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Sample records for adverse event risk

  1. Risk of Adverse Gastrointestinal Events from Inhaled Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Richard A.; Tu, Wanzhu; Wang, Jane; Ambuehl, Roberta; McDonald, Clement J.; Murray, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective Previous studies suggest a risk of gastrointestinal events in patients prescribed oral corticosteroids, but gastrointestinal events have not commonly been documented in patients prescribed inhaled corticosteroids. We explored whether patients prescribed inhaled corticosteroids are at risk of adverse gastrointestinal effects. Design A retrospective cohort study was conducted using 25 years of electronic medical record data. Setting An urban health center with an academic affiliation. Patients The incidence of adverse gastrointestinal events in patients prescribed inhaled corticosteroids and albuterol (n = 7,156) was compared to those prescribed albuterol alone (n = 12,287). Measurements and Main Results Adverse gastrointestinal outcomes included events such as gastritis, ulcers, and bleeding. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk of adverse events controlling for possible confounders such as alcohol use or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. Adverse gastrointestinal events were observed in 461 (6.4%) patients prescribed inhaled corticosteroids and albuterol and in 302 (2.5%) patients prescribed only albuterol. Patients prescribed inhaled albuterol and inhaled corticosteroids had an increased risk of adverse gastrointestinal events compared to patients prescribed only albuterol [hazard ratio 1.26 (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.56)] after controlling for potential confounders. A prescription for a spacer device reduced this risk among patients prescribed inhaled steroid [hazard ratio 0.26 (95% confidence interval 0.20 to 0.34)]. Conclusions Patients prescribed inhaled corticosteroids appear to have a slight risk of adverse gastrointestinal events that is mitigated in patients prescribed a spacer device. PMID:18956992

  2. Risk of Extrapyramidal Adverse Events With Aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Etminan, Mahyar; Procyshyn, Ric M; Samii, Ali; Carleton, Bruce C

    2016-10-01

    Aripiprazole is a unique atypical antipsychotic with partial agonist activity on the dopamine-2 (D2) receptor. This unique pharmacological profile of aripiprazole was thought to lead to a lower incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPSs). However, recent case reports have alluded to an increase in the risk of EPS in aripiprazole users compared with nonusers of the drug. No epidemiologic studies to date have quantified this risk. We conducted a pharmacoepidemiologic study composed of a nested case-control study using a large health claims database (IMS Health) in the United States. In the nested case-control analysis, there were 5242 cases of EPS with 50,532 corresponding controls in the entire cohort. The odds ratio (OR) for EPS among those with any prescription of aripiprazole was 5.38 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.03-9.57). The OR was lower among those taking 2 to 3 prescriptions (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.07-7.85) but increased in those receiving greater than 4 prescriptions (OR, 8.64; 95% CI, 2.63-28.38). All risk periods were compared with those of subjects who had not used aripiprazole or other antipsychotics. For the secondary outcome of dyskinesia, the risk for aripiprazole was 8.50 (95% CI, 8.53-2.27-31.97) compared with that of nonusers. In conclusion, we found an increase in the risk of EPS and dyskinesias among users of aripiprazole. PMID:27580493

  3. Prediction of clinical risks by analysis of preclinical and clinical adverse events.

    PubMed

    Clark, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the ability of nonclinical adverse event observations to predict human clinical adverse events observed in drug development programs. In addition it examines the relationship between nonclinical and clinical adverse event observations to drug withdrawal and proposes a model to predict drug withdrawal based on these observations. These analyses provide risk assessments useful for both planning patient safety programs, as well as a statistical framework for assessing the future success of drug programs based on nonclinical and clinical observations. Bayesian analyses were undertaken to investigate the connection between nonclinical adverse event observations and observations of that same event in clinical trial for a large set of approved drugs. We employed the same statistical methods used to evaluate the efficacy of diagnostic tests to evaluate the ability of nonclinical studies to predict adverse events in clinical studies, and adverse events in both to predict drug withdrawal. We find that some nonclinical observations suggest higher risk for observing the same adverse event in clinical studies, particularly arrhythmias, QT prolongation, and abnormal hepatic function. However the lack of these events in nonclinical studies is found to not be a good predictor of safety in humans. Some nonclinical and clinical observations appear to be associated with high risk of drug withdrawal from market, especially arrhythmia and hepatic necrosis. We use the method to estimate the overall risk of drug withdrawal from market using the product of the risks from each nonclinical and clinical observation to create a risk profile.

  4. Prediction of clinical risks by analysis of preclinical and clinical adverse events.

    PubMed

    Clark, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the ability of nonclinical adverse event observations to predict human clinical adverse events observed in drug development programs. In addition it examines the relationship between nonclinical and clinical adverse event observations to drug withdrawal and proposes a model to predict drug withdrawal based on these observations. These analyses provide risk assessments useful for both planning patient safety programs, as well as a statistical framework for assessing the future success of drug programs based on nonclinical and clinical observations. Bayesian analyses were undertaken to investigate the connection between nonclinical adverse event observations and observations of that same event in clinical trial for a large set of approved drugs. We employed the same statistical methods used to evaluate the efficacy of diagnostic tests to evaluate the ability of nonclinical studies to predict adverse events in clinical studies, and adverse events in both to predict drug withdrawal. We find that some nonclinical observations suggest higher risk for observing the same adverse event in clinical studies, particularly arrhythmias, QT prolongation, and abnormal hepatic function. However the lack of these events in nonclinical studies is found to not be a good predictor of safety in humans. Some nonclinical and clinical observations appear to be associated with high risk of drug withdrawal from market, especially arrhythmia and hepatic necrosis. We use the method to estimate the overall risk of drug withdrawal from market using the product of the risks from each nonclinical and clinical observation to create a risk profile. PMID:25746390

  5. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  6. Is Overweight a Risk Factor for Adverse Events during Removal of Impacted Lower Third Molars?

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Wathson Feitosa; do Egito Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti

    2014-01-01

    Being overweight is recognised as a significant risk factor for several morbidities; however, the experience of the dentistry faculties focusing on this population is still low. The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of adverse events during removal of impacted lower third molars in overweight patients. A prospective cohort study was carried out involving overweight patients subjected to surgical removal of impacted lower third molar as part of a line of research on third molar surgery. Predictor variables indicative of the occurrence of adverse events during surgery were classified by their demographic, clinical, radiographic, and surgical aspects. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed. In total, 140 patients fulfilled the eligibility criteria, and 280 surgeries were performed. Patients' mean age was 25.1 ± 2.2 years, and the proportion of women to men was 3 : 1. Eight different adverse events during surgery were recorded. These events occurred in approximately 29.3% of cases and were significantly associated with predictor variables (P < 0.05). Excess weight is recognised as a risk factor for the high rate of adverse events in impacted third molar surgery. The study suggests that overweight patients are highly likely to experience morbidities. PMID:25548786

  7. Evaluating the risk of patient re-identification from adverse drug event reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our objective was to develop a model for measuring re-identification risk that more closely mimics the behaviour of an adversary by accounting for repeated attempts at matching and verification of matches, and apply it to evaluate the risk of re-identification for Canada’s post-marketing adverse drug event database (ADE).Re-identification is only demonstrably plausible for deaths in ADE. A matching experiment between ADE records and virtual obituaries constructed from Statistics Canada vital statistics was simulated. A new re-identification risk is considered, it assumes that after gathering all the potential matches for a patient record (all records in the obituaries that are potential matches for an ADE record), an adversary tries to verify these potential matches. Two adversary scenarios were considered: (a) a mildly motivated adversary who will stop after one verification attempt, and (b) a highly motivated adversary who will attempt to verify all the potential matches and is only limited by practical or financial considerations. Methods The mean percentage of records in ADE that had a high probability of being re-identified was computed. Results Under scenario (a), the risk of re-identification from disclosing the province, age at death, gender, and exact date of the report is quite high, but the removal of province brings down the risk significantly. By only generalizing the date of reporting to month and year and including all other variables, the risk is always low. All ADE records have a high risk of re-identification under scenario (b), but the plausibility of that scenario is limited because of the financial and practical deterrent even for highly motivated adversaries. Conclusions It is possible to disclose Canada’s adverse drug event database while ensuring that plausible re-identification risks are acceptably low. Our new re-identification risk model is suitable for such risk assessments. PMID:24094134

  8. Evidence Report: Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence F.

    2013-01-01

    The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response is identified by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Research Program (HRP) as a recognized risk to human health and performance in space. The HRP Program Requirements Document (PRD) defines these risks. This Evidence Report provides a summary of the evidence that has been used to identify and characterize this risk. It is known that human immune function is altered in- and post-flight, but it is unclear at present if such alterations lead to increased susceptibility to disease. Reactivation of latent viruses has been documented in crewmembers, although this reactivation has not been directly correlated with immune changes or with observed diseases. As described in this report, further research is required to better characterize the relationships between altered immune response and susceptibility to disease during and after spaceflight. This is particularly important for future deep-space exploration missions.

  9. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data. Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure. The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52–0.62). Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases. PMID:27196497

  10. Defining molecular initiating events in the adverse outcome pathway framework for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Allen, Timothy E H; Goodman, Jonathan M; Gutsell, Steve; Russell, Paul J

    2014-12-15

    Consumer and environmental safety decisions are based on exposure and hazard data, interpreted using risk assessment approaches. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) conceptual framework has been presented as a logical sequence of events or processes within biological systems which can be used to understand adverse effects and refine current risk assessment practices in ecotoxicology. This framework can also be applied to human toxicology and is explored on the basis of investigating the molecular initiating events (MIEs) of compounds. The precise definition of the MIE has yet to reach general acceptance. In this work we present a unified MIE definition: an MIE is the initial interaction between a molecule and a biomolecule or biosystem that can be causally linked to an outcome via a pathway. Case studies are presented, and issues with current definitions are addressed. With the development of a unified MIE definition, the field can look toward defining, classifying, and characterizing more MIEs and using knowledge of the chemistry of these processes to aid AOP research and toxicity risk assessment. We also present the role of MIE research in the development of in vitro and in silico toxicology and suggest how, by using a combination of biological and chemical approaches, MIEs can be identified and characterized despite a lack of detailed reports, even for some of the most studied molecules in toxicology.

  11. Adverse events among high-risk participants in a home-based walking study: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, David E; Larkin, Angela R; Lowery, Julie C; Holleman, Robert G; Richardson, Caroline R

    2007-01-01

    Background For high-risk individuals and their healthcare providers, finding the right balance between promoting physical activity and minimizing the risk of adverse events can be difficult. More information on the prevalence and influence of adverse events is needed to improve providers' ability to prescribe effective and safe exercise programs for their patients. Methods This study describes the type and severity of adverse events reported by participants with cardiovascular disease or at-risk for cardiovascular disease that occurred during an unsupervised, home-based walking study. This multi-site, randomized controlled trial tested the feasibility of a diet and lifestyle activity intervention over 1.5 years. At month 13, 274 eligible participants (male veterans) were recruited who were ambulatory, BMI > 28, and reporting one or more cardiovascular disease risk factors. All participants attended five, face-to-face dietitian-delivered counseling sessions during the six-month intervention. Participants were randomized to three study arms: 1) time-based walking goals, 2) simple pedometer-based walking goals, and 3) enhanced pedometer-based walking goals with Internet-mediated feedback. Two physicians verified adverse event symptom coding. Results Enrolled participants had an average of five medical comorbidities. During 1110 person months of observation, 87 of 274 participants reported 121 adverse events. One serious study-related adverse event (atrial fibrillation) was reported; the individual resumed study participation within three days. Non-serious, study related adverse events made up 12% of all symptoms – predominantly minor musculoskeletal events. Serious, non-study related adverse events represented 32% of all symptoms while non-serious, non-study related adverse events made up 56% of symptoms. Cardiovascular disease events represented over half of the non-study related adverse event symptoms followed by musculoskeletal complaints. Adverse events caused

  12. Risk prediction models for major adverse cardiac event (MACE) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI): A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manan, Norhafizah A.; Abidin, Basir

    2015-02-01

    Five percent of patients who went through Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) experienced Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE) after PCI procedure. Risk prediction of MACE following a PCI procedure therefore is helpful. This work describes a review of such prediction models currently in use. Literature search was done on PubMed and SCOPUS database. Thirty literatures were found but only 4 studies were chosen based on the data used, design, and outcome of the study. Particular emphasis was given and commented on the study design, population, sample size, modeling method, predictors, outcomes, discrimination and calibration of the model. All the models had acceptable discrimination ability (C-statistics >0.7) and good calibration (Hosmer-Lameshow P-value >0.05). Most common model used was multivariate logistic regression and most popular predictor was age.

  13. Vaccine adverse events.

    PubMed

    Follows, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Millions of adults are vaccinated annually against the seasonal influenza virus. An undetermined number of individuals will develop adverse events to the influenza vaccination. Those who suffer substantiated vaccine injuries, disabilities, and aggravated conditions may file a timely, no-fault and no-cost petition for financial compensation under the National Vaccine Act in the Vaccine Court. The elements of a successful vaccine injury claim are described in the context of a claim showing the seasonal influenza vaccination was the cause of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  14. [Adverse events prevention ability].

    PubMed

    Aparo, Ugo Luigi; Aparo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    The issue of how to address medical errors is the key to improve the health care system performances. Operational evidence collected in the last five years shows that the solution is only partially linked to future technological developments. Cultural and organisational changes are mandatory to help to manage and drastically reduce the adverse events in health care organisations. Classical management, merely based on coordination and control, is inadequate. Proactive, self-organising network based structures must be put in place and managed using adaptive, fast evolving management tools. PMID:17484160

  15. [Adverse events prevention ability].

    PubMed

    Aparo, Ugo Luigi; Aparo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    The issue of how to address medical errors is the key to improve the health care system performances. Operational evidence collected in the last five years shows that the solution is only partially linked to future technological developments. Cultural and organisational changes are mandatory to help to manage and drastically reduce the adverse events in health care organisations. Classical management, merely based on coordination and control, is inadequate. Proactive, self-organising network based structures must be put in place and managed using adaptive, fast evolving management tools.

  16. Screening for adverse events.

    PubMed

    Karson, A S; Bates, D W

    1999-02-01

    Adverse events (AEs) in medical patients are common, costly, and often preventable. Development of quality improvement programs to decrease the number and impact of AEs demands effective methods for screening for AEs on a routine basis. Here we describe the impact, types, and potential causes of AEs and review various techniques for identifying AEs. We evaluate the use of generic screening criteria in detail and describe a recent study of the sensitivity and specificity of individual generic screening criteria and combinations of these criteria. In general, the most sensitive screens were the least specific and no small sub-set of screens identified a large percentage of adverse events. Combinations of screens that were limited to administrative data were the least expensive, but none were particularly sensitive, although in practice they might be effective since routine screening is currently rarely done. As computer systems increase in sophistication sensitivity will improve. We also discuss recent studies that suggest that programs that screen for and identify AEs can be useful in reducing AE rates. While tools for identifying AEs have strengths and weaknesses, they can play an important role in organizations' quality improvement portfolios. PMID:10468381

  17. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  18. Lower risk for serious adverse events and no increased risk for cancer after PBSC vs BM donation

    PubMed Central

    Pulsipher, Michael A.; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Logan, Brent R.; Navarro, Willis H.; Levine, John E.; Miller, John P.; Shaw, Bronwen E.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Confer, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    We compared serious early and late events experienced by 2726 bone marrow (BM) and 6768 peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donors who underwent collection of PBSC or BM between 2004 and 2009 as part of a prospective study through the National Marrow Donor Program. Standardized FDA definitions for serious adverse events (SAEs) were used, and all events were reviewed by an independent physician panel. BM donors had an increased risk for SAEs (2.38% for BM vs 0.56% for PBSC; odds ratio [OR], 4.13; P < .001), and women were twice as likely to experience an SAE (OR for men, 0.50; P = .005). Restricting the analysis to life-threatening, unexpected, or chronic/disabling events, BM donors maintained an increased risk for SAEs (0.99% for BM vs 0.31% for PBSC; OR, 3.20; P < .001). Notably, the incidence of cancer, autoimmune illness, and thrombosis after donation was similar in BM vs PBSC donors. In addition, cancer incidence in PBSC donors was less than that reported in the general population (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database). In conclusion, SAEs after donation are rare but more often occurred in BM donors and women. In addition, there was no evidence of increased risk for cancer, autoimmune illness, and stroke in donors receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during this period of observation. PMID:24735965

  19. Hepatitis B vaccine adverse events in China: risk control and regulation.

    PubMed

    Meina, Li; Xiaodong, Liu; Lulu, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The death of 17 children raised public fears over infant hepatitis B vaccination in China. Though the relation between hepatitis B and children's death was denied after prudent investigation, the negative impact remained. In order to prevent or minimize adverse events after vaccination, special strategy including regulation and reimbursement should be developed.

  20. Development of the Canadian Syncope Risk Score to predict serious adverse events after emergency department assessment of syncope

    PubMed Central

    Thiruganasambandamoorthy, Venkatesh; Kwong, Kenneth; Wells, George A.; Sivilotti, Marco L.A.; Mukarram, Muhammad; Rowe, Brian H.; Lang, Eddy; Perry, Jeffrey J.; Sheldon, Robert; Stiell, Ian G.; Taljaard, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Syncope can be caused by serious conditions not evident during initial evaluation, which can lead to serious adverse events, including death, after disposition from the emergency department. We sought to develop a clinical decision tool to identify adult patients with syncope who are at risk of a serious adverse event within 30 days after disposition from the emergency department. Methods: We prospectively enrolled adults (age ≥ 16 yr) with syncope who presented within 24 hours after the event to 1 of 6 large emergency departments from Sept. 29, 2010, to Feb. 27, 2014. We collected standardized variables at index presentation from clinical evaluation and investigations. Adjudicated serious adverse events included death, myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, structural heart disease, pulmonary embolism, serious hemorrhage and procedural interventions within 30 days. Results: We enrolled 4030 patients with syncope; the mean age was 53.6 years, 55.5% were women, and 9.5% were admitted to hospital. Serious adverse events occurred in 147 (3.6%) of the patients within 30 days after disposition from the emergency department. Of 43 candidate predictors examined, we included 9 in the final model: predisposition to vasovagal syncope, heart disease, any systolic pressure reading in the emergency department < 90 or > 180 mm Hg, troponin level above 99th percentile for the normal population, abnormal QRS axis (< −30° or > 100°), QRS duration longer than 130 ms, QTc interval longer than 480 ms, emergency department diagnosis of cardiac syncope and emergency department diagnosis of vasovagal syncope (C statistic 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85–0.90; optimism 0.015; goodness-of-fit p = 0.11). The risk of a serious adverse event within 30 days ranged from 0.4% for a score of −3 to 83.6% for a score of 11. The sensitivity was 99.2% (95% CI 95.9%–100%) for a threshold score of −2 or higher and 97.7% (95% CI 93.5%–99.5%) for a threshold score of −1

  1. Comments concerning the real risk of sexual adverse events secondary to the use of 5-ARIs.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi Farina, Furio; Pischedda, Antonella

    2015-12-01

    Treatment-induced sexual dysfunctions (SD) are a recurrent and controversial topic in recent literature on the adverse events related to the use of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) (1, 2). In order to deal adequately with the various aspects of this topic, it is necessary to first cover some of the steps that allow a better definition and understanding of the subject. PMID:26766804

  2. Risk Managers’ Descriptions of Programs to Support Second Victims after Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew A.; Brock, Doug; McCotter, Patricia I.; Hofeldt, Ron; Edrees, Hanan H.; Wu, Albert W.; Shannon, Sarah; Gallagher, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines call for healthcare organizations to provide emotional support for clinicians involved in adverse events, but little is known about these organizations seek to meet this need. We surveyed U.S. members of ASHRM about the presence, features, and perceived efficacy of their organization’s provider support program. The majority reported that their organization had a support program, but features varied widely and there are substantial opportunities to improve services. Provider support programs should enhance referral mechanisms and peer support, critically appraise the role of Employee Assistance Programs, and demonstrate their value to institutional leaders. PMID:25891288

  3. Torsadogenic Risk of Antipsychotics: Combining Adverse Event Reports with Drug Utilization Data across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Raschi, Emanuel; Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Godman, Brian; Koci, Ariola; Moretti, Ugo; Kalaba, Marija; Bennie, Marion; Barbui, Corrado; Wettermark, Bjorn; Sturkenboom, Miriam; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Background Antipsychotics (APs) have been associated with risk of torsade de Pointes (TdP). This has important public health implications. Therefore, (a) we exploited the public FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) to characterize their torsadogenic profile; (b) we collected drug utilization data from 12 European Countries to assess the population exposure over the 2005-2010 period. Methods FAERS data (2004-2010) were analyzed based on the following criteria: (1) ≥4 cases of TdP/QT abnormalities; (2) Significant Reporting Odds Ratio, ROR [Lower Limit of the 95% confidence interval>1], for TdP/QT abnormalities, adjusted and stratified (Arizona CERT drugs as effect modifiers); (3) ≥4 cases of ventricular arrhythmia/sudden cardiac death (VA/SCD); (4) Significant ROR for VA/SCD; (5) Significant ROR, combined by aggregating TdP/QT abnormalities with VA and SCD. Torsadogenic signals were characterized in terms of signal strength: from Group A (very strong torsadogenic signal: all criteria fulfilled) to group E (unclear/uncertain signal: only 2/5 criteria). Consumption data were retrieved from 12 European Countries and expressed as defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DID). Results Thirty-five antipsychotics met at least one criterium: 9 agents were classified in Group A (amisulpride, chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyamemazine, haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone). In 2010, the overall exposure to antipsychotics varied from 5.94 DID (Estonia) to 13.99 (France, 2009). Considerable increment of Group A agents was found in several Countries (+3.47 in France): the exposure to olanzapine increased across all Countries (+1.84 in France) and peaked 2.96 in Norway; cyamemazine was typically used only in France (2.81 in 2009). Among Group B drugs, levomepromazine peaked 3.78 (Serbia); fluphenazine 1.61 (Slovenia). Conclusions This parallel approach through spontaneous reporting and drug utilization analyses highlighted drug- and

  4. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib

    PubMed Central

    Lipsky, Andrew H.; Farooqui, Mohammed Z.H.; Tian, Xin; Martyr, Sabrina; Cullinane, Ann M.; Nghiem, Khanh; Sun, Clare; Valdez, Janet; Niemann, Carsten U.; Herman, Sarah E. M.; Saba, Nakhle; Soto, Susan; Marti, Gerald; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steve M.; Lozier, Jay N.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months, suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not. Compared to untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, response to collagen showed a mild further decrement on ibrutinib, while response to adenosine diphosphate improved. All parameters associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding-related events were present at baseline, including prolonged epinephrine closure time (HR 2.74, P=0.012), lower levels of von Willebrand factor activity (HR 2.73, P=0.009) and factor VIII (HR 3.73, P=0.0004). In conclusion, both disease and treatment-related factors influence the risk of bleeding. Patients at greater risk for bleeding of grade ≤2 can be identified by clinical laboratory tests and counseled to avoid aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fish oils. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500733 PMID

  5. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Andrew H; Farooqui, Mohammed Z H; Tian, Xin; Martyr, Sabrina; Cullinane, Ann M; Nghiem, Khanh; Sun, Clare; Valdez, Janet; Niemann, Carsten U; Herman, Sarah E M; Saba, Nakhle; Soto, Susan; Marti, Gerald; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steve M; Lozier, Jay N; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤ 2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥ 3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤ 2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥ 3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months, suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not. Compared to untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, response to collagen showed a mild further decrement on ibrutinib, while response to adenosine diphosphate improved. All parameters associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding-related events were present at baseline, including prolonged epinephrine closure time (HR 2.74, P=0.012), lower levels of von Willebrand factor activity (HR 2.73, P=0.009) and factor VIII (HR 3.73, P=0.0004). In conclusion, both disease and treatment-related factors influence the risk of bleeding. Patients at greater risk for bleeding of grade ≤ 2 can be identified by clinical laboratory tests and counseled to avoid aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fish oils. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500733.

  6. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Adverse Cardiovascular Events Among Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Magder, Laurence S.; Petri, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are at excess risk of cardiovascular events (CVEs). There is uncertainty regarding the relative importance of SLE disease activity, medications, or traditional risk factors in this increased risk. To gain insight into this, the authors analyzed data from a cohort of 1,874 patients with SLE who were seen quarterly at a single clinical center (April 1987–June 2010) using pooled logistic regression analysis. In 9,485 person-years of follow-up, the authors observed 134 CVEs (rate = 14.1/1,000 person-years). This was 2.66 times what would be expected in the general population based on Framingham risk scores (95% confidence interval: 2.16, 3.16). After adjustment for age, CVE rates were not associated with duration of SLE. However, they were associated with average past levels of SLE disease activity and recent levels of circulating anti-double-stranded DNA. Past use of corticosteroids (in the absence of current use) was not associated with CVE rates. However, persons currently using 20 mg/day or more of corticosteroids had a substantial increase in risk even after adjustment for disease activity. Thus, consistent with findings in several recent publications among cohorts with other diseases, current use of corticosteroids was associated with an increased risk of CVEs. These results suggest a short-term impact of corticosteroids on CVE risk. PMID:23024137

  7. Adverse Life Events and Psychopathology and Prosocial Behavior in Late Adolescence: Testing the Timing, Specificity, Accumulation, Gradient, and Moderation of Contextual Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flouri, Eirini; Kallis, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    A study examines the role of contextual risk in psychopathology and prosocial behavior in adolescents. The results show that risk accumulation matters instead of specificity and that the number of adverse life events is nonmultiplicative with psychopathology.

  8. Assessing risk factors for major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events during the perioperative period of carotid angioplasty with stenting patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Cui, Min; Li, Ling; Cheng, Yong; Zhou, Hua-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerotic stenosis is a risk factor for ischemic stroke. The rapid development of neuroimaging techniques had led to carotid angioplasty with stenting (CAS) becoming a useful, effective and minimally invasive method for the treatment of extracranial carotid artery stenosis. The aim of the present study was to identify independent risk factors to predict perioperative major adverse cerebral and cardiovascular events for CAS patients and establish a risk evaluation model. Consecutive patients treated with a standardized CAS procedure were enrolled in the present study. The patients included underwent independent neurological evaluation prior to and after the procedure and at 30 days. The rates of transient ischemic attack, stroke, myocardial infarction and mortality were recorded. A relative regression model was established to evaluate risk factors of perioperative major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). In total, 403 subjects treated with CAS were enrolled into the study at a baseline MACCE rate of 8.19%, whereas the overall stroke, myocardial infarction and mortality rate at 30 days was 3.97%. The multiple regression analysis revealed that certain factors significantly predicted the 30-day risk of treatment-related MACCE. These factors included age of ≥70 years, ulcerative plaque, severe carotid stenosis, bilateral carotid artery stenting and hemodynamic depression following CAS. The MACCE risk prediction model and risk score system were subsequently established. In conclusion, factors that significantly predicted the 30-day risk of MACCE of CAS included, age of ≥70 years, ulcerative plaque, severe carotid stenosis, bilateral carotid artery stenting and hemodynamic depression, with hemodynamic depression being a controllable factor. The established risk score system is therefore a potentially useful tool that can be employed in the prediction of MACCE after CAS. PMID:27446318

  9. Risk stratification for major adverse cardiac events and ventricular tachyarrhythmias by cardiac MRI in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masakazu; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Kato, Takao; Izumi, Toshiaki; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyaji, Yuki; Kawamura, Takayuki; Ikeguchi, Shigeru; Inoko, Moriaki; Kurita, Takashi; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence of myocardial fibrosis by cardiac MRI has prognostic value in cardiac sarcoidosis, and localisation may be equally relevant to clinical outcomes. Objective We aimed to analyse cardiac damage and function in detail and explore the relationship with clinical outcomes in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis using cardiac MRI. Methods We included 81 consecutive patients with cardiac sarcoidosis undergoing cardiac MR. Left ventricular mass and fibrosis mass were calculated, and localisation was analysed using a 17-segment model. Participants underwent follow-up through 2015, and the development of major adverse cardiac events including ventricular tachyarrhythmias was recorded. Results Increased left ventricular fibrosis mass was associated with increased prevalence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). When localisation was defined as the sum of late gadolinium enhancement in the left ventricular basal anterior and basal anteroseptal areas, or the right ventricular area, it was associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis during a median follow-up of 22.1 months showed that both the mass and localisation groupings for fibrosis were significantly associated with major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias and that when combined, the risk stratification was better than for each variable alone (p<0.001, respectively). By Cox-proportional hazard risk analysis, the localisation grouping was an independent predictor for the both. Conclusions In patients with cardiac sarcoidosis, both fibrosis mass and its localisation to the basal anterior/anteroseptal left ventricle, or right ventricle was associated with the development of major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Cardiac MR with late gadolinium enhancement may be useful for improving risk stratification in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:27547432

  10. 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence Review for: The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on February 3-4, 2014. The SRP reviewed the new Evidence Report for the Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response (from here on referred to as the 2013 Immune Evidence Report), as well as the Research Plan for this Risk that is in the current version of the Human Research Program’s (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP).

  11. Vaccine Risk Perception Among Reporters of Autism After Vaccination: Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System 1990–2001

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Emily Jane; Ball, Robert; Bostrom, Ann; Shadomy, Sean V.; Ball, Leslie K.; Evans, Geoffrey; Braun, Miles

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated vaccine risk perception among reporters of autism to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Methods. We conducted structured interviews with 124 parents who reported autism and related disorders to VAERS from 1990 to 2001 and compared results with those of a published survey of parents in the general population. Results. Respondents perceived vaccine-preventable diseases as less serious than did other parents. Only 15% of respondents deemed immunization extremely important for children’s health; two thirds had withheld vaccines from their children. Conclusions. Views of parents who believe vaccines injured their children differ significantly from those of the general population regarding the benefits of immunization. Understanding the factors that shape this perspective can improve communication among vaccine providers, policymakers, and parents/patients. PMID:15249304

  12. Bayesian inference on risk differences: an application to multivariate meta-analysis of adverse events in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Luo, Sheng; Chu, Haitao; Wei, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate meta-analysis is useful in combining evidence from independent studies which involve several comparisons among groups based on a single outcome. For binary outcomes, the commonly used statistical models for multivariate meta-analysis are multivariate generalized linear mixed effects models which assume risks, after some transformation, follow a multivariate normal distribution with possible correlations. In this article, we consider an alternative model for multivariate meta-analysis where the risks are modeled by the multivariate beta distribution proposed by Sarmanov (1966). This model have several attractive features compared to the conventional multivariate generalized linear mixed effects models, including simplicity of likelihood function, no need to specify a link function, and has a closed-form expression of distribution functions for study-specific risk differences. We investigate the finite sample performance of this model by simulation studies and illustrate its use with an application to multivariate meta-analysis of adverse events of tricyclic antidepressants treatment in clinical trials. PMID:23853700

  13. Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Kunz, Hawley; Sams, Clarence F.

    2015-01-01

    . Ground analog testing of humans and animals, as well as microgravity-analog cell culture, has demonstrated utility. However, in all cases, it is not known with certainty if these data would reflect similar testing during space travel. Given their ready availability, ground analogs may be extremely useful for assay development and the evaluation of potential countermeasures. In general, the evidence base suffers from widely disparate studies on small numbers of subjects that do not directly correlate well with each other or spaceflight itself. Also lacking are investigations of the effect of gender on adaption to spaceflight. This results in significant knowledge 'gaps' that must be filled by future studies to completely determine any clinical risk related to immunity for human exploration-class space missions. These gaps include a significant lack of in-flight data, particularly during long-duration space missions. The International Space Station represents an excellent science platform with which to address this knowledge gap. Other knowledge gaps include lack of a single validated ground analog for the phenomenon and a lack of flight-compatible laboratory equipment capable of monitoring astronauts (for either clinical or research purposes). However, enough significant data exist, as described in this manuscript, to warrant addressing this phenomenon during the utilization phase of the ISS. A recent Space Shuttle investigation has confirmed the 31 in-flight nature of immune dysregulation, demonstrating that it is not merely a post-flight phenomenon. Several current studies are ongoing onboard the ISS that should thoroughly characterize the phenomenon. NASA recognizes that if spaceflight-associated immune dysregulation persists during exploration flights in conjunction with other dangers, such as high-energy radiation, the result may be a significant clinical risk. This emphasizes the need for a continued integrated comprehensive approach to determining the effect of

  14. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related adverse events: general overview.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) represents a monumental advance in the management of patients with pancreaticobiliary diseases, but is a complex and technically demanding procedure with the highest inherent risk of adverse events of all routine endoscopic procedures. Overall adverse event rates for ERCP are typically reported as 5-10%. The most commonly reported adverse events include post-ERCP pancreatitis, bleeding, perforation, infection (cholangitis), and cardiopulomary or "sedation related" events. This article evaluates patient-related and procedure-related risk factors for ERCP-related adverse events, and discusses strategies for the prevention, diagnosis and management of these events.

  15. A Risk-Scoring Model to Predict One-year Major Adverse Cardiac Events after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kassaian, Seyed-Ebrahim; Saroukhani, Sepideh; Alaeddini, Farshid; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Capodanno, Davide; Poorhoseini, Hamidreza; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Leesar, Massoud A; Aghajani, Hassan; Hakki-Kazzazi, Elham; Alidoosti, Mohammad; Haji-Zeinali, Ali-Mohammad; Saifi, Maryam; Nematipour, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to develop a scoring system for predicting 1-year major adverse cardiac events (MACE), including mortality, target vessel or target lesion revascularization, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, and non-fatal myocardial infarction after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: The data were extracted from a single center PCI registry. The score was created based on the clinical, procedural, and laboratory characteristics of 8206 patients who underwent PCI between April 2004 and October 2009. Consecutive patients undergoing PCI between November 2009 and February 2011 (n= 2875) were included as a validation data set. Results: Diabetes mellitus, increase in the creatinine level, decrease in the left ventricular ejection fraction, presentation with the acute coronary syndrome, number of diseased vessels, primary PCI, PCI on the left anterior descending artery and saphenous vein graft, and stent type and diameter were identified as the predictors of the outcome and used to develop the score (R² = 0.795). The models had adequate goodness of fit (Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic; p value = 0.601) and acceptable ability of discrimination (c-statistics = 0.63). The score categorized the individual patients as low-, moderate-, and high-risk for the occurrence of MACE. The validation of the model indicated a good agreement between the observed and expected risks. Conclusion: An individual risk-scoring system based on both clinical and procedural variables can be used conveniently to predict 1-year MACE after PCI. Risk classification based on this score can assist physicians in decision-making and postprocedural health care. PMID:26985204

  16. Using the Personal Background Preparation Survey to Identify Health Science Professions Students at Risk for Adverse Academic Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig W.; Johnson, Ronald; McKee, John C.; Kim, Mira

    2009-01-01

    In the first predictive validity study of a diagnostic and prescriptive instrument for averting adverse academic status events (AASE) among multiple populations of diverse health science professions students, entering matriculates' personal background and preparation survey (PBPS) scores consistently significantly predicted 1st- or 2nd-year AASE.…

  17. Propensity-Weighted Comparison of Long-Term Risk of Urinary Adverse Events in Elderly Women Treated For Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Sean P.; Fan, Yunhua; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Downs, Levi; Dusenbery, Kathryn; Geller, Melissa A.; Virnig, Beth A.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Cervical cancer treatment is associated with a risk of urinary adverse events (UAEs) such as ureteral stricture and vesicovaginal fistula. We sought to measure the long-term UAE risk after surgery and radiation therapy (RT), with confounding controlled through propensity-weighted models. Methods and Materials: From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, we identified women ≥66 years old with nonmetastatic cervical cancer treated with simple surgery (SS), radical hysterectomy (RH), external beam RT plus brachytherapy (EBRT+BT), or RT+surgery. We matched them to noncancer controls 1:3. Differences in demographic and cancer characteristics were balanced by propensity weighting. Grade 3 to 4 UAEs were identified by diagnosis codes plus treatment codes. Cumulative incidence was measured using Kaplan-Meier methods. The hazard associated with different cancer treatments was compared using Cox models. Results: UAEs occurred in 272 of 1808 cases (17%) and 222 of 5424 (4%) controls; most (62%) were ureteral strictures. The raw cumulative incidence of UAEs was highest in advanced cancers. UAEs occurred in 31% of patients after EBRT+BT, 25% of patients after RT+surgery, and 15% of patients after RH; however, after propensity weighting, the incidence was similar. In adjusted Cox models (reference = controls), the UAE risk was highest after RT+surgery (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.32-11.07), followed by EBRT+BT (HR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.45-7.65), RH (HR, 3.65; 95% CI, 1.41-9.46) and SS (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.32-3.01). The higher risk after RT+surgery versus EBRT+BT was statistically significant, whereas, EBRT+BT and RH were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions: UAEs are common after cervical cancer treatment, particularly in patients with advanced cancers. UAEs are more common after RT, but these women tend to have the advanced cancers. After propensity weighting, the risk after RT was similar

  18. Major adverse cardiac events during endurance sports.

    PubMed

    Belonje, Anne; Nangrahary, Mary; de Swart, Hans; Umans, Victor

    2007-03-15

    Major adverse cardiac events in endurance exercise are usually due to underlying and unsuspected heart disease. The investigators present an analysis of major adverse cardiac events that occurred during 2 consecutive annual long distance races (a 36-km beach cycling race and a 21-km half marathon) over the past 5 years. All patients with events were transported to the hospital. Most of the 62,862 participants were men (77%; mean age 40 years). Of these, 4 men (3 runners, 1 cyclist; mean age 48 years) collapsed during (n = 2) or shortly after the races, rendering a prevalence of 0.006%. Two patients collapsed after developing chest pain, 1 of whom needed resuscitation at the event site, which was successful. These patients had acute myocardial infarctions and underwent primary angioplasty. The third patient was resuscitated at the site but did not have coronary disease or inducible ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation and collapsed presumably because of catecholamine-induced ventricular fibrillation. The fourth patient experienced heat stroke and had elevated creatine kinase-MB and troponins in the absence of electrocardiographic changes. In conclusion, the risk for major adverse cardiac events during endurance sports in well-trained athletes is very low.

  19. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    PubMed

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety.

  20. FKBP5 polymorphisms moderate the influence of adverse life events on the risk of anxiety and depressive disorders in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, Sandra; Ising, Marcus; Uhr, Manfred; Otto, Yvonne; von Klitzing, Kai; Klein, Annette Maria

    2016-01-01

    FKBP5 is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of stress-related disorders. Studies have shown that FKBP5 genotypes moderate the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression in traumatized adults. We aimed to replicate this finding in a sample of preschool children. Parents of preschoolers (N = 186) were interviewed using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment (PAPA) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depressive disorders and to quantify the child's exposure to adverse events. All FKBP5 polymorphisms showed significant interactions with mild to moderate life events, but not with severe life events, in predicting the risk of anxiety and/or depressive disorders (p = 0.003-0.019). Children who experienced a high number of mild to moderate life events had a higher risk of developing an anxiety and/or depressive disorder if they were carriers of the minor allele compared to major allele homozygotes. Results indicate that genetic variation in FKBP5 influences the risk of anxiety and/or depressive disorders in preschool age by altering the sensitivity to the deleterious effects of mild to moderate adverse events. In case of severe life events, the FKBP5 genotype does not seem to play a role, suggesting that severe life events might influence directly the risk of anxiety and/or depressive disorders independent of an FKBP5 genotype-dependent vulnerability.

  1. Systemic glucocorticoid therapy: risk factors for reported adverse events and beliefs about the drug. A cross-sectional online survey of 820 patients.

    PubMed

    Morin, Clément; Fardet, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    Despite systemic glucocorticoids are widely used, risk factors for most of their adverse events and patients' beliefs about the drug are poorly known. An online survey was conducted between February and July 2013 through the website www.cortisone-info.fr . Demographic (e.g., age, gender) and therapeutic (e.g., type of prescribed glucocorticoid, duration of prescription) data were collected. Patients were further asked to answer questions about glucocorticoid-induced adverse events and their beliefs about efficacy and safety of the drug. Risk factors for adverse events and efficacy/safety beliefs were assessed using multivariate logistic regression models. Eight hundred twenty questionnaires were analyzed (women 74.3 %; median age 49 [34-62] years, median equivalent prednisone dosage 20 [10-48] mg/day). The most frequently reported adverse events were insomnia (n = 477, 58.2 %), mood disturbances (n = 411, 50.1 %), hyperphagia (n = 402, 49.0 %), and lipodystrophy (n = 387, 47.2 %). The risk of some adverse events (e.g., weight gain, easy bruising) increased with the duration of exposure while other adverse events (e.g., insomnia, mood disorders, epigastric pain) were present since the first days of exposure. The risk of hirsutism, altered wound healing, mood disturbances, weight gain, lipodystrophy, hyperphagia, and epigastric pain decreased with age. Cutaneous disorders, morphological changes, and epigastric pain were more frequently reported by women. Interestingly, patients prescribed prednisolone reported less adverse events than those prescribed prednisone. No adverse event, demographical or prescribing characteristics were associated with beliefs about efficacy while factors associated with safety concerns were age (OR: 1.2 [1.1-1.3] per 10-year increase), osteoporosis (OR: 3.3 [1.4-7.9]), easy bruising (OR: 1.6 [1.1-2.3]), insomnia (OR: 1.7 [1.2-2.4]), and weight gain (OR: 1.6 [1.1-2.2]). These results may help clinicians to adapt information

  2. Adverse events occurring after smallpox vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lane, J Michael; Goldstein, Joel

    2003-07-01

    We reviewed the literature on adverse events reported to occur after smallpox vaccination. Nearly one-half of the United States population is vaccinia-naïve and may be at risk for development of serious adverse events. We describe the clinical features of postvaccinial central nervous system disease, progressive vaccinia, eczema vaccinatum, accidental implantations, "generalized vaccinia," and the common erythematous and/or urticarial rashes. In the 1960s, death occurred approximately once in every million primary vaccinations, with fatalities resulting from progressive vaccinia, postvaccinial encephalitis, and eczema vaccinatum. Death in revaccinees occurred less commonly and almost entirely from progressive vaccinia. In today's population, death rates might be higher because of the increased prevalence of immune deficiency and atopic dermatitis.

  3. Influence of gender on the risk of death and adverse events in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing pharmacoinvasive strategy.

    PubMed

    Lanaro, Eduardo; Caixeta, Adriano; Soares, Juliana A; Alves, Cláudia Maria Rodrigues; Barbosa, Adriano Henrique Pereira; Souza, José Augusto Marcondes; Sousa, José Marconi Almeida; Amaral, Amaury; Ferreira, Guilherme M; Moreno, Antônio Célio; Júnior, Iran Gonçalves; Stefanini, Edson; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Pharmacoinvasive treatment is an acceptable alternative for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in developing countries. The present study evaluated the influence of gender on the risks of death and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in this population. Seven municipal emergency rooms and the Emergency Mobile Healthcare Service in São Paulo treated STEMI patients with tenecteplase. The patients were subsequently transferred to a tertiary teaching hospital for early (<24 h) coronary angiography. A total of 469 patients were evaluated [329 men (70.1%)]. Compared to men, women had more advanced age (60.2 ± 12.3 vs. 56.5 ± 11 years; p = 0.002); lower body mass index (BMI; 25.85 ± 5.07 vs. 27.04 ± 4.26 kg/m2; p = 0.009); higher rates of hypertension (70.7 vs. 59.3%, p = 0.02); higher incidence of hypothyroidism (20.0 vs. 5.5%; p < 0.001), chronic renal failure (10.0 vs. 8.8%; p = 0.68), peripheral vascular disease (PVD; 19.3 vs. 4.3%; p = 0.03), and previous history of stroke (6.4 vs. 1.3%; p = 0.13); and higher thrombolysis in myocardial infarction risk scores (40.0 vs. 23.7%; p < 0.001). The overall in-hospital mortality and MACE rates for women versus men were 9.3 versus 4.9% (p = 0.07) and 12.9 versus 7.9% (p = 0.09), respectively. By multivariate analysis, diabetes (OR 4.15; 95% CI 1.86-9.25; p = 0.001), previous stroke (OR 4.81; 95% CI 1.49-15.52; p = 0.009), and hypothyroidism (OR 3.75; 95% CI 1.44-9.81; p = 0.007), were independent predictors of mortality, whereas diabetes (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.03-4.06; p = 0.04), PVD (OR 2.38; 95% CI 0.88-6.43; p = 0.08), were predictors of MACE. In STEMI patients undergoing pharmacoinvasive strategy, mortality and MACE rates were twice as high in women; however, this was due to a higher prevalence of risk factors and not gender itself. PMID:24671733

  4. Risk of Adverse Vascular Events in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme Patients Treated with Bevacizumab: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqing; Huang, Rongzhong; Xu, Zhongye

    2015-01-01

    Previous evidence suggests that the humanized anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab increases thrombosis risk in glioma patients. Here, we comprehensively assessed the risk of adverse vascular events in adult glioma patients receiving bevacizumab therapy. Systematic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were conducted to find prospective phase II/III clinical trials on adult bevacizumab-treated glioma patients and non-bevacizumab-treated controls that reported data on adverse vascular events. Four high-quality trials were finally included in the systematic review, scoring greater than or equal to 7/8 on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Three trials provided sufficient data for four meta-analytical comparisons between bevacizumab-treated and control groups of newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients: all-cause discontinuation, thrombocytopenia, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and pulmonary embolism. None of these adverse outcomes were found to be significantly different between bevacizumab-treated and control groups (P > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward significance with regard to bevacizumab therapy and the risk of pulmonary embolism (P = 0.07). As there was a trend toward significance with regard to bevacizumab therapy and the risk of pulmonary embolism, anticoagulation may be advisable in certain newly diagnosed adult GBM patients who display a history of thromboembolism and/or more serious risk factors for thromboembolic events.

  5. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed Central

    Reason, J

    1995-01-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  6. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed

    Reason, J

    1995-06-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  7. 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel Research Plan Review for: The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a meeting with representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP) Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element and HRP management on February 3-4, 2014 in Houston, TX to review the updated Research Plan for the Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response in the HRP Integrated Research Plan. The SRP is impressed with the work the immune discipline has done since the 2012 SRP review and agrees with the new wording of the Gaps, no longer questions, now statements. The SRP also likes the addition of adding targets for closing the Gaps, but it is not clear how they got to some of the interim stages (interval percentages). A major concern that the SRP has mentioned since the initial 2009 SRP meeting is that there is still not enough emphasis on the interdisciplinary aspect of the immune risk associated with other risks (i.e., nutrition, radiation, etc.). The SRP recommends that a "translational SRP" or advisory group be developed that is composed of members from all of the HRP SRPs. The SRP also thinks that the immune discipline should consider a more systems biology approach. Lastly, the SRP is concerned that the risks observed in research from low Earth orbit (LEO) missions may not accurately reflect all the risks of longer duration flight beyond LEO. Also, there does not seem to be a concern for immune responses that may occur when someone is in space longer than six months, for example, a Mars mission would take three years. The absence of disease in past and current flight scenarios does not mean the risk may not be there in future flight settings.

  8. Exposure to rufinamide and risks of CNS adverse events in drug-resistant epilepsy: a meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Alsaad, Abdulaziz M S; Koren, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Aim Epilepsy is a complex disease necessitating continuous development of new therapeutic strategies to encounter drug-resistant cases. Among new adjuvant antiepileptic drugs, rufinamide is structurally distinct from other antiepileptic drugs. It is used to treat partial-onset seizures and seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) in adult and children. To date, there has been no attempt to evaluate systematically the risks of adverse events with rufinamide. Methods We performed a quantitative risk analysis of central nervous system (CNS) adverse events of rufinamide from all randomized, double-blind, add-on, placebo-controlled trials. The meta-analysis was undertaken with fixed effects models. Results Of the 886 publications reviewed, 99 papers were retrieved and five articles met the inclusion criteria. One thousand two hundred and fifty-two patients were included. Our study showed that exposure to rufinamide was associated with a significant increase in risk of somnolence [relative ratio (RR) 1.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.33, 2.62; P = 0.0003], dizziness (RR 2.66; 95% CI 2.00, 3.55; P = 0.00001), fatigue (RR 2.14; 95% CI 1.57, 2.91; P = 0.01) and headache (RR 1.28; 95% CI 1.02, 1.59, P = 0.03). In addition, exposure to rufinamide was associated with higher treatment discontinuation rates as compared with placebo (RR 2.65; 95% CI 1.74, 4.03; P = 0.00001). Conclusions The risk of CNS adverse events appears to be increased in patients exposed to rufinamide as well as the treatment discontinuation rates. However, although statistical associations were significant, additional long term safety studies are required to confirm the clinical significance of these findings, as most reports described only mild and moderate adverse events. PMID:25132372

  9. Patient safety in external beam radiotherapy - guidelines on risk assessment and analysis of adverse error-events and near misses: introducing the ACCIRAD project.

    PubMed

    Malicki, Julian; Bly, Ritva; Bulot, Mireille; Godet, Jean-Luc; Jahnen, Andreas; Krengli, Marco; Maingon, Philippe; Martin, Carlos Prieto; Przybylska, Kamila; Skrobała, Agnieszka; Valero, Marc; Jarvinen, Hannu

    2014-08-01

    In 2011 the European Commission launched a tender to develop guidelines for risk analysis of accidental and unintended exposures in external beam radiotherapy. This tender was awarded to a consortium of 6 institutions, including the ESTRO, in late 2011. The project, denominated "ACCIRAD", recently finished the data collection phase. Data were collected by surveys administered in 38 European countries. Results indicate non-uniform implementation of event registration and classification, as well as incomplete or zero implementation of risk assessment and events analysis. Based on the survey results and analysis thereof, project leaders are currently drafting proposed guidelines entitled "Guidelines for patient safety in external beam radiotherapy - Guidelines on risk assessment and analysis of adverse-error events and near misses". The present article describes the aims and current status of the project, including results of the surveys. PMID:25245556

  10. The AFFORD Clinical Decision Aid To Identify Emergency Department Patients With Atrial Fibrillation At Low Risk For 30-Day Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tyler W.; Storrow, Alan B.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Abraham, Robert L.; Liu, Dandan; Miller, Karen F.; Moser, Kelly M.; Russ, Stephan; Roden, Dan M.; Harrell, Frank E.; Darbar, Dawood

    2015-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of emergency department (ED) patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to derive and internally validate the first prospective, ED-based clinical decision aid to identify patients with AF at low risk for 30-day adverse events. We performed a prospective cohort study at a university-affiliated, tertiary-care, ED. Patients were enrolled from June 9, 2010 to February 28, 2013 and followed for 30 days. We enrolled a convenience sample of ED patients presenting with symptomatic AF. Candidate predictors were based on ED data available in the first two hours. The decision aid was derived using model approximation (preconditioning) followed by strong bootstrap internal validation. We utilized an ordinal outcome hierarchy defined as the incidence of the most severe adverse event within 30 days of the ED evaluation. Of 497 patients enrolled, stroke and AF-related death occurred in 13 (3%) and 4 (<1%) patients, respectively. The decision aid included the following: age, triage vitals (systolic blood pressure, temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, supplemental oxygen requirement); medical history (heart failure, home sotalol use, prior percutaneous coronary intervention, electrical cardioversion, cardiac ablation, frequency of AF symptoms); ED data (2 hour heart rate, chest radiograph results, hemoglobin, creatinine, and brain natriuretic peptide). The decision aid’s c-statistic in predicting any 30-day adverse event was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.65, 0.76). In conclusion, among ED patients with AF, AFFORD provides the first evidence based decision aid for identifying patients who are at low risk for 30-day adverse events and candidates for safe discharge. PMID:25633190

  11. Limiting risk of hospital adverse events: avoiding train wrecks is more important than counting and reporting them.

    PubMed

    Morton, A; Cook, D; Mengersen, K; Waterhouse, M

    2010-12-01

    Targets implemented at national or state levels have been employed in response to excessive numbers of adverse events (AEs) such as multiple antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemias. Hospital resources are limited and setting such targets can result in resource diversion to dealing with the targeted AEs. There may be initial success as judged by decreasing counts but underlying problems are not necessarily addressed, and there is evidence that other non-targeted AEs may increase. Moreover, the values of individual observations can be greatly influenced by random variation. This can make it difficult using comparisons and targets to draw conclusions about the work of an institution. Although counting AEs is essential, the key to avoiding episodes of patient harm is prevention. This requires the implementation of evidence-based systems. These are already available for many AEs in the form of 'bundles' and checklists. When these systems are properly implemented and sustained, AE rates tend to occur at minimum predictable levels. Unfortunately, in spite of widespread knowledge and aggressive promotion, high levels of compliance have often been difficult to achieve and sustain. Better understanding and implementation of methods to sustain evidence-based systems are needed. Checklists, used as part of an overall system involving leadership and empowerment, application of evidence, culture change and measurement, may help to overcome this problem.

  12. Dietary patterns and the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in a global study of high-risk patients with stable coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ralph A. H.; Wallentin, Lars; Benatar, Jocelyne; Danchin, Nicolas; Hagström, Emil; Held, Claes; Husted, Steen; Lonn, Eva; Stebbins, Amanda; Chiswell, Karen; Vedin, Ola; Watson, David; White, Harvey D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether dietary pattern assessed by a simple self-administered food frequency questionnaire is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in high-risk patients with stable coronary artery disease. Background A Mediterranean dietary pattern has been associated with lower cardiovascular (CV) mortality. It is less certain whether foods common in western diets are associated with CV risk. Methods At baseline, 15 482 (97.8%) patients (mean age 67 ± 9 years) with stable coronary heart disease from 39 countries who participated in the Stabilisation of atherosclerotic plaque by initiation of darapladib therapy (STABILITY) trial completed a life style questionnaire which included questions on common foods. A Mediterranean diet score (MDS) was calculated for increasing consumption of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, fish, and alcohol, and for less meat, and a ‘Western diet score’ (WDS) for increasing consumption of refined grains, sweets and deserts, sugared drinks, and deep fried foods. A multi-variable Cox proportional hazards models assessed associations between MDS or WDS and MACE, defined as CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or non-fatal stroke. Results After a median follow-up of 3.7 years MACE occurred in 7.3% of 2885 subjects with an MDS ≥15, 10.5% of 4018 subjects with an MDS of 13–14, and 10.8% of 8579 subjects with an MDS ≤12. A one unit increase in MDS >12 was associated with lower MACE after adjusting for all covariates (+1 category HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91, 0.98, P = 0.002). There was no association between WDS (adjusted model +1 category HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.97, 1.01) and MACE. Conclusion Greater consumption of healthy foods may be more important for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease than avoidance of less healthy foods typical of Western diets. PMID:27109584

  13. Risk of Anaphylaxis with Repeated Courses of Rasburicase: A Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports (RADAR) Project

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Katherine C.; Champlain, Amanda H.; Cotliar, Jonathan A.; Belknap, Steven M.; West, Dennis P.; Mehta, Jayesh; Trifilio, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rasburicase, a recombinant urate oxidase, is used to rapidly metabolize uric acid in patients with hyperuricaemia. Rasburicase is an immunogenic therapeutic protein, which has been shown to elicit antibody response in 64 % of healthy volunteers within 1–6 weeks after the initial course, with persistent antibodies for over 1 year. Drug labelling indicates that anaphylaxis rarely occurs (in <1 % of patients) after a single course of therapy with rasburicase, but there are no data available on the incidence of anaphylaxis in patients receiving a subsequent rasburicase course. Objective To determine the incidence of anaphylaxis after multiple treatment courses of rasburicase. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on 97 consecutively treated patients who received repeated courses of rasburicase for hyperuricaemia, to determine whether the risk of anaphylaxis is increased with repeated exposure to rasburicase. Results None of the 97 patients who were reviewed experienced anaphylaxis during the first rasburicase course; however, six patients (6.2 %) experienced anaphylaxis during a subsequent rasburicase treatment course (p = 0.03). Conclusion Anaphylaxis after a second course of rasburicase appears to occur more frequently than described in the US Food and Drug Administration-approved package insert for initial treatment courses. Given the serious nature of anaphylactic events, caution is advised when administering repeated courses of rasburicase. PMID:25566825

  14. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided. PMID:25535415

  15. Identifying Adverse Drug Events by Relational Learning.

    PubMed

    Page, David; Costa, Vítor Santos; Natarajan, Sriraam; Barnard, Aubrey; Peissig, Peggy; Caldwell, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The pharmaceutical industry, consumer protection groups, users of medications and government oversight agencies are all strongly interested in identifying adverse reactions to drugs. While a clinical trial of a drug may use only a thousand patients, once a drug is released on the market it may be taken by millions of patients. As a result, in many cases adverse drug events (ADEs) are observed in the broader population that were not identified during clinical trials. Therefore, there is a need for continued, post-marketing surveillance of drugs to identify previously-unanticipated ADEs. This paper casts this problem as a reverse machine learning task, related to relational subgroup discovery and provides an initial evaluation of this approach based on experiments with an actual EMR/EHR and known adverse drug events. PMID:24955289

  16. Adverse Events Associated with Prolonged Antibiotic Use

    PubMed Central

    Meropol, Sharon B.; Chan, K. Arnold; Chen, Zhen; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Hennessy, Sean; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Platt, Richard; Schech, Stephanie D.; Shatin, Deborah; Metlay, Joshua P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Infectious Diseases Society of America and US CDC recommend 60 days of ciprofloxacin, doxycycline or amoxicillin for anthrax prophylaxis. It is not possible to determine severe adverse drug event (ADE) risks from the few people thus far exposed to anthrax prophylaxis. This study’s objective was to estimate risks of severe ADEs associated with long-term ciprofloxacin, doxycycline and amoxicillin exposure using 3 large databases: one electronic medical record (General Practice Research Database) and two claims databases (UnitedHealthcare, HMO Research Network). Methods We include office visit, hospital admission and prescription data for 1/1/1999–6/30/2001. Exposure variable was oral antibiotic person-days (pds). Primary outcome was hospitalization during exposure with ADE diagnoses: anaphylaxis, phototoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, seizures, ventricular arrhythmia or infectious colitis. Results We randomly sampled 999,773, 1,047,496 and 1,819,004 patients from Databases A, B and C respectively. 33,183 amoxicillin, 15,250 ciprofloxacin and 50,171 doxycycline prescriptions continued ≥30 days. ADE hospitalizations during long-term exposure were not observed in Database A. ADEs during long-term amoxicillin were seen only in Database C with 5 ADEs or 1.2(0.4–2.7) ADEs/100,000 pds exposure. Long-term ciprofloxacin showed 3 and 4 ADEs with 5.7(1.2–16.6) and 3.5(1.0–9.0) ADEs/100,000 pds in Databases B and C, respectively. Only Database B had ADEs during long-term doxycycline with 3 ADEs or 0.9(0.2–2.6) ADEs/100,000 pds. For most events, the incidence rate ratio, comparing >28 vs.1–28 pds exposure was <1, showing limited evidence for cumulative dose-related ADEs from long-term exposure. Conclusions Long-term amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin and doxycycline appears safe, supporting use of these medications if needed for large-scale post-exposure anthrax prophylaxis. PMID:18215001

  17. [Analysis of Spontaneously Reported Adverse Events].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Observational study is necessary for the evaluation of drug effectiveness in clinical practice. In recent years, the use of spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) for adverse drug reactions has increased and they have become an important resource for regulatory science. SRS, being the largest and most well-known databases worldwide, are one of the primary tools used for postmarketing surveillance and pharmacovigilance. To analyze SRS, the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER) are reviewed. Authorized pharmacovigilance algorithms were used for signal detection, including the reporting odds ratio. An SRS is a passive reporting database and is therefore subject to numerous sources of selection bias, including overreporting, underreporting, and a lack of a denominator. Despite the inherent limitations of spontaneous reporting, SRS databases are a rich resource and data mining index that provide powerful means of identifying potential associations between drugs and their adverse effects. Our results, which are based on the evaluation of SRS databases, provide essential knowledge that could improve our understanding of clinical issues.

