetic effects resulting from pollution exposure exists. Specifically, changes in allele frequencies of populations will occur as a result of population bottlenecks, inbreeding, or selection at loci critical for survival in polluted environments. We describe how such genetic alterations can be studied at the population level using the techniques of molecular genetics, and we predict the development of a new field, evolutionary toxicology, that will address such issues. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Effect of thyroid hormone status and concomitant medication on statin induced adverse effects in hyperlipidemic patients.

    PubMed

    Berta, E; Harangi, M; Zsíros, N; Nagy, E V; Paragh, G; Bodor, M

    2014-06-01

    Statins are effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, adverse effects induced by statins are the major barrier of maximalizing cardiovascular risk reduction. Hypothyroidism and administration of drugs metabolized on the same cytochrome P450 (CYPP450) pathways where statin biotransformation occurs represent a significant risk factor for statin induced adverse effects including myopathy. Simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin are metabolized by CYP3A4, fluvastatin by CYP2C9, while rosuvastatin by CYP2C9 and 2C19. We investigated the levels of the free thyroid hormones and CYP metabolism of concomitant medication in 101 hyperlipidemic patients (age 61.3 +/- 9.9 ys) with statin induced adverse effects including myopathy (56 cases; 55.4%), hepatopathy (39 cases; 38.6%) and gastrointestinal adverse effects (24 cases; 23.8%). Abnormal thyroid hormone levels were found in 5 patients (4.95%); clinical hypothyroidism in 2 and hyperthyroidism in 3 cases. 11 patients had a positive history for hypothyroidism (10.9%). Myopathy occured in one patient with hypothyroidism and two patients with hyperthyroidism. There were no significant differences in the TSH, fT4 and fT3 levels between patients with statin induced myopathy and patients with other types of adverse effects. 78 patients (77.2%) were administered drugs metabolized by CYP isoforms also used by statins (3A4: 66 cases (65.3%); 2C9: 67 cases (66.3%); 2C19: 54 cases (53.5%)). Patients with myopathy took significantly more drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 compared to patients with other types of adverse effects (p < 0.05). More myopathy cases were found in patients on simvastatin treatment (52% vs. 38%, ns.), while significantly less patients with myopathy were on fluvastatin treatment (13% vs. 33%, p < 0.05) compared to patients with other types of statin induced adverse effects. Both abnormal thyroid hormone status and administration of drugs metabolized by CYP

  4. Environmental Toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David A.; Welbourn, Pamela

    2002-03-01

    Environmental Toxicology is a comprehensive introductory textbook dealing with most aspects of the subject, from the molecular to the ecosystem level. Early chapters deal with basic to advanced concepts, methods and approaches. The next discusses the environmental toxicology of individual or groups of substances. The third part addresses complex issues, in which many of the concepts, approaches and substances covered in earlier parts are incorporated. The fourth part includes chapters on risk assessment, rehabilitation and regulatory toxicology. The book concludes with a summary of present and future areas of emphasis. Each chapter contains a comprehensive list of references and further reading, case studies from different jurisdictions, and student exercises.

  5. International monitoring of adverse health effects associated with herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Farah, M H; Edwards, R; Lindquist, M; Leon, C; Shaw, D

    2000-03-01

    Herbal medicines are used in health care around the world and may increase in importance. There is much uncertainty, however, with regard to their composition, efficacy and safety. There is substantial evidence that herbal medicines can cause serious adverse reactions, but more data are needed as regard their nature, frequency and preventability. In this respect the Uppsala Monitoring Centre of the World Health Organization can play a crucial role. Better reporting of adverse reactions to herbal medicines is needed, in particular with regard to the precise identity and composition of these products. A consistent use by producers, regulators and reporters of the international Latin binomial nomenclature and the use of the new Herbal Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification are recommended. Copyright (c) 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19025809

  6. Toxicological assessment of indium nitrate on aquatic organisms and investigation of the effects on the PLHC-1 fish cell line.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Jorge L; Jos, Angeles; del Peso, Ana; Salguero, Manuel; Cameán, Ana M; López-Artíguez, Miguel; Repetto, Guillermo

    2007-11-15

    Indium nitrate is mainly used as a semiconductor in batteries, for plating and other chemical and medical applications. There is a lack of available information about the adverse effects of indium compounds on aquatic organisms. Therefore, the toxic effects on systems from four trophic levels of the aquatic ecosystem were investigated. Firstly, the bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the alga Chlorella vulgaris and the cladoceran Daphnia magna were used in the toxicological evaluation of indium nitrate. The most sensitive model was V. fischeri, with a NOAEL of 0.02 and an EC(50) of 0.04 mM at 15 min. Although indium nitrate should be classified as harmful to aquatic organisms, it is not expected to represent acute risk to the aquatic biota. Secondly, PLHC-1 fish cell line was employed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of toxicity. Although protein content, neutral red uptake, methylthiazol metabolization, lysosomal function and acetylcholinesterase activity were reduced in cells, stimulations were observed for metallothionein levels and succinate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities. No changes were observed in ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity. To clarify the main events in PLHC-1 cell death induced by indium nitrate, nine modulators were applied. They were related to oxidative stress (alpha-tocopherol succinate, mannitol and sodium benzoate), disruption of calcium homeostasis (BAPTA-AM and EGTA), thiol protection (1,4-dithiotreitol), iron chelation (deferoxiamine) or regulation of glutathione levels (2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid and malic acid diethyl ester). The main morphological alterations were hydropic degeneration and loss of cells. At least, in partly, toxicity seems to be mediated by oxidative stress, and particularly by NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation. PMID:17804041

  7. Toxicological and biochemical responses of the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to contaminated soil: Effects of arsenic species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifeng; Cui, Zhaojie; Liu, Lei; Ma, Qianchi; Xu, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic is a pollutant that can be detected in different chemical forms in soil. However, the toxicological effects of different arsenic species on organisms have received little attention. In this study, we exposed earthworms Eisenia fetida to artificial soils contaminated by arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA) for 28 and 56 days. Three biomarkers including lipid peroxidation (LPO), metallothioneins (MTs) and lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) were analyzed in the organisms. In addition, the contents of total arsenic and arsenic species in earthworms were also determined to investigate the effects of bioaccumulation and biotransformation of arsenic on biomarkers and to evaluate the dose-response relationships. The results showed that the relationship between the three biomarkers and the two inorganic arsenic species were dose dependent, and the correlation levels between the biomarkers and As(III) were higher than that between the biomarkers and As(V). Trivalent arsenic species shows more toxicity than pentavalent arsenic on the earthworms at molecular and subcellular level, including oxidative damage, MTs induction and lysosomal membrane damage. The toxicity of MMA and DMA was lower than inorganic arsenic species. However, the occurrence of demethylation of organic arsenics could lead to the generation of highly toxic inorganic arsenics and induce adverse effects on organisms. The biotransformation of highly toxic inorganic arsenics to the less toxic organic species in the earthworms was also validated in this study. The biomarker responses of the earthworm to different arsenic species found in this study could be helpful in future environment monitoring programs. PMID:27045633

  8. Endocrine and Metabolic Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correll, Christoph U.; Carlson, Harold E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Despite increasing use of psychotropic medications in children and adolescents, data regarding their efficacy and safety are limited. Endocrine and metabolic adverse effects are among the most concerning adverse effects of commonly used psychotropic medications. Method: Selective review of endocrine and metabolic effects of psychotropic…

  9. Evaluation of submarine atmospheres: effects of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxygen on general toxicology, neurobehavioral performance, reproduction and development in rats. II. Ninety-day study.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Daniel J; James, R Arden; Gut, Chester P; McInturf, Shawn M; Sweeney, Lisa M; Erickson, Richard P; Gargas, Michael L

    2015-02-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2) and low-level oxygen (O2) (hypoxia) are submarine atmosphere components of highest concern because of a lack of toxicological data available to address the potential effects from long-duration, combined exposures on female reproductive and developmental health. In this study, subchronic toxicity of mixed atmospheres of these three submarine air components was evaluated in rats. Male and female rats were exposed via inhalation to clean air (0.4 ppm CO; 0.13% CO2; 20.6% O2) (control), a low-dose (5.0 ppm CO; 0.41% CO2; 17.1% O2), a mid-dose (13.9 ppm CO; 1.19 or 1.20% CO2; 16.1% O2) and a high-dose (89.9 ppm CO; 2.5% CO2; 15.0% O2) gas mixture for 23 h per day for 70 d premating and a 14-d mating period. Impregnated dams continued exposure to gestation day 19. Adverse reproductive effects were not identified in exposed parents (P0) or first (F1) and second generation (F2) offspring during mating, gestation or parturition. No adverse changes to the estrous cycle or in reproductive hormone concentrations were identified. The exposure-related effects were reduced weight gains and adaptive up-regulation of erythropoiesis in male rats from the high-dose group. No adverse, dose-related health effects on clinical data or physiological data were observed. Neurobehavioral tests identified no apparent developmental deficits at the tested levels of exposure. In summary, subchronic exposures to the submarine atmosphere gases did not affect the ability of the exposed rats or their offspring to reproduce and did not appear to have any significant adverse health effects.

  10. Ethical Considerations for Perinatal Toxicology Screening.

    PubMed

    Kohsman, Mindy G

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal nurses frequently care for babies who have been exposed in utero to potentially harmful substances, both licit and illicit. The risks to the fetus from nicotine, marijuana, alcohol, and opiates are significant. Adverse effects from environmental factors may confound pharmacologic effects of substances. Nurses are called to shift the perception of substance use disorder from that of willful harm to the fetus to that of an opportunity to provide treatment assistance that can positively affect child health and development. Concerns for unethical practices in the toxicology screening of pregnant women and their babies by risk factors that are unproven or disproven are discussed, and three goals of toxicology screening based on the ethical principles of justice and beneficence are proposed. This article will help equip neonatal nurses to fulfill their professional responsibility to advocate for just screening and referral practices in their institutions and communities. PMID:27636690

  11. Toxicology - A primer on toxicology principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kamrin, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    As the use of synthetic chemicals increased dramatically after World War II, concern about the possible adverse health and environmental effects of such use grew. The book opens with a discussion of the general principles of toxicology and how these general principles are applied in assessing the acute, subacute and chronic effects of chemicals. Both qualitative and quantitative measures of toxicity are addressed and the protocols for the various tests are described. Emphasis is placed on both the strengths and limitations of the techniques which are in current use. This is then followed by a discussion of risk assessment and risk management. Risk assessment deals with both the toxic potential of a chemical and the exposure likely to occur in specific situations. Risk management includes the steps taken to reduce or eliminate risks identified in the assessment process. The components of risk assessment are described in relation to a variety of possible toxic effects and exposure scenarios. The last part of the book provides a description and analysis of four case studies, each dealing with a different substance. These include the food additives, cyclamate and saccharin; asbestos; formaldehyde; and benzene. The basic toxicological information regarding each, and the different regulations to which they have been subject, provide the basis for exploring how the principles introduced in the first part of the book are applied in practice.

  12. Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    ‘Computational toxicology’ is a broad term that encompasses all manner of computer-facilitated informatics, data-mining, and modeling endeavors in relation to toxicology, including exposure modeling, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, dose-response modeling, ...

  13. [Dealing with adverse effects in phase I trials].

    PubMed

    Heger-Mahn, D; Mahler, M; Hermann, R; Nowak, H; Weber, W; Seibert-Grafe, M

    1995-03-01

    A questionnaire was completed by members of the Association for Applied Human Pharmacology (AGAH) in Germany with the aim of assessing the present situation regarding management of adverse events (AEs). A recommendation for documentation and evaluation of AEs was to be presented after discussion within the AGAH. The questionnaire referred to general questions, documentation of AEs, intensity and causality, coding and serious adverse events (SAE). Percentage return of answered questionnaires was 54.5%. Of the people contacted, 9.1% said they did not carry out phase I trials, and 36.4% did not reply. The survey in the 24 institutes convers an estimated 11200 volunteers who are included in clinical trials each year. The discussion about commencement of AEs documentation and its duration was contentious. Of the respondents, 38.5% AEs only after application of the trial substance, while 61.5% also make a documentation during the pre-trial phase (recruitment, pre-examination, supervision before application). 13.6% document only up to the post-examination and half of those questioned until AE symptoms have disappeared. 22.7% document until disappearance of symptoms only when AEs are definitely associated with the trial substance. A 3-point scale is used by most people questioned for evaluation of the intensity of an AE. Evaluation of causality, mostly undertaken by the examining physician and the director of the clinical trial, is not carried out homogeneously. There are several categories, but four classifications are most commonly used. 62.5% of codings of AEs are carried out according to the WHO Adverse Reaction Terminology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Toxicology of chlorofluorocarbon replacements.

    PubMed Central

    Dekant, W

    1996-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are stable in the atmosphere and may reach the stratosphere. They are cleaved by UV-radiation in the stratosphere to yield chlorine radicals, which are thought to interfere with the catalytic cycle of ozone formation and destruction and deplete stratospheric ozone concentrations. Due to potential adverse health effects of ozone depletion, chlorofluorocarbon replacements with much lower or absent ozone depleting potential are developed. The toxicology of these compounds that represent chlorofluorohydrocarbons (HCFCs) or fluorohydrocarbons (HFCs) has been intensively studied. All compounds investigated (1, 1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane [HCFC-141b], 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane [HFC-134a], pentafluoroethane [HFC-125], 1-chloro- 1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethane [HCFC-124], and 1,1-dichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane [HCFC-123]) show only a low potential for skin and eye irritation. Chronic adverse effects on the liver (HCFC-123) and the testes (HCFC-141b and HCFC-134a), including tumor formation, were observed in long-term inhalation studies in rodents using very high concentrations of these CFC replacements. All CFC replacements are, to varying extents, biotransformed in the organism, mainly by cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of C-H bonds. The formed acyl halides are hydrolyzed to give excretable carboxylic acids; halogenated aldehydes that are formed may be further oxidized to halogenated carboxylic acids or reduced to halogenated alcohols, which are excretory metabolites in urine from rodents exposed experimentally to CFC replacements. The chronic toxicity of the CFC replacements studied is unlikely to be of relevance for humans exposed during production and application of CFC replacements. PMID:8722112

  15. Toxicology of chlorofluorocarbon replacements.

    PubMed

    Dekant, W

    1996-03-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are stable in the atmosphere and may reach the stratosphere. They are cleaved by UV-radiation in the stratosphere to yield chlorine radicals, which are thought to interfere with the catalytic cycle of ozone formation and destruction and deplete stratospheric ozone concentrations. Due to potential adverse health effects of ozone depletion, chlorofluorocarbon replacements with much lower or absent ozone depleting potential are developed. The toxicology of these compounds that represent chlorofluorohydrocarbons (HCFCs) or fluorohydrocarbons (HFCs) has been intensively studied. All compounds investigated (1, 1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane [HCFC-141b], 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane [HFC-134a], pentafluoroethane [HFC-125], 1-chloro- 1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethane [HCFC-124], and 1,1-dichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane [HCFC-123]) show only a low potential for skin and eye irritation. Chronic adverse effects on the liver (HCFC-123) and the testes (HCFC-141b and HCFC-134a), including tumor formation, were observed in long-term inhalation studies in rodents using very high concentrations of these CFC replacements. All CFC replacements are, to varying extents, biotransformed in the organism, mainly by cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of C-H bonds. The formed acyl halides are hydrolyzed to give excretable carboxylic acids; halogenated aldehydes that are formed may be further oxidized to halogenated carboxylic acids or reduced to halogenated alcohols, which are excretory metabolites in urine from rodents exposed experimentally to CFC replacements. The chronic toxicity of the CFC replacements studied is unlikely to be of relevance for humans exposed during production and application of CFC replacements.

  16. Toxicological and epidemiological studies on effects of airborne fibers: coherence and public [corrected] health implications.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Morton

    2014-09-01

    Airborne fibers, when sufficiently biopersistent, can cause chronic pleural diseases, as well as excess pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancers. Mesothelioma and pleural plaques are caused by biopersistent fibers thinner than ∼0.1 μm and longer than ∼5 μm. Excess lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis are caused by biopersistent fibers that are longer than ∼20 μm. While biopersistence varies with fiber type, all amphibole and erionite fibers are sufficiently biopersistent to cause pathogenic effects, while the greater in vivo solubility of chrysotile fibers makes them somewhat less causal for the lung diseases, and much less causal for the pleural diseases. Most synthetic vitreous fibers are more soluble in vivo than chrysotile, and pose little, if any, health pulmonary or pleural health risk, but some specialty SVFs were sufficiently biopersistent to cause pathogenic effects in animal studies. My conclusions are based on the following: 1) epidemiologic studies that specified the origin of the fibers by type, and especially those that identified their fiber length and diameter distributions; 2) laboratory-based toxicologic studies involving fiber size characterization and/or dissolution rates and long-term observation of biological responses; and 3) the largely coherent findings of the epidemiology and the toxicology. The strong dependence of effects on fiber diameter, length, and biopersistence makes reliable routine quantitative exposure and risk assessment impractical in some cases, since it would require transmission electronic microscopic examination, of representative membrane filter samples, for determining statistically sufficient numbers of fibers longer than 5 and 20 μm, and those thinner than 0.1 μm, based on the fiber types. PMID:25168068

  17. Toxicological effects of cinnabar in rats by NMR-based metabolic profiling of urine and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Lai; Liao Peiqiu; Wu Huifeng; Li Xiaojing Pei Fengkui Li Weisheng; Wu Yijie

    2008-03-15

    Cinnabar, an important traditional Chinese mineral medicine, has been widely used as a Chinese patent medicine ingredient for sedative therapy. However, the pharmaceutical and toxicological effects of cinnabar, especially in the whole organism, were subjected to few investigations. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach has been applied to investigate the toxicological effects of cinnabar after intragastrical administration (dosed at 0.5, 2 and 5 g/kg body weight) on male Wistar rats. Liver and kidney histopathology examinations and serum clinical chemistry analyses were also performed. The {sup 1}H NMR spectra were analyzed using multivariate pattern recognition techniques to show the time- and dose-dependent biochemical variations induced by cinnabar. The metabolic signature of urinalysis from cinnabar-treated animals exhibited an increase in the levels of creatinine, acetate, acetoacetate, taurine, hippurate and phenylacetylglycine, together with a decrease in the levels of trimethyl-N-oxide, dimethylglycine and Kreb's cycle intermediates (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate and succinate). The metabolomics analyses of serum showed elevated concentrations of ketone bodies (3-D-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate), branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine), choline and creatine as well as decreased glucose, lipids and lipoproteins from cinnabar-treated animals. These findings indicated cinnabar induced disturbance in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism and gut microflora environment as well as slight injury in liver and kidney, which might indirectly result from cinnabar induced oxidative stress. This work illustrated the high reliability of NMR-based metabolomic approach on the study of the biochemical effects induced by traditional Chinese medicine.

  18. 40 CFR 174.71 - Submission of information regarding adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... any information regarding adverse effects on human health or the environment alleged to have been... this part. This may include, for example, researchers performing field experiments, breeders making... information. (b) Adverse effects on human health or the environment for purposes of...

  19. FEMALE SEX AND DISCONTINUATION OF ISONIAZID DUE TO ADVERSE EFFECTS DURING THE TREATMENT OF LATENT TUBERCULOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, April C.; Bethel, James; Hirsch-Moverman, Yael; Colson, Paul W.; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives To determine the rate of and risk factors for discontinuation of isoniazid due to adverse effects during the treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in a large, multi-site study. Methods The Tuberculosis Epidemiologic Studies Consortium (TBESC) conducted a prospective study from March 2007–September 2008 among adults initiating isoniazid for treatment of LTBI at 12 sites in the US and Canada. The relative risk for isoniazid discontinuation due to adverse effects was determined using negative binomial regression. Adjusted models were constructed using forward stepwise regression. Results Of 1,306 persons initiating isoniazid, 617 (47.2%, 95% CI 44.5–50.0%) completed treatment and 196 (15.0%, 95% CI 13.1–17.1%) discontinued due to adverse effects. In multivariable analysis, female sex (RR 1.67, 95% CI 1.32–2.10, p<0.001) and current alcohol use (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.13–1.77, p=0.003) were independently associated with isoniazid discontinuation due to adverse effects. Conclusions The rate of discontinuation of isoniazid due to adverse effects was substantially higher than reported earlier. Women were at increased risk of discontinuing isoniazid due to adverse effects; close monitoring of women for adverse effects may be warranted. Current alcohol use was also associated with isoniazid discontinuation; counseling patients to abstain from alcohol could decrease discontinuation due to adverse effects. PMID:23845828

  20. Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert R.; Meyers, Valerie E.

    2015-01-01

    silica (Permissible Exposure Limit [PEL] 0.05 mg/m3) but more toxic than the nuisance dust titanium dioxide (TiO2 [PEL 5.0 mg/m3]). A PEL for episodic exposure to airborne lunar dust during a six-month stay on the lunar surface was established, in consultation with an independent, extramural panel of expert pulmonary toxicologists, at 0.3 mg/m3. The PEL provided for lunar dust is limited to the conditions and exposure specified therefore additional research remains to be accomplished with lunar dust to further address the issues of activation, address other areas of more unique lunar geology (Glotch et al., 2010; Greenhagen et al., 2010), examine potential toxicological effects of inhaled or ingested dust upon other organ systems, such cardiovascular, nervous systems, and examine effects of acute exposure to massive doses of dust such as may occur during off-nominal situations. Work to support the establishment of PELs for Martian dust and dusts of asteroids remains to be accomplished. The literature that describes health effects of exposure to toxic terrestrial dusts provides substantial basis for concern that prolonged exposure to respirable celestial dust could be detrimental to human health. Celestial bodies where a substantial portion of the dust is in the respirable range or where the dusts have large reactive surface areas or contain transition metals or volatile organics, represent greater risks of adverse effects from exposure to the dust. It is possible that in addition to adverse effects to the respiratory system, inhalation and ingestion of celestial dusts could pose risks to other systems

  1. SOURCES OF VARIATION IN TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON PRECISION OF RESULTS: INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultimate goal of risk assessment is to estimate the adverse effects of exposures to environmental contaminants in the population. However, populations of humans and other species vary widely in many key factors such as age, genetic makeup, gender, and health status. Any or a...

  2. Magnetic field can alleviate toxicological effect induced by cadmium in mungbean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-ping; Li, Ran; He, Jun-Min

    2011-06-01

    To alleviate toxicological effect induced by cadmium in mungbean seedlings, seeds were divided into four groups: The controls groups (CK, without treatment), magnetic field treated groups (MF), cadmium treated groups (CS), and magnetic field treated followed by cadmium treated groups (MF + CS).The results showed: (i) Compared with the controls, cadmium stress resulted in enhancing in the concentration of malondialdehyde, H(2)O(2) and O(2-), and the conductivity of electrolyte leakage while decreasing in the nitrice oxide synthase (NOS) activity, the concentration of nitrice oxide (NO), chlorophyll and total carbon and nitrogen, the net photosynthetic rate, the stomatal conductance, the transpiration rate, the water use efficiency, the lateral number and seedlings growth except for intercellular CO(2) concentration increase. However, the seedlings treated with 600 mT magnetic field followed by cadmium stress the concentration of malondialdehyde, H(2)O(2) and O(2-), and the conductivity of electrolyte leakage decreased, while the above mentioned NO concentration, NOS activity, photosynthesis and growth parameters increased compared to cadmium stress alone. (ii) Compared with the cadmium stress (CS), the seedling growth were inhibited when the seeds were treated with NO scavenger (hemoglobin, HB) and inhibition of NO generating enzyme (sodium tungstate, ST), conversely, the seedling growth were improved by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and CaCl(2). In the case of the HB and ST treatment followed by magnetic field and then the seedling subjected to CS, the seedlings growth was better than that of hemoglobin (HB) followed by CS and ST followed by CS. The seeds were treated with SNP and CaCl(2) followed by MF, and then subjected to CS, the seedlings growth were better than that of SNP followed by CS, and CaCl(2) followed by CS. These results suggested that magnetic field compensates for the toxicological effects of cadmium exposure are related to NO signal.

  3. Chemical-chemical interaction between cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes: a mechanism-based QSAR approach to assess toxicological joint effects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Wei, D; Wang, X; Yin, K; Zhao, D

    2004-04-01

    A QSAR approach was proposed to assess toxicological joint effects based on the mechanism of chemical-chemical interactions between cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes. It has been observed that the chemical-chemical interaction between cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes resulted in the formation of carbanion intermediates, and therefore this interaction led to different toxicological joint effects between cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes. Analysis of this chemical-chemical interaction showed that the formation of carbanion intermediate highly depended on the charge of the carbon atom in the -CHO of aldehydes and this of the carbon atom (C*) in the carbochain of cyanogenic toxicant. By using the Hammett Constant (sigma(p)) to measure the charge of carbon atom in the -CHO of aldehydes, a mechanism-based QSAR approach (M = 0.316 - 4.386sigma(p) with r2 = 0.933, SE = 0.082, F = 55.389, p = 0.002, M = sum of toxic units) was proposed to assess the toxicological joint effects between alpha-hydroxy-isobutyronitrile and individual aliphatic aldehydes. Another one (M = 0.978 - 0.720sigma(p) with r2 = 0.852, SE = 0.152, F = 40.148, p = 0.0001) was also proposed to assess the toxicological joint effects between alpha-hydroxy-isobutyronitrile and individual aromatic aldehydes. Lastly, by using the charge of carbon atom (C*) in the carbochain of cyanogenic toxicant, a mechanism-based QSAR model (M = -0.161 - 7.721C* with r2 = 0.847, SE = 0.227, F = 27.657, p = 0.003) was derived to assess toxicological joint effects between p-nitrobenzaldehyde and cyanogenic toxicants.

  4. Transient Adverse Side Effects During Neurofeedback Training: A Randomized, Sham-Controlled, Double Blind Study.

    PubMed

    Rogel, Ainat; Guez, Jonathan; Getter, Nir; Keha, Eldad; Cohen, Tzlil; Amor, Tali; Todder, Doron

    2015-09-01

    The benefits of clinical neurofeedback training are well known, however, its adverse side-effects are less studied. This research focuses on the transient adverse side effects of neurofeedback training via a double-blind, sham/controlled methodology. Thirty healthy undergraduate students volunteers were randomly divided into three treatment groups: increasing a modified Sensory Motor Rhythm, increasing Upper Alpha, and Sham/control group who receive a random reward. The training sessions were administered for a total of ten sessions. Questionnaires of transient adverse side effects were completed by all volunteers before each session. The results suggest that similar to most medical treatments, neurofeedback can cause transient adverse side effects. Moreover, most participants reported experiencing some side effects. The side effects can be divided into non-specific side effect, associated with the neurofeedback training in general and specific ones associated with the particular protocol. Sensory Motor Rhythm protocol seems to be the most sensitive to side effects.

  5. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe res...

  6. 40 CFR 158.34 - Flagging of studies for potential adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the criteria of 40 CFR 158.34 for flagging studies for potential adverse effects to the results of the... exceeds criteria. I have applied the criteria of 40 CFR 158.34 for flagging studies for potential adverse... sex. 4 Prenatal developmental toxicityReproduction and fertility Developmental neurotoxicity...

  7. Effect of Two Different Methods of Initiating Atomoxetine on the Adverse Event Profile of Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhill, Laurence L.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Gao, Haitao; Feldman, Peter D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of two different methods for initiating atomoxetine in terms of the incidence of early adverse events. Method: Data on atomoxetine treatment-emergent adverse events in youths, ages 6 to 18 years, were analyzed from five randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, acute-phase studies. Two studies involve…

  8. Separate and Cumulative Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences in Predicting Adult Health and Health Care Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, Mariette J.; Walker, John R.; Naimark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Objectives of this population-based study were: (1) to examine the relative contribution of childhood abuse and other adverse childhood experiences to poor adult health and increased health care utilization and (2) to examine the cumulative effects of adverse childhood experiences on adult health and health care utilization. Methods:…

  9. Toxicological effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on freshwater turtles in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ming-Ch'eng Adams, Clare Isabel; Baker, Joel E; Kjellerup, Birthe V

    2016-07-01

    Prediction of vertebrate health effects originating from persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has remained a challenge for decades thus making the identification of bioindicators difficult. POPs are predominantly present in soil and sediment, where they adhere to particles due to their hydrophobic characteristics. Animals inhabiting soil and sediment can be exposed to PCBs via dermal exposure while others may obtain PCBs through contaminated trophic interaction. Freshwater turtles can serve as bioindicators due to their strong site fidelity, longevity and varied diet. Previous research observed the health effects of PCBs on turtles such as decreased bone mass, changed sexual development and decreased immune responses through studying both contaminated sites along with laboratory experimentation. Higher deformity rates in juveniles, increased mortality and slower growth have also been observed. Toxicological effects of PCBs vary between species of freshwater turtles and depend on the concertation and configuration of PCB congeners. Evaluation of ecotoxicological effects of PCBs in non-endangered turtles could provide important knowledge about the health effects of endangered turtle species thus inform the design of remediation strategies. In this review, the PCB presence in freshwater turtle habitats and the ecotoxicological effects were investigated with the aim of utilizing the health status to identify areas of focus for freshwater turtle conservation. PMID:27043381

  10. Toxicological effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on freshwater turtles in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ming-Ch'eng Adams, Clare Isabel; Baker, Joel E; Kjellerup, Birthe V

    2016-07-01

    Prediction of vertebrate health effects originating from persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has remained a challenge for decades thus making the identification of bioindicators difficult. POPs are predominantly present in soil and sediment, where they adhere to particles due to their hydrophobic characteristics. Animals inhabiting soil and sediment can be exposed to PCBs via dermal exposure while others may obtain PCBs through contaminated trophic interaction. Freshwater turtles can serve as bioindicators due to their strong site fidelity, longevity and varied diet. Previous research observed the health effects of PCBs on turtles such as decreased bone mass, changed sexual development and decreased immune responses through studying both contaminated sites along with laboratory experimentation. Higher deformity rates in juveniles, increased mortality and slower growth have also been observed. Toxicological effects of PCBs vary between species of freshwater turtles and depend on the concertation and configuration of PCB congeners. Evaluation of ecotoxicological effects of PCBs in non-endangered turtles could provide important knowledge about the health effects of endangered turtle species thus inform the design of remediation strategies. In this review, the PCB presence in freshwater turtle habitats and the ecotoxicological effects were investigated with the aim of utilizing the health status to identify areas of focus for freshwater turtle conservation.

  11. The basic science of dermal fillers: past and present Part II: adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Erin; Hui, Andrea; Meehan, Shane; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2012-09-01

    The ideal dermal filler should offer long-lasting aesthetic improvement with a minimal side-effect profile. It should be biocompatible and stable within the injection site, with the risk of only transient undesirable effects from injection alone. However, all dermal fillers can induce serious and potentially long-lasting adverse effects. In Part II of this paper, we review the most common adverse effects related to dermal filler use.

  12. Adverse Effects of Common Drugs: Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Karpa, Kelly Dowhower; Felix, Todd Matthew; Lewis, Peter R

    2015-09-01

    Drug use and harms are increasingly common among newborns, infants, children, and adolescents during ambulatory practice, emergency department, and in-hospital treatment, including treatment in pediatric intensive care units. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of drugs often are different for children compared with adults and must be considered before prescribing. Drug exposure and the potential for harms also should be considered for fetuses and breastfeeding infants. As with adult patients, a thorough drug and allergy history (including nonprescription drugs and herbal and dietary supplements) should be obtained and reviewed at each medical visit. Children and adolescents are increasingly at risk of drug harm/overdose through accidental or intentional ingestion of nonprescription and prescription drugs (eg, cough and cold preparations, candy-appearing vitamins, stimulants, narcotics). Parents and caregivers should receive training in the proper use, storage, and administration of all drugs. Prescribing clinicians should be vigilant in withholding unnecessary drugs, such as antibiotics for viral infections. When prescribing, clinicians should be aware of common drugs frequently associated with adverse reactions, including stimulants, antipsychotics, analgesics, asthma therapies, acne therapies, and tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. Scientifically based prescribing practices should be used and consultation with evidence-based resources and pharmacists sought as needed. PMID:26375994

  13. Effectiveness of Micro-Blowing Technique in Adverse Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Larosiliere, Louis M.; Hwang, Danny P.; Wood, Jerry R.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of the micro-blowing technique (MBT) on the skin friction and total drag of a strut in a turbulent, strong adverse-pressure-gradient flow is assessed experimentally over a range of subsonic Mach numbers (0.3 less than M less than 0.7) and reduced blowing fractions (0 less than or equal to 2F/C (sub f,o) less than or equal to 1.75). The MBT-treated strut is situated along the centerline of a symmetric 2-D diffuser with a static pressure rise coefficient of 0.6. In agreement with presented theory and earlier experiments in zero-pressure-gradient flows, the effusion of blowing air reduces skin friction significantly (e.g., by 60% at reduced blowing fractions near 1.75). The total drag of the treated strut with blowing is significantly lower than that of the treated strut in the limit of zero-blowing; further, the total drag is reduced below that of the baseline (solid-plate) strut, provided that the reduced blowing fractions are sufficiently high. The micro-blowing air is, however, deficient in streamwise momentum and the blowing leads to increased boundary-layer and wake thicknesses and shape factors. Diffuser performance metrics and wake surveys are used to discuss the impact of various levels of micro-blowing on the aerodynamic blockage and loss.

  14. [Are there cardiovascular adverse effects of inhaled anticholinergics?].

    PubMed

    Nagy, László Béla

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the cardiovascular risk associated with inhaled anticholinergics in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Several meta-analyses of data for tiotropium raised the possibility of an increased risk for arrhythmia, angina, myocardial infarction, etc. This review includes the data of retrospective studies of databases using databases, randomized controlled trials, and meta-analyses of clinical trials. The conclusions of studies were inconsistent. In most clinical trials the incidence of cardiovascular adverse events was similar in active treatment and placebo groups, especially in patients with previous cardiovascular diseases. Considering meta-analyses, there is little, if any, evidence for the association between anticholinergics and the development of cardiovascular symptoms. The author discusses the presence and function of cholinergic receptor subtypes in human heart, and cardiac functions controlled by the autonomic nervous system via these receptors, their possible role, and pharmacokinetic properties of inhaled anticholinergics. The author concludes that it is not possible to find evidence of increased cardiovascular harm of inhaled anticholinergics.

  15. Use and reported adverse effects of new chemical entities.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D L; Goetsch, R A; Dreis, M W

    1989-03-01

    Reports submitted to the FDA through 1987 of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to new chemical entities (NCEs) approved after 1983 are described, and estimates of each NCE's proportionate use in hospitals and within its therapeutic class are reported. This review was limited to those domestic spontaneous ADR reports submitted to the FDA by healthcare professionals. NCEs accounted for approximately 20% of the total number of domestic spontaneous ADR reports received in 1987, 22% of the reports of serious ADRs, and 24% of the reports that listed death as an outcome. Data on the use of these NCEs were obtained through the U.S. Pharmaceutical Market--Drugstores and Hospitals and the National Prescription Audit. Of the 93 drugs designated as NCEs in 1987, 65 had measurable use, with 41% of those used principally in hospitals. Most hospital-use NCEs were injectable antimicrobial agents, surgical drugs, and radioactive diagnostic agents. Because NCEs account for a disproportionate share of the ADRs reported to the FDA, and because of the high use of NCEs in hospitals, hospital pharmacists should be aware of the importance of monitoring and reporting serious ADRs associated with NCEs. PMID:2719041

  16. Adverse effects of extra-articular corticosteroid injections: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To estimate the occurrence and type of adverse effects after application of an extra-articular (soft tissue) corticosteroid injection. Methods A systematic review of the literature was made based on a PubMed and Embase search covering the period 1956 to January 2010. Case reports were included, as were prospective and retrospective studies that reported adverse events of corticosteroid injection. All clinical trials which used extra-articular corticosteroid injections were examined. We divided the reported adverse events into major (defined as those needing intervention or not disappearing) and minor ones (transient, not requiring intervention). Results The search yielded 87 relevant studies:44 case reports, 37 prospective studies and 6 retrospective studies. The major adverse events included osteomyelitis and protothecosis; one fatal necrotizing fasciitis; cellulitis and ecchymosis; tendon ruptures; atrophy of the plantar fat was described after injecting a neuroma; and local skin effects appeared as atrophy, hypopigmentation or as skin defect. The minor adverse events effects ranged from skin rash to flushing and disturbed menstrual pattern. Increased pain or steroid flare after injection was reported in 19 studies. After extra-articular injection, the incidence of major adverse events ranged from 0-5.8% and that of minor adverse events from 0-81%. It was not feasible to pool the risk for adverse effects due to heterogeneity of study populations and difference in interventions and variance in reporting. Conclusion In this literature review it was difficult to accurately quantify the incidence of adverse effects after extra-articular corticosteroid injection. The reported adverse events were relatively mild, although one fatal reaction was reported. PMID:20836867

  17. Adverse effects associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, E; Menon, D; Topfer, L A; Coloma, C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of antidepressant medications and the resulting costs have increased dramatically in recent years, partly because of the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). An assessment of the clinical and economic aspects of SSRIs compared with the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) was initiated to generate information for purchasers of these drugs as well as clinicians. One component of this study was an examination of the adverse effects associated with the use of these drugs. METHODS: Searches of bibliographic databases (for January 1980 through May 1996) and manual scanning of both peer-reviewed publications and other documents were used to identify double-blind, randomized controlled trials involving at least one SSRI and one TCA. For the study of adverse effects, only trials that had at least 20 patients in each trial arm and that reported rates of adverse effects in both arms were retained. In total 84 trials reporting on 18 adverse effects were available. Meta-analyses were undertaken to calculate pooled differences in rates of adverse effects. The question of whether the method of eliciting information from patients about adverse effects made a difference in the findings was also examined. Finally, differences in drop-out rates due to adverse effects were calculated. RESULTS: The crude rates of occurrence of adverse effects ranged from 4% (palpitations) to 26% (nausea) for SSRIs and from 4% (diarrhea) to 27% (dry mouth) for TCAs. The differences in the rates of adverse effects between the 2 types of drugs ranged from 14% more with SSRIs (for nausea) to 11% more with TCAs (for constipation). The results did not depend on the method of eliciting information from patients. There were no statistically significant differences between drug classes in terms of drop-outs due to adverse effects. INTERPRETATION: SSRIs and TCAs are both associated with adverse effects, although the key effects differ between the drug classes

  18. Manual therapy for the cervical spine and reported adverse effects: a survey of Irish manipulative physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Aoife; Doody, Catherine

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use of manipulation and mobilisation by the Chartered Physiotherapists (CMPT) in Manipulative Therapy Ireland and to describe adverse effects associated with the use of these techniques. A 44 item postal survey was sent to all 259 members of the CPMT (response rate 49%, n=127). All 127 respondents used non-High Velocity Thrust Techniques (HVTT) and 27% (n=34) used HVTT. Nine percent (n=12) used HVTT on the upper cervical spine. Twenty six percent (n=33) reported an adverse effect in the previous 2 years. The adverse effects were associated with the use of HVTT (4%, n=5), non-HVTT (20%, n=26) and cervical traction (2%, n=2). The most serious adverse effects were associated with non-HVTT and included 1 drop attack, 1 fainting episode and 1 Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) 4 days post treatment. Fifty three percent (n=18) of HVTT users and 40% (n=44) of non-HVTT users reported carrying out a vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) assessment. The study shows that VBI assessment may not detect every patient at risk of adverse effects. Large scale studies to investigate the risk of serious adverse reactions are needed. A system of reporting adverse effects on a routine basis could be considered.