  18. Reducing medical errors and adverse events.

    PubMed

    Pham, Julius Cuong; Aswani, Monica S; Rosen, Michael; Lee, HeeWon; Huddle, Matthew; Weeks, Kristina; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Medical errors account for ∼98,000 deaths per year in the United States. They increase disability and costs and decrease confidence in the health care system. We review several important types of medical errors and adverse events. We discuss medication errors, healthcare-acquired infections, falls, handoff errors, diagnostic errors, and surgical errors. We describe the impact of these errors, review causes and contributing factors, and provide an overview of strategies to reduce these events. We also discuss teamwork/safety culture, an important aspect in reducing medical errors.

  19. Efficacy and adverse events of azacitidine in the treatment of hemodialysis patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoshihiro, Tomoyasu; Muta, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Kenichi; Shimamoto, Syo; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Ogawa, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    We describe two hemodialysis patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) treated with azacitidine. A 65-year-old woman (case 1) received azacitidine at 75 mg/m(2) for 7 days, and a 52-year-old man (case 2) with liver cirrhosis received a 70% dose of azacitidine. Both cases developed grade 4 cytopenia, but they achieved transfusion independence after 3 and 2 courses, and the durations of remission were 10 and 11 months, respectively. Case 1 had the complication of febrile neutropenia (FN) twice during the 1(st) and 2(nd) courses, but continued to receive azacitidine treatment thereafter. Case 2 developed infectious peritonitis during the sixth course, and azacitidine treatment was thus discontinued. After a 4-month treatment interruption, he became transfusion-dependent, and re-induction of azacitidine was successful. Of note, the course of case 1 was complicated by erythema nodosum on admission, which then disappeared after one course of azacitidine treatment. The mean durations of hospitalization were 17.5 and 23 days per course of azacitidine treatment, respectively. Though there are few reports of azacitidine treatment for hemodialysis patients with high-risk MDS, we advocate administering azacitidine to such patients, while paying close attention to the dose intensity of azacitidine and taking prompt action to manage infectious complications. PMID:27599416

  20. Resting heart rate associates with one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Li; Wang, Cheng-Long; Wang, Pei-Li; Xu, Hao; Du, Jian-Peng; Zhang, Da-Wu; Gao, Zhu-Ye; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Chang-Geng; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2015-01-01

    The study was to access the association between resting heart rate (RHR) and one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients with ACS after PCI (n = 808) were prospectively followed-up for MACE. RHR was obtained from electrocardiogram. MACE was defined as a composite of cardiac death, nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction, ischemic-driven revascularization, and ischemic stroke. The association between RHR and one-year risk of MACE was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model. Compared with patients with RHR >76 bpm, the adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) was 0.51 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.23–1.14; P = 0.100) for patients with RHR < 61 bpm, and 0.44 (95%CI: 0.23–0.85; P = 0.014) for those with RHR 61–76 bpm. For patients with RHR ≥ 61 bpm, an increase of 10 bpm in RHR was associated with an increase by 38.0% in the risk of MACE (AHR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.04–1.83; P = 0.026). ACS patients after PCI with RHR >76 bpm were at higher risk of MACE during one-year follow-up compared with patients with RHR 61–76 bpm. An elevated RHR ≥ 61 bpm was associated with increased risk of one-year MACE in ACS patients. PMID:26585407

  1. Antimicrobial Postexposure Prophylaxis for Anthrax: Adverse Events and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Gabarro, Montse; Zell, Elizabeth R.; Hayslett, James; Lukacs, Susan; Goldstein, Susan; Factor, Stephanie; Jones, Joshua; Ridzon, Renee; Williams, Ian; Rosenstein, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    We collected data during postexposure antimicrobial prophylaxis campaigns and from a prophylaxis program evaluation 60 days after start of antimicrobial prophylaxis involving persons from six U.S. sites where Bacillus anthracis exposures occurred. Adverse events associated with antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent anthrax were commonly reported, but hospitalizations and serious adverse events as defined by Food and Drug Administration criteria were rare. Overall adherence during 60 days of antimicrobial prophylaxis was poor (44%), ranging from 21% of persons exposed in the Morgan postal facility in New York City to 64% of persons exposed at the Brentwood postal facility in Washington, D.C. Adherence was highest among participants in an investigational new drug protocol to receive additional antibiotics with or without anthrax vaccine—a likely surrogate for anthrax risk perception. Adherence of <60 days was not consistently associated with adverse events. PMID:12396927

  2. Risk of adverse events among older adults following co-prescription of clarithromycin and statins not metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daniel Q.; Kim, Richard; McArthur, Eric; Fleet, Jamie L.; Bailey, David G.; Juurlink, David; Shariff, Salimah Z.; Gomes, Tara; Mamdani, Muhammad; Gandhi, Sonja; Dixon, Stephanie; Garg, Amit X.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibitor clarithromycin may also inhibit liver-specific organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATP1B1 and OATP1B3). We studied whether concurrent use of clarithromycin and a statin not metabolized by CYP3A4 was associated with an increased frequency of serious adverse events. Methods: Using large health care databases, we studied a population-based cohort of older adults (mean age 74 years) who were taking a statin not metabolized by CYP3A4 (rosuvastatin [76% of prescriptions], pravastatin [21%] or fluvastatin [3%]) between 2002 and 2013 and were newly prescribed clarithromycin (n = 51 523) or azithromycin (n = 52 518), the latter an antibiotic that inhibits neither CYP3A4 nor OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. Outcomes were hospital admission with a diagnostic code for rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury or hyperkalemia, and all-cause mortality. All outcomes were assessed within 30 days after co-prescription. Results: Compared with the control group, patients co-prescribed clarithromycin and a statin not metabolized by CYP3A4 were at increased risk of hospital admission with acute kidney injury (adjusted relative risk [RR] 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31 to 2.09), admission with hyperkalemia (adjusted RR 2.17, 95% CI 1.22 to 3.86) and all-cause mortality (adjusted RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.76). The adjusted RR for admission with rhabdomyolysis was 2.27 (95% CI 0.86 to 5.96). The absolute increase in risk for each outcome was small and likely below 1%, even after we considered the insensitivity of some hospital database codes. Interpretation: Among older adults taking a statin not metabolized by CYP3A4, co-prescription of clarithromycin versus azithromycin was associated with a modest but statistically significant increase in the 30-day absolute risk of adverse outcomes. PMID:25534598

  3. Sex-Specific Associations Between Coronary Artery Plaque Extent and Risk of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events: from the CONFIRM Long-Term Registry

    PubMed Central

    Gransar, Heidi; Lin, Fay; Valenti, Valentina; Cho, Iksung; Berman, Daniel; Callister, Tracy; DeLago, Augustin; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew; Kaufmann, Philipp; Achenbach, Stephan; Raff, Gilbert; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Cademartiri, Filippo; Maffei, Erica; Villines, Todd; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Marques, Hugo; Shaw, Leslee; Min, James K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine sex-specific associations, if any, between per-vessel CAD extent and the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) over a five-year study duration. Background The presence and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is associated with increased short-term mortality and MACE. Nevertheless, some uncertainty remains regarding the influence of gender on these findings. Methods 5,632 patients (mean age 60.2 + 11.8 years, 36.5% female) from the CONFIRM (COronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter) registry were followed over the course of 5 years. Obstructive CAD was defined as ≥50% luminal stenosis in a coronary vessel. Using Cox proportional-hazards models, we calculated the hazard ratio (HR) for incident MACE among women and men, defined as death or myocardial infarction (MI). Results Obstructive CAD was more prevalent in men (42% vs. 26%, p<0.001) whereas women were more likely to have normal coronary arteries (43% vs. 27%, p<0.001). There were a total of 798 incident MACE events. After adjustment, there was a strong association between increased MACE risk and non-obstructive CAD (HR 2.16 for women, 2.56 for men, p<0.001 for both), obstructive one-vessel CAD (HR 3.69 and 2.66, p<0.001), two-vessel CAD (HR 3.92 and 3.55, p<0.001) and three-vessel/left-main CAD (HR 5.94 and 4.44, p<0.001). Further exploratory analyses of atherosclerotic burden did not identify gender-specific patterns predictive of MACE. Conclusion In a large prospective CCTA cohort followed long-term, we did not observe an interaction of gender for the association between MACE risk and increased per-vessel extent of obstructive CAD. These findings highlight the persistent prognostic significance of anatomic CAD subsets as detected by CCTA for the risk of MACE in both women and men. PMID:27056154

  4. Consumer reporting of adverse events following immunization

    PubMed Central

    Clothier, Hazel J; Selvaraj, Gowri; Easton, Mee Lee; Lewis, Georgina; Crawford, Nigel W; Buttery, Jim P

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance of adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) is an essential component of vaccine safety monitoring. The most commonly utilized passive surveillance systems rely predominantly on reporting by health care providers (HCP). We reviewed adverse event reports received in Victoria, Australia since surveillance commencement in July 2007, to June 2013 (6 years) to ascertain the contribution of consumer (vaccinee or their parent/guardian) reporting to vaccine safety monitoring and to inform future surveillance system development directions. Categorical data included were: reporter type; serious and non-serious AEFI category; and, vaccinee age group. Chi-square test and 2-sample test of proportions were used to compare categories; trend changes were assessed using linear regression. Consumer reporting increased over the 6 years, reaching 21% of reports received in 2013 (P <0.001), most commonly for children aged less than 7 years. Consumer reports were 5% more likely to describe serious AEFI than HCP (P = 0.018) and 10% more likely to result in specialist clinic attendance (P <0.001). Although online reporting increased to 32% of all report since its introduction in 2010, 85% of consumers continued to report by phone. Consumer reporting of AEFI is a valuable component of vaccine safety surveillance in addition to HCP reporting. Changes are required to AEFI reporting systems to implement efficient consumer AEFI reporting, but may be justified for their potential impact on signal detection sensitivity. PMID:25483686

  5. Anticoagulation-associated adverse drug events

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Nguyen, Thanh Nha; Cios, Deborah; Labreche, Matthew; Hohlfelder, Benjamin; Fanikos, John; Fiumara, Karen; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anticoagulant drugs are among the most common medications that cause adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitalized patients. We performed a five-year retrospective study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital to determine clinical characteristics, types, root causes, and outcomes of anticoagulant-associated adverse drug events (ADEs). Methods We reviewed all inpatient anticoagulant-associated ADEs, including adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and medication errors, reported at Brigham and Women’s Hospital through the Safety Reporting System from May 2004 to May 2009. We also collected data regarding the cost associated with hospitalizations in which ADRs occurred. Results Of 463 anticoagulant-associated ADEs, 226 were MEs (48.8%), 141 were ADRs (30.5%), and 96 (20.7%) involved both a medication error and ADR. Seventy percent of anticoagulant-associated ADEs were potentially preventable. Transcription errors (48%) were the most frequent root cause of anticoagulant-associated medication errors, while medication errors (40%) were a common root cause of anticoagulant-associated ADRs. Death within 30 days of anticoagulant-associated ADEs occurred in 11% of patients. After an anticoagulant-associated ADR, most hospitalization expenditures were attributable to nursing costs (mean $33,189 per ADR) followed by pharmacy costs (mean $7,451 per ADR). Conclusion Most anticoagulant-associated ADEs among inpatients result from medication errors and are therefore potentially preventable. We observed an elevated 30-day mortality rate among patients who suffered an anticoagulant-associated ADE and high hospitalization costs following ADRs. Further Quality Improvement efforts to reduce anticoagulant-associated medication errors are warranted to improve patient safety and decrease health care expenditures. PMID:22114827

  6. Regular treatment with formoterol for chronic asthma: serious adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Christopher J; Cates, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence has suggested a link between beta2-agonists and increases in asthma mortality. There has been much debate about possible causal links for this association, and whether regular (daily) long-acting beta2-agonists are safe. Objectives The aim of this review is to assess the risk of fatal and non-fatal serious adverse events in trials that randomised patients with chronic asthma to regular formoterol versus placebo or regular short-acting beta2-agonists. Search methods We identified trials using the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials. We checked websites of clinical trial registers for unpublished trial data and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) submissions in relation to formoterol. The date of the most recent search was January 2012. Selection criteria We included controlled, parallel design clinical trials on patients of any age and severity of asthma if they randomised patients to treatment with regular formoterol and were of at least 12 weeks’ duration. Concomitant use of inhaled corticosteroids was allowed, as long as this was not part of the randomised treatment regimen. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion in the review. One author extracted outcome data and the second author checked them. We sought unpublished data on mortality and serious adverse events. Main results The review includes 22 studies (8032 participants) comparing regular formoterol to placebo and salbutamol. Non-fatal serious adverse event data could be obtained for all participants from published studies comparing formoterol and placebo but only 80% of those comparing formoterol with salbutamol or terbutaline. Three deaths occurred on regular formoterol and none on placebo; this difference was not statistically significant. It was not possible to assess disease-specific mortality in view of the small number of deaths. Non-fatal serious adverse events were significantly increased when

  7. Systematic Analysis of Adverse Event Reports for Sex Differences in Adverse Drug Events.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Li, Dingcheng; Wang, Liwei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-04-22

    Increasing evidence has shown that sex differences exist in Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). Identifying those sex differences in ADEs could reduce the experience of ADEs for patients and could be conducive to the development of personalized medicine. In this study, we analyzed a normalized US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Chi-squared test was conducted to discover which treatment regimens or drugs had sex differences in adverse events. Moreover, reporting odds ratio (ROR) and P value were calculated to quantify the signals of sex differences for specific drug-event combinations. Logistic regression was applied to remove the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events. We detected among 668 drugs of the most frequent 20 treatment regimens in the United States, 307 drugs have sex differences in ADEs. In addition, we identified 736 unique drug-event combinations with significant sex differences. After removing the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events, there are 266 combinations remained. Drug labels or previous studies verified some of them while others warrant further investigation.

  8. Systematic Analysis of Adverse Event Reports for Sex Differences in Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Li, Dingcheng; Wang, Liwei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that sex differences exist in Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). Identifying those sex differences in ADEs could reduce the experience of ADEs for patients and could be conducive to the development of personalized medicine. In this study, we analyzed a normalized US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Chi-squared test was conducted to discover which treatment regimens or drugs had sex differences in adverse events. Moreover, reporting odds ratio (ROR) and P value were calculated to quantify the signals of sex differences for specific drug-event combinations. Logistic regression was applied to remove the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events. We detected among 668 drugs of the most frequent 20 treatment regimens in the United States, 307 drugs have sex differences in ADEs. In addition, we identified 736 unique drug-event combinations with significant sex differences. After removing the confounding effect from the baseline sex difference of the events, there are 266 combinations remained. Drug labels or previous studies verified some of them while others warrant further investigation. PMID:27102014

  9. Safety monitoring in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)

    PubMed Central

    Shimabukuro, Tom T.; Nguyen, Michael; Martin, David; DeStefano, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conduct post-licensure vaccine safety monitoring using the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a spontaneous (or passive) reporting system. This means that after a vaccine is approved, CDC and FDA continue to monitor safety while it is distributed in the marketplace for use by collecting and analyzing spontaneous reports of adverse events that occur in persons following vaccination. Various methods and statistical techniques are used to analyze VAERS data, which CDC and FDA use to guide further safety evaluations and inform decisions around vaccine recommendations and regulatory action. VAERS data must be interpreted with caution due to the inherent limitations of passive surveillance. VAERS is primarily a safety signal detection and hypothesis generating system. Generally, VAERS data cannot be used to determine if a vaccine caused an adverse event. VAERS data interpreted alone or out of context can lead to erroneous conclusions about cause and effect as well as the risk of adverse events occurring following vaccination. CDC makes VAERS data available to the public and readily accessible online. We describe fundamental vaccine safety concepts, provide an overview of VAERS for healthcare professionals who provide vaccinations and might want to report or better understand a vaccine adverse event, and explain how CDC and FDA analyze VAERS data. We also describe strengths and limitations, and address common misconceptions about VAERS. Information in this review will be helpful for healthcare professionals counseling patients, parents, and others on vaccine safety and benefit-risk balance of vaccination. PMID:26209838

  10. Innovative tools for assessing risks for severe adverse events in areas of overlapping Loa loa and other filarial distributions: the application of micro-stratification mapping

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The wide distribution of Loa loa infection (loiasis) throughout the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is a major obstacle to the plans to eliminate onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis (LF) because the standard drug regime is dependent on ivermectin, which cannot be used in co-endemic areas due to the risk of severe adverse events (SAEs). A better understanding of the micro-epidemiology, overlapping low and high risk areas, and how they relate to SAEs is critical to ensure safe and effective treatment. Findings Based on published data from the Bas Congo Province in DRC, this study used geographical information systems (GIS) to re-map and analyse onchocerciasis and loiasis prevalence (<20%, 20 to 40%, >40%) at 144 sites in relation to health district areas reporting SAEs. The new maps highlighted the contrasting patterns of the high prevalence sites, and significant geographical overlap between low onchocerciasis and high loiasis sites. Statistical analyses found that sites with medium to high loiasis prevalence were 10 to 16 times more likely to be in a SAE area than those with low prevalence of loiasis. Sites where both onchocerciasis and loiasis prevalence was >20% were also associated with SAE areas. Conclusions Collaborative efforts between the national onchocerciasis and LF programmes are critical as plans to scale interventions are moving forward and thus, alternative strategies needed in loiasis co-endemic areas which may include the new L. loa test and treat strategy using the Cellscope, or interventions such as integrated vector management, or anti Wolbachia therapy using doxycycline. PMID:24992829

  11. Patient stratification and identification of adverse event correlations in the space of 1190 drug related adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Roitmann, Eva; Eriksson, Robert; Brunak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: New pharmacovigilance methods are needed as a consequence of the morbidity caused by drugs. We exploit fine-grained drug related adverse event information extracted by text mining from electronic medical records (EMRs) to stratify patients based on their adverse events and to determine adverse event co-occurrences. Methods: We analyzed the similarity of adverse event profiles of 2347 patients extracted from EMRs from a mental health center in Denmark. The patients were clustered based on their adverse event profiles and the similarities were presented as a network. The set of adverse events in each main patient cluster was evaluated. Co-occurrences of adverse events in patients (p-value < 0.01) were identified and presented as well. Results: We found that each cluster of patients typically had a most distinguishing adverse event. Examination of the co-occurrences of adverse events in patients led to the identification of potentially interesting adverse event correlations that may be further investigated as well as provide further patient stratification opportunities. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach in pharmacovigilance to stratify patients based on fine-grained adverse event profiles, which also makes it possible to identify adverse event correlations. Used on larger data sets, this data-driven method has the potential to reveal unknown patterns concerning adverse event occurrences. PMID:25249979

  12. The attitudes of owners and veterinary professionals in the United Kingdom to the risk of adverse events associated with using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat dogs with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Belshaw, Zoe; Asher, Lucy; Dean, Rachel S

    2016-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed by veterinary surgeons for the treatment of canine osteoarthritis, and affected dogs may receive these drugs for long periods of time. Whilst short term administration of NSAIDs to dogs is linked to adverse events such as gastrointestinal haemorrhage and renal injury, reports of adverse events associated with their long-term administration are limited in the veterinary literature. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes towards the long term use of NSAIDs for canine osteoarthritis held by three groups who manage osteoarthritic dogs in the United Kingdom: dog owners, veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses. A qualitative methodology was adopted, using semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Thematic analysis of these data identified three themes: awareness of potential risks; recognition of adverse events; and influence of risk perception on the use of NSAIDs. Awareness of, and concern about, the risk of adverse events associated with NSAID administration to dogs with osteoarthritis was high in all groups, with veterinary surgeons being one of a variety of information sources used by owners to acquire this knowledge. Veterinary surgeons described difficulty in recognising, managing and avoiding adverse events associated with NSAIDs. When adverse events occurred, a wide range of management approaches were adopted ranging from a brief drug respite to permanent cessation of administration of any NSAIDs to that dog. Commonly employed approaches to minimise risk included dose reduction and screening blood tests. This study describes a high level of concern about the risks associated with long term NSAID administration to dogs with osteoarthritis and highlights a diverse range of strategies employed to minimise these risks. The evidence base for these strategies is poor, and this may present a risk to animal welfare if the affected dogs are not receiving adequate analgesia. In order to

  13. Reporting vaccine-associated adverse events.

    PubMed Central

    Duclos, P.; Hockin, J.; Pless, R.; Lawlor, B.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine family physicians' awareness of the need to monitor and report vaccine-associated adverse events (VAAE) in Canada and to identify mechanisms that could facilitate reporting. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: Canadian family practices. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of 747 family physicians. Overall response rate was 32% (226 of 717 eligible physicians). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Access to education on VAAE; knowledge about VAAE monitoring systems, reporting criteria, and reporting forms; method of reporting VAAEs and reasons for not reporting them; and current experience with VAAEs. RESULTS: Of 226 respondents, 55% reported observing VAAEs, and 42% reported the event. Fewer than 50% were aware of a monitoring system for VAAE, and only 39% had had VAAE-related education during medical training. Only 28% knew the reporting criteria. Reporting was significantly associated with knowledge of VAAE monitoring systems and reporting criteria (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Physicians need more feedback and education on VAAE reporting and more information about the importance of reporting and about reporting criteria and methods. PMID:9303234

  14. Incidence and relative risk of adverse events of special interest in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer treated with CYP-17 inhibitors: A meta-analysis of published trials.

    PubMed

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Sigala, Sandra; Danesi, Romano; Re, Marzia Del; Bonetta, Alberto; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Zanotti, Laura; Bottini, Alberto; Generali, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    Abiraterone acetate and orteronel are two CYP-17 inhibitors that have been studied in prostate cancer. They have shown relevant toxicities, including fluid retention/oedema, hypokalaemia, hypertension, liver function test abnormalities and cardiac events. The goal of this study was to determine the risk of special adverse events related to CYP- 17 inhibitor in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRCP). Summary data from four randomized phase III trials comparing CYP-17 inhibitors and prednisone versus placebo and prednisone in metastatic CRCP patients were meta-analysed. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) for the risk of all-grade and grade 3-4 adverse events of special interest were calculated. Data from 4916 patients (2849 in the AA experimental arm; 2067 in the control arm) were analysed. The incidence of grade 3-4 adverse events was never more than 10% of the patients. However, compared with placebo, the CYP-17 inhibitor significantly increased the all-grade events of hypertension (RR=1.53; 95% CI=1.3-1.8; p<0.00001), hypokalaemia (RR=1.56; 95% CI=1.29-1.89; p<0.00001), cardiac disorders (RR=1.47; 95% CI=1.27-1.7; p<0.00001) liver function test abnormalities (RR=1.93; 95% CI=1.15-3.24; p=0.01) grade≥3 adverse events, hypokalaemia (RR=4.23; 95% CI=1.28-13.99; p=0.02) and cardiac disorders (RR=1.55; 95% CI=1.18-2.05; p=0.002). A lot of adverse events such as hypertension, hypokalaemia, cardiac disorders and liver function test abnormalities are increased during CYP-17 inhibitor based therapy. Strict monitoring of these side effects should be considered during CYP- 17 inhibitor therapy in prostate cancer patients.

  15. Mixed-effects Poisson regression analysis of adverse event reports

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Segawa, Eisuke; Karabatsos, George; Amatya, Anup K.; Bhaumik, Dulal K.; Brown, C. Hendricks; Kapur, Kush; Marcus, Sue M.; Hur, Kwan; Mann, J. John

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A new statistical methodology is developed for the analysis of spontaneous adverse event (AE) reports from post-marketing drug surveillance data. The method involves both empirical Bayes (EB) and fully Bayes estimation of rate multipliers for each drug within a class of drugs, for a particular AE, based on a mixed-effects Poisson regression model. Both parametric and semiparametric models for the random-effect distribution are examined. The method is applied to data from Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) on the relationship between antidepressants and suicide. We obtain point estimates and 95 per cent confidence (posterior) intervals for the rate multiplier for each drug (e.g. antidepressants), which can be used to determine whether a particular drug has an increased risk of association with a particular AE (e.g. suicide). Confidence (posterior) intervals that do not include 1.0 provide evidence for either significant protective or harmful associations of the drug and the adverse effect. We also examine EB, parametric Bayes, and semiparametric Bayes estimators of the rate multipliers and associated confidence (posterior) intervals. Results of our analysis of the FDA AERS data revealed that newer antidepressants are associated with lower rates of suicide adverse event reports compared with older antidepressants. We recommend improvements to the existing AERS system, which are likely to improve its public health value as an early warning system. PMID:18404622

  16. Regular treatment with salmeterol for chronic asthma: serious adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Christopher J; Cates, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence has suggested a link between beta2-agonists and increases in asthma mortality. There has been much debate about possible causal links for this association, and whether regular (daily) long-acting beta2-agonists are safe. Objectives The aim of this review is to assess the risk of fatal and non-fatal serious adverse events in trials that randomised patients with chronic asthma to regular salmeterol versus placebo or regular short-acting beta2-agonists. Search methods We identified trials using the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials. We checked websites of clinical trial registers for unpublished trial data and FDA submissions in relation to salmeterol. The date of the most recent search was August 2011. Selection criteria We included controlled parallel design clinical trials on patients of any age and severity of asthma if they randomised patients to treatment with regular salmeterol and were of at least 12 weeks’ duration. Concomitant use of inhaled corticosteroids was allowed, as long as this was not part of the randomised treatment regimen. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion in the review. One author extracted outcome data and the second checked them. We sought unpublished data on mortality and serious adverse events. Main results The review includes 26 trials comparing salmeterol to placebo and eight trials comparing with salbutamol. These included 62,815 participants with asthma (including 2,599 children). In six trials (2,766 patients), no serious adverse event data could be obtained. All-cause mortality was higher with regular salmeterol than placebo but the increase was not significant (Peto odds ratio (OR) 1.33 (95% CI 0.85 to 2.08)). Non-fatal serious adverse events were significantly increased when regular salmeterol was compared with placebo (OR 1.15 95% CI 1.02 to 1.29). One extra serious adverse event occurred over 28 weeks for every 188 people

  17. [Adverse events and near misses in medical imaging].

    PubMed

    Brandão, Paulo; Rodrigues, Susana; Nelas, Luís; Neves, José; Alves, Vítor

    2011-01-01

    In 2000, the Institute of Medicine's report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, caught the public attention documenting the magnitude of the medical error problem and the inherent patient safety: medical errors cause between 44,000 and 98,000 deaths annually in the United States. Currently, there is a growing interest in risk management on the medical field, particularly in the management of adverse events. It has been mainly due to the commitment of the World Health Organization, that this field of research has gained increasing the attention it deserves. Medical imaging is one of the high risk fields for the occurrence of errors, especially due to the multiplicity of techniques, the several stakeholders and the complexity of the whole circuit that involves the conduct of studies. Many of the methods used to analyze patient safety were adapted from risk-management techniques in high-risk industries (e.g. chemical, nuclear power and aviation industry). It is recognized that we can learn more from our mistakes than from our successes and the reporting systems in these industries have provided a valuable contribution to error prevention and risk management techniques. At a minimum, adverse events reporting systems can help to identify hazards and risks, providing important information on the system aspects that should be improved. However, the accumulation of potentially relevant data contributes little to healthcare services improvement. It is crucial to apply models to identify the underlying system failures, the root causes, and enhance the sharing of knowledge and experience. In this paper, it is suggested a solution to reduce adverse events, by identifying and eliminating the root causes that are in their source. How the Eindhoven Classification Model was adapted and extended specifically for the Medical Imaging field is also presented. The proposed approach includes the root causes analysis and introduces incomplete information concepts through

  18. Association of Lower Fractional Flow Reserve Values With Higher Risk of Adverse Cardiac Events for Lesions Deferred Revascularization Among Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Masrani Mehta, Shriti; Depta, Jeremiah P; Novak, Eric; Patel, Jayendrakumar S; Patel, Yogesh; Raymer, David; Facey, Gabrielle; Zajarias, Alan; Lasala, John M; Singh, Jasvindar; Bach, Richard G; Kurz, Howard I

    2015-01-01

    Background The safety of deferring revascularization based on fractional flow reserve (FFR) during acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is unclear. We evaluated the association of FFR and adverse cardiac events among patients with coronary lesions deferred revascularization based on FFR in the setting of ACS versus non-ACS. Methods and Results The study population (674 patients; 816 lesions) was divided into ACS (n=334) and non-ACS (n=340) groups based on the diagnosis when revascularization was deferred based on FFR values >0.80 between October 2002 and July 2010. The association and interaction between FFR and clinical outcomes was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models within each group (mean follow-up of 4.5±2.1 years). Subsequent revascularization of a deferred lesion was classified as a deferred lesion intervention (DLI), whereas the composite of DLI or myocardial infarction (MI) attributed to a deferred lesion was designated as deferred lesion failure (DLF). In the non-ACS group, lower FFR values were not associated with any increase in adverse cardiac events. In the ACS group, every 0.01 decrease in FFR was associated with a significantly higher rate of cardiovascular death, MI, or DLI (hazard ratio [HR], 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03 to 1.12), MI or DLI (HR, 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.14), DLF (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.18), MI (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.14), and DLI (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.18). Conclusion Lower FFR values among ACS patients with coronary lesions deferred revascularization based on FFR are associated with a significantly higher rate of adverse cardiac events. This association was not observed in non-ACS patients. PMID:26289346

  19. Adverse events following immunization with vaccines containing adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Cerpa-Cruz, S; Paredes-Casillas, P; Landeros Navarro, E; Bernard-Medina, A G; Martínez-Bonilla, G; Gutiérrez-Ureña, S

    2013-07-01

    A traditional infectious disease vaccine is a preparation of live attenuated, inactivated or killed pathogen that stimulates immunity. Vaccine immunologic adjuvants are compounds incorporated into vaccines to enhance immunogenicity. Adjuvants have recently been implicated in the new syndrome named ASIA autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants. The objective describes the frequencies of post-vaccination clinical syndrome induced by adjuvants. We performed a cross-sectional study; adverse event following immunization was defined as any untoward medical occurrence that follows immunization 54 days prior to the event. Data on vaccinations and other risk factors were obtained from daily epidemiologic surveillance. Descriptive statistics were done using means and standard deviation, and odds ratio adjusted for potential confounding variables was calculated with SPSS 17 software. Forty-three out of 120 patients with moderate or severe manifestations following immunization were hospitalized from 2008 to 2011. All patients fulfilled at least 2 major and 1 minor criteria suggested by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin for ASIA diagnosis. The most frequent clinical findings were pyrexia 68%, arthralgias 47%, cutaneous disorders 33%, muscle weakness 16% and myalgias 14%. Three patients had diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome, one patient had Adult-Still's disease 3 days after vaccination. A total of 76% of the events occurred in the first 3 days post-vaccination. Two patients with previous autoimmune disease showed severe adverse reactions with the reactivation of their illness. Minor local reactions were present in 49% of patients. Vaccines containing adjuvants may be associated with an increased risk of autoimmune/inflammatory adverse events following immunization.

  20. Analysis of Adverse Events in Identifying GPS Human Factors Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Catherine A.; Hwoschinsky, Peter V.; Adams, Richard J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze GPS related adverse events such as accidents and incidents (A/I), Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) reports and Pilots Deviations (PDs) to create a framework for developing a human factors risk awareness program. Although the occurrence of directly related GPS accidents is small the frequency of PDs and ASRS reports indicated there is a growing problem with situational awareness in terminal airspace related to different types of GPs operational issues. This paper addresses the findings of the preliminary research and a brief discussion of some of the literature on related GPS and automation issues.

  1. Using Insulin Infusion Sets in CSII for Longer Than the Recommended Usage Time Leads to a High Risk for Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Pfützner, Andreas; Sachsenheimer, Daniela; Grenningloh, Marco; Heschel, Matthias; Walther-Johannesen, Lene; Gharabli, Rabi; Klonoff, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infusion sets for use with insulin pumps are recommended for use for 2 to 3 days to avoid local skin reactions, for example, to the insulin formulation and preservatives like meta-cresol. However, many patients use the catheters longer for economic reasons. We performed this study to investigate the tolerability of 2-day use of infusion sets in comparison to 4-day use in a real-world setting. Methods: This prospective randomized controlled crossover study with 2 × 3-month observation periods was performed with 24 type 1 patients. At baseline, patients were trained on the use of the infusion system (Medtronic /Mio® or inset™ II) and randomized to any of the 2 treatment sequences. Observation parameters included glycemic control, frequency and nature of device-related, and procedure-related adverse events and patient preference. Results: The per-protocol analysis was performed with 22 patients (5 men, 17 women, age 39 ± 11 years, BMI 27.0 ± 3.5 kg/m2). The number of catheter related adverse events was 290 with 2-day use versus 495 with 4-day use (P < .05). The overall number of treatment related events was 750 with 2-day use versus 934 with 4-day use (P < .001). There was no difference in glycemic control between the treatment arms. Treatment satisfaction was higher with 2-day use (very high/high satisfaction: 90.4% versus 4 day-use: 77.3%, P < .05). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that using the infusion sets for a longer usage period of 2-3 days resulted in a clinically relevant increase in treatment-related tolerability problems. Patients should be trained and encouraged not to use insulin pump infusion sets for a longer than the recommended time period. PMID:26341262

  2. Assessment of surgical adverse events in Rio de Janeiro hospitals.

    PubMed

    Moura, Maria de Lourdes de Oliveira; Mendes, Walter

    2012-09-01

    A study on surgical adverse events (AE) is relevant because of the frequency of these events, because they are in part attributable to deficiencies in health care, because of their considerable impact on patient health and economic consequences on social and health expenditures, and because this study is an assessment tool for quality of care. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and the contributive factors of surgical AE in hospitals of Rio de Janeiro. This retrospective cohort study aimed to perform a descriptive analysis of secondary data obtained from the Adverse Events Computer Program, which was developed for collecting data for the assessment of AE in three teaching hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Incidence of patients with surgical AE was 3.5% (38 of 1,103 patients) (95% CI 2.4 - 4.4) and the proportion of patients submitted to surgery among patients with surgical AE was 5.9% (38 of 643) (95% CI 4.1 - 7.6). The proportion of avoidable surgical AE was 68.3% (28 of 41 events) and the proportion of patients with avoidable surgical AE was 65.8% (25 of 38 patients). One in five patients with surgical AE had a permanent disability or died. Over 60% of the cases were classified as not complex or of low complexity, and with low risk for care-related AE. PMID:23090300

  3. Serious adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    de Menezes Martins, Reinaldo; Fernandes Leal, Maria da Luz; Homma, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Yellow fever vaccine was considered one of the safest vaccines, but in recent years it was found that it could rarely cause invasive and disseminated disease in some otherwise healthy individuals, with high lethality. After extensive studies, although some risk factors have been identified, the real cause of causes of this serious adverse event are largely unknown, but findings point to individual host factors. Meningoencephalitis, once considered to happen only in children less than 6 months of age, has also been identified in older children and adults, but with good prognosis. Efforts are being made to develop a safer yellow fever vaccine, and an inactivated vaccine or a vaccine prepared with the vaccine virus envelope produced in plants are being tested. Even with serious and rare adverse events, yellow fever vaccine is the best way to avoid yellow fever, a disease of high lethality and should be used routinely in endemic areas, and on people from non-endemic areas that could be exposed, according to a careful risk-benefit analysis.

  4. Analysing adverse events by time-to-event models: the CLEOPATRA study.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Tanja; Schumacher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    When analysing primary and secondary endpoints in a clinical trial with patients suffering from a chronic disease, statistical models for time-to-event data are commonly used and accepted. This is in contrast to the analysis of data on adverse events where often only a table with observed frequencies and corresponding test statistics is reported. An example is the recently published CLEOPATRA study where a three-drug regimen is compared with a two-drug regimen in patients with HER2-positive first-line metastatic breast cancer. Here, as described earlier, primary and secondary endpoints (progression-free and overall survival) are analysed using time-to-event models, whereas adverse events are summarized in a simple frequency table, although the duration of study treatment differs substantially. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of time-to-event models to first serious adverse events using the data of the CLEOPATRA study. This will cover the broad range between a simple incidence rate approach over survival and competing risks models (with death as a competing event) to multi-state models. We illustrate all approaches by means of graphical displays highlighting the temporal dynamics and compare the obtained results. For the CLEOPATRA study, the resulting hazard ratios are all in the same order of magnitude. But the use of time-to-event models provides valuable and additional information that would potentially be overlooked by only presenting incidence proportions. These models adequately address the temporal dynamics of serious adverse events as well as death of patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Adverse events of monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  6. Adverse Events of Monoclonal Antibodies Used for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  7. Adverse life events and mental health in middle adolescence.

    PubMed

    Flouri, Eirini; Kallis, Constantinos

    2011-04-01

    This study's aim was to search for the appropriate functional form of the effect of proximal cumulative contextual risk (PCCR), measured with number of adverse life events experienced in the last 6 months, on adolescent psychopathology and prosocial behavior, measured with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. The study sample was 171 year ten (aged 14-15) adolescents from predominantly socio-economically disadvantaged families in the UK. Adjustment was made for parental education, and for child's age, gender, and academic achievement, which was measured with results in Standard Attainment Tests in English, mathematics and science taken in the previous year. PCCR predicted total difficulties, emotional symptoms, conduct problems and hyperactivity. The relationship between PCCR and total difficulties and emotional symptoms was non-quadratic; the PCCR/externalizing problems relationship was quadratic. The findings highlight the importance of considering both outcome specificity and non-linear patterns of associations when modelling cumulative contextual risk effects on adolescent psychopathology. PMID:20434208

  8. Adverse Events of Auricular Therapy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Molassiotis, Alexander; Wang, Tao; Suen, Lorna K. P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the literature on adverse events associated with auricular therapy (AT). Case reports, case series, surveys, and all types of clinical trials reporting adverse events of AT were included. Relevant articles were mainly retrieved from 13 electronic databases and seven Chinese journals on complementary medicine. AT-related adverse events were reported in 32 randomized controlled trials, five uncontrolled clinical trials, four case reports, and two controlled clinical trials. For auricular acupuncture, the most frequently reported adverse events were tenderness or pain at insertion, dizziness, local discomfort, minor bleeding and nausea, and so forth. For auricular acupressure, local skin irritation and discomfort, mild tenderness or pain, and dizziness were commonly reported. Skin irritation, local discomfort, and pain were detected in auricular electroacupuncture, and minor infection was identified in auricular bloodletting therapy. Most of these events were transient, mild, and tolerable, and no serious adverse events were identified. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that AT is a relatively safe approach. Considering the patient's safety, prospective or retrospective surveys are needed in future research to gather practitioner-reported and patient-reported adverse events on AT, and the quality of adverse events reporting in future AT trials should be improved. PMID:25435890

  9. Adverse events in 50 cats with allergic dermatitis receiving ciclosporin.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Nicole A; McKeever, Patrick J; Eisenschenk, Melissa C

    2011-12-01

    Ciclosporin is an immunosuppressive drug that has been used to treat allergies and other immune-mediated diseases in cats, dogs and humans. Information about the adverse effects of ciclosporin in cats has been limited to smaller studies and case reports. Adverse effects in dogs are mainly gastrointestinal in nature, but humans can also experience hypertension and altered renal function. The aim of this retrospective case series study was to document the occurrence and clinical appearance of adverse events in cats receiving ciclosporin to treat allergic skin disease. The medical records of 50 cats with allergic dermatitis treated with oral ciclosporin (1.9-7.3 mg/kg/day) were reviewed. Adverse events occurred in 66% (33 cats). Adverse events likely to be associated with ciclosporin included the following: vomiting or diarrhoea within 1-8 weeks of receiving ciclosporin (24%), weight loss (16%), anorexia and subsequent hepatic lipidosis (2%) and gingival hyperplasia (2%). Other adverse events less likely to be associated with ciclosporin therapy included the following: weight gain (14%), dental tartar and gingivitis (10%), otitis (4%), chronic diarrhoea (4%), inflammatory bowel disease with indolent gastrointestinal lymphoma (2%), urinary tract infection (2%), cataract (2%), elevated liver enzymes (2%), hyperthyroidism and renal failure (2%) and transient inappropriate urination (2%). Some cats experienced multiple adverse events. Case-control studies are needed to prove cause and effect of ciclosporin with regard to these adverse events. PMID:21545660

  10. Reporting of Adverse Events in Published and Unpublished Studies of Health Care Interventions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Golder, Su; Wright, Kath

    2016-01-01

    Background We performed a systematic review to assess whether we can quantify the underreporting of adverse events (AEs) in the published medical literature documenting the results of clinical trials as compared with other nonpublished sources, and whether we can measure the impact this underreporting has on systematic reviews of adverse events. Methods and Findings Studies were identified from 15 databases (including MEDLINE and Embase) and by handsearching, reference checking, internet searches, and contacting experts. The last database searches were conducted in July 2016. There were 28 methodological evaluations that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 9 studies compared the proportion of trials reporting adverse events by publication status. The median percentage of published documents with adverse events information was 46% compared to 95% in the corresponding unpublished documents. There was a similar pattern with unmatched studies, for which 43% of published studies contained adverse events information compared to 83% of unpublished studies. A total of 11 studies compared the numbers of adverse events in matched published and unpublished documents. The percentage of adverse events that would have been missed had each analysis relied only on the published versions varied between 43% and 100%, with a median of 64%. Within these 11 studies, 24 comparisons of named adverse events such as death, suicide, or respiratory adverse events were undertaken. In 18 of the 24 comparisons, the number of named adverse events was higher in unpublished than published documents. Additionally, 2 other studies demonstrated that there are substantially more types of adverse events reported in matched unpublished than published documents. There were 20 meta-analyses that reported the odds ratios (ORs) and/or risk ratios (RRs) for adverse events with and without unpublished data. Inclusion of unpublished data increased the precision of the pooled estimates (narrower 95

  11. Adverse events after hepatitis A B combination vaccine.

    PubMed

    Woo, Emily Jane; Miller, Nancy B; Ball, Robert

    2006-03-24

    In May 2001, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Hepatitis A Inactivated and Hepatitis B Recombinant Vaccine (HEPAB) for immunization of adults. From May 2001 to September 2003, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) received 305 reports of adverse events after HEPAB. Many events were similar to those reported after the monovalent hepatitis A and B vaccines. Non-serious events included constitutional symptoms and local reactions. Serious events included neurologic, hepatobiliary, and dermatologic conditions, and detailed medical and epidemiological review did not suggest a clear pattern of evidence supporting a causal relationship with the vaccine, except for injection site reactions and some allergic reactions.

  12. A comparison of active adverse event surveillance systems worldwide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Lin; Moon, Jinhee; Segal, Jodi B

    2014-08-01

    Post-marketing drug surveillance for adverse drug events (ADEs) has typically relied on spontaneous reporting. Recently, regulatory agencies have turned their attention to more preemptive approaches that use existing data for surveillance. We conducted an environmental scan to identify active surveillance systems worldwide that use existing data for the detection of ADEs. We extracted data about the systems' structures, data, and functions. We synthesized the information across systems to identify common features of these systems. We identified nine active surveillance systems. Two systems are US based-the FDA Sentinel Initiative (including both the Mini-Sentinel Initiative and the Federal Partner Collaboration) and the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD); two are Canadian-the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies (CNODES) and the Vaccine and Immunization Surveillance in Ontario (VISION); and two are European-the Exploring and Understanding Adverse Drug Reactions by Integrative Mining of Clinical Records and Biomedical Knowledge (EU-ADR) Alliance and the Vaccine Adverse Event Surveillance and Communication (VAESCO). Additionally, there is the Asian Pharmacoepidemiology Network (AsPEN) and the Shanghai Drug Monitoring and Evaluative System (SDMES). We identified two systems in the UK-the Vigilance and Risk Management of Medicines (VRMM) Division and the Drug Safety Research Unit (DSRU), an independent academic unit. These surveillance systems mostly use administrative claims or electronic medical records; most conduct pharmacovigilance on behalf of a regulatory agency. Either a common data model or a centralized model is used to access existing data. The systems have been built using national data alone or via partnership with other countries. However, active surveillance systems using existing data remain rare. North America and Europe have the most population coverage; with Asian countries making good advances. PMID:25022829

  13. [Adverse events in patients from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Arriaga-Dávila, José de Jesús; Domínguez-Serrano, María Isabel; Guzmán-Bihouet, Beatriz Filomena; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: detection of adverse events is part of the safety management in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of adverse events that occurred in a pediatric hospital. Methods: cross-sectional study of the adverse events occurred in a pediatric hospital from 2007 to 2009. Factors associated with their developmental causes were identified. The statistical analysis was descriptive and bivariate, with contingency tables to estimate the relationship between those factors. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Results: a total of 177 adverse events were registered. When they began, human factor occurred in 23 cases (13 %, OR = 1.41, p = 0.001), organizational factor was present in 71 cases (40 %, OR = 1.91, p = 0.236) and technical factor in 46 cases (26 %, OR = 0.87, p = 0.01). Blows or bruises from falls as a result of adverse events occurred in 71 cases (40 %, 95 % CI = 64-78). Conclusions: we found 1.84 events per 100 hospital discharges during the study period. The fall of patients ranked first of the adverse events identified.

  14. Psychiatrists' Attitudes toward Metabolic Adverse Events in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Yamazaki, Manabu; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Mori, Takao; Sugai, Takuro; Suzuki, Yutaro; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing concern about the metabolic abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia. Aims The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of psychiatrists toward metabolic adverse events in patients with schizophrenia. Method A brief questionnaire was constructed to cover the following broad areas: the psychiatrists' recognition of the metabolic risk of antipsychotic therapy, pattern of monitoring patients for physical risks, practice pattern for physical risks, and knowledge of metabolic disturbance. In March 2012, the questionnaire was mailed to 8,482 psychiatrists who were working at hospitals belonging to the Japan Psychiatric Hospitals Association. Results The overall response rate was 2,583/8,482 (30.5%). Of the respondents, 85.2% (2,200/2,581) reported that they were concerned about prescribing antipsychotics that have a risk of elevating blood sugar; 47.6% (1,201/2,524) stated that their frequency of monitoring patients under antipsychotic treatment was based on their own experiences; and only 20.6% (5,22/2,534) of respondents answered that the frequency with which they monitored their patients was sufficient to reduce the metabolic risks. Conclusions Psychiatrists practicing in Japan were generally aware and concerned about the metabolic risks for patients being treated with antipsychotics. Although psychiatrists should monitor their patients for metabolic abnormalities to balance these risks, a limited number of psychiatrists answered that the frequency with which they monitored patients to reduce the metabolic risks was sufficient. Promotion of the best practices of pharmacotherapy and monitoring is needed for psychiatrists treating patients with schizophrenia. PMID:24466260

  15. Well-trained, healthy triathletes experience no adverse health risks regarding oxidative stress and DNA damage by participating in an ultra-endurance event.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Reichhold, Stefanie; Hölzl, Christine; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Nics, Lukas; Meisel, Marlies; Neubauer, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    Also physical exercise in general is accepted to be protective, acute and strenuous exercise has been shown to induce oxidative stress. Enhanced formation of free radicals leads to oxidation of macromolecules and to DNA damage. On the other hand ultra-endurance events which require strenuous exercise are very popular and the number of participants is continuously increasing worldwide. Since only few data exists on Ironman triathletes, who are prototypes of ultra-endurance athletes, this study was aimed at assessing the risk of oxidative stress and DNA damage after finishing a triathlon and to predict a possible health risk. Blood samples of 42 male athletes were taken 2 days before, within 20 min after the race, 1, 5 and 19 days post-race. Oxidative stress marker increased only moderately after the race and returned to baseline after 5 days. Marker of DNA damage measured by the SCGE assay with and without restriction enzymes as well as by the sister chromatid exchange assay did either show no change or deceased within the first day after the race. Due to intake during the race and the release by the cells plasma concentrations of vitamin C and α-tocopherol increased after the event and returned to baseline 1 day after. This study indicates that despite a temporary increase in some oxidative stress markers, there is no persistent oxidative stress and no DNA damage in response to an Ironman triathlon in trained athletes, mainly due to an appropriate antioxidant intake and general protective alterations in the antioxidant defence system.

  16. Grading dermatologic adverse events of cancer treatments: the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice P; Setser, Ann; Anadkat, Milan J; Cotliar, Jonathan; Olsen, Elise A; Garden, Benjamin C; Lacouture, Mario E

    2012-11-01

    Dermatologic adverse events to cancer therapies have become more prevalent and may to lead to dose modifications or discontinuation of life-saving or prolonging treatments. This has resulted in a new collaboration between oncologists and dermatologists, which requires accurate cataloging and grading of side effects. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 is a descriptive terminology and grading system that can be used for uniform reporting of adverse events. A proper understanding of this standardized classification system is essential for dermatologists to properly communicate with all physicians caring for patients with cancer. PMID:22502948

  17. Vaccine-related adverse events in Cuban children, 1999-2008.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Belkys M; Concepción, Damarys; Galindo, Miguel A; Pérez, Antonio; Saiz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    commission, which concluded that 8 of the 13 severe events were vaccination-related. CONCLUSIONS Low rates of severe vaccine-associated adverse events observed in this study underline the low risk of vaccination relative to its demonstrated benefits in Cuba. Decision-making for the continued success of the National Immunization Program is supported by reliable information from comprehensive national surveillance with standarized reporting, along with multidisciplinary expert analysis of rare and severe adverse events and program errors. KEYWORDS Immunization; immunization programs; vaccines; vaccination; product surveillance, postmarketing; adverse drug event; communicable disease control; Cuba.

  18. Could chiropractors screen for adverse drug events in the community? Survey of US chiropractors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The "Put Prevention into Practice" campaign of the US Public Health Service (USPHS) was launched with the dissemination of the Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services that recommended standards of clinical care for various prevention activities, including preventive clinical strategies to reduce the risk of adverse drug events. We explored whether nonprescribing clinicians such as chiropractors may contribute to advancing drug safety initiatives by identifying potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients, and by bringing suspected adverse drug events to the attention of the prescribing clinicians. Methods Mail survey of US chiropractors about their detection of potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients. Results Over half of responding chiropractors (62%) reported having identified a suspected adverse drug event occurring in one of their chiropractic patients. The severity of suspected drug-related events detected ranged from mild to severe. Conclusions Chiropractors or other nonprescribing clinicians may be in a position to detect potential adverse drug events in the community. These detection and reporting mechanisms should be standardized and policies related to clinical case management of suspected adverse drug events occurring in their patients should be developed. PMID:21083911

  19. Serenoa repens (saw palmetto): a systematic review of adverse events.

    PubMed

    Agbabiaka, Taofikat B; Pittler, Max H; Wider, Barbara; Ernst, Edzard

    2009-01-01

    Serenoa repens (W. Bartram) Small, also known as saw palmetto, is one of the most widely used herbal preparations for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Although a number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of the efficacy of S. repens for the treatment of LUTS and BPH have been published, no systematic review on its drug interactions or adverse events currently exists. This review assesses all available human safety data of S. repens monopreparations. Systematic literature searches were conducted from date of inception to February 2008 in five electronic databases; reference lists and our departmental files were checked for further relevant publications. Information was requested from spontaneous reporting schemes of the WHO and national safety bodies. Twenty-four manufacturers/distributors of S. repens preparations and four herbalist organizations were contacted for additional information. No language restrictions were imposed. Only reports of adverse events in humans from monopreparations of S. repens were included. Data from all articles, regardless of study design, reporting adverse events or interactions were independently extracted by the first author and validated by the second. Forty articles (26 randomized controlled trials, 4 non-randomized controlled trials, 6 uncontrolled trials and 4 case reports/series) were included. They suggest that adverse events associated with the use of S. repens are mild and similar to those with placebo. The most frequently reported adverse events are abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea, fatigue, headache, decreased libido and rhinitis. More serious adverse events such as death and cerebral haemorrhage are reported in isolated case reports and data from spontaneous reporting schemes, but causality is questionable. No drug interactions were reported. Currently available data suggest that S. repens is well tolerated by most users and is not

  20. [Nursing practice in view of adverse events following vaccination].

    PubMed

    Bisetto, Lúcia Helena Linheira; Cubas, Marcia Regina; Malucelli, Andreia

    2011-10-01

    The objectives of this article are to identify the adverse events following vaccination, the focus if nursing practice, using the Post-Vaccination Adverse Events Information System database, and discuss on the nurses' practice on the surveillance for those events. Secondary data were those regarding the vaccines applied in the Brazilian public health system, in the period from 1999 to 2008, totaling 65,442 registers, 59,899 of which were confirmed and 1,403 were associated with another vaccine. The 16 nursing practice events totaled 21,727 registers. Although they account for 35.4% of the registers, the data do not reflect the reality, because their reliability depends on the knowledge network that comprises diagnosis, notification and inclusion in the system. Discussions were made on interventions for the most prevalent events: fever and local events. Most interventions established in the adverse events manual was in agreement with the literature, though there were differences in the content between conducts for the same event due to different vaccines.

  1. Reliability of adverse symptom event reporting by clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuelin; Coffey, Charles W.; Sit, Laura; Shaw, Mary; Lavene, Dawn; Bennett, Antonia V.; Fruscione, Mike; Rogak, Lauren; Hay, Jennifer; Gönen, Mithat; Schrag, Deborah; Basch, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Adverse symptom event reporting is vital as part of clinical trials and drug labeling to ensure patient safety and inform risk–benefit decision making. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of adverse event reporting of different clinicians for the same patient for the same visit. Methods A retrospective reliability analysis was completed for a sample of 393 cancer patients (42.8% men; age 26–91, M = 62.39) from lung (n = 134), prostate (n = 113), and Ob/Gyn (n = 146) clinics. These patients were each seen by two clinicians who independently rated seven Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) symptoms. Twenty-three percent of patients were enrolled in therapeutic clinical trials. Results The average time between rater evaluations was 68 min. Intraclass correlation coefficients were moderate for constipation (0.50), diarrhea (0.58), dyspnea (0.69), fatigue (0.50), nausea (0.52), neuropathy (0.71), and vomiting (0.46). These values demonstrated stability over follow-up visits. Two-point differences, which would likely affect treatment decisions, were most frequently seen among symptomatic patients for constipation (18%), vomiting (15%), and nausea (8%). Conclusion Agreement between different clinicians when reporting adverse symptom events is moderate at best. Modification of approaches to adverse symptom reporting, such as patient self-reporting, should be considered. PMID:21984468

  2. Methodologic approach to adverse events applied to bupropion clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cato, A E; Cook, L; Starbuck, R; Heatherington, D

    1983-05-01

    A strategy for identifying and classifying adverse events and for assessing their relationship to therapy and frequency of occurrence is presented. Data from clinical trials of bupropion (Wellbutrin), a novel antidepressant, are presented as an example. Bupropion was studied in four double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (N = 360) at dosages of 300-750 mg/day. The incidence and frequency of adverse events associated with bupropion were minimal, and correlated well with the known pharmacologic and clinical properties of this new antidepressant. PMID:6406455

  3. Health care costs for prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy: treatment and adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Krahn, M.D.; Bremner, K.E.; Luo, J.; Alibhai, S.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Serious adverse events have been associated with androgen deprivation therapy (adt) for prostate cancer (pca), but few studies address the costs of those events. Methods All pca patients (ICD-9-CM 185) in Ontario who started 90 days or more of adt or had orchiectomy at the age of 66 or older during 1995–2005 (n = 26,809) were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry and drug and hospital data. Diagnosis dates of adverse events—myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, stroke, deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, any diabetes, and fracture or osteoporosis—before and after adt initiation were determined from administrative data. We excluded patients with the same diagnosis before and after adt, and we allocated each patient’s time from adt initiation to death or December 31, 2007, into health states: adt (no adverse event), adt-ae (specified single adverse event), Multiple (>1 event), and Final (≤180 days before death). We used methods for Canadian health administrative data to estimate annual total health care costs during each state, and we examined monthly trends. Results Approximately 50% of 21,811 patients with no pre-adt adverse event developed 1 or more events after adt. The costliest adverse event state was stroke ($26,432/year). Multiple was the most frequent (n = 2,336) and the second most costly health state ($24,374/year). Costs were highest in the first month after diagnosis (from $1,714 for diabetes to $14,068 for myocardial infarction). Costs declined within 18 months, ranging from $784 per 30 days (diabetes) to $1,852 per 30 days (stroke). Adverse events increased the costs of adt by 100% to 265%. Conclusions The economic burden of adverse events is relevant to programs and policies from clinic to government, and that burden merits consideration in the risks and benefits of adt. PMID:24940106

  4. Adverse Drug Event Ontology: Gap Analysis for Clinical Surveillance Application.

    PubMed

    Adam, Terrence J; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug event identification and management are an important patient safety problem given the potential for event prevention. Previous efforts to provide structured data methods for population level identification of adverse drug events have been established, but important gaps in coverage remain. ADE identification gaps contribute to suboptimal and inefficient event identification. To address the ADE identification problem, a gap assessment was completed with the creation of a proposed comprehensive ontology using a Minimal Clinical Data Set framework incorporating existing identification approaches, clinical literature and a large set of inpatient clinical data. The new ontology was developed and tested using the National Inpatient Sample database with the validation results demonstrating expanded ADE identification capacity. In addition, the newly proposed ontology elements are noted to have significant inpatient mortality, above median inpatient costs and a longer length of stay when compared to existing ADE ontology elements and patients without ADE exposure.

  5. Adverse Drug Event Ontology: Gap Analysis for Clinical Surveillance Application

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Terrence J.; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug event identification and management are an important patient safety problem given the potential for event prevention. Previous efforts to provide structured data methods for population level identification of adverse drug events have been established, but important gaps in coverage remain. ADE identification gaps contribute to suboptimal and inefficient event identification. To address the ADE identification problem, a gap assessment was completed with the creation of a proposed comprehensive ontology using a Minimal Clinical Data Set framework incorporating existing identification approaches, clinical literature and a large set of inpatient clinical data. The new ontology was developed and tested using the National Inpatient Sample database with the validation results demonstrating expanded ADE identification capacity. In addition, the newly proposed ontology elements are noted to have significant inpatient mortality, above median inpatient costs and a longer length of stay when compared to existing ADE ontology elements and patients without ADE exposure. PMID:26306223

  6. Root Cause Analysis: Learning from Adverse Safety Events.

    PubMed

    Brook, Olga R; Kruskal, Jonathan B; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Larson, David B

    2015-10-01

    Serious adverse events continue to occur in clinical practice, despite our best preventive efforts. It is essential that radiologists, both as individuals and as a part of organizations, learn from such events and make appropriate changes to decrease the likelihood that such events will recur. Root cause analysis (RCA) is a process to (a) identify factors that underlie variation in performance or that predispose an event toward undesired outcomes and (b) allow for development of effective strategies to decrease the likelihood of similar adverse events occurring in the future. An RCA process should be performed within the environment of a culture of safety, focusing on underlying system contributors and, in a confidential manner, taking into account the emotional effects on the staff involved. The Joint Commission now requires that a credible RCA be performed within 45 days for all sentinel or major adverse events, emphasizing the need for all radiologists to understand the processes with which an effective RCA can be performed. Several RCA-related tools that have been found to be useful in the radiology setting include the "five whys" approach to determine causation; cause-and-effect, or Ishikawa, diagrams; causal tree mapping; affinity diagrams; and Pareto charts. PMID:26466177

  7. [The management of an adverse event in a paediatric unit].

    PubMed

    Cruz, Emmanuelle; Dubrulle, Aurélie

    2016-04-01

    Adverse events remain a major issue in care services. The mission of hospital authorities is to analyse them in order to put in place corrective and preventive measures. The objective is to prevent them reoccurring and to ensure the sustainable improvement of the quality and safety of care. This article presents an example in paediatrics with parenteral nutrition. PMID:27085928

  8. Hematological Adverse Events in Clozapine-Treated Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerbino-Rosen, Ginny; Roofeh, David; Tompkins, D. Andrew; Feryo, Doug; Nusser, Laurie; Kranzler, Harvey; Napolitano, Barbara; Frederickson, Anne; Henderson, Inika; Rhinewine, Joe; Kumra, Sanjiv

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively examine rates of hematological adverse events (HAEs) in psychiatrically ill, hospitalized children treated with clozapine. Method: Clozapine treatment was administered in an open-label fashion using a flexible titration schedule, and data from weekly complete blood counts was obtained. The rate of neutropenia and…

  9. [Learning from errors after a care-related adverse event].

    PubMed

    Richard, Christian; Pibarot, Marie-Laure; Zantman, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    The mobilisation of all health professionals with regard to the detection and analysis of care-related adverse events is an essential element in the improvement of the safety of care. This approach is required by the authorities and justifiably expected by users. PMID:27085926

  10. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  11. Microfluidic Platform for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping of the Thiopurine S-Methyltransferase Gene to Evaluate Risk for Adverse Drug Events

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Jeeshan; Kagiala, Govind V.; Pushpakom, Sudeep; Lauzon, Jana; Makin, Alistair; Atrazhev, Alexey; Stickel, Alex; Newman, William G.; Backhouse, Christopher J.; Pilarski, Linda M.

    2007-01-01

    Prospective clinical pharmacogenetic testing of the thiopurine S-methyltransferase gene remains to be realized despite the large body of evidence demonstrating clinical benefit for the patient and cost effectiveness for health care systems. We describe an entirely microchip-based method to genotype for common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the thiopurine S-methyltransferase gene that lead to serious adverse drug reactions for patients undergoing thiopurine therapy. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction have been adapted to a microfluidic chip-based polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis platform to genotype the common *2, *3A, and *3C functional alleles. In total, 80 patients being treated with thiopurines were genotyped, with 100% concordance between microchip and conventional methods. This is the first report of single nucleotide polymorphism detection using portable instrumentation and represents a significant step toward miniaturized for personalized treatment and automated point-of-care testing. PMID:17690215

  12. Predicting the short-term risk of diabetes in HIV-positive patients: the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study

    PubMed Central

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe W; Fontas, Eric; Weber, Rainer; De Wit, Stephane; Bruyand, Mathias; Reiss, Peter; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Monforte, Antonella D'Arminio; Friis-Møller, Nina; Lundgren, Jens D; Law, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Introduction HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) frequently experience metabolic complications such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, as well as lipodystrophy, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Rates of DM and other glucose-associated disorders among HIV-positive patients have been reported to range between 2 and 14%, and in an ageing HIV-positive population, the prevalence of DM is expected to continue to increase. This study aims to develop a model to predict the short-term (six-month) risk of DM in HIV-positive populations and to compare the existing models developed in the general population. Methods All patients recruited to the Data Collection on Adverse events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study with follow-up data, without prior DM, myocardial infarction or other CVD events and with a complete DM risk factor profile were included. Conventional risk factors identified in the general population as well as key HIV-related factors were assessed using Poisson-regression methods. Expected probabilities of DM events were also determined based on the Framingham Offspring Study DM equation. The D:A:D and Framingham equations were then assessed using an internal-external validation process; area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve and predicted DM events were determined. Results Of 33,308 patients, 16,632 (50%) patients were included, with 376 cases of new onset DM during 89,469 person-years (PY). Factors predictive of DM included higher glucose, body mass index (BMI) and triglyceride levels, and older age. Among HIV-related factors, recent CD4 counts of<200 cells/µL and lipodystrophy were predictive of new onset DM. The mean performance of the D:A:D and Framingham equations yielded AUROC of 0.894 (95% CI: 0.849, 0.940) and 0.877 (95% CI: 0.823, 0.932), respectively. The Framingham equation over-predicted DM events compared to D:A:D for lower glucose and lower

  13. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term “hypersensitivity” is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as “hypersensitivities” while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  14. Gambling and Adverse Life Events Among Urban Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Grace P.; Derevensky, Jeffrey L.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.; Martins, Silvia S.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the cross sectional association between adverse life events and gambling in a sample of 515 urban adolescents (average age 17, 55% male, 88% African American). Approximately half of the sample had gambled in the past year (51%); 78% of the gamblers gambled monthly and 39% had a gambling-related problem. On the other hand, 88% of the sample had experienced at least one life event in the past year, and those experiencing events tended to live in more disadvantaged neighborhoods. The mere acknowledgement of experiencing a stressful life event in the past year (yes/no) was not associated with an increase in odds of being a gambler, with gambling more frequently, or with having a gambling problem. However, when the context of the event was considered, an association was found between directly experiencing threatening and deviant/violent types of events and frequent gambling (OR > 2). Additionally, the probability of being a gambler increased as the number of events experienced increased (aOR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.13, P = 0.013), but problems among gamblers were not associated with the number of events experienced (aOR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.92, 1.11, P = 0.876). During adolescence, life events appear to be connected more with the frequency of gambling rather than with problems related to gambling. PMID:21614529

  15. Adverse Drug Event Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference.

    PubMed

    Ducoffe, Aaron R; Baehr, Avi; Peña, Juliet C; Rider, Briana B; Yang, Sandra; Hu, Dale J

    2016-09-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) have been highlighted as a national patient safety and public health challenge by the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan), which was released by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in August 2014. The following October, the ADE Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference provided an opportunity for federal agencies, national experts, and stakeholders to coordinate and collaborate in the initiative to reduce preventable ADEs. The single-day conference included morning plenary sessions focused on the surveillance, evidence-based prevention, incentives and oversights, and additional research needs of the drug classes highlighted in the ADE Action Plan: anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioids. Afternoon breakout sessions allowed for facilitated discussions on measures for tracking national progress in ADE prevention and the identification of opportunities to ensure safe and high-quality health care and medication use.

  16. [A near-miss event. A new approach in the study of adverse events].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Cía, I; Obón Azuara, B; Aibar Remón, C

    2008-04-01

    A near-miss event is defined as an event that could have resulted in an injury, fatality, or property damage if it had not been prevented. Analysis of near-miss events could be an efficient method in the study of adverse events. Reporting of near-misses has many benefits in the study of adverse events since near-misses occur more frequently than adverse events. In addition, as they have no consequences, fear that the professionals involved would have to report them is less. However, up to now, this method has been slow to develop. We present two clinical cases that help to understand the usefulness of the near-miss reporting system.

  17. [Need for innovation in working with adverse events].

    PubMed

    Viskum, Birgit; Juhl, Andreas Granhof; Pedersen, Inge; Stæhr, Michael Dyre

    2011-10-10

    Patient safety has been in focus in the Danish health care for the past five years, with a mandatory reporting system for adverse events/incidents at hospitals. The incidents have been analysed with the Root Cause Analysis. This analysis is a relatively simple linear cause effect analysis, however, not suitable for the use in a complex sociotechnic health-care system. There is a need for other methods and approaches, which can reflect this complexity and focus on the future prospective prevention.

  18. Hematological Parameters Improve Prediction of Mortality and Secondary Adverse Events in Coronary Angiography Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gijsberts, Crystel M.; den Ruijter, Hester M.; de Kleijn, Dominique P.V.; Huisman, Albert; ten Berg, Maarten J.; van Wijk, Richard H.A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Voskuil, Michiel; Pasterkamp, Gerard; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Hoefer, Imo E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prediction of primary cardiovascular events has been thoroughly investigated since the landmark Framingham risk score was introduced. However, prediction of secondary events after initial events of coronary artery disease (CAD) poses a new challenge. In a cohort of coronary angiography patients (n = 1760), we examined readily available hematological parameters from the UPOD (Utrecht Patient Oriented Database) and their addition to prediction of secondary cardiovascular events. Backward stepwise multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to test their ability to predict death and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Continuous net reclassification improvement (cNRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) measures were calculated for the hematological parameters on top of traditional risk factors to assess prediction improvement. Panels of 3 to 8 hematological parameters significantly improved prediction of death and adverse events. The IDIs ranged from 0.02 to 0.07 (all P < 0.001) among outcome measures and the cNRIs from 0.11 to 0.40 (P < 0.001 in 5 of 6 outcome measures). In the hematological panels red cell distribution width (RDW) appeared most often. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratio of RDW per 1 standard deviation (SD) increase for MACE was 1.19 [1.08–1.32], P < 0.001. Routinely measured hematological parameters significantly improved prediction of mortality and adverse events in coronary angiography patients. Accurately indicating high-risk patients is of paramount importance in clinical decision-making. PMID:26559287

  19. The Role of a Research Administration Program in Adverse Event Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedor, Carol; Cola, Philip; Polites, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    The reporting, analysis, and management of adverse events (AEs) provide an ongoing assessment of risk in the context of a clinical trial and enhance the protection of human research participants and the informed consent process. Effective and efficient review of AEs has been a long-standing challenge for Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and…

  20. Clarifying adverse drug events: a clinician's guide to terminology, documentation, and reporting.

    PubMed

    Nebeker, Jonathan R; Barach, Paul; Samore, Matthew H

    2004-05-18

    Adverse drug events cause substantial morbidity and mortality, yet they remain underappreciated and misunderstood. The terminology to describe errors and patient harm associated with medications causes much confusion. This article uses the case study of a patient with multiple adverse drug events to clarify key terms, such as adverse event, adverse drug reaction, adverse drug event, medication error, and side effect. The case discussion illustrates clinical approaches to analyzing the causal connection between a suspect drug and an adverse event. Examples and rationale for meaningful documentation of adverse drug events are provided, along with an outline of the types of events that should be reported to regulatory agencies.

  1. Automated identification of adverse events related to central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Penz, Janet F E; Wilcox, Adam B; Hurdle, John F

    2007-04-01

    Methods for surveillance of adverse events (AEs) in clinical settings are limited by cost, technology, and appropriate data availability. In this study, two methods for semi-automated review of text records within the Veterans Administration database are utilized to identify AEs related to the placement of central venous catheters (CVCs): a Natural Language Processing program and a phrase-matching algorithm. A sample of manually reviewed records were then compared to the results of both methods to assess sensitivity and specificity. The phrase-matching algorithm was found to be a sensitive but relatively non-specific method, whereas a natural language processing system was significantly more specific but less sensitive. Positive predictive values for each method estimated the CVC-associated AE rate at this institution to be 6.4 and 6.2%, respectively. Using both methods together results in acceptable sensitivity and specificity (72.0 and 80.1%, respectively). All methods including manual chart review are limited by incomplete or inaccurate clinician documentation. A secondary finding was related to the completeness of administrative data (ICD-9 and CPT codes) used to identify intensive care unit patients in whom a CVC was placed. Administrative data identified less than 11% of patients who had a CVC placed. This suggests that other methods, including automated methods such as phrase matching, may be more sensitive than administrative data in identifying patients with devices. Considerable potential exists for the use of such methods for the identification of patients at risk, AE surveillance, and prevention of AEs through decision support technologies. PMID:16901760

  2. Predicting Adverse Drug Events from Personal Health Messages

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Brant W.; Berlin, Richard; Schatz, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) remain a large problem in the United States, being the fourth leading cause of death, despite post market drug surveillance. Much post consumer drug surveillance relies on self-reported “spontaneous” patient data. Previous work has performed datamining over the FDA’s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) and other spontaneous reporting systems to identify drug interactions and drugs correlated with high rates of serious adverse events. However, safety problems have resulted from the lack of post marketing surveillance information about drugs, with underreporting rates of up to 98% within such systems1,2. We explore the use of online health forums as a source of data to identify drugs for further FDA scrutiny. In this work we aggregate individuals’ opinions and review of drugs similar to crowd intelligence3. We use natural language processing to group drugs discussed in similar ways and are able to successfully identify drugs withdrawn from the market based on messages discussing them before their removal. PMID:22195073

  3. Adverse event reporting for herbal medicines: a result of market forces.

    PubMed

    Walji, Rishma; Boon, Heather; Barnes, Joanne; Austin, Zubin; Baker, G Ross; Welsh, Sandy

    2009-05-01

    Herbal products are readily available over the counter in health food stores and are often perceived to be without risk. The current Canadian adverse event reporting system suffers from severe underreporting, resulting in a scarcity of safety data on herbal products. Twelve health food store personnel in the Greater Toronto Area were interviewed about their responses to herbal product-related adverse reactions. They generally fostered customer loyalty by offering generous return policies, which included collecting contact information to be sent to the manufacturers with the returned product. Thus, despite the public's lack of knowledge about the formal reporting system, adverse reaction information was directed to manufacturers whenever it resulted in a product return. The relationship between health food stores, industry and Health Canada provides a new opportunity to facilitate adverse event reporting. Additional information could be collected during the return process, and educational initiatives could be implemented to augment current post-market surveillance procedures for herbal products. PMID:20436811

  4. Assessing Adverse Events of Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Outcomes in the Regione Emilia-Romagna, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Hegarty, Sarah E.; Rabinowitz, Carol; Maio, Vittorio; Hyslop, Terry; Dicker, Adam P.; Louis, Daniel Z.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Although the likelihood of radiation-related adverse events influences treatment decisions regarding radiation therapy after prostatectomy for eligible patients, the data available to inform decisions are limited. This study was designed to evaluate the genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events associated with postprostatectomy radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiation timing on the risk of adverse events. Methods: The Regione Emilia-Romagna Italian Longitudinal Health Care Utilization Database was queried to identify a cohort of men who received radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer during 2003 to 2009, including patients who received postprostatectomy radiation therapy. Patients with prior radiation therapy were excluded. Outcome measures were genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual adverse events after prostatectomy. Rates of adverse events were compared between the cohorts who did and did not receive postoperative radiation therapy. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were developed for each class of adverse events, including models with radiation therapy as a time-varying covariate. Results: A total of 9876 men were included in the analyses: 2176 (22%) who received radiation therapy and 7700 (78%) treated with prostatectomy alone. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, the additional exposure to radiation therapy after prostatectomy was associated with increased rates of gastrointestinal (rate ratio [RR] 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-2.27; P<.001) and urinary nonincontinence events (RR 1.83; 95% CI 1.83-2.80; P<.001) but not urinary incontinence events or erectile dysfunction. The addition of the time from prostatectomy to radiation therapy interaction term was not significant for any of the adverse event outcomes (P>.1 for all outcomes). Conclusion: Radiation therapy after prostatectomy is associated with an increase in gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events. However

  5. [Procedure adverse events: nursing care in central venous catheter fracture].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Juan, Eva; Maqueda-Palau, Mònica; Romero-Grilo, Cristina; Muñoz-Moles, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    In a intensive care unit (ICU) there are many factors that can lead to the occurrence of adverse events. A high percentage of these events are associated with the administration of drugs. Diagnostic tests, such as computed tomography, is common in critically ill patients and technique can be performed with injection of contrast agent to enhance the visualization of soft tissue. The contrast is a medication and the nurse is responsible for its proper administration. The management of the critically ill patient is complex. ICU team and radiology shares responsibility for the care and safety of the patient safety during the transfer and performing tests with contrast. The World Health Organisation patient safety strategies, recommends analysing errors and learning from them. Therefore, it was decided to investigate the causes of the category E severity adverse events that occurred in a patient who was admitted to the ICU for septic shock of abdominal origin. An abdominal computed tomography was performed with contrast which was injected through a central venous catheter. The contrast did not appear in the image. What happened? Causal analysis helped to understand what triggered the event. A care plan and an algorithm were drafted to prevent it from happening again, with the following objectives: improving knowledge, skills and promoting positive attitudes towards patient safety, working at primary, secondary and tertiary care levels.

  6. Developing a national system for dealing with adverse events following immunization.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, U.; Milstien, J. B.; Duclos, P.; Folb, P. I.

    2000-01-01

    Although vaccines are among the safest of pharmaceuticals, the occasional severe adverse event or cluster of adverse events associated with their use may rapidly become a serious threat to public health. It is essential that national monitoring and reporting systems for vaccine safety are efficient and adequately coordinated with those that conventionally deal with non-vaccine pharmaceuticals. Equally important is the need for an enlightened and informed national system to be in place to deal with public concerns and rapid evaluation of the risk to public safety when adverse events occur. Described in this article is the outcome of efforts by the WHO Global Training Network to describe a simple national system for dealing with vaccine safety and with emergencies as they arise. The goals of a training programme designed to help develop such a system are also outlined. PMID:10743281

  7. Adverse events of herbal food supplements for body weight reduction: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pittler, M H; Schmidt, K; Ernst, E

    2005-05-01

    Herbal weight-loss supplements are marketed with claims of effectiveness. Our earlier systematic review identified data from double-blind, randomized controlled trials for a number of herbal supplements. The aim of this systematic review was to assess all clinical evidence of adverse events of herbal food supplements for body weight reduction for which effectiveness data from rigorous clinical trials exist. We assessed Ephedra sinica, Garcinia cambogia, Paullinia cupana, guar gum, Plantago psyllium, Ilex paraguariensis and Pausinystalia yohimbe. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed and The Cochrane Library. Data were also requested from the spontaneous reporting scheme of the World Health Organization. We hand-searched relevant medical journals and our own files. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication. The results show that adverse events including hepatic injury and death have been reported with the use of some herbal food supplements. For herbal ephedra and ephedrine-containing food supplements an increased risk of psychiatric, autonomic or gastrointestinal adverse events and heart palpitations has been reported. In conclusion, adverse events are reported for a number of herbal food supplements, which are used for reducing body weight. Although the quality of the data does not justify definitive attribution of causality in most cases, the reported risks are sufficient to shift the risk-benefit balance against the use of most of the reviewed herbal weight-loss supplements. Exceptions are Garcinia cambogia and yerba mate, which merit further investigation.

  8. Error in medicine: adverse events in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Hart, G K

    1999-10-30

    Human error occurs in all walks of life, including medicine. Numerous studies demonstrate that iatrogenic complications account for many deaths, long-term disabilities and unnecessary expense. The study of these adverse events can be formalized in various ways in order to minimise the frequency and severity of complications. Incident monitoring borrows its methodology from the well proven airline, scuba diving and similar fields where "near miss" events are treated as seriously as actual events, because the near miss is often a pointer to a systematic problem which should be corrected. The areas of human performance psychology and the analysis of complex systems are of increasing relevance to the avoidance of error. These techniques have been incorporated into the Australian Incident Monitoring Program which developed in the anaesthetic forum but which has now been taken up by intensive care units and indeed hospital wide in many parts of Australia and New Zealand.

  9. Progression pattern and adverse events with bevacizumab in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mamo, A.; Baig, A.; Azam, M.; Rho, Y.S.; Sahebjam, S.; Muanza, T.; Owen, S.; Petrecca, K.; Guiot, M.C.; Al-Shami, J.; Sharma, R.; Kavan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of bevacizumab in the management of glioblastoma multiforme (gbm) remains controversial. In Canada, bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent gbm. We describe a pattern of progression across treatment lines in gbm. Methods During 2008–2014, 64 patients diagnosed with gbm were treated with bevacizumab at McGill University hospitals. Of those patients, 30 (46.9%) received bevacizumab in the first line (B1L), and 34 (53.1%) received it in the second line and beyond (B2L+). The average length of treatment with bevacizumab was 24.4 weeks (range: 0–232.7 weeks). The patterns of progression were categorized as local, distant, diffuse, multifocal, or multi-pattern. Results Local progression was seen in 46.7% of B1L patients and 26.5% of B2L+ patients, distant in 3.3% and 2.9%, diffuse in 20% and 47%, multifocal in 10% and 8.8%, and multi-pattern in 3.3% and 11.8%. No differences between the groups were observed for the distant (p = 0.3) or diffuse (p = 0.4) patterns. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events in the B1L and B2L+ groups were fatigue (33.3% vs. 17.6% respectively), hypertension (26.7% vs. 5.9%), thrombocytopenia (26.7% vs. 11.8%), neutropenia (26.7% vs. 11.8%), anemia (23.3% vs. 11.8%), leucopenia (20% vs. 8.8%), deep vein thrombosis (23.3% vs. 5.9%), seizure (16.7% vs. 8.8%), brain hemorrhage (6.7% vs. <1%), and delayed wound healing (6.7% vs. 2.9%). More total grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in the B1L group (p = 0.000519). Conclusions In our cohort, patterns of progression were not different in B1L and B2L+ patients. Moreover, both groups experienced similar adverse events, although more grades 3 and 4 events occurred in the B1L group, implying that severe adverse events in B1L patients could negatively affect survival outcomes.

  10. Decreasing intrapartum malpractice: Targeting the most injurious neonatal adverse events.

    PubMed

    Santos, Palmira; Ritter, Grant A; Hefele, Jennifer L; Hendrich, Ann; McCoy, Christine Kocot

    2015-01-01

    Medical malpractice expenditures are mainly due to the occurrence of preventable harm with some of the highest liability rates in obstetrics. Establishing delivery system models which decrease preventable harm and malpractice risk have had varied results over the last decade. We conducted a case study of a risk reduction labor and delivery model at 5 demonstration sites. The model included standardized protocols for the most injurious events, training teams in labor and delivery emergencies, rapid reporting with cause analysis for all unplanned events, and disclosing unexpected occurrences to patients using coordinated communication and documentation. Each of the model's components required buy in from the hospital's clinical and administrative leadership, and it also required collaboration, training, and continual feedback to labor and delivery nurses, doctors, midwives, and risk managers. The case study examined the key elements in the development of the model based on interviews of all team members and document review. We also completed data analysis pre and post implementation of the new model to assess the impact on event reporting and high liability occurrence rates. After 27 months post implementation, reporting of unintended events increased significantly (43 vs 84 per 1000 births, p < .01) while high-risk malpractice events decreased significantly (14 vs 7 per 1000 births, p < .01). This decrease enabled money allotted for malpractice claims to be reallocated for the implementation of the new model at 42 additional labor and delivery sites. Due to these results, this multilevel integrated model showed promise. PMID:25891287

  11. Adverse Event and Complication Management in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Richter, James M; Kelsey, Peter B; Campbell, Emily J

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a remarkably safe set of diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, and yet a small number of significant complications and adverse events are expected. Serious complications may have a material effect on the patient's health and well-being. They need to be anticipated and prevented if possible and managed effectively when identified. When complications occur they need to be discussed frankly with patients and their families. Informed consent, prevention, early detection, reporting, and systems improvement are critical aspects of effective complication management. Optimal complication management may improve patient satisfaction and outcome, as well as preserving the reputation and confidence of the endoscopist, and may minimize litigation.

  12. Adverse childhood event experiences, fertility difficulties, and menstrual cycle characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Marni B.; Boynton-Jarrett, Renee D.; Harville, Emily W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased childhood adversity may be affect adult fertility, however, the mechanism through which this occurs is unclear. Menstrual cycle abnormalities are predictive of fertility difficulties, and stress influences menstrual cycle characteristics. Here, we assesses whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with fertility difficulties and menstrual cycle dysregulation, offering a plausible mechanism for the link between lifetime stress and fertility. Methods From April 2012 – February 2014, 742 pregnant and non-pregnant women aged 18–45 years residing in southeastern Louisiana provided information on childhood adversity and reproductive history. Associations between ACEs and fertility difficulties and menstrual cycle patterns were evaluated. Results As the number of ACEs increased, risk of fertility difficulties and amenorrhea increased (RR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.05 – 1.13 and RR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04 – 1.10, respectively), while fecundability decreased (FR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 – 1.00). Compared to women with no adversity, women in the high adversity group were more likely to experience both infertility and amenorrhea (RR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.45 – 5.21 and RR = 2.54, 95% CI 1.52 – 4.25, respectively), and reduced fecundability (FR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.56 – 1.00). Although similar patterns were seen for menstrual cycle irregularity, associations were diminished. Associations did not materially change following adjustment for age, BMI, race, education, smoking, and income. Results are constrained by the self-report nature of the study and the limited generalizability of the study population. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first study to present evidence of a link between childhood stressors, menstrual cycle disruption, and fertility difficulties. The effect of childhood stress on fertility may be mediated through altered functioning of the HPA axis, acting to suppress fertility in response to less than optimal reproductive

  13. Adverse events in older patients undergoing ERCP: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Day, Lukejohn W.; Lin, Lisa; Somsouk, Ma

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims: Biliary and pancreatic diseases are common in the elderly; however, few studies have addressed the occurrence of adverse events in elderly patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Our objective was to determine the incidence rates of specific adverse events in this group and calculate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for selected comparison groups. Patients and methods: Bibliographical searches were conducted in Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases. The studies included documented the incidence of adverse events (perforation, pancreatitis, bleeding, cholangitis, cardiopulmonary adverse events, mortality) in patients aged ≥ 65 who underwent ERCP. Pooled incidence rates were calculated for each reported adverse event and IRRs were determined for available comparison groups. A parallel analysis was performed in patients aged ≥ 80 and ≥ 90. Results: Our literature search yielded 7429 articles, of which 69 studies met our inclusion criteria. Pooled incidence rates for adverse events (per 1000 ERCPs) in patients aged ≥ 65 were as follows: perforation 3.8 (95 %CI 1.8 – 7.0), pancreatitis 13.1 (95 %CI 11.0 – 15.5), bleeding 7.7 (95 %CI 5.7 – 10.1), cholangitis 16.1 (95 %CI 11.7 – 21.7), cardiopulmonary events 3.7 (95 %CI 1.5 – 7.6), and death 7.1 (95 %CI 5.2 – 9.4). Patients ≥ 65 had lower rates of pancreatitis (IRR 0.3, 95 %CI 0.3 – 0.4) compared with younger patients. Octogenarians had higher rates of death (IRR 2.4, 95 %CI 1.3 – 4.5) compared with younger patients, whereas nonagenarians had increased rates of bleeding (IRR 2.4, 95 %CI 1.1 – 5.2), cardiopulmonary events (IRR 3.7, 95 %CI 1.0 – 13.9), and death (IRR 3.8, 95 %CI 1.0 – 14.4). Conclusions ERCP appears to be safe in elderly patients, except in the very elderly who are at higher risk of some adverse events. These data on adverse

  14. Cardiovascular adverse events associated with smoking-cessation pharmacotherapies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhishek; Thakar, Saurabh; Lavie, Carl J; Garg, Jalaj; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Sochor, Ondrej; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Lichstein, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Smoking continues to be the leading cause of preventable deaths in the USA, accounting for one in every five deaths every year, and cardiovascular (CV) disease remains the leading cause of those deaths. Hence, there is increasing awareness to quit smoking among the public and counseling plays an important role in smoking cessation. There are different pharmacological methods to help quit smoking that includes nicotine replacement products available over the counter, including patch, gum, and lozenges, to prescription medications, such as bupropion and varenicline. There have been reports of both nonserious and serious adverse CV events associated with the use of these different pharmacological methods, especially varenicline, which has been gaining media attention recently. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the various pharmacotherapies used in smoking cessation and analyzed the evidence behind these CV events reported with these therapeutic agents.

  15. Predicting adverse obstetric outcome after early pregnancy events and complications: a review.

    PubMed

    van Oppenraaij, R H F; Jauniaux, E; Christiansen, O B; Horcajadas, J A; Farquharson, R G; Exalto, N

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to evaluate the impact of early pregnancy events and complications as predictors of adverse obstetric outcome. METHODS We conducted a literature review on the impact of first trimester complications in previous and index pregnancies using Medline and Cochrane databases covering the period 1980-2008. RESULTS Clinically relevant associations of adverse outcome in the subsequent pregnancy with an odds ratio (OR) > 2.0 after complications in a previous pregnancy are the risk of perinatal death after a single previous miscarriage, the risk of very preterm delivery (VPTD) after two or more miscarriages, the risk of placenta praevia, premature preterm rupture of membranes, VPTD and low birthweight (LBW) after recurrent miscarriage and the risk of VPTD after two or more termination of pregnancy. Clinically relevant associations of adverse obstetric outcome in the ongoing pregnancy with an OR > 2.0 after complications in the index pregnancy are the risk of LBW and very low birthweight (VLBW) after a threatened miscarriage, the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, preterm delivery (PTD), small for gestational age and low 5-min Apgar score after detection of an intrauterine haematoma, the risk of VPTD and intrauterine growth restriction after a crown-rump length discrepancy, the risk of VPTD, LBW and VLBW after a vanishing twin phenomenon and the risk of PTD, LBW and low 5-min Apgar score in a pregnancy complicated by severe hyperemesis gravidarum. CONCLUSIONS Data from our literature review indicate, by finding significant associations, that specific early pregnancy events and complications are predictors for subsequent adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. Though, some of these associations are based on limited or small uncontrolled studies. Larger population-based controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, identification of these risks will improve obstetric care. PMID:19270317

  16. Glaucoma-related Adverse Events in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS) : One Year Results

    PubMed Central

    Beck, AD; Freedman, SF; Lynn, MJ; Bothun, ED; Neely, D; Lambert, SR

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the incidence of glaucoma and glaucoma suspects in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS). To evaluate risk factors for the development of a glaucoma-related adverse event in IATS in the first year of follow-up. Methods 114 infants with a unilateral congenital cataract were assigned to undergo cataract surgery between 1 to 6 months of age either with (IOL) or without IOL implantation (CL). Standardized definitions of glaucoma and glaucoma suspect were created and used in the IATS. Results Ten patients (9%) developed glaucoma and 4 patients (4%) were glaucoma suspects for a total of 14 patients (12%) with a glaucoma-related adverse event in the treated eye through the first year of follow-up. Five CL patients (9%) and 9 IOL patients (16%) developed a glaucoma-related adverse event. The odds of developing a glaucoma-related adverse event was 3.1 times higher for a child with persistent fetal vasculature (PFV), and 1.6 times higher for each month of age younger at cataract surgery. Conclusions Modern surgical techniques do not eliminate the early development of glaucoma following congenital cataract surgery with or without an intraocular lens. Younger patients with or without PFV seem more likely to develop a glaucoma-related adverse event in the first year of follow-up.Vigilance for the early development of glaucoma is needed following congenital cataract surgery, especially when surgery is performed during early infancy or with PFV. Five year follow-up data for the IATS will likely reveal more glaucoma-related adverse events. PMID:22084157

  17. Management of sorafenib-related adverse events: a clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Brose, Marcia S; Frenette, Catherine T; Keefe, Stephen M; Stein, Stacey M

    2014-02-01

    Sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is approved for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). It is being evaluated in phase II and III clinical trials, which include treatment as a single agent (locally advanced/metastatic radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer [DTC]), as part of multimodality care (HCC), and in combination with chemotherapeutic agents (metastatic breast cancer). Sorafenib-related adverse events (AEs) that commonly occur across these tumor types include hand-foot skin reaction (HSFR), rash, upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) distress (ie, diarrhea), fatigue, and hypertension. These commonly range from grade 1 to 3, per the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), and often occur early in treatment. The goal for the management of these AEs is to prevent, treat, and/or minimize their effects, thereby enabling patients to remain on treatment and improve their quality of life. Proactive management, along with ongoing patient education (before and during sorafenib treatment), can help to effectively manage symptoms, often without the need for sorafenib dose modification or drug holidays. Effective management techniques for common sorafenib-related AEs, as well other important disease sequelae not directly related to treatment, are presented. Recommendations and observations are based on physician/author experience and recommendations from published literature. PMID:24576654

  18. Surveillance of adverse events following immunisation in Australia, 2012.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Deepika; Dey, Aditi; Cook, Jane; Harvey, Bronwen; Menzies, Rob I; Macartney, Kristine M

    2014-09-30

    This report summarises Australian passive surveillance data for adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) reported to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for 2012. It also describes reporting trends over the 13-year period 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2012. There were 1,897 AEFI records for vaccines administered in 2012, a decrease of 22% from 2,417 in 2011. The decrease in 2012 compared with 2011 was mainly attributable to a drop in the reports following receipt of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (405 reduced to 133). However, reporting rates for some other vaccines such as rotavirus and varicella vaccines were higher in 2012 than 2011. Although an increase was observed in estimated reporting rates for rotavirus and varicella in children aged < 7 years in 2012 compared with 2011, it was not statistically significant. There were 370 AEFI records (37.2 per 100,000 doses) for the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in 2012, which was fewer than in 2011 (43.4 per 100,000 doses). The most commonly reported reactions were injection site reactions (40%), fever (22%), allergic reactions (19%) and rash (10%). Only 7% of all the reported adverse events were categorised as serious. There were 2 reports of death, which were investigated by the TGA and no clear causal relationship with vaccination was found.

  19. Antidepressants and cardiovascular adverse events: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Nezafati, Mohammad Hassan; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Nezafati, Pouya

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Major depression or deterioration of previous mood disorders is a common adverse consequence of coronary heart disease, heart failure, and cardiac revascularization procedures. Therefore, treatment of depression is expected to result in improvement of mood condition in these patients. Despite demonstrated effects of anti-depressive treatment in heart disease patients, the use of some antidepressants have shown to be associated with some adverse cardiac and non-cardiac events. In this narrative review, the authors aimed to first assess the findings of published studies on beneficial and also harmful effects of different types of antidepressants used in patients with heart diseases. Finally, a new categorization for selecting antidepressants according to their cardiovascular effects was described. METHODS Using PubMed, Web of Science, SCOPUS, Index Copernicus, CINAHL, and Cochrane Database, we identified studies designed to evaluate the effects of depression and also using antidepressants on cardiovascular outcome. A 40 studies were finally assessed systematically. Among those eligible studies, 14 were cohort or historical cohort studies, 15 were randomized clinical trial, 4 were retrospective were case-control studies, 3 were meta-analyses and 2 animal studies, and 2 case studies. RESULTS According to the current review, we recommend to divide antidepressants into three categories based on the severity of cardiovascular adverse consequences including (1) the safest drugs including those drugs with cardio-protective effects on ventricular function, as well as cardiac conductive system including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, (2) neutralized drugs with no evidenced effects on cardiovascular system including serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and (3) harmful drugs with adverse effects on cardiac function, hemodynamic stability, and heart rate variability including tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitors

  20. Adverse Drug Events caused by Serious Medication Administration Errors

    PubMed Central

    Sawarkar, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A.; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how often serious or life-threatening medication administration errors with the potential to cause patient harm (or potential adverse drug events) result in actual patient harm (or adverse drug events (ADEs)) in the hospital setting. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of clinical events that transpired following observed medication administration errors. BACKGROUND Medication errors are common at the medication administration stage for hospitalized patients. While many of these errors are considered capable of causing patient harm, it is not clear how often patients are actually harmed by these errors. METHODS In a previous study where 14,041 medication administrations in an acute-care hospital were directly observed, investigators discovered 1271 medication administration errors, of which 133 had the potential to cause serious or life-threatening harm to patients and were considered serious or life-threatening potential ADEs. In the current study, clinical reviewers conducted detailed chart reviews of cases where a serious or life-threatening potential ADE occurred to determine if an actual ADE developed following the potential ADE. Reviewers further assessed the severity of the ADE and attribution to the administration error. RESULTS Ten (7.5% [95% C.I. 6.98, 8.01]) actual adverse drug events or ADEs resulted from the 133 serious and life-threatening potential ADEs, of which 6 resulted in significant, three in serious, and one life threatening injury. Therefore 4 (3% [95% C.I. 2.12, 3.6]) serious and life threatening potential ADEs led to serious or life threatening ADEs. Half of the ten actual ADEs were caused by dosage or monitoring errors for anti-hypertensives. The life threatening ADE was caused by an error that was both a transcription and a timing error. CONCLUSION Potential ADEs at the medication administration stage can cause serious patient harm. Given previous estimates of serious or life-threatening potential ADE of 1.33 per 100

  1. Voluntary Electronic Reporting of Medical Errors and Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Milch, Catherine E; Salem, Deeb N; Pauker, Stephen G; Lundquist, Thomas G; Kumar, Sanjaya; Chen, Jack

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the rate and types of events reported in acute care hospitals using an electronic error reporting system (e-ERS). DESIGN Descriptive study of reported events using the same e-ERS between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2003. SETTING Twenty-six acute care nonfederal hospitals throughout the U.S. that voluntarily implemented a web-based e-ERS for at least 3 months. PARTICIPANTS Hospital employees and staff. INTERVENTION A secure, standardized, commercially available web-based reporting system. RESULTS Median duration of e-ERS use was 21 months (range 3 to 33 months). A total of 92,547 reports were obtained during 2,547,154 patient-days. Reporting rates varied widely across hospitals (9 to 95 reports per 1,000 inpatient-days; median=35). Registered nurses provided nearly half of the reports; physicians contributed less than 2%. Thirty-four percent of reports were classified as nonmedication-related clinical events, 33% as medication/infusion related, 13% were falls, 13% as administrative, and 6% other. Among 80% of reports that identified level of impact, 53% were events that reached a patient (“patient events”), 13% were near misses that did not reach the patient, and 14% were hospital environment problems. Among 49,341 patient events, 67% caused no harm, 32% temporary harm, 0.8% life threatening or permanent harm, and 0.4% contributed to patient deaths. CONCLUSIONS An e-ERS provides an accessible venue for reporting medical errors, adverse events, and near misses. The wide variation in reporting rates among hospitals, and very low reporting rates by physicians, requires investigation. PMID:16390502

  2. Towards an organization with a memory: exploring the organizational generation of adverse events in health care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Denis; Toft, Brian

    2005-05-01

    The role of organizational factors in the generation of adverse events, and the manner in which such factors can also inhibit an organization's abilities to learn, have become important agenda items within health care. The government report 'An organization with a memory' highlighted many of the problems facing health care and suggested changes that need to be made if the sector is to learn effective lessons and prevent adverse events from occurring. This paper seeks to examine some of these organizational factors in more detail and suggests issues that managers need to consider as part of their wider strategies for the prevention and management of risk. The paper sets out five core elements that are held to be importance in shaping the manner in which the potential for risk is incubated within organizations. Although the paper focuses its attention on health care, the points made have validity across the public sector and into private sector organizations.

  3. Reporting of adverse events for marketed drugs: Need for strengthening safety database.

    PubMed

    Apte, Aditi Anand

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is an evolving discipline in the Indian context. However, there is limited regulatory guidance for adverse event reporting outside the purview of clinical trials. There are number of deficiencies in the framework for adverse event reporting from the perspective of pharma industry, health-care professional and general public due to which adverse events for marketed drugs are highly underreported. This article discusses the need to strengthen national safety database by promoting and mandating reporting of adverse events by all the stakeholders.

  4. Environmental Adversity Increases Genetic Risk for Externalizing Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Brian M.; South, Susan C.; DiRago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies of gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of psychiatric and substance use disorders are rapidly accumulating. However, few attempts have been made to integrate findings and articulate general mechanisms of G-E influence in the emergence of psychopathology. Objective Identify patterns of G-E interplay between externalizing (EXT; antisocial behavior and substance use) disorders and several environmental risk factors. Design We used quantitative genetic models to examine how genetic and environmental risk for EXT disorders changes as a function of environmental context. Setting Participants were recruited from the community and took part in a day-long assessment at a university laboratory. Participants The sample consisted of 1315 male and female twin pairs participating in the age 17 assessment of the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Main Outcome Measures Multiple measures and informants were employed to construct a composite of EXT disorders and composite measures of 6 environmental risk factors including academic achievement and engagement, antisocial and prosocial peer affiliation, mother-child and father-child relationship problems, and stressful life events. Results A significant G × E interaction was detected between each environmental risk factor and EXT such that greater environmental adversity was associated with increased genetic risk in EXT. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that in the context of environmental adversity, genetic factors become more important in the etiology of EXT disorders. The consistency of the results further suggests a general mechanism of environmental influence on EXT disorders regardless of the specific form of the environmental risk. PMID:19487629

  5. Genomic architecture of pharmacological efficacy and adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Chhibber, Aparna; Kroetz, Deanna L; Tantisira, Kelan G; McGeachie, Michael; Cheng, Cheng; Plenge, Robert; Stahl, Eli; Sadee, Wolfgang; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Pendergrass, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic disciplines address pharmacological traits, including efficacy and adverse events. Pharmacogenomics studies have identified pervasive genetic effects on treatment outcomes, resulting in the development of genetic biomarkers for optimization of drug therapy. Pharmacogenomics-based tests are already being applied in clinical decision making. However, despite substantial progress in identifying the genetic etiology of pharmacological response, current biomarker panels still largely rely on single gene tests with a large portion of the genetic effects remaining to be discovered. Future research must account for the combined effects of multiple genetic variants, incorporate pathway-based approaches, explore gene-gene interactions and nonprotein coding functional genetic variants, extend studies across ancestral populations, and prioritize laboratory characterization of molecular mechanisms. Because genetic factors can play a key role in drug response, accurate biomarker tests capturing the main genetic factors determining treatment outcomes have substantial potential for improving individual clinical care. PMID:25521360

  6. A review of adverse events caused by immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

      There has been no effective therapy in the unresectable melanoma for more than 40 years. Anti-PD-1 antibody and anti-CTLA-4 antibody have totally changed the situation. They have clearly shown the survival benefits of the patients with metastatic melanoma. However, immune checkpoint inhibitors sometimes induce various kinds of immune-related adverse events (irAEs). It is very important for the clinicians to know the reported cases of irAEs and to keep in mind the symptoms of irAEs for the early detection. This review describes the previously reported irAEs and adequate managements for irAEs induced by immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  7. Evaluating imbalances of adverse events during biosimilar development

    PubMed Central

    Vana, Alicia M.; Freyman, Amy W.; Reich, Steven D.; Yin, Donghua; Li, Ruifeng; Anderson, Scott; Jacobs, Ira A.; Zacharchuk, Charles M.; Ewesuedo, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biosimilars are designed to be highly similar to approved or licensed (reference) biologics and are evaluated based on the totality of evidence from extensive analytical, nonclinical and clinical studies. As part of the stepwise approach recommended by regulatory agencies, the first step in the clinical evaluation of biosimilarity is to conduct a pharmacokinetics similarity study in which the potential biosimilar is compared with the reference product. In the context of biosimilar development, a pharmacokinetics similarity study is not necessarily designed for a comparative assessment of safety. Development of PF-05280014, a potential biosimilar to trastuzumab, illustrates how a numerical imbalance in an adverse event in a small pharmacokinetics study can raise questions on safety that may require additional clinical trials. PMID:27050730

  8. Mining for adverse drug events with formal concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Estacio-Moreno, Alexander; Toussaint, Yannick; Bousquet, Cédric

    2008-01-01

    The pharmacovigilance databases consist of several case reports involving drugs and adverse events (AEs). Some methods are applied consistently to highlight all signals, i.e. all statistically significant associations between a drug and an AE. These methods are appropriate for verification of more complex relationships involving one or several drug(s) and AE(s) (e.g; syndromes or interactions) but do not address the identification of them. We propose a method for the extraction of these relationships based on Formal Concept Analysis (FCA) associated with disproportionality measures. This method identifies all sets of drugs and AEs which are potential signals, syndromes or interactions. Compared to a previous experience of disproportionality analysis without FCA, the addition of FCA was more efficient for identifying false positives related to concomitant drugs. PMID:18487830

  9. Systematic Review: Adverse Events of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqiang; Cao, Xiaocang; Piao, Meiyu; Khan, Samiullah; Yan, Fang; Cao, Hailong; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-01-01

    Background Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a microbiota-based therapy that shows therapeutic potential in recurrent or refractory Clostridium difficile infections and other intestinal or extra-intestinal disorders. Nonetheless, adverse events (AEs) remain a major challenge in the application of FMT. Aim To review the AEs of FMT and to address the concerns of safety during the procedure. Methods Publications were retrieved in the databases of Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. AEs were classified according to their causality with FMT or their severity. Results A total of 7562 original articles about FMT were identified in this study, 50 of them fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Totally 78 kinds of AEs were revealed enrolled in these 50 selected publications. The total incidence rate of AEs was 28.5%. Among the 42 publications, 5 kinds were definitely and 38 kinds were probably related to FMT. The commonest FMT-attributable AE was abdominal discomfort, which was reported in 19 publications. For upper gastrointestinal routes of FMT, 43.6% (89/204) patients were compromised by FMT-attributable AE, while the incidence dropped to 17.7% (76/430) for lower gastrointestinal routes. In contrast, the incidences of serious adverse events (SAEs) were 2.0% (4/196) and 6.1% (40/659) for upper and lower gastrointestinal routes, respectively. A total of 44 kinds of SAEs occurred in 9.2% patients, including death (3.5%, 38/1089), infection (2.5%, 27/1089), relapse of inflammatory bowel diseases (0.6%, 7/1089) and Clostridium difficile infection (0.9%, 10/1089). Conclusion Consequently, both AEs and SAEs are not rare and should be carefully monitored throughout FMT. However, high quality randomized controlled trials are still needed for the more definite incidence of AEs of FMT. PMID:27529553

  10. Incidence and management of life-threatening adverse events during cardiac catheterization for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, C Huie; Hegde, Sanjeet; Marshall, Audrey C; Porras, Diego; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Balzer, David T; Beekman, Robert H; Torres, Alejandro; Vincent, Julie A; Moore, John W; Holzer, Ralf; Armsby, Laurie; Bergersen, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Continued advancements in congenital cardiac catheterization and interventions have resulted in increased patient and procedural complexity. Anticipation of life-threatening events and required rescue measures is a critical component to preprocedural preparation. We sought to determine the incidence and nature of life-threatening adverse events in congenital and pediatric cardiac catheterization, risk factors, and resources necessary to anticipate and manage events. Data from 8905 cases performed at the 8 participating institutions of the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes were captured between 2007 and 2010 [median 1,095/site (range 133-3,802)]. The incidence of all life-threatening events was 2.1 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.8-2.4 %], whereas mortality was 0.28 % (95 % CI 0.18-0.41 %). Fifty-seven life-threatening events required cardiopulmonary resuscitation, whereas 9 % required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Use of a risk adjustment model showed that age <1 year [odd ratio (OR) 1.9, 95 % CI 1.4-2.7, p < 0.001], hemodynamic vulnerability (OR 1.6, 95 % CI 1.1-2.3, p < 0.01), and procedure risk (category 3: OR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.3-4.1; category 4: OR 4.2, 95 % CI 2.4-7.4) were predictors of life-threatening events. Using this model, standardized life-threatening event ratios were calculated, thus showing that one institution had a life-threatening event rate greater than expected. Congenital cardiac catheterization and intervention can be performed safely with a low rate of life-threatening events and mortality; preprocedural evaluation of risk may optimize preparation of emergency rescue and bailout procedures. Risk predictors (age < 1, hemodynamic vulnerability, and procedure risk category) can enhance preprocedural patient risk stratification and planning.

  11. Towards standardized measurement of adverse events in spine surgery: conceptual model and pilot evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Sohail K; Deyo, Richard A; Heagerty, Patrick J; Turner, Judith A; Lee, Lorri A; Goodkin, Robert

    2006-01-01

    occurrence severity rating had fair agreement (mean weighted kappa = 0.33) when using a scale based on the JCAHO Sentinel Event Policy, but agreement was substantial for severity ratings on a new 11-point numerical severity scale (ICC = 0.74). There was excellent inter-rater agreement for a lumbar degenerative disease severity score (ICC = 0.98) and an index of surgery invasiveness (ICC = 0.99). Conclusion Composite measures of disease severity and surgery invasiveness may allow development of risk-adjusted predictive models for adverse events in spine surgery. Standard measures of adverse events and risk adjustment may also facilitate post-marketing surveillance of spinal devices, effectiveness research, and quality improvement. PMID:16787537

  12. Adverse Health Events Following Intermittent and Continuous Androgen Deprivation in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hershman, Dawn L.; Unger, Joseph M.; Wright, Jason D.; Ramsey, Scott; Till, Cathee; Tangen, Catherine M.; Barlow, William E.; Blanke, Charles; Thompson, Ian M; Hussain, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Importance Although intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has not been associated with better overall survival in prostate cancer (PC), it has the potential for lower side effects. The incidence of long-term adverse health events has not been reported. Objective Given that older patients are more likely to suffer long-term complications from ADT, we examined long-term late events in elderly patients randomized to intermittent or continuous ADT. Our hypothesis was that late cardiovascular and endocrine events would be lower in patients on intermittent ADT. Design Linkage between patient trial data and corresponding Medicare claims. Setting Multicenter clinical trial. Participants Patients from S9346, a randomized SWOG trial of intermittent vs. continuous ADT in men with metastatic PC. Main Outcomes and Measures The main outcome was to identify long-term adverse health events by treatment arm. Patients were classified as having an adverse health event if they had any hospital claim – or at least 2 physician or outpatient claims at least 30 days apart – for any of the following diagnoses: ischemic and thrombotic events; endocrine events; sexual dysfunction, dementia and depression. To incorporate time from beginning of observation through evidence of an event, we determined the cumulative incidence of each event. Competing risks Cox regression was used, adjusting for covariates. Results In total, n=1134 eligible U.S.-based patients with metastatic PC were randomized to continuous vs. intermittent ADT on S9346. A total of 636 (56%) of trial participants had ≥1 year of continuous Medicare parts A & B coverage and no HMO participation. The median age was 71.3 years. The most common long-term events were hypercholesterolemia (31%) and osteoporosis (19%). The 10-year cumulative incidence of ischemic and thrombotic events differed by arm; 24% for continuous and 33% for intermittent ADT (Hazard Ratio=0.69, p=.02). There were no statistically significant

  13. [Medication adverse events: Impact of pharmaceutical consultations during the hospitalization of patients].