  19. Toxicology and epidemiology: improving the science with a framework for combining toxicological and epidemiological evidence to establish causal inference.

    PubMed

    Adami, Hans-Olov; Berry, Sir Colin L; Breckenridge, Charles B; Smith, Lewis L; Swenberg, James A; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Weiss, Noel S; Pastoor, Timothy P

    2011-08-01

    Historically, toxicology has played a significant role in verifying conclusions drawn on the basis of epidemiological findings. Agents that were suggested to have a role in human diseases have been tested in animals to firmly establish a causative link. Bacterial pathogens are perhaps the oldest examples, and tobacco smoke and lung cancer and asbestos and mesothelioma provide two more recent examples. With the advent of toxicity testing guidelines and protocols, toxicology took on a role that was intended to anticipate or predict potential adverse effects in humans, and epidemiology, in many cases, served a role in verifying or negating these toxicological predictions. The coupled role of epidemiology and toxicology in discerning human health effects by environmental agents is obvious, but there is currently no systematic and transparent way to bring the data and analysis of the two disciplines together in a way that provides a unified view on an adverse causal relationship between an agent and a disease. In working to advance the interaction between the fields of toxicology and epidemiology, we propose here a five-step "Epid-Tox" process that would focus on: (1) collection of all relevant studies, (2) assessment of their quality, (3) evaluation of the weight of evidence, (4) assignment of a scalable conclusion, and (5) placement on a causal relationship grid. The causal relationship grid provides a clear view of how epidemiological and toxicological data intersect, permits straightforward conclusions with regard to a causal relationship between agent and effect, and can show how additional data can influence conclusions of causality. PMID:21561883

  20. Adverse effects of meditation: a preliminary investigation of long-term meditators.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, D H

    1992-01-01

    Adverse effects of meditation were assessed in twenty-seven long term meditators (average 4.27 years) both retrospectively (time one) and prospectively at one month (time two) and six months (time three) following a meditation retreat. At both time one and time three subjects reported significantly more positive effects than negative from meditation. However, of the twenty-seven subjects, seventeen (62.9%) reported at least one adverse effect, and two (7.4%) suffered profound adverse effects. When subjects at time one were divided into three groups based on length of practice (16.7 months; 47.1 months; 105 months) there were no significant differences in adverse effects. How the data should be interpreted, and their implications both for the clinical and psychotherapeutic use of meditation as a relaxation/self-control strategy, and as a technique for facilitating personal and spiritual growth, are discussed. Limitations of the study and suggestions for future research are also offered.

  1. The Useage of Opioids and their Adverse Effects in Gastrointestinal Practice: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, MahmoudReza; Sohrabi, MasourReza; Zamani, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Opium is one of the oldest herbal medicines currently used as an analgesic, sedative and antidiarrheal treatment. The effects of opium are principally mediated by the μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Opioid substances consist of all natural and synthetic alkaloids that are derived from opium. Most of their effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion result from suppression of neural activity. Inhibition of gastric emptying, increase in sphincter tone, changes in motor patterns, and blockage of peristalsis result from opioid use. Common adverse effects of opioid administration include sedation, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, dependency and tolerance, and respiratory depression. The most common adverse effect of opioid use is constipation. Although stool softeners are frequently used to decrease opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, however they are not efficacious. Possibly, the use of specific opioid receptor antagonists is a more suitable approach. Opioid antagonists, both central and peripheral, could affect gastrointestinal function and visceromotor sensitivity, which suggests an important role for endogenous opioid peptides in the control of gastrointestinal physiology. Underlying diseases or medications known to influence the central nervous system (CNS) often accelerate the opioid’s adverse effects. However, changing the opioid and/or route of administration could also decrease their adverse effects. Appropriate patient selection, patient education and discussion regarding potential adverse effects may assist physicians in maximizing the effectiveness of opioids, while reducing the number and severity of adverse effects. PMID:24829664

  2. 15 CFR 970.701 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES... effects of deep seabed mining which cumulatively during commercial recovery have the potential for significant effect. These three effects also occur during mining system tests that may be conducted under...

  3. 15 CFR 970.701 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES... effects of deep seabed mining which cumulatively during commercial recovery have the potential for significant effect. These three effects also occur during mining system tests that may be conducted under...

  4. Short-term adverse effects in humans of ingested mineral oils, their additives and possible contaminants--a review.

    PubMed

    Hard, G C

    2000-03-01

    The toxicological databases for petroleum refinery products such as mineral oils, as well as for their potential contaminants and additives, were reviewed for human cases of poisoning by the oral route. The aim was to determine whether any overlooked adulterant in the oil implicated as the cause of the 1981 outbreak of Toxic Oil Syndrome (TOS) in Spain, may have been responsible for the unusual symptomatology characterizing this disease. The essential features of TOS were peripheral eosinophilia, pulmonary oedema and endothelial damage in the acute phase; myalgia, sensory neuropathy, hepatic injury, skin oedema and sicca in the intermediate phase; and peripheral neuropathy, muscle wasting, scleroderma and hepatopathy in the chronic phase. Of the more than 70 chemical entities and mixtures reviewed here, none had been reported as producing adverse toxic effects upon ingestion resembling the specific set of symptoms and progression that characterized TOS. Because of their viscosity, the most commonly recorded disease process associated with oral ingestion of petroleum refinery products was lipid pneumonia, implicating lung exposure via aspiration. The mineral oil additives and contaminants comprised a highly diverse range of chemical entities, producing a variety of symptoms in instances of poisoning. Specifically, no chemical entity amongst the refinery products, additives or contaminants was described as inducing a syndrome involving vasculitis accompanied by thrombotic events, along with immunological consequences (such as T-lymphocyte activation and cytokine release), as is considered to be the cellular basis of TOS.

  5. Preventive Effects of Multi-Lamellar Emulsion on Low Potency Topical Steroid Induced Local Adverse Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Geun Dong; Park, Hyun Jung; Bae, Jong Hwan; Hong, Keum Duck; Park, Byeong Deog; Chun, Jaesun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Lee, Seung Hun; Ahn, Sung Ku

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical steroid treatment induces diverse local Wand systemic adverse effects. Several approaches have been tried to reduce the steroid-induced adverse effects. Simultaneous application of physiological lipid mixture is also suggested. Objective Novel vehicles for topical glucocorticoids formulation were evaluated for the efficacy of reducing side-effects and the drug delivery properties of desonide, a low potency topical steroid. Methods Transcutaneous permeation and skin residual amount of desonide were measured using Franz diffusion cells. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using murine model. Results Topical steroids formulation containing desonide, in either cream or lotion form, were prepared using multi-lamellar emulsion (MLE), and conventional desonide formulations were employed for comparison. MLE formulations did not affect the anti-inflammatory activity of the desonide in phobol ester-induced skin inflammation model, compared with conventional formulations. While the penetrated amounts of desonide were similar for all the tested formulations at 24 hours after application, the increased lag time was observed for the MLE formulations. Interestingly, residual amount of desonide in epidermis was significantly higher in lotion type MLE formulation. Steroid-induced adverse effects, including permeability barrier function impairment, were partially prevented by MLE formulation. Conclusion Topical desonide formulation using MLE as a vehicle showed a better drug delivery with increased epidermal retention. MLE also partially prevented the steroid-induced side effects, such as skin barrier impairment. PMID:23467730

  6. Toxicology: Old Art, New Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timbrell, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the need for a science of toxicology and training at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in response to legislation controlling drugs, food additives and toxic substances in the work environment, and concern about effects on man. Stresses need for putting toxicology on a scientific base with adequate funding. (JM)

  7. Evaluation of Proper Usage of Glucocorticosteroid Inhalers and Their Adverse Effects in Asthmatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Mohammad Esmayil; Shafiifar, Afsaneh; Mashayekhi, Siminozar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequent use of corticosteroid inhalers (CSIs), especially at higher doses, has been accompanied by concern about both systemic and local adverse reactions. The local adverse reactions of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are considered to constitute infrequent and minor problems. However, while not usually serious, these local adverse reactions are of clinical importance. This study assessed the prevalence of local adverse reactions, their clinical features, role of inhaler devices and current measures that have been suggested to prevent the problem. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in YAS clinic in Tabriz on 500 asthmatic patients. A questionnaire about the patients’ demographic information, methods of using CSIs, local care after using CSIs, using spacer devices, doses of ICSs, and adverse reactions were filled then the patients were clinically examined for local adverse reactions. Results: Only 56% patients were using CSIs properly. In general, the incidence of complications was: oropharyngeal candidiasis 25.6%, laryngeal weakness 8.8%, choking 17.6%, tooth decay 15.2%, speechlessness 36.2%, taste decrease 20.8%, tongue burning 29.8% and tongue abrasion 27.8%. Conclusion: Persistent asthma can be effectively controlled with currently available CSIs. Although not life-threatening, local adverse reactions of ICSs are clinically significant and warrant attention. Use of spacer devices and changes in CSI usage, dosage amount and frequency and rinsing and gargling are the methods that have been used to reduce the incidence of local adverse reactions. PMID:27403173

  8. Aerospace Toxicology and Microbiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Parmet, A. J.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Toxicology dates to the very earliest history of humanity with various poisons and venom being recognized as a method of hunting or waging war with the earliest documentation in the Evers papyrus (circa 1500 BCE). The Greeks identified specific poisons such as hemlock, a method of state execution, and the Greek word toxos (arrow) became the root of our modern science. The first scientific approach to the understanding of poisons and toxicology was the work during the late middle ages of Paracelsus. He formulated what were then revolutionary views that a specific toxic agent or "toxicon" caused specific dose-related effects. His principles have established the basis of modern pharmacology and toxicology. In 1700, Bernardo Ramazzini published the book De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (The Diseases of Workers) describing specific illnesses associated with certain labor, particularly metal workers exposed to mercury, lead, arsenic, and rock dust. Modern toxicology dates from development of the modern industrial chemical processes, the earliest involving an analytical method for arsenic by Marsh in 1836. Industrial organic chemicals were synthesized in the late 1800 s along with anesthetics and disinfectants. In 1908, Hamilton began the long study of occupational toxicology issues, and by WW I the scientific use of toxicants saw Haber creating war gases and defining time-dosage relationships that are used even today.

  9. The behavior and toxicological effects of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) in a soil-earthworm system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Jing; Liu, Kou; Lin, Kuangfei

    2015-12-15

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) is easily absorbed by soil particles but barely degraded over time. Its potential ecological risk has received extensive attention. Here we supplemented natural soil with three different levels of BDE209 (1, 10 and 100 mg kg(-1) dry weight (i.e., dw)) to focus on the behavior and toxicological effects of BDE209 in a soil-earthworm system. Results demonstrated that earthworms accumulated BDE209 quickly, followed by biphasic elimination. The uptake rate constant (ku) values ranged from 0.156 to 0.232 mg soil kg(-1)worm d(-1), while the depuration rate (kd) values ranged from 0.228 to 0.239 d(-1). Biota-soil accumulation factor (BSAF) was also calculated in the present study, and the BSAF values for BDE209 ranged from 0.074 to 0.123. Throughout 28-d exposure, the concentrations of BDE209 among soil, worm casts and earthworms reached steady-state equilibrium. BDE209 content in worm casts might be a good indicator of actual concentration in soil. Neutral red retention time (NRRT) was also conducted to assess the lysosomal membrane stability, and it declined during the uptake phase when BDE209 gradually accumulated in earthworms, indicating a good dose-response relationship. These observations provide new insights into the potential ecological effects of BDE209 in a model soil-earthworm system.

  10. Toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lanzhou; Zhou, Lina; Liu, Yongding; Deng, Songqiang; Wu, Hao; Wang, Gaohong

    2012-10-01

    The toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on a unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were assessed by investigating the changes of the physiology and cyto-ultrastructure of this species under treatment. We found that nano-TiO2 inhibited photosynthetic efficiency and cell growth, but the content of chlorophyll a content in algae did not change, while carotenoid and chlorophyll b contents increased. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content reached maximum values after 8h exposure and then decreased to a moderately low level at 72 h. Electron microscopy images indicated that as concentrations of nano-TiO2 increased, a large number of C. reinhardtii cells were noted to be damaged: the number of chloroplasts declined, various other organelles were degraded, plasmolysis occurred, and TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be located inside cell wall and membrane. It was also noted that cell surface was surrounded by TiO2 particles, which could present an obstacle to the exchange of substances between the cell and its surrounding environment. To sum up, the effect of nano-TiO2 on C. reinhardtii included cell surface aggregation, photosynthesis inhibition, lipid peroxidation and new protein synthesis, while the response of C. reinhardtii to nano-TiO2 was a rapid process which occurs during 24 h after exposing and may relate to physiological stress system to mitigate damage. PMID:22883605

  11. Evaluation of the adverse effect of low concentration of cadmium on interleukin-4 induced class switch recombination in Burkett's lymphoma Raji cell line.

    PubMed

    Poltoratsky, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Affinity maturation of B lymphocytes, a process that includes somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, initiates global DNA rearrangements. The interruption of this process has an adverse effect on human health and results in immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease. Class switch recombination is a fundamental factor of the human adaptive immunity. Evaluation of the class switch recombination efficiency is an important component of laboratory diagnostic of immunotoxic components. Here, we describe a method for testing the efficiency of the class switch recombination. Cultivation of Raji Burkett's lymphoma cell line with anti-CD40 antibodies and recombinant interleukin-4 (IL-4) triggers a cascade of signal transduction network events that lead to switching the immunoglobulin isotopes from IgM to IgE. This chapter describes the methodology of class switch recombination assay for assessment of the effect of the environmental pollutants in toxicological laboratory diagnostics. PMID:24908303

  12. Evaluation of the adverse effect of low concentration of cadmium on interleukin-4 induced class switch recombination in Burkett's lymphoma Raji cell line.

    PubMed

    Poltoratsky, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Affinity maturation of B lymphocytes, a process that includes somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, initiates global DNA rearrangements. The interruption of this process has an adverse effect on human health and results in immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease. Class switch recombination is a fundamental factor of the human adaptive immunity. Evaluation of the class switch recombination efficiency is an important component of laboratory diagnostic of immunotoxic components. Here, we describe a method for testing the efficiency of the class switch recombination. Cultivation of Raji Burkett's lymphoma cell line with anti-CD40 antibodies and recombinant interleukin-4 (IL-4) triggers a cascade of signal transduction network events that lead to switching the immunoglobulin isotopes from IgM to IgE. This chapter describes the methodology of class switch recombination assay for assessment of the effect of the environmental pollutants in toxicological laboratory diagnostics.

  13. [THE ADVERSE EFFECTS OF SMOKING ON THE HANDS].

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Daniel; Calif, Edward; Stahl, Shalom

    2015-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is known to cause a multitude of harmful effects throughout the body. There are only a few accounts in the literature of these effects as related to the hands. This is a review of the literature, demonstrating the collected knowledge of decreased hand vascularity due to tobacco use and assessing the evidence connecting smoking and supposed resultant maladies, including Raynaud's phenomenon, hand-arm vibration syndrome, Buerger's disease, Dupuytren's contracture, carpal tunnel syndrome, effects on skin and fingernails, decreased skin and bone healing, complications of digit replantation and complex regional pain syndrome. Also presented is the possible increased risk of congenital hand malformations as related to maternal smoking. PMID:26168646

  14. Effects of intratracheally instilled laser printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles in a mouse model: A case study of toxicological implications from nanomaterials released during consumer use

    PubMed Central

    Pirela, Sandra V.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Miousse, Isabelle; Sisler, Jennifer D.; Qian, Yong; Guo, Nancy; Koturbash, Igor; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Godleski, John; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into toners used in laser printers has led to countless quality and performance improvements. However, the release of ENMs during printing (consumer use) has raised concerns about their potential adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to use “real world” printer-emitted particles (PEPs), rather than raw toner powder, and assess the pulmonary responses following exposure by intratracheal instillation. Nine-week old male Balb/c mice were exposed to various doses of PEPs (0.5, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg body weight) by intratracheal instillation. These exposure doses are comparable to real world human inhalation exposures ranging from 13.7 to 141.9 h of printing. Toxicological parameters reflecting distinct mechanisms of action were evaluated, including lung membrane integrity, inflammation and regulation of DNA methylation patterns. Results from this in vivo toxicological analysis showed that while intratracheal instillation of PEPs caused no changes in the lung membrane integrity, there was a pulmonary immune response, indicated by an elevation in neutrophil and macrophage percentage over the vehicle control and low dose PEPs groups. Additionally, exposure to PEPs upregulated expression of the Ccl5 (Rantes), Nos1 and Ucp2 genes in the murine lung tissue and modified components of the DNA methylation machinery (Dnmt3a) and expression of transposable element (TE) LINE-1 compared to the control group. These genes are involved in both the repair process from oxidative damage and the initiation of immune responses to foreign pathogens. The results are in agreement with findings from previous in vitro cellular studies and suggest that PEPs may cause immune responses in addition to modifications in gene expression in the murine lung at doses that can be comparable to real world exposure scenarios, thereby raising concerns of deleterious health effects. PMID:26989787

  15. In vitro toxicological effects of estrogenic mycotoxins on human placental cells: Structure activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Prouillac, Caroline; Lecoeur, Sylvaine

    2012-03-15

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a non-steroid estrogen mycotoxin produced by numerous strains of Fusarium which commonly contaminate cereals. After oral administration, ZEN is reduced via intestinal and hepatic metabolism to α- and β-zearalenol (αZEL and βZEL). These reduced metabolites possess estrogenic properties, αZEL showing the highest affinity for ERs. ZEN and reduced metabolites cause hormonal effects in animals, such as abnormalities in the development of the reproductive tract and mammary gland in female offspring, suggesting a fetal exposure to these contaminants. In our previous work, we have suggested the potential impact of ZEN on placental cells considering this organ as a potential target of xenobiotics. In this work, we first compared the in vitro effects of αZEL and βΖΕL on cell differentiation to their parental molecule on human trophoblast (BeWo cells). Secondly, we investigated their molecular mechanisms of action by investigating the expression of main differentiation biomarkers and the implication of nuclear receptor by docking prediction. Conversely to ZEN, reduced metabolites did not induce trophoblast differentiation. They also induced significant changes in ABC transporter expression by potential interaction with nuclear receptors (LXR, PXR, PR) that could modify the transport function of placental cells. Finally, the mechanism of ZEN differentiation induction seemed not to involve nuclear receptor commonly involved in the differentiation process (PPARγ). Our results demonstrated that in spite of structure similarities between ZEN, αZEL and βZEL, toxicological effects and toxicity mechanisms were significantly different for the three molecules. -- Highlights: ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on trophoblast differentiation. ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on ABC transporter expression. ► ZEN and metabolites effects involved nuclear receptors interaction.

  16. Saraca indica Bark Extract Shows In Vitro Antioxidant, Antibreast Cancer Activity and Does Not Exhibit Toxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Navneet Kumar; Saini, Karan Singh; Hossain, Zakir; Omer, Ankur; Sharma, Chetan; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Singh, Poonam; Arya, K. R.; Singh, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are used as a complementary and alternative medicine in treatment of various diseases including cancer worldwide, because of their ease of accessibility and cost effectiveness. Multicomposed mixture of compounds present in a plant extract has synergistic activity, increases the therapeutic potential many folds, compensates toxicity, and increases bioavailability. Saraca indica (family Caesalpiniaceae) is one of the most ancient sacred plants with medicinal properties, exhibiting a number of pharmacological effects. Antioxidant, antibreast cancer activity and toxicological evaluation of Saraca indica bark extract (SIE) were carried out in the present study. The results of the study indicated that this herbal preparation has antioxidant and antibreast cancer activity. Toxicological studies suggest that SIE is safer to use and may have a potential to be used as complementary and alternative medicine for breast cancer therapy. PMID:25861411

  17. Saraca indica bark extract shows in vitro antioxidant, antibreast cancer activity and does not exhibit toxicological effects.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Navneet Kumar; Saini, Karan Singh; Hossain, Zakir; Omer, Ankur; Sharma, Chetan; Gayen, Jiaur R; Singh, Poonam; Arya, K R; Singh, R K

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are used as a complementary and alternative medicine in treatment of various diseases including cancer worldwide, because of their ease of accessibility and cost effectiveness. Multicomposed mixture of compounds present in a plant extract has synergistic activity, increases the therapeutic potential many folds, compensates toxicity, and increases bioavailability. Saraca indica (family Caesalpiniaceae) is one of the most ancient sacred plants with medicinal properties, exhibiting a number of pharmacological effects. Antioxidant, antibreast cancer activity and toxicological evaluation of Saraca indica bark extract (SIE) were carried out in the present study. The results of the study indicated that this herbal preparation has antioxidant and antibreast cancer activity. Toxicological studies suggest that SIE is safer to use and may have a potential to be used as complementary and alternative medicine for breast cancer therapy.

  18. Science: Aquatic Toxicology Matures, Gains Importance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagani, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent advances in aquatic toxicology, whose major goal is to protect diverse aquatic organisms and whole ecological communities from the dire effects of man-made chemicals. Current legislation is reviewed. Differences in mammalian and aquatic toxicology are listed, and examples of research in aquatic toxicology are discussed. (CS)

  19. Possible sertraline-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Fang; Huang, Jin-Wen; Shan, Si-Yang; Ding, Jia-Hong; Lai, Jian-Bo; Xu, Yi; Hu, Shao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sertraline has been considered to be a relatively safe selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for adolescents for a long time. We report herein a case of a 16-year-old Chinese boy with depression who experienced extrapyramidal-like effects, for example, facial spasm, upper limb dystonia, akathisia, and other disturbed behaviors, while being treated with sertraline 200 mg per day. His movement symptoms were significantly alleviated after the discontinuation of sertraline and the administration of scopolamine. This finding indicates that albeit infrequent, sertraline may cause severe extrapyramidal symptoms in adolescent patients, suggesting that clinicians should be alert to the neurological side effects of sertraline in young patients. PMID:27226717

  20. Possible sertraline-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lian-fang; Huang, Jin-wen; Shan, Si-yang; Ding, Jia-hong; Lai, Jian-bo; Xu, Yi; Hu, Shao-hua

    2016-01-01

    Sertraline has been considered to be a relatively safe selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for adolescents for a long time. We report herein a case of a 16-year-old Chinese boy with depression who experienced extrapyramidal-like effects, for example, facial spasm, upper limb dystonia, akathisia, and other disturbed behaviors, while being treated with sertraline 200 mg per day. His movement symptoms were significantly alleviated after the discontinuation of sertraline and the administration of scopolamine. This finding indicates that albeit infrequent, sertraline may cause severe extrapyramidal symptoms in adolescent patients, suggesting that clinicians should be alert to the neurological side effects of sertraline in young patients. PMID:27226717

  1. The problems of anticholinergic adverse effects in older patients.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, M

    1993-01-01

    The old saying 'red as a beet, dry as a bone, blind as a bat, hot as a hare, mad as a hatter' is often quoted when describing the autonomic effects of drugs that block the muscarinic cholinergic system. These effects may be subtle or dramatic, yet can be overlooked or discounted as a natural consequence of old age. Elderly patients can be particularly sensitive to the anticholinergic action of drugs because of physiological and pathophysiological changes that often accompany the aging process. The use of multiple drugs, a common finding in older patients, may result in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions that heighten anticholinergic effects. While the classic anticholinergic problems of decreased secretions, slowed gastrointestinal motility, blurred vision, increased heart rate, heat intolerance, sedation and possibly mild confusion, may be uncomfortable for a younger patient in relatively good health, these effects can be disastrous for older patients. Even the most common peripheral anticholinergic complaint of dry mouth can reduce the ability to communicate, predispose to malnutrition, promote mucosal damage, denture misfit or dental caries, and increase the risk of serious respiratory infection secondary to loss of antimicrobial activity of saliva. Mydriasis and the inability to accommodate will impair near vision and may precipitate narrow angle glaucoma in predisposed patients, but less obviously could lead to an increased risk of accidents, including falls. Somatic complaints of constipation and urinary hesitancy, could, in the presence of anticholinergic challenge, result in faecal impaction or urinary retention. Cardiac effects may be poorly tolerated. Increases in heart rate may precipitate or worsen angina. Finally, thermoregulatory impairment induced by anticholinergics, which block the ability to sweat, may lead to life threatening hyperthermia. Central anticholinergic effects range from sedation, mild confusion and inability to

  2. Identifying and managing adverse environmental health effects: 4. Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, Margaret D.; Cole, Donald; Abelsohn, Alan; Weir, Erica

    2002-01-01

    PESTICIDE EXPOSURE CAN CAUSE MANY DIFFERENT HEALTH EFFECTS, from acute problems such as dermatitis and asthma exacerbation to chronic problems such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cancer. The resulting clinical presentations are undifferentiated, and specific knowledge of the links to environmental exposures is often required for effective diagnosis. In this article we illustrate the use of the CH2OPD2 mnemonic (Community, Home, Hobbies, Occupation, Personal habits, Drugs and Diet), a history-taking tool that assists physicians in quickly identifying possible environmental exposures. We also provide clinical information on the epidemiology, clinical presentations, treatment and prevention of pesticide exposures. PMID:12054413

  3. Historical perspectives on cadmium toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Nordberg, Gunnar F.

    2009-08-01

    The first health effects of cadmium (Cd) were reported already in 1858. Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred among persons using Cd-containing polishing agent. The first experimental toxicological studies are from 1919. Bone effects and proteinuria in humans were reported in the 1940's. After World War II, a bone disease with fractures and severe pain, the itai-itai disease, a form of Cd-induced renal osteomalacia, was identified in Japan. Subsequently, the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of Cd were described including its binding to the protein metallothionein. International warnings of health risks from Cd-pollution were issued in the 1970's. Reproductive and carcinogenic effects were studied at an early stage, but a quantitative assessment of these effects in humans is still subject to considerable uncertainty. The World Health Organization in its International Program on Chemical Safety, WHO/IPCS (1992) (Cadmium. Environmental Health Criteria Document 134, IPCS. WHO, Geneva, 1-280.) identified renal dysfunction as the critical effect and a crude quantitative evaluation was presented. In the 1990's and 2000 several epidemiological studies have reported adverse health effects, sometimes at low environmental exposures to Cd, in population groups in Japan, China, Europe and USA (reviewed in other contributions to the present volume). The early identification of an important role of metallothionein in cadmium toxicology formed the basis for recent studies using biomarkers of susceptibility to development of Cd-related renal dysfunction such as gene expression of metallothionein in peripheral lymphocytes and autoantibodies against metallothionein in blood plasma. Findings in these studies indicate that very low exposure levels to cadmium may give rise to renal dysfunction among sensitive subgroups of human populations such as persons with diabetes.

  4. Effect of oxygenated fuels on physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of diesel particulate emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2014-12-16

    A systematic study was conducted to make a comparative evaluation of the effects of blending five different oxygenates (diglyme (DGM), palm oil methyl ester (PME), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), diethyl adipate (DEA), and butanol (Bu)) with ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) at 2% and 4% oxygen levels on physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of particulate emissions from a nonroad diesel engine. All blended fuels led to an overall decrease in the particulate mass concentration and elemental carbon (EC) emissions, which was strongly associated with the oxygen content in fuels and the specific type of fuels used. In general, the proportion of particulate-bound organic carbon (OC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) increased while using oxygenated fuel blends. Compared to ULSD, all fuel blends showed different emission factors of particle-phase PAHs and n-alkanes, slight alterations in soot nanostructure, lower soot ignition temperature, and lower activation energy. The total counts of particles (≤ 560 nm diameter) emitted decreased gradually for ULSD blended with DMC, DEA, and Bu, while they increased significantly for other fuel blends. The in vitro toxicity of particulates significantly increased with ULSD blended with DMC and DEA, while it decreased when ULSD was blended with PME, DGM, and Bu. PMID:25383974

  5. Geochemical properties of coal wastes and the toxicological effects on aquatic life. Environmental geology notes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Griffin, R.A.; Dickerson, D.R.; Schuller, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Leachates from solid wastes generated by coal mining, cleaning, and gasification are potentially harmful to the environment. The toxicological effects of leachates on aquatic organisms have not been adequately assessed. In this investigation, samples of seven coal-related wastes were charcterized chemically and mineralogically. Laboratory extracts of each sample, obtained by a variety of extraction methods, were used in both acute and chronic bioassay. A coal-slurry sample (coarse fraction) and two samples of coal-cleaning refuse were chemically and mineralogically similar; they generated acidic water-waste systems, both in the laboratory and in the field. Two mine-spoil samples, essentially shale, tended to generate water-waste systems that were neutral in pH; consequently, they released lower quantities of potential pollutants than the acidic wastes. Each extract was tested for acute toxicity with four species of fresh-water aquatic organisms; the green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), the fathead minnow, (Pimephales promelas), a crustacean (Daphia magna), and a snail (Physa anatina). The extracts of the two mine spoil samples and of the gasification residue were not toxic to any of the organisms; whereas the extracts from the acidic refuse and slurry samples were acutely toxic to all the organisms.

  6. Toxicological effects of short-term dietary acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Raju, Jayadev; Roberts, Jennifer; Taylor, Marnie; Patry, Dominique; Chomyshyn, Emily; Caldwell, Don; Cooke, Gerard; Mehta, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that acrylamide, a known rodent and probable human carcinogen, does not increase the risk of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced rat colon precancerous lesions when administered through the diet. Here, we present toxicological data from non-AOM-injected rats. Briefly, male F344 rats were randomized into four dietary groups and received experimental diets based on AIN-93G formulation and containing acrylamide at 0 (control), 5, 10 or 50mg/kg diet (wt/wt) ad libitum for 10 weeks, after which they were killed and their blood collected for hematological and biochemical markers. Acrylamide at the higher doses (10 and 50mg/kg diet) significantly lowered (p<0.05) serum total high density lipoprotein and total testosterone and increased serum lipase in comparison to the control. Blood hematocrit values and lymphocyte counts were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the high dose acrylamide (50mg/kg diet) group compared to control, with a concomitant decrease in hemoglobin level, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. These results provide additional hazard characterization data and strengthen the notion that at high doses, acrylamide may involve systemic toxicity potentiating tumorigenesis in experimental animals. Further studies are required to understand the health effects of food-borne acrylamide, especially at the lower exposures typified by human diets.

  7. Abuse potential and adverse cognitive effects of mitragynine (kratom).

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Nurul H M; Suhaimi, Farah W; Vadivelu, Raja K; Hassan, Zurina; Rümler, Anne; Rotter, Andrea; Amato, Davide; Dringenberg, Hans C; Mansor, Sharif M; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Müller, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    Mitragynine is the major psychoactive alkaloid of the plant kratom/ketum. Kratom is widely used in Southeast Asia as a recreational drug, and increasingly appears as a pure compound or a component of 'herbal high' preparations in the Western world. While mitragynine/kratom may have analgesic, muscle relaxant and anti-inflammatory effects, its addictive properties and effects on cognitive performance are unknown. We isolated mitragynine from the plant and performed a thorough investigation of its behavioural effects in rats and mice. Here we describe an addictive profile and cognitive impairments of acute and chronic mitragynine administration, which closely resembles that of morphine. Acute mitragynine has complex effects on locomotor activity. Repeated administration induces locomotor sensitization, anxiolysis and conditioned place preference, enhances expression of dopamine transporter- and dopamine receptor-regulating factor mRNA in the mesencephalon. While there was no increase in spontaneous locomotor activity during withdrawal, animals showed hypersensitivity towards small challenging doses for up to 14 days. Severe somatic withdrawal signs developed after 12 hours, and increased level of anxiety became evident after 24 hours of withdrawal. Acute mitragynine independently impaired passive avoidance learning, memory consolidation and retrieval, possibly mediated by a disruption of cortical oscillatory activity, including the suppression of low-frequency rhythms (delta and theta) in the electrocorticogram. Chronic mitragynine administration led to impaired passive avoidance and object recognition learning. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for an addiction potential with cognitive impairments for mitragynine, which suggest its classification as a harmful drug. PMID:25262913

  8. The (Adverse) Effects of Expanding Higher Education: Evidence from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppedisano, Veruska

    2011-01-01

    Over the period 1995-1998 Italy experienced an expansion of its higher education supply with the aim of reducing regional differences in educational attainment. This paper evaluates the effects of this policy on enrolment, drop out and academic performance. The paper combines differences across provinces in the number of campuses constructed with…

  9. Abuse potential and adverse cognitive effects of mitragynine (kratom).

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Nurul H M; Suhaimi, Farah W; Vadivelu, Raja K; Hassan, Zurina; Rümler, Anne; Rotter, Andrea; Amato, Davide; Dringenberg, Hans C; Mansor, Sharif M; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Müller, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    Mitragynine is the major psychoactive alkaloid of the plant kratom/ketum. Kratom is widely used in Southeast Asia as a recreational drug, and increasingly appears as a pure compound or a component of 'herbal high' preparations in the Western world. While mitragynine/kratom may have analgesic, muscle relaxant and anti-inflammatory effects, its addictive properties and effects on cognitive performance are unknown. We isolated mitragynine from the plant and performed a thorough investigation of its behavioural effects in rats and mice. Here we describe an addictive profile and cognitive impairments of acute and chronic mitragynine administration, which closely resembles that of morphine. Acute mitragynine has complex effects on locomotor activity. Repeated administration induces locomotor sensitization, anxiolysis and conditioned place preference, enhances expression of dopamine transporter- and dopamine receptor-regulating factor mRNA in the mesencephalon. While there was no increase in spontaneous locomotor activity during withdrawal, animals showed hypersensitivity towards small challenging doses for up to 14 days. Severe somatic withdrawal signs developed after 12 hours, and increased level of anxiety became evident after 24 hours of withdrawal. Acute mitragynine independently impaired passive avoidance learning, memory consolidation and retrieval, possibly mediated by a disruption of cortical oscillatory activity, including the suppression of low-frequency rhythms (delta and theta) in the electrocorticogram. Chronic mitragynine administration led to impaired passive avoidance and object recognition learning. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for an addiction potential with cognitive impairments for mitragynine, which suggest its classification as a harmful drug.

  10. Relationships of maternal and fetal weight changes in developmental toxicology bioassays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard developmental toxicology bioassays are designed to identify agents with the potential to induce adverse effects in the embryo/fetus. Guidelines require the inclusion of a dose level(s) that induces “overt maternal toxicity”. The common occurrence of dose levels at which ...