    PubMed

    Santucci, R; Levêque, D; Herbrecht, R; Fischbach, M; Gérout, A C; Untereiner, C; Bouayad-Agha, K; Couturier, F

    2014-11-01

    The medication iatrogenic events are responsible for nearly one iatrogenic event in five. The main purpose of this prospective multicenter study is to determine the effect of pharmaceutical consultations on the occurrence of medication adverse events during hospitalization (MAE). The other objectives are to study the impact of age, of the number of medications and pharmaceutical consultations on the risk of MAE. The pharmaceutical consultation is associated to a complete reassessment done by both a physician and a pharmacist for the home medication, the hospital treatment (3days after admission), the treatment during chemotherapy, and/or, the treatment when the patient goes back home. All MAE are subject to an advice for the patient, additional clinical-biological monitoring and/or prescription changes. Among the 318 patients, 217 (68%) had 1 or more clinically important MAE (89% drug-drug interaction, 8% dosing error, 2% indication error, 1% risk behavior). The patients have had 1121 pharmaceutical consultations (3.2±1.4/patient). Thus, the pharmaceutical consultations divided by 2.34 the risk of MAE (unadjusted incidence ratio, P≤0.05). Each consultation decreased by 24% the risk of MAE. Moreover, adding one medication increases from 14 to 30% as a risk of MAE on the population. Pharmaceutical consultations during the hospital stay could reduce significantly the number of medication adverse effects. PMID:25438655

  14. Systematic review and meta-analysis on the adverse events of rimonabant treatment: Considerations for its potential use in hepatology

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The cannabinoid-1 receptor blockers have been proposed in the management of obesity and obesity-related liver diseases (fatty liver as NAFLD or NASH). Due to increasing number of patients to be potentially treated and the need to assess the advantage of this treatment in terms of risk/benefit, we analyze the side events reported during the treatment with rimonabant by a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled studies. Methods All published randomized controlled trials using rimonabant versus placebo in adult subjects were retrieved. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence interval for relevant adverse events and number needed to harm was calculated. Results Nine trials (n = 9635) were considered. Rimonabant 20 mg was associated with an increased risk of adverse event (RR 1.35; 95%CI 1.17-1.56), increased discontinuation rate (RR 1.79; 95%CI 1.35-2.38), psychiatric (RR 2.35; 95%CI 1.66-3.34), and nervous system adverse events (RR 2.35; 95%CI 1.49-3.70). The number needed to harm for psychiatric adverse events is 30. Conclusion Rimonabant is associated with an increased risk of adverse events. Despite of an increasing interest for its use on fatty liver, the security profile and efficacy it is needs to be carefully assessed before its recommendation. At present the use of rimonabant on fatty liver cannot be recommended. PMID:19818116

  15. Adverse events following yellow fever immunization: Report and analysis of 67 neurological cases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martins, Reinaldo de Menezes; Pavão, Ana Luiza Braz; de Oliveira, Patrícia Mouta Nunes; dos Santos, Paulo Roberto Gomes; Carvalho, Sandra Maria D; Mohrdieck, Renate; Fernandes, Alexandre Ribeiro; Sato, Helena Keico; de Figueiredo, Patricia Mandali; von Doellinger, Vanessa Dos Reis; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S

    2014-11-20

    Neurological adverse events following administration of the 17DD substrain of yellow fever vaccine (YEL-AND) in the Brazilian population are described and analyzed. Based on information obtained from the National Immunization Program through passive surveillance or intensified passive surveillance, from 2007 to 2012, descriptive analysis, national and regional rates of YFV associated neurotropic, neurological autoimmune disease, and reporting rate ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated for first time vaccinees stratified on age and year. Sixty-seven neurological cases were found, with the highest rate of neurological adverse events in the age group from 5 to 9 years (2.66 per 100,000 vaccine doses in Rio Grande do Sul state, and 0.83 per 100,000 doses in national analysis). Two cases had a combination of neurotropic and autoimmune features. This is the largest sample of YEL-AND already analyzed. Rates are similar to other recent studies, but on this study the age group from 5 to 9 years of age had the highest risk. As neurological adverse events have in general a good prognosis, they should not contraindicate the use of yellow fever vaccine in face of risk of infection by yellow fever virus.

  16. Adverse Events of Acupuncture: A Systematic Review of Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shifen; Wang, Lizhen; Cooper, Emily; Zhang, Ming; Manheimer, Eric; Berman, Brian; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping, important in traditional Eastern medicine, are increasingly used in the West. Their widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review, a sequel to one our team published 10 years ago, is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) reported for acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping between 2000 and 2011. Relevant English-language reports in six databases were identified and assessed by two reviewers. During this 12-year period, 117 reports of 308 AEs from 25 countries and regions were associated with acupuncture (294 cases), moxibustion (4 cases), or cupping (10 cases). Country of occurrence, patient's sex and age, and outcome were extracted. Infections, mycobacterial, staphylococcal, and others, were the main complication of acupuncture. In the previous review, we found the main source of infection to be hepatitis, caused by reusable needles. In this review, we found the majority of infections to be bacterial, caused by skin contact at acupoint sites; we found no cases of hepatitis. Although the route of infection had changed, infections were still the major complication of acupuncture. Clearly, guidelines such as Clean Needle Technique must be followed in order to minimize acupuncture AEs. PMID:23573135

  17. Antimicrobial resistance: consideration as an adverse drug event.

    PubMed

    Martin, Steven J; Micek, Scott T; Wood, G Christopher

    2010-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has increased dramatically in the past 15 to 20 yrs and presents a patient safety concern unlike any other in the intensive care unit. Antimicrobial resistance in critically ill patients increases morbidity, mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Some organisms may have intrinsically high levels of resistance or may be spread between patients by poor infection control practices. However, a major driver of antimicrobial resistance is antibiotic use. As such, the development of antimicrobial resistance can often be thought of as an adverse drug event. This article explores the link between drug use, drug dosing, other selective pressures and resistance, and describes concepts to minimize the negative impact of antimicrobial therapy. Two broad themes of these concepts are minimizing the use of antibiotics whenever possible and optimizing antibiotic usage when they are needed. Strategies for minimizing the use of antimicrobials include using optimal diagnostic procedures to ensure the need for antimicrobials, streamlining or discontinuing therapy when possible based on culture results, and using the shortest duration of therapy needed for documented infections. Strategies for optimizing antimicrobial use include using optimal dosing based on the manufacturer's instructions and current pharmacodynamic data, guiding better prescribing based on local susceptibility patterns and formulary restriction, and avoiding drugs with more propensity to foster resistance.

  18. Rotation and Displacement Predict Adverse Events in Pediatric Supracondylar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Michael A; Carry, Patrick M; Scott, Frank; Georgopoulos, Gaia; Hadley-Miller, Nancy

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to identify supracondylar fracture patterns that were predictive of adverse events and poor outcomes. The study consisted of a retrospective review of patients admitted for surgical treatment of a supracondylar humerus fracture between June 2008 and August 2010. Preoperative radiographs were assessed based on appearance (simple vs oblique vs comminuted), coronal plane displacement (angulated, posterior, posteromedial vs posterolateral), and rotation (rotation vs no rotation). Logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between fracture pattern and clinical outcome parameters in 373 patients who were followed for 4 weeks or more postoperatively. Outcome parameters included postoperative complications (infection, delayed healing, pin migration, revision surgery), need for physical or occupational therapy, need for postoperative intravenous narcotics, and preoperative nerve injury. Rotation and coronal displacement patterns of the fracture segments were significantly associated with postoperative complications, postoperative need for physical or occupational therapy as a result of residual stiffness, and nerve injury (P<.05). Compared with posteriorly displaced fractures, posterolaterally displaced fractures were associated with significantly greater odds of complications (P=.045), need for physical or occupational therapy (P<.001), and nerve injury (P<.001). Additionally, fractures with rotation were associated with significantly greater odds of complications (P<.001), need for physical or occupational therapy (P<.001), and nerve injury (P<.001) compared with fractures without rotation. Rotation and coronal plane displacement were predictive of complications, need for physical or occupational therapy, and nerve injury, and thus should be considered as potential prognostic variables when evaluating the initial injury pattern.

  19. Algorithm to assess causality after individual adverse events following immunizations.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Neal A; Edwards, Kathryn M; Dekker, Cornelia L; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger; Larussa, Philip; Marchant, Colin; Slade, Barbara; Vellozzi, Claudia

    2012-08-24

    Assessing individual reports of adverse events following immunizations (AEFI) can be challenging. Most published reviews are based on expert opinions, but the methods and logic used to arrive at these opinions are neither well described nor understood by many health care providers and scientists. We developed a standardized algorithm to assist in collecting and interpreting data, and to help assess causality after individual AEFI. Key questions that should be asked during the assessment of AEFI include: Is the diagnosis of the AEFI correct? Does clinical or laboratory evidence exist that supports possible causes for the AEFI other than the vaccine in the affected individual? Is there a known causal association between the AEFI and the vaccine? Is there strong evidence against a causal association? Is there a specific laboratory test implicating the vaccine in the pathogenesis? An algorithm can assist with addressing these questions in a standardized, transparent manner which can be tracked and reassessed if additional information becomes available. Examples in this document illustrate the process of using the algorithm to determine causality. As new epidemiologic and clinical data become available, the algorithm and guidelines will need to be modified. Feedback from users of the algorithm will be invaluable in this process. We hope that this algorithm approach can assist with educational efforts to improve the collection of key information on AEFI and provide a platform for teaching about causality assessment.

  20. [Contemplation and suggestion on the medical device adverse event reporting program].

    PubMed

    Yu, Baodong; Guan, Yingjie; Mo, Xiaomei

    2014-01-01

    The number of medical device adverse events reported to national monitoring center increased greatly year by year, but the reporting system still existed some deficiencies which resulting in confusion when filling the forms, especially those selections about relationship evaluation. This paper proposed amendments about event-evaluation process according to the characteristics of medical device adverse events reported in China, in order to perform timely and effectively regulation on different types of adverse events for different purposes.

  1. CHADS2 Scores in the Prediction of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Mei-Hua; Chuang, Tzyy-Ling; Huang, Kung-Yung; Lyu, Shaw-Ruey; Huang, Chih-Yuan; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Vascular events are one of the major causes of death in case of Cushing's syndrome (CS). However, due to the relative low frequency of CS, it is hard to perform a risk assessment for these events. As represented congestive heart failure (C), hypertension (H), age (A), diabetes (D), and stroke (S), the CHADS2 score is now accepted to classify the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, participants were enrolled from the National Health Research Institute Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan, and we reviewed 551 patients with their sequential clinically diagnosed CS data between 2002 and 2009 in relation to MACEs risk using CHADS2 score. Good correlation could be identified between the CS and CHADS2 score (AUC = 0.795). Our results show that patients with CS show significantly higher risk of vascular events and the CHADS2 score could be applied for MACEs evaluation. Adequate lifestyle modifications and aggressive cardiovascular risks treatment are suggested for CS patients with higher CHADS2 score. PMID:25101124

  2. Adverse Cardiovascular Events after a Venomous Snakebite in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oh Hyun; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, KyoungChul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Hwang, Sung Oh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although cardiac involvement is an infrequently recognized manifestation of venomous snakebites, little is known of the adverse cardiovascular events (ACVEs) arising as a result of snakebite in Korea. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence of ACVEs associated with venomous snakebites in Korea and compared the clinical features of patients with and without ACVEs. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 65 consecutive venomous snakebite cases diagnosed and treated at the emergency department of Wonju Severance Christian Hospital between May 2011 and October 2014. ACVEs were defined as the occurrence of at least one of the following: 1) myocardial injury, 2) shock, 3) ventricular dysrhythmia, or 4) cardiac arrest. Results Nine (13.8%) of the 65 patients had ACVEs; myocardial injury (9 patients, 13.8%) included high sensitivity troponin I (hs-TnI) elevation (7 patients, 10.8%) or electrocardiogram (ECG) determined ischemic change (2 patients, 3.1%), and shock (2 patient, 3.1%). Neither ventricular dysrhythmia nor cardiac arrest was observed. The median of elevated hs-TnI levels observed in the present study were 0.063 ng/mL (maximum: 3.000 ng/mL) and there was no mortality in the ACVEs group. Underlying cardiac diseases were more common in the ACVEs group than in the non-ACVEs group (p=0.017). Regarding complications during hospitalization, 3 patients (5.4%) in the non-ACVEs group and 3 patients (33.3%) in the ACVEs group developed bleeding (p=0.031). Conclusion Significant proportion of the patients with venomous snakebite is associated with occurrence of ACVEs. Patients with ACVEs had more underlying cardiac disease and bleeding complication. PMID:26847308

  3. Monitoring adverse events in Norwegian hospitals from 2010 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Deilkås, Ellen Tveter; Bukholm, Geir; Lindstrøm, Jonas Christoffer; Haugen, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe how adverse event (AE) rates were monitored and estimated nationally across all Norwegian hospitals from 2010 to 2013, and how they developed during the monitoring period. Monitoring was based on medical record review with Global Trigger Tool (GTT). Setting All publicly and privately owned hospitals were mandated to review randomly selected medical records to monitor AE rates. The initiative was part of the Norwegian patient safety campaign, launched by the Norwegian Ministry of Health and Care Services. It started in January 2011 and lasted until December 2013. 2010 was the baseline for the review. One of the main aims of the campaign was to reduce patient harm. Method To standardise the medical record reviews in all hospitals, GTT was chosen as a standard method. GTT teams from all hospitals reviewed 40 851 medical records randomly selected from 2 249 957 discharges from 2010 to 2013. Data were plotted in time series for local measurement and national AE rates were estimated, plotted and monitored. Results AE rates were estimated and published nationally from 2010 to 2013. Estimated AE rates in severity categories E-I decreased significantly from 16.1% in 2011 to 13.0% in 2013 (−3.1% (95% CI −5.2% to −1.1%)). Conclusions Monitoring estimated AE rates emerges as a potential element in national systems for patient safety. Estimated AE rates in the category of least severity decreased significantly during the first 2 years of the monitoring. PMID:26719311

  4. Toxicogenomics of nevirapine-associated cutaneous and hepatic adverse events among populations of African, Asian, and European descent

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Guo, Sheng; Hall, David; Cammett, Anna M.; Jayadev, Supriya; Distel, Manuel; Storfer, Stephen; Huang, Zimei; Mootsikapun, Piroon; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Podzamczer, Daniel; Haas, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Nevirapine is widely prescribed for HIV-1 infection. We characterized relationships between nevirapine-associated cutaneous and hepatic adverse events and genetic variants among HIV-infected adults. Design We retrospectively identified cases and controls. Cases experienced symptomatic nevirapine-associated severe (grade III/IV) cutaneous and/or hepatic adverse events within 8 weeks of initiating nevirapine. Controls did not experience adverse events during more than 18 weeks of nevirapine therapy. Methods Cases and controls were matched 1 : 2 on baseline CD4 T-cell count, sex, and race. Individuals with 150 or less CD4 T cells/μl at baseline were excluded. We characterized 123 human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and 2744 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and drug metabolism and transport genes. Results We studied 276 evaluable cases (175 cutaneous adverse events, 101 hepatic adverse events) and 587 controls. Cutaneous adverse events were associated with CYP2B6 516G→T (OR 1.66, all), HLA-Cw*04 (OR 2.51, all), and HLA-B*35 (OR 3.47, Asians; 5.65, Thais). Risk for cutaneous adverse events was particularly high among Blacks with CYP2B6 516TT and HLA-Cw*04 (OR 18.90) and Asians with HLA-B*35 and HLA-Cw*04 (OR 18.34). Hepatic adverse events were associated with HLA-DRB*01 (OR 3.02, Whites), but not CYP2B6 genotypes. Associations differed by population, at least in part reflecting allele frequencies. Conclusion Among patients with at least 150 CD4 T cells/μl, polymorphisms in drug metabolism and immune response pathways were associated with greater likelihood of risk for nevirapine-related adverse events. Results suggest fundamentally different mechanisms of adverse events: cutaneous, most likely MHC class I-mediated, influenced by nevirapine CYP2B6 metabolism; hepatic, most likely MHC class II-mediated and unaffected by such metabolism. These risk variants are insensitive for routine clinical screening. PMID

  5. Prevalence of Adverse Intraoperative Events during Obesity Surgery and Their Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, Alexander J; Wahed, Abdus S; Adeniji, Abidemi; Courcoulas, Anita P; Dakin, Greg; Flum, David R; Harrison, Vincent; Mitchell, James E; O'Rourke, Robert; Pomp, Alfons; Pender, John; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Wolfe, Bruce M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adverse intraoperative events (AIEs) during surgery are a well-known entity. A better understanding of the incidence of AIEs and their relationship with outcomes is helpful for surgeon preparation and preoperative patient counseling. The goals of this study are to describe the incidence of AIEs during bariatric surgery and examine their impact on major adverse complications. STUDY DESIGN The study included 5,882 subjects who had bariatric surgery in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study between March 2005 and April 2009. Prospectively collected AIEs included organ injuries, anesthesia-related events, anastomotic revisions, and equipment failure. The relationship between AIEs and a composite end point of 30-day major adverse complications (ie, death, venous thromboembolism, percutaneous, endoscopic, or operative reintervention and failure to be discharged from the hospital within 30 days from surgery) was evaluated using a multivariable relative risk model adjusting for factors known to influence their risk. RESULTS There were 1,608 laparoscopic adjusted gastric banding, 3,770 laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operations, and 504 open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operations. Adverse intraoperative events occurred in 5% of the overall sample and were most frequent during open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (7.3%), followed by laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (5.5%) and laparoscopic adjusted gastric banding (3%). The rate of composite end point was 8.8% in the AIE group compared with 3.9% among those without an AIE (p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis revealed that patients with an AIE were at 90% greater risk of composite complication than those without an event (relative risk = 1.90; 95% CI, 1.26–2.88; p = 0.002), independent of the type of procedure (open or laparoscopic). CONCLUSIONS Incidence of an AIE is not infrequent during bariatric surgery and is associated with much higher risk of major complication. Additional study is needed to

  6. Gastroscopy-related adverse cardiac events and bleeding complications among patients treated with coronary stents and dual antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Egholm, Gro; Thim, Troels; Madsen, Morten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Pedersen, Jan Bech; Eggert Jensen, Svend; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Maeng, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is recommended following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent (DES). DAPT is a risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding. We aimed to quantify (1) the rate of gastroscopy within 12 months after PCI, (2) the rate of adverse cardiac events and gastroscopy-related bleeding complications within 30 days of gastroscopy, and (3) the association between antiplatelet therapy and these events. Patients and methods: Patients receiving gastroscopy within 12 months of PCI were identified and two nested case-control analyses were performed within the PCI cohort by linking Danish medical registries. Cases were patients with adverse cardiac events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or stent thrombosis) or hemostatic intervention. In both studies, controls were patients with gastroscopy including biopsy without adverse cardiac events and hemostatic intervention, respectively. Medical records were reviewed to obtain information on exposure to DAPT. Results: We identified 22 654 PCI patients of whom 1497 patients (6.6 %) underwent gastroscopy. Twenty-two patients (1.5 %) suffered an adverse cardiac event, 93 patients (6.2 %) received hemostatic intervention during or within 30 days of the index gastroscopy. Interrupting DAPT was associated with a 3.46 times higher risk of adverse cardiac events (95 %CI 0.49 – 24.7). Discontinuation of one antiplatelet agent did not increase the risk (OR 0.65, 95 %CI 0.17 – 2.47). No hemostatic interventions were caused by endoscopic complications. Conclusion: Gastroscopy can be safely performed in PCI patients treated with DES and single antiplatelet therapy while interruption of DAPT may be associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiac events. PMID:27227109

  7. Adverse events following immunisation associated with the 1998 Australian Measles Control Campaign.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, R M; Campbell-Lloyd, S; Isaacs, D; Gold, M; Burgess, M; Turnbull, F; O'Brien, E

    2000-02-17

    in the United Kingdom. On comparing the risks and benefits of MMR vaccine, the benefits of this MCC far outweigh the incidence of serious adverse events associated with immunisation.

  8. Reporting of adverse events for marketed drugs: Need for strengthening safety database

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Aditi Anand

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance is an evolving discipline in the Indian context. However, there is limited regulatory guidance for adverse event reporting outside the purview of clinical trials. There are number of deficiencies in the framework for adverse event reporting from the perspective of pharma industry, health-care professional and general public due to which adverse events for marketed drugs are highly underreported. This article discusses the need to strengthen national safety database by promoting and mandating reporting of adverse events by all the stakeholders. PMID:27453826

  9. Application of a temporal reasoning framework tool in analysis of medical device adverse events.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kimberly K; Sharma, Deepak K; Chute, Christopher G; Tao, Cui

    2011-01-01

    The Clinical Narrative Temporal Relation Ontology (CNTRO)1 project offers a semantic-web based reasoning framework, which represents temporal events and relationships within clinical narrative texts, and infer new knowledge over them. In this paper, the CNTRO reasoning framework is applied to temporal analysis of medical device adverse event files. One specific adverse event was used as a test case: late stent thrombosis. Adverse event narratives were obtained from the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Manufacturing and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database2. 15 adverse event files in which late stent thrombosis was confirmed were randomly selected across multiple drug eluting stent devices. From these files, 81 events and 72 temporal relations were annotated. 73 temporal questions were generated, of which 65 were correctly answered by the CNTRO system. This results in an overall accuracy of 89%. This system should be pursued further to continue assessing its potential benefits in temporal analysis of medical device adverse events.

  10. Pembrolizumab Cutaneous Adverse Events and Their Association With Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Adil; Algazi, Alain; Gubens, Matthew; Luna, Sara Alcántara; Lin, Kevin; Quaglino, Pietro; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Immunomodulatory anticancer drugs, such as the anti–programmed death-1 drug pembrolizumab, have shown promising results in trials, and more patients will receive such treatments. Little is known about cutaneous adverse events (AEs) caused by these drugs and their possible correlation with treatment response. OBJECTIVE To describe the frequency and spectrum of cutaneous AEs linked with pembrolizumab and their possible correlation with treatment response. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A single-institution, retrospective medical record review was conducted of patients with cancer who were treated with pembrolizumab from March 1, 2011, to May 28, 2014. The review comprised 83 consecutive patients who were enrolled in 2 clinical trials, received at least 1 dose of pembrolizumab, and had at least 1 follow-up visit. Patients were grouped according to the following therapeutic regimen for pembrolizumab: 43 received 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks, 24 received 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks, and 16 received 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks. Sixty-six patients were treated for melanoma, 15 patients for lung cancer, 1 patient for prostate cancer, and 1 patient for Merkel cell carcinoma. Median follow-up was 15 weeks (range, 2-105 weeks). The analysis was conducted from March 1 to September 30, 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Occurrence, severity, and type of cutaneous AEs, as well as disease progression and response to pembrolizumab treatment. RESULTS Thirty-five patients (42%) developed cutaneous AEs attributed to pembrolizumab. The most common cutaneous AEs were macular papular eruption (24 [29%]), pruritus (10 [12%]), and hypopigmentation (7 [8%]). All 7 patients who developed hypopigmentation were treated for melanoma. Survival analyses showed that patients who developed cutaneous AEs had significantly longer progression-free intervals in all 3 groups (pembrolizumab, 10 mg/kg, every 3 weeks, P = .001; pembrolizumab, 10 mg/kg, every 2 weeks, P = .003; pembrolizumab, 2 mg/kg, every 3

  11. Adverse events in emerging adulthood are associated with increases in neuroticism.

    PubMed

    Boals, Adriel; Southard-Dobbs, Shana; Blumenthal, Heidemarie

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have produced mixed results when examining whether experiencing an adverse event can lead to changes in Neuroticism. We sought to examine this effect when (a) the event was relatively recent, (b) the event occurred during a relatively early development stage (i.e., emerging adulthood), and (c) the event was severely adverse. A sample of 1,108 undergraduates completed three measures of Neuroticism twice, separated by approximately 3 months, and indicated the most traumatic or adverse event they experienced during the intervening 3 months. We examined two operationalizations of adverse events: one that is more objectively defined (indicated experiencing a trauma listed on a trauma history measure) and another more subjectively defined (participant ratings of event centrality). The results revealed that high Neuroticism at Time 1 predicted future exposure to both types of adverse events. Critically, participants who experienced either type of adverse event during the semester reported significant increases in Neuroticism. Experiencing a high event centrality event was also associated with small increases in the personality traits Openness to Experience and Conscientiousness. The results are discussed in terms of the conditions necessary for adverse events to affect personality traits.

  12. Impact of dose intensity of ponatinib on selected adverse events: Multivariate analyses from a pooled population of clinical trial patients.

    PubMed

    Dorer, David J; Knickerbocker, Ronald K; Baccarani, Michele; Cortes, Jorge E; Hochhaus, Andreas; Talpaz, Moshe; Haluska, Frank G

    2016-09-01

    Ponatinib is approved for adults with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia or Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, including those with the T315I BCR-ABL1 mutation. We pooled data from 3 clinical trials (N=671) to determine the impact of ponatinib dose intensity on the following adverse events: arterial occlusive events (cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular events), venous thromboembolic events, cardiac failure, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, hypertension, pancreatitis, increased lipase, increased alanine aminotransferase, increased aspartate aminotransferase, rash, arthralgia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Multivariate analyses allowed adjustment for covariates potentially related to changes in dosing or an event. Logistic regression analysis identified significant associations between dose intensity and most events after adjusting for covariates. Pancreatitis, rash, and cardiac failure had the strongest associations with dose intensity (odds ratios >2). Time-to-event analyses showed significant associations between dose intensity and risk of arterial occlusive events and each subcategory. Further, these analyses suggested that a lag exists between a change in dose and the resulting change in event risk. No significant association between dose intensity and risk of venous thromboembolic events was evident. Collectively, these findings suggest a potential causal relationship between ponatinib dose and certain adverse events and support prospective investigations of approaches to lower average ponatinib dose intensity. PMID:27505637

  13. Impact of dose intensity of ponatinib on selected adverse events: Multivariate analyses from a pooled population of clinical trial patients.

    PubMed

    Dorer, David J; Knickerbocker, Ronald K; Baccarani, Michele; Cortes, Jorge E; Hochhaus, Andreas; Talpaz, Moshe; Haluska, Frank G

    2016-09-01

    Ponatinib is approved for adults with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia or Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, including those with the T315I BCR-ABL1 mutation. We pooled data from 3 clinical trials (N=671) to determine the impact of ponatinib dose intensity on the following adverse events: arterial occlusive events (cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular events), venous thromboembolic events, cardiac failure, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, hypertension, pancreatitis, increased lipase, increased alanine aminotransferase, increased aspartate aminotransferase, rash, arthralgia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Multivariate analyses allowed adjustment for covariates potentially related to changes in dosing or an event. Logistic regression analysis identified significant associations between dose intensity and most events after adjusting for covariates. Pancreatitis, rash, and cardiac failure had the strongest associations with dose intensity (odds ratios >2). Time-to-event analyses showed significant associations between dose intensity and risk of arterial occlusive events and each subcategory. Further, these analyses suggested that a lag exists between a change in dose and the resulting change in event risk. No significant association between dose intensity and risk of venous thromboembolic events was evident. Collectively, these findings suggest a potential causal relationship between ponatinib dose and certain adverse events and support prospective investigations of approaches to lower average ponatinib dose intensity.

  14. Beyond the prescription: medication monitoring and adverse drug events in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Michael A.; Handler, Steven M.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Schiff, Gordon D.; Covinsky, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Whether a given patient will suffer harm from a medication or how severe that harm will be is difficult to precisely predict. As a result, many adverse drug events (ADEs) occur in patients in whom it was reasonable to believe that the drug's benefits exceeded its risks. Improving safety and reducing the burden of ADEs in older adults requires addressing this uncertainty by focusing not only on the appropriateness of the initial prescribing decision but also on detecting and mitigating adverse events once they have started to occur. Such enhanced monitoring of signs, symptoms, and laboratory parameters can determine whether an adverse event has only mild and short-term impacts or major long-term effects on morbidity and mortality. While current medication monitoring practices are often suboptimal, several strategies can be leveraged to improve the quality and outcomes of monitoring. These strategies include using health information technology to link pharmacy and laboratory data, prospective delineation of risk, and patient outreach and activation, all within a framework of team-based approaches to patient management. While many of these strategies are theoretically possible now, they are poorly utilized and will be difficult to implement without a significant restructuring of medical practice. An enhanced focus on medication monitoring will also require a new conceptual framework to re-engineer the prescribing process. In this approach, prescribing quality hinges not on static attributes of the initial prescribing decision, but entails a dynamic process in which the benefits and harms of drugs are actively monitored, managed, and reassessed over time. PMID:21797831

  15. Adverse Events Following Infusion of T Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy: A 10 Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Conrad Russell; Hanley, Patrick J.; Liu, Hao; Torrano, Vicky; Lin, Yu-Feng; Arce, James A.; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Louis, Chrystal U.; Leen, Ann M.; Gee, Adrian P.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Heslop, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background The FDA currently recommends at least 4 hours of recipient monitoring to detect early infusion reactions; recent catastrophic reactions to “first in man” biological agents have emphasized the importance of this rule for initial studies of new products. The value of such monitoring for better established agents is less obvious. Methods We therefore reviewed infusion-related adverse events (AEs) following administration of ex-vivo expanded T cell products (antigen specific CTLs, allodepleted T cells and genetically modified T cells) on Investigational New Drug (IND) studies in our center. Results From 1998 to 2008, we infused 381 T cell products to 180 recipients, enrolled on 18 studies, receiving T cells targeting malignancies or post-transplant viral infections. There were no Grade 3-4 infusion reactions during initial monitoring or 24 hour follow-up. Twenty four mild (grade 1-2) adverse events (AEs) occurred in 21 infusions either during or immediately following infusion (up to 6 hours), most commonly nausea and vomiting (10/24; 41.6%), likely due to the DMSO cryoprotectant, and hypotension (20.8%), attributable to diphenhydramine pre-medication. 22 additional non-severe events were reported within 24 hours of infusion, most commonly culture negative fever, chills and nausea. Increased risk of adverse effects was associated with age (IRR 0.98; 95% CI 0.96-1.00; p=0.05), while an increase risk of immediate infusion-related events was higher in patients reporting allergies (IRR 2.72; 95% CI 1.00-7.40; p=0.05); sex, disease type or T cell source (allogeneic or autologous) had no effect on frequency of adverse events. Discussion Hence infusion of T cells is safe in the outpatient setting and associated with no severe reactions, so that monitoring for one hour after infusion is likely sufficient. As many of the AEs were attributable to diphenhydramine premedication, a lower dose (0.25mg/kg) should be selected. PMID:20429793

  16. Adaptation options for wheat in Europe will be limited by increased adverse weather events under climate change.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Miroslav; Hlavinka, Petr; Semenov, Mikhail A

    2015-11-01

    Ways of increasing the production of wheat, the most widely grown cereal crop, will need to be found to meet the increasing demand caused by human population growth in the coming decades. This increase must occur despite the decrease in yield gains now being reported in some regions, increased price volatility and the expected increase in the frequency of adverse weather events that can reduce yields. However, if and how the frequency of adverse weather events will change over Europe, the most important wheat-growing area, has not yet been analysed. Here, we show that the accumulated probability of 11 adverse weather events with the potential to significantly reduce yield will increase markedly across all of Europe. We found that by the end of the century, the exposure of the key European wheat-growing areas, where most wheat production is currently concentrated, may increase more than twofold. However, if we consider the entire arable land area of Europe, a greater than threefold increase in risk was predicted. Therefore, shifting wheat production to new producing regions to reduce the risk might not be possible as the risk of adverse events beyond the key wheat-growing areas increases even more. Furthermore, we found a marked increase in wheat exposure to high temperatures, severe droughts and field inaccessibility compared with other types of adverse events. Our results also showed the limitations of some of the presently debated adaptation options and demonstrated the need for development of region-specific strategies. Other regions of the world could be affected by adverse weather events in the future in a way different from that considered here for Europe. This observation emphasizes the importance of conducting similar analyses for other major wheat regions. PMID:26577595

  17. Adaptation options for wheat in Europe will be limited by increased adverse weather events under climate change

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, Miroslav; Hlavinka, Petr; Semenov, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Ways of increasing the production of wheat, the most widely grown cereal crop, will need to be found to meet the increasing demand caused by human population growth in the coming decades. This increase must occur despite the decrease in yield gains now being reported in some regions, increased price volatility and the expected increase in the frequency of adverse weather events that can reduce yields. However, if and how the frequency of adverse weather events will change over Europe, the most important wheat-growing area, has not yet been analysed. Here, we show that the accumulated probability of 11 adverse weather events with the potential to significantly reduce yield will increase markedly across all of Europe. We found that by the end of the century, the exposure of the key European wheat-growing areas, where most wheat production is currently concentrated, may increase more than twofold. However, if we consider the entire arable land area of Europe, a greater than threefold increase in risk was predicted. Therefore, shifting wheat production to new producing regions to reduce the risk might not be possible as the risk of adverse events beyond the key wheat-growing areas increases even more. Furthermore, we found a marked increase in wheat exposure to high temperatures, severe droughts and field inaccessibility compared with other types of adverse events. Our results also showed the limitations of some of the presently debated adaptation options and demonstrated the need for development of region-specific strategies. Other regions of the world could be affected by adverse weather events in the future in a way different from that considered here for Europe. This observation emphasizes the importance of conducting similar analyses for other major wheat regions. PMID:26577595

  18. Adaptation options for wheat in Europe will be limited by increased adverse weather events under climate change.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Miroslav; Hlavinka, Petr; Semenov, Mikhail A

    2015-11-01

    Ways of increasing the production of wheat, the most widely grown cereal crop, will need to be found to meet the increasing demand caused by human population growth in the coming decades. This increase must occur despite the decrease in yield gains now being reported in some regions, increased price volatility and the expected increase in the frequency of adverse weather events that can reduce yields. However, if and how the frequency of adverse weather events will change over Europe, the most important wheat-growing area, has not yet been analysed. Here, we show that the accumulated probability of 11 adverse weather events with the potential to significantly reduce yield will increase markedly across all of Europe. We found that by the end of the century, the exposure of the key European wheat-growing areas, where most wheat production is currently concentrated, may increase more than twofold. However, if we consider the entire arable land area of Europe, a greater than threefold increase in risk was predicted. Therefore, shifting wheat production to new producing regions to reduce the risk might not be possible as the risk of adverse events beyond the key wheat-growing areas increases even more. Furthermore, we found a marked increase in wheat exposure to high temperatures, severe droughts and field inaccessibility compared with other types of adverse events. Our results also showed the limitations of some of the presently debated adaptation options and demonstrated the need for development of region-specific strategies. Other regions of the world could be affected by adverse weather events in the future in a way different from that considered here for Europe. This observation emphasizes the importance of conducting similar analyses for other major wheat regions.

  19. Adverse events following influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, United States, October 1, 2009-January 31, 2010.

    PubMed

    Vellozzi, Claudia; Broder, Karen R; Haber, Penina; Guh, Alice; Nguyen, Michael; Cano, Maria; Lewis, Paige; McNeil, Michael M; Bryant, Marthe; Singleton, James; Martin, David; DeStefano, Frank

    2010-10-21

    The United States (US) influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent (2009-H1N1) vaccination program began in October 2009. Reports to the vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS), a US spontaneous reporting system, were reviewed to identify potential rare events or unusual adverse event (AE) patterns after 2009-H1N1 vaccination. The adverse event profile after 2009-H1N1 vaccine in VAERS (∼10,000 reports) was consistent with that of seasonal influenza vaccines, although the reporting rate was higher after 2009-H1N1 than seasonal influenza vaccines, this may be, at least in part, a reflection of stimulated reporting. Death, Guillain-Barré syndrome and anaphylaxis reports after 2009-H1N1 vaccination were rare (each <2 per million doses administered).

  20. Effect of Two Different Methods of Initiating Atomoxetine on the Adverse Event Profile of Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhill, Laurence L.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Gao, Haitao; Feldman, Peter D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of two different methods for initiating atomoxetine in terms of the incidence of early adverse events. Method: Data on atomoxetine treatment-emergent adverse events in youths, ages 6 to 18 years, were analyzed from five randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, acute-phase studies. Two studies involve…

  1. 22 CFR 504.13 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 504.13 Section 504.13 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS TESTIMONY BY BBG EMPLOYEES... Requests for Testimony and Production of Documents § 504.13 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling....

  2. 10 CFR 1707.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1707.210 Section 1707.210 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD TESTIMONY BY DNFSB EMPLOYEES AND....210 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other competent authority fails...

  3. 45 CFR 1201.8 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1201.8 Section 1201.8 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR... OR STATE LITIGATION § 1201.8 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or...

  4. 12 CFR 404.33 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 404.33 Section 404.33 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION DISCLOSURE... § 404.33 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to...

  5. 19 CFR 103.25 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 103.25 Section 103.25 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Foreign Proceedings § 103.25 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other...

  6. 29 CFR 1610.36 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1610.36 Section 1610.36 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION... Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect...

  7. 22 CFR 172.7 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 172.7 Section 172.7 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCESS TO INFORMATION SERVICE OF PROCESS... FEDERAL OR STATE LITIGATION; EXPERT TESTIMONY § 172.7 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If...

  8. 28 CFR 16.28 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 16.28 Section 16.28 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF... event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect of the demand...

  9. 5 CFR 1631.33 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1631.33 Section 1631.33 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD... Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect...

  10. 10 CFR 1707.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1707.210 Section 1707.210 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD TESTIMONY BY DNFSB EMPLOYEES AND....210 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other competent authority fails...

  11. 45 CFR 1201.8 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1201.8 Section 1201.8 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR... OR STATE LITIGATION § 1201.8 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or...

  12. 19 CFR 103.25 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 103.25 Section 103.25 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Foreign Proceedings § 103.25 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other...

  13. 22 CFR 504.13 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 504.13 Section 504.13 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS TESTIMONY BY BBG EMPLOYEES... Requests for Testimony and Production of Documents § 504.13 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling....

  14. 5 CFR 1305.4 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1305.4 Section 1305.4 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET ADMINISTRATIVE....4 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay...

  15. 19 CFR 103.25 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 103.25 Section 103.25 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Foreign Proceedings § 103.25 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other...

  16. 10 CFR 1707.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1707.210 Section 1707.210 Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD TESTIMONY BY DNFSB EMPLOYEES AND....210 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other competent authority fails...

  17. 12 CFR 1070.36 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1070.36 Section 1070.36 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS... Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If a stay or, or other relief from, the effect of a demand...

  18. 29 CFR 1610.36 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1610.36 Section 1610.36 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION... Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect...

  19. 45 CFR 1201.8 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1201.8 Section 1201.8 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR... OR STATE LITIGATION § 1201.8 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or...

  20. 10 CFR 9.204 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 9.204 Section 9.204 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Production or Disclosure in Response to Subpoenas or Demands of Courts or Other Authorities § 9.204 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling....

  1. 5 CFR 2502.33 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 2502.33 Section 2502.33 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION, EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF... Other Authorities § 2502.33 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other...

  2. 29 CFR 2.24 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 2.24 Section 2.24 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Employees Served With Subpoenas § 2.24 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect...

  3. 29 CFR 2.24 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 2.24 Section 2.24 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Employees Served With Subpoenas § 2.24 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect...

  4. 12 CFR 404.33 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 404.33 Section 404.33 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION DISCLOSURE... § 404.33 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to...

  5. 28 CFR 16.28 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 16.28 Section 16.28 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF... event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect of the demand...

  6. 28 CFR 16.28 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 16.28 Section 16.28 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF... event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect of the demand...

  7. 5 CFR 1216.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1216.210 Section 1216.210 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION... Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other competent authority fails to stay...

  8. 22 CFR 172.7 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 172.7 Section 172.7 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCESS TO INFORMATION SERVICE OF PROCESS... FEDERAL OR STATE LITIGATION; EXPERT TESTIMONY § 172.7 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If...

  9. 29 CFR 1610.36 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1610.36 Section 1610.36 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION... Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect...

  10. 45 CFR 1201.8 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1201.8 Section 1201.8 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR... OR STATE LITIGATION § 1201.8 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or...

  11. 12 CFR 404.33 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 404.33 Section 404.33 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION DISCLOSURE... § 404.33 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to...

  12. 19 CFR 103.25 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 103.25 Section 103.25 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Foreign Proceedings § 103.25 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other...

  13. 29 CFR 2.24 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 2.24 Section 2.24 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Employees Served With Subpoenas § 2.24 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect...

  14. 5 CFR 1216.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1216.210 Section 1216.210 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION... Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other competent authority fails to stay...

  15. Incorporating adverse event relatedness into dose-finding clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Darssan, Darsy; Thompson, Mery H; Pettitt, Anthony N

    2014-03-30

    Dose-finding designs estimate the dose level of a drug based on observed adverse events. Relatedness of the adverse event to the drug has been generally ignored in all proposed design methodologies. These designs assume that the adverse events observed during a trial are definitely related to the drug, which can lead to flawed dose-level estimation. We incorporate adverse event relatedness into the so-called continual reassessment method. Adverse events that have 'doubtful' or 'possible' relationships to the drug are modelled using a two-parameter logistic model with an additive probability mass. Adverse events 'probably' or 'definitely' related to the drug are modelled using a cumulative logistic model. To search for the maximum tolerated dose, we use the maximum estimated toxicity probability of these two adverse event relatedness categories. We conduct a simulation study that illustrates the characteristics of the design under various scenarios. This article demonstrates that adverse event relatedness is important for improved dose estimation. It opens up further research pathways into continual reassessment design methodologies. PMID:24122859

  16. Angiographic adverse events during percutaneous coronary intervention fail to predict creatine kinase-MB elevation.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, James C; Islam, M Ashequl; Wood, G Craig; Iliadis, Elias A

    2004-09-01

    We attempted to determine if aggressive detection of angiographic adverse events during coronary intervention could predict subsequent creatine kinase (CK)-MB elevations. During coronary intervention, both fluoroscopy and cine angiography were used to detect angiographic adverse events. At least one angiographic adverse event occurred in 133/251 (53%) of procedures. CK-MB elevation occurred in 24% of procedures. Slow flow during the procedure (P=0.002) and chest discomfort at the end of the procedure (P=0.007) were the strongest predictors of CK-MB elevation. Among procedures with no angiographic adverse events, CK-MB elevation occurred in 15/121 (12%), accounting for 25% of CK-MB elevations. We conclude that CK-MB elevation occurs after angiographically uncomplicated coronary interventions even when angiographic adverse events are aggressively detected. Routine monitoring of cardiac enzymes is necessary to detect all patients who will experience myocardial injury after coronary intervention.

  17. Teaching dental students about patient communication following an adverse event: a pilot educational module.

    PubMed

    Raja, Sheela; Rajagopalan, Chelsea F; Patel, Janki; Van Kanegan, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    Adverse events are an important but understudied area in dentistry. Most dentists will face the issue of an adverse event several times in their clinical careers. The authors implemented a six-hour pilot educational module at one dental school to improve fourth-year dental students' knowledge and confidence in communicating with patients about adverse events. Based on results from the twenty-nine students who completed both the pre- and posttests, the module significantly increased the students' knowledge of the key concepts involved in adverse events. However, the module did not improve the students' confidence that they would be able to implement these communication skills in clinical situations. Based on these results, this article discusses how future educational efforts can be modified to better prepare students for the communication challenges associated with adverse events.

  18. The Ontology of Vaccine Adverse Events (OVAE) and its usage in representing and analyzing adverse events associated with US-licensed human vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Licensed human vaccines can induce various adverse events (AE) in vaccinated patients. Due to the involvement of the whole immune system and complex immunological reactions after vaccination, it is difficult to identify the relations among vaccines, adverse events, and human populations in different age groups. Many known vaccine adverse events (VAEs) have been recorded in the package inserts of US-licensed commercial vaccine products. To better represent and analyze VAEs, we developed the Ontology of Vaccine Adverse Events (OVAE) as an extension of the Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE) and the Vaccine Ontology (VO). Results Like OAE and VO, OVAE is aligned with the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). The commercial vaccines and adverse events in OVAE are imported from VO and OAE, respectively. A new population term ‘human vaccinee population’ is generated and used to define VAE occurrence. An OVAE design pattern is developed to link vaccine, adverse event, vaccinee population, age range, and VAE occurrence. OVAE has been used to represent and classify the adverse events recorded in package insert documents of commercial vaccines licensed by the USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA). OVAE currently includes over 1,300 terms, including 87 distinct types of VAEs associated with 63 human vaccines licensed in the USA. For each vaccine, occurrence rates for every VAE in different age groups have been logically represented in OVAE. SPARQL scripts were developed to query and analyze the OVAE knowledge base data. To demonstrate the usage of OVAE, the top 10 vaccines accompanying with the highest numbers of VAEs and the top 10 VAEs most frequently observed among vaccines were identified and analyzed. Asserted and inferred ontology hierarchies classify VAEs in different levels of AE groups. Different VAE occurrences in different age groups were also analyzed. Conclusions The ontology-based data representation and integration using the FDA-approved information from

  19. Adverse events among Ontario home care clients associated with emergency room visit or hospitalization: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    frequent of the adverse events and was associated with increased admission to long-term care or death. We recommend the use of tools that are presently available in Canada, such as the Resident Assessment Instrument and its Clinical Assessment Protocols, for assessing and mitigating the risk of an adverse event occurring. PMID:23800280

  20. Usefulness of the Myocardial Infarction and Cardiac Arrest Calculator as a Discriminator of Adverse Cardiac Events After Elective Hip and Knee Surgery.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brandon; Ghahramani, Mehrdad; Harris, Stephanie; Suchniak-Mussari, Kristen; Bedi, Gurneet; Bulathsinghala, Charles; Foy, Andrew

    2016-06-15

    The 2014 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines on perioperative evaluation recommend differentiating patients at low risk (<1%) versus elevated risk (≥1%) for cardiac complications to guide appropriate preoperative testing. Among the tools recommended for estimating perioperative risk is the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Myocardial Infarction and Cardiac Arrest (MICA) risk calculator. We investigated whether the NSQIP MICA risk calculator would accurately discriminate adverse cardiac events in a cohort of adult patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 1,098 consecutive, elective orthopedic surgeries performed at Hershey Medical Center from January 1, 2013, to December 31, 2014. Adverse cardiac events were defined as myocardial infarction or cardiac arrest within 30 days of surgery. The mean estimated risk for adverse cardiac events using the NSQIP MICA risk calculator was 0.54%, which was not significantly different (p = 1) compared with the observed incidence of 0.64% (7 of 1,098 procedures). The c-statistic for discriminating adverse cardiac events was 0.85 (95% CI 0.67 to 1) for the NSQIP MICA risk calculator and 0.9 (95% CI 0.75 to 1) for the Revised Cardiac Risk Index. In conclusion, the NSQIP MICA risk calculator is a good discriminator of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing elective hip and knee surgery, performing comparably to the Revised Cardiac Risk Index. PMID:27131613

  1. [Epidemiology of the hospital adverse events in Catalonia, Spain: a first step for the patient safety improvement].

    PubMed

    Bañeres, Joaquim; Orrego, Carola; Navarro, Laura; Casas, Lidia; Banqué, Marta; Suñol, Rosa

    2014-07-01

    It has been published that hospital adverse events are an important source of morbidity and mortality in different countries and settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, magnitude, distribution and degree of preventability of adverse events in the Autonomous Community of Catalonia (Spain). We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 4,790 hospital discharges that were selected by simple random sampling after stratified multistage sampling in 15 hospitals in Catalonia. 38.25% of patients had positive risk criteria (screening phase). We identified 356 cases of adverse events, which represent a 7.4% (95%CI: 6.7% to 8.1%). Of these, 43.5% (155 cases) were considered preventable. This study confirms that adverse events in hospitals in Catalonia are frequent, and generate a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. As in other studies, corroborated that a high proportion of these adverse events are considered preventable. It was possible to identify priority areas to focus improvement efforts.

  2. [Epidemiology of the hospital adverse events in Catalonia, Spain: a first step for the patient safety improvement].

    PubMed

    Bañeres, Joaquim; Orrego, Carola; Navarro, Laura; Casas, Lidia; Banqué, Marta; Suñol, Rosa

    2014-07-01

    It has been published that hospital adverse events are an important source of morbidity and mortality in different countries and settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, magnitude, distribution and degree of preventability of adverse events in the Autonomous Community of Catalonia (Spain). We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 4,790 hospital discharges that were selected by simple random sampling after stratified multistage sampling in 15 hospitals in Catalonia. 38.25% of patients had positive risk criteria (screening phase). We identified 356 cases of adverse events, which represent a 7.4% (95%CI: 6.7% to 8.1%). Of these, 43.5% (155 cases) were considered preventable. This study confirms that adverse events in hospitals in Catalonia are frequent, and generate a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. As in other studies, corroborated that a high proportion of these adverse events are considered preventable. It was possible to identify priority areas to focus improvement efforts. PMID:25128353

  3. Adverse Events in Robotic Surgery: A Retrospective Study of 14 Years of FDA Data

    PubMed Central

    Alemzadeh, Homa; Raman, Jaishankar; Leveson, Nancy; Kalbarczyk, Zbigniew; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of robotic systems for minimally invasive surgery has rapidly increased during the last decade. Understanding the causes of adverse events and their impact on patients in robot-assisted surgery will help improve systems and operational practices to avoid incidents in the future. Methods By developing an automated natural language processing tool, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the adverse events reported to the publicly available MAUDE database (maintained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration) from 2000 to 2013. We determined the number of events reported per procedure and per surgical specialty, the most common types of device malfunctions and their impact on patients, and the potential causes for catastrophic events such as patient injuries and deaths. Results During the study period, 144 deaths (1.4% of the 10,624 reports), 1,391 patient injuries (13.1%), and 8,061 device malfunctions (75.9%) were reported. The numbers of injury and death events per procedure have stayed relatively constant (mean = 83.4, 95% confidence interval (CI), 74.2–92.7 per 100,000 procedures) over the years. Surgical specialties for which robots are extensively used, such as gynecology and urology, had lower numbers of injuries, deaths, and conversions per procedure than more complex surgeries, such as cardiothoracic and head and neck (106.3 vs. 232.9 per 100,000 procedures, Risk Ratio = 2.2, 95% CI, 1.9–2.6). Device and instrument malfunctions, such as falling of burnt/broken pieces of instruments into the patient (14.7%), electrical arcing of instruments (10.5%), unintended operation of instruments (8.6%), system errors (5%), and video/imaging problems (2.6%), constituted a major part of the reports. Device malfunctions impacted patients in terms of injuries or procedure interruptions. In 1,104 (10.4%) of all the events, the procedure was interrupted to restart the system (3.1%), to convert the procedure to non-robotic techniques (7.3%), or to

  4. Social Involvement Modulates the Response to Novel and Adverse Life Events in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Colnaghi, Luca; Clemenza, Kelly; Groleau, Sarah E.; Weiss, Shira; Snyder, Anna M.; Lopez-Rosas, Mariana; Levine, Amir A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological findings suggest that social involvement plays a major role in establishing resilience to adversity, however, the neurobiology by which social involvement confers protection is not well understood. Hypothesizing that social involvement confers resilience by changing the way adverse life events are encoded, we designed a series of behavioral tests in mice that utilize the presence or absence of conspecific cage mates in measuring response to novel and adverse events. We found that the presence of cage mates increased movement after exposure to a novel environment, increased time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze, and decreased freezing time after a foot shock as well as expedited fear extinction, therefore significantly changing the response to adversity. This is a first description of a mouse model for the effects of social involvement on adverse life events. Understanding how social involvement provides resilience to adversity may contribute to the future treatment and prevention of mental and physical illness. PMID:27632422

  5. Social Involvement Modulates the Response to Novel and Adverse Life Events in Mice.

    PubMed

    Colnaghi, Luca; Clemenza, Kelly; Groleau, Sarah E; Weiss, Shira; Snyder, Anna M; Lopez-Rosas, Mariana; Levine, Amir A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological findings suggest that social involvement plays a major role in establishing resilience to adversity, however, the neurobiology by which social involvement confers protection is not well understood. Hypothesizing that social involvement confers resilience by changing the way adverse life events are encoded, we designed a series of behavioral tests in mice that utilize the presence or absence of conspecific cage mates in measuring response to novel and adverse events. We found that the presence of cage mates increased movement after exposure to a novel environment, increased time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze, and decreased freezing time after a foot shock as well as expedited fear extinction, therefore significantly changing the response to adversity. This is a first description of a mouse model for the effects of social involvement on adverse life events. Understanding how social involvement provides resilience to adversity may contribute to the future treatment and prevention of mental and physical illness. PMID:27632422

  6. Incidence and pattern of 12 years of reported transfusion adverse events in Zimbabwe: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A.; Chitiyo, McLeod E.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemovigilance hinges on a systematically structured reporting system, which unfortunately does not always exist in resource-limited settings. We determined the incidence and pattern of transfusion-related adverse events reported to the National Blood Service Zimbabwe. Materials and methods A retrospective review of the transfusion-event records of the National Blood Service Zimbabwe was conducted covering the period from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2011. All transfusion-related event reports received during the period were analysed. Results A total of 308 transfusion adverse events (0.046%) were reported for 670,625 blood components distributed. The majority (61.6%) of the patients who experienced an adverse event were female. The median age was 36 years (range, 1–89 years). The majority (68.8%) of the adverse events were acute transfusion reactions consisting of febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (58.5%), minor allergies (31.6%), haemolytic reactions (5.2%), severe allergic reactions (2.4%), anaphylaxis (1.4%) and hypotension (0.9%). Two-thirds (66.6%) of the adverse events occurred following administration of whole blood, although only 10.6% of the blood was distributed as whole blood. Packed cells, which accounted for 75% of blood components distributed, were associated with 20.1% of the events. Discussion The incidence of suspected transfusion adverse events was generally lower than the incidences reported globally in countries with well-established haemovigilance systems. The administration of whole blood was disproportionately associated with transfusion adverse events. The pattern of the transfusion adverse events reported here highlights the probable differences in practice between different settings. Under-reporting of transfusion events is rife in passive reporting systems. PMID:24887217

  7. Discontinuation due to adverse events in randomized trials of orlistat, sibutramine and rimonabant: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, K; Neovius, K; DeSantis, S M; Rössner, S; Neovius, M

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this article was to estimate the risk of discontinuation due to adverse events in trials of orlistat, sibutramine and rimonabant. Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane controlled trials register and reference lists of identified articles were searched from 1990 to May 2008. All randomized placebo-controlled trials of 12-24 months of duration on adults using licensed doses were included. Studies/study arms were excluded if they evaluated weight maintenance after weight loss. Trials were identified, subjected to inclusion and exclusion criteria and reviewed. Data on participants, interventions and discontinuation were extracted and trials rated for quality based on established criteria. A random effects model was used to estimate pooled risk ratios, risk differences and number needed to harm (NNH). A total of 28 trials met the inclusion criteria (16 orlistat, 7 sibutramine and 5 rimonabant). The risk ratios for discontinuation due to adverse events were significantly elevated for rimonabant (2.00; 1.66-2.41) and orlistat (1.59; 1.21-2.08), but not sibutramine (0.98, 0.68-1.41). Compared with placebo, the risk difference was the largest for rimonabant (7%, 5-9%; NNH 14, 11-19), followed by orlistat (3%, 1-4%; NNH 39, 25-83), while no significant difference was seen for sibutramine (0.2%, -3 to 4%; NNH 500). The most common adverse events leading to withdrawal were gastrointestinal for orlistat (40%) and psychiatric for rimonabant (47%). Corresponding information was unavailable for sibutramine. In conclusion, available weight loss drugs differ markedly regarding risk of discontinuation due to adverse events, as well as in underlying causes of these events. Given the large number of patients eligible for treatment, the low NNH for rimonabant is a concern.

  8. Adverse events of acupuncture and occlusal splint therapy in the treatment of craniomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    List, T; Helkimo, M

    1992-10-01

    Occlusal splint therapy and acupuncture have been found to provide positive treatment in a number of studies. As with other therapies, adverse events may occur. In this paper, adverse event refers to any reaction to a treatment besides the intended treatment effect--irrespective of any correlation between the treatment and the reaction. This reaction can be positive, as well as negative, to the patient. In the present study, 61 patients with craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD) were treated with acupuncture or occlusal splint therapy and the adverse events were carefully recorded. The results show that the profile of the adverse events differed between the two treatment modes. Acupuncture seemed to have adverse events of a more general nature, e.g., relaxed feeling, improved sleep, temporarily increased pain; whereas, adverse events of occlusal splint therapy seemed to be more locally related to the orofacial region, e.g., increased/decreased salivation and tension in the teeth. The majority of the patients responded positively to both treatment modalities. Only in a few cases did the patients consider the treatment uncomfortable. No serious adverse event or complication was observed in this study.

  9. Association Between Vascular Access Dysfunction and Subsequent Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Tseng, Chien-Tzu; Lin, Wei-Hung; Chao, Jo-Yen; Wang, Wei-Ming; Li, Chung-Yi; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between dialysis vascular access dysfunction and the risk of developing major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in hemodialysis patients is unclear and has not yet been investigated. We analyzed data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to quantify this association. Adopting a case–control design nested within a cohort of patients who received hemodialysis from 2001 to 2010, we identified 9711 incident cases of MACE during the stage of stable maintenance dialysis and 19,422 randomly selected controls matched to cases on age, gender, and duration of dialysis. Events of vascular access dysfunction in the 6-month period before the date of MACE onset (ie, index date) for cases and before index dates for controls were evaluated retrospectively. The presence of vascular access dysfunction was associated with a 1.385-fold higher odds of developing MACE as estimated from the logistic regression analysis. This represents a significantly increased adjusted odds ratio (OR) at 1.268 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.186–1.355) after adjustment for comorbidities and calendar years of initiating dialysis. We also noted a significant exposure–response trend (P < 0.001) between the frequency of vascular access dysfunction and MACE, with the greatest risk (adjusted OR = 1.840, 95% CI = 1.549–2.186) noted in patients with ≥3 vascular access events. We concluded that dialysis vascular access dysfunction was significantly associated with an increased risk of MACE. Hence, vascular access failure can be an early sign for MACE in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Active monitoring and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and related diseases, not merely managing vascular access dysfunction, would be required to reduce the risk of MACE. PMID:26131808

  10. Postlicensure surveillance for pre-specified adverse events following the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hung Fu; Sy, Lina S; Liu, In-Lu Amy; Qian, Lei; Marcy, S Michael; Weintraub, Eric; Yih, Katherine; Baxter, Roger; Glanz, Jason M; Donahue, James; Naleway, Allison; Nordin, James; Jacobsen, Steven J

    2013-05-24

    Although no increased risk was detected for serious adverse events in the prelicensure trials for the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine, Prevnar 13(®) (PCV13), continued monitoring of rare but serious adverse events is necessary. A surveillance system using cohort study design was set up to monitor safety of PCV13 immediately after it was included in the childhood immunization program in the United States. The exposed population included children of 1 month to 2 years old who received PCV13 from April, 2010 to January, 2012 from the eight managed care organizations participating in the Vaccine Safety Datalink Project in the United States. The historical unexposed population was children of the same age who received the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine Prevnar 7(®) (PCV7) in 2007 (or 2005 depending on the outcome of interest) to 2009. The risk of pre-specified adverse events in the risk window following PCV13 was repeatedly compared to that in the historical comparison group. The number of doses included in the study was 599,229. No increased risk was found for febrile seizures, urticaria or angioneurotic edema, asthma, thrombocytopenia, or anaphylaxis. An increased risk for encephalopathy was not confirmed following the medical record review. The relative risk for Kawasaki disease in 0-28 days following vaccination was 1.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.79-4.86), comparing PCV13 to PCV7. Comparing to PCV7 vaccine, we identified no significant increased risk of pre-specified adverse events in the Vaccine Safety Datalink study cohort. The possible association between PCV13 and Kawasaki disease may deserve further investigation.

  11. Organisational sources of safety and danger: sociological contributions to the study of adverse events

    PubMed Central

    West, E.

    2000-01-01

    Organisational sociology has long accepted that mistakes of all kinds are a common, even normal, part of work. Medical work may be particularly prone to error because of its complexity and technological sophistication. The results can be tragic for individuals and families. This paper describes four intrinsic characteristics of organisations that are relevant to the level of risk and danger in healthcare settings—namely, the division of labour and "structural secrecy" in complex organisations; the homophily principle and social structural barriers to communication; diffusion of responsibility and the "problem of many hands"; and environmental or other pressures leading to goal displacement when organisations take their "eyes off the ball". The paper argues that each of these four intrinsic characteristics invokes specific mechanisms that increase danger in healthcare organisations but also offer the possibility of devising strategies and behaviours to increase patient safety. Stated as hypotheses, these ideas could be tested empirically, thus adding to the evidence on which the avoidance of adverse events in healthcare settings is based and contributing to the development of theory in this important area. (Quality in Health Care 2000;9:120–126) Key Words: organisation; safety; errors; adverse events PMID:11067250

  12. Glycopeptide antibiotics: evolving resistance, pharmacology and adverse event profile.

    PubMed

    Henson, Karl Evans R; Levine, Miriam T; Wong, Eunice Ann H; Levine, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The first glycopeptide antibiotic was vancomycin, isolated from the soil in the 1950s; since then, the class has expanded to include teicoplanin and the new semisynthetic glycopeptides dalbavancin, oritavancin and telavancin. They are bactericidal, active against most Gram-positive organisms, and in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibit cell wall synthesis. Resistance to vancomycin has emerged, especially among enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus through a variety of mechanisms. This emerging resistance to vancomycin makes proper dosing and monitoring of the area under the curve/MIC critically important. The chief adverse effect of vancomycin is nephrotoxicity, which is also intricately related to its dose. The efficacy of the semisynthetic glycopeptides has been demonstrated in skin and soft-tissue infections, but remains to be seen in serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  13. ACCEPT: Introduction of the Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney A.; Santanu, Das; Janakiraman, Vijay Manikandan; Hosein, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of anomalies or adverse events is a challenging task, and there are a variety of methods which can be used to address the problem. In this paper, we introduce a generic framework developed in MATLAB (sup registered mark) called ACCEPT (Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox). ACCEPT is an architectural framework designed to compare and contrast the performance of a variety of machine learning and early warning algorithms, and tests the capability of these algorithms to robustly predict the onset of adverse events in any time-series data generating systems or processes.

  14. Transient paralysis during acupuncture therapy: a case report of an adverse event.

    PubMed

    Beable, Anne

    2013-09-01

    A patient with apparently well-controlled epilepsy with a painful musculoskeletal condition was treated successfully with two sessions of acupuncture. However, 4 h after the first treatment and during the second, an adverse event involving impairment of consciousness occurred. The patient subsequently experienced an increased frequency of complex partial seizures resulting in the loss of his driving licence. A detailed retrospective review of the past medical history indicated that the patient probably had comorbidities in the form of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and dysfunctional somatosensory/vestibular processing. Acupuncture may have triggered the adverse event via shared neurosubstrates. This adverse event raises possible implications regarding safe clinical acupuncture practice.

  15. Adverse events among nurse aides in long-term care facilities in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man-Ling; Perng, Shoa-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between the incidence of adverse events and related factors among nurse aides in long-term settings in Taiwan. Of 213 nurse aides, 54.93% experienced an adverse event during the previous year. Four variables, including institution type, certification, years of work experience as a nurse aide, and job type, were found to be associated with the occurrence of adverse events. Findings suggested that health care managers provide training to nurse aides with a specific focus on maintaining quality care. PMID:24375108

  16. 24 CFR 2004.28 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an... Testimony and Production of Documents § 2004.28 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. (a) Opportunity... seek review of that decision pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Procedure in the event...

  17. 24 CFR 2004.28 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an... Testimony and Production of Documents § 2004.28 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. (a) Opportunity... seek review of that decision pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Procedure in the event...

  18. 24 CFR 2004.28 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an... Testimony and Production of Documents § 2004.28 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. (a) Opportunity... seek review of that decision pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Procedure in the event...

  19. 24 CFR 2004.28 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an... Testimony and Production of Documents § 2004.28 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. (a) Opportunity... seek review of that decision pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Procedure in the event...

  20. 24 CFR 2004.28 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an... Testimony and Production of Documents § 2004.28 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. (a) Opportunity... seek review of that decision pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Procedure in the event...

  1. Medication safety program reduces adverse drug events in a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, M; Kimmel, N; Benage, M; Cox, M; Sanders, N; Spence, D; Chen, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is widespread interest in improving medication safety, particularly in the hospital setting. Numerous suggestions have been made as to how this should be done, but there is a paucity of data demonstrating the effectiveness of any of the interventions that have been proposed. Objectives: To assess the impact of a wide ranging, community hospital based patient safety program on patient harm as measured by the rate of adverse drug events. Design: An audit of discharged hospital patients was conducted from January 2001 to December 2003. Baseline data were collected for the first 6 months and multiple drug protocols and other interventions were instituted on the nursing units and in the pharmacy department over the subsequent 9 months (transition period). These interventions were largely based on information about medication risks acquired from internal medication event reporting. Each month of the study adverse drug events (ADE) were sought from a random sample of inpatient charts. A trigger tool was used to detect clues to ADEs, the presence of which was confirmed or excluded by detailed manual chart review. The severity of these events was categorized using the classification system of the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error and Reporting and Prevention. Main outcome measures and results: Median ADEs per 1000 doses of medication dispensed declined significantly from 2.04 to 0.65 (p<0.001). Median ADEs per 100 patient days declined significantly from 5.07 to 1.30 (p<0.001). The proportion of inpatients with one or more ADE in the baseline period was 31% and declined threefold (p<0.001). The severity of reported medication events also declined. The number of ADEs associated conclusively with patient harm was 1.67 per total doses delivered in the baseline period and declined eightfold (p<0.001). Conclusion: The implementation of a carefully planned series of low cost interventions focused on high risk medications, driven by information

  2. Therapeutic potential and adverse events of everolimus for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma - systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kenya; Petrulionis, Marius; Lin, Shibo; Gao, Chao; Galli, Uwe; Richter, Susanne; Winkler, Susanne; Houben, Philipp; Schultze, Daniel; Hatano, Etsuro; Schemmer, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Everolimus is an orally administrated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. Several large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated the survival benefits of everolimus at the dose of 10 mg/day for solid cancers. Furthermore, mTOR-inhibitor-based immunosuppression is associated with survival benefits for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have received liver transplantation. However, a low rate of tumor reduction and some adverse events have been pointed out. This review summarizes the antitumor effects and adverse events of everolimus and evaluates its possible application in advanced HCC. For the meta-analysis of adverse events, we used the RCTs for solid cancers. The odds ratios of adverse events were calculated using the Peto method. Manypreclinical studies demonstrated that everolimus had antitumor effects such as antiproliferation and antiangiogenesis. However, some differences in the effects were observed among in vivo animal studies for HCC treatment. Meanwhile, clinical studies demonstrated that the response rate of single-agent everolimus was low, though survival benefits could be expected. The meta-analysis revealed the odds ratios (95% confidence interval [CI]) of stomatitis: 5.42 [4.31-6.73], hyperglycemia: 3.22 [2.37-4.39], anemia: 3.34 [2.37-4.67], pneumonitis: 6.02 [3.95-9.16], aspartate aminotransferase levels: 2.22 [1.37-3.62], and serum alanine aminotransferase levels: 2.94 [1.72-5.02], respectively. Everolimus at the dose of 10 mg/day significantly increased the risk of the adverse events. In order to enable its application to the standard conventional therapies of HCC, further studies are required to enhance the antitumor effects and manage the adverse events of everolimus. PMID:24403259

  3. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in Women with CKD.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Attini, Rossella; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Maxia, Stefania; Lepori, Nicola; Tuveri, Milena; Massidda, Marco; Marchi, Cecilia; Mura, Silvia; Coscia, Alessandra; Biolcati, Marilisa; Gaglioti, Pietro; Nichelatti, Michele; Pibiri, Luciana; Chessa, Giuseppe; Pani, Antonello; Todros, Tullia

    2015-08-01

    CKD is increasingly prevalent in pregnancy. In the Torino-Cagliari Observational Study (TOCOS), we assessed whether the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes is associated with CKD by comparing pregnancy outcomes of 504 pregnancies in women with CKD to outcomes of 836 low-risk pregnancies in women without CKD. The presence of hypertension, proteinuria (>1 g/d), systemic disease, and CKD stage (at referral) were assessed at baseline. The following outcomes were studied: cesarean section, preterm delivery, and early preterm delivery; small for gestational age (SGA); need for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU); new onset of hypertension; new onset/doubling of proteinuria; CKD stage shift; "general" combined outcome (preterm delivery, NICU, SGA); and "severe" combined outcome (early preterm delivery, NICU, SGA). The risk for adverse outcomes increased across stages (for stage 1 versus stages 4-5: "general" combined outcome, 34.1% versus 90.0%; "severe" combined outcome, 21.4% versus 80.0%; P<0.001). In women with stage 1 CKD, preterm delivery was associated with baseline hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 3.42; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.87 to 6.21), systemic disease (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.51 to 6.50), and proteinuria (OR, 3.69; 95% CI, 1.63 to 8.36). However, stage 1 CKD remained associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes (general combined outcome) in women without baseline hypertension, proteinuria, or systemic disease (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.79). The risk of intrauterine death did not differ between patients and controls. Findings from this prospective study suggest a "baseline risk" for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes linked to CKD.

  4. Dermatological Adverse Events Associated with Topical Brimonidine Gel 0.33% in Subjects with Erythema of Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Anna D.; Waite, Kimberly A.; Chen, Michael C.; Palaniswamy, Kiruthi; Wiser, Thomas H.; Draelos, Zoe D.; Rafal, Elyse S.; Werschler, W. Philip; Harvey, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The topical α2 adrenergic receptor agonist brimonidine gel 0.33% is an effective and safe pharmacological treatment for the facial erythema of rosacea. However, adverse events of worsened redness have occasionally been reported with its use. Objective: A detailed analysis of adverse events is needed to accurately define worsening erythema and the adverse-events profile associated with brimonidine gel treatment. Methods and measurements: A retrospective review of related dermatological adverse events occurring in subjects enrolled in the two pivotal four-week Phase 3 studies and the 52-week long-term safety study for brimonidine gel was conducted. Measurements included total adverse-event incidences; number of subjects experiencing adverse events; study discontinuation due to adverse events, severity, onset, episodic duration period; and correlation of adverse events to subject disposition, and rosacea profile. Results: Flushing and erythema were the most commonly reported adverse events, occurring in a total of 5.4 percent of subjects in the Phase 3 studies and in 15.4 percent in the long-term study. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity, transient, and intermittent. Adverse events occurred early in treatment, and duration was short-lived in the majority of cases. Adverse-event patterns were not remarkably altered with regard to subject disposition in the long-term study. Conclusion: Adverse events of worsening redness are not frequent, are transient in nature, and occur early in the course of treatment with brimonidine gel. PMID:26345379

  5. The role of the Immunisation Adverse Events Clinic at The Children's Hospital at Westmead.

    PubMed

    Wood, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    Specialist immunisation clinics review and manage children who have experienced an adverse event following immunisation and provide advice to parents and health care providers regarding the revaccination of these children. Information collected by these clinics supplement passive surveillance data and allow the investigation of suspected safety signals associated with the delivery of immunisation programs. This paper reviews the role and experience of the Immunisation Adverse Events Clinic at The Children's Hospital at Westmead and identifies areas for development.

  6. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting and research needs. A joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-05-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycaemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilised due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices, EUDAMED) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to 'predicate' products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  7. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting, and research needs: a joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-04-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to "predicate" products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  8. Antiretroviral Drugs and Risk of Chronic Alanine Aminotransferase Elevation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Monoinfected Persons: The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs Study

    PubMed Central

    Kovari, Helen; Sabin, Caroline A.; Ledergerber, Bruno; Ryom, Lene; Reiss, Peter; Law, Matthew; Pradier, Christian; Dabis, Francois; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Smith, Colette; de Wit, Stephane; Kirk, Ole; Lundgren, Jens D.; Weber, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) frequently have chronic liver enzyme elevation (cLEE), the underlying cause is often unclear. Methods. Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) Study participants without chronic viral hepatitis were observed to the earliest of cLEE (elevated aminotransferase ≥6 months), death, last follow-up, or January 2, 2014. Antiretroviral treatment exposure was categorized as follows: no exposure and ongoing short- and long-term exposure (<2 or ≥2 years) after initiation. Association between development of cLEE and ART exposure was investigated using Poisson regression. Results. Among 21 485 participants observed for 105 413 person-years (PY), 6368 developed cLEE (incidence 6.04/100 PY; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.89–6.19). Chronic liver enzyme elevation was associated with short-and long-term exposure to didanosine (<2 years rate ratio [RR] = 1.29, 95% CI, 1.11–1.49; >2 years RR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.13–1.41); stavudine (<2 years RR = 1.51, 95% CI, 1.26–1.81; >2 years RR = 1.17, 95% CI, 1.03–1.32), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (<2 years RR = 1.55, 95% CI, 1.40–1.72; >2 years RR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.05–1.32), but only short-term exposure to nevirapine (<2 years RR = 1.44, 95% CI, 1.29–1.61), efavirenz (<2 years RR = 1.14, 95% CI, 1.03–1.26), emtricitabine (<2 years RR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.04–1.33), and atazanavir (<2 years RR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.04–1.38). Chronic liver enzyme elevation was not associated with use of lamivudine, abacavir, and other protease inhibitors. Mortality did not differ between participants with and without cLEE. Conclusions. Although didanosine, stavudine, nevirapine, and efavirenz have been described to be hepatotoxic, we additionally observed a consistent association between tenofovir and cLEE emerging within the first 2 years after drug initiation. This novel tenofovir-cLEE signal should be

  9. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting, and research needs: a joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-04-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to "predicate" products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  10. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting and research needs. A joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-05-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycaemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilised due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices, EUDAMED) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to 'predicate' products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  11. Vaccine adverse events in the new millennium: is there reason for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Ward, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    As more and more infectious agents become targets for immunization programmes, the spectrum of adverse events linked to vaccines has been widening. Although some of these links are tenuous, relatively little is known about the immunopathogenesis of even the best characterized vaccine-associated adverse events (VAAEs). The range of possible use of active immunization is rapidly expanding to include vaccines against infectious diseases that require cellular responses to provide protection (e.g. tuberculosis, herpes viral infections), therapeutic vaccines for chronic infections (e.g. human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, viral hepatitis B and C), and vaccines against non-infectious conditions (e.g. cancer, autoimmune diseases). Less virulent pathogens (e.g. varicella, rotavirus in the developed world) are also beginning to be targeted, and vaccine use is being justified in terms of societal and parental "costs" rather than in straightforward morbidity and mortality costs. In the developed world the paediatric immunization schedule is becoming crowded, with pressure to administer increasing numbers of antigens simultaneously in ever simpler forms (e.g. subcomponent, peptide, and DNA vaccines). This trend, while attractive in many ways, brings hypothetical risks (e.g. genetic restriction, narrowed shield of protection, and loss of randomness), which will need to be evaluated and monitored. The available epidemiological and laboratory tools to address the issues outlined above are somewhat limited. As immunological and genetic tools improve in the years ahead, it is likely that we shall be able to explain the immunopathogenesis of many VAAEs and perhaps even anticipate and avoid some of them. However, this will only happen if the human and financial resources needed for monitoring and studying vaccine safety stay in step with the accelerating pace of vaccine development. Failure to make such a commitment would put all immunization programmes at risk. PMID

  12. Adverse Symptom Event Reporting by Patients vs Clinicians: Relationships With Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaoyu; Heller, Glenn; Barz, Allison; Sit, Laura; Fruscione, Michael; Appawu, Mark; Iasonos, Alexia; Atkinson, Thomas; Goldfarb, Shari; Culkin, Ann; Kris, Mark G.; Schrag, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Background In cancer treatment trials, the standard source of adverse symptom data is clinician reporting by use of items from the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Patient self-reporting has been proposed as an additional data source, but the implications of such a shift are not understood. Methods Patients with lung cancer receiving chemotherapy and their clinicians independently reported six CTCAE symptoms and Karnofsky Performance Status longitudinally at sequential office visits. To compare how patient's vs clinician's reports relate to sentinel clinical events, a time-dependent Cox regression model was used to measure associations between reaching particular CTCAE grade severity thresholds with the risk of death and emergency room visits. To measure concordance of CTCAE reports with indices of daily health status, Kendall tau rank correlation coefficients were calculated for each symptom with EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaire and global question scores. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results A total of 163 patients were enrolled for an average of 12 months (range = 1–28 months), with a mean of 11 visits and 67 (41%) deaths. CTCAE reports were submitted by clinicians at 95% of visits and by patients at 80% of visits. Patients generally reported symptoms earlier and more frequently than clinicians. Statistically significant associations with death and emergency room admissions were seen for clinician reports of fatigue (P < .001), nausea (P = .01), constipation (P = .038), and Karnofsky Performance Status (P < .001) but not for patient reports of these items. Higher concordance with EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaire and global question scores was observed for patient-reported symptoms than for clinician-reported symptoms. Conclusions Longitudinally collected clinician CTCAE assessments better predict unfavorable clinical events, whereas patient reports better reflect daily health status. These perspectives are

  13. [Adverse drug reaction - Definitions, risk factors and pharmacovigilance].

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADR} are the downside of active pharmacotherapies and can only partially be avoided. Risk factors have been identified for certain ADR which should be taken into account for the choice and dosing of critical drugs. Medical staff have a legal obligation to report severe ADR and ADR caused by newly licensed drugs. Such reports are important for monitoring the safety of drugs that are on the market. PMID:26654809

  14. Unintended hepatic adverse events associated with cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Senior, John R

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy is meant to be toxic, but it is particularly aimed at the tumor cells. Collateral damage may occur to normal cells and tissues, especially if they are fairly rapidly regenerating, as is the case for bone marrow cells, intestinal epithelial cells, and liver cells after hepatic injury. The liver has a great capacity to resist injury, overcome it, and to regenerate, even after quite massive injury (resection of 50%-65%, for example). This capacity may make it susceptible to chemotherapeutic toxicity, and a struggle between injury and adaptation, leading to recovery and tolerance or to failure and death. If the chemotherapy is aimed just at delaying progression of the cancer for a few weeks or months, it may not be worth the risk of irreversible liver injury developing in that time. Close clinical observation and sound clinical judgment are required. PMID:19858501

  15. The Logic of Surveillance Guidelines: An Analysis of Vaccine Adverse Event Reports from an Ontological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Courtot, Mélanie; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Ruttenberg, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background When increased rates of adverse events following immunization are detected, regulatory action can be taken by public health agencies. However to be interpreted reports of adverse events must be encoded in a consistent way. Regulatory agencies rely on guidelines to help determine the diagnosis of the adverse events. Manual application of these guidelines is expensive, time consuming, and open to logical errors. Representing these guidelines in a format amenable to automated processing can make this process more efficient. Methods and Findings Using the Brighton anaphylaxis case definition, we show that existing clinical guidelines used as standards in pharmacovigilance can be logically encoded using a formal representation such as the Adverse Event Reporting Ontology we developed. We validated the classification of vaccine adverse event reports using the ontology against existing rule-based systems and a manually curated subset of the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. However, we encountered a number of critical issues in the formulation and application of the clinical guidelines. We report these issues and the steps being taken to address them in current surveillance systems, and in the terminological standards in use. Conclusions By standardizing and improving the reporting process, we were able to automate diagnosis confirmation. By allowing medical experts to prioritize reports such a system can accelerate the identification of adverse reactions to vaccines and the response of regulatory agencies. This approach of combining ontology and semantic technologies can be used to improve other areas of vaccine adverse event reports analysis and should inform both the design of clinical guidelines and how they are used in the future. Availability Sufficient material to reproduce our results is available, including documentation, ontology, code and datasets, at http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/aero. PMID:24667848

  16. Association between Adverse Life Events and Addictive Behaviors among Male and Female Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Grace P.; Storr, Carla L.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.; Martins, Silvia S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Adverse life events have been associated with gambling and substance use as they can serve as forms of escapism. Involvement in gambling and substance use can also place individuals in adversely stressful situations. Objectives To explore potential male-female differences in the association between addictive behavior and adverse life events among an urban cohort of adolescents. Methods The study sample comprised of 515 adolescent participants in a randomized prevention trial. With self-reported data, four addictive behavior groups were created: Non-Substance Users and Non-Gamblers, Substance Users Only, Gamblers Only, and Substance Users and Gamblers. Multinomial logistic regression analyses with interaction terms of sex and adverse life events were conducted. Results Adverse life events and engaging in at least one addictive behavior were common for both sexes. Substance Users and Gamblers had more than twice the likelihood of Non-Substance Users and Non-Gamblers to experience any event as well as events of various domains (i.e., relationship, violence, and instability). Neither relationship nor instability events’ associations with the co-occurrence of substance use and gambling significantly differed between sexes. Conversely, females exposed to violence events were significantly more likely than similarly exposed males to report the co-occurrence of substance use and gambling. Conclusion Findings from the current study prompt future studies to devote more attention to the development of effective programs that teach adaptive coping strategies to adolescents, particularly to females upon exposure to violence. PMID:23082829

  17. Evaluation of Late Adverse Events in Long-Term Wilms' Tumor Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, Irma van; Oldenburger, Foppe; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C.; Geenen, Maud M.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in long-term Wilms' tumor (WT) survivors, with special attention to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The single-center study cohort consisted of 185 WT survivors treated between 1966 and 1996, who survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. All survivors were invited to a late-effects clinic for medical assessment of AEs. AEs were graded for severity in a standardized manner. Detailed radiotherapy data enabled us to calculate the equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}) to compare radiation doses in a uniform way. Risk factors were evaluated with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: Medical follow-up was complete for 98% of survivors (median follow-up, 18.9 years; median attained age, 22.9 years); 123 survivors had 462 AEs, of which 392 had Grade 1 or 2 events. Radiotherapy to flank/abdomen increased the risk of any AE (OR, 1.08 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.04-1.13]). Furthermore, radiotherapy to flank/abdomen was associated with orthopedic events (OR, 1.09 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.05-1.13]) and second tumors (OR, 1.11 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.03-1.19]). Chest irradiation increased the risk of pulmonary events (OR, 1.14 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.06-1.21]). Both flank/abdominal and chest irradiation were associated with cardiovascular events (OR, 1.05 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.00-1.10], OR, 1.06 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.01-1.12]) and tissue hypoplasia (OR, 1.17 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.10-1.24], OR 1.10 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.03-1.18]). Conclusion: The majority of AEs, overall as well as in irradiated survivors, were mild to moderate. Nevertheless, the large amount of AEs emphasizes the importance of follow-up programs for WT survivors.

  18. Emotional Suppression Mediates the Relation Between Adverse Life Events and Adolescent Suicide: Implications for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kaplow, Julie B.; Gipson, Polly Y.; Horwitz, Adam G.; Burch, Bianca N.; King, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    Suicidal ideation substantially increases the odds of future suicide attempts, and suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents. A history of adverse life events has been linked with future suicidal ideation and attempts, although studies examining potential mediating variables have been scarce. One probable mediating mechanism is how the individual copes with adverse life events. For example, certain coping strategies appear to be more problematic than others in increasing future psychopathology, and emotional suppression in particular has been associated with poor mental health outcomes in adults and children. However, no studies to date have examined the potential mediating role of emotional suppression in the relation between adverse life events and suicidal thoughts/behavior in adolescence. The goal of the current study was to examine emotional suppression as a mediator in the relation between childhood adversity and future suicidal thoughts/behaviors in youth. A total of 625 participants, aged 14–19 years, seeking ER services were administered measures assessing adverse life events, coping strategies, suicidal ideation in the last 2 weeks, and suicide attempts in the last month. The results suggest that emotional suppression mediates the relation between adversity and both (1) suicidal thoughts and (2) suicide attempts above and beyond demographic variables and depressive symptoms. This study has important implications for interventions aimed at preventing suicidal thoughts and behavior in adolescents with histories of adversity. PMID:23412949

  19. Hospitalizations Due to Adverse Drug Events in the Elderly—A Retrospective Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Laatikainen, Outi; Sneck, Sami; Bloigu, Risto; Lahtinen, Minna; Lauri, Timo; Turpeinen, Miia

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are more likely to affect geriatric patients due to physiological changes occurring with aging. Even though this is an internationally recognized problem, similar research data in Finland is still lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the number of geriatric medication-related hospitalizations in the Finnish patient population and to discover the potential means of recognizing patients particularly at risk of ADEs. The study was conducted retrospectively from the 2014 emergency department patient records in Oulu University Hospital. A total number of 290 admissions were screened for ADEs, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) by a multi-disciplinary research team. Customized Naranjo scale was used as a control method. All admissions were categorized into “probable,” “possible,” or “doubtful” by both assessment methods. In total, 23.1% of admissions were categorized as “probably” or “possibly” medication-related. Vertigo, falling, and fractures formed the largest group of ADEs. The most common ADEs were related to medicines from N class of the ATC-code system. Age, sex, residence, or specialty did not increase the risk for medication-related admission significantly (min p = 0.077). Polypharmacy was, however, found to increase the risk (OR 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5–6.9; p = 0.01). In conclusion, screening patients for specific demographics or symptoms would not significantly improve the recognition of ADEs. In addition, as ADE detection today is largely based on voluntary reporting systems and retrospective manual tracking of errors, it is evident that more effective methods for ADE detection are needed in the future. PMID:27761112

  20. Low Prevalance of Major Events Adverse to Exercise Stress Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Telino, Caio José Coutinho Leal; Sousa, Antônio Carlos Sobral; de Melo, Enaldo Vieira; Teixeira, Carla Carolina Cardoso; Teixeira, Clarissa Karine Cardoso; Santana, Jaquiele Santos; Mota, Igor Larchert; de Matos, Carlos José Oliveira; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress echocardiography is well validated for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease. Exercise stress echocardiography (ESE) has been shown to be the most physiological among the modalities of stress, but its safety is not well established. Objective: To study the complications related to ESE and clinical and echocardiographic variables most commonly associated with their occurrence. Methods: Cross-sectional study consisting of 10250 patients submitted to ESE for convenience, from January 2000 to June 2014. Cardiac Arrhythmias (CA) were the most frequent complications observed during the examination. The volunteers were divided into two groups according to the occurrence of CA during ESE: G1 group, composed of patients who have CA, and G2 formed by individuals who did not show such complication. Results: Group G1, consisting of 2843 patients (27.7%), and Group G2 consisting of 7407 patients (72.3%). There was no death, acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation or asystole. Predominant CAs were: supraventricular extrasystoles (13.7%), and ventricular extrasystoles (11.5%). G1 group had a higher mean age, higher frequency of hypertension and smoking, larger aortic roots and left atrium (LA) and lower ejection fraction than G2. G1 group also had more ischemic changes (p < 0.001). The predictor variables were age (RR 1.04; [CI] 95% from 1.038 to 1.049) and LA (RR 1.64; [CI] 95% from 1.448 to 1.872). Conclusion: ESE proved to be a safe modality of stress, with non-fatal complications only. Advanced age and enlargement of the left atrium are predictive of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:27355587

  1. Using Registries to Identify Adverse Events in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lionetti, Geraldina; Kimura, Yukiko; Schanberg, Laura E.; Beukelman, Timothy; Wallace, Carol A.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Winsor, Jane; Fox, Kathleen; Natter, Marc; Sundy, John S.; Brodsky, Eric; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Del Gaizo, Vincent; Iyasu, Solomon; Jahreis, Angelika; Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Mittleman, Barbara B.; Murphy, Bernard M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Raymond, Sandra C.; Setoguchi, Soko; Siegel, Jeffrey N.; Sobel, Rachel E.; Solomon, Daniel; Southwood, Taunton R.; Vesely, Richard; White, Patience H.; Wulffraat, Nico M.; Sandborg, Christy I.

    2013-01-01

    The proven effectiveness of biologics and other immunomodulatory products in inflammatory rheumatic diseases has resulted in their widespread use as well as reports of potential short- and long-term complications such as infection and malignancy. These complications are especially worrisome in children who often have serial exposures to multiple immunomodulatory products. Post-marketing surveillance of immunomodulatory products in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus is currently based on product-specific registries and passive surveillance, which may not accurately reflect the safety risks for children owing to low numbers, poor long-term retention, and inadequate comparators. In collaboration with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), patient and family advocacy groups, biopharmaceutical industry representatives and other stakeholders, the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) have developed a novel pharmacosurveillance model (CARRA Consolidated Safety Registry [CoRe]) based on a multicenter longitudinal pediatric rheumatic diseases registry with over 8000 participants. The existing CARRA infrastructure provides access to much larger numbers of subjects than is feasible in single-product registries. Enrollment regardless of medication exposure allows more accurate detection and evaluation of safety signals. Flexibility built into the model allows the addition of specific data elements and safety outcomes, and designation of appropriate disease comparator groups relevant to each product, fulfilling post-marketing requirements and commitments. The proposed model can be applied to other pediatric and adult diseases, potentially transforming the paradigm of pharmacosurveillance in response to the growing public mandate for rigorous post-marketing safety monitoring. PMID:24144710

  2. Evidence-based interventions to reduce adverse events in hospitals: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Zegers, Marieke; Hesselink, Gijs; Geense, Wytske; Vincent, Charles; Wollersheim, Hub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of effective interventions aimed at reducing rates of adverse events in hospitals. Design Systematic review of systematic reviews. Data sources PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE were searched for systematic reviews published until October 2015. Study selection English-language systematic reviews of interventions aimed at reducing adverse events in hospitals, including studies with an experimental design and reporting adverse event rates, were included. Two reviewers independently assessed each study's quality and extracted data on the study population, study design, intervention characteristics and adverse patient outcomes. Results Sixty systematic reviews with moderate to high quality were included. Statistically significant pooled effect sizes were found for 14 types of interventions, including: (1) multicomponent interventions to prevent delirium; (2) rapid response teams to reduce cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality rates; (3) pharmacist interventions to reduce adverse drug events; (4) exercises and multicomponent interventions to prevent falls; and (5) care bundle interventions, checklists and reminders to reduce infections. Most (82%) of the significant effect sizes were based on 5 or fewer primary studies with an experimental study design. Conclusions The evidence for patient-safety interventions implemented in hospitals worldwide is weak. The findings address the need to invest in high-quality research standards in order to identify interventions that have a real impact on patient safety. Interventions to prevent delirium, cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality, adverse drug events, infections and falls are most effective and should therefore be prioritised by clinicians. PMID:27687901

  3. Transfusion-related adverse events at the tertiary care center in North India: An institutional hemovigilance effort

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasun; Marwaha, Neelam; Dhawan, Hari Krishan; Roy, Pallab; Sharma, R. R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to analyze the incidence and spectrum of adverse effects of blood transfusion so as to initiate measures to minimize risks and improve overall transfusion safety in the institute. Materials and Methods: During the period from July 2002 to July 2003 all the adverse events related to transfusion of blood and blood components in various clinical specialties were recorded. They were analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Attempt was also made to study the predisposing risk factors. Results: During the study period 56,503 blood and blood components were issued to 29,720 patients. A total of 105 adverse reactions due to transfusion were observed during the study period. A majority of the adverse reactions was observed in hemato-oncology patients 43% (n = 45) and in presensitized patient groups 63% (n = 66). FNHTR 41% (n = 43) and allergic reactions 34% (n = 36) were the most common of all types of adverse transfusion reactions, followed by AcHTR 8.56% (n = 9). Majority of these AcHTR were due to unmonitored storage of blood in the refrigerator of wards resulting in hemolysis due to thermal injury. Less frequently observed reactions were anaphylactoid reactions (n = 4), bacterial sepsis (n = 4), hypervolemia (n = 2), hypocalcemia (n = 2), TRALI (n = 1), DHTR (n = 1), and TAGvHD (n = 1). Conclusion: Analysis of transfusion-related adverse outcomes is essential for improving safety. Factors such as improvement of blood storage conditions outside the blood bank, improvement in cross-matching techniques, careful donor screening, adherence to good manufacturing practices while component preparation, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events will help in reducing transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:21897598

  4. 77 FR 17076 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Adverse Event...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... event reports for dietary supplements. In the Federal Register of July 14, 2009 (74 FR 34024), FDA..., or Holding Operations for Dietary Supplements'' (72 FR 34752, June 25, 2007) that there were 1,460... Collection; Comment Request; Adverse Event Reporting and Recordkeeping for Dietary Supplements as Required...

  5. 5 CFR 295.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 295.210 Section 295.210 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE... LEGAL PROCEEDINGS Requests for Testimony and Production of Documents § 295.210 Procedure in the event...

  6. 6 CFR 5.47 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 5.47 Section 5.47 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Disclosure of Information in Litigation § 5.47 Procedure in the event...

  7. 5 CFR 295.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 295.210 Section 295.210 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE... LEGAL PROCEEDINGS Requests for Testimony and Production of Documents § 295.210 Procedure in the event...

  8. 5 CFR 295.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 295.210 Section 295.210 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE... LEGAL PROCEEDINGS Requests for Testimony and Production of Documents § 295.210 Procedure in the event...

  9. 5 CFR 2417.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 2417.210 Section 2417.210 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL... PROCEEDINGS Demands or Requests for Testimony and Production of Documents § 2417.210 Procedure in the event...

  10. 5 CFR 295.210 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 295.210 Section 295.210 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE... LEGAL PROCEEDINGS Requests for Testimony and Production of Documents § 295.210 Procedure in the event...

  11. 6 CFR 5.47 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 5.47 Section 5.47 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Disclosure of Information in Litigation § 5.47 Procedure in the event...

  12. 6 CFR 5.47 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 5.47 Section 5.47 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Disclosure of Information in Litigation § 5.47 Procedure in the event...

  13. A Systematic Review of the Reporting of Adverse Events Associated With Medical Herb Use Among Children

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Denise; Filippelli, Amanda C.; Nasser, Hafsa; Saper, Robert; White, Laura; Vohra, Sunita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Information about the safety of herbal medicine often comes from case reports published in the medical literature, thus necessitating good quality reporting of these adverse events. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review of the comprehensiveness of reporting of published case reports of adverse events associated with herb use in the pediatric population. Methods: Electronic literature search included 7 databases and a manual search of retrieved articles from inception through 2010. We included published case reports and case series that reported an adverse event associated with exposure to an herbal product by children under the age of 18 years old. We used descriptive statistics. Based on the International Society of Epidemiology's “Guidelines for Submitting Adverse Events Reports for Publication,” we developed and assigned a guideline adherence score (0-17) to each case report. Results: Ninety-six unique journal papers were identified and represented 128 cases. Of the 128 cases, 37% occurred in children under 2 years old, 38% between the ages of 2 and 8 years old, and 23% between the ages of 9 and 18 years old. Twenty-nine percent of cases were the result of an intentional ingestion while 36% were from an unintentional ingestion. Fifty-two percent of cases documented the Latin binomial of the herb ingredients; 41% documented plant part. Thirty-two percent of the cases reported laboratory testing of the herb, 20% documented the manufacturer of the product, and 22% percent included an assessment of the potential concomitant therapies that could have been influential in the adverse events. Mean guideline adherence score was 12.5 (range 6-17). Conclusions: There is considerable need for improvement in reporting adverse events in children following herb use. Without better quality reporting, adverse event reports cannot be interpreted reliably and do not contribute in a meaningful way to guiding recommendations for medicinal herb use

  14. Ventilator-Related Adverse Events: A Taxonomy and Findings From 3 Incident Reporting Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Julius Cuong; Williams, Tamara L; Sparnon, Erin M; Cillie, Tam K; Scharen, Hilda F; Marella, William M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2009, researchers from Johns Hopkins University's Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality; public agencies, including the FDA; and private partners, including the Emergency Care Research Institute and the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization, sought to form a public-private partnership for the promotion of patient safety (P5S) to advance patient safety through voluntary partnerships. The study objective was to test the concept of the P5S to advance our understanding of safety issues related to ventilator events, to develop a common classification system for categorizing adverse events related to mechanical ventilators, and to perform a comparison of adverse events across different adverse event reporting systems. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of ventilator-related adverse events reported in 2012 from the following incident reporting systems: the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System, UHC's Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization database, and the FDA's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database. Once each organization had its dataset of ventilator-related adverse events, reviewers read the narrative descriptions of each event and classified it according to the developed common taxonomy. RESULTS: A Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, FDA, and UHC search provided 252, 274, and 700 relevant reports, respectively. The 3 event types most commonly reported to the UHC and the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System databases were airway/breathing circuit issue, human factor issues, and ventilator malfunction events. The top 3 event types reported to the FDA were ventilator malfunction, power source issue, and alarm failure. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found that (1) through the development of a common taxonomy, adverse events from 3 reporting systems can be evaluated, (2) the types of

  15. [Specific adverse events caused by monoclonal antibodies, focusing on the prophylaxis and management].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Shoko

    2012-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies play important roles in medical oncology. The antibodies were designed as specific molecular targeting drugs and supposed to have less toxicity to normal cells compared to classical cytotoxic agents. Indeed, they do not have severe bone marrow suppression, nausea, or vomiting unlike cytotoxic drugs. On the other hand, clinicians often undergo characteristic adverse events we have never experienced before the appearance of the molecular targeting drugs. To fully utilize these powerful yet particular medicines, we have to be well aware of their severe or fatal adverse events and comprehend how to manage those toxic events. In this manuscript, important adverse events including infusion reaction, gastrointestinal perforation, cardiotoxicity, venous thromboembolism, and interstitial lung disease are subjects for discussion. PMID:23259397

  16. Metamizole-Associated Adverse Events: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fässler, Margrit; Blozik, Eva; Linde, Klaus; Jüni, Peter; Reichenbach, Stephan; Scherer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Metamizole is used to treat pain in many parts of the world. Information on the safety profile of metamizole is scarce; no conclusive summary of the literature exists. Objective To determine whether metamizole is clinically safe compared to placebo and other analgesics. Methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and several clinical trial registries. We screened the reference lists of included trials and previous systematic reviews. We included randomized controlled trials that compared the effects of metamizole, administered to adults in any form and for any indication, to other analgesics or to placebo. Two authors extracted data regarding trial design and size, indications for pain medication, patient characteristics, treatment regimens, and methodological characteristics. Adverse events (AEs), serious adverse events (SAEs), and dropouts were assessed. We conducted separate meta-analyses for each metamizole comparator, using standard inverse-variance random effects meta-analysis to pool the estimates across trials, reported as risk ratios (RRs). We calculated the DerSimonian and Laird variance estimate T2 to measure heterogeneity between trials. The pre-specified primary end point was any AE during the trial period. Results Of the 696 potentially eligible trials, 79 trials including almost 4000 patients with short-term metamizole use of less than two weeks met our inclusion criteria. Fewer AEs were reported for metamizole compared to opioids, RR = 0.79 (confidence interval 0.79 to 0.96). We found no differences between metamizole and placebo, paracetamol and NSAIDs. Only a few SAEs were reported, with no difference between metamizole and other analgesics. No agranulocytosis or deaths were reported. Our results were limited by the mediocre overall quality of the reports. Conclusion For short-term use in the hospital setting, metamizole seems to be a safe choice when compared to other widely used analgesics. High-quality, adequately sized

  17. Association of hypothyroidism with adverse events in patients with heart failure receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay K; Vegh, Eszter; Orencole, Mary; Miller, Alexandra; Blendea, Dan; Moore, Stephanie; Lewis, Gregory D; Singh, Jagmeet P; Parks, Kimberly A; Heist, E Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Hypothyroidism is associated with an adverse prognosis in cardiac patients in general and in particular in patients with heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of hypothyroidism on patients with HF receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Additionally, the impact of level of control of hypothyroidism on risk of adverse events after CRT implantation was also evaluated. We included consecutive patients in whom a CRT device was implanted from April 2004 to April 2010 at our institution with sufficient follow-up data available for analysis; 511 patients were included (age 68.5±12.4 years, women 20.4%); 84 patients with a clinical history of hypothyroidism, on treatment with thyroid hormone repletion or serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level≥5.00 μU/ml, were included in the hypothyroid group. The patients were followed for up to 3 years after implant for a composite end point of hospitalization for HF, left ventricular assist device placement, or heart transplant and cardiac death; 215 composite end point events were noted in this period. In a multivariate model, hypothyroidism (hazard ratio [HR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.027 to 2.085, p=0.035), female gender (HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.428 to 0.963, p=0.032), and creatinine (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.145 to 1.382, p<0.001) were significantly associated with occurrence of the composite end point; 53.6% of patients with hypothyroidism at baseline developed the composite end point compared with 39.8% of those with euthyroidism (p=0.02). In conclusion, hypothyroidism is associated with a worse prognosis after CRT implantation.

  18. Early Life Adversity and Adult Biological Risk Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Esther M.; Karlamangla, Arun S.; Gruenewald, Tara; Koretz, Brandon; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether there is a relationship between early life adversity (ELA) and biological parameters known to predict health risks and to examine the extent to which circumstances in midlife mediate this relationship. Methods We analyzed data on 1,180 respondents from the biomarker subsample of the second wave of the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) study. ELA assessments were based on childhood socioeconomic disadvantage (i.e. on welfare, perceived low income, less-educated parents) and other stressors (e.g., parental death, parental divorce, and parental physical abuse). The outcome variable was cumulative allostatic load (AL), a marker of biological risk. We also incorporate information on adult circumstances, including: education, social relationships, and health behaviors. Results Childhood socioeconomic adversity was associated with increased AL (B=0.094, SE=0.041) and physical abuse (B=0.263, SE=0.091), with non-significant associations for parental divorce and death. Adult education mediated the relationship between socioeconomic ELA and cumulative allostatic load to the point of non-significance, with this factor alone explaining nearly 40% of the relationship. The association between childhood physical abuse and AL remained even after adjusting for adult educational attainments, social relationships, and health behaviors. These associations were most pronounced for secondary stress systems, including inflammation, cardiovascular function, and lipid metabolism. Conclusions The physiological consequences of early life socioeconomic adversity are attenuated by achieving high levels of schooling later on. The adverse consequences of childhood physical abuse, on the other hand, persist in multivariable adjusted analysis. PMID:25650548

  19. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Cardiovascular Risk Factor Management

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Puja K.; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading health threat to American women. In addition to established risk factors for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and obesity, adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) including pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational diabetes are now recognized as factors that increase a woman’s risk for future CVD. CVD risk factor burden is disproportionately higher in those of low socioeconomic status and in ethnic/racial minority women. Since younger women often use their obstetrician/gynecologist as their primary health provider, this is an opportune time to diagnose and treat CVD risk factors early. Embedding preventive care providers such as nurse practitioners or physician assistants within OB/GYN practices can be considered, with referral to family medicine or internist for ongoing risk assessment and management. The American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA) stroke prevention guidelines tailored to women recommend that women with a history of pre-eclampsia be evaluated for hypertension and other CVD risk factors within 6 months to 1 year post-partum. Given the burden and impact of CVD on women our society, the entire medical community must work to establish feasible practice and referral patterns for assessment and treatment of CVD risk factors. PMID:26159741

  20. Adverse pregnancy outcomes and cardiovascular risk factor management.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja K; Minissian, Margo; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading health threat to American women. In addition to establish risk factors for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and obesity, adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) including pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational diabetes are now recognized as factors that increase a woman's risk for future CVD. CVD risk factor burden is disproportionately higher in those of low socioeconomic status and in ethnic/racial minority women. Since younger women often use their obstetrician/gynecologist as their primary health provider, this is an opportune time to diagnose and treat CVD risk factors early. Embedding preventive care providers such as nurse practitioners or physician assistants within OB/GYN practices can be considered, with referral to family medicine or internist for ongoing risk assessment and management. The American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA) stroke prevention guidelines tailored to women recommend that women with a history of pre-eclampsia can be evaluated for hypertension and other CVD risk factors within 6 months to 1-year post-partum. Given the burden and impact of CVD on women in our society, the entire medical community must work to establish feasible practice and referral patterns for assessment and treatment of CVD risk factors. PMID:26159741

  1. Adverse pregnancy outcomes and cardiovascular risk factor management.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja K; Minissian, Margo; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading health threat to American women. In addition to establish risk factors for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and obesity, adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) including pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational diabetes are now recognized as factors that increase a woman's risk for future CVD. CVD risk factor burden is disproportionately higher in those of low socioeconomic status and in ethnic/racial minority women. Since younger women often use their obstetrician/gynecologist as their primary health provider, this is an opportune time to diagnose and treat CVD risk factors early. Embedding preventive care providers such as nurse practitioners or physician assistants within OB/GYN practices can be considered, with referral to family medicine or internist for ongoing risk assessment and management. The American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA) stroke prevention guidelines tailored to women recommend that women with a history of pre-eclampsia can be evaluated for hypertension and other CVD risk factors within 6 months to 1-year post-partum. Given the burden and impact of CVD on women in our society, the entire medical community must work to establish feasible practice and referral patterns for assessment and treatment of CVD risk factors.

  2. Biometrical issues in the analysis of adverse events within the benefit assessment of drugs.

    PubMed

    Bender, Ralf; Beckmann, Lars; Lange, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of adverse events plays an important role in the benefit assessment of drugs. Consequently, results on adverse events are an integral part of reimbursement dossiers submitted by pharmaceutical companies to health policy decision-makers. Methods applied in the analysis of adverse events commonly include simple standard methods for contingency tables. However, the results produced may be misleading if observations are censored at the time of discontinuation due to treatment switching or noncompliance, resulting in unequal follow-up periods. In this paper, we present examples to show that the application of inadequate methods for the analysis of adverse events in the reimbursement dossier can lead to a downgrading of the evidence on a drug's benefit in the subsequent assessment, as greater harm from the drug cannot be excluded with sufficient certainty. Legal regulations on the benefit assessment of drugs in Germany are presented, in particular, with regard to the analysis of adverse events. Differences in safety considerations between the drug approval process and the benefit assessment are discussed. We show that the naive application of simple proportions in reimbursement dossiers frequently leads to uninterpretable results if observations are censored and the average follow-up periods differ between treatment groups. Likewise, the application of incidence rates may be misleading in the case of recurrent events and unequal follow-up periods. To allow for an appropriate benefit assessment of drugs, adequate survival time methods accounting for time dependencies and duration of follow-up are required, not only for time-to-event efficacy endpoints but also for adverse events. © 2016 The Authors. Pharmaceutical Statistics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Metabolic syndrome definitions and components in predicting major adverse cardiovascular events after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V Ramesh; Huang, Michael; Silver, Samuel A; Al-Lawati, Ali I; Rapi, Lindita; Nash, Michelle M; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) associates with cardiovascular risk post-kidney transplantation, but its ambiguity impairs understanding of its diagnostic utility relative to components. We compared five MetS definitions and the predictive value of constituent components of significant definitions for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in a cohort of 1182 kidney transplant recipients. MetS definitions were adjusted for noncomponent traditional Framingham risk factors and relevant transplant-related variables. Kaplan-Meier, logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazards analysis were utilized. There were 143 MACE over 7447 patient-years of follow-up. Only the World Health Organization (WHO) 1998 definition predicted MACE (25.3 vs 15.5 events/1000 patient-years, P = 0.019). Time-to-MACE was 5.5 ± 3.5 years with MetS and 6.8 ± 3.9 years without MetS (P < 0.0001). MetS was independent of pertinent MACE risk factors except age and previous cardiac disease. Among MetS components, dysglycemia provided greatest hazard ratio (HR) for MACE (1.814 [95% confidence interval 1.26-2.60]), increased successively by microalbuminuria (HR 1.946 [1.37-2.75]), dyslipidemia (3.284 [1.72-6.26]), hypertension (4.127 [2.16-7.86]), and central obesity (4.282 [2.09-8.76]). MetS did not affect graft survival. In summary, although the WHO 1998 definition provides greatest predictive value for post-transplant MACE, most of this is conferred by dysglycemia and is overshadowed by age and previous cardiac disease. PMID:25207680

  4. Canadian paediatricians’ approaches to managing patients with adverse events following immunization: The role of the Special Immunization Clinic network

    PubMed Central

    Top, Karina A; Zafack, Joseline; De Serres, Gaston; Halperin, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When moderate or severe adverse events occur after vaccination, physicians and patients may have concerns about future immunizations. Similar concerns arise in patients with underlying conditions whose risk for adverse events may differ from the general population. The Special Immunization Clinic (SIC) network was established in 2013 at 13 sites in Canada to provide expertise in the clinical evaluation and vaccination of these patients. OBJECTIVES: To assess referral patterns for patients with vaccine adverse events or potential vaccine contraindications among paediatricians and to assess the anticipated utilization of an SIC. METHODS: A 12-item questionnaire was distributed to paediatricians and subspecialists participating in the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program through monthly e-mail and mail contacts. RESULTS: The response rate was 24% (586 of 2490). Fifty-three percent of respondents practiced general paediatrics exclusively and 52% reported that they administer vaccines. In the previous 12 months, 26% of respondents had encountered children with challenging adverse events or potential vaccine contraindications in their practice and 29% had received referrals for such patients, including 27% of subspecialists. Overall, 69% of respondents indicated that they would be likely or very likely to refer patients to an SIC, and 34% indicated that they would have referred at least one patient to an SIC in the previous 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who experience challenging adverse events following immunization or potential vaccine contraindications are encountered by paediatricians and subspecialists in all practice settings. The SIC network will be able to respond to a clinical need and support paediatricians in managing these patients. PMID:25332661

  5. Vaxtracker: Active on-line surveillance for adverse events following inactivated influenza vaccine in children.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Patrick; Moberley, Sarah; Dalton, Craig; Stephenson, Jody; Elvidge, Elissa; Butler, Michelle; Durrheim, David N

    2014-09-22

    Vaxtracker is a web based survey for active post marketing surveillance of Adverse Events Following Immunisation. It is designed to efficiently monitor vaccine safety of new vaccines by early signal detection of serious adverse events. The Vaxtracker system automates contact with the parents or carers of immunised children by email and/or sms message to their smart phone. A hyperlink on the email and text messages links to a web based survey exploring adverse events following the immunisation. The Vaxtracker concept was developed during 2011 (n=21), and piloted during the 2012 (n=200) and 2013 (n=477) influenza seasons for children receiving inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in the Hunter New England Local Health District, New South Wales, Australia. Survey results were reviewed by surveillance staff to detect any safety signals and compare adverse event frequencies among the different influenza vaccines administered. In 2012, 57% (n=113) of the 200 participants responded to the online survey and 61% (290/477) in 2013. Vaxtracker appears to be an effective method for actively monitoring adverse events following influenza vaccination in children.

  6. Vaxtracker: Active on-line surveillance for adverse events following inactivated influenza vaccine in children.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Patrick; Moberley, Sarah; Dalton, Craig; Stephenson, Jody; Elvidge, Elissa; Butler, Michelle; Durrheim, David N

    2014-09-22

    Vaxtracker is a web based survey for active post marketing surveillance of Adverse Events Following Immunisation. It is designed to efficiently monitor vaccine safety of new vaccines by early signal detection of serious adverse events. The Vaxtracker system automates contact with the parents or carers of immunised children by email and/or sms message to their smart phone. A hyperlink on the email and text messages links to a web based survey exploring adverse events following the immunisation. The Vaxtracker concept was developed during 2011 (n=21), and piloted during the 2012 (n=200) and 2013 (n=477) influenza seasons for children receiving inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in the Hunter New England Local Health District, New South Wales, Australia. Survey results were reviewed by surveillance staff to detect any safety signals and compare adverse event frequencies among the different influenza vaccines administered. In 2012, 57% (n=113) of the 200 participants responded to the online survey and 61% (290/477) in 2013. Vaxtracker appears to be an effective method for actively monitoring adverse events following influenza vaccination in children. PMID:25077424

  7. New thoughts on the "forgotten" aspect of antimicrobial stewardship: adverse event reporting.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Charles; Khadem, Tina; Schweighardt, Anne; Brown, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship is an activity that optimizes patient care through selection of the most appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Antimicrobial stewardship programs strive to enhance patient care and reduce preventable consequences of antimicrobial use. They are also vital in monitoring for the development of adverse events occurring as a result of antimicrobial therapy, although literature reviews of this activity are scarce. Although randomized controlled trials are considered the gold standard to study the efficacy of a medication, these trials are not designed to test safety end points and often are only able to identify the most commonly occurring and acute adverse events. In addition, prior to a drug going to market, it is difficult to detect rare adverse events because the associated costs are economically untenable given the limited pipeline of novel agents. These limitations in some ways may be resolved with the use of postmarketing surveillance and spontaneous reporting systems such as the United States Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. The focus of this commentary is to highlight the importance of adverse event reporting by antimicrobial stewardship programs to spontaneous reporting systems as a means to improve patient care.

  8. Pharmacovigilance, risks and adverse effects of self-medication.

    PubMed

    Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Abadie, Delphine; Lacroix, Isabelle; Berreni, Aurélia; Pugnet, Grégory; Durrieu, Geneviève; Sailler, Laurent; Giroud, Jean-Paul; Damase-Michel, Christine; Montastruc, François

    2016-04-01

    Self-medication means resorting to one or more drugs in order to treat oneself without the help of a doctor. This phenomenon is developing fast. In this review, we will discuss the main definitions of self-medication; we will then present a few important characteristics of this therapeutic practice: prevalence, reasons, populations involved and drugs used. Whilst the theoretical risks of self-medication have been abundantly discussed in the literature (adverse effects, interactions, product, dosage or treatment duration errors, difficulty in self-diagnosis, risk of addiction or abuse…), there is in fact very little detailed pharmacovigilance data concerning the characteristics and the consequences of this usage in real life. This study therefore describes the all too rare data that is available: patients, clinical characteristics, "seriousness" and drugs involved in the adverse effects of self-medication. It also discusses leads to be followed in order to minimize medication risks, which are obviously not well known and clearly not sufficiently notified.