  11. Maternal and fetal toxicity in developmental toxicology bioassays: Weight changes and their biological significance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard developmental toxicology bioassays are designed to identify agents with the potential to induce adverse effects in the embryo/fetus. Guidelines call for the inclusion of a dose level(s) that induces “overt maternal toxicity.” The possibility that general maternal toxicit...

  12. Increasing the Benefits of Chemotherapy by Ameliorating the Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    When cancer is first diagnosed in most patients, it is usually incurable. Chemotherapy can cause remissions, prolonged disease-free survival, and prolonged survival in general, but it is associated with considerable toxicity to the physical and mental well-being of the patient. The number of side-effects increases when multiple drug combinations are used. In addition, financial and social problems add to the stress of coping with a fatal disease. Therefore both patients and physicians have asked whether survival (sometimes for extra months) with added side-effects of chemotherapy is worthwhile. The “soft” index of quality of life has been measured by many investigators, and a variety of interventions have been found to alleviate some distress. PMID:21263996

  13. Adverse effects of thalidomide administration in patients with neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, Vagelis

    2004-10-01

    Thalidomide, a glutamic acid derivative, was withdrawn from clinical use in 1962 due to its severe teratogenic effects. Its recent reinstitution in clinical practice was related to its benefits in leprosy and multiple myeloma. Moreover, the antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory properties of thalidomide have led to its evaluation in several malignant diseases, including myelofibrosis, renal cell cancer, prostate cancer, and Kaposi sarcoma. However, thalidomide use is associated with several side effects: somnolence and constipation are the most common, while deep vein thrombosis and peripheral neuropathy are the most serious. A combination of thalidomide with steroids or chemotherapy is being evaluated in several phase 2 studies. While it is not yet clear whether these combinations will enhance efficacy, they appear to increase the toxicity of thalidomide, and thalidomide analogs are being developed to minimize this toxicity. Ongoing studies will clarify the potential advantages of these agents in the treatment of neoplastic diseases.

  14. In Silico Models for Repeated-Dose Toxicity (RDT): Prediction of the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) and Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level (LOAEL) for Drugs.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Fabiola; Benfenati, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical stage in drug development requires the determination of repeated-dose toxicity (RDT) in animal models. The main outcome of RDT studies is the determination of the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) and the lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL). NOAEL is important since it serves to calculate the maximum recommended starting dose (MRSD) which is the safe starting dose for clinical studies in human beings. Since in vivo RDT studies are expensive and time-consuming, in silico approaches could offer a valuable alternative. However, NOAEL and LOAEL modeling suffer some limitations since they do not refer to a single end point but to several different effects and the doses used in experimental studies strongly influence the final results. Few attempts to model NOAEL and LOAEL have been reported. The available database and models for the prediction of NOAEL and LOAEL are reviewed here. PMID:27311467

  15. Computational chemistry, systems biology and toxicology. Harnessing the chemistry of life: revolutionizing toxicology. a commentary.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Humphris, Colin; Westmoreland, Carl; Alepee, Nathalie; Negro, Gianni Dal; Manou, Irene

    2011-04-01

    There is a continuing interest in, and increasing imperatives for, the development of alternative methods for toxicological evaluations that do not require the use of animals. Although a significant investment has resulted in some achievements, progress has been patchy and there remain many challenges. Among the most significant hurdles is developing non-animal methods that would permit assessment of the potential for a chemical or drug to cause adverse health effects following repeated systemic exposure. Developing approaches to address this challenge has been one of the objectives of the European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA). The EPAA is a unique partnership between the European Commission and industry that has interests in all aspects of reducing, refining and replacing the use of animals (the '3Rs'). One possible strategy that emerged from a broad scientific debate sponsored by the EPAA was the opportunity for developing entirely new paradigms for toxicity testing based upon harnessing the increasing power of computational chemistry in combination with advanced systems biology. This brief commentary summarizes a workshop organized by the EPAA in 2010, that had the ambitious title of 'Harnessing the Chemistry of Life: Revolutionizing Toxicology'. At that workshop international experts in chemistry, systems biology and toxicology sought to map out how best developments in these sciences could be exploited to design new strategies for toxicity testing using adverse effects in the liver as an initial focus of attention. Here we describe the workshop design and outputs, the primary purpose being to stimulate debate about the need to align different areas of science with toxicology if new and truly innovative approaches to toxicity testing are to be developed.

  16. Adverse effects of poor micronutrient status during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Umesh; Bhavna, A

    2002-05-01

    Despite India's substantial progress in human development since its independence in 1947, 5-7% of its children have vitamin A deficiency disorders in selected geographic areas, 53% have iron deficiency anemia, and 9% have goiter. Three micronutrients--vitamin A, iron, and iodine--are among the most important of all the nutrients needed by the body because they are vital for developing normal learning and cognitive functions, immunity, work capacity, and reproductive health. The body cannot synthesize them, so they must be made available through the diet. Deficiencies of these three micronutrients are known to have devastating effects on health. PMID:12035866

  17. 18 CFR 292.211 - Petition for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment (AEE petition). 292.211... for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment... that it has no substantial adverse effect on the environment as specified in § 292.208(b)(1). (b)...

  18. 18 CFR 292.211 - Petition for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment (AEE petition). 292.211... for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment... that it has no substantial adverse effect on the environment as specified in § 292.208(b)(1). (b)...

  19. 18 CFR 292.211 - Petition for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment (AEE petition). 292.211... for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment... that it has no substantial adverse effect on the environment as specified in § 292.208(b)(1). (b)...

  20. 18 CFR 292.211 - Petition for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment (AEE petition). 292.211... for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment... that it has no substantial adverse effect on the environment as specified in § 292.208(b)(1). (b)...

  1. 18 CFR 292.211 - Petition for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment (AEE petition). 292.211... for initial determination on whether a project has a substantial adverse effect on the environment... that it has no substantial adverse effect on the environment as specified in § 292.208(b)(1). (b)...

  2. The uses and adverse effects of beryllium on health

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ross G.; Harrison, Adrian P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: This review describes the health effects of beryllium exposure in the workplace and the environment. Aim: To collate information on the consequences of occupational and environmental exposure to beryllium on physiological function and well being. Materials and Methods: The criteria used in the current review for selecting articles were adopted from proposed criteria in The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Articles were classified based on acute and chronic exposure and toxicity of beryllium. Results: The proportions of utilized and nonutilized articles were tabulated. Years 2001–10 gave the greatest match (45.9%) for methodological parameters, followed by 27.71% for 1991–2000. Years 1971–80 and 1981–90 were not significantly different in the information published and available whereas years 1951–1960 showed a lack of suitable articles. Some articles were published in sources unobtainable through requests at the British Library, and some had no impact factor and were excluded. Conclusion: Beryllium has some useful but undoubtedly harmful effects on health and well-being. Measures need to be taken to prevent hazardous exposure to this element, making its biological monitoring in the workplace essential. PMID:20386622

  3. The Adverse Effects of Alcohol on Vitamin A Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Clugston, Robin D.; Blaner, William S.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this review is to explore the relationship between alcohol and the metabolism of the essential micronutrient, vitamin A; as well as the impact this interaction has on alcohol-induced disease in adults. Depleted hepatic vitamin A content has been reported in human alcoholics, an observation that has been confirmed in animal models of chronic alcohol consumption. Indeed, alcohol consumption has been associated with declines in hepatic levels of retinol (vitamin A), as well as retinyl ester and retinoic acid; collectively referred to as retinoids. Through the use of animal models, the complex interplay between alcohol metabolism and vitamin A homeostasis has been studied; the reviewed research supports the notion that chronic alcohol consumption precipitates a decline in hepatic retinoid levels through increased breakdown, as well as increased export to extra-hepatic tissues. While the precise biochemical mechanisms governing alcohol’s effect remain to be elucidated, its profound effect on hepatic retinoid status is irrefutable. In addition to a review of the literature related to studies on tissue retinoid levels and the metabolic interactions between alcohol and retinoids, the significance of altered hepatic retinoid metabolism in the context of alcoholic liver disease is also considered. PMID:22690322

  4. Unexpected adverse effects of Freon 11 and Freon 12 as medication propellants.

    PubMed

    Oenbrink, R J

    1993-06-01

    Metered-dose inhalers are frequently used in treating pulmonary diseases associated with bronchoconstriction, chiefly asthma and chronic bronchitis. These aerosolized medications are not without the potential for adverse effects. The author describes two patients who likely had adverse reactions to the Freon propellants used in the inhalers. These reactions are reported in order to alert physicians to their possible occurrence and to suggest a rational treatment approach. PMID:8349485

  5. Adverse effects of bisphenol A on water louse (Asellus aquaticus).

    PubMed

    Plahuta, Maja; Tišler, Tatjana; Pintar, Albin; Toman, Mihael Jožef

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were performed to study the effects of short and long-term exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) on a freshwater crustacean isopod Asellus aquaticus (L.). Two life stages of isopods were exposed to a range of BPA concentrations, from aqueous and two dietary sources, in the form of with BPA spiked conditioned alder leaf (Alnus glutinosa) discs, or spiked formulated sediment, to determine the relative importance of each source of exposure on the uptake of this contaminant. Several lethal and sublethal endpoints were evaluated in this study to measure the potential effects of BPA on A. aquaticus, including mortality, growth and feeding rate inhibition, mobility inhibition, de-pigmentation and molting disturbances. They signify a correlation to BPA levels and a difference in BPA uptake efficiency from different uptake sources. Results of acute exposure to BPA show a greater sensitivity of test systems using juvenile specimens with a 96 h LC₅₀ of 8.6 mg L(-1) BPA in water medium and a 96 h LC₅₀ of 13.5 mg L(-1) BPA in sediment. In comparison, adult isopods show a 96 h LC₅₀ of 25.1 mg L(-1) BPA in water medium and a 96 h LC₅₀ of 65.1 mg L(-1) BPA in sediment. Observed endpoints of chronic exposures suggest the alder leave discs to be the most efficient uptake source of BPA, in contrast to uptake from water or heterogeneous sediment. Significant (p<0.05) growth inhibition, with a 21d NOEC of 0.5/2.5 mg L(-1) (for juvenile/adult organisms), and feeding rate inhibition, with a 21d NOEC of 0.5/1.0 mg L(-1) (for juvenile/adult organisms), were proven to be the most sensitive toxicity endpoints. An even more sensitive effect turned out to be molting frequency, which was significantly reduced; a 21d NOEC was 1.0 mg L(-1) of BPA for adult organisms and an even lower 21d NOEC of 0.05 mg L(-1) of BPA for juveniles. The observed endpoints are recorded at very low, non-toxic exposure concentrations, indicating that BPA acts as an endocrine disrupting compound, as

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans as Model System in Pharmacology and Toxicology: Effects of Flavonoids on Redox-Sensitive Signalling Pathways and Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Karoline; Havermann, Susannah; Büchter, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are secondary plant compounds that mediate diverse biological activities, for example, by scavenging free radicals and modulating intracellular signalling pathways. It has been shown in various studies that distinct flavonoid compounds enhance stress resistance and even prolong the life span of organisms. In the last years the model organism C. elegans has gained increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological sciences due to the availability of various genetically modified nematode strains, the simplicity of modulating genes by RNAi, and the relatively short life span. Several studies have been performed demonstrating that secondary plant compounds influence ageing, stress resistance, and distinct signalling pathways in the nematode. Here we present an overview of the modulating effects of different flavonoids on oxidative stress, redox-sensitive signalling pathways, and life span in C. elegans introducing the usability of this model system for pharmacological and toxicological research. PMID:24895670

  7. Thermal Dose and the Probability of Adverse Effects from HIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Charles C.

    2007-05-01

    The absorption of high-intensity, focused ultrasound (HIFU) by the body results in brief, intense heating capable of killing cells, tissues or entire organisms, thereby providing the basis for many applications in medical therapy. The object of such therapy is in assuring the destruction of diseased tissue while sparing adjacent, healthy tissue. However, even moderate heating to a few degrees above normal physiological temperatures can perturb biological systems, e.g., by altering normal metabolic processes. In modeling the bioeffects produced by ultrasound-induced heating, the physicist typically relies on bulk tissue properties and ultrasound exposure parameters to calculate the thermal `dose' delivered to the tissue. Although thermal dose is currently given in units of time rather than energy, the concept is quite useful, and its use in quantifying the probability and extent of biological effects expected from therapeutic exposures is demonstrated. The results demonstrate the need for additional experimental data to validate and advance existing theoretical approaches for HIFU exposures.

  8. Advanced urine toxicology testing.

    PubMed

    Tenore, Peter L

    2010-10-01

    Urine toxicology screening testing is an important standard of care in the addiction and pain treatment setting, offering a reproducible, unbiased, and accurate laboratory test to monitor patients and provide objective support for clinical observations. It has been shown that physicians do not have proficiency in the ordering or interpretation of these tests. This article is an attempt to respond to that need. Current antibody-based enzymatic immunoassays (EIAs) used for urine toxicology screening are useful to detect classes of drugs (ex., opiate) but cannot determine which specific drug (ex., morphine) is present. Gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy can determine exactly which drugs are present, allowing prescribed (or illicit) opiates and benzodiazepines to be identified. This article will discuss principles and details of opiate and benzodiazepine EIA and gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy urine toxicology testing. The approach to detecting patients attributing positive opiate EIAs to prescription opiates who are using heroin or other opioids will be reviewed. Cases of controlled prescription drugs that do not produce the expected positive urine tests (ex., oxycodone producing negative opiate screening tests) will be discussed. How to differentiate codeine from heroin and the role of poppy seeds in toxicology will be examined. The case of an anti-depressant drug that produces false-positive benzodiazepine results and antibiotics that cause positive opiate urine toxicology results will be reviewed. Common benzodiazepines (ex., clonazepam and lorazepam) that do not reliably produce positive benzodiazepine EIAs will be discussed. The approach to detection and management of all these types of toxicology cases will be reviewed, and it is hoped that the analyses presented will impart an adequate information base to medical providers and staff members of drug treatment and pain centers, enabling them to order and interpret these tests in the clinic more

  9. Toxicology and Chemical Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Stephen K.

    1983-01-01

    Topics addressed in this discussion of toxicology and chemical safety include routes of exposure, dose/response relationships, action of toxic substances, and effects of exposure to chemicals. Specific examples are used to illustrate the principles discussed. Suggests prudence in handling any chemicals, whether or not toxicity is known. (JN)

  10. Adversity in Preschool-Aged Children: Effects on Salivary Interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Audrey R.; Parade, Stephanie H.; Valentine, Thomas R.; Eslinger, Nicole M.; Seifer, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to early life adversity is linked to impaired affective, cognitive, and behavioral functioning and increases risk for various psychiatric and medical conditions. Stress-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines may be a biological mechanism of these effects. Few studies have examined cytokine levels in children experiencing early life adversity, and very little research has investigated cytokines or other markers of inflammation in saliva. In the present study, we examined salivary IL-1β and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in relation to stress exposure in 40 children aged 3 to 5 years who were enrolled in a larger study of early life adversity. Childhood maltreatment status was assessed via review of child welfare records, and contextual stress exposure, traumatic life event history, and symptoms of psychopathology were assessed via caregiver interviews at a home visit. In a subsequent visit, salivary IL-1β and CRP were obtained before and after participation in four emotion-eliciting tasks. Number of past month contextual stressors, lifetime contextual stressors, and traumatic life events each demonstrated a significant main effect on IL-1β. Baseline IL-1β was positively associated with each of the significant main-effect adversities. Post-challenge IL-1β displayed positive associations with each adversity variable, but were not significant. CRP was not significantly associated with any of the adversity variables. Given evidence suggesting involvement of IL-1β in the neuropathology of psychiatric conditions, these results may have important implications for developmental outcomes. PMID:25997772

  11. Adversity in preschool-aged children: Effects on salivary interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Tyrka, Audrey R; Parade, Stephanie H; Valentine, Thomas R; Eslinger, Nicole M; Seifer, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to early life adversity is linked to impaired affective, cognitive, and behavioral functioning and increases risk for various psychiatric and medical conditions. Stress-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines may be a biological mechanism of these effects. Few studies have examined cytokine levels in children experiencing early life adversity, and very little research has investigated cytokines or other markers of inflammation in saliva. In the present study, we examined salivary interleukin (IL)-1β and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in relation to stress exposure in 40 children aged 3 to 5 years who were enrolled in a larger study of early life adversity. Childhood maltreatment status was assessed via review of child welfare records. Contextual stress exposure, traumatic life event history, and symptoms of psychopathology were assessed via caregiver interviews at a home visit. In a subsequent visit, salivary IL-1β and CRP were obtained before and after participation in four emotion-eliciting tasks. The number of past-month contextual stressors, lifetime contextual stressors, and traumatic life events each demonstrated a significant main effect on IL-1β. Baseline IL-1β was positively associated with each of the significant main-effect adversities. Postchallenge IL-1β displayed positive associations with each adversity variable, but these were not significant. CRP was not significantly associated with any of the adversity variables. Given the evidence suggesting the involvement of IL-1β in the neuropathology of psychiatric conditions, these results may have important implications for developmental outcomes. PMID:25997772

  12. The adverse effects of obesity on conception and implantation.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Christopher J; Balen, Adam H

    2010-09-01

    Whilst many multiparous women are obese (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)), obesity has been associated with impaired fecundity; however, the mechanism which links obesity to reduced fertility remains to be fully elucidated. Obese women, particularly those with central obesity, are less likely to conceive per cycle. Obese women suffer perturbations to the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, menstrual cycle disturbance and are up to three times more likely to suffer oligo-/anovulation. A fine hormonal balance regulates follicular development and oocyte maturation, and it has been observed that obesity can alter the hormonal milieu. Leptin, a hormone produced by adipocytes, is elevated in obese women, and raised leptin has been associated with impaired fecundity. Obesity impairs ovulation but has also been observed to detrimentally affect endometrial development and implantation. The expression of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is regulated, in part, by weight, and so obese women with PCOS often have a more severe phenotype and experience more subfertility. Obesity also impairs the response of women to assisted conception treatments. Weight loss through lifestyle modification or bariatric surgery has been demonstrated to restore menstrual cyclicity and ovulation and improve the likelihood of conception. In this article, we will discuss the effect of obesity upon key reproductive mechanisms and its relation to fertility treatments.

  13. Adverse effects of psychological therapy: An exploratory study of practitioners' experiences from child and adolescent psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Ulf; Johanson, Josefin; Nilsson, Elin; Lindblad, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The scientific knowledge about adverse effects of psychological therapies and how such effects should be detected is limited. It is possible that children and adolescents are particularly vulnerable and need specific support in order to express adverse effects. In this exploratory study, we used a qualitative approach to explore practitioners' experiences of this phenomenon. Fourteen practitioners providing psychological therapy within the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was applied to the data. Four overarching categories brought up by the practitioners were identified: vagueness of the concept (reflecting that the concept was novel and hard to define), psychotherapist-client interaction (encompassing aspects of the interaction possibly related to adverse effects), consequences for the young person (including a range of emotional, behavioural and social consequences) and family effects (e.g. professional complications and decreased autonomy for the parent). Professional discussions on these issues could improve psychological therapy for children and adolescents. Based on our findings and previous research, we propose three basic aspects to consider when adverse effects are detected and managed in this context: typology (form, severity and duration), aetiology (hypothesis about the causes) and perspective (adverse effects seen from the points of view of different interested parties).

  14. Long-term antidepressant use: patient perspectives of benefits and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Claire; Gibson, Kerry; Read, John; Cowan, Ondria; Dehar, Tamsin

    2016-01-01

    Long-term antidepressant treatment has increased and there is evidence of adverse effects; however, little is known about patients’ experiences and views of this form of treatment. This study used mixed methods to examine patients’ views and experiences of long-term antidepressant treatment, including benefits and concerns. Data from 180 patients, who were long-term users of antidepressants (3–15 years), were extracted from an anonymous online survey of patients’ experiences of antidepressants in New Zealand. Participants had completed rating scales about the effectiveness of antidepressants, levels of depression before and during antidepressant use, quality of life, and perceived adverse effects. Two open-ended questions allowed participants to comment on personal experiences. The majority (89.4%) reported that antidepressants had improved their depression although 30% reported moderate-to-severe depression on antidepressants. Common adverse effects included withdrawal effects (73.5%), sexual problems (71.8%), and weight gain (65.3%). Adverse emotional effects, such as feeling emotionally numb (64.5%) and addicted (43%), were also common. While the majority of patients were pleased with the benefits of antidepressant treatment, many were concerned about these adverse effects. Some expressed a need for more information about long-term risks and increased information and support to discontinue. PMID:27528803

  15. Long-term antidepressant use: patient perspectives of benefits and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Claire; Gibson, Kerry; Read, John; Cowan, Ondria; Dehar, Tamsin

    2016-01-01

    Long-term antidepressant treatment has increased and there is evidence of adverse effects; however, little is known about patients' experiences and views of this form of treatment. This study used mixed methods to examine patients' views and experiences of long-term antidepressant treatment, including benefits and concerns. Data from 180 patients, who were long-term users of antidepressants (3-15 years), were extracted from an anonymous online survey of patients' experiences of antidepressants in New Zealand. Participants had completed rating scales about the effectiveness of antidepressants, levels of depression before and during antidepressant use, quality of life, and perceived adverse effects. Two open-ended questions allowed participants to comment on personal experiences. The majority (89.4%) reported that antidepressants had improved their depression although 30% reported moderate-to-severe depression on antidepressants. Common adverse effects included withdrawal effects (73.5%), sexual problems (71.8%), and weight gain (65.3%). Adverse emotional effects, such as feeling emotionally numb (64.5%) and addicted (43%), were also common. While the majority of patients were pleased with the benefits of antidepressant treatment, many were concerned about these adverse effects. Some expressed a need for more information about long-term risks and increased information and support to discontinue. PMID:27528803

  16. Road traffic and adverse effects on respiratory health in children.

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, M; Reitmeir, P; Dold, S; Wulff, A; Nicolai, T; von Loeffelholz-Colberg, E F; von Mutius, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine whether road traffic in a big city has a direct effect on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in children. DESIGN--Cross sectional study. SETTING--Of all 7445 fourth grade children (aged 9-11 years) in Munich, 6537 were examined. Of the children with German nationality and the same residence during the past five years and known exposure data, 4678 questionnaires and 4320 pulmonary function tests could be analysed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Variables of pulmonary function by forced expiration and respiratory symptoms reported in a questionnaire; census data on car traffic collected in the school district. RESULTS--Density of car traffic ranged from 7000 to 125,000 cars per 24 hours. Multiple regression analysis of peak expiratory flow showed a significant decrease of 0.71% (95% confidence interval 1.08% to 0.33%) per increase of 25,000 cars daily passing through the school district on the main road. Maximum expiratory flow when 25% vital capacity had been expired was decreased by 0.68% (1.11% to 0.25%). In contrast, response to cold air challenge was not increased. The adjusted odds ratio for the cumulative prevalence of recurrent wheezing with the same exposure was 1.08 (1.01 to 1.16). Cumulative prevalence of recurrent dyspnoea was increased, with an odds ratio of 1.10 (1.00 to 1.20). Lifetime prevalence of asthma (odds ratio 1.04; 0.89 to 1.21) and recurrent bronchitis (1.05; 0.98 to 1.12) were not significantly increased. CONCLUSIONS--High rates of road traffic diminish forced expiratory flow and increase respiratory symptoms in children. Images FIG 1 PMID:7691304

  17. In silico toxicology for the pharmaceutical sciences.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Luis G

    2009-12-15

    The applied use of in silico technologies (a.k.a. computational toxicology, in silico toxicology, computer-assisted tox, e-tox, i-drug discovery, predictive ADME, etc.) for predicting preclinical toxicological endpoints, clinical adverse effects, and metabolism of pharmaceutical substances has become of high interest to the scientific community and the public. The increased accessibility of these technologies for scientists and recent regulations permitting their use for chemical risk assessment supports this notion. The scientific community is interested in the appropriate use of such technologies as a tool to enhance product development and safety of pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotics, while ensuring the reliability and accuracy of in silico approaches for the toxicological and pharmacological sciences. For pharmaceutical substances, this means active and impurity chemicals in the drug product may be screened using specialized software and databases designed to cover these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. A major goal for use of these software programs is to enable industry scientists not only to enhance the discovery process but also to ensure the judicious use of in silico tools to support risk assessments of drug-induced toxicities and in safety evaluations. However, a great amount of applied research is still needed, and there are many limitations with these approaches which are described in this review. Currently, there is a wide range of endpoints available from predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models driven by many different computational software programs and data sources, and this is only expected to grow. For example, there are models based on non-proprietary and/or proprietary information specific to assessing potential rodent carcinogenicity, in silico screens for ICH genetic toxicity assays, reproductive and developmental toxicity, theoretical

  18. In silico toxicology for the pharmaceutical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio, Luis G.

    2009-12-15

    The applied use of in silico technologies (a.k.a. computational toxicology, in silico toxicology, computer-assisted tox, e-tox, i-drug discovery, predictive ADME, etc.) for predicting preclinical toxicological endpoints, clinical adverse effects, and metabolism of pharmaceutical substances has become of high interest to the scientific community and the public. The increased accessibility of these technologies for scientists and recent regulations permitting their use for chemical risk assessment supports this notion. The scientific community is interested in the appropriate use of such technologies as a tool to enhance product development and safety of pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotics, while ensuring the reliability and accuracy of in silico approaches for the toxicological and pharmacological sciences. For pharmaceutical substances, this means active and impurity chemicals in the drug product may be screened using specialized software and databases designed to cover these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. A major goal for use of these software programs is to enable industry scientists not only to enhance the discovery process but also to ensure the judicious use of in silico tools to support risk assessments of drug-induced toxicities and in safety evaluations. However, a great amount of applied research is still needed, and there are many limitations with these approaches which are described in this review. Currently, there is a wide range of endpoints available from predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models driven by many different computational software programs and data sources, and this is only expected to grow. For example, there are models based on non-proprietary and/or proprietary information specific to assessing potential rodent carcinogenicity, in silico screens for ICH genetic toxicity assays, reproductive and developmental toxicity, theoretical

  19. Potential adverse effects of omega-3 Fatty acids in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Lenox, C E; Bauer, J E

    2013-01-01

    Fish oil omega-3 fatty acids, mainly eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, are used in the management of several diseases in companion animal medicine, many of which are inflammatory in nature. This review describes metabolic differences among omega-3 fatty acids and outlines potential adverse effects that may occur with their supplementation in dogs and cats with a special focus on omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil. Important potential adverse effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation include altered platelet function, gastrointestinal adverse effects, detrimental effects on wound healing, lipid peroxidation, potential for nutrient excess and toxin exposure, weight gain, altered immune function, effects on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity, and nutrient-drug interactions.

  20. Pretreatment Predictors of Adverse Radiation Effects After Radiosurgery for Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayhurst, Caroline; Monsalves, Eric; Prooijen, Monique van; Cusimano, Michael; Tsao, May; Menard, Cynthia; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Schwartz, Michael; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To identify vascular and dosimetric predictors of symptomatic T2 signal change and adverse radiation effects after radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformation, in order to define and validate preexisting risk models. Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVM) were treated at our institution between 2005 and 2009. Eighty-five patients have at least 12 months of clinical and radiological follow-up. Any new-onset headaches, new or worsening seizures, or neurological deficit were considered adverse events. Follow-up magnetic resonance images were assessed for new onset T2 signal change and the volume calculated. Pretreatment characteristics and dosimetric variables were analyzed to identify predictors of adverse radiation effects. Results: There were 19 children and 66 adults in the study cohort, with a mean age of 34 (range 6-74). Twenty-three (27%) patients suffered adverse radiation effects (ARE), 9 patients with permanent neurological deficit (10.6%). Of these, 5 developed fixed visual field deficits. Target volume and 12 Gy volume were the most significant predictors of adverse radiation effects on univariate analysis (p < 0.001). Location and cortical eloquence were not significantly associated with the development of adverse events (p = 0.12). No additional vascular parameters were identified as predictive of ARE. There was a significant target volume threshold of 4 cm{sup 3}, above which the rate of ARE increased dramatically. Multivariate analysis target volume and the absence of prior hemorrhage are the only significant predictors of ARE. The volume of T2 signal change correlates to ARE, but only target volume is predictive of a higher volume of T2 signal change. Conclusions: Target volume and the absence of prior hemorrhage is the most accurate predictor of adverse radiation effects and complications after radiosurgery for AVMs. A high percentage of permanent visual field defects in this series suggest the

  1. High intake of dietary tyramine does not deteriorate glucose handling and does not cause adverse cardiovascular effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Carpéné, Christian; Schaak, Stéphane; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Mercader, Josep; Mialet-Perez, Jeanne

    2016-09-01

    Tyramine is naturally occurring in food and induces pressor responses. Low-tyramine diets are recommended for patients treated with MAO inhibitors to avoid the fatal hypertensive crisis sadly known as "cheese effect". Hence, tyramine intake is suspected to have toxicological consequences in humans, while its administration to type 1 diabetic rodents has been reported to improve glucose tolerance. We investigated in mice whether prolonged tyramine ingestion could alter glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, adipose tissue physiology or cardiovascular functions. Tyramine was added at 0.04 or 0.14 % in the drinking water since this was estimated to increase by 10- to 40-fold the spontaneous tyramine intake of control mice fed a standard diet. Ten to 12 weeks of such tyramine supplementation did not influence body weight gain, adiposity or food consumption. Both doses (reaching approx. 300 and 1100 μmol tyramine/kg bw/day) decreased nonfasting blood glucose but did not modify glucose tolerance or fasting levels of glucose, insulin or circulating lipids. Blood pressure was not increased in tyramine-drinking mice, while only the higher tested dose moderately increased heart rate without change in its variability. Markers of cardiac tissue injury or oxidative stress remained unaltered, except an increased hydrogen peroxide production in heart preparations. In isolated adipocytes, tyramine inhibited lipolysis similarly in treated and control groups, as did insulin. The lack of serious adverse cardiovascular effects of prolonged tyramine supplementation in normoglycemic mice together with the somewhat insulin-like effects found on adipose cells should lead to reconsider favourably the risk/benefit ratio of the intake of this dietary amine. PMID:26634369

  2. High intake of dietary tyramine does not deteriorate glucose handling and does not cause adverse cardiovascular effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Carpéné, Christian; Schaak, Stéphane; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Mercader, Josep; Mialet-Perez, Jeanne

    2016-09-01

    Tyramine is naturally occurring in food and induces pressor responses. Low-tyramine diets are recommended for patients treated with MAO inhibitors to avoid the fatal hypertensive crisis sadly known as "cheese effect". Hence, tyramine intake is suspected to have toxicological consequences in humans, while its administration to type 1 diabetic rodents has been reported to improve glucose tolerance. We investigated in mice whether prolonged tyramine ingestion could alter glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, adipose tissue physiology or cardiovascular functions. Tyramine was added at 0.04 or 0.14 % in the drinking water since this was estimated to increase by 10- to 40-fold the spontaneous tyramine intake of control mice fed a standard diet. Ten to 12 weeks of such tyramine supplementation did not influence body weight gain, adiposity or food consumption. Both doses (reaching approx. 300 and 1100 μmol tyramine/kg bw/day) decreased nonfasting blood glucose but did not modify glucose tolerance or fasting levels of glucose, insulin or circulating lipids. Blood pressure was not increased in tyramine-drinking mice, while only the higher tested dose moderately increased heart rate without change in its variability. Markers of cardiac tissue injury or oxidative stress remained unaltered, except an increased hydrogen peroxide production in heart preparations. In isolated adipocytes, tyramine inhibited lipolysis similarly in treated and control groups, as did insulin. The lack of serious adverse cardiovascular effects of prolonged tyramine supplementation in normoglycemic mice together with the somewhat insulin-like effects found on adipose cells should lead to reconsider favourably the risk/benefit ratio of the intake of this dietary amine.

  3. High Content Screening Analysis to Evaluate the Toxicological Effects of Harmful and Potentially Harmful Constituents (HPHC)

    PubMed Central

    Marescotti, Diego; Gonzalez Suarez, Ignacio; Acali, Stefano; Johne, Stephanie; Laurent, Alexandra; Frentzel, Stefan; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and lung diseases. Because CS is a complex aerosol containing more than 7,000 chemicals1 it is challenging to assess the contributions of individual constituents to its overall toxicity. Toxicological profiles of individual constituents as well as mixtures can be however established in vitro, by applying high through-put screening tools, which enable the profiling of Harmful and Potentially Harmful Constituents (HPHCs) of tobacco smoke, as defined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).2 For an initial assessment, an impedance-based instrument was used for a real-time, label-free assessment of the compound's toxicity. The instrument readout relies on cell adhesion, viability and morphology that all together provide an overview of the cell status. A dimensionless parameter, named cell index, is used for quantification. A set of different staining protocols was developed for a fluorescence imaging-based investigation and a HCS platform was used to gain more in-depth information on the kind of cytotoxicity elicited by each HPHC. Of the 15 constituents tested, only five were selected for HCS-based analysis as they registered a computable LD50 (< 20 mM). These included 1-aminonaphtalene, Arsenic (V), Chromium (VI), Crotonaldehyde and Phenol. Based on their effect in the HCS, 1-aminonaphtalene and Phenol could be identified to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, and, together with Chromium (VI) as genotoxic based on the increased histone H2AX phosphorylation. Crotonaldehyde was identified as an oxidative stress inducer and Arsenic as a stress kinase pathway activator. This study demonstrates that a combination of impedance-based and HCS technologies provides a robust tool for in vitro assessment of CS constituents. PMID:27228213

  4. Toxicological Benchmarks for Screening Potential Contaminants of Concern for Effects on Sediment-Associated Biota

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    A hazardous waste site may contain hundreds of chemicals; therefore, it is important to screen contaminants of potential concern for the ecological risk assessment. Often this screening is done as part of a screening assessment, the purpose of which is to evaluate the available data, identify data gaps, and screen contaminants of potential concern. Screening may be accomplished by using a set of toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks are helpful in determining whether contaminants warrant further assessment or are at a level that requires no further attention. If a chemical concentration or the reported detection limit exceeds a proposed lower benchmark, further analysis is needed to determine the hazards posed by that chemical. If, however, the chemical concentration falls below the lower benchmark value, the chemical may be eliminated from further study. The use of multiple benchmarks is recommended for screening chemicals of concern in sediments. Integrative benchmarks developed for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection are included for inorganic and organic chemicals. Equilibrium partitioning benchmarks are included for screening nonionic organic chemicals. Freshwater sediment effect concentrations developed as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediment Project are included for inorganic and organic chemicals (EPA 1996). Field survey benchmarks developed for the Ontario Ministry of the Environment are included for inorganic and organic chemicals. In addition, EPA-proposed sediment quality criteria are included along with screening values from EPA Region IV and Ecotox Threshold values from the EPA Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. Pore water analysis is recommended for ionic organic compounds; comparisons are then made against water quality benchmarks. This report is an update of three prior reports (Jones et al

  5. Neurological Adverse Effects in Patients of Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Treated with Different Schedules of FOLFOX

    PubMed Central

    Najam, Rahila; Mateen, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The study is designed to assess the frequency and severity of few dose limiting neurological adverse effects of four different schedules of FOLFOX. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were included in the study. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v 2.0. The frequency of grade 3 and 4 adverse effects was comparatively assessed in each treatment arm. The difference in the pattern of toxicity between the treatment schedule was evaluated. The most frequent adverse symptom of neurological adverse effect was grade 1 paresthesia in the patients treated with FOLFOX4 schedule. Grade 4 peripheral neuropathy was reported in few patients of FOLFOX7 treatment arm. Frequency and onset of neurological adverse effects like paresthesia, dizziness, and hypoesthesia were significantly different (P < 0.05), whereas frequency and onset of peripheral neuropathy were highly significant (P < 0.01) in each treatment arm of FOLFOX. Peripheral neuropathy was associated with electrolyte imbalance and diabetes in few patients. Frequency of symptoms, for example, paresthesia, is associated with increased number of recurrent exposure to oxaliplatin (increased number of cycles) even at low doses (85 mg/m2), whereas severity of symptoms, for example, peripheral neuropathy, is associated with higher dose (130 mg/m2) after few treatment cycles. PMID:24187619

  6. Neurological Adverse Effects in Patients of Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Treated with Different Schedules of FOLFOX.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Mateen, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The study is designed to assess the frequency and severity of few dose limiting neurological adverse effects of four different schedules of FOLFOX. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were included in the study. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v 2.0. The frequency of grade 3 and 4 adverse effects was comparatively assessed in each treatment arm. The difference in the pattern of toxicity between the treatment schedule was evaluated. The most frequent adverse symptom of neurological adverse effect was grade 1 paresthesia in the patients treated with FOLFOX4 schedule. Grade 4 peripheral neuropathy was reported in few patients of FOLFOX7 treatment arm. Frequency and onset of neurological adverse effects like paresthesia, dizziness, and hypoesthesia were significantly different (P < 0.05), whereas frequency and onset of peripheral neuropathy were highly significant (P < 0.01) in each treatment arm of FOLFOX. Peripheral neuropathy was associated with electrolyte imbalance and diabetes in few patients. Frequency of symptoms, for example, paresthesia, is associated with increased number of recurrent exposure to oxaliplatin (increased number of cycles) even at low doses (85 mg/m(2)), whereas severity of symptoms, for example, peripheral neuropathy, is associated with higher dose (130 mg/m(2)) after few treatment cycles.