  9. Adverse Events in Connective Tissue Disease–Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Rennie L.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Praestgaard, Amy; Merkel, Peter A.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)–associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have a poorer prognosis compared to those with idiopathic PAH, but little is known about the differences in treatment-related adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) between these groups. This study was undertaken to characterize these differences. Methods Individual patient-level data from 10 randomized controlled trials of therapies for PAH were obtained from the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients diagnosed as having either CTD-associated PAH or idiopathic PAH were included. A treatment-by-diagnosis interaction term was used to examine whether the effect of treatment on occurrence of AEs differed between patients with CTD-associated PAH and those with idiopathic PAH. Studies were pooled using fixed-effect models. Results The study sample included 2,370 participants: 716 with CTD-associated PAH and 1,654 with idiopathic PAH. In the active treatment group compared to the placebo group, the risk of AEs was higher among patients with CTD-associated PAH than among those with idiopathic PAH (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.00–2.47 versus OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.69–1.26; P for interaction = 0.061), but there was no difference in the risk of SAEs in analyses adjusted for age, race, sex, hemodynamic findings, and laboratory values. Despite the higher occurrence of AEs in patients with CTD-associated PAH assigned to active therapy compared to those receiving placebo, the risk of drug discontinuation due to an AE was similar to that in patients with idiopathic PAH assigned to active therapy (P for interaction = 0.27). Conclusion Patients with CTD-associated PAH experienced more treatment-related AEs compared to those with idiopathic PAH in therapeutic clinical trials. These findings suggest that the overall benefit of advanced therapies for PAH may be attenuated by the greater frequency of AEs. PMID:26016953

  10. Ontology-based combinatorial comparative analysis of adverse events associated with killed and live influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Shedden, Kerby A; Markel, Howard; Omenn, Gilbert S; Athey, Brian D; He, Yongqun

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine adverse events (VAEs) are adverse bodily changes occurring after vaccination. Understanding the adverse event (AE) profiles is a crucial step to identify serious AEs. Two different types of seasonal influenza vaccines have been used on the market: trivalent (killed) inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) and trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). Different adverse event profiles induced by these two groups of seasonal influenza vaccines were studied based on the data drawn from the CDC Vaccine Adverse Event Report System (VAERS). Extracted from VAERS were 37,621 AE reports for four TIVs (Afluria, Fluarix, Fluvirin, and Fluzone) and 3,707 AE reports for the only LAIV (FluMist). The AE report data were analyzed by a novel combinatorial, ontology-based detection of AE method (CODAE). CODAE detects AEs using Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), Chi-square significance test, and base level filtration, and groups identified AEs by ontology-based hierarchical classification. In total, 48 TIV-enriched and 68 LAIV-enriched AEs were identified (PRR>2, Chi-square score >4, and the number of cases >0.2% of total reports). These AE terms were classified using the Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), MedDRA, and SNOMED-CT. The OAE method provided better classification results than the two other methods. Thirteen out of 48 TIV-enriched AEs were related to neurological and muscular processing such as paralysis, movement disorders, and muscular weakness. In contrast, 15 out of 68 LAIV-enriched AEs were associated with inflammatory response and respiratory system disorders. There were evidences of two severe adverse events (Guillain-Barre Syndrome and paralysis) present in TIV. Although these severe adverse events were at low incidence rate, they were found to be more significantly enriched in TIV-vaccinated patients than LAIV-vaccinated patients. Therefore, our novel combinatorial bioinformatics analysis discovered that LAIV had lower chance of inducing these two

  11. Adverse Events in Treating Smear-Positive Tuberculosis Patients in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Du, Jian; Yin, Xiaoyan; Xue, Fuzhong; Liu, Yanxun; Li, Runzi; Luo, Cheng; Li, Liang; Li, Xiujun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the adverse events (AE) rate during anti-tuberculosis treatment and to explore AE-related risk factors. New and previously treated smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) cases were enrolled from eight regions in China between April 2009 and October 2010. The AE rate was estimated, and AE risk factors during anti-TB treatment were assessed using Cox proportional models. Among 2091 Chinese subjects with anti-TB treatment, 462 (22.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 20.3-23.9) patients developed AE, with liver injury and gastrointestinal reactions constituting the most common AE. Specifically, 9.8% (95% CI, 8.5-11.1) and 6.3% (95% CI, 5.3-7.4) developed liver injuries and gastrointestinal reactions, respectively. We found that AE rate differed by regions, TB knowledge score, symptoms score and smoking status. Liver injuries were associated with age, sex and smoking status; gastrointestinal reactions were associated with education level and symptom score. Improving patients' knowledge on TB could reduce AE rate.

  12. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA commitment to human space flight includes continuing to fly astronauts on the ISS until it is decommissioned as well as possibly returning astronauts to the moon or having astronauts venture to an asteroid or Mars. As missions leave low Earth orbit and explore deeper space, BHP supports and conducts research to enable a risk posture that considers the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders “acceptable given mitigations,” for pre-, in, and post-flight.The Human System Risk Board (HSRB) determines the risk of various mission scenarios using a likelihood (per person per year) by consequences matrix examining those risks across two categories—long term health and operational (within mission). Colors from a stoplight signal are used by HSRB and quickly provide a means of assessing overall perceived risk for a particular mission scenario. Risk associated with the current six month missions on the ISS are classified as “accepted with monitoring” while planetary missions, such as a mission to Mars, are recognized to be a “red” risk that requires mitigation to ensure mission success.Currently, the HSRB deems that the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric outcomes requires mitigation for planetary missions owing to long duration isolation and radiation exposure (see Table 1). While limited research evidence exists from spaceflight, it is well known anecdotally that the shift from the two week shuttle missions to the six month ISS missions renders the psychological stressors of space as more salient over longer duration missions. Shuttle astronauts were expected just to tolerate any stressors that arose during their mission and were successful at doing so (Whitmire et al, 2013). While it is possible to deal with stressors such as social isolation and to live with incompatible crewmembers for two weeks on shuttle, “ignoring it” is much less likely to be a successful coping mechanism

  13. Shattering world assumptions: A prospective view of the impact of adverse events on world assumptions.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Eric R; Boals, Adriel

    2016-05-01

    Shattered Assumptions theory (Janoff-Bulman, 1992) posits that experiencing a traumatic event has the potential to diminish the degree of optimism in the assumptions of the world (assumptive world), which could lead to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder. Prior research assessed the assumptive world with a measure that was recently reported to have poor psychometric properties (Kaler et al., 2008). The current study had 3 aims: (a) to assess the psychometric properties of a recently developed measure of the assumptive world, (b) to retrospectively examine how prior adverse events affected the optimism of the assumptive world, and (c) to measure the impact of an intervening adverse event. An 8-week prospective design with a college sample (N = 882 at Time 1 and N = 511 at Time 2) was used to assess the study objectives. We split adverse events into those that were objectively or subjectively traumatic in nature. The new measure exhibited adequate psychometric properties. The report of a prior objective or subjective trauma at Time 1 was related to a less optimistic assumptive world. Furthermore, participants who experienced an intervening objectively traumatic event evidenced a decrease in optimistic views of the world compared with those who did not experience an intervening adverse event. We found support for Shattered Assumptions theory retrospectively and prospectively using a reliable measure of the assumptive world. We discuss future assessments of the measure of the assumptive world and clinical implications to help rebuild the assumptive world with current therapies. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. A case-control study of serious autoimmune adverse events following hepatitis B immunization.

    PubMed

    Geier, David A; Geier, Mark R

    2005-06-01

    Hepatitis B infection is one of the most important causes of acute and chronic liver disease. During the 1980s, genetically engineered hepatitis B vaccines (HBVs) were introduced in the United States. A large-series of serious autoimmune conditions have been reported following HBVs, despite the fact that HBVs have been reported to be "generally well-tolerated." A case-control epidemiological study was conducted to evaluate serious autoimmune adverse events prospectively reported to the vaccine adverse events reporting system (VAERS) database following HBVs, in comparison to an age, sex, and vaccine year matched unexposed tetanus-containing vaccine (TCV) group for conditions that have been previously identified on an a priori basis from case-reports. Adults receiving HBV had significantly increased odds ratios (OR) for multiple sclerosis (OR = 5.2, p < 0.0003, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.9 - 20), optic neuritis (OR = 14, p < 0.0002, 95% CI = 2.3 - 560), vasculitis (OR = 2.6, p < 0.04, 95% CI = 1.03 - 8.7), arthritis (OR = 2.01, p < 0.0003, 95% CI = 1.3 - 3.1), alopecia (OR = 7.2, p < 0.0001, 95% CI = 3.2 - 20), lupus erythematosus (OR = 9.1, p < 0.0001, 95% CI = 2.3 - 76), rheumatoid arthritis (OR = 18, p < 0.0001, 95% CI = 3.1 - 740), and thrombocytopenia (OR = 2.3, p < 0.04, 95% CI = 1.02 - 6.2) in comparison to the TCV group. Minimal confounding or systematic error was observed. Despite the negative findings of the present study regarding the rare serious adverse effects of HBVs, it is clear that HBV does, indeed, offer significant benefits, but it is also clear that chances of exposure to hepatitis B virus in adults is largely life-style dependent. Adults should make an informed consent decision, weighing the risks and benefits of HBV, as to whether or not to be immunized. PMID:16206512

  15. Novel algorithms for improved pattern recognition using the US FDA Adverse Event Network Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Botsis, Taxiarchis; Scott, John; Goud, Ravi; Toman, Pamela; Sutherland, Andrea; Ball, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The medical review of adverse event reports for medical products requires the processing of "big data" stored in spontaneous reporting systems, such as the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). VAERS data are not well suited to traditional statistical analyses so we developed the FDA Adverse Event Network Analyzer (AENA) and three novel network analysis approaches to extract information from these data. Our new approaches include a weighting scheme based on co-occurring triplets in reports, a visualization layout inspired by the islands algorithm, and a network growth methodology for the detection of outliers. We explored and verified these approaches by analysing the historical signal of Intussusception (IS) after the administration of RotaShield vaccine (RV) in 1999. We believe that our study supports the use of AENA for pattern recognition in medical product safety and other clinical data. PMID:25160375

  16. Novel algorithms for improved pattern recognition using the US FDA Adverse Event Network Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Botsis, Taxiarchis; Scott, John; Goud, Ravi; Toman, Pamela; Sutherland, Andrea; Ball, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The medical review of adverse event reports for medical products requires the processing of "big data" stored in spontaneous reporting systems, such as the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). VAERS data are not well suited to traditional statistical analyses so we developed the FDA Adverse Event Network Analyzer (AENA) and three novel network analysis approaches to extract information from these data. Our new approaches include a weighting scheme based on co-occurring triplets in reports, a visualization layout inspired by the islands algorithm, and a network growth methodology for the detection of outliers. We explored and verified these approaches by analysing the historical signal of Intussusception (IS) after the administration of RotaShield vaccine (RV) in 1999. We believe that our study supports the use of AENA for pattern recognition in medical product safety and other clinical data.

  17. Transient paralysis during acupuncture therapy: a case report of an adverse event.

    PubMed

    Beable, Anne

    2013-09-01

    A patient with apparently well-controlled epilepsy with a painful musculoskeletal condition was treated successfully with two sessions of acupuncture. However, 4 h after the first treatment and during the second, an adverse event involving impairment of consciousness occurred. The patient subsequently experienced an increased frequency of complex partial seizures resulting in the loss of his driving licence. A detailed retrospective review of the past medical history indicated that the patient probably had comorbidities in the form of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and dysfunctional somatosensory/vestibular processing. Acupuncture may have triggered the adverse event via shared neurosubstrates. This adverse event raises possible implications regarding safe clinical acupuncture practice. PMID:23660010

  18. Does Illicit Drug Use Influence Inpatient Adverse Events, Death, Length of Stay, and Discharge After Orthopaedic Trauma?

    PubMed

    Babatunde, Victor D; Menendez, Mariano E; Ring, David

    2016-01-01

    Illicit drug use among adults is increasing, but its associated risk following orthopaedic trauma remains largely unexplored. This study assessed the relationship of illicit drug use with inpatient adverse events, in-hospital mortality, prolonged length of stay, and nonroutine discharge. With the use of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, 7,118,720 orthopaedic trauma inpatients from 2002 to 2011 were identified and separated into illicit drug users (1.5%) and non-illicit drug users (98.5%). Multivariable regression modeling was used to determine the association between illicit drug use and each outcome variable. Illicit drug use was associated with higher odds of inpatient adverse events, but not greater likelihood of inpatient death. Illicit drug users were also more likely to experience prolonged hospital stay and nonroutine discharge. Prompt recognition and effective treatment interventions for orthopaedic trauma patients with a history of illicit drug use may improve inpatient outcomes. PMID:27082887

  19. Left atrial area index predicts adverse cardiovascular events in patients with unstable angina pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Fan; Li, Wei-Hong; Li, Zhao-Ping; Feng, Xin-Heng; Xu, Wei-Xian; Chen, Shao-Min; Gao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background The left atrial size has been considered as a useful marker of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it is not well known whether left atrial area index (LAAI) has predictive value for prognosis in patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP). This study was aimed to assess the association between LAAI and outcomes in UAP patients. Methods We enrolled a total of 391 in-hospital patients diagnosed as UAP. Clinical and echocardiographic data at baseline were collected. The patients were followed for the development of adverse cardiovascular (CV) events, including hospital readmission for angina pectoris, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), stroke and all-cause mortality. Results During a mean follow-up time of 26.3 ± 8.6 months, 98 adverse CV events occurred (84 hospital readmission for angina pectoris, four AMI, four CHF, one stroke and five all-cause mortality). In a multivariate Cox model, LAAI [OR: 1.140, 95% CI: 1.016–1.279, P = 0.026], diastolic blood pressure (OR: 0.976, 95% CI: 0.956–0.996, P = 0.020) and pulse pressure (OR: 1.020, 95% CI: 1.007–1.034, P = 0.004) were independent predictors for adverse CV events in UAP patients. Conclusions LAAI is a predictor of adverse CV events independent of clinical and other echocardiographic parameters in UAP patients. PMID:27781054

  20. Mobility therapy and central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in an ICU in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Natália Pontes; da Silva, Gregório Marques Cardim; Park, Marcelo; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether mobility therapy is associated with central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in critically ill patients in an ICU in Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the daily medical records of patients admitted to the Clinical Emergency ICU of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine Hospital das Clínicas Central Institute between December of 2009 and April of 2011. In addition to the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, we collected data related to central venous catheters (CVCs), hemodialysis (HD) catheters and indwelling arterial catheters (IACs): insertion site; number of catheter days; and types of adverse events. We also characterized the mobility therapy provided. RESULTS: Among the 275 patients evaluated, CVCs were used in 49%, HD catheters were used in 26%, and IACs were used in 29%. A total of 1,268 mobility therapy sessions were provided to patients while they had a catheter in place. Catheter-related adverse events occurred in 20 patients (a total of 22 adverse events): 32%, infection; 32%, obstruction; and 32%, accidental dislodgement. We found that mobility therapy was not significantly associated with any catheter-related adverse event, regardless of the type of catheter employed: CVC-OR = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.7-1.0; p = 0.14; HD catheter-OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.89-1.21; p = 0.56; or IAC-OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 0.94-3.23; p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients, mobility therapy is not associated with the incidence of adverse events involving CVCs, HD catheters, or IACs. PMID:26176520

  1. Seamless prevention of adverse events from tattooing: integrated strategy emphasising the customer-tattooist interaction.

    PubMed

    Serup, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The boom in tattooing has been paralleled by more frequent adverse events, which may be localised in the skin or systemic and manifested clinically or latent. Infections, allergic reactions from red-coloured tattoos and papulo-nodular reactions from black tattoos dominate. Mild complaints are very common, with 1/5 of all tattooed individuals having acquired sensitivity to sunlight in the tattooed skin. The potential risk of cancer due to potential carcinogens in some tattoo inks has hitherto not manifested in clinical reports, despite the millions of people who have been tattooed over many decades. A risk of death from tattooing remains associated with severe infection, i.e. sepsis. Preventive strategies may rely on focused preventions, and sterility and preservation of ink is essential, rational and knowledge-based. The chemical and particle contents of ink nanoparticles cannot be unrestricted; however, focused control of ink is facing many uncertainties, including analytical problems, lack of identification of allergens in ink and discrepancies between the content of potential carcinogens and manifestation of cancer in the clinic. The concept of seamless prevention is introduced as a pragmatic strategy that emphasises the customer-tattooist interaction, which is the 'engine' of tattoo safety. This strategy amalgamates the range of narrow-scope preventive instruments and shall ensure that any relevant instrument is used actively and without deficiency or drop out, thus resulting in a complete orchestration of a multi-targeted strategy. High-priority elements of this strategy shall facilitate a qualified 'go' or 'no go' decision by the customer before the tattoo is made and should involve informed consent, qualification of the tattooist and the parlour, including supplies of inks etc., and attention to hygienic security. Records and documentation of tattoo cases with complications and the culprit inks as well as the establishment of national or European

  2. 12 CFR 404.33 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 404.33 Section 404.33 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION DISCLOSURE Demands for Testimony of Current and Former Ex-Im Bank Personnel and for Production of Ex-Im Bank Records § 404.33 Procedure in the event of...

  3. The role of nonverbal cognitive ability in the association of adverse life events with dysfunctional attitudes and hopelessness in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Flouri, Eirini; Panourgia, Constantina

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether nonverbal cognitive ability buffers the effect of life stress (number of adverse life events in the last year) on diatheses for depression. It was expected that, as problem-solving aptitude, nonverbal cognitive ability would moderate the effect of life stress on those diatheses (such as dysfunctional attitudes) that are depressogenic because they represent deficits in information-processing or problem-solving skills, but not on diatheses (such as hopelessness) that are depressogenic because they represent deficits in motivation or effort to apply problem-solving skills. The sample included 558 10- to 19-year-olds from a state secondary school in London. Nonverbal cognitive ability was negatively associated with both dysfunctional attitudes and hopelessness. As expected, nonverbal cognitive ability moderated the association between life adversity and dysfunctional attitudes. However, hopelessness was not related to life stress, and therefore, there was no life stress effect for nonverbal cognitive ability to moderate. This study adds to knowledge about the association between problem-solving ability and depressogenic diatheses. By identifying life stress as a risk factor for dysfunctional attitudes but not hopelessness, it highlights the importance of considering outcome specificity in models predicting adolescent outcomes from adverse life events. Importantly for practice, it suggests that an emphasis on recent life adversity will likely underestimate the true level of hopelessness among adolescents.

  4. Adverse Life Events, Coping and Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors in Urban African American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Yadira M.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Cooley-Strickland, Michele

    2013-01-01

    African American youth residing in low income urban neighborhoods are at increased risk of experiencing negative life events in multiple domains, increasing their risk for internalizing and externalizing behaviors. However, little is known about youth's differential responses to life event stress, or protective processes and coping strategies for…

  5. Incidence of adverse events in paediatric procedural sedation in the emergency department: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bellolio, M Fernanda; Puls, Henrique A; Anderson, Jana L; Gilani, Waqas I; Murad, M Hassan; Barrionuevo, Patricia; Erwin, Patricia J; Wang, Zhen; Hess, Erik P

    2016-01-01

    Objective and design We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the incidence of adverse events in the emergency department (ED) during procedural sedation in the paediatric population. Randomised controlled trials and observational studies from the past 10 years were included. We adhere to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Setting ED. Participants Children. Interventions Procedural sedation. Outcomes Adverse events like vomiting, agitation, hypoxia and apnoea. Meta-analysis was performed with random-effects model and reported as incidence rates with 95% CIs. Results A total of 1177 studies were retrieved for screening and 258 were selected for full-text review. 41 studies reporting on 13 883 procedural sedations in 13 876 children (≤18 years) were included. The most common adverse events (all reported per 1000 sedations) were: vomiting 55.5 (CI 45.2 to 65.8), agitation 17.9 (CI 12.2 to 23.7), hypoxia 14.8 (CI 10.2 to 19.3) and apnoea 7.1 (CI 3.2 to 11.0). The need to intervene with either bag valve mask, oral airway or positive pressure ventilation occurred in 5.0 per 1000 sedations (CI 2.3 to 7.6). The incidences of severe respiratory events were: 34 cases of laryngospasm among 8687 sedations (2.9 per 1000 sedations, CI 1.1 to 4.7; absolute rate 3.9 per 1000 sedations), 4 intubations among 9136 sedations and 0 cases of aspiration among 3326 sedations. 33 of the 34 cases of laryngospasm occurred in patients who received ketamine. Conclusions Serious adverse respiratory events are very rare in paediatric procedural sedation in the ED. Emesis and agitation are the most frequent adverse events. Hypoxia, a late indicator of respiratory depression, occurs in 1.5% of sedations. Laryngospasm, though rare, happens most frequently with ketamine. The results of this study provide quantitative risk estimates to facilitate shared decision-making, risk communication, informed consent and

  6. Adverse Events during 2 Years of Daily Wear of Silicone Hydrogels in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sankaridurg, Padmaja; Chen, Xiang; Naduvilath, Thomas; de la Jara, Percy Lazon; Lin, Zhi; Li, Li; Smith, Earl L.; Ge, Jian; Holden, Brien A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Type and incidence of adverse events and rate of discontinuations for 2 years of daily wear with silicone hydrogel contact lenses in Chinese children with myopia. Methods Two hundred forty children aged 7 to 14 years were enrolled in a prospective randomized clinical trial from November 2008 to April 2009. Children with myopia of up to −3.50 diopters (D) spherical equivalent with astigmatism less than or equal to −0.75 D were randomized to one commercial and three experimental lens designs of Lotrafilcon B silicone hydrogel lenses (four groups) used bilaterally on a daily wear, monthly replacement schedule. The main outcome measures were incidence per 100 patient-years (incidence, in percentage) of adverse events and rate of discontinuations. Results There were no events of microbial keratitis. Fifty-five adverse events (incidence, 14.2%) were seen. There were also 12 recurrent events. The type and incidence percentage were contact lens papillary conjunctivitis (16 events, 4.1%), superior epithelial arcuate lesions (SEALs, six events, 1.5%), corneal erosions (eight events, 2.1%), infiltrative keratitis (five events, 1.3%), asymptomatic infiltrative keratitis (seven events, 1.8%), and asymptomatic infiltrates (13 events, 3.42%). There were differences in the incidence of SEALs between groups (p = 0.023), with the incidence of SEALs being greater with one of the experimental designs. No event resulted in any vision loss. Seventy participants (29.2%) discontinued, with one-third (26 participants, 10.8%) occurring in the first month of lens wear. Discomfort and non–lens-related reasons such as safety concern and disinterest were frequently cited reasons for discontinuations. Conclusions Adverse events with daily wear of silicone hydrogels in children were mainly mechanical in nature, and significant infiltrative events were few. The large number of dropouts in the early days of lens wear and their reasons for discontinuation suggest that adaptation and

  7. The Relationship Between the Adverse Events and Efficacy of Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Fuli; Wu, Guojun; Zhang, Longlong; Wang, Yangmin; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Li, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Lu, Xitao; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the adverse events and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), with a purpose to guide the judgment of efficacy in sorafenib treatment. Eighty-three mRCC patients who received sorafenib therapy at northwest China were studied retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) with adverse event types and grades. Among 83 patients who underwent sorafenib therapy, 2 cases (2.4%) had completed response (CR), 14 cases (16.9%) had partial response (PR), 57 cases (68.7%) had stable disease (SD), and 10 cases (12.0%) developed progressive disease (PD). The median PFS and OS were 15.0 and 29.0 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 1 or 2 adverse events included hand-foot syndrome (68.7%), diarrhea (54.2%), and alopecia (51.8%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (6.0%), hypertension (4.8%), and diarrhea (3.6%). The frequency and severity of adverse events correlated with tumor response rate (both with P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed the independent predictors of better PFS included rash (OR 0.307, 95%CI 0.148–0.636, P = 0.001) and diarrhea (OR 0.391, 95%CI 0.169–0.783, P = 0.008). Elevated transaminase was the independent predictor of poor PFS (OR 2.606, 95%CI 1.299–5.532, P = 0.012). For OS, rash (OR 0.473, 95%CI 0.253–0.886, P = 0.019) and diarrhea (OR 0.321, 95%CI 0.171–0.605, P = 0.000) correlated with better OS. Sorafenib-related adverse events are associated with efficacy in patients with mRCC from northwest China. Rash and diarrhea are independent protective factors of both PFS and OS, and elevated transaminase is an independent risk factor of PFS. A large prospective study is warranted. PMID:26656362

  8. 'Skating on thin ice?' Consultant surgeon's contemporary experience of adverse surgical events.

    PubMed

    Skevington, Suzanne M; Langdon, Joanne E; Giddins, Grey

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about patient safety have prompted studies of adverse surgical events (ASEs), but descriptive classification of errors and malpractice claims have overshadowed qualitative investigations into the processes that lead to expert errors and their solutions. We studied consultant surgeon's perspectives on how and why events occurred through semi-structured interviews about general and specific events. The sample contained heterogeneous cross-section of ages, gender and specialists, with >2 years consultant status and working within a 25-mile radius. Overarching findings included (1) pressures to work harder, faster and beyond capability within a blaming culture; (2) optimism bias from over-confidence and complacency; and (3) multiple pressures to 'finish' an operation or list, resulting in completion bias. Seven high order themes were identified on the healthcare system, adverse event types, contributing factors, emotions, cognitive processes, error detection, and strategies, solutions and barriers. The process of classifying event types guided solution selection, and the decision about whether to formally report it. How serious consequences were for patients and their temporal effects, defined an adversity continuum. Minor events arose routinely i.e. technical discrepancies, side-effects. More problematic were sub-optimal outcomes and avoidable events. Despite their expertise, consultants were vulnerable to unavoidable, uncontrollable events which were major concerns. Most serious were near-misses, errors and mistakes. However, major errors did not inevitably lead to a catastrophe and minor errors could be extremely serious. A 'cascade' of minor events exacerbated by negative emotions can precipitate major events, and interception methods need investigation. Consultants felt powerless and helpless to change environmental, organisational and systemic problems; new communication and action channels are desirable. Confidence building in team leadership would

  9. Childhood Adverse Events and Health Outcomes among Methamphetamine-Dependent Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messina, Nena P.; Marinelli-Casey, Patricia; Hillhouse, Maureen; Ang, Alfonso; Hunter, Jeremy; Rawson, Richard

    2008-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of childhood adverse events (CAEs) among methamphetamine-dependent men and women, and assess the relationship of cumulative CAEs to health problems. Data for 236 men and 351 women were analyzed assessing CAEs. Dependent variables included 14 self-reported health problems or psychiatric symptom domains. Mental health was…

  10. Performance Characteristics of a Methodology to Quantify Adverse Events over Time in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharek, Paul J; Parry, Gareth; Goldmann, Donald; Bones, Kate; Hackbarth, Andrew; Resar, Roger; Griffin, Frances A; Rhoda, Dale; Murphy, Cathy; Landrigan, Christopher P

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the performance characteristics of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Global Trigger Tool (GTT) to determine its reliability for tracking local and national adverse event rates. Data Sources Primary data from 2008 chart reviews. Study Design A retrospective study in a stratified random sample of 10 North Carolina hospitals. Hospital-based (internal) and contract research organization–hired (external) reviewers used the GTT to identify adverse events in the same 10 randomly selected medical records per hospital in each quarter from January 2002 through December 2007. Data Collection/Extraction Interrater and intrarater reliability was assessed using κ statistics on 10 percent and 5 percent, respectively, of selected medical records. Additionally, experienced GTT users reviewed 10 percent of records to calculate internal and external teams' sensitivity and specificity. Principal Findings Eighty-eight to 98 percent of the targeted 2,400 medical records were reviewed. The reliability of the GTT to detect the presence, number, and severity of adverse events varied from κ=0.40 to 0.60. When compared with a team of experienced reviewers, the internal teams' sensitivity (49 percent) and specificity (94 percent) exceeded the external teams' (34 and 93 percent), as did their performance on all other metrics. Conclusions The high specificity, moderate sensitivity, and favorable interrater and intrarater reliability of the GTT make it appropriate for tracking local and national adverse event rates. The strong performance of hospital-based reviewers supports their use in future studies. PMID:20722749

  11. Comparison of Increasingly Detailed Elicitation Methods for the Assessment of Adverse Events in Pediatric Psychopharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhill, Laurence L.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Fisher, Prudence; Levine, Jerome; Davies, Mark; Abikoff, Howard; Chrisman, Allan K.; Chuang, Shirley; Findling, Robert L.; March, John; Scahill, Lawrence; Walkup, John; Riddle, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To improve the gathering of adverse events (AEs) in pediatric psychopharmacology by examining the value and acceptability of increasingly detailed elicitation methods. Method: Trained clinicians administered the Safety Monitoring Uniform Report Form (SMURF) to 59 parents and outpatients (mean age [+ or -] SD = 11.9 [+ or -] 3.2 years)…

  12. 10 CFR 9.204 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9.204 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Production or Disclosure in Response to Subpoenas or Demands of Courts or Other Authorities § 9.204 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other judicial or quasi-judicial authority declines to stay the effect of the demand...

  13. 41 CFR 105-60.607 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Production or Disclosure by Present or Former General Services Administration Employees in Response to Subpoenas or Similar Demands in Judicial or Administrative Proceedings § 105-60.607 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect of the demand...

  14. 10 CFR 9.204 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Subpoenas or Demands of Courts or Other Authorities § 9.204 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other judicial or quasi-judicial authority declines to stay the effect of the demand in response to a request made in accordance with § 9.203 pending receipt of instructions, or if the court...

  15. 29 CFR 1610.36 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS Production in Response to Subpenas or Demands of Courts or Other Authorities § 1610.36 Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. If the court or other authority declines to stay the effect of... instructions from the Legal Counsel, or if the court or other authority rules that the demand must be...

  16. 78 FR 71620 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Adverse Event...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... devices in clinical use. This system is called the Medical Product Safety Network (MedSun). FDA is seeking... the user facilities participating in MedSun, to obtain a demographic profile of the facilities, and... collecting data on the electronic adverse event report form, MedSun collects additional information...

  17. 14 CFR 1263.108 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1263.108 Section 1263.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DEMAND FOR INFORMATION OR TESTIMONY SERVED ON AGENCY EMPLOYEES; PROCEDURES § 1263.108 Procedure in the...

  18. 22 CFR 206.5 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 206.5 Section 206.5 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES AND THE PRODUCTION OF DOCUMENTS IN PROCEEDINGS WHERE A.I.D. IS NOT A PARTY § 206.5 Procedure in the...

  19. An Educational Program to Prevent Adverse Events in Neonates : a Randomised Trial.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-20

    Intensive Care Units, Neonatal; Misadventures to Patients During Surgical and Medical Care; Catheter-related Bloodstream Infection (CRBSI) Nos; Quality of Healthcare; Ventilator Adverse Event; Nosocomial Pneumonia; Immature Newborn; Skin Lesion; Extravasation Injury; Nasal Injury; Intubation Complication; Medication Administered in Error; IV Catheter Nos Deep Venous Thrombosis

  20. Application of Knowledge Discovery in Databases Methodologies for Predictive Models for Pregnancy Adverse Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Laritza M.

    2010-01-01

    In its report "To Err is Human", The Institute of Medicine recommended the implementation of internal and external voluntary and mandatory automatic reporting systems to increase detection of adverse events. Knowledge Discovery in Databases (KDD) allows the detection of patterns and trends that would be hidden or less detectable if analyzed by…

  1. Serious Adverse Events in Randomized Psychosocial Treatment Studies: Safety or Arbitrary Edicts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Roll, John M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.; Ball, Samuel A.; Stitzer, Maxine; Peirce, Jessica M.; Blaine, Jack; Kirby, Kimberly C.; McCarty, Dennis; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2008-01-01

    Human subjects protection policies developed for pharmaceutical trials are now being widely applied to psychosocial intervention studies. This study examined occurrences of serious adverse events (SAEs) reported in multicenter psychosocial trials of the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network. Substance-abusing participants (N =…

  2. 14 CFR 1263.108 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1263.108 Section 1263.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DEMAND FOR INFORMATION OR TESTIMONY SERVED ON AGENCY EMPLOYEES; PROCEDURES § 1263.108 Procedure in the...

  3. 41 CFR 105-60.607 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 105-60.607 Section 105-60.607 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Subpoenas or Similar Demands in Judicial or Administrative Proceedings § 105-60.607 Procedure in the...

  4. 14 CFR 1263.108 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1263.108 Section 1263.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DEMAND FOR INFORMATION OR TESTIMONY SERVED ON AGENCY EMPLOYEES; PROCEDURES § 1263.108 Procedure in the...

  5. 14 CFR 1263.108 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 1263.108 Section 1263.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DEMAND FOR INFORMATION OR TESTIMONY SERVED ON AGENCY EMPLOYEES; PROCEDURES § 1263.108 Procedure in the...

  6. 41 CFR 105-60.607 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 105-60.607 Section 105-60.607 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Subpoenas or Similar Demands in Judicial or Administrative Proceedings § 105-60.607 Procedure in the...

  7. 22 CFR 206.5 - Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure in the event of an adverse ruling. 206.5 Section 206.5 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES AND THE PRODUCTION OF DOCUMENTS IN PROCEEDINGS WHERE A.I.D. IS NOT A PARTY § 206.5 Procedure in the...

  8. Developmental Regression and Autism Reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Emily Jane; Ball, Robert; Landa, Rebecca; Zimmerman, Andrew W.; Braun, M. Miles

    2007-01-01

    We report demographic and clinical characteristics of children reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) as having autism or another developmental disorder after vaccination. We completed 124 interviews with parents and reviewed medical records for 31 children whose records contained sufficient information to evaluate the…

  9. 21 CFR 803.20 - How do I complete and submit an individual adverse event report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... first person or entity who reported the information to you). (2) If you are a user facility, importer... you are correcting or supplying information that is missing from another reporter's Form 3500A, you... do not have to report an adverse event if you have information that would lead a person who...

  10. Integrating Recent Data in Managing Adverse Events in the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gish, Robert G.; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; Tong, Myron J.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the United States, HCC is the main cause of death in patients with cirrhosis, and the incidence of this malignancy is on the rise. Because HCC is associated with a particularly poor prognosis, emphasis is placed on surveillance of high-risk patients. Early detection allows a greater chance of diagnosing HCC before it has spread, thus increasing the chances that the patient can be potentially cured with surgical techniques such as resection and transplantation. However, most cases of HCC are not diagnosed until at least some of the cancer has spread or multiple nodules exist. For these patients, treatment options include percutaneous and transarterial ablation, as well as systemic chemotherapy. Systemic therapy is now considered the standard of care for patients with advanced tumors. Traditional treatment was based on cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin. This approach was associated with minimal benefit and a high rate of toxicity. Recently, targeted agents have proven more effective and safer in this setting. The oral multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is now approved for the treatment of unresectable HCC and is currently the only approved agent for advanced HCC. In order to maximize the benefit of sorafenib and other investigational agents for patients with advanced disease, effective interventions have been designed to mitigate their associated adverse events, such as hand-foot skin reactions and hypertension. PMID:22423222

  11. Raising the Minimum Effective Dose of Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Antidepressants: Adverse Drug Events.

    PubMed

    Safer, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the dose-response of serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants for efficacy and for adverse drug events (ADEs). Dose-response is identified by placebo-controlled, double-blind, fixed-dose clinical trials comparing various doses for efficacy and for ADEs. Reports from the great majority of clinical trials have consistently found that the minimum SRI effective dose is usually optimal for efficacy in the treatment of depression disorders, even though most American medical practitioners raise the dose when early antidepressant treatment results are negative or partial. To better understand this issue, the medical literature was comprehensively reviewed to ascertain the degree to which SRI medications resulted in a flat dose response for efficacy and then to identify specific ADEs that are dose-dependent. Strong evidence from fixed-dose trial data for the efficacy of nonascendant, minimum effective doses of SRIs was found for the treatment of both major depression and anxiety disorders. Particularly important was the finding that most SRI ADEs have an ascending dose-response curve. These ADEs include sexual dysfunction, hypertension, cardiac conduction risks, hyperglycemia, decreased bone density, sweating, withdrawal symptoms, and agitation. Thus, routinely raising the SRI dose above the minimum effective dose for efficacy can be counter-productive. PMID:27518478

  12. Effectiveness, Medication Patterns, and Adverse Events of Traditional Chinese Herbal Patches for Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuezong; Liu, Ting; Gao, Ningyang; Ding, Daofang; Duan, Tieli; Cao, Yuelong; Zheng, Yuxin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the evidence whether traditional Chinese herbal patches (TCHPs) for osteoarthritis (OA) are effective and safe and analyze their medication patterns. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using all the possible Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and keywords from January 1979 to July 2013. Both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies were included. Estimated effects were analyzed using mean difference (MD) or relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and meta-analysis. Results. 86 kinds of TCHPs were identified. RCTs and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) which were mostly of low quality favored TCHPs for local pain and dysfunction relief. TCHPs, compared with diclofenac ointment, had significant effects on global effectiveness rate (RR = 0.50; 95% CI (0.29, 0.87)). Components of formulae were mainly based on the compounds “Xiao Huo Luo Dan” (Minor collateral-freeing pill) and “Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang” (Angelicae Pubescentis and Loranthi decoction). Ten kinds of adverse events (AEs), mainly consisting of itching and/or local skin rashes, were identified after 3-4 weeks of follow-up. Conclusions. TCHPs have certain evidence in improving global effectiveness rate for OA; however, more rigorous studies are warranted to support their use. PMID:24527043

  13. Measuring Adverse Events in Helicopter Emergency Medical Services: Establishing Content Validity

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Lave, Judith R.; Martin-Gill, Christian; Weaver, Matthew D.; Wadas, Richard J.; Arnold, Robert M.; Roth, Ronald N.; Mosesso, Vincent N.; Guyette, Francis X.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We sought to create a valid framework for detecting Adverse Events (AEs) in the high-risk setting of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS). Methods We assembled a panel of 10 expert clinicians (n=6 emergency medicine physicians and n=4 prehospital nurses and flight paramedics) affiliated with a large multi-state HEMS organization in the Northeast U.S. We used a modified Delphi technique to develop a framework for detecting AEs associated with the treatment of critically ill or injured patients. We used a widely applied measure, the Content Validity Index (CVI), to quantify the validity of the framework’s content. Results The expert panel of 10 clinicians reached consensus on a common AE definition and four-step protocol/process for AE detection in HEMS. The consensus-based framework is composed of three main components: 1) a trigger tool, 2) a method for rating proximal cause, and 3) a method for rating AE severity. The CVI findings isolate components of the framework considered content valid. Conclusions We demonstrate a standardized process for the development of a content valid framework for AE detection. The framework is a model for the development of a method for AE identification in other settings, including ground-based EMS. PMID:24003951

  14. Predicting risk of adverse drug reactions in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lavan, Amanda Hanora; Gallagher, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common in older adults, with falls, orthostatic hypotension, delirium, renal failure, gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding being amongst the most common clinical manifestations. ADR risk increases with age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, increasing burden of comorbidity, polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing and suboptimal monitoring of drugs. ADRs are a preventable cause of harm to patients and an unnecessary waste of healthcare resources. Several ADR risk tools exist but none has sufficient predictive value for clinical practice. Good clinical practice for detecting and predicting ADRs in vulnerable patients includes detailed documentation and regular review of prescribed and over-the-counter medications through standardized medication reconciliation. New medications should be prescribed cautiously with clear therapeutic goals and recognition of the impact a drug can have on multiple organ systems. Prescribers should regularly review medication efficacy and be vigilant for ADRs and their contributory risk factors. Deprescribing should occur at an individual level when drugs are no longer efficacious or beneficial or when safer alternatives exist. Inappropriate prescribing and unnecessary polypharmacy should be minimized. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and the use of explicit prescribing criteria can be useful in this regard. PMID:26834959

  15. What Can Hospitalized Patients Tell Us About Adverse Events? Learning from Patient-Reported Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Weingart, Saul N; Pagovich, Odelya; Sands, Daniel Z; Li, Joseph M; Aronson, Mark D; Davis, Roger B; Bates, David W; Phillips, Russell S

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about how well hospitalized patients can identify errors or injuries in their care. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to elicit incident reports from hospital inpatients in order to identify and characterize adverse events and near-miss errors. Subjects We conducted a prospective cohort study of 228 adult inpatients on a medicine unit of a Boston teaching hospital. Methods Investigators reviewed medical records and interviewed patients during the hospitalization and by telephone 10 days after discharge about “problems,”“mistakes,” and “injuries” that occurred. Physician investigators classified patients' reports. We calculated event rates and used multivariable Poisson regression models to examine the factors associated with patient-reported events. Results Of 264 eligible patients, 228 (86%) agreed to participate and completed 528 interviews. Seventeen patients (8%) experienced 20 adverse events; 1 was serious. Eight patients (4%) experienced 13 near misses; 5 were serious or life threatening. Eleven (55%) of 20 adverse events and 4 (31%) of 13 near misses were documented in the medical record, but none were found in the hospital incident reporting system. Patients with 3 or more drug allergies were more likely to report errors compared with patients without drug allergies (incidence rate ratio 4.7, 95% CI 1.7, 13.4). Conclusion Inpatients can identify adverse events affecting their care. Many patient-identified events are not captured by the hospital incident reporting system or recorded in the medical record. Engaging hospitalized patients as partners in identifying medical errors and injuries is a potentially promising approach for enhancing patient safety. PMID:16117751

  16. Methods for estimating causal relationships of adverse events with dietary supplements

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Kazuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Mamoru; Kawasaki, Yohei; Buno, Yuma; Matsushita, Kumi; Kaji, Masayuki; Fujimoto, Kazuko; Waki, Masako; Nakashima, Mitsuyoshi; Umegaki, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dietary supplement use has increased over past decades, resulting in reports of potentially serious adverse events. The aim of this study was to develop optimised methods to evaluate the causal relationships between adverse events and dietary supplements, and to test these methods using case reports. Design Causal relationship assessment using prospectively collected data. Setting and participants 4 dietary supplement experts, 4 pharmacists and 11 registered dietitians (5 men and 14 women) examined 200 case reports of suspected adverse events using the modified Naranjo scale and the modified Food and Drug Administration (FDA) algorithm. Primary outcome measures The distribution of evaluation results was analysed and inter-rater reliability was evaluated for the two modified methods employed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Fleiss’ κ. Results Using these two methods, most of the 200 case reports were categorised as ‘lack of information’ or ‘possible’ adverse events. Inter-rater reliability among entire assessors ratings for the two modified methods, based on ICC and Fleiss’ κ, were classified as more than substantial (modified Naranjo scale: ICC (95% CI) 0.873 (0.850 to 0.895); Fleiss’ κ (95% CI) 0.615 (0.615 to 0.615). Modified FDA algorithm: Fleiss’ κ (95% CI) 0.622 (0.622 to 0.622). Conclusions These methods may help to assess the causal relationships between adverse events and dietary supplements. By conducting additional studies of these methods in different populations, researchers can expand the possibilities for the application of our methods. PMID:26608636

  17. Platelet density per monocyte predicts adverse events in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Bert; Roest, Mark; McClellan, Elizabeth A; Sels, Jan W; Stubbs, Andrew; Jukema, J Wouter; Doevendans, Pieter A; Waltenberger, Johannes; van Zonneveld, Anton-Jan; Pasterkamp, Gerard; De Groot, Philip G; Hoefer, Imo E

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte recruitment to damaged endothelium is enhanced by platelet binding to monocytes and contributes to vascular repair. Therefore, we studied whether the number of platelets per monocyte affects the recurrence of adverse events in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Platelet-monocytes complexes with high and low median fluorescence intensities (MFI) of the platelet marker CD42b were isolated using cell sorting. Microscopic analysis revealed that a high platelet marker MFI on monocytes corresponded with a high platelet density per monocyte while a low platelet marker MFI corresponded with a low platelet density per monocyte (3.4 ± 0.7 vs 1.4 ± 0.1 platelets per monocyte, P=0.01). Using real-time video microscopy, we observed increased recruitment of high platelet density monocytes to endothelial cells as compared with low platelet density monocytes (P=0.01). Next, we classified PCI scheduled patients (N=263) into groups with high, medium and low platelet densities per monocyte and assessed the recurrence of adverse events. After multivariate adjustment for potential confounders, we observed a 2.5-fold reduction in the recurrence of adverse events in patients with a high platelet density per monocyte as compared with a low platelet density per monocyte [hazard ratio=0.4 (95% confidence interval, 0.2-0.8), P=0.01]. We show that a high platelet density per monocyte increases monocyte recruitment to endothelial cells and predicts a reduction in the recurrence of adverse events in patients after PCI. These findings may imply that a high platelet density per monocyte protects against recurrence of adverse events. PMID:26423019

  18. Adverse events with intravitreal injection of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors: nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Sudeep S; Bronskill, Susan E; Paterson, J Michael; Whitehead, Marlo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk of systemic adverse events associated with intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibiting drugs. Design Population based nested case-control study. Setting Ontario, Canada. Participants 91 378 older adults with a history of physician diagnosed retinal disease identified between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2011. Cases were 1477 patients admitted to hospital for ischaemic stroke, 2229 admitted for an acute myocardial infarction, 1059 admitted or assessed in an emergency department for venous thromboembolism, and 2623 admitted for congestive heart failure. Event-free controls (at a ratio of 5:1) were matched to cases on the basis of year of birth, sex, history of the outcome in the previous 5 years, and diabetes. Main exposure measure Exposure to vascular endothelial growth factor inhibiting drugs identified within 180 days before the index date. Results After adjustment for potential confounders, participants who had ischaemic stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, or venous thromboembolism were not more likely than control participants to have been exposed to either bevacizumab (adjusted odds ratios of 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.68 to 1.34) for ischaemic stroke, 1.04 (0.77 to 1.39) for acute myocardial infarction, 0.81 (0.49 to 1.34) for venous thromboembolism, and 1.21 (0.91 to 1.62) for congestive heart failure) or ranibizumab (adjusted odds ratios 0.87 (0.68 to 1.10) for ischaemic stroke, 0.90 (0.72 to 1.11) for acute myocardial infarction, 0.88 (0.67 to 1.16) for venous thromboembolism, and 0.87 (0.70 to 1.07) for congestive heart failure). Similarly, a secondary analysis of exclusive users of bevacizumab or ranibizumab showed no differences in risk between the two drugs (adjusted odds ratios for bevacizumab relative to ranibizumab of 1.03 (0.67 to 1.60) for ischaemic stroke, 1.23 (0.85 to 1.77) for acute myocardial infarction, 0.92 (0.51 to 1.69) for venous thromboembolism, and

  19. Meaningful use stage 2 e-prescribing threshold and adverse drug events in the Medicare Part D population with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Meghan Hufstader; Encinosa, William; Mostashari, Farzad; Bynum, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supports the potential for e-prescribing to reduce the incidence of adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospital-based studies, but studies in the ambulatory setting have not used occurrence of ADE as their outcome. Using the “prescription origin code” in 2011 Medicare Part D prescription drug events files, the authors investigate whether physicians who meet the meaningful use stage 2 threshold for e-prescribing (≥50% of prescriptions e-prescribed) have lower rates of ADEs among their diabetic patients. Risk of any patient with diabetes in the provider’s panel having an ADE from anti-diabetic medications was modeled adjusted for prescriber and patient panel characteristics. Physician e-prescribing to Medicare beneficiaries was associated with reduced risk of ADEs among their diabetes patients (Odds Ratio: 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.96), as were several prescriber and panel characteristics. However, these physicians treated fewer patients from disadvantaged populations. PMID:25948698

  20. Meaningful use stage 2 e-prescribing threshold and adverse drug events in the Medicare Part D population with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Powers, Christopher; Gabriel, Meghan Hufstader; Encinosa, William; Mostashari, Farzad; Bynum, Julie

    2015-09-01

    Evidence supports the potential for e-prescribing to reduce the incidence of adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospital-based studies, but studies in the ambulatory setting have not used occurrence of ADE as their outcome. Using the "prescription origin code" in 2011 Medicare Part D prescription drug events files, the authors investigate whether physicians who meet the meaningful use stage 2 threshold for e-prescribing (≥50% of prescriptions e-prescribed) have lower rates of ADEs among their diabetic patients. Risk of any patient with diabetes in the provider's panel having an ADE from anti-diabetic medications was modeled adjusted for prescriber and patient panel characteristics. Physician e-prescribing to Medicare beneficiaries was associated with reduced risk of ADEs among their diabetes patients (Odds Ratio: 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.96), as were several prescriber and panel characteristics. However, these physicians treated fewer patients from disadvantaged populations.

  1. A perspective from clinical and business ethics on adverse events in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J T; Meier, C; Higdon, T

    1997-11-01

    Adverse events occur in a significant, but undetermined, number of hospitalized patients. These types of patient injuries are more often the result of faulty systems than human maleficence. A culture exists among health care providers that discourages the reporting of such events and resists the implementation of formal efforts to eliminate them. This resistance serves to perpetuate the problem. Both business and clinical ethics argue that sound reasons exist for hospitals to reduce, if not eliminate, adverse events. To do so is cost effective, particularly in a managed care environment. It is also at the heart of responsible professional behavior. Physicians are afforded an opportunity to be at the forefront in this quality improvement effort.

  2. Melanoma Associated with TNFα Inhibitors: a Research on Adverse Drug events And Reports (RADAR) Project

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, B.; Hammel, J.A.; Raisch, D.W.; Weaver, L.L.; Schneider, D.; West, D.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors (TNFαIs) are used for treatment of inflammatory disorders. There is evidence linking these agents with occurrence of malignancies. For four out of five TNFαIs the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label states, “melanoma has been reported in patients treated with these agents.” Objectives Determine whether a statistically-significant association exists between administration of TNFαIs and development of malignant melanoma. Methods We searched the FDA Adverse Events Reporting System (FAERS) database for terms related to melanoma and TNFαIs for detection of safety signals. We also searched a large urban academic electronic medical record (EMR) database for which we calculated the relative risk (RR) of melanoma in subjects exposed to TNFαIs vs. non-exposed subjects. Results There were 972 reports of melanoma associated with a TNFαIs identified in the FAERS database, with 69 reports among individuals using more than one TNFαI. A safety signal was detected for infliximab (I) golimumab (G), etanercept (E), and adalimumab (A). Cetrolizumab pegol (CP) had no detectible safety signal. For TNFαIs as a class of drugs, a safety signal was detectable in the FAERS database, and RR was significant in the EMR database. For the EMR cohort, 6,045 patients were exposed to TNFαIs and 35 cases of melanoma were detected. Significance for RR was detected for A (RR = 1.8, p = 0.02) and E (RR 2.35, p = 0.0004). Conclusions We identified a significant association between exposure to TNFαIs and malignant melanoma in two different analyses. Our findings add to existing evidence linking these agents with the occurrence of malignant melanoma. Additional investigations are required to further explore this association and the risk of melanoma with TNFαI therapy. PMID:24328939

  3. Adverse event management in mass drug administration for neglected tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur; Zink, Amanda

    2014-03-01

    The ethical challenges of reporting and managing adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) in the context of mass drug administration (MDA) for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) require reassessment of domestic and international policies on a global scale. Although the World Health Organization has set forth AE/SAE guidelines specifically for NTD MDA that incorporate suspected causality, and recommends that only SAEs get reported in this setting, most regulatory agencies continue to require the reporting of all SAEs exhibiting even a merely temporal relationship to activities associated with an MDA program. This greatly increases the potential for excess "noise" and undue risk aversion and is not only impractical but arguably unethical where huge proportions of populations are being treated for devastating diseases, and no good baseline exists against which to compare possible AE/SAE reports. Other population-specific variables that might change the way drug safety ought to be assessed include differing efficacy rates of a drug, background morbidity/mortality rates of the target disease in question, the growth rate of the incidence of disease, the availability of rescue or salvage therapies, and the willingness of local populations to take risks that other populations might not. The fact that NTDs are controllable and potentially eradicable with well-tolerated, effective, existing drugs might further alter our assessment of MDA safety and AE/SAE tolerability. At the same time, diffuseness of population, communication barriers, lack of resources, and other difficult surveillance challenges may present in NTD-affected settings. These limitations could impair the ability to monitor an MDA program's success, as well as hinder efforts to obtain informed consent or provide rescue therapy. Denying beneficial research interventions and MDA programs intended to benefit millions requires sound ethical justification based on more than the identification of

  4. Conscious Sedation for Upper Endoscopy in the Gastric Bypass Patient: Prevalence of Cardiopulmonary Adverse Events and Predictors of Sedation Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Safety of conscious sedation for performing esophagoduodenoscopy (EGD) in obese and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) patients remains controversial. Additionally, it has been suggested that patients with higher body mass index (BMI) require higher sedation doses, imparting greater risk. Aim The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of sedation-related adverse events and the independent predictors of sedation requirements in RYGB patients. Methods This study is a retrospective database review of RYGB patients who underwent EGD under conscious sedation. Database analysis was performed and linear regression applied to identify significant predictors of sedation requirement. Primary outcomes are sedation-related adverse events and predictors of sedation requirement. Results Data on 1,385 consecutive procedures (diagnostic 967; therapeutic 418) performed under conscious sedation were analyzed. Unplanned events were reported in 1.6 %, with 0.6 % being cardiopulmonary in nature and 0.7 % requiring early termination. Multivariable linear regression revealed procedural time was the only significant predictor of fentanyl (standardized β 0.34; P value < 0.001) and midazolam (standardized β 0.30; P value < 0.001) doses. Post-RYGB BMI was not significantly associated with the dose of fentanyl (standardized β 0.08; P value 0.29) or midazolam administered (standardized β 0.01; P value 0.88). Conclusions Upper endoscopy can be safely performed in RYGB patients under conscious sedation with a similar cardiopulmonary risk profile to that of standard EGD. The non-cardiopulmonary adverse events were procedure-specific and unrelated to sedation. Procedure length, and not absolute BMI, was the only predictor of sedation requirement in this patient population. PMID:24723069

  5. Adverse events in cardiovascular-related training programs in people with spinal cord injury: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Warms, Catherine A.; Backus, Deborah; Rajan, Suparna; Bombardier, Charles H.; Schomer, Katherine G.; Burns, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Context There are anecdotal reports of adverse events (AEs) associated with exercise in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and consequent concern by people with SCI and their providers about potential risks of exercise. Enumeration of specific events has never been performed and the extent of risk of exercise to people with SCI is not understood. Objective To systematically review published evidence to identify and enumerate reports of adverse events or AEs associated with training in persons with SCI. Methods Review was limited to peer-reviewed studies published in English from 1970 to 2011: (1) in adults with SCI, (2) evaluating training protocols consisting of repeated sessions over at least 4 weeks to maintain or improve cardiovascular health, (3) including volitional exercise modalities and functional electrical stimulation (FES)-enhanced exercise modalities, and (4) including a specific statement about AEs. Trained reviewers initially identified a total of 145 studies. After further screening, 38 studies were included in the review. Quality of evidence was evaluated using established procedures. Results There were no serious AEs reported. There were no common AEs reported across most types of interventions, except for musculoskeletal AEs related to FES walking. There were few AEs in volitional exercise studies. Conclusion There is no evidence to suggest that cardiovascular exercise done according to guidelines and established safety precautions is harmful. To improve the strength of these conclusions, future publications should include definition of AEs, information about pre-intervention screening, and statements of the nature and extent of AEs. PMID:24090603

  6. Who will pay for the adverse events resulting from smallpox vaccination? Liability and compensation issues.

    PubMed

    Strongin, Robin J; Salinsky, Eileen

    2003-03-12

    This paper summarizes liability and compensation concerns surrounding the smallpox vaccination program announced by President Bush on December 13, 2002. The paper examines the nature of adverse health events that are likely to occur in connection with the smallpox vaccine, assesses the liability protections that have been established for organizations and individuals participating in the vaccination program, and discusses the compensation mechanisms being considered to address the damages incurred by volunteers who may suffer from adverse vaccine reactions. Specifically, the implications of the Federal Tort Claims Act, workers' compensation programs, and the creation of a new no-fault compensation fund are explored.

  7. Non-Verbal Reasoning Ability and Academic Achievement as Moderators of the Relation between Adverse Life Events and Emotional and Behavioural Problems in Early Adolescence: The Importance of Moderator and Outcome Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flouri, Eirini; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to model the functional form of the effect of contextual risk (number of adverse life events) on emotional and behavioural problems in early adolescence, and to test how intelligence and academic achievement compare as moderators of this effect. The effect of number of adverse life events on emotional and behavioural…

  8. Adverse events after endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Annovazzi, P; Amato, M P; Capello, E; Cavalla, P; Cocco, E; Falcini, M; Gallo, A; Patti, F; Perini, P; Rodegher, M E; Rovaris, M; Rottoli, M R; Comi, G

    2013-06-01

    Although it is debated whether chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) plays a role in multiple sclerosis (MS) development, many patients undergo endovascular treatment (ET) of CCSVI. A study is ongoing in Italy to evaluate the clinical outcome of ET. Severe adverse events (AEs) occurred in 15/462 subjects at a variable interval after ET: jugular thrombosis in seven patients, tetraventricular hydrocephalus, stroke, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, status epilepticus, aspiration pneumonia, hypertension with tachicardia, or bleeding of bedsore in the remaining seven cases. One patient died because of myocardial infarction 10 weeks after ET. The risk of severe AEs related to ET for CCSVI must be carefully considered.