  7. Genetic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P J

    1998-04-01

    Systems for testing genetic toxicology are components of carcinogenic and genetic risk assessment. Present routine genotoxicity-testing is based on at least 20 years of development during which many different test systems have been introduced and used. Today, it is clear that no single test is capable of detecting all genotoxic agents. Therefore, the usual approach is to perform a standard battery of in-vitro and in-vivo tests for genotoxicity. Work-groups of the European Union (EU), the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and, very recently, the work-group of the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) have defined such standard battery tests. These and some currently used supplementary or confirmatory tests are briefly discussed here. Additional test systems for the assessment of genotoxic and carcinogenic hazard and risk are seriously needed. These tests must be more relevant to man than are current assays and less demanding in respect of cost, time and number of animals. Another aspect for reassessment derives from the actual situation in the pharmaceutical industry. Companies have to prepare for the world economy of the 21st century. Therefore, pharmaceutical research is speeding up tremendously by use of tools such as genomics, combinatorial chemistry, high throughput screening and proteomics. Toxicology and genotoxicology need to re-evaluate their changing environment and must find ways to respond to these needs. In conclusion, genetic toxicology needs to answer questions coming from two major directions: hazard and risk identification and high throughput testing. PMID:9625484

  8. The Effect of Lifetime Cumulative Adversity and Depressive Symptoms on Functional Status

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The study aimed to examine whether lifetime cumulative adversity (LCA) and depressive symptoms moderate time-related trajectories of functional status. Method. A total of 15,073 older adults (mean age = 63.91 at Wave 1) who participated in the first four waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe reported on exposure to negative life events, depressive symptoms and three measures of functional status—difficulty in performing daily and instrumental activities, and functional limitation. Results. Growth–curve models showed that time-related increase in disability and functional limitation was steeper among those exposed to higher levels of lifetime adversity. Moreover, a three-way interaction between time, lifetime adversity, and depressive symptoms emerged across measures of functional status, so that when exposure to lifetime adversity was accompanied by high level of depressive symptoms, the time-related increase in disability and functional limitation was the steepest. Discussion. LCA is associated with a hastening of the disablement process, especially under conditions of high distress. Although the overall modest effects imply that resilience to lifetime adversity is widespread among older adults, prevention and intervention programs should consider that distressed older adults previously exposed to high levels of lifetime adversity are at risk for more rapid impairment in functional status. PMID:24898028

  9. Redox nanoparticle therapeutics to cancer--increase in therapeutic effect of doxorubicin, suppressing its adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, Toru; Ozaki, Yuki; Thangavel, Sindhu; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2013-11-28

    The ultimate goal of cancer chemotherapy is to achieve a cure without causing any adverse effects. We have developed a pH-sensitive redox nanoparticle (RNP(N)), which disintegrates under acidic conditions and exposes nitroxide radicals, leading to strongly scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). After intravenous administration of RNP(N) to tumor bearing mice, it effectively accumulated in tumors due to the leaky neovascular and immature lymphatic system and scavenged ROS, resulting in suppression of inflammation and activation of NF-кB, after disintegration of RNP(N) in the tumors. Pre-administration of RNP(N) prior to treatments with anticancer agents, doxorubicin, to tumor-bearing mice significantly suppressed the progression of tumor size, compared to low-molecular weight 4-hydroxy-TEMPO. Interestingly, the administration of RNP(N) suppressed adverse effects of doxorubicin to normal organs due to the scavenging ROS and suppression of inflammation, which was confirmed by reduction in lactate dehydrogenase and creatine phosphokinase activities in plasma. RNP(N) is thus anticipated as a novel and ideal adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy.

  10. The toxicology of inhaled woodsmoke.

    PubMed

    Zelikoff, Judith T; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Schlesinger, Richard B

    2002-01-01

    In addition to developing nations relying almost exclusively upon biomass fuels, such as wood for cooking and home heating, North Americans, particularly in Canada and the northwestern and northeastern sections of the United States, have increasingly turned to woodburning as an alternate method for domestic heating because of increasing energy costs. As a result, the number of households using woodburning devices has increased dramatically. This has resulted in an increase in public exposure to indoor and outdoor woodsmoke-associated pollutants, which has prompted widespread concern about the adverse human health consequences that may be associated with prolonged woodsmoke exposure. This mini-review article brings together many of the human and animal studies performed over the last three decades in an attempt to better define the toxicological impact of inhaled woodsmoke on exposed children and adults; particular attention is given to effects upon the immune system. General information regarding occurrence and woodsmoke chemistry is provided so as to set the stage for a better understanding of the toxicological impact. It can be concluded from this review that exposure to woodsmoke, particularly for children, represents a potential health hazard. However, despite its widespread occurrence and apparent human health risks, relatively few studies have focused upon this particular area of research. More laboratory studies aimed at understanding the effects and underlying mechanisms of woodsmoke exposure, particularly on those individuals deemed to be at greatest risk, are badly needed, so that precise human health risks can be defined, appropriate regulatory standards can be set, and accurate decisions can be made concerning the use of current and new woodburning devices.

  11. Influence of experimental pulmonary emphysema on the toxicological effects from inhaled nitrogen dioxide and diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.; Bice, D.E.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gillett, N.A.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.; Wolff, R.K. )

    1989-10-01

    This project examined the influence of preexisting, experimentally induced pulmonary emphysema on the adverse health effects in rats of chronic inhalation exposure to either nitrogen dioxide or automotive diesel-engine exhaust. Previous reports indicated that humans with chronic lung disease were among those most severely affected by episodic exposures to high concentrations of airborne toxicants. There were no previous reports comparing the effects of chronic inhalation exposure to components of automotive emissions in emphysematous and normal animals. The hypothesis tested in this project was that rats with preexisting pulmonary emphysema were more susceptible than rats with normal lungs to the adverse effects of the toxicant exposures. Young adult rats were housed continuously in inhalation exposure chambers and exposed seven hours per day, five days per week, for 24 months to nitrogen dioxide at 9.5 parts per million (ppm)2, or to diesel exhaust at 3.5 mg soot/m3, or to clean air as control animals. These concentrations were selected to produce mild, but distinct, effects in rats with normal lungs. Pulmonary emphysema was induced in one-half of the rats by intratracheal instillation of the proteolytic enzyme elastase six weeks before the toxicant exposures began. Health effects were evaluated after 12, 18, and 24 months of exposure. The measurements included respiratory function, clearance of inhaled radiolabeled particles, pulmonary immune responses to instilled antigen, biochemistry and cytology of airway fluid, total lung collagen, histopathology, lung morphometry, and lung burdens of diesel soot. The significance of influences of emphysema and toxicant exposure, and interactions between influences of the two treatments, were evaluated by analysis of variance.

  12. Correlation of adverse effects of cisplatin administration in patients affected by solid tumours: A retrospective evaluation

    PubMed Central

    ASTOLFI, LAURA; GHISELLI, SARA; GUARAN, VALERIA; CHICCA, MILVIA; SIMONI, EDI; OLIVETTO, ELENA; LELLI, GIORGIO; MARTINI, ALESSANDRO

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is the most common antineoplastic drug used for the therapy of solid tumours. To date, researchers have focused on the dosage to be administered for each specific tumour, mainly considering the local adverse effects. The aim of this study was to correlate the severity of the adverse effects with: i) the dosage of cisplatin; ii) the specific site of the tumour; iii) the association with other drugs; and iv) the symptoms. We analysed data from 123 patients with 11 different tumour classes undergoing therapy from 2007 to 2008 at St. Anna Hospital (Ferrara, Italy), using the Spearman non-parametric correlation index. Even though significant correlations were found among the variables, the overall results showed that the main factor influencing the severity of the adverse effects was the dosage of cisplatin administered. PMID:23404427

  13. A review of the adverse effects and safety of noradrenergic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Whiskey, Eromona; Taylor, David

    2013-08-01

    There are a variety of noradrenergic antidepressants available, most of which act by inhibiting neuronal noradrenaline re-uptake, although few drugs are specific for this action. Where drugs have numerous actions the adverse effects of noradrenaline reuptake may be difficult to isolate, although in this respect the adverse effects of reboxetine, a specific noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor, are illuminating. Noradrenergic antidepressants typically cause minor changes in blood and heart rate, sweating and insomnia. Other pharmacological actions shown by non-specific antidepressants may act to worsen or mitigate these adverse effects. Noradrenergic drugs are less likely than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to cause sexual dysfunction but more likely to cause urinary hesitancy. Doubts remain over the relative propensity for antidepressants with different modes of action to cause diabetes and hyponatraemia. Noradrenergic actions do not seem to confer a risk of death in overdose.

  14. Prevalence of Adverse Effects Post-Brachytherapy on Women with Uterine Cervix Cancer in Durango, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yañez, Elvia; Deras, Diana C.; Reyes, Francianella

    2010-12-01

    This work aimed at determining the local prevalence of adverse effects on women with CaCu that recieved LDR brachytherapy treatment at CECAN. The data was extracted from the patient's and medical physics' departement records. Non Gaussian statistics was used due to dose distribution characteristics. A total of 103 patients were studied with average age of 55±13 years and Ia-IV FIGO clinical clasification. The observed prevalence is higher than that reported by other studies. It was observed that patients with proctitis were prescribed a slightly higher dose than those without adverse effects (90% confidence). Patients with proctitis also presented higher age (95% confidence) when compared with the mean of the studied population. The inverse applies to the group with other adverse effects, its average age is lower than the mean (90% confidence).

  15. Identifying potential adverse effects using the web: a new approach to medical hypothesis generation

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Adrian; Ungar, Lyle; Hill, Shawndra; Hennessy, Sean; Mao, Jun; Chung, Annie; Leonard, Charles E.; Holmes, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Medical message boards are online resources where users with a particular condition exchange information, some of which they might not otherwise share with medical providers. Many of these boards contain a large number of posts and contain patient opinions and experiences that would be potentially useful to clinicians and researchers. We present an approach that is able to collect a corpus of medical message board posts, de-identify the corpus, and extract information on potential adverse drug effects discussed by users. Using a corpus of posts to breast cancer message boards, we identified drug event pairs using co-occurrence statistics. We then compared the identified drug event pairs with adverse effects listed on the package labels of tamoxifen, anastrozole, exemestane, and letrozole. Of the pairs identified by our system, 75–80% were documented on the drug labels. Some of the undocumented pairs may represent previously unidentified adverse drug effects. PMID:21820083

  16. A review of the adverse effects and safety of noradrenergic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Whiskey, Eromona; Taylor, David

    2013-08-01

    There are a variety of noradrenergic antidepressants available, most of which act by inhibiting neuronal noradrenaline re-uptake, although few drugs are specific for this action. Where drugs have numerous actions the adverse effects of noradrenaline reuptake may be difficult to isolate, although in this respect the adverse effects of reboxetine, a specific noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor, are illuminating. Noradrenergic antidepressants typically cause minor changes in blood and heart rate, sweating and insomnia. Other pharmacological actions shown by non-specific antidepressants may act to worsen or mitigate these adverse effects. Noradrenergic drugs are less likely than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to cause sexual dysfunction but more likely to cause urinary hesitancy. Doubts remain over the relative propensity for antidepressants with different modes of action to cause diabetes and hyponatraemia. Noradrenergic actions do not seem to confer a risk of death in overdose. PMID:23784737

  17. Antiangiogenic agents and the skin: cutaneous adverse effects of sorafenib, sunitinib, and bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Ara, M; Pastushenko, E

    2014-12-01

    As new antiangiogenic therapies have been introduced and added to the therapeutic arsenal against various types of cancer, previously unknown adverse effects have been detected. These effects negatively impact patients' quality of life and can even make it necessary to suspend treatment. Adverse skin reactions occur in 90% of patients treated with angiogenesis inhibitors. In some cases, a correlation has been observed between the severity of reactions and treatment efficacy and tumor response. It is therefore extremely important that dermatologists be able to recognize and manage these reactions. Moreover, in order to avoid the unjustified withdrawal of potentially life-extending treatments, dermatologists must be able to differentiate between non-life-threatening reactions and life-threatening reactions that necessitate the suspension of treatment. In this review article, we analyze the main cutaneous adverse effects of the most common antiangiogenic agents. PMID:24766821

  18. Prevalence of Adverse Effects Post-Brachytherapy on Women with Uterine Cervix Cancer in Durango, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Higmar; Yanez, Elvia

    2010-12-07

    This work aimed at determining the local prevalence of adverse effects on women with CaCu that recieved LDR brachytherapy treatment at CECAN. The data was extracted from the patient's and medical physics' departement records. Non Gaussian statistics was used due to dose distribution characteristics. A total of 103 patients were studied with average age of 55{+-}13 years and Ia-IV FIGO clinical clasification. The observed prevalence is higher than that reported by other studies. It was observed that patients with proctitis were prescribed a slightly higher dose than those without adverse effects (90% confidence). Patients with proctitis also presented higher age (95% confidence) when compared with the mean of the studied population. The inverse applies to the group with other adverse effects, its average age is lower than the mean (90% confidence).

  19. The value of glucocorticoid co-therapy in different rheumatic diseases - positive and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a pivotal role in the management of many inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The therapeutic effects range from pain relief in arthritides, to disease-modifying effects in early rheumatoid arthritis, and to strong immunosuppressive actions in vasculitides and systemic lupus erythematosus. There are multiple indications that adverse effects are more frequent with the longer use of glucocorticoids and use of higher dosages, but high-quality data on the occurrence of adverse effects are scarce especially for dosages above 10 mg prednisone daily. The underlying rheumatic disease, disease activity, risk factors and individual responsiveness of the patient should guide treatment decisions. Monitoring for adverse effects should also be tailored to the patient. Continuously balancing the benefits and risks of glucocorticoid therapy is recommended. There is an ongoing quest for new drugs with glucocorticoid actions without the potential to cause harmful effects, such as selective glucocorticoid receptor agonists, but the application of a new compound in clinical practice will probably not occur within the next few years. In the meantime, basic research on glucocorticoid effects and detailed reports on therapeutic efficacy and occurrence of adverse effects will be valuable in weighing benefits and risks in clinical practice. PMID:25608693

  20. On the Likelihood of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Causing Adverse Marine Ecological Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief article discusses the ecological effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)in the marine environment. Based on new research and a review of the scientific literature, the paper concludes that SWNTs are unlikely to cause adverse ecological effects in the marine ...

  1. Toxicological effects of the lipid regulator gemfibrozil in four aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Jorge L; Repetto, Guillermo; Jos, Angeles; Salguero, Manuel; López-Artíguez, Miguel; Cameán, Ana M

    2007-02-15

    Gemfibrozil is a lipid-regulating agent widely used in patients at risk of coronary disease. Pharmaceutical products, such as gemfibrozil, are found in municipal effluents and represent a major source of contamination. To date, there is little available information about the adverse effects of gemfibrozil in aquatic organisms. For this reason, the toxic effects were investigated using model systems from four trophic levels. The most sensitive system was the immobilization of Daphnia magna, with a non-observed adverse effect level of 30 microM and a mean effective concentration of 120 microM after 72 h, followed by the inhibition of bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri, the hepatoma fish cell line PLHC-1 line and the inhibition of the growth of Chlorella vulgaris. Although protein content, neutral red uptake, methylthiazol metabolization and lysosomal function were reduced in PLHC-1 cells, stimulations were observed for lysosomal function, metallothionein levels and succinate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and acetylcholinesterase activities. No changes were observed in ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity. The main morphological alterations were hydropic degeneration and loss of cells. Modulation studies on gemfibrozil toxicity were also carried out. General antioxidants and calcium chelators did not modify the toxicity of gemfibrozil, whereas a Fe(III) chelator, a membrane permeable sulphydryl-protecting compound and glutathione level modifying agents did change the toxicity. One of the possible mechanisms of gemfibrozil toxicity seems to be the binding to sulphydryl groups, including those of glutathione. According to the result, gemfibrozil should be classified as harmful to aquatic organisms. However, comparing the concentrations in water and the toxicity quantified in the assayed systems, gemfibrozil is not expected to represent acute risk to the aquatic biota. PMID:17169444

  2. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  3. Topiramate-Induced Somnambulism in a Migraineur: A Probable Idiosyncratic Adverse Effect

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Thomas; Sarma, G. R. K.; Nadig, Raghunandan; Varghese, Raji

    2012-01-01

    Somnambulism (sleepwalking) is a disorder of arousal that falls under “parasomnia” group and is more common in children. These phenomena occur as primary sleep events or secondary to systemic disease or can be drug induced. Medications that can cause sleepwalking include neuroleptics, hypnotics, lithium, amitriptyline, and β-blockers.1 This report presents an unusual adverse effect of topiramate on sleep in a patient with migraine. Citation: Mathew T; Sarma GRK; Nadig R; Varghese R. Topiramate-induced somnambulism in a migraineur: a probable idiosyncratic adverse effect. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(2):197-198. PMID:22505867

  4. Biochemical and toxicological evidence of neurological effects of pesticides: the example of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Moretto, A; Colosio, C

    2011-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently reported to be associated with pesticide exposure but the issue has not yet been solved because the data are inconsistent and the studies suffer from several biases and limitations. The aim of this article is to summarise available biochemical and toxicological data on some pesticides, particularly on paraquat, that might help in the evaluation of epidemiological data. The nigrostriatal system appears to be particularly sensitive to oxidative damage caused by different mechanisms and agents, thus supporting the epidemiological evidence that Parkinson's disease is in fact an environmental disease. In available experimental studies, animals have been treated with a high single or a few doses of pesticide, and have been followed up for a few days or weeks after treatment. Moreover, experimental data indicate additive/synergistic effects of different pesticides that act on different targets within the dopaminergic system. In these conditions and to a different extent, pesticides such as paraquat, maneb and other dithiocarbamates, pyrethroids, rotenone, and dieldrin cause neurotoxic effects that may suggest a possible role in the development of a PD-like syndrome in animals. Although, all the characteristics of PD cannot be reproduced by any single chemical, these data can be of help for understanding the role of pesticide exposure in human PD development. On the other hand farmers are exposed for days or weeks during several years to much lower doses than those used in experimental studies. Therefore, a firm conclusion on the role of pesticide exposure on the increased risk of developing PD cannot be drawn. However, it is suggested that close follow up of survivors of acute poisonings by these pesticides, or identification in epidemiological studies of such subjects or of those reporting episodes of accidentally high exposure will certainly provide information useful for the understanding of the relevance of actual human exposure

  5. Toxicological effects of the aquatic herbicide, fluridone, on male water mites (Hydrachnidiae: Arrenurus: Megaluracarus).

    PubMed

    Yi, Sandra A; Francis, Bettina M; Jarrell, Wesley M; Soucek, David J

    2011-01-01

    The acute toxicities for technical grade fluridone (Sonar™) and the commercial formulation of fluridone (Sonar®AS) were assessed for male water mites (Hydrachnidiae: Arrenurus: Megaluracarus). Signs of toxicity were evaluated by detection of locomotor dysfunction or death after exposure to concentrations of 100,000, 10,000, 1,000, and 100 μg/L of Sonar™ and 10,000, 5,000, 1,000, 100, and 10 μg/L of Sonar®AS in US EPA, moderately hard reconstituted water (MHRW). The median effective concentration (EC50) was 891 and 631 μg/L for Sonar™ at 48 and 96 h and less than 10 μg/L for Sonar®AS at 96 h. Increased duration of exposure to Sonar®AS from 48 to 96 h had a significant effect on increasing the rate of combined morbidity and mortality. At the lowest concentration of Sonar®AS tested, which is half the concentration allowed within 400 m of any functioning potable water intake for human usage, 40% of the mites were adversely affected at 48 h and 70% were affected after 96 h of exposure. This study demonstrates that Sonar®AS is 60-fold more toxic to water mites than the active ingredient alone. At currently acceptable application rates of 90-150 μg/L fluridone, the addition of ingredients classified as inert, as in Sonar®AS, result in an increased risk of adverse effects on populations of male water mites (Arrenurus: Megaluracarus) in aquatic ecosystems.

  6. Effects of coal rank on the chemical composition and toxicological activity of coal liquefaction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Dauble, D.D.

    1986-05-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and toxicological testing of coal liquefaction materials from the EDS and H-Coal processes operated using different ranks of coal. Samples of recycle solvent from the bottoms recycle mode of the EDS direct coal liquefaction process derived from bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite coals were analyzed. In addition, the H-Coal heavy fuel oils derived from bituminous and sub-bituminous coals were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsoprtion column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry. The toxicological activity of selected samples was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay, an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity, and a static bioassy with Daphnia magna for aquatic toxicity of the water-soluble fractions. 22 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. A replication of the study ‘Adverse effects of spinal manipulation: a systematic review’

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    and related adverse effects. PMID:22998971

  8. Carbon nanotubes: a review of their properties in relation to pulmonary toxicology and workplace safety.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Ken; Aitken, Robert; Tran, Lang; Stone, Vicki; Duffin, Rodger; Forrest, Gavin; Alexander, Andrew

    2006-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are an important new class of technological materials that have numerous novel and useful properties. The forecast increase in manufacture makes it likely that increasing human exposure will occur, and as a result, CNT are beginning to come under toxicological scrutiny. This review seeks to set out the toxicological paradigms applicable to the toxicity of inhaled CNT, building on the toxicological database on nanoparticles (NP) and fibers. Relevant workplace regulation regarding exposure is also considered in the light of our knowledge of CNT. CNT could have features of both NP and conventional fibers, and so the current paradigm for fiber toxicology, which is based on mineral fibers and synthetic vitreous fibers, is discussed. The NP toxicology paradigm is also discussed in relation to CNT. The available peer-reviewed literature suggests that CNT may have unusual toxicity properties. In particular, CNT seem to have a special ability to stimulate mesenchymal cell growth and to cause granuloma formation and fibrogenesis. In several studies, CNT have more adverse effects than the same mass of NP carbon and quartz, the latter a commonly used benchmark of particle toxicity. There is, however, no definitive inhalation study available that would avoid the potential for artifactual effects due to large mats and aggregates forming during instillation exposure procedures. Studies also show that CNT may exhibit some of their effects through oxidative stress and inflammation. CNT represent a group of particles that are growing in production and use, and therefore, research into their toxicology and safe use is warranted.

  9. Oleoresin Capsicum toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) is an extract of the pepper plant used for centuries as a culinary spice (hot peppers). This material has been identified as a safe and effective Less-Than- Lethal weapon for use by Law enforcement and security professionals against assault. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is currently also evaluating its use in conjunction with other Less-Than-Lethal agents such as aqueous foam for use in corrections applications. Therefore, a comprehensive toxicological review of the literature was performed for the National Institute of Justice Less-Than-Lethal Force program to review and update the information available on the toxicity and adverse health effects associated with OC exposure. The results of this evaluation indicate that exposure to OC can result in dermatitis, as well as adverse nasal, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal effects in humans. The primary effects of OC exposure include pain and irritation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and lining of the mouth. Blistering and rash have been shown to occur after chronic or prolonged dermal exposure. Ingestion of capsicum may cause acute stinging of the lips, tongue, and oral mucosa and may lead to vomiting and diarrhea with large doses. OC vapors may also cause significant pulmonary irritation and prolonged cough. There is no evidence of long term effects associated with an acute exposure to OC, and extensive use as a culinary additive and medicinal ointment has further provided no evidence of long term adverse effects following repeated or prolonged exposure.

  10. [Toxicologic estimation, an element of therapeutical progress].

    PubMed

    Fournier, P E

    1991-01-01

    The clinical toxicology plays a great part to the progresses of human therapy. It is an essential observation for a good clinical use of drugs and of materials used by physicians. It permits a better knowledge of the dose-effect relationship (in acute either in chronic adverse effects). It specifies the statement of the therapeutic efficacy between the threshold, a placebo effect with adverse disorders as those possibly related to any xenobiotic and the overdose where the nocivity predominates on the therapeutic results. A better detection of some individual responses as adverse or toxic reactions due to a genetic peculiarity belongs to clinical toxicogenetic studies in parallel with pharmacogenetics. The recent evolution of drugs needs a more scientific approach of the therapy for cytotoxic drugs largely used against cancers, in terms of tolerable doses, cumulative actions, interactions and cofactors. On the opposite, the bio-chemical variations of new bio-drugs acting as real bioprotheses of hormones or biomediators need specific toxicological studies according to the progresses and to the limits of biotechnologies. Among numerous drugs issued of chemical research one must separate the reversible functional drugs designed as enzyme-inhibitors or cellular receptors ligands very close to the dominant themes of biochemistry and experimental physiology from chemicals coined by synthetic "chance" which are for the time being plain xenobiotics whose dangers are often poorly evaluated but whose practical applications will take place either in disciplines related to pharmacopea like chemicals used in plant protection, either beginning their commercial trip very far from health concern in industrial preparations and being brought back to medicine as plastics, glues or metallic implants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1842171

  11. Radiological/toxicological sabotage assessments at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.D.; Pascal, M.D.; Richardson, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the methods being employed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform graded assessments of radiological and toxicological sabotage vulnerability at Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. These assessments are conducted to ensure that effective measures are in place to prevent, mitigate, and respond to a potential sabotage event which may cause an airborne release of radiological/toxicological material, causing an adverse effect on the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. Department of Energy (DOE) Notice 5630.3A, {open_quotes}Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,{close_quotes} and the associated April 1993 DOE-Headquarters guidance provide the requirements and outline an eight-step process for hazardous material evaluation. The process requires the integration of information from a variety of disciplines, including safety, safeguards and security, and emergency preparedness. This paper summarizes WSRC`s approach towards implementation of the DOE requirements, and explains the inter-relationships between the Radiological and Toxicological Assessments developed using this process, and facility Hazard Assessment Reports (HAs), Safety Analysis Reports (SARs), and Facility Vulnerability Assessments (VAs).

  12. Systems toxicology.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Thomas; van Vliet, Erwin; Jaworska, Joanna; Bonilla, Leo; Skinner, Nigel; Thomas, Russell

    2012-01-01

    The need for a more mechanistic understanding of the ways in which chemicals modulate biological pathways is urgent if we are to identify and better assess safety issues relating to a wide range of substances developed by the pharmaceutical, chemical, agri-bio, and cosmetic industries. Omics technologies provide a valuable opportunity to refine existing methods and provide information for so-called integrated testing strategies via the creation of signatures of toxicity. By mapping these signatures to underlying pathways of toxicity, some of which have been identified by toxicologists over the last few decades, and bringing them together with pathway information determined from biochemistry and molecular biology, a "systems toxicology" approach will enable virtual experiments to be conducted that can improve the prediction of hazard and the assessment of compound toxicity. PMID:22562485

  13. Possible involvement of DEC1 on the adverse effects of quinolone antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaohong; Zheng, Yan; Ma, Wanshan; Wang, Yunshan

    2010-04-30

    Quinolone antibacterial agents are widely used in the clinic because of their high antibacterial activity, broad spectra and favorable pharmacokinetics. However, the adverse effects induced by quinolones, such as tendon/articular toxicity, central nervous system toxicity, phototoxicity and dysglycemia, have greatly restricted their therapeutic use. Differentiated embryo-chondrocyte expressed gene 1 (DEC1), an important transcription factor that has a basic helix-loop-helix domain and is ubiquitously expressed in both human embryonic and adult tissues, has a pivotal function in various biological phenomena, including neurogenesis, neuroregulation, chondrogenesis, cell growth, oncogenesis, immune balance and circandian rhythm. Recently, DEC1 has received increasing attention for its role in maintaining the homeostasis of metabolism and energy. Research has shown that DEC1 may play a vital role in metabolic disease. Although the mechanism of the adverse reactions caused by quinolones has not been clarified, the distribution of these serious adverse effects in tissues and organs is consistent with the expression of DEC1 in corresponding normal tissues. In the present paper, we review evidence showing that DEC1 may take part in the adverse effects induced by quinolone antibiotics. The investigation of the molecular details of the toxicity caused by quinolones may help overcome the shortcomings of the antibiotics and reveal new, useful therapeutic functions besides their antimicrobial effect.

  14. 40 CFR 158.34 - Flagging of studies for potential adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Flagging of studies for potential adverse effects. 158.34 Section 158.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES General Provisions § 158.34 Flagging...

  15. 40 CFR 158.34 - Flagging of studies for potential adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Flagging of studies for potential adverse effects. 158.34 Section 158.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES General Provisions § 158.34 Flagging...

  16. 40 CFR 158.34 - Flagging of studies for potential adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flagging of studies for potential adverse effects. 158.34 Section 158.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES General Provisions § 158.34 Flagging...

  17. Caregiver Acceptance of Adverse Effects and Use of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oremus, Mark; Wolfson, Christina; Vandal, Alain C.; Bergman, Howard; Xie, Qihao

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers play a determining role in choosing treatments for persons with Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this study was to examine caregivers' willingness to have persons with Alzheimer's disease continue taking cholinesterase inhibitors in the event that any 1 of 11 adverse effects was to occur. Data were gathered via postal questionnaire…

  18. Potassium fertilization mitigates the adverse effects of drought on selected Zea mays cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present study, the role of potassium (K) in mitigating the adverse effects of drought stress (DS) on 2 maize (Zea mays L.) cultivars, ‘Shaandan 9’ (S9; drought-tolerant) and ‘Shaandan 911’ (S911; drought-sensitive), was assessed. K application increased dry matter (DM) across all growth stage...

  19. ARE ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES TO CHLOROPHENOXY HERBICIDES ASSOCIATED WITH AN INCREASE IN ADVERSE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Associations between adverse health effects and environmental exposures are difficult to study because exposures may be widespread, low-dose in nature, and common throughout the study population. Individual risk-factor epidemiology may not be able to initially ident...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS AND ADVERSE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS: HAZARD IDENTIFICATION USING INTERREGION COMPARISONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Associations between adverse health effects and environmental exposures are difficult to study, because exposures may be widespread, low-dose in nature, and common throughout the study population. Therefore, individual risk-factor epidemiology may not be the right to...

  1. Effects of copy center particles on the lungs: A toxicological characterization using a Balb/c mice model

    PubMed Central

    Pirela, Sandra; Molina, Ramon; Watson, Christa; Cohen, Joel; Bello, Dhimiter; Demokritou, Philip; Brain, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Context Printers and photocopiers release respirable particles into the air. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have been recently incorporated into toner formulations but their potential toxicological effects have not been well studied. Objective To evaluate the biologic responses to copier-emitted particles in the lungs using a mouse model. Methods Particles from a university copy center were sampled and fractionated into three distinct sizes, two of which (PM0.1 and PM0.1–2.5) were evaluated in this study. The particles were extracted and dispersed in deionized water and RPMI/10% FBS. Hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential were evaluated by dynamic light scattering. The toxicologic potential of these particles was studied using 8-week-old male Balb/c mice. Mice were intratracheally instilled with 0.2, 0.6, 2.0 mg/kg bw of the PM0.1 and PM0.1–2.5 size fractions. Fe2O3 and welding fumes were used as comparative materials, while RPMI/10% FBS was used as the vehicle control. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 24 hours post-instillation. The BAL fluid was analyzed for total and differential cell counts, and biochemical markers of injury and inflammation. Results Particle size- and dose-dependent pulmonary effects were found. Specifically, mice instilled with PM0.1 (2.0 mg/kg bw) had significant increases in neutrophil number, lactate dehydrogenase and albumin compared to vehicle control. Likewise, pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated in mice exposed to PM0.1 (2.0 mg/kg bw) compared to other groups. Conclusion Our results indicate that exposure to copier-emitted nanoparticles may induce lung injury and inflammation. Further exposure assessment and toxicological investigations are necessary to address this emerging environmental health pollutant. PMID:23895351

  2. Toxicological effects of short-term resuspension of metal-contaminated freshwater and marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Fetters, Kyle J; Costello, David M; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Burton, G Allen

    2016-03-01

    Sediments in navigation-dominated waterways frequently are contaminated with a variety of particle-associated pollutants and are subject to frequent short-term resuspension events. There is little information documenting whether resuspension of metal-contaminated sediments has adverse ecological effects on resident aquatic organisms. Using a novel laboratory approach, the authors examined the mobilization of Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb, Ni, and Cr during resuspension of 1 freshwater and 2 coastal marine sediments and whether resuspension and redeposition resulted in toxicity to model organisms. Sediment flux exposure chambers were used to resuspend metal-contaminated sediments from 1 site in Lake DePue, Illinois (USA), and 2 sites in Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Maine (USA). Short-term (4-h) resuspension of sediment at environmentally relevant suspended particulate matter concentrations (<1 g/L) resulted in metal mobilization to water that was sediment and metal specific. Overall, the net release of metals from suspended particles was limited, likely because of scavenging by organic matter and Fe oxides that formed during sediment interaction with oxic water. Minimal toxicity to organisms (survival of Hyalella azteca and Daphnia magna; survival, growth, and tissue metal concentration of Neanthes arenaceodentata; bioluminescence of Pyrocystis lunula) was observed during 4-h exposure to resuspended sediments and during 4-d to 10-d post-exposure recovery periods in uncontaminated water. Redeposited suspended particles exhibited increased metal bioavailability and toxicity to H. azteca, highlighting the potential for adverse ecological impacts because of changes in metal speciation. It is important to consider interactions between organisms' life histories and sediment disturbance regimes when assessing risks to ecosystems.

  3. A critical review of the toxicological effects of carrageenan and processed eucheuma seaweed on the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Samuel M; Ito, Nobuyuki

    2002-09-01

    Carrageenan is a high-molecular-weight, strongly anionic polymer derived from several species of red seaweed that is used for the textural stabilization of foods. Processed Eucheuma Seaweed (PES) is a form of carrageenan with a higher cellulose content. Food-grade carrageenan has a weight average molecular weight greater than 100,000 Da, with a low percentage of smaller fragments. Carrageenan is not degraded to any extent in the gastrointestinal tract and is not absorbed from it in species examined, such as rodents, dogs, and non-human primates. Systemically administered carrageenan has been reported to have a variety of effects, particularly on the immune system, but these are not pertinent to orally administered carrageenan. The substance poligeenan (formerly referred to as degraded carrageenan) is not a food additive. It exhibits toxicological properties at high doses that do not occur with the food additive carrageenan. In-long term bioassays, carrageenan has not been found to be carcinogenic, and there is no credible evidence supporting a carcinogenic effect or a tumor-promoting effect on the colon in rodents. Also, like many dietary fibers, there is significant cecal enlargement in rodents when it is administered at high doses, but this does not appear to be associated with any toxicological consequences to the rodent. Many toxicological studies on carrageenan have involved administration at doses in excess of today's standards for dietary feeding levels in bioassays, and they are orders of magnitude in excess of those to which humans are exposed. Previous reviews of carrageenan and PES by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) have recommended a group allowable daily intake (ADI) of "not specified". The lack of carcinogenic, genotoxic, or tumor-promoting activity with carrageenan strongly supports continuing such an ADI, and JECFA, during its most recent review in 2001, continued this

  4. Orlistat-associated adverse effects and drug interactions: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Derdemezis, Christos S; Gazi, Irene F; Nakou, Eleni S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Elisaf, Moses S

    2008-01-01

    Orlistat, an anti-obesity drug, is a potent and specific inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In light of the recent US FDA approval of the over-the-counter sale of orlistat (60 mg three times daily), clinicians need to be aware that its use may be associated with less well known, but sometimes clinically relevant, adverse effects. More specifically, the use of orlistat has been associated with several mild-to-moderate gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as oily stools, diarrhoea, abdominal pain and faecal spotting. A few cases of serious hepatic adverse effects (cholelithiasis, cholostatic hepatitis and subacute liver failure) have been reported. However, the effects of orlistat on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are beneficial. Orlistat-induced weight loss seems to have beneficial effects on blood pressure. No effect has been observed on calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper or zinc balance or on bone biomarkers. Interestingly, the use of orlistat has been associated with rare cases of acute kidney injury, possibly due to the increased fat malabsorption resulting from the inhibition of pancreatic and gastric lipase by orlistat, leading to the formation of soaps with calcium and resulting in increased free oxalate absorption and enteric hyperoxaluria. Orlistat has a beneficial effect on carbohydrate metabolism. No significant effect on cancer risk has been reported with orlistat.Orlistat interferes with the absorption of many drugs (such as warfarin, amiodarone, ciclosporin and thyroxine as well as fat-soluble vitamins), affecting their bioavailability and effectiveness. This review considers orlistat-related adverse effects and drug interactions. The clinical relevance and pathogenesis of these effects is also discussed.

  5. [Analysis of the cardiac side effects of antipsychotics: Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER)].

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Takashi; Okumara, Yasuyuki; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka; Ito, Hiroto

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed the cases of side effects due to antipsychotics reported to Japan's Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2012. We used the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER) and analyzed 136 of 216,945 cases using the defined terms. We also checked the cardiac adverse effects listed in the package inserts of the antipsychotics involved. We found cases of Ikr blockade resulting in sudden death (49 cases), electrocardiogram QT prolonged (29 cases), torsade de pointes (TdP, 19 cases), ventricular fibrillation (VF, 10 cases). M2 receptor blockade was observed in tachycardia (8 cases) and sinus tachycardia (3 cases). Calmodulin blockade was involved in reported cardiomyopathy (3 cases) and myocarditis (1 case). Multiple adverse events were reported simultaneously in 14 cases. Our search of package inserts revealed warnings regarding electrocardiogram QT prolongation (24 drugs), tachycardia (23), sudden death (18), TdP (14), VF (3), myocarditis (1) and cardiomyopathy (1). We suggest that when an antipsychotic is prescribed, the patient should be monitored regularly with ECG, blood tests, and/or biochemical tests to avoid adverse cardiac effects. PMID:25069255

  6. 20 years of toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, B E

    1998-01-01

    With over 80,000 chemicals being used in commerce worldwide, it is important to identify the human health effects of these chemicals and the levels of exposure at which they are harmful to humans. In order to address this need, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) was established in 1978; since then, the NTP has become the world's leader in designing, conducting, and interpreting various types of toxicity assays. PMID:9755149

  7. The toxicological properties of petroleum gases.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Herron, Deborah; Saperstein, Mark; Podhasky, Paula; Hoffman, Gary M; Roberts, Linda

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the toxicological hazards of petroleum gases, 90-day inhalation toxicity (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD] 413) and developmental toxicity (OECD 414) tests were conducted with liquefied propane gas (LPG) at concentrations of 1000, 5000, or 10,000 ppm. A micronucleus test (OECD 474) of LPG was also conducted. No systemic or developmental effects were observed; the overall no observed adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) was 10,000 ppm. Further, there was no effect of LPG exposure at levels up to 10,000 ppm on micronucleus induction and no evidence of bone marrow toxicity. Other alkane gases (ethane, propane, n-butane, and isobutane) were then evaluated in combined repeated exposure studies with reproduction/development toxicity screening tests (OECD 422). There were no toxicologically important changes in parameters relating to systemic toxicity or neurotoxicity for any of these gases at concentrations ranging from 9000 to 16,000 ppm. There was no evidence of effects on developmental or reproductive toxicity in the studies of ethane, propane, or n-butane at the highest concentrations tested. However, there was a reduction in mating in the high-exposure group (9000 ppm) of the isobutane study, which although not significantly different was outside the range previously observed in the testing laboratory. Assuming the reduction in mating to have been toxicologically significant, the NOAEC for the isobutane reproductive toxicity screening test was 3000 ppm (7125 mg/m(3)). A method is proposed by which the toxicity of any of the 106 complex petroleum gas streams can be estimated from its composition.

  8. The toxicological properties of petroleum gases.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Herron, Deborah; Saperstein, Mark; Podhasky, Paula; Hoffman, Gary M; Roberts, Linda

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the toxicological hazards of petroleum gases, 90-day inhalation toxicity (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD] 413) and developmental toxicity (OECD 414) tests were conducted with liquefied propane gas (LPG) at concentrations of 1000, 5000, or 10,000 ppm. A micronucleus test (OECD 474) of LPG was also conducted. No systemic or developmental effects were observed; the overall no observed adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) was 10,000 ppm. Further, there was no effect of LPG exposure at levels up to 10,000 ppm on micronucleus induction and no evidence of bone marrow toxicity. Other alkane gases (ethane, propane, n-butane, and isobutane) were then evaluated in combined repeated exposure studies with reproduction/development toxicity screening tests (OECD 422). There were no toxicologically important changes in parameters relating to systemic toxicity or neurotoxicity for any of these gases at concentrations ranging from 9000 to 16,000 ppm. There was no evidence of effects on developmental or reproductive toxicity in the studies of ethane, propane, or n-butane at the highest concentrations tested. However, there was a reduction in mating in the high-exposure group (9000 ppm) of the isobutane study, which although not significantly different was outside the range previously observed in the testing laboratory. Assuming the reduction in mating to have been toxicologically significant, the NOAEC for the isobutane reproductive toxicity screening test was 3000 ppm (7125 mg/m(3)). A method is proposed by which the toxicity of any of the 106 complex petroleum gas streams can be estimated from its composition. PMID:24179026

  9. Systematic Review of Adverse Effects from Herbal Drugs Reported in Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Jun, Seung Ah; Hong, Sung Shin; Ahn, Yo Chan; Lee, Dong Soo; Son, Chang Gue

    2016-09-01

    Herbal drugs have become a popular form of healthcare, raising concerns about their safety. This study aimed to characterize the adverse effects of herbal drugs through a systematic review of results reported in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Using eight electronic databases including PubMed, the Cochrane library and six Korean medical databases, the frequency of reported toxicity was recorded based on drug composition and indication. Among 4957 potentially relevant articles, 242 papers comprised of 244 studies met our inclusion criteria; these included 111 studies of a single herb and 133 of multiple herbs. These studies accounted for a total 15 441 participants (male = 5590; female = 9851; 7383 for single and 8058 for multiple herb studies). There were 480 cases (3.1%) of adverse events (344 for single, 136 for multiple herb studies; p < 0.01). A total of 259 cases reported blood test abnormalities, including five cases of abnormality in hepatic functional enzymes. The most frequently reported adverse event was digestive symptoms (44.3%), followed by nervous system symptoms (17.3%) and behaviors such as loss of appetite (16.3%). This is the first systematic review of adverse effects of herbal drugs among clinical studies, and the results indicate that herbal drugs are relatively safe. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27196988

  10. Analysis of volatile combustion products and a study of their toxicological effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seader, J. D.; Einhorn, I. N.; Drake, W. O.; Mihlfeith, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study the thermochemical, flammability and toxicological characteristics of uncoated and coated polyisocyanurate foams. The coatings used were fluorinated copolymer and an intumescent material. Combustion and pyrolysis gases were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The LD-50 and LD-100 tests were performed on Sprague-Dawley rats housed in an environmental chamber. The isocyanurate foam, fluorinated-copolymer-coated foam, and the intumescent-coated foam were found to have excellent flammability and insulation characteristics, although smoke development was substantial.

  11. Deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, prevents hepatocarcinogenesis and adverse effects of sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Takami, Taro; Uchida, Koichi; Fujisawa, Koichi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Saeki, Issei; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Although sorafenib is expected to have a chemopreventive effect on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence, there are limitations to its use because of adverse effects, including effects on liver function. We have reported that the iron chelator, deferoxamine can prevent liver fibrosis and preneoplastic lesions. We investigated the influence of administering a new oral iron chelator, deferasirox (DFX), on the effects of sorafenib. We used the choline-deficient l-amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet-induced rat liver fibrosis and HCC model. We divided rats into four groups: CDAA diet only (control group), CDAA diet with sorafenib (sorafenib group), CDAA diet with DFX (DFX group), and CDAA diet with DFX and sorafenib (DFX + sorafenib group). Liver fibrosis and development of preneoplastic lesions were assessed. In addition, we assessed adverse effects such as changes in body and liver weight, skin damage (eruption, dryness, and hair loss), which is defined as hand-foot skin syndrome, in the sorafenib and DFX + sorafenib groups. The combination of DFX + sorafenib markedly prevented liver fibrosis and preneoplastic lesions better than the other treatments. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly decreased adverse effects compared with the sorafenib group. In conclusion, the combination therapy with DFX and sorafenib may be a useful adjuvant therapy to prevent recurrence after curative treatment of HCC. PMID:27257345

  12. Metabolomic application in toxicity evaluation and toxicological biomarker identification of natural product.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan-Qian; Chen, Hua; Chen, Lin; Tang, Dan-Dan; Miao, Hua; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2016-05-25

    Natural product plays a vital role in disease prevention and treatment since the appearance of civilization, but the toxicity severely hinders its wide use. In order to avoid toxic effect as far as possible and use natural product safely, more comprehensive understandings of toxicity are urgently required. Since the metabolome represents the physiological or pathological status of organisms, metabolomics-based toxicology is of significance to observe potential injury before toxins have caused physiological or pathological damages. Metabolomics-based toxicology can evaluate toxicity and identify toxicological biomarker of natural product, which is helpful to guide clinical medication and reduce adverse drug reactions. In the past decades, dozens of metabolomic researches have been implemented on toxicity evaluation, toxicological biomarker identification and potential mechanism exploration of nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxicity and central nervous system toxicity induced by pure compounds, extracts and compound prescriptions. In this paper, metabolomic technology, sample preparation, data process and analysis, and metabolomics-based toxicological research of natural product are reviewed, and finally, the potential problems and further perspectives in toxicological metabolomic investigations of natural product are discussed.

  13. Functional correlates of the therapeutic and adverse effects evoked by thalamic stimulation for essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, William S.; Jo, Hang Joon; Testini, Paola; Cho, Shinho; Felmlee, Joel P.; Welker, Kirk M.; Klassen, Bryan T.; Min, Hoon-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is an established neurosurgical therapy for movement disorders including essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease. While typically highly effective, deep brain stimulation can sometimes yield suboptimal therapeutic benefit and can cause adverse effects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that intraoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging could be used to detect deep brain stimulation-evoked changes in functional and effective connectivity that would correlate with the therapeutic and adverse effects of stimulation. Ten patients receiving deep brain stimulation of the ventralis intermedius thalamic nucleus for essential tremor underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during stimulation applied at a series of stimulation localizations, followed by evaluation of deep brain stimulation-evoked therapeutic and adverse effects. Correlations between the therapeutic effectiveness of deep brain stimulation (3 months postoperatively) and deep brain stimulation-evoked changes in functional and effective connectivity were assessed using region of interest-based correlation analysis and dynamic causal modelling, respectively. Further, we investigated whether brain regions might exist in which activation resulting from deep brain stimulation might correlate with the presence of paraesthesias, the most common deep brain stimulation-evoked adverse effect. Thalamic deep brain stimulation resulted in activation within established nodes of the tremor circuit: sensorimotor cortex, thalamus, contralateral cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei (FDR q < 0.05). Stimulation-evoked activation in all these regions of interest, as well as activation within the supplementary motor area, brainstem, and inferior frontal gyrus, exhibited significant correlations with the long-term therapeutic effectiveness of deep brain stimulation (P < 0.05), with the strongest correlation (P < 0.001) observed within the contralateral cerebellum. Dynamic causal

  14. Tissue Expander Placement to Prevent the Adverse Intestinal Effects of Radiotherapy in Malignant Pelvic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shuichiro; Oue, Takaharu; Adachi, Kana; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Nakahata, Kengo; Ueno, Takehisa; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2016-03-01

    We herein report the findings of 3 patients with primary Ewing sarcoma in a pelvic lesion who underwent the placement of a tissue expander (TE) before radiation therapy to prevent the adverse effects of radiotherapy. The simulation study showed that the TE drastically reduced volume of the intestine that was irradiated at all dose levels. All patients could receive the scheduled dose of radiotherapy without any acute and late complications such as diarrhea, melena, the dislodging of the TE, infection, or the formation of fistulae. In the 4-year (minimum) observation period, we did not observe intestinal complications in any of our patients. TE placement is considered to be a safe and effective method for preventing the adverse effects of radiotherapy in pediatric malignant pelvic tumors.

  15. Diagnosis, Prevention, and Management of Statin Adverse Effects and Intolerance: Canadian Consensus Working Group Update (2016).

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet; Tashakkor, A Yashar

    2016-07-01

    The Canadian Consensus Working Group has updated its evaluation of the literature pertaining to statin intolerance and adverse effects. This overview introduces a pragmatic definition of statin intolerance (goal-inhibiting statin intolerance) that emphasizes the effects of symptoms on achieving nationally vetted goals in patients fulfilling indications for lipid-lowering therapy and cardiovascular risk reduction. The Canadian Consensus Working Group provides a structured framework for avoiding, evaluating and managing goal-inhibiting statin intolerance. Particularly difficult practice situations are reviewed, including management in young and elderly individuals, and in athletes and labourers. Finally, targeted at specialty practitioners, more detailed analyses of specific but more unusual adverse effects ascribed to statins are updated including evidence regarding new-onset diabetes, cognitive dysfunction, cataracts, and the rare but important immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. PMID:27342697

  16. Neuromuscular adverse effects associated with systemic retinoid dermatotherapy: monitoring and treatment algorithm for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Chroni, Elisabeth; Monastirli, Alexandra; Tsambaos, Dionysios

    2010-01-01

    Although neuromuscular adverse effects represent significant clinical manifestations of hypervitaminosis A syndrome, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the potential neuromuscular toxicity of vitamin A derivatives (retinoids). Since isotretinoin and acitretin are currently the two most commonly used oral retinoids in systemic dermatotherapy, this review focuses exclusively on their neuromuscular adverse effects and proposes a neuromuscular algorithm for appropriate monitoring of patients treated with these two compounds. The most frequent CNS adverse effect associated with oral isotretinoin is headache, either as an independent adverse effect or as part of benign intracranial hypertension, which is additionally characterized by nausea and visual changes. Isolated cases of stiff-person-like syndrome, epileptic seizures and generalized muscle stiffness syndrome, possibly or probably related to oral treatment with isotretinoin, have also been reported. In addition, oral isotretinoin has reportedly been associated with muscular adverse effects that most frequently manifest as myalgia and stiffness and, in rare cases, as true myopathy or rhabdomyolysis. Creatine phosphokinase, a specific marker of muscle destruction, has been found to be elevated, occasionally by up to 100 times the normal value (with or without muscular symptoms and signs), in a variable percentage of patients receiving isotretinoin treatment and particularly in those undergoing vigorous physical exercise. Oral acitretin has been found to cause peripheral nerve dysfunction, particularly of sensory fibres, which in rare cases leads to clinically evident sensory disturbances. Less clear is the causal relationship between acitretin and benign intracranial hypertension or myopathy, whereas an isolated case of cranial nerve IV (oculomotor) palsy and a further case of thrombotic stroke during treatment with oral acitretin have been reported. Systemic diseases with involvement of nervous and

  17. General and specific effects of early-life psychosocial adversities on adolescent grey matter volume☆

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Nicholas D.; Dalgleish, Tim; Lombardo, Michael V.; Dunn, Valerie J.; Van Harmelen, Anne-Laura; Ban, Maria; Goodyer, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to childhood adversities (CA) is associated with subsequent alterations in regional brain grey matter volume (GMV). Prior studies have focused mainly on severe neglect and maltreatment. The aim of this study was to determine in currently healthy adolescents if exposure to more common forms of CA results in reduced GMV. Effects on brain structure were investigated using voxel-based morphometry in a cross-sectional study of youth recruited from a population-based longitudinal cohort. 58 participants (mean age = 18.4) with (n = 27) or without (n = 31) CA exposure measured retrospectively from maternal interview were included in the study. Measures of recent negative life events (RNLE) recorded at 14 and 17 years, current depressive symptoms, gender, participant/parental psychiatric history, current family functioning perception and 5-HTTLPR genotype were covariates in analyses. A multivariate analysis of adversities demonstrated a general association with a widespread distributed neural network consisting of cortical midline, lateral frontal, temporal, limbic, and cerebellar regions. Univariate analyses showed more specific associations between adversity measures and regional GMV: CA specifically demonstrated reduced vermis GMV and past psychiatric history with reduced medial temporal lobe volume. In contrast RNLE aged 14 was associated with increased lateral cerebellar and anterior cingulate GMV. We conclude that exposure to moderate levels of childhood adversities occurring during childhood and early adolescence exerts effects on the developing adolescent brain. Reducing exposure to adverse social environments during early life may optimize typical brain development and reduce subsequent mental health risks in adult life. PMID:25061568

  18. The role of ADHD in academic adversity: disentangling ADHD effects from other personal and contextual factors.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) experience significant academic difficulties that can lead to numerous negative academic consequences. With a focus on adverse academic outcomes, this study seeks to disentangle variance attributable to ADHD from variance attributable to salient personal and contextual covariates. Responses from 136 students with ADHD and 3,779 non-ADHD peers from 9 high schools were analyzed using logistic regression. Dependent measures included academic failure, grade repetition, school refusal, changing classes and school, school exclusion, and schoolwork noncompletion. Covariates comprised personal (e.g., sociodemographics, personality, prior achievement, specific learning disabilities, motivation) and contextual (e.g., school size, school socioeconomic status, school average achievement) factors. Findings indicated that, after accounting for personal and contextual covariates, ADHD explained significant variance in numerous adversities (schoolwork noncompletion, school suspension, school expulsion, changing schools, grade repetition). Thus, beyond the effects of numerous personal and contextual covariates, ADHD has a distinct presence in students' academic adversity. Also interesting, after accounting for other personal and contextual factors, was academic adversity with which ADHD was not associated. Findings provide direction for educational intervention targeting ADHD and associated factors found to be significant in the study.

  19. Efficacy and adverse effects of memantine treatment for Alzheimer's disease from randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jue; Jiang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    The role of memantine as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been controversial. In clinical trials, a high dropout rate and numerous adverse events associated with memantine have been observed. However, given the relative scarcity of effective treatments for AD it would seem prudent to re-examine existing evidence to determine whether or not memantine should be used. Eight databases were utilized for randomized controlled trials that were published prior to December 31, 2013 and were according with the inclusion criteria. Trial methods, clinical characteristics, outcomes, and adverse events were extracted and analyzed with Review Manager 5.2. We obtained 2293 studies and determined that 13 of those studies met the inclusion criteria. Memantine therapy showed significant benefits to cognition, mental state, activities of daily life, the clinician's global impression in term with MMSE, SIB, NPI, ADCS-ADL19, CIBIC-Plus, respectively. Memantine therapy did not significantly increase the incidence of total adverse events, serious adverse events, death but it did increase the risk for somnolence.

  20. Establishing Adverse Outcome Pathways of Thyroid Hormone Disruption in an Amphibian Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) provides a framework for understanding the relevance of toxicology data in ecotoxicological hazard assessments. The AOP concept can be applied to many toxicological pathways including thyroid hormone disruption. Thyroid hormones play a critical r...

  1. Adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors among medical students using Facebook.

    PubMed

    Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Al-Shagga, Mustafa Ahmed Mahdi; Yadav, Hematram; Arokiasamy, John T

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the relationships between adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors among medical students using Facebook. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors with Facebook use. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a private university in Malaysia among 316 medical students. A self-administered questionnaire was used. It included questions on sociodemographics, pattern of Facebook use, social relationship, unhealthy behaviors, and health effects. Mean age was 20.5 (±2.7) years. All students had a Facebook account. The average daily Facebook surfing hours were 2.5 (±1.7). Significant associations were found between average hours of Facebook surfing and the following factors: isolation from family members and community, refusing to answer calls, musculoskeletal pain, headache, and eye irritation (P < 0.005). The average hours spent on Facebook were significantly associated with holding urination and defecation while online, surfing Facebook until midnight, and postponing, forgetting, or skipping meals (P < 0.005). The average hours spent on Facebook were associated with adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors among medical students, as well as social isolation from the family and community. PMID:24453859

  2. Adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors among medical students using Facebook.

    PubMed

    Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Al-Shagga, Mustafa Ahmed Mahdi; Yadav, Hematram; Arokiasamy, John T

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the relationships between adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors among medical students using Facebook. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors with Facebook use. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a private university in Malaysia among 316 medical students. A self-administered questionnaire was used. It included questions on sociodemographics, pattern of Facebook use, social relationship, unhealthy behaviors, and health effects. Mean age was 20.5 (±2.7) years. All students had a Facebook account. The average daily Facebook surfing hours were 2.5 (±1.7). Significant associations were found between average hours of Facebook surfing and the following factors: isolation from family members and community, refusing to answer calls, musculoskeletal pain, headache, and eye irritation (P < 0.005). The average hours spent on Facebook were significantly associated with holding urination and defecation while online, surfing Facebook until midnight, and postponing, forgetting, or skipping meals (P < 0.005). The average hours spent on Facebook were associated with adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors among medical students, as well as social isolation from the family and community.

  3. Adverse Health Effects and Unhealthy Behaviors among Medical Students Using Facebook

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Al-Shagga, Mustafa Ahmed Mahdi; Yadav, Hematram; Arokiasamy, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the relationships between adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors among medical students using Facebook. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors with Facebook use. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a private university in Malaysia among 316 medical students. A self-administered questionnaire was used. It included questions on sociodemographics, pattern of Facebook use, social relationship, unhealthy behaviors, and health effects. Mean age was 20.5 (±2.7) years. All students had a Facebook account. The average daily Facebook surfing hours were 2.5 (±1.7). Significant associations were found between average hours of Facebook surfing and the following factors: isolation from family members and community, refusing to answer calls, musculoskeletal pain, headache, and eye irritation (P < 0.005). The average hours spent on Facebook were significantly associated with holding urination and defecation while online, surfing Facebook until midnight, and postponing, forgetting, or skipping meals (P < 0.005). The average hours spent on Facebook were associated with adverse health effects and unhealthy behaviors among medical students, as well as social isolation from the family and community. PMID:24453859

  4. Adversity, cannabis use and psychotic experiences: evidence of cumulative and synergistic effects

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Craig; Reininghaus, Ulrich; Reichenberg, Abraham; Frissa, Souci; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is robust evidence that childhood adversity is associated with an increased risk of psychosis. There is, however, little research on intervening factors that might increase or decrease risk following childhood adversity. Aims To investigate main effects of, and synergy between, childhood abuse and life events and cannabis use on odds of psychotic experiences. Method Data on psychotic experiences and childhood abuse, life events and cannabis use were collected from 1680 individuals as part of the South East London Community Health Study (SELCoH), a population-based household survey. Results There was strong evidence that childhood abuse and number of life events combined synergistically to increase odds of psychotic experiences beyond the effects of each individually. There was similar, but weaker, evidence for cannabis use (past year). Conclusions Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that childhood abuse creates an enduring vulnerability to psychosis that is realised in the event of exposure to further stressors and risk factors. PMID:24627297

  5. Proximal muscular atrophy and weakness: An unusual adverse effect of deferasirox iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Vill, K; Müller-Felber, W; Teusch, V; Blaschek, A; Gerstl, L; Huetker, S; Albert, M H

    2016-01-01

    Deferasirox is a standard treatment for chronic transfusional iron overload. Adverse effects of deferasirox have been reported in large prospective studies. We report two cases of monozygotic twins manifesting with proximal muscular atrophy and weakness under deferasirox. Discontinuation of deferasirox resulted in symptom improvement and ultimately in complete remission five months after successful haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Broad diagnostic work-up could not bring evidence of another aetiology of muscular weakness. Iron overload or beta thalassemia itself as a cause is considered unlikely in our patients because the chronological coincidence of muscular symptoms was contra-directional to serum ferritin levels and significant clinical improvement was observed promptly after cessation of deferasirox even before transplantation. These observations suggest that the development of muscular weakness in patients on deferasirox should be recognised as a possible adverse effect of the drug.

  6. A Cohort Study on Long-Term Adverse Effects of Parental Drinking: Background and Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Ingunn Olea; Bukten, Anne; Storvoll, Elisabet E; Moan, Inger Synnøve; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Handal, Marte; Nordfjærn, Trond; Brunborg, Geir Scott; Rossow, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have addressed adverse outcomes in children of parents with alcohol abuse/dependence, less is known about the possible long-term effects of more normative patterns of parental alcohol consumption, including drinking at lower risk levels and heavy episodic or binge drinking. The extent of harm from parental drinking may therefore be underestimated. With this research proposal, we describe a project that aims to assess possible long-term adverse effects of parental drinking by combining survey and nationwide registry data. Advantages of a longitudinal general population cohort design include that it allows for detailed information on parental drinking through survey data and identification of possible negative long-term health and social outcomes from exposure to parental drinking 1–19 years after exposure through continuously updated nationwide registers. The rich information available from combining survey and registry data allows us to take into account important confounders, mediators, and moderators. PMID:26688663

  7. Technical evaluation report, AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics was to provide an update of the stae-of-the-art with respect to the prediction, simulation, and measurement of the effects of icing, anti-icing fluids, and various precipitation on the aerodynamic characteristics of flight vehicles. Sessions were devoted to introductory and survey papers and icing certification issues, to analytical and experimental simulation of ice frost contamination and its effects of aerodynamics, and to the effects of heavy rain and deicing/anti-icing fluids.

  8. Topiramate-induced somnambulism in a migraineur: a probable idiosyncratic adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Thomas; Sarma, G R K; Nadig, Raghunandan; Varghese, Raji

    2012-04-15

    Somnambulism (sleepwalking) is a disorder of arousal that falls under "parasomnia" group and is more common in children. These phenomena occur as primary sleep events or secondary to systemic disease or can be drug induced. Medications that can cause sleepwalking include neuroleptics, hypnotics, lithium, amitriptyline, and β-blockers. This report presents an unusual adverse effect of topiramate on sleep in a patient with migraine. PMID:22505867

  9. Tooth-Bleaching: A Review of the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Various Tooth Whitening Products.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, R J

    2015-12-01

    Tooth bleaching (whitening) is one of the most common and inexpensive method for treating discolouration of teeth. Dental aesthetics, especially tooth colour, is of great importance to majority of the people; and discolouration of even a single tooth can negatively influence the quality of life. Therefore, a review of the literature was carried out (limited to aesthetic tooth-bleaching) to provide a broad overview of the efficacy and adverse effects of various tooth whitening products on soft and hard oral tissues.

  10. Predicting Nonauditory Adverse Radiation Effects Following Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma: A Volume and Dosimetric Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayhurst, Caroline; Monsalves, Eric; Bernstein, Mark; Gentili, Fred; Heydarian, Mostafa; Tsao, May; Schwartz, Michael; Prooijen, Monique van; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Menard, Cynthia; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Laperriere, Norm; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To define clinical and dosimetric predictors of nonauditory adverse radiation effects after radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma treated with a 12 Gy prescription dose. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our experience of vestibular schwannoma patients treated between September 2005 and December 2009. Two hundred patients were treated at a 12 Gy prescription dose; 80 had complete clinical and radiological follow-up for at least 24 months (median, 28.5 months). All treatment plans were reviewed for target volume and dosimetry characteristics; gradient index; homogeneity index, defined as the maximum dose in the treatment volume divided by the prescription dose; conformity index; brainstem; and trigeminal nerve dose. All adverse radiation effects (ARE) were recorded. Because the intent of our study was to focus on the nonauditory adverse effects, hearing outcome was not evaluated in this study. Results: Twenty-seven (33.8%) patients developed ARE, 5 (6%) developed hydrocephalus, 10 (12.5%) reported new ataxia, 17 (21%) developed trigeminal dysfunction, 3 (3.75%) had facial weakness, and 1 patient developed hemifacial spasm. The development of edema within the pons was significantly associated with ARE (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, only target volume is a significant predictor of ARE (p = 0.001). There is a target volume threshold of 5 cm3, above which ARE are more likely. The treatment plan dosimetric characteristics are not associated with ARE, although the maximum dose to the 5th nerve is a significant predictor of trigeminal dysfunction, with a threshold of 9 Gy. The overall 2-year tumor control rate was 96%. Conclusions: Target volume is the most important predictor of adverse radiation effects, and we identified the significant treatment volume threshold to be 5 cm3. We also established through our series that the maximum tolerable dose to the 5th nerve is 9 Gy.

  11. Topiramate-induced somnambulism in a migraineur: a probable idiosyncratic adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Thomas; Sarma, G R K; Nadig, Raghunandan; Varghese, Raji

    2012-04-15

    Somnambulism (sleepwalking) is a disorder of arousal that falls under "parasomnia" group and is more common in children. These phenomena occur as primary sleep events or secondary to systemic disease or can be drug induced. Medications that can cause sleepwalking include neuroleptics, hypnotics, lithium, amitriptyline, and β-blockers. This report presents an unusual adverse effect of topiramate on sleep in a patient with migraine.

  12. The toxicologic effects of the carbamate insecticide aldicarb in mammals: a review.

    PubMed

    Risher, J F; Mink, F L; Stara, J F

    1987-06-01

    Aldicarb, 2-methyl-2-(methylthio)propionaldehyde-O-methylcarbamoyloxime, is an oxime carbamate insecticide manufactured by the Union Carbide Corporation and sold under the trade name Temik. It is a soil-applied systemic pesticide used against certain insects, mites, and nematodes, and is applied below the soil surface for absorption by plant roots. It is generally applied to the soil in the form of 5, 10, or 15% granules, and soil moisture is essential for the release of the toxicant. Uptake by plants is rapid. Aldicarb is currently registered for use on cotton, sugar beets, sugar cane (Louisiana only), potatoes, sweet potatoes, peanuts, oranges, pecans (Southeast only), dry beans, soybeans, and ornamental plants. Home and garden use is not permitted. Discovery of aldicarb and its oxidative sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites in well or ground water in Florida, Wisconsin, and New York, and accidental poisonings from ingesting contaminated watermelons and cucumbers in the South and West have spurred interest and concern about this pesticide. The primary mechanism of toxic action of aldicarb is cholinesterase inhibition. However, unlike the relatively irreversible anticholinesterase activity of the organophosphate pesticides, the carbamylation process which produces the anti-AChE action is quickly reversible. Aldicarb is readily absorbed through both the gut and the skin, but is rapidly metabolized and excreted in the urine almost completely within 24 hr. Although it is acutely toxic to humans and laboratory animals, aldicarb is not known to be carcinogenic, teratogenic, conclusively mutagenic, or to produce other long-term adverse health effects. In cases of accidental poisoning, the cholinergic symptoms have generally subsided within 6 hr, with no side effects or complications. PMID:3304999

  13. The toxicologic effects of the carbamate insecticide aldicarb in mammals: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Risher, J F; Mink, F L; Stara, J F

    1987-01-01

    Aldicarb, 2-methyl-2-(methylthio)propionaldehyde-O-methylcarbamoyloxime, is an oxime carbamate insecticide manufactured by the Union Carbide Corporation and sold under the trade name Temik. It is a soil-applied systemic pesticide used against certain insects, mites, and nematodes, and is applied below the soil surface for absorption by plant roots. It is generally applied to the soil in the form of 5, 10, or 15% granules, and soil moisture is essential for the release of the toxicant. Uptake by plants is rapid. Aldicarb is currently registered for use on cotton, sugar beets, sugar cane (Louisiana only), potatoes, sweet potatoes, peanuts, oranges, pecans (Southeast only), dry beans, soybeans, and ornamental plants. Home and garden use is not permitted. Discovery of aldicarb and its oxidative sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites in well or ground water in Florida, Wisconsin, and New York, and accidental poisonings from ingesting contaminated watermelons and cucumbers in the South and West have spurred interest and concern about this pesticide. The primary mechanism of toxic action of aldicarb is cholinesterase inhibition. However, unlike the relatively irreversible anticholinesterase activity of the organophosphate pesticides, the carbamylation process which produces the anti-AChE action is quickly reversible. Aldicarb is readily absorbed through both the gut and the skin, but is rapidly metabolized and excreted in the urine almost completely within 24 hr. Although it is acutely toxic to humans and laboratory animals, aldicarb is not known to be carcinogenic, teratogenic, conclusively mutagenic, or to produce other long-term adverse health effects. In cases of accidental poisoning, the cholinergic symptoms have generally subsided within 6 hr, with no side effects or complications. PMID:3304999

  14. The toxicologic effects of the carbamate insecticide aldicarb in mammals: a review.

    PubMed

    Risher, J F; Mink, F L; Stara, J F

    1987-06-01

    Aldicarb, 2-methyl-2-(methylthio)propionaldehyde-O-methylcarbamoyloxime, is an oxime carbamate insecticide manufactured by the Union Carbide Corporation and sold under the trade name Temik. It is a soil-applied systemic pesticide used against certain insects, mites, and nematodes, and is applied below the soil surface for absorption by plant roots. It is generally applied to the soil in the form of 5, 10, or 15% granules, and soil moisture is essential for the release of the toxicant. Uptake by plants is rapid. Aldicarb is currently registered for use on cotton, sugar beets, sugar cane (Louisiana only), potatoes, sweet potatoes, peanuts, oranges, pecans (Southeast only), dry beans, soybeans, and ornamental plants. Home and garden use is not permitted. Discovery of aldicarb and its oxidative sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites in well or ground water in Florida, Wisconsin, and New York, and accidental poisonings from ingesting contaminated watermelons and cucumbers in the South and West have spurred interest and concern about this pesticide. The primary mechanism of toxic action of aldicarb is cholinesterase inhibition. However, unlike the relatively irreversible anticholinesterase activity of the organophosphate pesticides, the carbamylation process which produces the anti-AChE action is quickly reversible. Aldicarb is readily absorbed through both the gut and the skin, but is rapidly metabolized and excreted in the urine almost completely within 24 hr. Although it is acutely toxic to humans and laboratory animals, aldicarb is not known to be carcinogenic, teratogenic, conclusively mutagenic, or to produce other long-term adverse health effects. In cases of accidental poisoning, the cholinergic symptoms have generally subsided within 6 hr, with no side effects or complications.

  15. Adverse cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular effects of marijuana inhalation: what cardiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Grace; Kloner, Robert A; Rezkalla, Shereif

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Once illegal throughout the United States, cannabis is now legal for medicinal purposes in several states and for recreational use in 3 states. The current wave of decriminalization may lead to more widespread use, and it is important that cardiologists be made aware of the potential for marijuana-associated adverse cardiovascular effects that may begin to occur in the population at a greater frequency. In this report, the investigators focus on the known cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral effects of marijuana inhalation. Temporal associations between marijuana use and serious adverse events, including myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, cardiomyopathy, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and cannabis arteritis have been described. In conclusion, the potential for increased use of marijuana in the changing legal landscape suggests the need for the community to intensify research regarding the safety of marijuana use and for cardiologists to maintain an awareness of the potential for adverse effects.

  16. Effects of early adversity on young children's diurnal cortisol rhythms and externalizing behavior.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Kristin; Zwerling, Jordana; Dozier, Mary

    2015-12-01

    Early adversity is associated with biological and behavioral dysregulation in early childhood. We examined whether early adversity (i.e., poverty and involvement with child protective services [CPS]) had an indirect effect on externalizing behavior through HPA axis dysregulation, specifically blunted diurnal cortisol patterns. Participants included 94 children between the ages of 3.94 and 6.52 years old, who had a history of CPS involvement (n = 53) or no history of CPS involvement (n = 41). Cortisol samples were collected at wake-up and bedtime across 3 days, and parent-reported externalizing behavior was assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist. Results showed that history of CPS involvement and poverty were associated with blunted cortisol patterns, which in turn led to elevated externalizing behavior. The indirect effect of CPS involvement on externalizing behavior through blunted cortisol was significant, whereas the indirect effect of poverty on externalizing behavior was nonsignificant. Findings add to our understanding of neurobiological mechanisms linking early adversity to psychopathology. PMID:26289841

  17. A strategy for regulatory action when new adverse effects of a licensed product emerge.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K; Price, Deirdre; Ferner, Robin E

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory agencies grant product licences (marketing authorizations) for medicinal products in the light of evidence that the balance between benefit and harm in the population is favourable. Here we consider a framework for allowing regulatory agencies to make rational decisions when reviewing product licences in the light of new information about harms that change that balance. The regulator can revoke the product licence, restrict the product's availability or change the 'label' in different ways. We examine the features of the adverse effect that may be relevant in making the decision: namely, individual differences in susceptibility; the possibility of monitoring; and the availability of protective strategies. The balance of benefit and harm, and the time-course and dose relation of the adverse effect play important roles in the decision-making process. We set out how these factors can help determine the logical response to new information on the balance between benefit and harm, and provide a series of relevant examples. We believe that when regulatory agencies have to decide how to amend the product licence of a drug when new serious adverse effects cause concern, they would find it useful to adopt a framework of this kind, using different strategies for different cases. Our proposed framework could also be useful in risk management planning during drug development. PMID:19236116

  18. A strategy for regulatory action when new adverse effects of a licensed product emerge.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K; Price, Deirdre; Ferner, Robin E

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory agencies grant product licences (marketing authorizations) for medicinal products in the light of evidence that the balance between benefit and harm in the population is favourable. Here we consider a framework for allowing regulatory agencies to make rational decisions when reviewing product licences in the light of new information about harms that change that balance. The regulator can revoke the product licence, restrict the product's availability or change the 'label' in different ways. We examine the features of the adverse effect that may be relevant in making the decision: namely, individual differences in susceptibility; the possibility of monitoring; and the availability of protective strategies. The balance of benefit and harm, and the time-course and dose relation of the adverse effect play important roles in the decision-making process. We set out how these factors can help determine the logical response to new information on the balance between benefit and harm, and provide a series of relevant examples. We believe that when regulatory agencies have to decide how to amend the product licence of a drug when new serious adverse effects cause concern, they would find it useful to adopt a framework of this kind, using different strategies for different cases. Our proposed framework could also be useful in risk management planning during drug development.