  9. [Neonatal adverse events and near misses reported in Brazil from 2007 to 2013].

    PubMed

    Lanzillotti, Luciana da Silva; Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares de; Mendes, Walter; Seta, Marismary Horsth De

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze adverse events and near misses in newborns up to 28 days of life, reported to the Brazilian National Notification System for Sanitary Surveillance (NOTIVISA) system from 2007 to 2013. This was a quantitative, descriptive, retrospective study with analysis of secondary data. A total of 355 incidents were reported: 118 (33.3%) related to medical devices, 4 (1.1%) medical equipment, and 233 (65.6%) medicines. Silver nitrate and antibiotics were the most frequently reported medicines, and among medical devices and equipment, phlebitis associated with IV lines was the most frequently reported adverse event. The study unveils the reporting of adverse events and near misses, fostering discussion on what actually constitutes harm according to the person that reports the event. The challenge for NOTIVISA is to improve the system, and as with other information systems, this results from its use, critical analysis, and interaction with users - incident reporters and interested parties like teaching and research institutions. PMID:27653193

  10. Climate Change and Crop Exposure to Adverse Weather: Changes to Frost Risk and Grapevine Flowering Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mosedale, Jonathan R.; Wilson, Robert J.; Maclean, Ilya M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of grapevines in the UK and many other cool climate regions is expected to benefit from the higher growing season temperatures predicted under future climate scenarios. Yet the effects of climate change on the risk of adverse weather conditions or events at key stages of crop development are not always captured by aggregated measures of seasonal or yearly climates, or by downscaling techniques that assume climate variability will remain unchanged under future scenarios. Using fine resolution projections of future climate scenarios for south-west England and grapevine phenology models we explore how risks to cool-climate vineyard harvests vary under future climate conditions. Results indicate that the risk of adverse conditions during flowering declines under all future climate scenarios. In contrast, the risk of late spring frosts increases under many future climate projections due to advancement in the timing of budbreak. Estimates of frost risk, however, were highly sensitive to the choice of phenology model, and future frost exposure declined when budbreak was calculated using models that included a winter chill requirement for dormancy break. The lack of robust phenological models is a major source of uncertainty concerning the impacts of future climate change on the development of cool-climate viticulture in historically marginal climatic regions. PMID:26496127

  11. Climate Change and Crop Exposure to Adverse Weather: Changes to Frost Risk and Grapevine Flowering Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mosedale, Jonathan R; Wilson, Robert J; Maclean, Ilya M D

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of grapevines in the UK and many other cool climate regions is expected to benefit from the higher growing season temperatures predicted under future climate scenarios. Yet the effects of climate change on the risk of adverse weather conditions or events at key stages of crop development are not always captured by aggregated measures of seasonal or yearly climates, or by downscaling techniques that assume climate variability will remain unchanged under future scenarios. Using fine resolution projections of future climate scenarios for south-west England and grapevine phenology models we explore how risks to cool-climate vineyard harvests vary under future climate conditions. Results indicate that the risk of adverse conditions during flowering declines under all future climate scenarios. In contrast, the risk of late spring frosts increases under many future climate projections due to advancement in the timing of budbreak. Estimates of frost risk, however, were highly sensitive to the choice of phenology model, and future frost exposure declined when budbreak was calculated using models that included a winter chill requirement for dormancy break. The lack of robust phenological models is a major source of uncertainty concerning the impacts of future climate change on the development of cool-climate viticulture in historically marginal climatic regions.

  12. Incidence and predictors of adverse drug events in an African cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with efavirenz

    PubMed Central

    Abah, Isaac Okoh; Akanbi, Maxwell; Abah, Mercy Enuwa; Finangwai, Amos Istifanus; Dady, Christy W; Falang, Kakjing Dadul; Ebonyi, Augustine Odoh; Okopi, Joseph Anejo; Agbaji, Oche Ochai; Sagay, Altiene Solomon; Okonkwo, Prosper; Idoko, John A; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adverse drug reactions associated with efavirenz (EFV) therapy are poorly described beyond the first year of treatment. We aimed to describe the incidence and predictors of EFV-related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in a cohort of adult Nigerian HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods This retrospective cohort study utilized clinical data of HIV-1 infected adults (aged ≥15 years), commenced on efavirenz containing-regimen between January 2004 and December 2011. The time-dependent occurrence of clinical adverse events as defined by the World Health Organization was analyzed by Cox regression analysis. Results A total of 2920 patients with baseline median (IQR) age of 39 (33-46) years, largely made up of men (78%) were included in the study. During 8834 person-years of follow up, 358 adverse drug events were reported; the incidence rate was 40.3 ADRs per 1000 person-years of treatment. Lipodystrophy and neuropsychiatric disorders were the most common ADRs with incidences of 63 and 30 per 1000 patients respectively. About one-third of the neuropsychiatric adverse events were within 12 months of commencement of ART. The risk of neuropsychiatric ADRs was independently predicted for women [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 9.05; 95% CI: 5.18-15.82], those aged <40 years (aHR 2.59; 95% CI: 1.50-4.45), advanced HIV disease (WHO stage 3 or 4) [aHR 2.26; 95% CI: 1.37-3.72], and zidovudine [aHR 2.21; 95% CI: 1.27-3.83] or stavudine [aHR 4.22; 95% CI: 1.99-8.92] containing regimen compared to tenofovir. Conclusion Neuropsychiatric adverse drug events associated with efavirenz-based ART had both early and late onset in our clinical cohort of patients on chronic EFV therapy. Continuous neuropsychiatric assessment for improved detection and management of neuropsychiatric ADRs is recommended in resource-limited settings where the use of efavirenz-based regimens has been scaled up. PMID:26405676

  13. 21 CFR 803.20 - How do I complete and submit an individual adverse event report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Persons qualified to make a medical judgment include physicians, nurses, risk managers, and biomedical engineers. You must keep in your MDR event files (described in § 803.18) the information that the...

  14. 21 CFR 803.20 - How do I complete and submit an individual adverse event report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Persons qualified to make a medical judgment include physicians, nurses, risk managers, and biomedical engineers. You must keep in your MDR event files (described in § 803.18) the information that the...

  15. 21 CFR 803.20 - How do I complete and submit an individual adverse event report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Persons qualified to make a medical judgment include physicians, nurses, risk managers, and biomedical engineers. You must keep in your MDR event files (described in § 803.18) the information that the...

  16. 21 CFR 803.20 - How do I complete and submit an individual adverse event report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Persons qualified to make a medical judgment include physicians, nurses, risk managers, and biomedical engineers. You must keep in your MDR event files (described in § 803.18) the information that the...

  17. Development and Validation of a Risk Model for Predicting Adverse Drug Reactions in Older People during Hospital Stay: Brighton Adverse Drug Reactions Risk (BADRI) Model

    PubMed Central

    Tangiisuran, Balamurugan; Scutt, Greg; Stevenson, Jennifer; Wright, Juliet; Onder, G.; Petrovic, M.; van der Cammen, T. J.; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi; Davies, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Background Older patients are at an increased risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADR). Of particular concern are the oldest old, which constitute an increasingly growing population. Having a validated clinical tool to identify those older patients at risk of developing an ADR during hospital stay would enable healthcare staff to put measures in place to reduce the risk of such an event developing. The current study aimed to (1) develop and (2) validate an ADR risk prediction model. Methods We used a combination of univariate analysis and multivariate binary logistic regression to identify clinical risk factors for developing an ADR in a population of older people from a UK teaching hospital. The final ADR risk model was then validated in a European population (European dataset). Results Six-hundred-ninety patients (median age 85 years) were enrolled in the development stage of the study. Ninety-five reports of ADR were confirmed by independent review in these patients. Five clinical variables were identified through multivariate analysis and included in our final model; each variable was attributed a score of 1. Internal validation produced an AUROC of 0.74, a sensitivity of 80%, and specificity of 55%. During the external validation stage the AUROC was 0.73, with sensitivity and specificity values of 84% and 43% respectively. Conclusions We have developed and successfully validated a simple model to use ADR risk score in a population of patients with a median age of 85, i.e. the oldest old. The model is based on 5 clinical variables (≥8 drugs, hyperlipidaemia, raised white cell count, use of anti-diabetic agents, length of stay ≥12 days), some of which have not been previously reported. PMID:25356898

  18. [Analysis of the cardiac side effects of antipsychotics: Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER)].

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Takashi; Okumara, Yasuyuki; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka; Ito, Hiroto

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed the cases of side effects due to antipsychotics reported to Japan's Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2012. We used the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER) and analyzed 136 of 216,945 cases using the defined terms. We also checked the cardiac adverse effects listed in the package inserts of the antipsychotics involved. We found cases of Ikr blockade resulting in sudden death (49 cases), electrocardiogram QT prolonged (29 cases), torsade de pointes (TdP, 19 cases), ventricular fibrillation (VF, 10 cases). M2 receptor blockade was observed in tachycardia (8 cases) and sinus tachycardia (3 cases). Calmodulin blockade was involved in reported cardiomyopathy (3 cases) and myocarditis (1 case). Multiple adverse events were reported simultaneously in 14 cases. Our search of package inserts revealed warnings regarding electrocardiogram QT prolongation (24 drugs), tachycardia (23), sudden death (18), TdP (14), VF (3), myocarditis (1) and cardiomyopathy (1). We suggest that when an antipsychotic is prescribed, the patient should be monitored regularly with ECG, blood tests, and/or biochemical tests to avoid adverse cardiac effects. PMID:25069255

  19. Recent Literature on Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Semla, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are common in older adults, but locating literature addressing these issues is often challenging. The objective of this article was to summarize recent studies addressing medication errors and adverse drug events in a single location to improve accessibility for individuals working with older adults. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature search for studies published in 2014 and identified 51 potential articles. After critical review, 17 studies were selected for inclusion based on innovation, rigorous observational or experimental study designs, and use of reliable, valid measures. Four articles characterizing potentially inappropriate prescribing and interventions to optimize medication regimens were annotated and critiqued in detail. We hope that health policy makers and clinicians find this information helpful in improving the quality of care for older adults. PMID:26804210

  20. Impact of Adverse Events Following Immunization in Viet Nam in 2013 on chronic hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Wiesen, Eric; Diorditsa, Sergey; Toda, Kohei; Duong, Thi Hong; Nguyen, Lien Huong; Nguyen, Van Cuong; Nguyen, Tran Hien

    2016-02-01

    Adverse Events Following Immunization in Viet Nam in 2013 led to substantial reductions in hepatitis B vaccination coverage (both the birth dose and the three-dose series). In order to estimate the impact of the reduction in vaccination coverage on hepatitis B transmission and future mortality, a widely-used mathematical model was applied to the data from Viet Nam. Using the model, we estimated the number of chronic infections and deaths that are expected to occur in the birth cohort in 2013 and the number of excessive infections and deaths attributable to the drop in immunization coverage in 2013. An excess of 90,137 chronic infections and 17,456 future deaths were estimated to occur in the 2013 birth cohort due to the drop in vaccination coverage. This analysis highlights the importance of maintaining high vaccination coverage and swiftly responding to reported Adverse Events Following Immunization in order to regain consumer confidence in the hepatitis B vaccine.

  1. Glacial Acetic Acid Adverse Events: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Doles, William; Wilkerson, Garrett; Morrison, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Glacial acetic acid is a dangerous chemical that has been associated with several adverse drug events involving patients over recent years. When diluted to the proper concentration, acetic acid solutions have a variety of medicinal uses. Unfortunately, despite warnings, the improper dilution of concentrated glacial acetic acid has resulted in severe burns and other related morbidities. We report on 2 additional case reports of adverse drug events involving glacial acetic acid as well as a review of the literature. A summary of published case reports is provided, including the intended and actual concentration of glacial acetic acid involved, the indication for use, degree of exposure, and resultant outcome. Strategies that have been recommended to improve patient safety are summarized within the context of the key elements of the medication use process. PMID:26448660

  2. Antenatal psychosocial risk factors associated with adverse postpartum family outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, L M; Reid, A J; Midmer, D K; Biringer, A; Carroll, J C; Stewart, D E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the strength of the association between antenatal psychosocial risk factors and adverse postpartum outcomes in the family, such as assault of women by their partner, child abuse, postpartum depression, marital dysfunction and physical illness. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Cinahl, Famli, Psych Abstracts and the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials were searched from relevant articles published from Jan. 1, 1980, to Dec. 31, 1993, with the use of MeSH terms "depression, involutional," "child abuse," "child neglect," "domestic violence," "family," "marital adjustment," "family health," "newborn health," "child health," "physical illness," "social support," "psychosocial risk," "prediction," "risk factors," "obstetrics" and "prenatal care." Further articles were identified from bibliographies. STUDY SELECTION: Of the 370 articles identified through the search, 118 were included for review. Studies were included if they examined the association between psychosocial risk factors and the outcomes of interest. Articles were excluded if they were reviews of poor quality or they had one or more of the following features: insufficient description of the sample, a high attrition rate, a lack of standardized outcome measures, outcomes other than the ones of interest or results that had already been reported in a previous study. DATA EXTRACTION: The strength of evidence of each study was evaluated. On the basis of the evidence, each risk factor was assigned a rating of the strength of its association with each of the postpartum outcomes. The ratings were class A (good evidence of association), class B (fair evidence) and class C (no clear evidence). Of the 129 antenatal psychosocial risk factors studied, 15 were found to have a class A association with at least one of the postpartum outcomes. DATA SYNTHESIS: Child abuse and abuse of the mother by her partner were most strongly correlated (class A evidence) with a history of lack of social support, recent life

  3. Adverse life events and delinquent behavior among Kenyan adolescents: a cross-sectional study on the protective role of parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Past research provides strong evidence that adverse life events heighten the risk of delinquent behavior among adolescents. Urban informal (slum) settlements in sub-Saharan Africa are marked by extreme adversity. However, the prevalence and consequences of adverse life events as well as protective factors that can mitigate the effects of exposure to these events in slum settlements is largely understudied. We examine two research questions. First, are adverse life events experienced at the individual and household level associated with a higher likelihood of delinquent behavior among adolescents living in two slums in Nairobi, Kenya? Second, are parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem protective against delinquency in a context of high adversity? Methods We used cross-sectional data from 3,064 males and females aged 12–19 years who participated in the Transitions to Adulthood Study. We examined the extent to which a composite index of adverse life events was associated with delinquent behavior (measured using a composite index derived from nine items). We also examined the direct and moderating effects of three protective factors: parental monitoring, religiosity, and self-esteem. Results Fifty-four percent of adolescents reported at least one adverse life event, while 18% reported three or more adverse events. For both males and females, adversity was positively and significantly associated with delinquency in bivariate and multivariate models. Negative associations were observed between the protective factors and delinquency. Significant adverse events × protective factor interaction terms were observed for parental monitoring (females and males), religiosity (males), and self-esteem (females). Conclusions Similar to research in high income countries, adverse life events are associated with an increased likelihood of delinquent behavior among adolescents living in urban slums in Kenya, a low-income country. However, parental monitoring

  4. Adverse moisture events predict seasonal abundance of Lyme disease vector ticks (Ixodes scapularis)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in north temperate regions worldwide, affecting an estimated 300,000 people annually in the United States alone. The incidence of LB is correlated with human exposure to its vector, the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis). To date, attempts to model tick encounter risk based on environmental parameters have been equivocal. Previous studies have not considered (1) the differences between relative humidity (RH) in leaf litter and at weather stations, (2) the RH threshold that affects nymphal blacklegged tick survival, and (3) the time required below the threshold to induce mortality. We clarify the association between environmental moisture and tick survival by presenting a significant relationship between the total number of tick adverse moisture events (TAMEs - calculated as microclimatic periods below a RH threshold) and tick abundance each year. Methods We used a 14-year continuous statewide tick surveillance database and corresponding weather data from Rhode Island (RI), USA, to assess the effects of TAMEs on nymphal populations of I. scapularis. These TAMEs were defined as extended periods of time (>8 h below 82% RH in leaf litter). We fit a sigmoid curve comparing weather station data to those collected by loggers placed in tick habitats to estimate RH experienced by nymphal ticks, and compiled the number of historical TAMEs during the 14-year record. Results The total number of TAMEs in June of each year was negatively related to total seasonal nymphal tick densities, suggesting that sub-threshold humidity episodes >8 h in duration naturally lowered nymphal blacklegged tick abundance. Furthermore, TAMEs were positively related to the ratio of tick abundance early in the season when compared to late season, suggesting that lower than average tick abundance for a given year resulted from tick mortality and not from other factors. Conclusions Our results clarify the mechanism

  5. Use of internet search logs to evaluate potential drug adverse events.

    PubMed

    Sarntivijai, S; Abernethy, D R

    2014-08-01

    Internet search logs provide an abundant source of data that can be explored for purposes such as identifying drug exposure-adverse event relationships. The methodology to rigorously conduct such evaluations is not well characterized, and the utility of such analyses is not well defined. In this issue, White and colleagues propose an approach using Internet search logs for this purpose and compare it to parallel analyses conducted using the US Food and Drug Administration's spontaneous reporting database.

  6. Novel Data Mining Methodologies for Adverse Drug Event Discovery and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Rave; DuMouchel, William; Shah, Nigam H.; Madigan, David; Ryan, Patrick; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of new adverse drug events (ADEs) in the post-approval period is an important goal of the health system. Data mining methods that can transform data into meaningful knowledge to inform patient safety have proven to be essential. New opportunities have emerged to harness data sources that have not been used within the traditional framework. This article provides an overview of recent methodological innovations and data sources used in support of ADE discovery and analysis. PMID:22549283

  7. Evaluating Predictive Pharmacogenetic Signatures of Adverse Events in Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with Fluoropyrimidines

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Jane; Keane, Melanie; Chu, Gavin S.; Turner, Richard; Epurescu, Daniel; Barrett, Ann; Willis, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    The potential clinical utility of genetic markers associated with response to fluoropyrimidine treatment in colorectal cancer patients remains controversial despite extensive study. Our aim was to test the clinical validity of both novel and previously identified markers of adverse events in a broad clinical setting. We have conducted an observational pharmacogenetic study of early adverse events in a cohort study of 254 colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. Sixteen variants of nine key folate (pharmacodynamic) and drug metabolising (pharmacokinetic) enzymes have been analysed as individual markers and/or signatures of markers. We found a significant association between TYMP S471L (rs11479) and early dose modifications and/or severe adverse events (adjusted OR = 2.02 [1.03; 4.00], p = 0.042, adjusted OR = 2.70 [1.23; 5.92], p = 0.01 respectively). There was also a significant association between these phenotypes and a signature of DPYD mutations (Adjusted OR = 3.96 [1.17; 13.33], p = 0.03, adjusted OR = 6.76 [1.99; 22.96], p = 0.002 respectively). We did not identify any significant associations between the individual candidate pharmacodynamic markers and toxicity. If a predictive test for early adverse events analysed the TYMP and DPYD variants as a signature, the sensitivity would be 45.5 %, with a positive predictive value of just 33.9 % and thus poor clinical validity. Most studies to date have been under-powered to consider multiple pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variants simultaneously but this and similar individualised data sets could be pooled in meta-analyses to resolve uncertainties about the potential clinical utility of these markers. PMID:24167597

  8. Genomic and metabolomic advances in the identification of disease and adverse event biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Mendrick, Donna L; Schnackenberg, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Incomplete knowledge of tissue pathogenesis is hampering the identification of biomarkers for the appropriate therapeutic targets to prevent or inhibit disease processes, and the prediction and diagnosis of injury due to disease and adverse events of drug therapy. The revolution in genomics and metabolomics, combined with advanced bioinformatics and computational methods for mining such large, complex data sets, are beginning to provide critical insights into tissue injury. Such results will move us closer to the promise of personalized medicine.

  9. Prenatal exposure to amphetamines. Risks and adverse outcomes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Plessinger, M A

    1998-03-01

    Based on findings in humans and the confirmation of prenatal exposures in animals, amphetamines and methamphetamines increase the risk of an adverse outcome when abused during pregnancy. Clefting, cardiac anomalies, and fetal growth reduction deficits that have been seen in infants exposed to amphetamines during pregnancy have all been reproduced in animal studies involving prenatal exposures to amphetamines. The differential effects of amphetamines between genetic strains of mice and between species demonstrate that pharmacokinetics and the genetic disposition of the mother and developing embryo can have an enormous influence on enhancing or reducing these potential risks. The effects of prenatal exposure to amphetamines in producing altered behavior in humans appear less compelling when one considers other confounding variables of human environment, genetics, and polydrug abuse. In view of the animal data concerning altered behavior and learning tasks in comparison with learning deficits observed in humans, the influence of the confounding variables in humans may serve to increase the sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to prenatal exposure to amphetamines. These factors and others may predispose the developing conceptus to the damaging effects of amphetamines by actually lowering the threshold of susceptibility at the sites where damage occurs. Knowledge of the effects of prenatal exposure of the fetus and the mother to designer amphetamines is lacking. Based on the few studies in which designer drugs have been examined in animal models, more questions are raised than answered. Possible reasons why no malformations or significant fetal effects were found in the study by St. Omer include the genetic strain of rat used, the conservative exposure profile, or the fact that the placenta metabolized MDMA before reaching the embryo. These questions underscore the need for further investigations concerning the prenatal exposure effects of designer compounds and

  10. Prenatal exposure to amphetamines. Risks and adverse outcomes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Plessinger, M A

    1998-03-01

    Based on findings in humans and the confirmation of prenatal exposures in animals, amphetamines and methamphetamines increase the risk of an adverse outcome when abused during pregnancy. Clefting, cardiac anomalies, and fetal growth reduction deficits that have been seen in infants exposed to amphetamines during pregnancy have all been reproduced in animal studies involving prenatal exposures to amphetamines. The differential effects of amphetamines between genetic strains of mice and between species demonstrate that pharmacokinetics and the genetic disposition of the mother and developing embryo can have an enormous influence on enhancing or reducing these potential risks. The effects of prenatal exposure to amphetamines in producing altered behavior in humans appear less compelling when one considers other confounding variables of human environment, genetics, and polydrug abuse. In view of the animal data concerning altered behavior and learning tasks in comparison with learning deficits observed in humans, the influence of the confounding variables in humans may serve to increase the sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to prenatal exposure to amphetamines. These factors and others may predispose the developing conceptus to the damaging effects of amphetamines by actually lowering the threshold of susceptibility at the sites where damage occurs. Knowledge of the effects of prenatal exposure of the fetus and the mother to designer amphetamines is lacking. Based on the few studies in which designer drugs have been examined in animal models, more questions are raised than answered. Possible reasons why no malformations or significant fetal effects were found in the study by St. Omer include the genetic strain of rat used, the conservative exposure profile, or the fact that the placenta metabolized MDMA before reaching the embryo. These questions underscore the need for further investigations concerning the prenatal exposure effects of designer compounds and

  11. Safety of immunisation and adverse events following vaccination against hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Duclos, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    Hepatitis B vaccines (HBVs) are composed of highly purified preparations of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg). An adjuvant, either aluminium phosphate or aluminium hydroxide, is added to the vaccines, which are sometimes preserved with thiomersal. In placebo-controlled studies, common side effects other than local reactions were reported no more frequently among vaccine recipients than among individuals receiving a placebo. A number of controversial adverse events have, however, been purported to be associated with HBVs, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes, demyelinating diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis [MS]), chronic fatigue syndrome, and more recently, lymphoblastic leukaemia. In addition, the safety of the thiomersal and aluminium contained in the vaccine has also been under close scrutiny. These issues have been reviewed by a number of country-specific or international independent review committees such as that of the US Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety (GACVS). Upon review of the scientific evidence, none of the serious allegations have so far been confirmed. On the contrary, scientific evidence has accumulated to disprove many of the allegations. In particular, the IOM committee has concluded that the evidence favoured rejection of a causal relationship between HBV administered to adults and incident MS or MS relapse. Whilst it is important to continue monitoring some of the safety issues, there is no evidence to suggest that the WHO should consider altering its recommendation that all countries should have universal infant and/or adolescent immunisation programmes. The risks of hepatitis B vaccination are only theoretical in comparison with clear benefits in terms of cirrhosis and cancer prevention, and the HBV remains one with an excellent safety profile. PMID:12904102

  12. Consumer reporting of adverse events following immunization (AEFI): identifying predictors of reporting an AEFI.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Adriana; Gold, Michael; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Baghurst, Peter; Marshall, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Passive reporting of adverse events following immunization (AEFI) by consumers or healthcare professionals is the primary mechanism for post-marketing surveillance of vaccine safety. Although recent initiatives have promoted consumer reporting, there is a lack of research concerning consumer reporters. Computer assisted telephone interviews (CATI) were conducted in 2011 of a cross-sectional, random, general population sample of 191 South Australian parents who stated that their children had previously experienced an AEFI. We compared awareness of surveillance, vaccine safety opinions, and demographics of parents reporting an AEFI to either healthcare professionals or surveillance authorities with those who did not report their children's AEFI. Multivariate regression analyses measured: the association between reporting and safety views; and demographic predictors of reporting an AEFI. Reporting an AEFI to a healthcare professional or a surveillance authority was not significantly associated with awareness of a surveillance system. AEFI reporters, when compared with non-reporters, were more likely to be Australian-born (OR = 4.58, [1.64, 12.78], P = 0.004); were associated with the perception that a serious reaction was more likely to occur at their children's last immunization (OR = 2.54 [95%CI 1.22, 5.30], P = 0.013); and were less accepting of the risk of febrile convulsion, (OR = 3.59 [95%CI 1.50, 8.57], P = 0.004). Although reporting an AEFI was not associated with awareness of surveillance or most socio-demographics, the results suggest some difference in safety opinions. Further studies are required to ascertain if these differences pre-date the occurrence of an AEFI or are a consequence of the AEFI and how consumers can contribute further to vaccine safety surveillance. PMID:24406315

  13. Attitudes toward metabolic adverse events among patients with schizophrenia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Yamazaki, Manabu; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Mori, Takao; Sugai, Takuro; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yutaro; Minami, Yoshitake; Ozeki, Yuji; Okamoto, Kurefu; Sagae, Toyoaki; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is a growing concern among patients with schizophrenia because metabolic abnormalities are widely regarded as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. The current study assessed attitudes toward metabolic adverse events among patients with schizophrenia. Methods A brief questionnaire was constructed to investigate patient recognition of the following broad areas: dietary habits, lifestyle, self-monitoring, knowledge, and medical practice. Between January 2012 and June 2013, questionnaires were sent to patients associated with 520 outpatient facilities and 247 inpatient facilities belonging to the Japan Psychiatric Hospital Association. All of the participants (n=22,072; inpatients =15,170, outpatients =6,902) were diagnosed with schizophrenia based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, or the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision. Results Approximately 55.0% (8,069/14,669) of inpatients and 44.8% of outpatients (2,978/6,649) reported that they did not exercise at all. Although 60.9% (4,116/6,760) of outpatients reported that they felt obese, only 35.6% (5,261/14,794) of inpatients felt obese. More than half of the inpatients (51.2%; 7,514/14,690) and outpatients (60.8%; 4,086/6,721) hoped to receive regular blood tests to prevent weight gain and diseases such as diabetes. Conclusion Although more than half of patients hoped to prevent weight gain and diabetes, only a minority of patients were mindful of eating balanced meals and having physical exercise. Educational efforts and the promotion of the best pharmacotherapy and monitoring practices are needed for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26966364

  14. A secure distributed logistic regression protocol for the detection of rare adverse drug events

    PubMed Central

    El Emam, Khaled; Samet, Saeed; Arbuckle, Luk; Tamblyn, Robyn; Earle, Craig; Kantarcioglu, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited capacity to assess the comparative risks of medications after they enter the market. For rare adverse events, the pooling of data from multiple sources is necessary to have the power and sufficient population heterogeneity to detect differences in safety and effectiveness in genetic, ethnic and clinically defined subpopulations. However, combining datasets from different data custodians or jurisdictions to perform an analysis on the pooled data creates significant privacy concerns that would need to be addressed. Existing protocols for addressing these concerns can result in reduced analysis accuracy and can allow sensitive information to leak. Objective To develop a secure distributed multi-party computation protocol for logistic regression that provides strong privacy guarantees. Methods We developed a secure distributed logistic regression protocol using a single analysis center with multiple sites providing data. A theoretical security analysis demonstrates that the protocol is robust to plausible collusion attacks and does not allow the parties to gain new information from the data that are exchanged among them. The computational performance and accuracy of the protocol were evaluated on simulated datasets. Results The computational performance scales linearly as the dataset sizes increase. The addition of sites results in an exponential growth in computation time. However, for up to five sites, the time is still short and would not affect practical applications. The model parameters are the same as the results on pooled raw data analyzed in SAS, demonstrating high model accuracy. Conclusion The proposed protocol and prototype system would allow the development of logistic regression models in a secure manner without requiring the sharing of personal health information. This can alleviate one of the key barriers to the establishment of large-scale post-marketing surveillance programs. We extended the secure protocol to account for

  15. Comparison of computerized surveillance and manual chart review for adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R Scott; Staes, Catherine J; Lloyd, James F; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Haug, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand how the source of information affects different adverse event (AE) surveillance methods. Design Retrospective analysis of inpatient adverse drug events (ADEs) and hospital-associated infections (HAIs) detected by either a computerized surveillance system (CSS) or manual chart review (MCR). Measurement Descriptive analysis of events detected using the two methods by type of AE, type of information about the AE, and sources of the information. Results CSS detected more HAIs than MCR (92% vs 34%); however, a similar number of ADEs was detected by both systems (52% vs 51%). The agreement between systems was greater for HAIs than ADEs (26% vs 3%). The CSS missed events that did not have information in coded format or that were described only in physician narratives. The MCR detected events missed by CSS using information in physician narratives. Discharge summaries were more likely to contain information about AEs than any other type of physician narrative, followed by emergency department reports for HAIs and general consult notes for ADEs. Some ADEs found by MCR were detected by CSS but not verified by a clinician. Limitations Inability to distinguish between CSS false positives and suspected AEs for cases in which the clinician did not document their assessment in the CSS. Conclusion The effect that information source has on different surveillance methods depends on the type of AE. Integrating information from physician narratives with CSS using natural language processing would improve the detection of ADEs more than HAIs. PMID:21672911

  16. Identifying adverse drug event information in clinical notes with distributional semantic representations of context.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Aron; Kvist, Maria; Dalianis, Hercules; Duneld, Martin

    2015-10-01

    For the purpose of post-marketing drug safety surveillance, which has traditionally relied on the voluntary reporting of individual cases of adverse drug events (ADEs), other sources of information are now being explored, including electronic health records (EHRs), which give us access to enormous amounts of longitudinal observations of the treatment of patients and their drug use. Adverse drug events, which can be encoded in EHRs with certain diagnosis codes, are, however, heavily underreported. It is therefore important to develop capabilities to process, by means of computational methods, the more unstructured EHR data in the form of clinical notes, where clinicians may describe and reason around suspected ADEs. In this study, we report on the creation of an annotated corpus of Swedish health records for the purpose of learning to identify information pertaining to ADEs present in clinical notes. To this end, three key tasks are tackled: recognizing relevant named entities (disorders, symptoms, drugs), labeling attributes of the recognized entities (negation, speculation, temporality), and relationships between them (indication, adverse drug event). For each of the three tasks, leveraging models of distributional semantics - i.e., unsupervised methods that exploit co-occurrence information to model, typically in vector space, the meaning of words - and, in particular, combinations of such models, is shown to improve the predictive performance. The ability to make use of such unsupervised methods is critical when faced with large amounts of sparse and high-dimensional data, especially in domains where annotated resources are scarce.

  17. Opioid Therapy Pharmacogenomics for Noncancer Pain: Efficacy, Adverse Events, and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Chronic non-cancer pain is a debilitating condition associated with high individual and societal costs. While opioid treatment for pain has been available for centuries, it is associated with high variability in outcome, and a considerable proportion of patients is unable to attain relief from symptoms while suffering adverse events and developing medication dependence. We performed a review of the efficacy of pharmacogenomic markers and their abilities to predict adverse events, dependence, and associated economic costs, focusing on two genes: OPRM1 and CYP2D6. Data sources were articles indexed by PubMed on or before August 6, 2013. Articles were first selected after review of their titles and abstracts, and full papers were read to confirm eligibility. Initially, fifty-two articles were identified. Of these, 17 were relevant to biological actions of pharmacogenomic markers and their effect on therapeutic efficacy, 16 to adverse events, 15 to opioid dependence, and eight to economic costs. In conclusion, increasing costs of opioid therapy have made the advances in pharmacogenomics an attractive solution to personalize care with unclear repercussions related to the impact on costs, morbidity, and outcomes. This intersection of pharmacoeconomics and pharmacogenomics presents a unique platform to further examine current advances in clinical medicine and their utility in cost-effective treatment of chronic pain. PMID:24167729

  18. Doctors' experiences of adverse events in secondary care: the professional and personal impact.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Reema; Lawton, Rebecca; Stewart, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    We carried out a cross-sectional online survey of fellows and members of the Royal College of Physicians to establish physicians' experiences of adverse patient safety events and near misses, and the professional and personal impact of these. 1,755 physicians answered at least one question; 1,334 answered every relevant question. Of 1,463 doctors whose patients had an adverse event or near miss, 1,119 (76%) believed this had affected them personally or professionally. 1,077 (74%) reported stress, 995 (68%) anxiety, 840 (60%) sleep disturbance and 886 (63%) lower professional confidence. 1,192 (81%) became anxious about the potential for future errors. Of 1,141 who had used NHS incident reporting systems, only 315 (28%) were satisfied with this process. 201 (14%) received useful feedback, 201 (19%) saw local improvements and 277 (19%) saw system changes. 364 (25%) did not report an incident that they should have. Adverse safety events affect physicians, but few formal sources of support are available. Most doctors use incident-reporting systems, but many describe a lack of useful feedback, systems change or local improvement.

  19. Early Life Conditions, Adverse Life Events, and Chewing Ability at Middle and Later Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Richard G.; Tsakos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine the extent to which early life conditions and adverse life events impact chewing ability in middle and later adulthood. Methods. Secondary analyses were conducted based on data from waves 2 and 3 of the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), collected in the years 2006 to 2009 and encompassing information on current chewing ability and the life history of persons aged 50 years or older from 13 European countries. Logistic regression models were estimated with sequential inclusion of explanatory variables representing living conditions in childhood and adverse life events. Results. After controlling for current determinants of chewing ability at age 50 years or older, certain childhood and later life course socioeconomic, behavioral, and cognitive factors became evident as correlates of chewing ability at age 50 years or older. Specifically, childhood financial hardship was identified as an early life predictor of chewing ability at age 50 years or older (odds ratio = 1.58; 95% confidence interval = 1.22, 2.06). Conclusions. Findings suggest a potential enduring impact of early life conditions and adverse life events on oral health in middle and later adulthood and are relevant for public health decision-makers who design strategies for optimal oral health. PMID:24625140

  20. The reasons of the nursing staff to notify adverse events 1

    PubMed Central

    de Paiva, Miriam Cristina Marques da Silva; Popim, Regina Célia; Melleiro, Marta Maria; Tronchim, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Lima, Silvana Andréa Molina; Juliani, Carmen Maria Casquel Monti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: this research aimed to understand the motivation for reporting adverse events from the perspective of nursing staff in the work environment. METHOD: qualitative study that used the phenomenology of Alfred Schutz for reference, which offers a systematic approach to understand the social aspects of human action. Data were collected by open interviews with 17 nurses and 14 technicians/assistant nurses in a university hospital. RESULTS: motivation was revealed through six categories: all types of occurrences must be reported; the incident report is an auxiliary instrument to health care provision management; the culture of punishment in transition; nurses as the agents responsible for voluntary reporting; sharing problems with higher management and achieving quality in the work process. DISCUSSION: it was unveiled that, when reporting adverse events, team members perceived themselves to be in a collaborative relationship with the institution and trusted that they would receive administrative support and professional security, which encouraged them to continue reporting. Reporting allows health care professionals to share responsibilities with managers and encourages corrective actions. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: the study revealed the nursing staff's motivation for adverse event reporting, contributing to reflections on institutional policies aimed at patient safety in health care. PMID:25493669

  1. Identifying adverse drug event information in clinical notes with distributional semantic representations of context.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Aron; Kvist, Maria; Dalianis, Hercules; Duneld, Martin

    2015-10-01

    For the purpose of post-marketing drug safety surveillance, which has traditionally relied on the voluntary reporting of individual cases of adverse drug events (ADEs), other sources of information are now being explored, including electronic health records (EHRs), which give us access to enormous amounts of longitudinal observations of the treatment of patients and their drug use. Adverse drug events, which can be encoded in EHRs with certain diagnosis codes, are, however, heavily underreported. It is therefore important to develop capabilities to process, by means of computational methods, the more unstructured EHR data in the form of clinical notes, where clinicians may describe and reason around suspected ADEs. In this study, we report on the creation of an annotated corpus of Swedish health records for the purpose of learning to identify information pertaining to ADEs present in clinical notes. To this end, three key tasks are tackled: recognizing relevant named entities (disorders, symptoms, drugs), labeling attributes of the recognized entities (negation, speculation, temporality), and relationships between them (indication, adverse drug event). For each of the three tasks, leveraging models of distributional semantics - i.e., unsupervised methods that exploit co-occurrence information to model, typically in vector space, the meaning of words - and, in particular, combinations of such models, is shown to improve the predictive performance. The ability to make use of such unsupervised methods is critical when faced with large amounts of sparse and high-dimensional data, especially in domains where annotated resources are scarce. PMID:26291578

  2. Facilitating adverse drug event detection in pharmacovigilance databases using molecular structure similarity: application to rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Harpaz, Rave; Chase, Herbert S; Costanzi, Stefano; Rabadan, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse drug events (ADE) cause considerable harm to patients, and consequently their detection is critical for patient safety. The US Food and Drug Administration maintains an adverse event reporting system (AERS) to facilitate the detection of ADE in drugs. Various data mining approaches have been developed that use AERS to detect signals identifying associations between drugs and ADE. The signals must then be monitored further by domain experts, which is a time-consuming task. Objective To develop a new methodology that combines existing data mining algorithms with chemical information by analysis of molecular fingerprints to enhance initial ADE signals generated from AERS, and to provide a decision support mechanism to facilitate the identification of novel adverse events. Results The method achieved a significant improvement in precision in identifying known ADE, and a more than twofold signal enhancement when applied to the ADE rhabdomyolysis. The simplicity of the method assists in highlighting the etiology of the ADE by identifying structurally similar drugs. A set of drugs with strong evidence from both AERS and molecular fingerprint-based modeling is constructed for further analysis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the proposed methodology could be used as a pharmacovigilance decision support tool to facilitate ADE detection. PMID:21946238

  3. Glaucoma-related adverse events in the first five years after unilateral cataract removal in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Sharon F.; Lynn, Michael J.; Beck, Allen D.; Bothun, Erick D.; Orge, Faruk H.; Lambert, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Glaucoma-related adverse events constitute major sight-threatening complications of cataract removal in infancy, yet their relationship to aphakia versus primary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation remains unsettled. Objective To identify and characterize cases of glaucoma and glaucoma-related adverse events (glaucoma+glaucoma suspect) among children in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS) by the age of five years. Design, Setting, and Participants A multicenter randomized controlled trial of 114 infants with unilateral congenital cataract who were between age 1–6 months at surgery. Interventions Participants were randomized at cataract surgery to either primary IOL, or no IOL implantation (contact lens [CL]). Standardized definitions of glaucoma and glaucoma suspect were created for IATS and applied for surveillance and diagnosis. Main Outcome Measures Development of glaucoma and glaucoma+glaucoma suspect in operated eyes up to age five years, plus intraocular pressure, visual acuity, and axial length at age five years. Results Product limit estimates of the risk of glaucoma and glaucoma+glaucoma suspect at 4.8 years after surgery were 17% (95%CI=11%–25%) and 31% (95%CI=24%–41%), respectively. The CL and IOL groups were not significantly different for either outcome: glaucoma (hazard ratio(HR)=0.8[95%CI=0.3–2.0],p=0.62); glaucoma+glaucoma suspect: (HR=1.3[95%CI=0.6–2.5],p=0.58). Younger (versus older) age at surgery conferred increased risk of glaucoma (26% versus 9%, respectively at 4.8 years after surgery (HR=3.2[95%CI=1.2–8.3]), and smaller (versus larger) corneal diameter showed increased risk for glaucoma+glaucoma suspect (HR=2.5[95%CI=1.3–5.0]). Age and corneal diameter were significantly positively correlated. Glaucoma was predominantly open angle (19/20 cases, 95%), most eyes received medication (19/20, 95%), and 8/20 (40%) eyes had surgery. Conclusions and Relevance These results suggest that glaucoma-related adverse events

  4. Effect of RAAS blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high CVD risk subjects with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chaugai, Sandip; Sherpa, Lhamo Yanchang; Sepehry, Amir A.; Arima, Hisatomi; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that atrial fibrillation significantly increases the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects. Application of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers for prevention of recurrence of atrial fibrillation and adverse clinical outcomes in subjects with atrial fibrillation is a theoretically appealing concept. However, results of clinical trials evaluating the effect of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation remain inconclusive. A pooled study of 6 randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on subjects with atrial fibrillation was performed. A total of 6 randomized controlled trials enrolled a total of 53,510 patients followed for 1 to 5 years. RAAS blockade therapy was associated with 14% reduction in the incidence of heart failure (OR: 0.86, [95%CI: 0.76– 0.97], P=0.018) and 17% reduction in the incidence of CVE (OR: 0.83, [95%CI: 0.70–0.99], P = 0.038). The corresponding decline in absolute risk against heart failure (ARR: 1.4%, [95%CI: 0.2–2.6%], P = 0.018) and CVE (ARR: 3.5%, [95%CI: 0.0–6.9%], P = 0.045) in the AF group was much higher than the non-AF group for heart failure (ARR: 0.4%, [95%CI: 0.0–0.7%], P = 0.057) and CVE (ARR: 1.6%, [95%CI: –0.1% to 3.3%], P = 0.071). No significant effect was noted on all-cause or cardiovascular mortality, stroke, or myocardial infarction. This study suggests that RAAS blockade offers protection against heart failure and cardiovascular events in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation. PMID:27368043

  5. Assessment of Adverse Events in Protocols, Clinical Study Reports, and Published Papers of Trials of Orlistat: A Document Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schroll, Jeppe Bennekou; Penninga, Elisabeth I.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about how adverse events are summarised and reported in trials, as detailed information is usually considered confidential. We have acquired clinical study reports (CSRs) from the European Medicines Agency through the Freedom of Information Act. The CSRs describe the results of studies conducted as part of the application for marketing authorisation for the slimming pill orlistat. The purpose of this study was to study how adverse events were summarised and reported in study protocols, CSRs, and published papers of orlistat trials. Methods and Findings We received the CSRs from seven randomised placebo controlled orlistat trials (4,225 participants) submitted by Roche. The CSRs consisted of 8,716 pages and included protocols. Two researchers independently extracted data on adverse events from protocols and CSRs. Corresponding published papers were identified on PubMed and adverse event data were extracted from this source as well. All three sources were compared. Individual adverse events from one trial were summed and compared to the totals in the summary report. None of the protocols or CSRs contained instructions for investigators on how to question participants about adverse events. In CSRs, gastrointestinal adverse events were only coded if the participant reported that they were “bothersome,” a condition that was not specified in the protocol for two of the trials. Serious adverse events were assessed for relationship to the drug by the sponsor, and all adverse events were coded by the sponsor using a glossary that could be updated by the sponsor. The criteria for withdrawal due to adverse events were in one case related to efficacy (high fasting glucose led to withdrawal), which meant that one trial had more withdrawals due to adverse events in the placebo group. Finally, only between 3% and 33% of the total number of investigator-reported adverse events from the trials were reported in the publications because of post hoc

  6. Neurological, Metabolic, and Psychiatric Adverse Events in Children and Adolescents Treated With Aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Klaus Damgaard; Bruhn, Christina Hedegaard; Pagsberg, Anne-Katrine; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2016-10-01

    Aripiprazole is a partial dopamine agonist with only minor neurological and psychiatric adverse effects, making it a potential first-line drug for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. However, the evidence of its use in children and adolescents is rather sparse. The aim of this case study is to discuss adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports concerning aripiprazole-associated neurological and psychiatric events in children and adolescents. The ADR report database at Danish Medicines Agency was searched for all ADRs involving children and adolescents (<18 years) reported by the search term [aripiprazole] AND all spontaneous reports since the introduction of aripiprazole in 2003 until December 31, 2015. Nineteen case reports were included in the study and included both patients with psychotic disorders (PS group) and nonpsychotic disorders (non-PS group). The PS group consisted of 5 patients with schizophrenia and psychoses, not otherwise specified; and the non-PS group consisted of fourteen cases including autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome. The main reported adverse effects in the non-PS group were chronic insomnia, Parkinsonism, behavioral changes psychoses, and weight gain, whereas the adverse effects in the PS group was predominantly anxiety, convulsions, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Although aripiprazole is considered safe and well tolerated in children and adolescents, severe adverse events as neuroleptic malignant syndrome, extreme insomnia, and suicidal behavior has been reported to health authorities. Clinicians should pay attention to these possible hazards when prescribing aripiprazole to this vulnerable group of patients. PMID:27504593

  7. Post-marketing assessment of neuropsychiatric adverse events in influenza patients treated with oseltamivir: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Toovey, Stephen; Prinssen, Eric P; Rayner, Craig R; Thakrar, Bharat T; Dutkowski, Regina; Koerner, Annette; Chu, Tom; Sirzen-Zelenskaya, Alexandra; Britschgi, Markus; Bansod, Sudhir; Donner, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    A 2008 review by our group concluded that the risk of neuropsychiatric adverse events (NPAEs) in influenza patients was not increased by oseltamivir exposure, and did not identify any mechanism by which oseltamivir or its metabolites could cause or worsen such events. The current article reviews new information on this topic. Between September 16, 2007 and May 15, 2010, 1,805 spontaneously-reported NPAEs were identified in 1,330 patients receiving oseltamivir: 767 (42.5%) from Japan, 296 (16.4%) from the USA, and 742 (41.1%) from other countries. NPAEs were more common in children: 1,072 (59.4%) events were in those aged ≤16 years. NPAEs often occurred within 48 h of treatment initiation (953 events; 52.8%). Nearly half of the events were serious in nature (838; 46.4%). The three largest categories of events were abnormal behavior (457 events, 25.3%), miscellaneous psychiatric events (370; 20.5%), and delusions/perceptual disturbances (316 events, 17.5%). A total of 1,545 events (85.6%) in eight different categories were considered to be delirium or delirium-like. Twenty-eight suicide-related events were reported. A US healthcare claims database analysis showed that the risk of NPAEs in 7,798 oseltamivir-treated patients was no higher than that in 10,411 patients not on antivirals, but a study on oseltamivir and abnormal behavior in Japan was less conclusive. NPAE frequency in oseltamivir-exposed Japanese and Taiwanese children with influenza was the same as in unexposed children. New analysis of the UK General Practice Research Database showed that the relative adjusted risk of NPAEs in influenza patients was 2.18-times higher than in the general population. Other epidemiology studies report frequent occurrence of encephalitis and similar disorders in influenza patients independently of oseltamivir exposure. The new data support the findings of the original assessment. Evidence suggests that influenza-related encephalopathies are caused by influenza

  8. Yellow fever vaccine-associated adverse events following extensive immunization in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Biscayart, Cristián; Carrega, María Eugenia Pérez; Sagradini, Sandra; Gentile, Angela; Stecher, Daniel; Orduna, Tomás; Bentancourt, Silvia; Jiménez, Salvador García; Flynn, Luis Pedro; Arce, Gabriel Pirán; Uboldi, María Andrea; Bugna, Laura; Morales, María Alejandra; Digilio, Clara; Fabbri, Cintia; Enría, Delia; Diosque, Máximo; Vizzotti, Carla

    2014-03-01

    As a consequence of YF outbreaks that hit Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay in 2008-2009, a significant demand for YF vaccination was subsequently observed in Argentina, a country where the usual vaccine recommendations are restricted to provinces that border Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia. The goal of this paper is to describe the adverse events following immunization (AEFI) against YF in Argentina during the outbreak in the northeastern province of Misiones, which occurred from January 2008 to January 2009. During this time, a total of nine cases were reported, almost two million doses of vaccine were administered, and a total of 165 AEFI were reported from different provinces. Case study analyses were performed using two AEFI classifications. Forty-nine events were classified as related to the YF vaccine (24 serious and 1 fatal case), and 12 events were classified as inconclusive. As the use of the YF 17D vaccine can be a challenge to health systems of countries with different endemicity patterns, a careful clinical and epidemiological evaluation should be performed before its prescription to minimize serious adverse events. PMID:24456625

  9. 3D Pharmacophoric Similarity improves Multi Adverse Drug Event Identification in Pharmacovigilance

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Hripcsak, George

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining. PMID:25744369

  10. 3D Pharmacophoric Similarity improves Multi Adverse Drug Event Identification in Pharmacovigilance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Hripcsak, George

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining.

  11. A process mining-based investigation of adverse events in care processes.

    PubMed

    Caron, Filip; Vanthienen, Jan; Vanhaecht, Kris; Van Limbergen, Erik; Deweerdt, Jochen; Baesens, Bart

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the Clinical Pathway Analysis Method (CPAM) approach that enables the extraction of valuable organisational and medical information on past clinical pathway executions from the event logs of healthcare information systems. The method deals with the complexity of real-world clinical pathways by introducing a perspective-based segmentation of the date-stamped event log. CPAM enables the clinical pathway analyst to effectively and efficiently acquire a profound insight into the clinical pathways. By comparing the specific medical conditions of patients with the factors used for characterising the different clinical pathway variants, the medical expert can identify the best therapeutic option. Process mining-based analytics enables the acquisition of valuable insights into clinical pathways, based on the complete audit traces of previous clinical pathway instances. Additionally, the methodology is suited to assess guideline compliance and analyse adverse events. Finally, the methodology provides support for eliciting tacit knowledge and providing treatment selection assistance. PMID:27010685

  12. A clinical risk score of myocardial fibrosis predicts adverse outcomes in aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Calvin W.L.; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Shah, Anoop S.V.; Lefevre, Guillaume; Bailleul, Sophie; Yeung, Emily N.W.; Koo, Maria; Mirsadraee, Saeed; Mathieu, Tiffany; Semple, Scott I.; Mills, Nicholas L.; Vahanian, Alec; Newby, David E.; Dweck, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Midwall myocardial fibrosis on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a marker of early ventricular decompensation and adverse outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS). We aimed to develop and validate a novel clinical score using variables associated with midwall fibrosis. Methods and results One hundred forty-seven patients (peak aortic velocity (Vmax) 3.9 [3.2,4.4] m/s) underwent CMR to determine midwall fibrosis (CMR cohort). Routine clinical variables that demonstrated significant association with midwall fibrosis were included in a multivariate logistic score. We validated the prognostic value of the score in two separate outcome cohorts of asymptomatic patients (internal: n = 127, follow-up 10.3 [5.7,11.2] years; external: n = 289, follow-up 2.6 [1.6,4.5] years). Primary outcome was a composite of AS-related events (cardiovascular death, heart failure, and new angina, dyspnoea, or syncope). The final score consisted of age, sex, Vmax, high-sensitivity troponin I concentration, and electrocardiographic strain pattern [c-statistic 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.78–0.91), P < 0.001; Hosmer–Lemeshow χ2 = 7.33, P = 0.50]. Patients in the outcome cohorts were classified according to the sensitivity and specificity of this score (both at 98%): low risk (probability score <7%), intermediate risk (7–57%), and high risk (>57%). In the internal outcome cohort, AS-related event rates were >10-fold higher in high-risk patients compared with those at low risk (23.9 vs. 2.1 events/100 patient-years, respectively; log rank P < 0.001). Similar findings were observed in the external outcome cohort (31.6 vs. 4.6 events/100 patient-years, respectively; log rank P < 0.001). Conclusion We propose a clinical score that predicts adverse outcomes in asymptomatic AS patients and potentially identifies high-risk patients who may benefit from early valve replacement. PMID:26491110

  13. Association of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with major adverse cardiovascular events: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shunquan; Wu, Fuquan; Ding, Yingying; Hou, Jun; Bi, Jingfeng; Zhang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence connects non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study is to assess whether and to what extent the excess risk of CVD is conferred by NAFLD in a meta-analysis. We systematically searched PubMed, EmBase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library for reports published between 1965 and July 3, 2015. Studies that reported data on association between NAFLD and adverse cardiovascular events or mortality were included. Thirty-four studies (164,494 participants, 21 cross-sectional studies, and 13 cohort studies) were included. NAFLD was not associated with overall mortality (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.99-1.32) and CVD mortality (HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 0.86-1.41). However, NAFLD was associated with an increased risk of prevalent (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.23-2.66) and incident (HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.10-1.72) CVD. For some specific CVDs, NAFLD was associated with an increased risk of prevalent (OR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.47-2.37) and incident (HR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.46-3.65) coronary artery disease (CAD), prevalent (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.14-1.36) and incident (HR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.06-1.27) hypertension, and prevalent (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.07-1.62) atherosclerosis. In conclusion, the presence of NAFLD is associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events, although it is not related to mortality from all causes or CVD. PMID:27633274

  14. Association of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with major adverse cardiovascular events: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shunquan; Wu, Fuquan; Ding, Yingying; Hou, Jun; Bi, Jingfeng; Zhang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence connects non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study is to assess whether and to what extent the excess risk of CVD is conferred by NAFLD in a meta-analysis. We systematically searched PubMed, EmBase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library for reports published between 1965 and July 3, 2015. Studies that reported data on association between NAFLD and adverse cardiovascular events or mortality were included. Thirty-four studies (164,494 participants, 21 cross-sectional studies, and 13 cohort studies) were included. NAFLD was not associated with overall mortality (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.99–1.32) and CVD mortality (HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 0.86–1.41). However, NAFLD was associated with an increased risk of prevalent (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.23–2.66) and incident (HR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.10–1.72) CVD. For some specific CVDs, NAFLD was associated with an increased risk of prevalent (OR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.47–2.37) and incident (HR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.46–3.65) coronary artery disease (CAD), prevalent (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.14–1.36) and incident (HR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.06–1.27) hypertension, and prevalent (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.07–1.62) atherosclerosis. In conclusion, the presence of NAFLD is associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events, although it is not related to mortality from all causes or CVD. PMID:27633274

  15. Measles virus infection and vaccination: potential role in chronic illness and associated adverse events.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ronald C; Byers, Vera S; Marchalonis, John J

    2004-01-01

    Over the last decade, a number of concerns have arisen related to safety issues that have had an adverse effect on the public's trust, particularly among parents whose children are the primary recipient of the vaccine. Historically, the live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccine and the combination multivalent measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine have had a major impact on the health of children worldwide and have been extremely successful at preventing infectious diseases associated with three childhood viral pathogens. In this report, we describe MV infection, replication, pathogenesis, and immunization. MV is a viral pathogen that exhibits a number of complex processes that can effect its replication, pathogenesis, and the induction of an effective antiviral immune response. We describe the published literature as it relates to MV infection and immunization and report adverse events in an attempt to provide a balanced discussion and an historical perspective of the MMR vaccine and autism.

  16. Rare adverse events due to house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy in pediatric practice: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Galip, Nilufer; Bahceciler, Nerin

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual route, a noninjective way of allergen administration appears to be associated with a lower incidence of severe systemic reactions compared with the subcutaneous route. Local adverse reactions are reported which resolve spontaneously within a few days without need for discontinuation of treatment. Hereby, we report two pediatric cases, one with persistent asthma and the other one with persistent allergic rhinitis. Both were treated by house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy, one of whom developed severe wheezing (grade 2 systemic reaction based on World Allergy Organization subcutaneous systemic reaction grading system) and the other intractable vomiting (grade 3 local reaction based on World Allergy Organization sublingual immunotherapy local adverse events grading system) at the end of the build-up phase which repeated on re-administration of the same dose. Both of those two cases completed their 3-year immunotherapy successfully by patient-based adjustment of the highest tolerated dose of the maintenance.