  19. Possible adverse effect of chromium in occupational exposure of tannery workers.

    PubMed

    Kornhauser, Carlos; Wróbel, Katarzyna; Wróbel, Kazimierz; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Nava, Laura Eugenia; Gómez, Leobardo; González, Rita

    2002-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the adverse effects of occupational exposure to trivalent chromium. We measured chromium and iron levels in serum and urine and hemoglobin levels in tannery workers and unexposed persons. We studied three groups of subjects. Group 1 included 15 non-smoking male tannery workers highly exposed to chromium from tanning and retanning departments. Group 2 included 14 non-smoking male tannery workers with moderate chromium exposure from dying, drying and finishing departments. Group 3 included 11 healthy, non-smoking male subjects without direct chromium exposure. Higher serum chromium levels were observed in groups 1 and 2 with respect to group 3 (mean values respectively: 0.43; 0.25 and 0.13 microg x l(-1)). Urine chromium levels in group 1 were higher than those in controls (mean values: 1.78 and 1.35 microg x l(-1)). In group 1 an inverse association was found between serum chromium and urine iron (-0.524), urine chromium and hemoglobin (-0.594) and between the urine chromium to iron ratio and hemoglobin (-0.693, p<0.05). The results suggest a chromium adverse effect on iron metabolism, possibly associated with excessive body chromium accumulation. In conclusion, chromium urine test could be recommended for diagnosis of chromium adverse effect on iron metabolism. Further studies are needed to quantify the relationship between urine chromium and hemoglobin metabolism.

  20. Adverse cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular effects of marijuana inhalation: what cardiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Grace; Kloner, Robert A; Rezkalla, Shereif

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Once illegal throughout the United States, cannabis is now legal for medicinal purposes in several states and for recreational use in 3 states. The current wave of decriminalization may lead to more widespread use, and it is important that cardiologists be made aware of the potential for marijuana-associated adverse cardiovascular effects that may begin to occur in the population at a greater frequency. In this report, the investigators focus on the known cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral effects of marijuana inhalation. Temporal associations between marijuana use and serious adverse events, including myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, cardiomyopathy, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and cannabis arteritis have been described. In conclusion, the potential for increased use of marijuana in the changing legal landscape suggests the need for the community to intensify research regarding the safety of marijuana use and for cardiologists to maintain an awareness of the potential for adverse effects. PMID:24176069

  1. Distance learning in toxicology: resident and remote; Scotland, IPCS, IUPAC, and the world.

    PubMed

    Duffus, John H

    2005-09-01

    Globally, very few college or university chemistry courses incorporate toxicology although public perception of chemicals and the chemical industry as threats to health and the environment has had an adverse effect on chemistry and on the use of its products. The International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) through its Commission on Toxicology recognized this and, with the support of the Committee on the Teaching of Chemistry has used the IUPAC web site to promote distance learning in toxicology for chemists. After preparation of a thoroughly refereed consensus Glossary of Terms for Chemists of Terms Used in Toxicology, a textbook Fundamental Toxicology for Chemists and a set of educational modules entitled Essential Toxicology were compiled and put through the normal thorough review procedure of IUPAC before being approved by the organization. There is now an additional Glossary of Terms Used in Toxicokinetics. The modules are freely downloadable in Adobe PDF format and are designed to be used both by educators and by students. Educators are asked to select whatever is appropriate to their students and to use the material as they wish, adding content specifically relevant to their circumstances. For self-study, the web modules have self-assessment questions and model answers. Currently the original Glossary for Chemists of Terms Used in Toxicology is being revised and it is expected that this will lead to further developments. The currently available components of the IUPAC programme may be accessed through the IUPAC website at the Subcommittee on Toxicology and Risk Assessment page: http://www.iupac.org/divisions/VII/VII.C.2/index.html.

  2. Distance learning in toxicology: Resident and remote; Scotland, IPCS, IUPAC, and the world

    SciTech Connect

    Duffus, John H. . E-mail: J.H.Duffus@btinternet.com

    2005-09-01

    Globally, very few college or university chemistry courses incorporate toxicology although public perception of chemicals and the chemical industry as threats to health and the environment has had an adverse effect on chemistry and on the use of its products. The International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) through its Commission on Toxicology recognized this and, with the support of the Committee on the Teaching of Chemistry has used the IUPAC web site to promote distance learning in toxicology for chemists. After preparation of a thoroughly refereed consensus Glossary of Terms for Chemists of Terms Used in Toxicology, a textbook Fundamental Toxicology for Chemists and a set of educational modules entitled Essential Toxicology were compiled and put through the normal thorough review procedure of IUPAC before being approved by the organization. There is now an additional Glossary of Terms Used in Toxicokinetics. The modules are freely downloadable in Adobe PDF format and are designed to be used both by educators and by students. Educators are asked to select whatever is appropriate to their students and to use the material as they wish, adding content specifically relevant to their circumstances. For self-study, the web modules have self-assessment questions and model answers. Currently the original Glossary for Chemists of Terms Used in Toxicology is being revised and it is expected that this will lead to further developments. The currently available components of the IUPAC programme may be accessed through the IUPAC website at the Subcommittee on Toxicology and Risk Assessment page: http://www.iupac.org/divisions/VII/VII.C.2/index.html.

  3. Acute toxicological effects on the earthworm Eisenia fetida of 18 common pharmaceuticals in artificial soil.

    PubMed

    Pino, Ma Rosa; Val, Jonatan; Mainar, Ana Ma; Zuriaga, Estefanía; Español, Cecilia; Langa, Elisa

    2015-06-15

    Following soil applications of recycled water and biosolids, pharmaceutical residues can eventually enter the terrestrial environment. In vitro and in vivo assays have largely focused on the acute ecotoxicity of these compounds in aquatic systems. However, studies on the ecotoxicological effects of pharmaceuticals in soil biota are especially scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute toxicity of 18 pharmaceuticals (4 NSAIDs, 5 blood lipid-lowering agents, 6 β-blockers and 3 antibiotics) that are usually found in the environment by using an Eisenia fetida bioassay. In addition, the presence of these pharmaceuticals in artificial soil was verified at the end of the test. Our results indicate that seven of the studied drugs cause acute adverse effects in E. fetida, in particular, the NSAIDs and the blood lipid-lowering agents. Ibuprofen (LC50=64.80 mg/kg) caused the highest acute toxicity for all tested compounds, followed by diclofenac (LC50=90.49 mg/kg) and simvastatin (LC50=92.70 mg/kg). Other tested pharmaceuticals from NSAIDs and blood lipid-lowering families have toxicity effects, from a LC50=140.87 mg/kg for gemfibrozil to 795.07 mg/kg for lovastatin. Atorvastatin, bezafibrate, β-blockers and antibiotics showed no detectable lethality in E. fetida. The four NSAIDs showed evidence of modification of their original chemical structure after 14 days so the detected toxicity may be due to the original product as well as their degradation products. The three blood lipid-lowering agents seem to be more stable in soil. From an environmental perspective, the lethal concentrations of the tested drugs are much greater than those reported in wastewater and biosolids, therefore acute toxic effects may be improbable. However, little is known about the accumulation of these substances in soils after regular applications, so accumulative and chronic effects cannot be excluded. Moreover, more studies are needed to determine the role of the degradation

  4. The effect of MMF dose and trough levels on adverse effects in pediatric heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Nida; Lamour, Jacqueline M; Hsu, Daphne T

    2015-09-01

    Limited pharmacokinetic and safety data exist for MMF in pediatric HTR. Previously targeted MPA-TL are 1.5-3.0 μg/mL. The objective of this study was to assess the outcomes targeting MPA-TL of 0.8-2.0 μg/mL in pediatric HTR. MPA-TL were retrospectively collected 2-12 months post-transplant. Acute rejection, infection, leukopenia, and GI complaints were then correlated with MPA-TL. A total of 355 MPA-TL from 22 HTR were included. Median age was 2.5 yr. Primary indication for transplant was dilated cardiomyopathy (64%). Mean MPA-TL was 1.7 ± 0.9 μg/mL. African American patients received significantly higher doses (702 ± 235 mg/m(2) ) compared with other races (p = 0.035). Leukopenia was less common in patients with SUB MPA vs. others (p = 0.01). MMF was discontinued for GI complaints in one patient and leukopenia in two patients. One SUB patient had acute rejection, and one SUP patient had infection. One-yr survival was 100%. Targeting a lower range for MPA-TL was not associated with significant rejection or infection. Despite lower MPA-TL, MMF was discontinued in 3/22 patients for adverse effects.

  5. Evaluating legacy contaminants and emerging chemicals in marine environments using adverse outcome pathways and biological effects-directed analysis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Lyons, Brett P; Thain, John E; Law, Robin J

    2013-09-30

    important scientific, economic and health challenges. In order to meet these challenges and pursue cost-effective scientific approaches that can provide evidence necessary to support policy needs (e.g. the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive), it is widely recognised that there is a need to (i) provide marine exposure assessments for priority contaminants using a range of validated models, passive samplers and biomarkers; (ii) integrate chemical monitoring data with biological effects data across spatial and temporal scales (including quality controls); and (iii) strengthen the evidence base to understand the relationship between exposure to complex chemical mixtures, biological and ecological impacts through integrated approaches and molecular data (e.g. genomics, proteomics and metabolomics). Additionally, we support the widely held view that (iv) that rather than increasing the analytical chemistry monitoring of large number of emerging contaminants, it will be important to target analytical chemistry towards key groups of chemicals of concern using effects-directed analysis. It is also important to evaluate to what extent existing biomarkers and bioassays can address various classes of emerging chemicals using the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) approach now being developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with respect to human toxicology and ecotoxicology.

  6. Strategic approaches to adverse outcome pathway development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are conceptual frameworks for organizing biological and toxicological knowledge in a manner that supports extrapolation of data pertaining to the initiation or early progression of toxicity to an apical adverse outcome that occurs at a level of org...

  7. Chemical and microbial exposures in a school building: adverse health effects in children.

    PubMed

    Putus, Tuula; Tuomainen, Anneli; Rautiala, Sirpa

    2004-04-01

    In this cross-sectional study, the authors examined the relationship between an unusual combination of indoor air contaminants in a school and adverse health effects among the attending children. A leaking roof and damp floors, together with gaseous leaks from the sewage system, led to a combined exposure of hydrocarbons, 2-ethylhexanol from plastic floor coverings, and moisture-associated microbes. The health status of 274 children in the school was assessed via repeated symptom questionnaires. Statistical analysis revealed a relationship between the indoor air contaminants and adverse health outcomes such as respiratory irritation, asthmatic symptoms, eye and general symptoms, and increased occurrence of common viral respiratory infections. No association was found between the exposures and doctor-diagnosed asthma, other allergic diseases, or bacterial respiratory infections. Chemical contaminants from the sewer system and damp construction materials were identified as the source of the problem. Remediation of the school building improved the indoor air quality and the health status of the children.

  8. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  9. History of wildlife toxicology.

    PubMed

    Rattner, Barnett A

    2009-10-01

    The field of wildlife toxicology can be traced to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Initial reports included unintentional poisoning of birds from ingestion of spent lead shot and predator control agents, alkali poisoning of waterbirds, and die-offs from maritime oil spills. With the advent of synthetic pesticides in the 1930s and 1940s, effects of DDT and other pesticides were investigated in free-ranging and captive wildlife. In response to research findings in the US and UK, and the publication of Silent Spring in 1962, public debate on the hazards of pollutants arose and national contaminant monitoring programs were initiated. Shortly thereafter, population-level effects of DDT on raptorial and fish-eating birds were documented, and effects on other species (e.g., bats) were suspected. Realization of the global nature of organochlorine pesticide contamination, and the discovery of PCBs in environmental samples, launched long-range studies in birds and mammals. With the birth of ecotoxicology in 1969 and the establishment of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry in 1979, an international infrastructure began to emerge. In the 1980s, heavy metal pollution related to mining and smelting, agrichemical practices and non-target effects, selenium toxicosis, and disasters such as Chernobyl and the Exxon Valdez dominated the field. Biomarker development, endocrine disruption, population modeling, and studies with amphibians and reptiles were major issues of the 1990s. With the turn of the century, there was interest in new and emerging compounds (pharmaceuticals, flame retardants, surfactants), and potential population-level effects of some compounds. Based upon its history, wildlife toxicology is driven by chemical use and misuse, ecological disasters, and pollution-related events affecting humans. Current challenges include the need to more thoroughly estimate and predict exposure and effects of chemical-related anthropogenic

  10. Mechanisms of nanosilver-induced toxicological effects: more attention should be paid to its sublethal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Xia, Tian; Liu, Sijin

    2015-04-01

    Due to its unique physicochemical properties and remarkable antimicrobial activity, nanosilver (nAg) is increasingly being used in a wide array of fields, including medicine and personal care products. Despite substantial progress being made towards the understanding of the acute toxicity of nAg, large knowledge gaps still exist on the assessment of its chronic toxicity to humans. Chronic effects of nAg, typically at low doses (i.e. sublethal doses) should be different from the acute toxicity at high doses (i.e., lethal doses), which is analogous to other environmental pollutants. Although a few review papers have elaborated the findings on nAg-mediated toxicity, most of them only discussed overt toxicity of nAg at high-level exposure and failed to evaluate the chronic and cumulative effects of nAg at sublethal doses. Therefore, it is necessary to more stringently scrutinize the sublethal toxicity of nAg under environmentally relevant conditions. Herein, we recapitulated recent findings on the sublethal effects of nAg toxicity performed by our groups and others. We then discussed the molecular mechanisms by which nAg exerts its toxicity under low concentrations and compared that with nAg-induced cell death.

  11. Mechanisms of nanosilver-induced toxicological effects: more attention should be paid to its sublethal effects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Xia, Tian; Liu, Sijin

    2015-01-01

    Due to its unique physicochemical properties and remarkable antimicrobial activity, nanosilver (nAg) is increasingly being used in a wide array of fields, including medicine and personal care products. Despite substantial progress being made towards the understanding of the acute toxicity of nAg, large knowledge gaps still exist on the assessment of its chronic toxicity to humans. Chronic effects of nAg, typically at low doses (i.e. sublethal doses) should be different from the acute toxicity at high doses (i.e., lethal doses), which is analogous to other environmental pollutants. Although a few review papers have elaborated the findings on nAg-mediated toxicity, most of them only discussed overt toxicity of nAg at high-level exposure and failed to evaluate the chronic and cumulative effects of nAg at sublethal doses. Therefore, it is necessary to more stringently scrutinize the sublethal toxicity of nAg under environmentally relevant conditions. Herein, we recapitulated recent findings on the sublethal effects of nAg toxicity performed by our groups and others. We then discussed the molecular mechanisms by which nAg exerts its toxicity under low concentrations and compared that with nAg-induced cell death. PMID:25865054

  12. Parent Report of Antidepressant, Anxiolytic, and Antipsychotic Medication Use in Individuals with Williams Syndrome: Effectiveness and Adverse Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Marilee A.; Seyfer, Daisha L.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Foster, Jessica E. A.; Chowdhury, Monali; McClure, Kelsey E.; Coury, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterized in part by anxiety and behavioral difficulties. We examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of antidepressant, anxiolytic, and antipsychotic medications in individuals with WS. A total of 513 parents/caregivers completed a survey of psychotropic medication usage…

  13. Toxicology Education Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment for website design. Donate Now OUR MISSION AND VISION Our mission is to enhance public understanding of toxicology through access to objective, science-based information on the safety of chemicals and other agents ...

  14. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Samantha J.; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B.; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P.; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P.; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E.; Elmore, Susan A.; Morrison, James P.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2014-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  15. Inhaled diesel emissions generated with cerium oxide nanoparticle fuel additive induce adverse pulmonary and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C; Thomas, Ronald F; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E; Elmore, Susan A; Morrison, James P; Johnson, Crystal L; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2014-12-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe.

  16. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  17. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-12-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous.

  18. Hypomagnesemia as a potentially life-threatening adverse effect of omeprazole

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Bent-Are; Bruserud, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    Hypomagnesemia can be caused by a wide range of diseases (e.g. gastrointestinal disorders, kidney diseases or endocrine disorders), but it can also be a side effect of several drugs. It can be asymptomatic or cause many different clinical symptoms, and the clinical manifestations mainly depend on the rate of development rather than the actual serum magnesium concentration. We here present a 40-year-old female patient with Torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia and cardiac arrest caused by severe hypomagnesemia as an adverse effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole. PMID:27471598

  19. Reduction in adverse effect on pulmonary function after exposure to filtered diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Ulfvarson, U.; Alexandersson, R. )

    1990-01-01

    A statistically significant temporary reduction on pulmonary function was measured with spirometry in stevedores on a roll-on-roll-off ro-ro ship who were exposed to diesel exhausts from trucks during a work shift. When all trucks were equipped with specially designed microfilters mounted on the exhaust pipes, this impairment in pulmonary function was reduced. Removal of the particulate fraction of the exhausts by filtering is an important factor in reducing the adverse effect of diesel exhaust on pulmonary function. The particle fraction should be considered when designing an indicator of the biological effects of diesel exhausts.

  20. Adverse effects and tolerability of medications for the treatment of tobacco use and dependence.

    PubMed

    Hays, J Taylor; Ebbert, Jon O

    2010-12-24

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and disability in the world. Although gradually declining in most developed countries, the prevalence of tobacco use has increased among developing countries. Treatment for tobacco use and dependence is effective, although long-term abstinence rates remain disappointingly low. In response, new treatments continue to be developed. In addition, many of the pharmacotherapies that have been available for years have found new applications with the use of medication combinations, higher doses and a longer duration of therapy for approved medications. There are now seven medications (nicotine patch, nicotine gum, nicotine lozenge, nicotine inhaler, nicotine nasal spray, bupropion sustained release and varenicline) approved for tobacco dependence treatment in most countries, and many national and professional society practice guidelines recommend their use. Although each of the medications used for tobacco dependence treatment has been rigorously tested for efficacy and safety, broader experience in clinical trials and in observational population-based studies suggests that adverse events associated with these medications are relatively common. Since 2008, two of the medications (varenicline and bupropion) have come under increasing scrutiny because of reports of unexplained serious adverse events (SAEs), including behaviour change, depression, self-injurious thoughts and suicidal behaviour. To date, this association has not been shown to be caused by these medications, but concerns about medication safety continue. Prescribers require a working knowledge of the common adverse effects for all of these medications as well as a more detailed knowledge of the SAE potential. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has been rigorously tested in clinical trials for over 30 years. A number of adverse effects are commonly associated with NRT use, although SAEs are rare. The adverse effects associated with NRT are due to the

  1. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR CHLOROETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicological data in the published literature on Chloroethane (CE) will be assimilated, reviewed, and integated into a Toxicological Review of CE (assessment document), which seeks to characterize the key cancer, and non cancer health effect hazards from environmental exposures...

  2. Adverse Effects and Safety of 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors (Finasteride, Dutasteride): A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hirshburg, Jason M.; Kelsey, Petra A.; Therrien, Chelsea A.; Gavino, A. Carlo; Reichenberg, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Finasteride and dutasteride, both 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, are considered first-line treatment for androgenetic hair loss in men and used increasingly in women. In each case, patients are expected to take the medications indefinitely despite the lack of research regarding long-term adverse effects. Concerns regarding the adverse effects of these medications has led the United States National Institutes of Health to add a link for post-finasteride syndrome to its Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center. Herein, the authors report the results of a literature search reviewing adverse events of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors as they relate to prostate cancer, psychological effects, sexual health, and use in women. Several large studies found no increase in incidence of prostate cancer, a possible increase of high-grade cancer when detected, and no change in survival rate with 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use. Currently, there is no direct link between 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use and depression; however, several small studies have led to depression being listed as a side effect on the medication packaging. Sexual effects including erectile dysfunction and decreased libido and ejaculate were reported in as many as 3.4 to 15.8 percent of men. To date, there are very few studies evaluating 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use in women. Risks include birth defects in male fetuses if used in pregnancy, decreased libido, headache, gastrointestinal discomfort, and isolated reports of changes in menstruation, acne, and dizziness. Overall, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors were well-tolerated in both men and women, but not without risk, highlighting the importance of patient education prior to treatment. PMID:27672412

  3. Adverse Effects and Safety of 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors (Finasteride, Dutasteride): A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hirshburg, Jason M.; Kelsey, Petra A.; Therrien, Chelsea A.; Gavino, A. Carlo; Reichenberg, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Finasteride and dutasteride, both 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, are considered first-line treatment for androgenetic hair loss in men and used increasingly in women. In each case, patients are expected to take the medications indefinitely despite the lack of research regarding long-term adverse effects. Concerns regarding the adverse effects of these medications has led the United States National Institutes of Health to add a link for post-finasteride syndrome to its Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center. Herein, the authors report the results of a literature search reviewing adverse events of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors as they relate to prostate cancer, psychological effects, sexual health, and use in women. Several large studies found no increase in incidence of prostate cancer, a possible increase of high-grade cancer when detected, and no change in survival rate with 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use. Currently, there is no direct link between 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use and depression; however, several small studies have led to depression being listed as a side effect on the medication packaging. Sexual effects including erectile dysfunction and decreased libido and ejaculate were reported in as many as 3.4 to 15.8 percent of men. To date, there are very few studies evaluating 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use in women. Risks include birth defects in male fetuses if used in pregnancy, decreased libido, headache, gastrointestinal discomfort, and isolated reports of changes in menstruation, acne, and dizziness. Overall, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors were well-tolerated in both men and women, but not without risk, highlighting the importance of patient education prior to treatment.

  4. Adverse Effects and Safety of 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors (Finasteride, Dutasteride): A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hirshburg, Jason M; Kelsey, Petra A; Therrien, Chelsea A; Gavino, A Carlo; Reichenberg, Jason S

    2016-07-01

    Finasteride and dutasteride, both 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, are considered first-line treatment for androgenetic hair loss in men and used increasingly in women. In each case, patients are expected to take the medications indefinitely despite the lack of research regarding long-term adverse effects. Concerns regarding the adverse effects of these medications has led the United States National Institutes of Health to add a link for post-finasteride syndrome to its Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center. Herein, the authors report the results of a literature search reviewing adverse events of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors as they relate to prostate cancer, psychological effects, sexual health, and use in women. Several large studies found no increase in incidence of prostate cancer, a possible increase of high-grade cancer when detected, and no change in survival rate with 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use. Currently, there is no direct link between 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use and depression; however, several small studies have led to depression being listed as a side effect on the medication packaging. Sexual effects including erectile dysfunction and decreased libido and ejaculate were reported in as many as 3.4 to 15.8 percent of men. To date, there are very few studies evaluating 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use in women. Risks include birth defects in male fetuses if used in pregnancy, decreased libido, headache, gastrointestinal discomfort, and isolated reports of changes in menstruation, acne, and dizziness. Overall, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors were well-tolerated in both men and women, but not without risk, highlighting the importance of patient education prior to treatment. PMID:27672412

  5. Polytraumatization and Trauma Symptoms in Adolescent Boys and Girls: Interpersonal and Noninterpersonal Events and Moderating Effects of Adverse Family Circumstances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Doris Kristina; Gustafsson, Per E.; Svedin, Carl Goran

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cumulative effect of interpersonal and noninterpersonal traumatic life events (IPEs and nIPEs, respectively) on the mental health of adolescents and to determine if the adverse impacts of trauma were moderated by adverse family circumstances (AFC). Adolescents (mean age 16.7 years) from the…

  6. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  11. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of statin adverse effects and intolerance: Canadian Working Group Consensus update.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John; Tashakkor, A Yashar; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic S; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet

    2013-12-01

    The Proceedings of a Canadian Working Group Consensus Conference, first published in 2011, provided a summary of statin-associated adverse effects and intolerance and management suggestions. In this update, new clinical studies identified since then that provide further insight into effects on muscle, cognition, cataracts, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer are discussed. Of these, the arenas of greatest controversy pertain to purported effects on cognition and the emergence of diabetes during long-term therapy. Regarding cognition, the available evidence is not strongly supportive of a major adverse effect of statins. In contrast, the linkage between statin therapy and incident diabetes is more firm. However, this risk is more strongly associated with traditional risk factors for new-onset diabetes than with statin itself and any possible negative effect of new-onset diabetes during statin treatment is far outweighed by the cardiovascular risk reduction benefits. Additional studies are also discussed, which support the principle that systematic statin rechallenge, and lower or intermittent statin dosing strategies are the main methods for dealing with suspected statin intolerance at this time.

  12. Time-Dependent Effects in Algae for Chemicals with Different Adverse Outcome Pathways: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Vogs, Carolina; Altenburger, Rolf

    2016-07-19

    Chemicals affect unicellular algae as a result of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic processes. The internal concentration of chemicals in algae cells typically reaches equilibrium within minutes, while damage cumulatively increases over hours. The time gap between the steady state of internal exposure and damage development is thus suspected to span up to hours, mainly due to toxicodynamic processes. The quantification of rate-limited toxicodynamic processes, aggregated as a progressive effect from an initiating molecular event through biological key events toward the adverse outcome on algae growth inhibition, might discriminate between different adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). To support our hypothesis, we selected six chemicals according to different physicochemical properties and three distinctly dissimilar AOPs. The time courses of internal concentrations were linked to the observed affected Scenedesmus vacuolatus growth using toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic modeling. Effects on cell growth were explained by effect progression and not by the time to reach internal equilibrium concentration. Effect progression rates ranged over 6 orders of magnitude for all chemicals but varied by less than 1 order of magnitude within similar AOP (photosystem II inhibitors > reactive chemicals > lipid biosynthesis inhibitors), meaning that inhibitors of photosystem II advance an effect toward algae growth fastest compared to reactive chemicals and inhibitors of lipid biosynthesis. PMID:27149222

  13. Determination of an acute no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for copper in water.

    PubMed

    Araya, M; McGoldrick, M C; Klevay, L M; Strain, J J; Robson, P; Nielsen, F; Olivares, M; Pizarro, F; Johnson, L A; Poirier, K A

    2001-10-01

    A prospective, double-blind controlled study was designed to determine the acute no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of nausea in an apparently healthy population of 179 individuals who drank copper-containing water as the sulfate salt. Subjects were recruited at three different international sites and given a blind, randomly selected dose (0, 2, 4, 6, or 8 mg Cu/L) in a bolus of 200 ml (final total copper dose was equivalent to 0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 mg) once weekly over a consecutive 5-week period. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea were screened for a period of up to 24 h. Nausea was the most frequently reported effect and was reported within the first 15 min of ingestion. For the combined trisite population (n=179), 8, 9, 14, 25, and 44 subjects responded positively to one or more GI symptoms at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 mg Cu/L, respectively. Analysis of the data demonstrated a clear dose response to the combined positive GI effects and to nausea alone. Statistically significant greater reporting of effects occurred at 6 and 8 mg Cu/L. Therefore, an acute NOAEL and lowest-observed-adverse-effect level of 4 and 6 mg Cu/L (0.8 and 1.2 mg Cu), respectively, were determined in drinking water for a combined international human population.

  14. Time-Dependent Effects in Algae for Chemicals with Different Adverse Outcome Pathways: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Vogs, Carolina; Altenburger, Rolf

    2016-07-19

    Chemicals affect unicellular algae as a result of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic processes. The internal concentration of chemicals in algae cells typically reaches equilibrium within minutes, while damage cumulatively increases over hours. The time gap between the steady state of internal exposure and damage development is thus suspected to span up to hours, mainly due to toxicodynamic processes. The quantification of rate-limited toxicodynamic processes, aggregated as a progressive effect from an initiating molecular event through biological key events toward the adverse outcome on algae growth inhibition, might discriminate between different adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). To support our hypothesis, we selected six chemicals according to different physicochemical properties and three distinctly dissimilar AOPs. The time courses of internal concentrations were linked to the observed affected Scenedesmus vacuolatus growth using toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic modeling. Effects on cell growth were explained by effect progression and not by the time to reach internal equilibrium concentration. Effect progression rates ranged over 6 orders of magnitude for all chemicals but varied by less than 1 order of magnitude within similar AOP (photosystem II inhibitors > reactive chemicals > lipid biosynthesis inhibitors), meaning that inhibitors of photosystem II advance an effect toward algae growth fastest compared to reactive chemicals and inhibitors of lipid biosynthesis.

  15. Effect of fuel zinc content on toxicological responses of particulate matter from pellet combustion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uski, O; Jalava, P I; Happo, M S; Torvela, T; Leskinen, J; Mäki-Paakkanen, J; Tissari, J; Sippula, O; Lamberg, H; Jokiniemi, J; Hirvonen, M-R

    2015-04-01

    Significant amounts of transition metals such as zinc, cadmium and copper can become enriched in the fine particle fraction during biomass combustion with Zn being one of the most abundant transition metals in wood combustion. These metals may have an important role in the toxicological properties of particulate matter (PM). Indeed, many epidemiological studies have found associations between mortality and PM Zn content. The role of Zn toxicity on combustion PM was investigated. Pellets enriched with 170, 480 and 2300 mg Zn/kg of fuel were manufactured. Emission samples were generated using a pellet boiler and the four types of PM samples; native, Zn-low, Zn-medium and Zn-high were collected with an impactor from diluted flue gas. The RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line was exposed for 24h to different doses (15, 50,150 and 300 μg ml(-1)) of the emission samples to investigate their ability to cause cytotoxicity, to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), to altering the cell cycle and to trigger genotoxicity as well as to promote inflammation. Zn enriched pellets combusted in a pellet boiler produced emission PM containing ZnO. Even the Zn-low sample caused extensive cell cycle arrest and there was massive cell death of RAW 264.7 macrophages at the two highest PM doses. Moreover, only the Zn-enriched emission samples induced a dose dependent ROS response in the exposed cells. Inflammatory responses were at a low level but macrophage inflammatory protein 2 reached a statistically significant level after exposure of RAW 264.7 macrophages to ZnO containing emission particles. ZnO content of the samples was associated with significant toxicity in almost all measured endpoints. Thus, ZnO may be a key component producing toxicological responses in the PM emissions from efficient wood combustion. Zn as well as the other transition metals, may contribute a significant amount to the ROS responses evoked by ambient PM. PMID:25553547

  16. Identifying Adverse Effects of HIV Drug Treatment and Associated Sentiments Using Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Adrover, Cosme; Bodnar, Todd; Huang, Zhuojie

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media platforms are increasingly seen as a source of data on a wide range of health issues. Twitter is of particular interest for public health surveillance because of its public nature. However, the very public nature of social media platforms such as Twitter may act as a barrier to public health surveillance, as people may be reluctant to publicly disclose information about their health. This is of particular concern in the context of diseases that are associated with a certain degree of stigma, such as HIV/AIDS. Objective The objective of the study is to assess whether adverse effects of HIV drug treatment and associated sentiments can be determined using publicly available data from social media. Methods We describe a combined approach of machine learning and crowdsourced human assessment to identify adverse effects of HIV drug treatment solely on individual reports posted publicly on Twitter. Starting from a large dataset of 40 million tweets collected over three years, we identify a very small subset (1642; 0.004%) of individual reports describing personal experiences with HIV drug treatment. Results Despite the small size of the extracted final dataset, the summary representation of adverse effects attributed to specific drugs, or drug combinations, accurately captures well-recognized toxicities. In addition, the data allowed us to discriminate across specific drug compounds, to identify preferred drugs over time, and to capture novel events such as the availability of preexposure prophylaxis. Conclusions The effect of limited data sharing due to the public nature of the data can be partially offset by the large number of people sharing data in the first place, an observation that may play a key role in digital epidemiology in general. PMID:27227141

  17. Novel associations between FAAH genetic variants and postoperative central opioid-related adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sadhasivam, S; Zhang, X; Chidambaran, V; Mavi, J; Pilipenko, V; Mersha, T B; Meller, J; Kaufman, K M; Martin, L J; McAuliffe, J

    2015-10-01

    Opioid effects are potentiated by cannabinoid agonists including anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Inter-individual variability in responses to opioids is a major clinical problem. Multiple deaths and anoxic brain injuries occur every year because of opioid-induced respiratory depression (RD) in surgical patients and drug abusers of opioids and cannabinoids. This study aimed to determine specific associations between genetic variants of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and postoperative central opioid adverse effects in children undergoing tonsillectomy. This is a prospective genotype-blinded observational study in which 259 healthy children between 6 and 15 years of age who received standard perioperative care with a standard anesthetic and an intraoperative dose of morphine were enrolled. Associations between frequent polymorphisms of FAAH and central postoperative opioid adverse effects including, RD, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and prolonged stay in Post Anesthesia Recovery Room (postoperative anesthesia care unit, PACU) due to RD and PONV were analyzed. Five specific FAAH single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had significant associations with more than twofold increased risk for refractory PONV (adjusted P<0.0018), and nominal associations (P<0.05) with RD and prolonged PACU stay in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. The FAAH SNP, rs324420, is a missense mutation with altered FAAH function and it is linked with other FAAH SNPs associated with PONV and RD in our cohort; association between PONV and rs324420 was confirmed in our extended cohort with additional 66 white children. Specific FAAH polymorphisms are associated with refractory PONV, opioid-related RD, and prolonged PACU stay due to opioid adverse effects in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. PMID:25558980

  18. Mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings: absorbed dose and the potential for adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Mackert, J R; Berglund, A

    1997-01-01

    This review examines the question of whether adverse health effects are attributable to amalgam-derived mercury. The issue of absorbed dose of mercury from amalgam is addressed first. The use of intra-oral Hg vapor measurements to estimate daily uptake must take into account the differences between the collection volume and flow rate of the measuring instrument and the inspiratory volume and flow rate of air through the mouth during inhalation of a single breath. Failure to account for these differences will result in substantial overestimation of the absorbed dose. Other factors that must be considered when making estimates of Hg uptake from amalgam include the accurate measurement of baseline (unstimulated) mercury release rates and the greater stimulation of Hg release afforded by chewing gum relative to ordinary food. The measured levels of amalgam-derived mercury in brain, blood, and urine are shown to be consistent with low absorbed doses (1-3 micrograms/day). Published relationships between the number of amalgam surfaces and urine levels are used to estimate the number of amalgam surfaces that would be required to produce the 30 micrograms/g creatinine urine mercury level stated by WHO to be associated with the most subtle, pre-clinical effects in the most sensitive individuals. From 450 to 530 amalgam surfaces would be required to produce the 30 micrograms/g creatinine urine mercury level for people without any excessive gum-chewing habits. The potential for adverse health effects and for improvement in health following amalgam removal is also addressed. Finally, the issue of whether any material can ever be completely exonerated of claims of producing adverse health effects is considered.

  19. Effects of N-acetylcysteine on alcohol abstinence and alcohol-induced adverse effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Seiva, Fábio Rodrigues; Amauchi, Juliana Fujihara; Ribeiro Rocha, Katiucha Karolina; Souza, Gisele Aparecida; Ebaid, Geovana Xavier; Burneiko, Regina Miranda; Novelli, Ethel Lourenzi Barbosa

    2009-03-01

    Alcoholism is rampant in modern society and some antioxidant compound could perhaps be useful to reduce the damage done by alcohol consumption and abstinence. The present study was undertaken to investigate the association of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) intake, alcoholism, and alcohol abstinence on lipid profile, in vivo low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, oxidative stress, and antioxidant status in serum and liver of rats. Initially, male Wistar 30 rats were divided into two groups: (C, N=6) given standard chow and water; (E, N=24) receiving standard chow and aqueous ethanol solution in semi-voluntary research. After 30 days of ethanol exposure, (E) group was divided into four subgroups (N=6/group): (E-E) continued drinking 30% ethanol solution; (E-NAC) drinking ethanol solution containing 2 g/L NAC; (AB) changed ethanol solution to water; (AB-NAC) changed ethanol to aqueous solution 2 g/L NAC. After 15 days of the E-group division, E-E rats had higher serum alanine transaminase, lower body weight, and surface area, despite higher energy intake than C. E-E rats had also lower feed efficiency, dyslipidemia with enhanced triacylglycerol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), lipid hydroperoxide (LH) and in vivo oxidized-LDL (ox-LDL). AB, E-NAC, and AB-NAC rats ameliorated serum oxidative stress markers and normalized serum lipids. E-E rats had higher hepatic LH and lower reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio than C, indicating hepatic oxidative stress. AB and E-NAC rats normalized hepatic LH, GSSG, and the GSH/GSSG ratio, compared to E-E. AB-NAC rats had the lowest serum ox-LDL, hepatic LH levels, and the highest GSH reductase activity in hepatic tissue. In conclusion, the present study brought new insights into alcohol consumption, because ethanol exposure enhanced serum in vivo ox-LDL, as well as serum and hepatic oxidative stress. N-acetylcysteine offers promising therapeutic value to inhibit ethanol-induced adverse effects. Ethanol

  20. Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic(PBPK) Models Application to Screen Environmental Hazards Related to Adverse Outcome Pathways(AOPs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK models are useful in estimating exposure levels based on in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) calculations. Linkage of large sets of chemically screened vitro signature effects to in vivo adverse outcomes using IVIVE is central to the concepts of toxicology in the 21st ...

  1. Study of Adverse Effect Profile of Parenteral Zoledronic Acid in Female Patients with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Kotian, Prem; Sreenivasan, Sushanth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Osteoporosis is still a under recognized entity in the population. Osteoporosis-related fractures can be prevented if people at risk can be screened, diagnosed and treated early. Bisphosphonates remain the mainstay of osteoporosis treatment as they have multimodal action. Oral bisphosphonate therapy has, significant gastrointestinal side effects leading to noncompliance. Of late parenteral Zoledronic Acid is being used as once or twice yearly infusion for the treatment of osteoporosis. Aim Our article studies the side effect profile and tolerability of parenteral Zoledronic Acid, one of the most potent bisphosphonate used in clinical practice in patients with osteoporosis. Materials and Methods This study was done in KMC hospitals where 49 patients diagnosed with osteoporosis were included for the study. After obtaining a written informed consent each patient received one infusion of 5 mg Zoledronic Acid as per standard treatment protocol. Patient was monitored for clinical improvement and development of any adverse effects. Conclusion In our study all subjects reported significant pain relief after infusion of Zoledronic Acid. Zoledronic Acid had very few serious adverse effects that can be prevented through pre-infusion screening, maintaining good hydration and careful patient monitoring. In our population the patients only experienced mild symptoms of pyrexia, arthralgia myalgia and influenza like symptoms which resolved with symptomatic treatment. PMID:26894105

  2. Herbal Medicines and Epilepsy: The Potential for Benefit and Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Marcello

    2001-12-01

    The widespread availability and use of herbal medicines raise the potential for adverse effects in the epilepsy population. Herbal sedatives (kava, valerian, chamomile, passionflower) may potentiate the effects of antiepileptic medications, increasing their sedative and cognitive effects. Despite some antiseizure effects in animal models, they should not be used in place of standard seizure medications because efficacy has not been established. Anecdotal, uncontrolled observations suggest that herbal stimulants containing ephedrine (ephedra or ma huang) and caffeine (cocoa, coffee, tea, maté, guarana, cola or kola) can exacerbate seizures in people with epilepsy, especially when taken in combination. Ginkgo and ginseng may also exacerbate seizures although the evidence for this is similarly anecdotal and uncertain. St. John's wort has the potential to alter medication pharmacokinetics and the seizure threshold. The essential oils of many plants contain epileptogenic compounds. There is mixed evidence for evening primrose and borage lowering the seizure threshold. Education of both health care providers and patients is the best way to avoid unintentional and unnecessary adverse reactions to herbal medicines. PMID:12609386

  3. Vitamin C: Intravenous Use by Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practitioners and Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Espey, Michael Graham; Drisko, Jeanne; Levine, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Anecdotal information and case reports suggest that intravenously administered vitamin C is used by Complementary and Alternate Medicine (CAM) practitioners. The scale of such use in the U.S. and associated side effects are unknown. Methods and Findings We surveyed attendees at annual CAM Conferences in 2006 and 2008, and determined sales of intravenous vitamin C by major U.S. manufacturers/distributors. We also queried practitioners for side effects, compiled published cases, and analyzed FDA's Adverse Events Database. Of 199 survey respondents (out of 550), 172 practitioners administered IV vitamin C to 11,233 patients in 2006 and 8876 patients in 2008. Average dose was 28 grams every 4 days, with 22 total treatments per patient. Estimated yearly doses used (as 25g/50ml vials) were 318,539 in 2006 and 354,647 in 2008. Manufacturers' yearly sales were 750,000 and 855,000 vials, respectively. Common reasons for treatment included infection, cancer, and fatigue. Of 9,328 patients for whom data is available, 101 had side effects, mostly minor, including lethargy/fatigue in 59 patients, change in mental status in 21 patients and vein irritation/phlebitis in 6 patients. Publications documented serious adverse events, including 2 deaths in patients known to be at risk for IV vitamin C. Due to confounding causes, the FDA Adverse Events Database was uninformative. Total numbers of patients treated in the US with high dose vitamin C cannot be accurately estimated from this study. Conclusions High dose IV vitamin C is in unexpectedly wide use by CAM practitioners. Other than the known complications of IV vitamin C in those with renal impairment or glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, high dose intravenous vitamin C appears to be remarkably safe. Physicians should inquire about IV vitamin C use in patients with cancer, chronic, untreatable, or intractable conditions and be observant of unexpected harm, drug interactions, or benefit. PMID:20628650

  4. Effect of monthly vitamin D3 supplementation in healthy adults on adverse effects of earthquakes: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Florkowski, Christopher M; Chambers, Stephen T; Priest, Patricia C; Stewart, Alistair W; Jennings, Lance C; Livesey, John H; Camargo, Carlos A; Scragg, Robert; Murdoch, David R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether supplementation with vitamin D improves resilience to the adverse effects of earthquakes. Design Opportunistic addition to an established randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. Setting Christchurch, New Zealand, where a prolonged series of catastrophic earthquakes beginning on 4 September 2010 occurred, which caused widespread destruction, fatalities, and extensive psychological damage. Participants 322 healthy adults (241 women; 81 men) aged 18-67 who were already participating in the vitamin D and acute respiratory infections study (VIDARIS) between February 2010 and November 2011. Intervention Participants were randomised to receive an oral dose of either 200 000 IU vitamin D3 monthly for two months then 100 000 IU monthly (n=161) or placebo (n=161) for a total of 18 months. Main outcome measure This is a post hoc analysis from the previously published VIDARIS trial. The primary endpoint in the current analysis was the self reported effects and overall adverse impact of the Christchurch earthquakes as assessed by questionnaire four months after the most destructive earthquake on 22 February 2011, which was used as the index event. The secondary end point was the number of “psychological” adverse events that participants reported at their usual monthly appointments as part of the original VIDARIS trial. Results 308 participants completed the earthquake impact questionnaire (n=152 in the vitamin D group and 156 in the placebo group). There was no significant difference in the number of self reported adverse effects between those receiving vitamin D supplementation and those receiving placebo. There was also no difference in the overall adverse impact score between treatment groups (χ2 P=0.44). The exception was that those in the vitamin D group experienced more adverse effects on family relationships (22% v 13%; χ2 P=0.03). The number of psychological adverse events—such as fatigue, stress, anxiety, and insomnia

  5. Adverse effects of low level heavy metal exposure on male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Julia J; Mijal, Renée S

    2010-04-01

    Lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic, often referred to as "heavy metals", are toxic for wildlife, experimental animals, and humans. While experimental animal and human occupational studies with high exposure levels generally support an adverse role for these metals in human reproductive outcomes, information on the effects of low, environmentally-realistic exposure levels of these metals on male reproductive outcomes is limited. We review the literature on effects of exposure to low levels of these metals on measures of male fertility (semen quality and reproductive hormone levels) and provide supporting evidence from experimental and occupational studies. Potentially modifying effects of genetic polymorphisms on these associations are discussed. A brief review of the literature on the effects of three trace metals, copper, manganese, and molybdenum, that are required for human health, yet may also cause adverse reproductive effects, follows. Overall, there were few studies examining the effects of exposure to low levels of these metals on male reproductive health. For all metals, there were several well-designed studies with sufficient populations appropriately adjusted for potential confounders and many of these reported harmful effects. However, many studies lacked sufficient numbers of participants to be able to detect differences in outcomes between exposed and non-exposed individuals, did not clearly identify the source and characteristics of the participants, and did not control for other exposures that could alter or contribute to the outcomes. The evidence for the effects of low exposure was strongest for cadmium, lead, and mercury and less certain for arsenic. The potential modifying effects of genetic polymorphisms has not been fully explored. Additional studies on the reproductive effects of these toxic ubiquitous metals on male reproduction are required to expand the knowledge base and to resolve inconsistencies.

  6. Adverse Effects in the Pharmacologic Management of Bipolar Disorder During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Charlotte S; Freeman, Marlene P

    2016-09-01

    Management of bipolar disorder during pregnancy often involves medications with potential adverse effects, including risks to the mother and fetus. Although some specifics are known, many medications continue to have incompletely characterized reproductive safety profiles. Women with bipolar disorder who are planning pregnancy face challenging decisions about their treatment; careful risk-benefit discussions are necessary. With the goal of further informing these discussions, this article reviews the data currently available regarding medication safety in the management of bipolar disorder during pregnancy, with specific attention to lithium, valproic acid, lamotrigine, carbamazepine, and antipsychotic medications. PMID:27514299

  7. [Antivaccine misinformation about rate of adverse effects and toxicity of vaccines].

    PubMed

    Mats, A N; Gol'dshteĭn, A V

    2010-01-01

    Two widely known antivaccine inventions are discussed: "vaccination is accompanied by adverse effects, which exceeded complications of respective infections on frequency and severity" and "vaccines represent appalling conglomerate of toxic substances, which is unnaturally to administer to children". Informational and psychological nature of dissemination of these inventions is analyzed. On the basis of recent literature data conclusion was made about the absence of real toxicity (including neurotoxicity), carcinogenicity, allergenicity and autopathogenicity of phenol, folmaldehyde, aluminium hydroxide, Twin 80, squalen (MF59) and ethylmercury in concentrations found in vaccines of national immunization schedule.

  8. [Herbal medicines and severe adverse effects: uvular angioedema caused by Echballium elaterium].

    PubMed

    Caiozzi, Gianella; Cabrera, Daniel; Mardónez, José Miguel; Saldías, Fernando

    2002-12-01

    Herbal medicine is a growing alternative for established medicine. Many plants and herbs are currently in use for a myriad of diseases and symptoms. However, there are many reports in the literature of life-threatening adverse effects of these drugs. We report a 39 years old male, that consulted for pain in the nostrils and severe nasal obstruction, that appeared two hours after instilling Ecballium elaterirum in the nostrils. On physical examination, uvular edema was observed. The patient was successfully managed with intravenous betametasone and chlorphenamine. PMID:12611242

  9. Tooth-Bleaching: A Review of the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Various Tooth Whitening Products.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, R J

    2015-12-01

    Tooth bleaching (whitening) is one of the most common and inexpensive method for treating discolouration of teeth. Dental aesthetics, especially tooth colour, is of great importance to majority of the people; and discolouration of even a single tooth can negatively influence the quality of life. Therefore, a review of the literature was carried out (limited to aesthetic tooth-bleaching) to provide a broad overview of the efficacy and adverse effects of various tooth whitening products on soft and hard oral tissues. PMID:26691365

  10. Cyproheptadine for prevention of neuropsychiatric adverse effects of efavirenz: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dabaghzadeh, Fatemeh; Ghaeli, Padideh; Khalili, Hossein; Alimadadi, Abbas; Jafari, Sirous; Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Khazaeipour, Zahra

    2013-03-01

    Cyproheptadine prevention of the neuropsychiatric adverse effects of an antiretroviral regimen including efavirenz has been evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. Twenty-five patients (16 males and 9 females with mean±SD ages of 36±9 years) in a cyproheptadine group, and 26 patients (17 males and 9 females with mean±SD ages of 34±7 years) in a control group completed the trial. Sexual contact and injection drug use were the main routs of HIV infection in both groups. The patients' neuropsychiatric adverse effects were evaluated based on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Beck Depression Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory, Positive and Negative Suicide Ideation, and Somatization Subscale of Symptom Checklist 90 at baseline and 4 weeks after treatment. Cyproheptadine significantly decreased the scores of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Beck Depression Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory, Positive and Negative Suicide Ideation of the patients after 4 weeks in comparison with control group. All of the scores increased in control group following antiretroviral therapy. Although short duration of the patients' follow-up was a major limitation of the study, the results of the study showed that cyprohepradine is effective in prevention of depression, anxiety, hallucination, aggressive behaviors, emotional withdrawal, poor rapport, poor impulse control, active social avoidance, suicidal ideation, and improved sleep quality of HIV-positive patients after initiation of antiretroviral therapy including efavirenz.

  11. Longitudinal in vivo tracking of adverse effects following topical steroid treatment.

    PubMed

    Bower, Andrew J; Arp, Zane; Zhao, Youbo; Li, Joanne; Chaney, Eric J; Marjanovic, Marina; Hughes-Earle, Angela; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-05-01

    Topical steroids are known for their anti-inflammatory properties and are commonly prescribed to treat many adverse skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. While these treatments are known to be effective, adverse effects including skin atrophy are common. In this study, the progression of these effects is investigated in an in vivo mouse model using multimodal optical microscopy. Utilizing a system capable of performing two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEF) of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to visualize the epidermal cell layers and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to identify collagen in the dermis, these processes can be studied at the cellular level. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is also utilized to image intracellular NADH levels to obtain molecular information regarding metabolic activity following steroid treatment. In this study, fluticasone propionate (FP)-treated, mometasone furoate (MF)-treated and untreated animals were imaged longitudinally using a custom-built multimodal optical microscope. Prolonged steroid treatment over the course of 21 days is shown to result in a significant increase in mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH, suggesting a faster rate of maturation of epidermal keratinocytes. Alterations to collagen organization and the structural microenvironment are also observed. These results give insight into the structural and biochemical processes of skin atrophy associated with prolonged steroid treatment. PMID:26739196

  12. Adverse effects of topical corticosteroids in paediatric eczema: Australasian consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Emma; Rademaker, Marius; Dailey, Rebecca; Daniel, Ben S; Drummond, Catherine; Fischer, Gayle; Foster, Rachael; Grills, Claire; Halbert, Anne; Hill, Sarah; King, Emma; Leins, Elizabeth; Morgan, Vanessa; Phillips, Roderic J; Relic, John; Rodrigues, Michelle; Scardamaglia, Laura; Smith, Saxon; Su, John; Wargon, Orli; Orchard, David

    2015-11-01

    Atopic eczema is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting about 30% of Australian and New Zealand children. Severe eczema costs over AUD 6000/year per child in direct medical, hospital and treatment costs as well as time off work for caregivers and untold distress for the family unit. In addition, it has a negative impact on a child's sleep, education, development and self-esteem. The treatment of atopic eczema is complex and multifaceted but a core component of therapy is to manage the inflammation with topical corticosteroids (TCS). Despite this, TCS are often underutilised by many parents due to corticosteroid phobia and unfounded concerns about their adverse effects. This has led to extended and unnecessary exacerbations of eczema for children. Contrary to popular perceptions, (TCS) use in paediatric eczema does not cause atrophy, hypopigmentation, hypertrichosis, osteoporosis, purpura or telangiectasia when used appropriately as per guidelines. In rare cases, prolonged and excessive use of potent TCS has contributed to striae, short-term hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis alteration and ophthalmological disease. TCS use can also exacerbate periorificial rosacea. TCS are very effective treatments for eczema. When they are used to treat active eczema and stopped once the active inflammation has resolved, adverse effects are minimal. TCS should be the cornerstone treatment of atopic eczema in children. PMID:25752907

  13. Adverse effects of topical corticosteroids in paediatric eczema: Australasian consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Emma; Rademaker, Marius; Dailey, Rebecca; Daniel, Ben S; Drummond, Catherine; Fischer, Gayle; Foster, Rachael; Grills, Claire; Halbert, Anne; Hill, Sarah; King, Emma; Leins, Elizabeth; Morgan, Vanessa; Phillips, Roderic J; Relic, John; Rodrigues, Michelle; Scardamaglia, Laura; Smith, Saxon; Su, John; Wargon, Orli; Orchard, David

    2015-11-01

    Atopic eczema is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting about 30% of Australian and New Zealand children. Severe eczema costs over AUD 6000/year per child in direct medical, hospital and treatment costs as well as time off work for caregivers and untold distress for the family unit. In addition, it has a negative impact on a child's sleep, education, development and self-esteem. The treatment of atopic eczema is complex and multifaceted but a core component of therapy is to manage the inflammation with topical corticosteroids (TCS). Despite this, TCS are often underutilised by many parents due to corticosteroid phobia and unfounded concerns about their adverse effects. This has led to extended and unnecessary exacerbations of eczema for children. Contrary to popular perceptions, (TCS) use in paediatric eczema does not cause atrophy, hypopigmentation, hypertrichosis, osteoporosis, purpura or telangiectasia when used appropriately as per guidelines. In rare cases, prolonged and excessive use of potent TCS has contributed to striae, short-term hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis alteration and ophthalmological disease. TCS use can also exacerbate periorificial rosacea. TCS are very effective treatments for eczema. When they are used to treat active eczema and stopped once the active inflammation has resolved, adverse effects are minimal. TCS should be the cornerstone treatment of atopic eczema in children.

  14. Effect of RAAS blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high CVD risk subjects with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chaugai, Sandip; Sherpa, Lhamo Yanchang; Sepehry, Amir A.; Arima, Hisatomi; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that atrial fibrillation significantly increases the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects. Application of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers for prevention of recurrence of atrial fibrillation and adverse clinical outcomes in subjects with atrial fibrillation is a theoretically appealing concept. However, results of clinical trials evaluating the effect of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation remain inconclusive. A pooled study of 6 randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on subjects with atrial fibrillation was performed. A total of 6 randomized controlled trials enrolled a total of 53,510 patients followed for 1 to 5 years. RAAS blockade therapy was associated with 14% reduction in the incidence of heart failure (OR: 0.86, [95%CI: 0.76– 0.97], P=0.018) and 17% reduction in the incidence of CVE (OR: 0.83, [95%CI: 0.70–0.99], P = 0.038). The corresponding decline in absolute risk against heart failure (ARR: 1.4%, [95%CI: 0.2–2.6%], P = 0.018) and CVE (ARR: 3.5%, [95%CI: 0.0–6.9%], P = 0.045) in the AF group was much higher than the non-AF group for heart failure (ARR: 0.4%, [95%CI: 0.0–0.7%], P = 0.057) and CVE (ARR: 1.6%, [95%CI: –0.1% to 3.3%], P = 0.071). No significant effect was noted on all-cause or cardiovascular mortality, stroke, or myocardial infarction. This study suggests that RAAS blockade offers protection against heart failure and cardiovascular events in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation. PMID:27368043

  15. Psychiatric symptoms in adolescents: FKBP5 genotype--early life adversity interaction effects.

    PubMed

    Comasco, Erika; Gustafsson, Per A; Sydsjö, Gunilla; Agnafors, Sara; Aho, Nikolas; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders are multi-factorial and their symptoms overlap. Constitutional and environmental factors influence each other, and this contributes to risk and resilience in mental ill-health. We investigated functional genetic variation of stress responsiveness, assessed as FKBP5 genotype, in relation to early life adversity and mental health in two samples of adolescents. One population-based sample of 909 12-year-old adolescents was assessed using the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events scale and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. One sample of 398 17-year-old adolescents, enriched for poly-victimized individuals (USSS), was assessed using the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC). The FKBP5 rs1360780 and rs3800373 polymorphisms were genotyped using a fluorescence-based competitive allele-specific PCR. Most prominently among poly-victimized older male adolescents, the least common alleles of the polymorphisms, in interaction with adverse life events, were associated with psychiatric symptoms, after controlling for ethno-socio-economic factors. The interaction effect between rs3800373 and adverse life events on the TSCC sub-scales-anxiety, depression, anger, and dissociation-and with the rs1360780 on dissociation in the USSS cohort remained significant after Bonferroni correction. This pattern of association is in line with the findings of clinical and neuroimaging studies, and implies interactive effects of FKBP5 polymorphisms and early life environment on several psychiatric symptoms. These correlates add up to provide constructs that are relevant to several psychiatric symptoms, and to identify early predictors of mental ill-health.

  16. Adverse Effects of Daylight Saving Time on Adolescents' Sleep and Vigilance

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Diana; Ebben, Matthew; Milrad, Sara; Atkinson, Brianna; Krieger, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Daylight saving time (DST) has been established with the intent to reduce energy expenditure, however unintentional effects on sleep and vigilance have not been consistently measured. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that DST adversely affects high school students' sleep and vigilance on the school days following its implementation. Methods: A natural experiment design was used to assess baseline and post-DST differences in objective and subjective measures of sleep and vigilance by actigraphy, sleep diary, sleepiness scale, and psychomotor vigilance testing (PVT). Students were tested during school days immediately preceding and following DST. Results: A total of 40 high school students were enrolled in this study; 35 completed the protocol. Sleep duration declined by an average of 32 minutes on the weeknights post-DST, reflecting a cumulative sleep loss of 2 h 42 min as compared to the baseline week (p = 0.001). This finding was confirmed by sleep diary analyses, reflecting an average sleep loss of 27 min/night (p = 0.004) post-DST. Vigilance significantly deteriorated, with a decline in PVT performance post-DST, resulting in longer reaction times (p < 0.001) and increased lapses (p < 0.001). Increased daytime sleepiness was also demonstrated (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The early March DST onset adversely affected sleep and vigilance in high school students resulting in increased daytime sleepiness. Larger scale evaluations of sleep impairments related to DST are needed to further quantify this problem in the population. If confirmed, measures to attenuate sleep loss post-DST should be implemented. Citation: Medina D, Ebben M, Milrad S, Atkinson B, Krieger AC. Adverse effects of daylight saving time on adolescents' sleep and vigilance. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(8):879–884. PMID:25979095

  17. Global Association of Cold Spells and Adverse Health Effects: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ryti, Niilo R.I.; Guo, Yuming; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is substantial evidence that mortality increases in low temperatures. Less is known about the role of prolonged cold periods denoted as cold spells. Objective We conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the evidence on the adverse health effects of cold spells in varying climates. Data sources and extraction Four databases (Ovid Medline, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science) were searched for all years and languages available. “Cold spell” was defined as an event below a temperature threshold lasting for a minimum duration of 2 days. Of 1,527 identified articles, 26 satisfied our eligibility criteria for the systematic review, and 9 were eligible for meta-analyses. The articles were grouped by the three main study questions into Overall-effect Group, Added-effect Group, and Temperature-change-effect Group. Data synthesis Based on random-effects models in the meta-analyses, cold spells were associated with increased mortality from all or all nonaccidental causes (summary rate ratio = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.17 based on 9 estimates from five studies), cardiovascular diseases (1.11; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.19; 12 estimates from eight studies), and respiratory diseases (1.21; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.51; 8 estimates from four studies). Estimated associations were stronger for people ≥ 65 years of age (1.06; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.12) than for people 0–64 years of age (1.01; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.03). Study-specific effect estimates from a limited number of studies suggested an increased morbidity related to cold spells, but it was not possible to quantitatively summarize the evidence. Conclusions Cold spells are associated with increased mortality rates in populations around the world. The body of evidence suggests that cold spells also have other adverse health effects. There was substantial heterogeneity among the studies, which should be taken into account in the interpretation of the results. Citation Ryti NR, Guo Y, Jaakkola JJ. 2016. Global

  18. Combustion-derived nanoparticulate induces the adverse vascular effects of diesel exhaust inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Nicholas L.; Miller, Mark R.; Lucking, Andrew J.; Beveridge, Jon; Flint, Laura; Boere, A. John F.; Fokkens, Paul H.; Boon, Nicholas A.; Sandstrom, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders; Duffin, Rodger; Donaldson, Ken; Hadoke, Patrick W.F.; Cassee, Flemming R.; Newby, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Exposure to road traffic and air pollution may be a trigger of acute myocardial infarction, but the individual pollutants responsible for this effect have not been established. We assess the role of combustion-derived-nanoparticles in mediating the adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution. Methods and results To determine the in vivo effects of inhalation of diesel exhaust components, 16 healthy volunteers were exposed to (i) dilute diesel exhaust, (ii) pure carbon nanoparticulate, (iii) filtered diesel exhaust, or (iv) filtered air, in a randomized double blind cross-over study. Following each exposure, forearm blood flow was measured during intra-brachial bradykinin, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and verapamil infusions. Compared with filtered air, inhalation of diesel exhaust increased systolic blood pressure (145 ± 4 vs. 133 ± 3 mmHg, P< 0.05) and attenuated vasodilatation to bradykinin (P= 0.005), acetylcholine (P= 0.008), and sodium nitroprusside (P< 0.001). Exposure to pure carbon nanoparticulate or filtered exhaust had no effect on endothelium-dependent or -independent vasodilatation. To determine the direct vascular effects of nanoparticulate, isolated rat aortic rings (n= 6–9 per group) were assessed in vitro by wire myography and exposed to diesel exhaust particulate, pure carbon nanoparticulate and vehicle. Compared with vehicle, diesel exhaust particulate (but not pure carbon nanoparticulate) attenuated both acetylcholine (P< 0.001) and sodium-nitroprusside (P= 0.019)-induced vasorelaxation. These effects were partially attributable to both soluble and insoluble components of the particulate. Conclusion Combustion-derived nanoparticulate appears to predominately mediate the adverse vascular effects of diesel exhaust inhalation. This provides a rationale for testing environmental health interventions targeted at reducing traffic-derived particulate emissions. PMID:21753226

  19. Efficacy and adverse effects of medical marijuana for chronic noncancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Amol; Mailis-Gagnon, Angela; Zoheiry, Nivan; Lakha, Shehnaz Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine if medical marijuana provides pain relief for patients with chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) and to determine the therapeutic dose, adverse effects, and specific indications. Data sources In April 2014, MEDLINE and EMBASE searches were conducted using the terms chronic noncancer pain, smoked marijuana or cannabinoids, placebo and pain relief, or side effects or adverse events. Study selection An article was selected for inclusion if it evaluated the effect of smoked or vaporized cannabinoids (nonsynthetic) for CNCP; it was designed as a controlled study involving a comparison group, either concurrently or historically; and it was published in English in a peer-review journal. Outcome data on pain, function, dose, and adverse effects were collected, if available. All articles that were only available in abstract form were excluded. Synthesis A total of 6 randomized controlled trials (N = 226 patients) were included in this review; 5 of them assessed the use of medical marijuana in neuropathic pain as an adjunct to other concomitant analgesics including opioids and anticonvulsants. The 5 trials were considered to be of high quality; however, all of them had challenges with masking. Data could not be pooled owing to heterogeneity in delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol potency by dried weight, differing frequency and duration of treatment, and variability in assessing outcomes. All experimental sessions in the studies were of short duration (maximum of 5 days) and reported statistically significant pain relief with nonserious side effects. Conclusion There is evidence for the use of low-dose medical marijuana in refractory neuropathic pain in conjunction with traditional analgesics. However, trials were limited by short duration, variability in dosing and strength of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and lack of functional outcomes. Although well tolerated in the short term, the long-term effects of psychoactive and neurocognitive effects of medical

  20. Potential Adverse Effects of Amphetamine Treatment on Brain and Behavior: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Steven M.; Kuczenski, Ronald; McCracken, James T.; London, Edythe D.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Amphetamine stimulants have been used medically since early in the twentieth century, but they have a high abuse potential and can be neurotoxic. Although they have long been used effectively to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents, amphetamines are now being prescribed increasingly as maintenance therapy for ADHD and narcolepsy in adults, considerably extending the period of potential exposure. Effects of prolonged stimulant treatment have not been fully explored, and understanding such effects is a research priority 1. Because the pharmacokinetics of amphetamines differ between children and adults, reevaluation of the potential for adverse effects of chronic treatment of adults is essential. Findings Despite information on the effects of stimulants in laboratory animals, profound species differences in susceptibility to stimulant-induced neurotoxicity underscore the need for systematic studies of prolonged human exposure. Early amphetamine treatment has been linked to slowing in height and weight growth in some children. Because the number of prescriptions for amphetamines has increased several-fold over the past decade, an amphetamine-containing formulation is the most commonly prescribed stimulant in North America, and it is noteworthy that amphetamines are also the most abused prescription medications. Although early treatment does not increase risk for substance abuse, few studies have tracked the compliance and usage profiles of individuals who began amphetamine treatment as adults. Overall, there is concern about risk for slowed growth in young patients who are dosed continuously, and for substance abuse in patients first medicated in late adolescence or adulthood. Although most adult patients also use amphetamines effectively and safely, occasional case reports indicate that prescription use can produce marked psychological adverse events, including stimulant-induced psychosis. Assessments of central

  1. Noise monitoring and adverse health effects in residents in different functional areas of Luzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhi-Xia; Lei, Zhang-Heng; Zhang, Chun-Lian; Xiong, Wei; Gan, Zhong-Lin; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Qing-Bi

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the noise pollution situation and the resulting adverse effect on residents' health in Luzhou, China, to provide data for noise pollution prevention policies and interventions. Four different functional areas (commercial, construction, residential, and transportation hub areas) were chosen to monitor noise level for 3 months. The survey was performed by questionnaire on the spot on randomly selected individuals; it collected data on the impact of noise on residents' health (quality of sleep, high blood pressure, subjective feeling of nervous system damage, and attention) as well as the knowledge of noise-induced health damage, the degree of adaptation to noise, and their solutions. The noise levels of residential, commercial, transportation, and construction areas exceeded the national standards (P < .001). Sleep quality, prevalence of hypertension, and attention in transportation hub areas were significantly different from those in the other 3 areas (P < .05); only 24.46% of people knew the health hazards associated with noise; 64.57% of residents have adapted to the current noise environment. Most of them have to close the doors and windows to reduce noise. The noise pollution situation in Luzhou, China, is serious, especially the traffic noise pollution. Residents pay less attention to it and adopt single measures to reduce the noise. We should work toward the prevention and control of traffic noise and improve the residents' awareness to reduce the adverse health effects of noise.

  2. Organophosphate pesticides exposure among farmworkers: pathways and risk of adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Suratman, Suratman; Edwards, John William; Babina, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds are the most widely used pesticides with more than 100 OP compounds in use around the world. The high-intensity use of OP pesticides contributes to morbidity and mortality in farmworkers and their families through acute or chronic pesticides-related illnesses. Many factors contributing to adverse health effects have been investigated by researchers to determine pathways of OP-pesticide exposure among farmers in developed and developing countries. Factors like wind/agricultural pesticide drift, mixing and spraying pesticides, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), knowledge, perceptions, washing hands, taking a shower, wearing contaminated clothes, eating, drinking, smoking, and hot weather are common in both groups of countries. Factors including low socioeconomic status areas, workplace conditions, duration of exposure, pesticide safety training, frequency of applying pesticides, spraying against the wind, and reuse of pesticide containers for storage are specific contributors in developing countries, whereas housing conditions, social contextual factors, and mechanical equipment were specific pathways in developed countries. This paper compares existing research in environmental and behavioural exposure modifying factors and biological monitoring between developing and developed countries. The main objective of this review is to explore the current depth of understanding of exposure pathways and factors increasing the risk of exposure potentially leading to adverse health effects specific to each group of countries.

  3. [Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and adverse gastrointestinal effects. An unresolved problem].

    PubMed

    López, A

    1999-01-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are a class of medicine widely used throughout the world. This is a pharmacological group in continuous growth, to which some new molecules have been added in recent years. The great drawback of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are their adverse effects, outstanding of which due to their frequency and importance being those that occur in the gastrointestinal tract. By means of a search in Medline and other databases, this work reviews the latest data published on the incidence of dyspepsia, gastroduodenal lesions, gastrointestinal complications and mortality associated with consumption of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Similarly, a brief description is made of the mechanism of lesions to the stomach of the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and the different risk factors that condition the appearance of adverse effects at the gastrointestinal level. Finally, an analysis is made of the preventive strategy and the different medicines that can be used to this end and a contrast is made of the evidence extracted from the different published studies and the reality of the use of the different "gastroprotectors". This review concludes with a series of questions that still remain unresolved concerning treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and their lesions to the stomach.

  4. HPV vaccines: their pathology-based discovery, benefits, and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Alcina F; de Andrade, Cecilia V; Russomano, Fabio B; Rodrigues, Luana S L; Oliveira, Nathalia S; Provance, David William; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine illustrates the power of in situ-based pathologic analysis in better understanding and curing diseases. The 2 available HPV vaccines have markedly reduced the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, genital warts, and cervical cancer throughout the world. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, health care officials, and parents to refuse providing the recommended vaccination to the target population. The aims of the study were to discuss the discovery of HPV vaccine and review scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines. The strong type-specific immunity against HPV in humans has been known for more than 25 years. Multiple studies confirm the positive risk benefit of HPV vaccination with minimal documented adverse effects. The most common adverse effect, injection site pain, occurred in about 10% of girls and was less than the rate reported for other vaccines. Use of HPV vaccine should be expanded into more diverse populations, mainly in low-resource settings.

  5. Physical basis of adverse and therapeutic effects of low intensity microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Hyland, G J

    2008-05-01

    A physical basis of adverse and therapeutic effects of low intensity microwave radiation is presented based on the concept of oscillatory similitude between the frequency of an external microwave field (together with any lower frequency modulations thereof) and those of certain endogenous dipolar coherent excitations allied to aliveness, which play the role of 'tuned circuits' via which a living organism is electromagnetically sensitised in a non-linear way to external fields too weak to be able to cause heating. From this perspective, an external electromagnetic field affects a living system not as a toxin but rather by perturbing its endogenous electromagnetic activity. The possibility of adverse perturbation is illustrated by reference to the microwave fields used in mobile telecommunications whose signals interfere in a non-thermal way with biofunctionality--in particular, undermining the efficacy of processes that would otherwise afford natural protection against the development of pathology. Therapeutic modalities of microwave exposure, on the other hand, are illustrated using the example of microwave resonance therapy--which can be considered as an electromagnetic version of acupuncture, and as an example of 'quantum medicine'--whose normalising effect on a wide range of pathologies is striking, and which affords a novel alternative to conventional pharmacological interventions.

  6. Adverse environmental health effects of ultra-low relative humidity indoor air.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mikiya; Fukayo, Shingo; Yano, Eiji

    2003-03-01

    In Japan, relative humidity (RH) shows the lowest achievement rate among the various general air quality standards for work environment. It has been mainly contributed by airtight design of modern buildings and occurrence of dry outdoor air in winter. Furthermore, an ultra-dry air environment of nearly 0% RH is often required in sophisticated industries. In order to assess the adverse health effects of the ultra-dry air environment, using a self-reported questionnaire, we have undertaken a study of over 200 employees of a high-tech device developing laboratory having a room at 2.5% RH (ultra-dry room). Those who worked in the ultra-dry room were identified and the prevalence of symptoms was compared with the other workers. Analysis was performed by Wilcoxon's test and Fisher's exact test. In the ultra-dry room, all the twelve workers covered their skin with long-sleeve clothes, paper caps, paper masks and latex gloves. They reported skin symptoms more often (p<0.05) than the other workers (N=143). The prevalence of atopic dermatitis was also higher in the exposed workers (p<0.05). The complaints of workers in the ultra-dry environment were similar to preceding reports concerning moderately dry environmental exposures. The current precautions to protect the workers from the adverse effects of ultra-low RH appear to be insufficient, indicating that additional measures such as selection of appropriate clothing to mere skin coverage should be considered.

  7. HPV vaccines: their pathology-based discovery, benefits, and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Alcina F; de Andrade, Cecilia V; Russomano, Fabio B; Rodrigues, Luana S L; Oliveira, Nathalia S; Provance, David William; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine illustrates the power of in situ-based pathologic analysis in better understanding and curing diseases. The 2 available HPV vaccines have markedly reduced the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, genital warts, and cervical cancer throughout the world. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, health care officials, and parents to refuse providing the recommended vaccination to the target population. The aims of the study were to discuss the discovery of HPV vaccine and review scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines. The strong type-specific immunity against HPV in humans has been known for more than 25 years. Multiple studies confirm the positive risk benefit of HPV vaccination with minimal documented adverse effects. The most common adverse effect, injection site pain, occurred in about 10% of girls and was less than the rate reported for other vaccines. Use of HPV vaccine should be expanded into more diverse populations, mainly in low-resource settings. PMID:26321154

  8. Imipenem and meropenem: Comparison of in vitro activity, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhanel, George G; Simor, Andrew E; Vercaigne, Lavern; Mandell, Lionell

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare and contrast imipenem and meropenem in terms of in vitro activity, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and adverse effects. DATA SELECTION: MEDLINE search from 1975 to 1997 and follow-up of references. DATA EXTRACTION: Clinical trials comparing imipenem with meropenem, or either imipenem or meropenem with standard therapy in the treatment of serious infections were selected. DATA SYNTHESIS: Imipenem, the first carbapenem, was first marketed in 1987; meropenem was introduced to the market in 1996. In general, imipenem is more active against Gram-positive cocci while meropenem is more active against Gram-negative bacilli. The agents display similar pharmacokinetics. Clinical studies in patients with serious infections (intra-abdominal infection, respiratory infection, septicemia, febrile neutropenia) report similar bacteriological and clinical cure rates with imipenem and meropenem. Meropenem is approved for the treatment of bacterial meningitis, whereas imipenem is not. Adverse effects are similar. CONCLUSIONS: Current literature supports the use of imipenem at a dose of 500 mg every 6 h and meropenem at 1 g every 8 h for the treatment of severe infections. For the treatment of serious infections, imipenem (500 mg every 6 h or 2 g/day [$98/day]) is more economical than meropenem (1 g every 8 h or 3 g/day [$142/day]) based on acquisition cost. PMID:22346545

  9. Low incidence of severe adverse effects after mandibular ridge reconstruction using hydroxylapatite.

    PubMed

    Mercier, P; Bellavance, F

    1999-08-01

    The short and long term adverse effects after ridge reconstruction using hydroxylapatite (HA) are presented in this study. The HA was inserted using a modified tunnelling technique, followed by a lowering of the floor of the mouth and a vestibuloplasty using split thickness skin graft, 4-6 weeks later. The study comprised 637 patients followed for a period of 1 to 10 years (mean 6.0+/-2.6 years). Major loss of HA was seen in 17 patients (2.7%). Donor site visibility (skin graft) appeared to improve greatly over the years from 29.2% to 8.8% at the latest follow-up. Neurosurgery deficits also improved from 11.6% (paraesthesia and dysaesthesia) to 4.6%. Long term follow-up revealed a high percentage of patient satisfaction (97%), indicating that the low incidence of severe adverse effects of the procedure does play a significant role in the appreciation of the procedure and prosthetic care. PMID:10416894

  10. Investigating clandestine drug laboratories: adverse medical effects in law enforcement personnel.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J L; Barnhart, S; Checkoway, H

    1996-10-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted among an international group of 46 law enforcement chemists and 13 Washington State clandestine drug laboratory investigation team members with more than 2,800 combined investigations. Each participant completed a questionnaire concerning previous drug laboratory investigations and adverse health effects during response activities. Methamphetamine laboratories accounted for 81-97% of all responses. Total illness incident rates varied between 0.75-3.4% of responses. Most exposures were through inhalation, and many occurred in the years prior to use of personal protective equipment. Symptoms were primarily those of headache and respiratory, mucous membrane, and skin irritation. Most illness episodes occurred during the processing phase of laboratory responses, and none occurred during the entry phase. A majority of illness episodes occurred in laboratories with leak/spills, fire/explosion, or uncontrolled reactions. Responding to an active laboratory was associated with a 7 to 15-fold risk of becoming ill as compared with setup, in-transit, or former (equipment removed) laboratory responses. No other laboratories characteristics were consistently associated with a significantly elevated relative risk of adverse health effects. PMID:8892555

  11. [Antibodies, human leukocyte antigens, and biomodulators in transfusion-related acute adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Martínez Álvarez, Julio César

    2013-01-01

    With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, major changes occurred in blood banking and transfusion medicine. These changes occurred mainly in donor selection and screening tests for infectious diseases, blood centers modified their organizational philosophy regarding quality. Transfusion of blood products are procedures that allow us to correct the haematology deficiencies for which was indicated. But today, despite the strict controls that precede transfusion,recipients may have undesirable effects, which are known as adverse effects or adverse reactions to transfusion. Antibodies and antigens of the HLA system plays a role in a series of events related to transfusion, such as immunological platelet refractoriness, febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. The determination of anti-HLA antibodies is evidence that in most developed countries is used on a daily basis in the regular assessment of patients multitransfused or waiting lists for organs from deceased donors. The biomodulators are able to modify biological responses which act in sequence to lead to the differentiation of T lymphocytes. These agents may subcategorizes those which facilitate a normal immune response, those stimulates the immune response, those are capable of inducing immunosuppression not cytotoxic, and those enhancing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic treatment (transfusion or transplant).

  12. Maternal adverse effects of different antenatal magnesium sulphate regimens for improving maternal and infant outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antenatal magnesium sulphate, widely used in obstetrics to improve maternal and infant outcomes, may be associated with adverse effects for the mother sufficient for treatment cessation. This systematic review aimed to quantify maternal adverse effects attributed to treatment, assess how adverse effects vary according to different regimens, and explore women’s experiences with this treatment. Methods Bibliographic databases were searched from their inceptions to July 2012 for studies of any design that reported on maternal adverse effects associated with antenatal magnesium sulphate given to improve maternal or infant outcomes. Primary outcomes were life-threatening adverse effects of treatment (death, cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest). For randomised controlled trials, data were meta-analysed, and risk ratios (RR) pooled using fixed-effects or random-effects models. For non-randomised studies, data were tabulated by design, and presented as RR, odds ratios or percentages, and summarised narratively. Results A total of 143 publications were included (21 randomised trials, 15 non-randomised comparative studies, 32 case series and 75 reports of individual cases), of mixed methodological quality. Compared with placebo or no treatment, magnesium sulphate was not associated with an increased risk of maternal death, cardiac arrest or respiratory arrest. Magnesium sulphate significantly increased the risk of 'any adverse effects’ overall (RR 4.62, 95% CI 2.42-8.83; 4 trials, 13,322 women), and treatment cessation due to adverse effects (RR 2.77; 95% CI 2.32-3.30; 5 trials, 13,666 women). Few subgroup differences were observed (between indications for use and treatment regimens). In one trial, a lower dose regimen (2 g/3 hours) compared with a higher dose regimen (5 g/4 hours) significantly reduced treatment cessation (RR 0.05; 95% CI 0.01-0.39, 126 women). Adverse effect estimates from studies of other designs largely supported data from randomised

  13. Toxicological effects and recovery of the corneal epithelium in Cyprinus carpio communis Linn. exposed to monocrotophos: an scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Ravneet Kaur; Johal, Mohinder Singh; Sharma, Madan Lal

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted based on the evidence of fish habitats in North India being affected by organophosphate pesticides draining from agricultural fields into bodies of water, especially during the rainy season. Various tissues of fish such as scales, gills ovaries, kidney, and liver have been studied from the toxicological point of view, but the toxicological effects of aquatic pollutants on fish cornea have not been investigated to date. We conducted comparative toxicological studies on the cornea of Cyprinus carpio communis using two sublethal (0.038 and 0.126 ppm) concentrations of monocrotophos pesticide for 30 days. Corneas from all the groups were evaluated by a scanning electron microscope. The fish exposed to the monocrotophos pesticide developed corneal necrosis due to the formation of crystalloid-like structures, thinning and shrinkage of microridges on the corneal epithelium. After 30 days, fish from the monocrotophos-treated tank were transferred to normal environmental conditions. After 60 days under natural condition, epithelial cells did not fully recover. In conclusion, exposure to monocrotophos induces irreversible changes in the cornea of C. carpio communis. As fish and mammalian visual systems share many similarities, the reported finding may offer useful insights for further toxicological and ophthalmological studies in humans.

  14. Gratitude buffers the adverse effect of viewing the thin ideal on body dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristin J; Sedlak, Brittany L; Boyd, Elizabeth A

    2014-06-01

    Gratitude has robust associations with multiple aspects of well-being. However, little research has explored whether the psychological benefits of gratitude extend to body image. We used a repeated measures experimental design to test whether a brief period of grateful reflection would buffer the adverse effect of exposure to thin-ideal media. Female undergraduates (N=67) completed three sessions one week apart. The conditions were specifically designed to isolate (a) the effects of viewing thin models on body dissatisfaction and (b) the moderating effect of grateful contemplation. Results showed that body dissatisfaction scores were lower for women who engaged in a brief period of grateful contemplation before viewing photographs of thin models than for women who reflected upon life hassles before viewing the same photographs. The magnitude of this decrease depended on BMI. Gratitude offers an innovative direction for future research directed toward helping women to accept their bodies.

  15. Adverse effects of perioperative paracetamol, NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids and their combinations: a topical review.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, O; Wetterslev, J; Kontinen, V K; Pommergaard, H-C; Nikolajsen, L; Rosenberg, J; Hansen, M S; Hamunen, K; Kjer, J J; Dahl, J B

    2014-11-01

    Post-operative pain affects millions of patients worldwide and the post-operative period has high rates of morbidity and mortality. Some of this morbidity may be related to analgesics. The aim of this review was to provide an update of current knowledge of adverse events (AE) associated with the most common perioperative non-opioid analgesics: paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids (GCCs), gabapentinoids and their combinations. The review is based on data from systematic reviews with meta-analyses of analgesic efficacy and/or adverse effects of perioperative non-opioid analgesics, and randomised trials and cohort/retrospective studies. Generally, data on AE are sparse and related to the immediate post-operative period. For paracetamol, the incidence of AEs appears trivial. Data are inconclusive regarding an association of NSAIDs with mortality, cardiovascular events, surgical bleeding and renal impairment. Anastomotic leakage may be associated with NSAID usage. No firm evidence exists for an association of NSAIDs with impaired bone healing. Single-dose GCCs were not significantly related to increased infection rates or delayed wound healing. Gabapentinoid treatment was associated with increased sedation, dizziness and visual disturbances, but the clinical relevance needs clarification. Importantly, data on AEs of combinations of the above analgesics are sparse and inconclusive. Despite the potential adverse events associated with the most commonly applied non-opioid analgesics, including their combinations, reporting of such events is sparse and confined to the immediate perioperative period. Knowledge of benefit and harm related to multimodal pain treatment is deficient and needs clarification in large trials with prolonged observation. PMID:25116762

  16. Characterization of the adverse effects of nicotine on placental development: in vivo and in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, A. C.; Salomon, A.; Soares, M. J.; Garnier, V.; Raha, S.; Sergent, F.; Nicholson, C. J.; Feige, J. J.; Benharouga, M.

    2013-01-01

    In utero exposure to nicotine is associated with increased risk of numerous adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes, which suggests that it acts directly to affect placental development and the establishment of the fetomaternal circulation (FC). This study used both in vivo [Wistar rats treated with 1 mg/kg nicotine from 2 wk prior to mating until gestational day (GD) 15] and in vitro (RCHO-1 cell line; treated with 10−9 to 10−3M nicotine) models to examine the effects of nicotine on these pathways. At GD 15, control and treated placentas were examined for the impact of nicotine on 1) trophoblast invasion, proliferation, and degree of hypoxia, 2) labyrinth vascularization, 3) expression of key genes of placental development, and 4) expression of placental angiogenic factors. The RCHO-1 cell line was used to determine the direct effects of nicotine on trophoblast differentiation. Our in vivo experiments show that nicotine inhibits trophoblast interstitial invasion, increases placental hypoxia, downregulates labyrinth vascularization as well as key transcription factors Hand1 and GCM1, and decreases local and circulating EG-VEGF, a key placental angiogenic factor. The in vitro experiments confirmed the inhibitory effects of nicotine on the trophoblast migration, invasion, and differentiation processes and demonstrated that those effects are most likely due to a dysregulation in the expression of nicotine receptors and a decrease in MMP9 activity. Taken together, these data suggest that adverse effects of maternal smoking on pregnancy outcome are due in part to direct and endocrine effects of nicotine on the main processes of placental development and establishment of FC. PMID:24368670

  17. Nanotechnology: Toxicologic Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hubbs, Ann F.; Sargent, Linda M.; Porter, Dale W.; Sager, Tina M.; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David G.; Castranova, Vincent; Sriram, Krishnan; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Reynolds, Steven H.; Battelli, Lori A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Fluharty, Kara L.; Mercer, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies. PMID:23389777

  18. Te Inclusions in CZT Detectors: New Method for Correcting Their Adverse Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S.U.; Hawrami, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R.B.

    2009-10-25

    Both Te inclusions and point defects can trap the charge carriers generated by ionizing particles in CdZnTe (CZT) detectors. The amount of charge trapped by point defects is proportional to the carriers’ drift time and can be corrected electronically. In the case of Te inclusions, the charge loss depends upon their random locations with respect to the electron cloud. Consequently, inclusions introduce fluctuations in the charge signals, which cannot be easily corrected. In this paper, we describe direct measurements of the cumulative effect of Te inclusions and its influence on the response of CZT detectors of different thicknesses and different sizes and concentrations of Te inclusions. We also discuss a means of partially correcting their adverse effects.

  19. Exercise in the heat: strategies to minimize the adverse effects on performance.

    PubMed

    Terrados, N; Maughan, R J

    1995-01-01

    Exercise in the heat is usually associated with reduced performance; both dehydration and hyperthermia adversely affect mental and physical performance. For athletes from temperate climates, the negative effects of heat had humidity can be attenuated by a period of acclimatization. This requires up to 10-14 days. Endurance-trained individuals already show some of the adaptations that accompany acclimatization, but further adaptation occurs with training in the heat. Prior dehydration has a negative effect even on exercise of short duration where sweat losses are small. The athlete must begin exercise fully hydrated and regular ingestion of fluids is beneficial where the exercise duration exceeds 40 min. Dilute carbohydrate-electrolyte (sodium) drinks are best for fluid replacement and also supply some substrate for the exercising muscles. Post-exercise rehydration requires electrolyte as well as volume replacement. In extreme conditions, neither acclimatization nor fluid replacement will allow hard exercise to be performed without some risk of heat illness.

  20. Acute Liver and Renal Failure: A Rare Adverse Effect Exclusive to Intravenous form of Amiodarone

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Acharya, Saurav; Matta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug which is highly effective against a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias making it irreplaceable in certain group of patients. We report an unusual case of acute liver and renal failure within 24 hours of initiation of intravenous (IV) amiodarone which resolved after stopping the medication. The mechanism of acute liver and renal toxicity is not clearly known but is believed to be secondary to amiodarone induced (relative) hypotension, idiosyncratic reaction to the drug, and toxicity of the vector that carries the medication, polysorbate-80. In this case review, we discuss the hyperacute drug toxicity caused by IV amiodarone being a distinctly different entity compared to the adverse effects shown by oral amiodarone and support the suggestion that oral amiodarone can be safely administered even in patients who manifest acute hepatitis with the IV form. PMID:27672457

  1. Acute Liver and Renal Failure: A Rare Adverse Effect Exclusive to Intravenous form of Amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Robin; Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Acharya, Saurav; Matta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug which is highly effective against a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias making it irreplaceable in certain group of patients. We report an unusual case of acute liver and renal failure within 24 hours of initiation of intravenous (IV) amiodarone which resolved after stopping the medication. The mechanism of acute liver and renal toxicity is not clearly known but is believed to be secondary to amiodarone induced (relative) hypotension, idiosyncratic reaction to the drug, and toxicity of the vector that carries the medication, polysorbate-80. In this case review, we discuss the hyperacute drug toxicity caused by IV amiodarone being a distinctly different entity compared to the adverse effects shown by oral amiodarone and support the suggestion that oral amiodarone can be safely administered even in patients who manifest acute hepatitis with the IV form. PMID:27672457

  2. Acute Liver and Renal Failure: A Rare Adverse Effect Exclusive to Intravenous form of Amiodarone

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Acharya, Saurav; Matta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug which is highly effective against a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias making it irreplaceable in certain group of patients. We report an unusual case of acute liver and renal failure within 24 hours of initiation of intravenous (IV) amiodarone which resolved after stopping the medication. The mechanism of acute liver and renal toxicity is not clearly known but is believed to be secondary to amiodarone induced (relative) hypotension, idiosyncratic reaction to the drug, and toxicity of the vector that carries the medication, polysorbate-80. In this case review, we discuss the hyperacute drug toxicity caused by IV amiodarone being a distinctly different entity compared to the adverse effects shown by oral amiodarone and support the suggestion that oral amiodarone can be safely administered even in patients who manifest acute hepatitis with the IV form.

  3. Air pollution and adverse cardiac remodeling: clinical effects and basic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yonggang; Goodson, Jamie M; Zhang, Bo; Chin, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has long been known to trigger cardiovascular events, primarily through activation of local and systemic inflammatory pathways that affect the vasculature. Detrimental effects of air pollution exposure on heart failure and cardiac remodeling have also been described in human populations. Recent studies in both human subjects and animal models have provided insights into the basic physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a role in adverse cardiac remodeling. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between air pollution and cardiovascular disease, describe the clinical effects of air pollution exposure on cardiac remodeling, describe the basic mechanisms that affect remodeling as described in human and animal systems and will discuss future areas of investigation.

  4. Addressing the potential adverse effects of school-based BMI assessments on children's wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Lisa; O'Connor, Thea; Waters, Elizabeth; Booth, Michael; Walsh, Orla; Green, Julie; Bartlett, Jenny; Swinburn, Boyd

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Do child obesity prevention research and intervention measures have the potential to generate adverse concerns about body image by focussing on food, physical activity and body weight? Research findings now demonstrate the emergence of body image concerns in children as young as 5 years. In the context of a large school-community-based child health promotion and obesity prevention study, we aimed to address the potential negative effects of height and weight measures on child wellbeing by developing and implementing an evidence-informed protocol to protect and prevent body image concerns. fun 'n healthy in Moreland! is a cluster randomised controlled trial of a child health promotion and obesity prevention intervention in 23 primary schools in an inner urban area of Melbourne, Australia. Body image considerations were incorporated into the study philosophies, aims, methods, staff training, language, data collection and reporting procedures of this study. This was informed by the published literature, professional body image expertise, pilot testing and implementation in the conduct of baseline data collection and the intervention. This study is the first record of a body image protection protocol being an integral part of the research processes of a child obesity prevention study. Whilst we are yet to measure its impact and outcome, we have developed and tested a protocol based on the evidence and with support from stakeholders in order to minimise the adverse impact of study processes on child body image concerns.

  5. Duration of Internet use and adverse psychosocial effects among European adolescents.

    PubMed

    Secades-Villa, Roberto; Calafat, Amador; Fernández-Hermida, José Ramón; Juan, Montse; Duch, Mariangels; Skärstrand, Eva; Becoña, Elisardo; Talic, Sanela

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant contributions from previous studies about the prevalence of problematic Internet use (PIU) among adolescents in Europe, important questions remain regarding adverse consequences of PIU. This study aims to assess the relation between duration of Internet use and adverse psychosocial effects among adolescents from six European countries. The final sample included 7,351 adolescents (50.8% male and 49.2% female; mean age: 14.6±1.90) recruited from randomly selected schools within the six study sites. Results showed that 12.9% of adolescents used Internet more than 20 hours per week. There was a significant relationship between duration of Internet use and frequency of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and other illegal drug use. Duration of Internet use is also significantly associated with school problems, with use of slot machines and with other psychosocial problems. These findings highlight the need to strengthen preventive efforts for reducing PIU and related consequences among adolescents. Key Words: Internet, adolescents, psychosocial problems.

  6. Mediators and Adverse Effects of Child Poverty in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, John M; Wood, David L; Duffee, James H; Kuo, Alice

    2016-04-01

    The link between poverty and children's health is well recognized. Even temporary poverty may have an adverse effect on children's health, and data consistently support the observation that poverty in childhood continues to have a negative effect on health into adulthood. In addition to childhood morbidity being related to child poverty, epidemiologic studies have documented a mortality gradient for children aged 1 to 15 years (and adults), with poor children experiencing a higher mortality rate than children from higher-income families. The global great recession is only now very slowly abating for millions of America's children and their families. At this difficult time in the history of our nation's families and immediately after the 50th anniversary year of President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty, it is particularly germane for the American Academy of Pediatrics, which is "dedicated to the health of all children," to publish a research-supported technical report that examines the mediators associated with the long-recognized adverse effects of child poverty on children and their families. This technical report draws on research from a number of disciplines, including physiology, sociology, psychology, economics, and epidemiology, to describe the present state of knowledge regarding poverty's negative impact on children's health and development. Children inherit not only their parents' genes but also the family ecology and its social milieu. Thus, parenting skills, housing, neighborhood, schools, and other factors (eg, medical care) all have complex relations to each other and influence how each child's genetic canvas is expressed. Accompanying this technical report is a policy statement that describes specific actions that pediatricians and other child advocates can take to attenuate the negative effects of the mediators identified in this technical report and improve the well-being of our nation's children and their families.

  7. Mediators and Adverse Effects of Child Poverty in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, John M; Wood, David L; Duffee, James H; Kuo, Alice

    2016-04-01

    The link between poverty and children's health is well recognized. Even temporary poverty may have an adverse effect on children's health, and data consistently support the observation that poverty in childhood continues to have a negative effect on health into adulthood. In addition to childhood morbidity being related to child poverty, epidemiologic studies have documented a mortality gradient for children aged 1 to 15 years (and adults), with poor children experiencing a higher mortality rate than children from higher-income families. The global great recession is only now very slowly abating for millions of America's children and their families. At this difficult time in the history of our nation's families and immediately after the 50th anniversary year of President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty, it is particularly germane for the American Academy of Pediatrics, which is "dedicated to the health of all children," to publish a research-supported technical report that examines the mediators associated with the long-recognized adverse effects of child poverty on children and their families. This technical report draws on research from a number of disciplines, including physiology, sociology, psychology, economics, and epidemiology, to describe the present state of knowledge regarding poverty's negative impact on children's health and development. Children inherit not only their parents' genes but also the family ecology and its social milieu. Thus, parenting skills, housing, neighborhood, schools, and other factors (eg, medical care) all have complex relations to each other and influence how each child's genetic canvas is expressed. Accompanying this technical report is a policy statement that describes specific actions that pediatricians and other child advocates can take to attenuate the negative effects of the mediators identified in this technical report and improve the well-being of our nation's children and their families. PMID:26962239

  8. Arrhythmogenic adverse effects of cardiac glycosides are mediated by redox modification of ryanodine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Stevens, Sarah C W; Terentyeva, Radmila; Carnes, Cynthia A; Terentyev, Dmitry; Györke, Sandor

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The therapeutic use of cardiac glycosides (CGs), agents commonly used in treating heart failure (HF), is limited by arrhythmic toxicity. The adverse effects of CGs have been attributed to excessive accumulation of intracellular Ca2+ resulting from inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase ion transport activity. However, CGs are also known to increase intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could contribute to arrhythmogenesis through redox modification of cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2s). Here we sought to determine whether modification of RyR2s by ROS contributes to CG-dependent arrhythmogenesis and examine the relevant sources of ROS. In isolated rat ventricular myocytes, the CG digitoxin (DGT) increased the incidence of arrhythmogenic spontaneous Ca2+ waves, decreased the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ load, and increased both ROS and RyR2 thiol oxidation. Additionally, pretreatment with DGT increased spark frequency in permeabilized myocytes. These effects on Ca2+ waves and sparks were prevented by the antioxidant N-(2-mercaptopropionyl) glycine (MPG). The CG-dependent increases in ROS, RyR2 oxidation and arrhythmogenic propensity were reversed by inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, mitochondrial ATP-dependent K+ channels (mito-KATP) or permeability transition pore (PTP), but not by inhibition of xanthine oxidase. These results suggest that the arrhythmogenic adverse effects of CGs involve alterations in RyR2 function caused by oxidative changes in the channel structure by ROS. These CG-dependent effects probably involve release of ROS from mitochondria possibly mediated by NADPH oxidase. PMID:21807619

  9. Eco-toxicological effects of two kinds of lead compounds on forest tree seed in alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Zhou, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jin-Xin

    2016-03-01

    In order to compare the different eco-toxicological effects of lead nitrate and lead acetate on forest tree seed, a biological incubation experiment was conducted to testify the inhibition effects of two lead compounds on rates of seed germination, root and stem elongation, and seedling fresh weight for six plants (Amaorpha fruticosa L., Robinia psedoacacia L., Pinus tabuliformis Carr., Platycladus orientalis L., Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm., Hippophae rhamnoides L.) in soil. The results indicate that the inhibition effects of the two lead compounds on the rates of root elongation of plants were greater than other indices; root elongation can possibly be used as indices to investigate the relationship between lead toxicity and plant response. The response of trees to lead toxicity varied significantly, and the order of tolerance to lead pollution was as follows: Amaorpha fruticosa L. > Platycladus orientalis L. > Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm. > Robinia psedoacacia L. > Pinus tabuliformis Carr. > Hippophae rhamnoides L. Therefore, we suggest that Amaorpha fruticosa L. and Platycladus orientalis L. be used as tolerant plants for soil phytoremediation and Hippophae rhamnoides L. as an indicative plant to diagnose the toxicity of lead pollution on soil quality. Lead nitrate and lead acetate differentially restrain seeds, with seeds being more sensitive to lead nitrate than lead acetate in the soil. Thus, the characteristics of lead compounds should be taken into full consideration to appraise its impact on the environment.

  10. Toxicological in vitro effects of heavy metals on gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) head-kidney leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, Patricia; Cordero, Héctor; Meseguer, José; Esteban, María Á; Cuesta, Alberto

    2015-12-25

    Heavy metals provoke toxicological effects on aquatic animal species, including fish, though their effects on fish leucocytes and immunotoxicology are still limited. In the present work the effects of heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Pb or As) on viability, oxidative stress and innate immune parameters of isolated head-kidney leucocytes from gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) are studied. Cytotoxicity results indicated that short exposures (30 min or 2h) to Hg promoted both apoptosis and necrosis cell death of leucocytes whilst Cd, Pb and As did only by apoptosis, in all cases in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, production of free oxygen radicals was induced by Cd, Hg and As heavy metals. Cd failed to change phagocytosis but Hg and As increased the percentage of phagocytic cells but decreased the number of ingested particles per cell whilst Pb increased both phagocytic parameters. On the other hand, respiratory burst activity was significantly reduced by incubation with Cd, Hg and As but increased with Pb. Furthermore, the gene expression profiles partly support the functional finding of this work. This study provides an in vitro approach for elucidating the heavy metals toxicity, and particularly the immunotoxicity, in fish leucocytes.

  11. Eco-toxicological effects of two kinds of lead compounds on forest tree seed in alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Zhou, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jin-Xin

    2016-03-01

    In order to compare the different eco-toxicological effects of lead nitrate and lead acetate on forest tree seed, a biological incubation experiment was conducted to testify the inhibition effects of two lead compounds on rates of seed germination, root and stem elongation, and seedling fresh weight for six plants (Amaorpha fruticosa L., Robinia psedoacacia L., Pinus tabuliformis Carr., Platycladus orientalis L., Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm., Hippophae rhamnoides L.) in soil. The results indicate that the inhibition effects of the two lead compounds on the rates of root elongation of plants were greater than other indices; root elongation can possibly be used as indices to investigate the relationship between lead toxicity and plant response. The response of trees to lead toxicity varied significantly, and the order of tolerance to lead pollution was as follows: Amaorpha fruticosa L. > Platycladus orientalis L. > Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm. > Robinia psedoacacia L. > Pinus tabuliformis Carr. > Hippophae rhamnoides L. Therefore, we suggest that Amaorpha fruticosa L. and Platycladus orientalis L. be used as tolerant plants for soil phytoremediation and Hippophae rhamnoides L. as an indicative plant to diagnose the toxicity of lead pollution on soil quality. Lead nitrate and lead acetate differentially restrain seeds, with seeds being more sensitive to lead nitrate than lead acetate in the soil. Thus, the characteristics of lead compounds should be taken into full consideration to appraise its impact on the environment. PMID:26927657

  12. Effects of planting system design on the toxicological sensitivity of Myriophyllum spicatum and Elodea canadensis to atrazine.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Erin B; Solomon, K R; Hanson, M L

    2008-09-01

    The triazine herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-trazine) was selected as a chemical stressor in an investigation of how toxicological responses of individually grown macrophytes reflect those of plants grown in more natural model populations and two-species communities. Phytotoxicity of the compound to Myriophyllumspicatum L. and Elodeacanadensis Michx. was assessed under semi-natural field conditions using 12000l outdoor microcosms. Exposure concentrations of 25, 50, 100, 250microgl(-1) plus controls (n=3) were evaluated, selected to fall within a range of concentrations known to produce a toxic response in the tested macrophytes, and effective concentrations required to cause a decrease in biomass endpoints by 10%, 25%, and 50% were estimated. The sensitivities of aquatic plants to atrazine did not differ substantially between planting systems, and few interactions between the effects of the planting method and atrazine effects on macrophyte biomass were detected using a two-way ANOVA. A lack of significant differences in biomass and relative growth rate measures between plants grown under the various test systems also indicated that interactions between and among species did not influence growth of plants in the model population and communities. Under these test conditions, the use of the "cone-tainer" method provided estimates of toxicity consistent with those from plants grown in assemblages, and potential interactions between plants were not found to modify the response of macrophytes to atrazine.

  13. Conditional pharmacology/toxicology V: ambivalent effects of thiocyanate upon the development and the inhibition of experimental arthritis in rats by aurothiomalate (Myocrysin®) and metallic silver.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Michael; Butters, Desley; Vernon-Roberts, Barrie

    2013-08-01

    This article discusses the bizarre and contrary effects of thiocyanate, the major detoxication product of hydrogen cyanide inhaled from tobacco smoke or liberated from cyanogenic foods, e.g. cassava. Thiocyanate both (1) promotes inflammatory disease in rats and (2) facilitates the anti-inflammatory action of historic metal therapies based on gold (Au) or silver (Ag) in three models of chronic polyarthritis in rats. Low doses of nanoparticulate metallic silver (NMS) preparations, i.e. zerovalent silver (Ag°) administered orally, suppressed the mycobacterial ('adjuvant')-induced arthritis (MIA) in rats. Similar doses of cationic silver, Ag(I), administered orally as silver oxide or soluble silver salts were inactive. By contrast, NMS only inhibited the development of the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in rats when thiocyanate was also co-administered in drinking water. These (a) arthritis-selective and (b) thiocyanate-inducible effects of Ag° were also observed in some previous, and now extended, studies with the classic anti-arthritic drug, sodium aurothiomalate (ATM, Myocrisin(®)) and its silver analogue (STM), administered subcutaneously to rats developing the same three forms of polyarthritis. In the absence of either Ag° or ATM, thiocyanate considerably increased the severity of the MIA, CIA and PIA, i.e. acting as a pro-pathogen. Hitherto, thiocyanate was considered relatively harmless. This may not be true in rats/people with immuno-inflammatory stress and concomitant leukocyte activation. Collectively, these findings show how the drug action of a xenobiotic might be determined by the nature (and severity) of the experimental inflammation, as an example of conditional pharmacology. They also suggest that an incipient toxicity, even of normobiotics such as thiocyanate, might likewise be modulated beneficially by well-chosen xenobiotics (drugs, nutritional supplements, etc.), i.e. conditional toxicology (Powanda 1995

  14. Aquatic toxicology: fact or fiction

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, K.J.

    1980-02-01

    The science of aquatic toxicology is a relatively new science. The development of the field of aquatic toxicology since 1930 is traced. The state of the art of aquatic toxicology compared with that of classical toxicology is evaluated. The science of aquatic toxicology is expected to undergo a significant period of rapid growth and development, leading ultimately to the formation of a mature science.

  15. Ground experiments for finding principles and working out methods for preventing adverse effects of weightlessness on the human organism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakurin, L. I.; Gregoryev, A. I.; Mikhailov, V. M.; Tishler, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    A comparative assessment of the effectiveness of different prophylactic procedures to prevent the adverse effects of weightlessness is presented. It is concluded that: physical training is most effective but no single method by itself produces the full effect, and an adjustment of regimes to one another enhances the effect. The approved complex of prophylactic procedures affected basic changes occurring in hypokinesia: deficit of muscular activity, no or reduced BP hydrostatic component, reduced volume of blood circulation, reduced hydration level, and the application of various prophylactic complexes during 49 day antiorthostatic hypodynamia eliminated or reduced the adverse effects of weightlessness in simulation.

  16. Toxicological Effects Induced by Silver Nanoparticles in Zebra Fish (Danio Rerio) and in the Bacteria Communities Living at Their Surface.

    PubMed

    Bacchetta, Carla; López, Gerardo; Pagano, Gisela; Muratt, Diana Tomazi; de Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Monserrat, José María

    2016-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) makes them useful in a wide range of products although their environmental impact is still uncertain. The main goal of this study was to evaluate short-term effects induced by AgNP on gills oxidative status and bacterial communities living at the skin mucus of zebrafish. Both the number of bacteria colony forming units and bacteria growth obtained from skin mucus were lower in all concentrations tested (25, 50 and 100 µg nAg/L). Besides, AgNP exposure caused a significant decrease in bacteria growth in zebrafish exposed to 100 µg nAg/L. AgNP accumulated in zebrafish gills at both highest concentrations tested, but this accumulation did not appear to result in oxidative stress. Overall the results indicated toxicological effects of AgNP on bacteria communities living at the zebrafish mucus surface. Although silver accumulation was verified in gills, no evidence of toxicity in terms of oxidative stress was found.

  17. Natural Co-Occurrence of Mycotoxins in Foods and Feeds and Their in vitro Combined Toxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Marie-Caroline; Madec, Stéphanie; Coton, Emmanuel; Hymery, Nolwenn

    2016-01-01

    Some foods and feeds are often contaminated by numerous mycotoxins, but most studies have focused on the occurrence and toxicology of a single mycotoxin. Regulations throughout the world do not consider the combined effects of mycotoxins. However, several surveys have reported the natural co-occurrence of mycotoxins from all over the world. Most of the published data has concerned the major mycotoxins aflatoxins (AFs), ochratoxin A (OTA), zearalenone (ZEA), fumonisins (FUM) and trichothecenes (TCTs), especially deoxynivalenol (DON). Concerning cereals and derived cereal product samples, among the 127 mycotoxin combinations described in the literature, AFs+FUM, DON+ZEA, AFs+OTA, and FUM+ZEA are the most observed. However, only a few studies specified the number of co-occurring mycotoxins with the percentage of the co-contaminated samples, as well as the main combinations found. Studies of mycotoxin combination toxicity showed antagonist, additive or synergic effects depending on the tested species, cell model or mixture, and were not necessarily time- or dose-dependent. This review summarizes the findings on mycotoxins and their co-occurrence in various foods and feeds from all over the world as well as in vitro experimental data on their combined toxicity. PMID:27023609

  18. Natural Co-Occurrence of Mycotoxins in Foods and Feeds and Their in vitro Combined Toxicological Effects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie-Caroline; Madec, Stéphanie; Coton, Emmanuel; Hymery, Nolwenn

    2016-04-01

    Some foods and feeds are often contaminated by numerous mycotoxins, but most studies have focused on the occurrence and toxicology of a single mycotoxin. Regulations throughout the world do not consider the combined effects of mycotoxins. However, several surveys have reported the natural co-occurrence of mycotoxins from all over the world. Most of the published data has concerned the major mycotoxins aflatoxins (AFs), ochratoxin A (OTA), zearalenone (ZEA), fumonisins (FUM) and trichothecenes (TCTs), especially deoxynivalenol (DON). Concerning cereals and derived cereal product samples, among the 127 mycotoxin combinations described in the literature, AFs+FUM, DON+ZEA, AFs+OTA, and FUM+ZEA are the most observed. However, only a few studies specified the number of co-occurring mycotoxins with the percentage of the co-contaminated samples, as well as the main combinations found. Studies of mycotoxin combination toxicity showed antagonist, additive or synergic effects depending on the tested species, cell model or mixture, and were not necessarily time- or dose-dependent. This review summarizes the findings on mycotoxins and their co-occurrence in various foods and feeds from all over the world as well as in vitro experimental data on their combined toxicity. PMID:27023609

  19. Toxicological Effects Induced by Silver Nanoparticles in Zebra Fish (Danio Rerio) and in the Bacteria Communities Living at Their Surface.

    PubMed

    Bacchetta, Carla; López, Gerardo; Pagano, Gisela; Muratt, Diana Tomazi; de Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Monserrat, José María

    2016-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) makes them useful in a wide range of products although their environmental impact is still uncertain. The main goal of this study was to evaluate short-term effects induced by AgNP on gills oxidative status and bacterial communities living at the skin mucus of zebrafish. Both the number of bacteria colony forming units and bacteria growth obtained from skin mucus were lower in all concentrations tested (25, 50 and 100 µg nAg/L). Besides, AgNP exposure caused a significant decrease in bacteria growth in zebrafish exposed to 100 µg nAg/L. AgNP accumulated in zebrafish gills at both highest concentrations tested, but this accumulation did not appear to result in oxidative stress. Overall the results indicated toxicological effects of AgNP on bacteria communities living at the zebrafish mucus surface. Although silver accumulation was verified in gills, no evidence of toxicity in terms of oxidative stress was found. PMID:27393328

  20. Toxicological evaluation of the effects of waste-to-energy ash-concrete on two marine species

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, K.L.; Nelson, W.G.; Curley, J.L. )

    1993-10-01

    The toxicological effects of waste-to-energy ash-concrete on survivorship, growth, and fecundity (end-point parameters) of Mysidopsis bahia and on survivorship and growth of Menidia beryllina were evaluated with the 7-d static-renewal toxicity test. Leachate and elutriate solutions were prepared from experimental ash-concrete test cylinders constructed from concrete with additions of either bottom ash (mix BA), mixed bottom ash and scrubber residue, or mixed bottom ash and fly ash (60:40%, mix BA:FA). Control experiments with concrete (without ash) and pH (7-9.5) were conducted to assess any toxic effects of the stabilization process. pH did not affect end-point parameters of Mysidopsis bahia or Menidia beryllina. However, the 100% elutriate solution made from concrete reduced survivorship of Mysidopsis bahia. For experiments with ash-concrete test cylinders with the BA mixture, 10-d leachate solution reduced survivorship of Mysidopsis bahia and the 100% elutriate solutions reduced survivorship of Mysidopsis bahia and Manidia beryllina. With the BA:SR mixture, the 100 and 50% elutriate solutions reduced survivorship of Menidia beryllina. The BA:FA 10- and 5-d leachate solutions and the 100, 50, and 25% elutriate solutions reduced survivorship of Menidia beryllina. The BA:FA 10- and 5-d leachate solutions and the 100, 50, 25% elutriate solutions reduced survivorship of Mysidopsis bahia.