  17. EMPADE Study: Evaluation of Medical Prescriptions and Adverse Drug Events in COPD Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Amer; Khan, M. Nematullah; Sultan, Ihtisham; Khan, M. Aamer; Ali, S. Amir; Farooqui, Afroze

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inappropriate drug usage may preclude ideal benefit due to increased medical cost, antimicrobial resistance, adverse effects and mortality. Therefore drug utilization studies have become a plausible means in evaluating the healthcare systems. COPD management usually involves more than one drug which may escalate the risk of ADEs (adverse drug events). Aim The present study was aimed at assessing the current drug practice and ADEs in COPD management in ICU. Materials and Methods A total of 1,044 patients admitted for the treatment of COPD were included in the study. Their prescriptions were recorded for evaluation of drug utilization and patients were counseled for assessing ADEs. Results were evaluated by Chi-square test and percentages. Result All-embracing 15,360 drugs were prescribed at an average of 14.71 drugs per patient, wherein β2-agonists were extensively prescribed agents followed by inhaled-corticosteroids and anti-cholinergics. 372 ADEs were reported in 252 patients, wherein restlessness was the most frequent ADE and theophylline was found to be associated with highest cases of ADEs. Conclusion Practitioners should prescribe least number of drugs to mitigate the likelihood of adverse outcomes in patients due to numerous drugs usage, which may be achieved by following GOLD guidelines. The present work may help in improving the current management of COPD by rectifying the flaws delineated in this article. PMID:26675667

  18. Using self-report and adverse event measures to track health's impact on productivity in known groups.

    PubMed

    Allen, Harris M; Bunn, William B

    2003-09-01

    The use of survey data to measure and monitor health and productivity differences between groups is an issue of increasing importance. This article examines the capacity of productivity self-reports (derived from surveys) and adverse event measures (derived from administrative sources) to differentiate groups with a priori known characteristics. A replication strategy is used to test the contributions that productivity self-reports make, alone as well as above and beyond measures of adverse events, to the discrimination of 5 pairs of groups classified by clinical, job type, and demographic criteria. These tests are conducted on representative samples of the active, largely blue-collar employee population at International Truck and Engine Corporation. The results show that both productivity self-reports and adverse event measures differentiate and track known groups. Even in the presence of highly significant effects from adverse event measures, self-reports improve the assessment of productivity. We conclude that: 1) although the joint use of self-reports and adverse event measures is the better approach, practitioners can use self-reports with the expectation that this method will track group differences in health and productivity when adverse event measures are not available; and 2) survey self-reports make unique and independent contributions when adverse events measures are used.

  19. Remote monitoring of cardiovascular implantable devices in the pediatric population improves detection of adverse events.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Lindsey E; Gingerich, Jean; Olson, Mark D; Atkins, Dianne L

    2014-02-01

    With the exponential growth of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) in pediatric patients, a new method of long-term surveillance, remote monitoring (RM), has become the standard of care. The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of RM as a monitoring tool in the pediatric population. A retrospective review was performed of 198 patients at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital who had CIEDs. Data transmitted by RM were analyzed. The following data were examined: patient demographics; median interval between transmissions; detection of adverse events requiring corrective measures, including detection of lead failure; detection of arrhythmias and device malfunctions independent of symptoms; time gained in the detection of events using RM versus standard practice; the validity of RM; and the impact of RM on data management. Of 198 patients, 162 submitted 615 RM transmissions. The median time between remote transmissions was 91 days. Of 615 total transmissions, 16 % had true adverse events with 11 % prompting clinical intervention. Of those events requiring clinical response, 61 % of patients reported symptoms. The median interval between last follow-up and occurrence of events detected by RM was 46 days, representing a gain of 134 days for patients followed-up at 6-month intervals and 44 days for patients followed-up at 3 month-intervals. The sensitivity and specificity of RM were found to be 99 and 72 %, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were found to be 41 and 99 %, respectively. RM allows for early identification of arrhythmias and device malfunctions, thus prompting earlier corrective measures and improving care and safety in pediatric patients.

  20. Wheeze as an Adverse Event in Pediatric Vaccine and Drug Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Marangu, Diana; Kovacs, Stephanie; Walson, Judd; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Ortiz, Justin R.; John-Stewart, Grace; Horne, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wheeze is an important sign indicating a potentially severe adverse event in vaccine and drug trials, particularly in children. However, there are currently no consensus definitions of wheeze or associated respiratory compromise in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Objective To identify definitions and severity grading scales of wheeze as an adverse event in vaccine and drug RCTs enrolling children <5 years and to determine their diagnostic performance based on sensitivity, specificity and inter-observer agreement. Methods We performed a systematic review of electronic databases and reference lists with restrictions for trial settings, English language and publication date ≥ 1970. Wheeze definitions and severity grading were abstracted and ranked by a diagnostic certainty score based on sensitivity, specificity and inter-observer agreement. Results Of 1,205 articles identified using our broad search terms, we identified 58 eligible trials conducted in 38 countries, mainly in high-income settings. Vaccines made up the majority (90%) of interventions, particularly influenza vaccines (65%). Only 15 trials provided explicit definitions of wheeze. Of 24 studies that described severity, 11 described wheeze severity in the context of an explicit wheeze definition. The remaining 13 studies described wheeze severity where wheeze was defined as part of a respiratory illness or a wheeze equivalent. Wheeze descriptions were elicited from caregiver reports (14%), physical examination by a health worker (45%) or a combination (41%). There were 21/58 studies in which wheeze definitions included combined caregiver report and healthcare worker assessment. The use of these two methods appeared to have the highest combined sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion Standardized wheeze definitions and severity grading scales for use in pediatric vaccine or drug trials are lacking. Standardized definitions of wheeze are needed for assessment of possible adverse events as

  1. Quality of Reporting of Serious Adverse Drug Events to an Institutional Review Board

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Burdon, Rachel; West, Dennis P.; Lagman, Jennifer; Georgopoulos, Christina; Belknap, Steven M.; McKoy, June M.; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Weitzman, Sigmund A.; Boyle, Simone; Tallman, Martin S.; Talpaz, Moshe; Sartor, Oliver; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Serious adverse drug event (sADE) reporting to Institutional Review Boards (IRB) is essential to ensure pharmaceutical safety. However, the quality of these reports has not been studied. Safety reports are especially important for cancer drugs that receive accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval, like imatinib, as preapproval experience with these drugs is limited. We evaluated the quality, accuracy, and completeness of sADE reports submitted to an IRB. Experimental Design sADE reports submitted to an IRB from 14 clinical trials with imatinib were reviewed. Structured case report forms, containing detailed clinical data fields and a validated causality assessment instrument, were developed. Two forms were generated for each ADE, the first populated with data abstracted from the IRB reports, and the second populated with data from the corresponding clinical record. Completeness and causality assessments were evaluated for each of the two sources, and then compared. Accuracy (concordance between sources) was also assessed. Results Of 115 sADEs reported for 177 cancer patients to the IRB, overall completeness of adverse event descriptions was 2.4-fold greater for structured case report forms populated with information from the clinical record versus the corresponding forms from IRB reports (95.0% versus 40.3%, P < 0.05). Information supporting causality assessments was recorded 3.5-fold more often in primary data sources versus IRB adverse event descriptions (93% versus 26%, P < 0.05). Some key clinical information was discrepant between the two sources. Conclusions The use of structured syndrome-specific case report forms could enhance the quality of reporting to IRBs, thereby improving the safety of pharmaceuticals administered to cancer patients. PMID:19458059

  2. Adverse childhood events: incarceration of household members and health-related quality of life in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Gjelsvik, Annie; Dumont, Dora M.; Nunn, Amy; Rosen, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Incarceration of a household member has been associated with adverse outcomes for child well-being. Methods We assessed the association between childhood exposure to the incarceration of a household member and adult health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in the 2009/2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System controlling for age, race/ethnicity, education, and additional adverse childhood experiences. Results Adults who lived in childhood with an incarcerated household member had higher risk of poor HRQOL compared with adults who had not (adjusted relative risk [ARR] 1.18; 95% CI 1.07, 1.31). Among Black adults the association was strongest with the physical health component of HRQOL (ARR 1.58 [95% CI 1.18, 2.12]); among White adults, the association was strongest with the mental health component of HRQOL (ARR 1.29, [95% CI 1.07–1.54]). Conclusions Living with an incarcerated household member during childhood is associated with higher risk of poor HRQOL during adulthood, suggesting that the collateral damages of incarceration for children are long-term. PMID:25130232

  3. Dose-Effect Relationships for Adverse Events After Cranial Radiation Therapy in Long-term Childhood Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, Irma W.E.M. van; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C.; Pal, Helena J.H. van der; Oldenburger, Foppe; Os, Rob M. van; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Schouten–van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N.; Kremer, Leontien C.M.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of clinical adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT), with the aim of assessing dose-effect relationships. Methods and Materials: The retrospective study cohort consisted of 1362 Dutch childhood cancer survivors, of whom 285 were treated with CRT delivered as brain irradiation (BI), as part of craniospinal irradiation (CSI), and as total body irradiation (TBI). Individual CRT doses were converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Survivors had received their diagnoses between 1966 and 1996 and survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. A complete inventory of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3.0 AEs was available from our hospital-based late-effect follow-up program. We used multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses to examine the EQD{sub 2} in relation to the prevalence and severity of AEs, correcting for sex, age at diagnosis, follow-up time, and the treatment-related risk factors surgery and chemotherapy. Results: There was a high prevalence of AEs in the CRT group; over 80% of survivors had more than 1 AE, and almost half had at least 5 AEs, both representing significant increases in number of AEs compared with survivors not treated with CRT. Additionally, the proportion of severe, life-threatening, or disabling AEs was significantly higher in the CRT group. The most frequent AEs were alopecia and cognitive, endocrine, metabolic, and neurologic events. Using the EQD{sub 2}, we found significant dose-effect relationships for these and other AEs. Conclusion: Our results confirm that CRT increases the prevalence and severity of AEs in childhood cancer survivors. Furthermore, analyzing dose-effect relationships with the cumulative EQD{sub 2} instead of total physical dose connects the knowledge from radiation therapy and radiobiology with the clinical experience.

  4. Elevated ratio of urinary metabolites of thromboxane and prostacyclin is associated with adverse cardiovascular events in ADAPT.

    PubMed

    Montine, Thomas J; Sonnen, Joshua A; Milne, Ginger; Baker, Laura D; Breitner, John C S

    2010-01-01

    Results from prevention trials, including the Alzheimer's Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT), have fueled discussion about the cardiovascular (CV) risks associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We tested the hypotheses that (i) adverse CV events reported among ADAPT participants (aged 70 years and older) are associated with increased ratio of urine 11-dehydrothromboxane B(2) (Tx-M) to 2'3-donor-6-keto-PGF1 (PGI-M) attributable to NSAID treatments; (ii) coincident use of aspirin (ASA) would attenuate NSAID-induced changes in Tx-M/PGI-M ratio; and (iii) use of NSAIDs and/or ASA would not alter urine or plasma concentrations of F(2)-isoprostanes (IsoPs), in vivo biomarkers of free radical damage. We quantified urine Tx-M and PGI-M, and urine and plasma F(2)-IsoPs from 315 ADAPT participants using stable isotope dilution assays with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and analyzed these data by randomized drug assignment and self-report compliance as well as ASA use. Adverse CV events were significantly associated with higher urine Tx-M/PGI-M ratio, which seemed to derive mainly from lowered PGI-M. Participants taking ASA alone had reduced urine Tx-M/PGI-M compared to no ASA or NSAID; however, participants taking NSAIDs plus ASA did not have reduced urine Tx-M/PGI-M ratio compared to NSAIDs alone. Neither NSAID nor ASA use altered plasma or urine F(2)-IsoPs. These data suggest a possible mechanism for the increased risk of CV events reported in ADAPT participants assigned to NSAIDs, and suggest that the changes in the Tx-M/PGI-M ratio was not substantively mitigated by coincident use of ASA in individuals 70 years or older. PMID:20174466

  5. High Yield Research Opportunities in Geriatric Emergency Medicine: Prehospital Care, Delirium, Adverse Drug Events, and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Shah, Manish N.; Hustey, Fredric M.; Heard, Kennon; Gerson, Lowell W.

    2011-01-01

    Emergency services constitute crucial and frequently used safety nets for older persons, an emergency visit by a senior very often indicates high vulnerability for functional decline and death, and interventions via the emergency system have significant opportunities to change the clinical course of older patients who require its services. However, the evidence base for widespread employment of emergency system-based interventions is lacking. In this article, we review the evidence and offer crucial research questions to capitalize on the opportunity to optimize health trajectories of older persons seeking emergency care in four areas: prehospital care, delirium, adverse drug events, and falls. PMID:21498881

  6. Borrowing to cope with adverse health events: liquidity constraints, insurance coverage, and unsecured debt.

    PubMed

    Babiarz, Patryk; Widdows, Richard; Yilmazer, Tansel

    2013-10-01

    This article uses data from the Health and Retirement Study for 1998-2010 to investigate whether households respond to the financial stress caused by health problems by increasing their unsecured debt. Results show both the probability of having unsecured debt and the amount of debt increase after an adverse health event among households with low financial assets, who are uninsured, or who have less generous health insurance. The effect of health problems on borrowing is caused by both medical expenditures and disruptions to the income stream. Unsecured debt seems to remain on some households' balance sheets for an extended period.

  7. Adverse events post smallpox-vaccination: insights from tail scarification infection in mice with Vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Mota, Bruno E F; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia; Trindade, Giliane; Keckler, M Shannon; Karem, Kevin; Carroll, Darin; Campos, Marco A; Vieira, Leda Q; da Fonseca, Flávio G; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Damon, Inger K; Kroon, Erna G

    2011-04-15

    Adverse events upon smallpox vaccination with fully-replicative strains of Vaccinia virus (VACV) comprise an array of clinical manifestations that occur primarily in immunocompromised patients leading to significant host morbidity/mortality. The expansion of immune-suppressed populations and the possible release of Variola virus as a bioterrorist act have given rise to concerns over vaccination complications should more widespread vaccination be reinitiated. Our goal was to evaluate the components of the host immune system that are sufficient to prevent morbidity/mortality in a murine model of tail scarification, which mimics immunological and clinical features of smallpox vaccination in humans. Infection of C57BL/6 wild-type mice led to a strictly localized infection, with complete viral clearance by day 28 p.i. On the other hand, infection of T and B-cell deficient mice (Rag1(-/-)) produced a severe disease, with uncontrolled viral replication at the inoculation site and dissemination to internal organs. Infection of B-cell deficient animals (µMT) produced no mortality. However, viral clearance in µMT animals was delayed compared to WT animals, with detectable viral titers in tail and internal organs late in infection. Treatment of Rag1(-/-) with rabbit hyperimmune anti-vaccinia serum had a subtle effect on the morbidity/mortality of this strain, but it was effective in reduce viral titers in ovaries. Finally, NUDE athymic mice showed a similar outcome of infection as Rag1(-/-), and passive transfer of WT T cells to Rag1(-/-) animals proved fully effective in preventing morbidity/mortality. These results strongly suggest that both T and B cells are important in the immune response to primary VACV infection in mice, and that T-cells are required to control the infection at the inoculation site and providing help for B-cells to produce antibodies, which help to prevent viral dissemination. These insights might prove helpful to better identify individuals with

  8. Influence of Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphisms and Adverse Life Events on Depressive Symptoms in the Elderly: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Davin, Annalisa; Monti, Maria Cristina; Polito, Letizia; Vaccaro, Roberta; Abbondanza, Simona; Gnesi, Marco; Villani, Simona; Guaita, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is common in the elderly. The role of genetic and environmental factors in modulating depressive symptoms is not clear. Methods We evaluated the influence of serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and recent adverse life events on depressive symptoms in an elderly Italian population. We used data from “InveCe.Ab”, a population-based study of 1321 subjects aged 70–74 years. We used the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) to assess depressive symptoms–a GDS score ≥5 points (GDS≥5) indicated the presence of clinically relevant symptoms–and performed 5-HTTLPR and rs25531 genotyping to obtain the triallelic polymorphism of the serotonin transporter. We used the Geriatric Adverse Life Events Scale to measure adverse life events, and logistic regression models to evaluate the role of genotype and recent adverse life events in depressive symptoms, controlling for potential confounders and independent predictors. Results Two hundred subjects (15.76%) had a GDS≥5. The 5-HTTLPR triallelic polymorphism was significantly associated with GDS≥5. Only S′S′ carriers showed an increased risk of depressive symptoms (ORadj = 1.81, p = .022); one extra adverse life event increased this risk by 14% (p = .061) independently of genotype. Other factors significantly related to GDS≥5 were: female gender (ORadj = 2.49, p < .001), age (ORadj = 1.19, p = .007), a history of depression (ORadj = 4.73, p < .001), and comorbidity (ORadj = 1.23, p = .001). One extra adverse life event increased the risk of depressive symptoms by 57% (p = .005) only in the L′L′ carriers, while antidepressant intake was directly related to GDS≥5 in the L′S′ carriers (ORadj = 2.46, p = .036) and borderline significant in the S′S′ carriers (ORadj = 2.41, p = .081). Discussion The S′S′ genotype and recent exposure to adverse life events were independently associated with depressive symptoms. The S′S′ genotype, compared with the environment

  9. Systematic review and meta-analysis: Multi-strain probiotics as adjunct therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication and prevention of adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Lin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Eradication rates with triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori infections have currently declined to unacceptable levels worldwide. Newer quadruple therapies are burdened with a high rate of adverse events. Whether multi-strain probiotics can improve eradication rates or diminish adverse events remains uncertain. Methods Relevant publications in which patients with H. pylori infections were randomized to a multi-strain probiotic or control were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Databases, and other sources from 1 January 1960–3 June 2015. Primary outcomes included eradication rates, incidence of any adverse event and the incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. As probiotic efficacy is strain-specific, pooled relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using meta-analysis stratified by similar multi-strain probiotic mixtures. Results A total of 19 randomized controlled trials (20 treatment arms, n = 2730) assessing one of six mixtures of strains of probiotics were included. Four multi-strain probiotics significantly improved H. pylori eradication rates, five significantly prevented any adverse reactions and three significantly reduced antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Only two probiotic mixtures (Lactobacillus acidophilus/Bifidobacterium animalis and an eight-strain mixture) had significant efficacy for all three outcomes. Conclusions Our meta-analysis found adjunctive use of some multi-strain probiotics may improve H. pylori eradication rates and prevent the development of adverse events and antibiotic-associated diarrhea, but not all mixtures were effective. PMID:27536365

  10. Nutravigilance: principles and practices to enhance adverse event reporting in the dietary supplement and natural products industry.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Stephen M; Lopez, Hector L; MacKay, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    Nutravigilance is defined as "the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects related to the use of a food, dietary supplement, or medical food". The nutravigilance approach is derived from well-defined principles of pharmacovigilance in the drug and biologics industries, which have been developed and refined over a number of years through expert recommendations. While the primary purpose of nutravigilance is to protect customer/patient safety, it also serves to reduce product liability risks for manufacturers and marketing agents of such products. Compliance with the current FDA adverse event reporting requirements is suboptimal, and FDA oversight and enforcement activities have recently increased. In order to better protect customer and product safety, dietary supplement manufacturers must significantly change their current approach, and demonstrate a proactive, systematic, risk-based, scientific approach to product safety, similar to one utilized successfully in the pharmaceutical industry. While this article focuses on FDA regulations, the principles are widely relevant to the supplement industry in the rest of the world. PMID:24112316

  11. Neuropsychiatric adverse events associated with statins: epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Tuccori, Marco; Montagnani, Sabrina; Mantarro, Stefania; Capogrosso-Sansone, Alice; Ruggiero, Elisa; Saporiti, Alessandra; Antonioli, Luca; Fornai, Matteo; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2014-03-01

    Statins, or 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, such as lovastatin, atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin, are cholesterol-lowering drugs used in clinical practice to prevent coronary heart disease. These drugs are generally well tolerated and have been rarely associated with severe adverse effects (e.g. rhabdomyolysis). Over the years, case series and data from national registries of spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports have demonstrated the occurrence of neuropsychiatric reactions associated with statin treatment. They include behavioural alterations (severe irritability, homicidal impulses, threats to others, road rage, depression and violence, paranoia, alienation, antisocial behaviour); cognitive and memory impairments; sleep disturbance (frequent awakenings, shorter sleep duration, early morning awakenings, nightmares, sleepwalking, night terrors); and sexual dysfunction (impotence and decreased libido). Studies designed to investigate specific neuropsychiatric endpoints have yielded conflicting results. Several mechanisms, mainly related to inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis, have been proposed to explain the detrimental effects of statins on the central nervous system. Approaches to prevent and manage such adverse effects may include drug discontinuation and introduction of dietary restrictions; maintenance of statin treatment for some weeks with close patient monitoring; switching to a different statin; dose reduction; use of ω-3 fatty acids or coenzyme Q10 supplements; and treatment with psychotropic drugs. The available information suggests that neuropsychiatric effects associated with statins are rare events that likely occur in sensitive patients. Additional data are required, and further clinical studies are needed. PMID:24435290

  12. Neurologic Adverse Events Associated with Voriconazole Therapy: Report of Two Pediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Sevliya Öcal; Atici, Serkan; Akkoç, Gülşen; Yakut, Nurhayat; İkizoğlu, Nilay Baş; Eralp, Ela Erdem; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Although voriconazole, a triazole antifungal, is a safe drug, treatment with this agent is associated with certain adverse events such as hepatic, neurologic, and visual disturbances. The current report presents two cases, one a 9-year-old boy and the other a 17-year-old girl, who experienced neurologic side effects associated with voriconazole therapy. Our aim is to remind readers of the side effects of voriconazole therapy in order to prevent unnecessary investigations especially for psychological and ophthalmologic problems. The first case was a 9-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis and invasive aspergillosis that developed photophobia, altered color sensation, and fearful visual hallucination. The second case was a 17-year-old girl with cystic fibrosis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and she experienced photophobia, fatigue, impaired concentration, and insomnia, when the dose of voriconazole therapy was increased from 12 mg/kg/day to 16 mg/kg/day. The complaints of the two patients disappeared after discontinuation of voriconazole therapy. Our experience in these patients reminded us of the importance of being aware of the neurologic adverse events associated with voriconazole therapy in establishing early diagnosis and initiating prompt treatment. In addition, although serum voriconazole concentration was not measured in the present cases, therapeutic drug monitoring for voriconazole seems to be critically important in preventing neurologic side effects in pediatric patients. PMID:27313918

  13. Oral Cholera Vaccine Coverage, Barriers to Vaccination, and Adverse Events following Vaccination, Haiti, 2013.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Rania A; François, Jeannot; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Iyengar, Preetha; Dismer, Amber; Adrien, Paul; Hyde, Terri B; Marston, Barbara J; Date, Kashmira; Mintz, Eric; Katz, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    In 2013, the first government-led oral cholera vaccination (OCV) campaign in Haiti was implemented in Petite Anse and Cerca Carvajal. To evaluate vaccination coverage, barriers to vaccination, and adverse events following vaccination, we conducted a cluster survey. We enrolled 1,121 persons from Petite Anse and 809 persons from Cerca Carvajal, categorized by 3 age groups (1-4, 5-14, >15 years). Two-dose OCV coverage was 62.5% in Petite Anse and 76.8% in Cerca Carvajal. Two-dose coverage was lowest among persons >15 years of age. In Cerca Carvajal, coverage was significantly lower for male than female respondents (69% vs. 85%; p<0.001). No major adverse events were reported. The main reason for nonvaccination was absence during the campaign. Vaccination coverage after this campaign was acceptable and comparable to that resulting from campaigns implemented by nongovernmental organizations. Future campaigns should be tailored to reach adults who are not available during daytime hours.

  14. Persistent constipation and abdominal adverse events with newer treatments for constipation

    PubMed Central

    Sonu, Irene; Triadafilopoulos, George; Gardner, Jerry D

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of several new treatments for opioid-induced constipation (OIC), chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C) have focused on differences between subjects relieved of constipation with placebo and active treatment. Patients and clinicians however, are more interested in the probability these treatments provide actual relief of constipation and its associated symptoms. Methods We searched the medical literature using MEDLINE and Cochrane central register of controlled trials. Randomised, placebo-controlled trials that examined the use of methylnaltrexone, naloxegol, lubiprostone, prucalopride or linaclotide in adults with OIC, CIC and IBS-C were eligible for inclusion. The primary efficacy measure was relief of constipation. Adverse event data for abdominal symptoms were also analysed. Key results and findings 25 publications were included in our analyses. The proportion of constipated individuals with active treatment was significantly lower than the proportion with placebo; however, in 15 of these 20 trials analysed, a majority of patients remained constipated with active treatment. Analyses of adverse event data revealed that the percentage of participants who experienced abdominal pain, diarrhoea and flatulence with active treatment was higher than that with placebo in the majority of trials analysed. Conclusions Newer pharmacological treatments for constipation are superior to placebo in relieving constipation, but many patients receiving active treatment may remain constipated. In addition, all 5 of the treatments studied are accompanied by no change or a possible increase in the prevalence of abdominal symptoms, such as abdominal pain, diarrhoea and flatulence. PMID:27486521

  15. [Preventive measures against human error based on the classification of the adverse events].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    It is impossible to entirely eliminate human error; however, systematic attempts have been made to comprehensively minimize accidents originating in human error. It appears that the "work classification" we proposed previously is not able to reduce adverse events, fifty percent of which were duty confirmation failures. We have therefore reviewed and classified the causes of human error from the perspective of working conditions to create a simpler and more preventative strategy. Text-mining analysis was applied to speech part classification to reveal areas with room for improvement. In an objective approach, a conduct code was created and put into practice, based on the common features revealed from a classification of human error in the examples investigated. The average number of accidents per year was reduced from 36 to 24, and those due to human error per year were reduced from 17.6 to 11. This objective approach appears to achieve a reduction of adverse events, including those caused by human error. However, these results were obtained over only one year, in a single-center analysis, and thus, widespread and continuous enforcement would be needed to demonstrate the validity of this objective approach to the prevention of human error. PMID:24464065

  16. Oral Cholera Vaccine Coverage, Barriers to Vaccination, and Adverse Events following Vaccination, Haiti, 2013(1).

    PubMed

    Tohme, Rania A; François, Jeannot; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Iyengar, Preetha; Dismer, Amber; Adrien, Paul; Hyde, Terri B; Marston, Barbara J; Date, Kashmira; Mintz, Eric; Katz, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    In 2013, the first government-led oral cholera vaccination (OCV) campaign in Haiti was implemented in Petite Anse and Cerca Carvajal. To evaluate vaccination coverage, barriers to vaccination, and adverse events following vaccination, we conducted a cluster survey. We enrolled 1,121 persons from Petite Anse and 809 persons from Cerca Carvajal, categorized by 3 age groups (1-4, 5-14, >15 years). Two-dose OCV coverage was 62.5% in Petite Anse and 76.8% in Cerca Carvajal. Two-dose coverage was lowest among persons >15 years of age. In Cerca Carvajal, coverage was significantly lower for male than female respondents (69% vs. 85%; p<0.001). No major adverse events were reported. The main reason for nonvaccination was absence during the campaign. Vaccination coverage after this campaign was acceptable and comparable to that resulting from campaigns implemented by nongovernmental organizations. Future campaigns should be tailored to reach adults who are not available during daytime hours. PMID:25988350

  17. Adverse events in apheresis: An update of the WAA registry data.

    PubMed

    Mörtzell Henriksson, M; Newman, E; Witt, V; Derfler, K; Leitner, G; Eloot, S; Dhondt, A; Deeren, D; Rock, G; Ptak, J; Blaha, M; Lanska, M; Gasova, Z; Hrdlickova, R; Ramlow, W; Prophet, H; Liumbruno, G; Mori, E; Griskevicius, A; Audzijoniene, J; Vrielink, H; Rombout, S; Aandahl, A; Sikole, A; Tomaz, J; Lalic, K; Mazic, S; Strineholm, V; Brink, B; Berlin, G; Dykes, J; Toss, F; Axelsson, C G; Stegmayr, B; Nilsson, T; Norda, R; Knutson, F; Ramsauer, B; Wahlström, A

    2016-02-01

    Apheresis with different procedures and devices are used for a variety of indications that may have different adverse events (AEs). The aim of this study was to clarify the extent and possible reasons of various side effects based on data from a multinational registry. The WAA-apheresis registry data focus on adverse events in a total of 50846 procedures in 7142 patients (42% women). AEs were graded as mild, moderate (need for medication), severe (interruption due to the AE) or death (due to AE). More AEs occurred during the first procedures versus subsequent (8.4 and 5.5%, respectively). AEs were mild in 2.4% (due to access 54%, device 7%, hypotension 15%, tingling 8%), moderate in 3% (tingling 58%, urticaria 15%, hypotension 10%, nausea 3%), and severe in 0.4% of procedures (syncope/hypotension 32%, urticaria 17%, chills/fever 8%, arrhythmia/asystole 4.5%, nausea/vomiting 4%). Hypotension was most common if albumin was used as the replacement fluid, and urticaria when plasma was used. Arrhythmia occurred to similar extents when using plasma or albumin as replacement. In 64% of procedures with bronchospasm, plasma was part of the replacement fluid used. Severe AEs are rare. Although most reactions are mild and moderate, several side effects may be critical for the patient. We present side effects in relation to the procedures and suggest that safety is increased by regular vital sign measurements, cardiac monitoring and by having emergency equipment nearby. PMID:26776481

  18. Oral Cholera Vaccine Coverage, Barriers to Vaccination, and Adverse Events following Vaccination, Haiti, 20131

    PubMed Central

    François, Jeannot; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Iyengar, Preetha; Dismer, Amber; Adrien, Paul; Hyde, Terri B.; Marston, Barbara J.; Date, Kashmira; Mintz, Eric; Katz, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the first government-led oral cholera vaccination (OCV) campaign in Haiti was implemented in Petite Anse and Cerca Carvajal. To evaluate vaccination coverage, barriers to vaccination, and adverse events following vaccination, we conducted a cluster survey. We enrolled 1,121 persons from Petite Anse and 809 persons from Cerca Carvajal, categorized by 3 age groups (1–4, 5–14, >15 years). Two-dose OCV coverage was 62.5% in Petite Anse and 76.8% in Cerca Carvajal. Two-dose coverage was lowest among persons >15 years of age. In Cerca Carvajal, coverage was significantly lower for male than female respondents (69% vs. 85%; p<0.001). No major adverse events were reported. The main reason for nonvaccination was absence during the campaign. Vaccination coverage after this campaign was acceptable and comparable to that resulting from campaigns implemented by nongovernmental organizations. Future campaigns should be tailored to reach adults who are not available during daytime hours. PMID:25988350

  19. Clinical review: Serious adverse events associated with the use of rituximab - a critical care perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The advent of biologic agents has provided a more specific and targeted approach to the treatment of various hematological malignancies and other autoimmune disorders. Such biologic agents have been relatively well tolerated with fewer adverse events reported as compared with many other chemotherapeutic agents. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody to the B-cell marker CD20 and is a common biologic agent widely used for the treatment of B-cell lymphoma, lymphoproliferative disorders, and inflammatory conditions that are refractory to conventional treatment, including rheumatoid arthritis and some vasculitides. However, through randomized controlled trials and post-marketing surveillance, an increasing number of serious adverse events are being associated with the use of rituximab, often leading to or complicating an intensive care unit admission. The purpose of this review is to focus on the severe complications that are associated with the use of rituximab and that require critical care. Management and prevention strategies for the most common complications along with some examples of its uses within the critical care setting are also discussed. PMID:22967460

  20. Nursing implications for prevention of adverse drug events in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    George, Elisabeth L; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Tasota, Frederick J

    2010-06-01

    Adverse drug events are common in the intensive care unit setting. Despite the existence of many long-standing safety principles (such as the "five rights") and new mechanisms to promote medication safety, there is still a gap between practice and the goal of patient safety. This is the result of the many human and system factors that impact care delivery. Research supports the role of the nurse as having a positive impact on patient outcomes. Future research requires the evaluation of new strategies and technologies to support safe medication administration. For example, patient simulation is being used to teach student and novice nurses principles of medication administration in a "safe" setting that more closely resembles the clinical environment. The Institute of Nursing repeatedly has stressed the need to address the organizational, technical, and human issues that impact patient safety, with an emphasis on the need to transform the nurse work environment to keep patients safe. This transformation will require a new level of interdisciplinary research and nursing involvement to address better care for our patients and, in particular, reduce adverse drug events.

  1. Near Real-Time Optimal Prediction of Adverse Events in Aviation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney Alexander; Das, Santanu

    2010-01-01

    The prediction of anomalies or adverse events is a challenging task, and there are a variety of methods which can be used to address the problem. In this paper, we demonstrate how to recast the anomaly prediction problem into a form whose solution is accessible as a level-crossing prediction problem. The level-crossing prediction problem has an elegant, optimal, yet untested solution under certain technical constraints, and only when the appropriate modeling assumptions are made. As such, we will thoroughly investigate the resilience of these modeling assumptions, and show how they affect final performance. Finally, the predictive capability of this method will be assessed by quantitative means, using both validation and test data containing anomalies or adverse events from real aviation data sets that have previously been identified as operationally significant by domain experts. It will be shown that the formulation proposed yields a lower false alarm rate on average than competing methods based on similarly advanced concepts, and a higher correct detection rate than a standard method based upon exceedances that is commonly used for prediction.

  2. The state of adverse event reporting and signal generation of dietary supplements in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung Sik; Kwon, Oran

    2010-06-01

    One of the most important objectives of post-marketing monitoring of dietary supplements is the early detection of unknown and unexpected adverse events (AEs). Since 2006, the Korea Food & Drug Administration (KFDA) has established an AE monitoring system for dietary supplements with emphases on the facilitation of AE reporting from consumers, the creation of a new database for aggregating information from multiple sources, and the proposition of appropriate tools for analyzing the likelihood that a product or an ingredient caused an adverse reaction. During the 3-year period from 2006 through 2008, 1430 AE reports had been collected from consumers and 222 AE reports providing complete case details were extracted by integrating AE reports into the product information. The 'relative AE profile' method was applied first to detect statistically significant signals, resulting in only one substrate-event pair (dietary fiber and vomiting) as a signal. Subsequently, the WHO scale was used to estimate the likelihood that dietary fiber caused vomiting. Due to the limited information available, the KFDA determined that no conclusion could be drawn to support any regulatory action, but that the relationship between dietary fiber and vomiting is an area of concern warranting further investigation. PMID:20074608

  3. An automated standardized system for managing adverse events in clinical research networks.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel L; Malloy, Jamie F; Paulus, Kathleen; Cuthbertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2008-01-01

    Multi-site clinical protocols and clinical research networks require tools to manage and monitor adverse events (AEs). To be successful, these tools must be designed to comply with applicable regulatory requirements, reflect current data standards, international directives and advances in pharmacovigilance, and be convenient and adaptable to multiple needs. We describe an Adverse Event Data Management System (AEDAMS) that is used across multiple study designs in the various clinical research networks and multi-site studies for which we provide data and technological support. Investigators enter AE data using a standardized and structured web-based data collection form. The automated AEDAMS forwards the AE information to individuals in designated roles (investigators, sponsors, Data Safety and Monitoring Boards) and manages subsequent communications in real time, as the entire reporting, review and notification is done by automatically generated emails. The system was designed to adhere to timelines and data requirements in compliance with Good Clinical Practice (International Conference on Harmonisation E6) reporting standards and US federal regulations, and can be configured to support AE management for many types of study designs and adhere to various domestic or international reporting requirements. This tool allows AEs to be collected in a standard way by multiple distributed users, facilitates accurate and timely AE reporting and reviews, and allows the centralized management of AEs. Our design justification and experience with the system are described.

  4. Adverse Events Associated with Yoga: A Systematic Review of Published Case Reports and Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Holger; Krucoff, Carol; Dobos, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    While yoga is gaining increased popularity in North America and Europe, its safety has been questioned in the lay press. The aim of this systematic review was to assess published case reports and case series on adverse events associated with yoga. Medline/Pubmed, Scopus, CAMBase, IndMed and the Cases Database were screened through February 2013; and 35 case reports and 2 case series reporting a total of 76 cases were included. Ten cases had medical preconditions, mainly glaucoma and osteopenia. Pranayama, hatha yoga, and Bikram yoga were the most common yoga practices; headstand, shoulder stand, lotus position, and forceful breathing were the most common yoga postures and breathing techniques cited. Twenty-seven adverse events (35.5%) affected the musculoskeletal system; 14 (18.4%) the nervous system; and 9 (11.8%) the eyes. Fifteen cases (19.7%) reached full recovery; 9 cases (11.3%) partial recovery; 1 case (1.3%) no recovery; and 1 case (1.3%) died. As any other physical or mental practice, yoga should be practiced carefully under the guidance of a qualified instructor. Beginners should avoid extreme practices such as headstand, lotus position and forceful breathing. Individuals with medical preconditions should work with their physician and yoga teacher to appropriately adapt postures; patients with glaucoma should avoid inversions and patients with compromised bone should avoid forceful yoga practices. PMID:24146758

  5. Adverse events and deterioration reported by participants in the PACE trial of therapies for chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dougall, Dominic; Johnson, Anthony; Goldsmith, Kimberley; Sharpe, Michael; Angus, Brian; Chalder, Trudie; White, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Adverse events (AEs) are health related events, reported by participants in clinical trials. We describe AEs in the PACE trial of treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and baseline characteristics associated with them. Methods AEs were recorded on three occasions over one year in 641 participants. We compared the numbers and nature of AEs between treatment arms of specialist medical care (SMC) alone, or SMC supplemented by adaptive pacing therapy (APT), cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) or graded exercise therapy (GET). We examined associations with baseline measures by binary logistic regression analyses, and compared the proportions of participants who deteriorated by clinically important amounts. Results Serious adverse events and reactions were infrequent. Non-serious adverse events were common; the median (quartiles) number was 4 (2, 8) per participant, with no significant differences between treatments (P = .47). A greater number of NSAEs were associated with recruitment centre, and baseline physical symptom count, body mass index, and depressive disorder. Physical function deteriorated in 39 (25%) participants after APT, 15 (9%) after CBT, 18 (11%) after GET, and 28 (18%) after SMC (P < .001), with no significant differences in worsening fatigue. Conclusions The numbers of adverse events did not differ significantly between trial treatments, but physical deterioration occurred most often after APT. The reporting of non-serious adverse events may reflect the nature of the illness rather than the effect of treatments. Differences between centres suggest that both standardisation of ascertainment methods and training are important when collecting adverse event data. PMID:24913337

  6. Sulfites--a food and drug administration review of recalls and reported adverse events.

    PubMed

    Timbo, Babgaleh; Koehler, Kathleen M; Wolyniak, Cecilia; Klontz, Karl C

    2004-08-01

    Sulfite-sensitive individuals can experience adverse reactions after consuming foods containing sulfiting agents (sulfites), and some of these reactions may be severe. In the 1980s and 1990s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acted to reduce the likelihood that sulfite-sensitive individuals would unknowingly consume foods containing sulfites. The FDA prohibited the use of sulfites on fruits and vegetables (except potatoes) to be served or presented fresh to the public and required that the presence of detectable levels of sulfites be declared on food labels, even when these sulfites are used as a processing aid or are a component of another ingredient in the food. In the present study, data from FDA recall records and adverse event reports were used to examine the current status of problems of sensitivity to sulfites in foods. From 1996 through 1999, the FDA processed a total of 59 recalls of foods containing undeclared sulfites; these 59 recalls involved 93 different food products. Fifty (55%) of the recalled products were classified as class I, a designation indicating that a consumer reasonably could have ingested > or = 10 mg of undeclared sulfites on a single occasion, a level that could potentially cause a serious adverse reaction in a susceptible person. From 1996 through mid-1999, the FDA received a total of 34 reports of adverse reactions allegedly due to eating foods containing undeclared sulfites. The average of 10 reports per year, although derived from a passive surveillance system, was lower than the average of 111 reports per year that the FDA received from 1980 to 1987, a decrease that may have resulted in part from FDA regulatory action.

  7. Study of Natural Health Product Adverse Reactions (SONAR): Active Surveillance of Adverse Events Following Concurrent Natural Health Product and Prescription Drug Use in Community Pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Sunita; Cvijovic, Kosta; Boon, Heather; Foster, Brian C.; Jaeger, Walter; LeGatt, Don; Cembrowski, George; Murty, Mano; Tsuyuki, Ross T.; Barnes, Joanne; Charrois, Theresa L.; Arnason, John T.; Necyk, Candace; Ware, Mark; Rosychuk, Rhonda J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many consumers use natural health products (NHPs) concurrently with prescription medications. As NHP-related harms are under-reported through passive surveillance, the safety of concurrent NHP-drug use remains unknown. To conduct active surveillance in participating community pharmacies to identify adverse events related to concurrent NHP-prescription drug use. Methodology/Principal Findings Participating pharmacists asked individuals collecting prescription medications about (i) concurrent NHP/drug use in the previous three months and (ii) experiences of adverse events. If an adverse event was identified and if the patient provided written consent, a research pharmacist conducted a guided telephone interview to gather additional information after obtaining additional verbal consent and documenting so within the interview form. Over a total of 112 pharmacy weeks, 2615 patients were screened, of which 1037 (39.7%; 95% CI: 37.8% to 41.5%) reported concurrent NHP and prescription medication use. A total of 77 patients reported a possible AE (2.94%; 95% CI: 2.4% to 3.7%), which represents 7.4% of those using NHPs and prescription medications concurrently (95%CI: 6.0% to 9.2%). Of 15 patients available for an interview, 4 (26.7%: 95% CI: 4.3% to 49.0%) reported an AE that was determined to be “probably” due to NHP use. Conclusions/Significance Active surveillance markedly improves identification and reporting of adverse events associated with concurrent NHP-drug use. Although not without challenges, active surveillance is feasible and can generate adverse event data of sufficient quality to allow for meaningful adjudication to assess potential harms. PMID:23028841

  8. Polytraumatization and Trauma Symptoms in Adolescent Boys and Girls: Interpersonal and Noninterpersonal Events and Moderating Effects of Adverse Family Circumstances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Doris Kristina; Gustafsson, Per E.; Svedin, Carl Goran

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cumulative effect of interpersonal and noninterpersonal traumatic life events (IPEs and nIPEs, respectively) on the mental health of adolescents and to determine if the adverse impacts of trauma were moderated by adverse family circumstances (AFC). Adolescents (mean age 16.7 years) from the…

  9. Adverse events in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: results from the DOTS-Plus initiative.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, E; Gupta, R; Huamani, P; Leimane, V; Pasechnikov, A D; Tupasi, T E; Vink, K; Jaramillo, E; Espinal, M A

    2004-11-01

    Adverse events associated with second-line drugs have been mentioned as obstacles in the management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Data on adverse events were collected from five DOTS-Plus sites in Estonia, Latvia, Peru (Lima), the Philippines (Manila) and the Russian Federation (Tomsk Oblast). The results show that among 818 patients enrolled on MDR-TB treatment only 2% of patients stopped treatment, but 30% required removal of the suspected drug(s) from the regimen due to adverse events. The study shows that adverse events are manageable in the treatment of MDR-TB in resource-limited settings provided that standard management strategies are applied. PMID:15581210

  10. ADESSA: A Real-Time Decision Support Service for Delivery of Semantically Coded Adverse Drug Event Data.

    PubMed

    Duke, Jon D; Friedlin, Jeff

    2010-11-13

    Evaluating medications for potential adverse events is a time-consuming process, typically involving manual lookup of information by physicians. This process can be expedited by CDS systems that support dynamic retrieval and filtering of adverse drug events (ADE's), but such systems require a source of semantically-coded ADE data. We created a two-component system that addresses this need. First we created a natural language processing application which extracts adverse events from Structured Product Labels and generates a standardized ADE knowledge base. We then built a decision support service that consumes a Continuity of Care Document and returns a list of patient-specific ADE's. Our database currently contains 534,125 ADE's from 5602 product labels. An NLP evaluation of 9529 ADE's showed recall of 93% and precision of 95%. On a trial set of 30 CCD's, the system provided adverse event data for 88% of drugs and returned these results in an average of 620ms.

  11. Analysis of adverse events of potential autoimmune aetiology in a large integrated safety database of AS04 adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Thomas; Descamps, Dominique; David, Marie-Pierre; Zahaf, Toufik; Hardt, Karin; Izurieta, Patricia; Dubin, Gary; Breuer, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Newly licensed vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) and hepatitis B (HBV), and several vaccines in development, including a vaccine against genital herpes simplex virus (HSV), contain a novel Adjuvant System, AS04, composed of 3-O-desacyl-4' monophosphoryl lipid A and aluminium salts. Given the background incidence of autoimmune disorders in some of the groups targeted for immunisation with these vaccines, it is likely that autoimmune events will be reported in temporal association with vaccination, even in the absence of a causal relationship. The objective of this integrated analysis was to assess safety of AS04 adjuvanted vaccines with regard to adverse events (AEs) of potential autoimmune aetiology, particularly in adolescents and young adults. All randomised, controlled trials of HPV-16/18, HSV and HBV vaccines were analysed in an integrated analysis of individual data (N = 68,512). A separate analysis of the HPV-16/18 vaccine trials alone was also undertaken (N = 39,160). All data were collected prospectively during the vaccine development programmes (mean follow-up of 21.4 months), and included in the analysis up to a pre-defined data lock point. Reporting rates of overall autoimmune events were around 0.5% and did not differ between the AS04 and control groups. The relative risk (AS04/control) of experiencing any autoimmune event was 0.98 (95% confidence intervals 0.80, 1.21) in the integrated analysis and 0.92 (0.70, 1.22) in the HPV-16/18 vaccine analysis. Relative risks calculated overall, for disease category or for individual events were close to 1, and all confidence intervals around the relative risk included 1, indicating no statistically significant difference in event rates between the AS04 and control groups. This integrated analysis of over 68,000 participants who received AS04 adjuvanted vaccines or controls demonstrated a low rate of autoimmune disorders, without evidence of an increase in relative risk associated with AS04 adjuvanted

  12. Loa loa microfilarial periodicity in ivermectin-treated patients: comparison between those developing and those free of serious adverse events.

    PubMed

    Kamgno, Joseph; Pion, Sébastien D; Mackenzie, Charles D; Thylefors, Björn; Boussinesq, Michel

    2009-12-01

    The main risk factor of post-ivermectin serious adverse events (SAEs) is the presence of a high Loa loa microfilaremia. However, the majority of patients with such high loads do not develop SAEs, suggesting that co-factors may be involved. An infection with simian Loa parasites, whose microfilariae show a nocturnal periodicity, might be such a co-factor. The periodicity of Loa microfilariae was compared, using cosinor methodology, in 4 patients who had developed a post-ivermectin neurologic SAE, 4 patients who had experienced a non-neurologic SAE, and 14 control individuals. The periodicity was similar in all three groups, with a peak of microfilaremia occurring between 12:30 and 2:00 PM. The results of this study, which for the first time characterizes the periodicity of Loa microfilariae mathematically, suggest that post-ivermectin SAEs are not related to an infection with a Loa simian strain. PMID:19996437

  13. Guillain-Barré syndrome after Gardasil vaccination: data from Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Souayah, Nizar; Michas-Martin, P A; Nasar, Abu; Krivitskaya, Nataliya; Yacoub, Hussam A; Khan, Hafiz; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2011-01-29

    Using data from Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, we identified 69 reports of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) after Gardasil vaccination that occurred in the United States between 2006 and 2009. The onset of symptoms was within 6 weeks after vaccination in 70% of the patients in whom the date of vaccination was known. The estimated weekly reporting rate of post-Gardasil GBS within the first 6 weeks (6.6 per 10,000,000) was higher than that of the general population, and higher than post-Menactra and post-influenza vaccinations. Further prospective active surveillance for accurate ascertainment and identification of high-risk groups of GBS after Gardasil vaccination is warranted.

  14. Resets Do Not Appear to Increase the Rate of Adverse Events or Prolong Relapse in Voucher-Based Reinforcement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Versek, Brian E.; Carpenedo, Carolyn M.; Rosenwasser, Beth J.; Dugosh, Karen Leggett; Bresani, Elena; Kirby, Kimberly C.

    2011-01-01

    Voucher-based reinforcement therapy (VBRT) is an efficacious contingency management intervention for substance use disorders that provides escalating voucher values to reinforce continuous abstinence and typically resets escalated values to the initial low level upon detection of drug use. The objective of this study involving 130 methadone-maintained outpatients receiving VBRT was to investigate whether resets 1) increase risk for adverse events (AEs) and 2) delay return to abstinence in relation to magnitude of voucher reset. Weeks following resets were examined for increased likelihood of AEs using a Poisson regression. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine if higher resets increased the number of days until a negative urine specimen. Results showed that resets did not increase the likelihood of AEs nor were higher resets related to an increased delay to abstinence. Research involving larger samples is needed to produce sufficient data directly addressing safety concerns of various treatment stakeholders. PMID:20598837

  15. Resets do not appear to increase the rate of adverse events or prolong relapse in voucher-based reinforcement therapy.

    PubMed

    Versek, Brian E; Carpenedo, Carolyn M; Rosenwasser, Beth J; Dugosh, Karen Leggett; Bresani, Elena; Kirby, Kimberly C

    2010-09-01

    Voucher-based reinforcement therapy (VBRT) is an efficacious contingency management intervention for substance use disorders that provides escalating voucher values to reinforce continuous abstinence and typically resets escalated values to the initial low level upon detection of drug use. The objective of this study involving 130 methadone-maintained outpatients receiving VBRT was to investigate whether resets (a) increase risk for adverse events (AEs) and (b) delay return to abstinence in relation to magnitude of voucher reset. Weeks following resets were examined for increased likelihood of AEs using a Poisson regression. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine if higher resets increased the number of days until a negative urine specimen. Results showed that resets did not increase the likelihood of AEs nor were higher resets related to an increased delay to abstinence. Research involving larger samples is needed to produce sufficient data directly addressing safety concerns of various treatment stakeholders.

  16. Change in Adverse Events After Enrollment in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Montroy, Joshua; Breau, Rodney H.; Cnossen, Sonya; Witiuk, Kelsey; Binette, Andrew; Ferrier, Taylor; Lavallée, Luke T.; Fergusson, Dean A.; Schramm, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The American College of Surgeons’ National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) is the first nationally validated, risk-adjusted, outcomes-based program to measure and compare the quality of surgical care across North America. Participation in this program may provide an opportunity to reduce the incidence of adverse events related to surgery. Study Design A systematic review of the literature was performed. MedLine, EMBASE and PubMed were searched for studies relevant to NSQIP. Patient characteristics, intervention, and primary outcome measures were abstracted. The intervention was participation in NSQIP and monitoring of Individual Site Summary Reports with or without implementation of a quality improvement program. The outcomes of interest were change in peri-operative adverse events and mortality represented by pooled risk ratios (pRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Eleven articles reporting on 35 health care institutions were included. Nine (82%) of the eleven studies implemented a quality improvement program. Minimal improvements in superficial (pRR 0.81; 95% CI 0.72–0.91), deep (pRR 0.82; 95% CI0.64–1.05) and organ space (pRR 1.15; 95% CI 0.96–1.37) infections were observed at centers that did not institute a quality improvement program. However, centers that reported formal interventions for the prevention and treatment of infections observed substantial improvements (superficial pRR 0.55, 95% CI 0.39–0.77; deep pRR 0.61, 95% CI 0.50–0.75, and organ space pRR 0.60, 95% CI 0.50–0.71). Studies evaluating other adverse events noted decreased incidence following NSQIP participation and implementation of a formal quality improvement program. Conclusions These data suggest that NSQIP is effective in reducing surgical morbidity. Improvement in surgical quality appears to be more marked at centers that implemented a formal quality improvement program directed at the reduction of specific morbidities. PMID:26812596

  17. POVERTY, LIFE EVENTS AND THE RISK FOR DEPRESSION IN UGANDA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the determinants of major depression in sub-Saharan Africa is important for planning effective intervention strategies. Objective To investigate the social and life-event determinants of major depressive disorder in the African socio-cultural context of rural Uganda. Methods A cross-section survey was carried out in 14 districts in Uganda from 1st June 2003-30th October 2004. 4660 randomly selected respondents (15 years and above) were interviewed. The primary outcome was the presence of major depressive disorder as assessed by the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25). Results The prevalence of major depressive disorder was 29.3% (95% confidence interval, 28.0%-30.6%). Factors independently associated with depression in both genders included: the ecological factor, district; age (increase with each age category after 35 years); indices of poverty and deprivation (no formal education, having no employment, broken family, and socio-economic classes III-V). Only a few adverse life events, notably those suggestive of a disrupted family background (death of a father in females and death of a mother in males) were associated with increased risk. Conclusion: Socioeconomic factors operating at both ecological and the individual level are the strongest independent determinants of depression. Adverse life events were less strongly associated with depression in this sample. PMID:19916062

  18. Association of smoking with restenosis and major adverse cardiac events after coronary stenting: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rui-ting; Liu, Jie; Zhou, You; Hu, Bang-li

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The association between smoking and clinical outcomes after coronary stenting is controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the association between smoking and in stent restenosis (ISR), major adverse cardiac events (MACE), or major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) after coronary stenting. Methods: A search for studies published before December 2014 was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library. An inverse random weighted meta-analysis was conducted using logarithm of the odds ratio (OR) and its standard error for each study. Results: Ten studies investigated the association between smoking and ISR. Overall, smoking was not associated with ISR (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.79–1.41; I2 = 47.8%). Subgroup analysis also failed to show a significant association between smoking and ISR risk regardless of bare metal stent (BMS) and drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Eight studies explored the association between smoking and MACE, but no association was found (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.77–1.10; I2 = 25.5%), and subgroup analysis revealed that no distinct difference was found between BMS and DES implantation. Three studies investigated the association between smoking and MACCE and significant association was found (OR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.43–3.06; I2 = 21.6%). Conclusions: Our results suggest that in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, smoking is not associated with ISR and MACE; however, smoking is an independent risk factor for MACCE. PMID:26430448

  19. [Adverse events following influenza vaccination: reaction to specific reports and the necessity of a central registration system].

    PubMed

    Swaan, C M; van der Sande, M A B; Speelman, P; Conyn-van Spaendonck, M A E; Straus, S M J M; Coutinho, R A

    2007-09-29

    The influenza vaccine is considered safe, but information on vaccine-related adverse events is limited and a nationwide overview of adverse events is lacking. In 2006, after deaths occurred in Israel and the Netherlands following influenza vaccination, the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport (VWS) asked the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) twice for a recommendation regarding the continuation of the national vaccination campaign. After 4 deaths were reported in Israel in October 2006 following administration of Vaxigrip, the Dutch vaccination campaign was suspended for one week. One month later, 4 additional deaths were reported after influenza vaccination in the Netherlands. The newly appointed outbreak management team concluded that a causal relationship between vaccination and the deaths was highly unlikely, based on data regarding the individual cases, background mortality rates and prior reports of adverse events. Further suspension of the vaccination campaign was deemed unnecessary this time. A centralised nationwide registry of adverse events has since been established to provide further insight into the incidence of adverse events following influenza vaccination. Physicians are advised to report potential adverse events following influenza vaccination to the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb (www.lareb.nl). PMID:17957995

  20. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders: Evidence Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Williams, Thomas J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Schmidt, Lacey L.; Shea, Camille

    2016-01-01

    In April 2010, President Obama declared a space pioneering goal for the United States in general and NASA in particular. "Fifty years after the creation of NASA, our goal is no longer just a destination to reach. Our goal is the capacity for people to work and learn and operate and live safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time, ultimately in ways that are more sustainable and even indefinite." Thus NASA's Strategic Objective 1.1 emerged as "expand human presence into the solar system and to the surface of Mars to advance exploration, science, innovation, benefits to humanity, and international collaboration" (NASA 2015b). Any space flight, be it of long or short duration, occurs in an extreme environment that has unique stressors. Even with excellent selection methods, the potential for behavioral problems among space flight crews remain a threat to mission success. Assessment of factors that are related to behavioral health can help minimize the chances of distress and, thus, reduce the likelihood of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders arising within a crew. Similarly, countermeasures that focus on prevention and treatment can mitigate the cognitive or behavioral conditions that, should they arise, would impact mission success. Given the general consensus that longer duration, isolation, and confined missions have a greater risk for behavioral health ensuring crew behavioral health over the long term is essential. Risk, which within the context of this report is assessed with respect to behavioral health and performance, is addressed to deter development of cognitive and behavioral degradations or psychiatric conditions in space flight and analog populations, and to monitor, detect, and treat early risk factors, predictors and other contributing factors. Based on space flight and analog evidence, the average incidence rate of an adverse behavioral health event occurring during a space mission is relatively low for the

  1. Adverse events after immunisation with aluminium-containing DTP vaccines: systematic review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Tom; Rudin, Melanie; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo

    2004-02-01

    We have reviewed evidence of adverse events after exposure to aluminium-containing vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTP), alone or in combination, compared with identical vaccines, either without aluminium or containing aluminium in different concentrations. The study is a systematic review with meta-analysis. We searched the Cochrane Vaccines Field Register, the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Biological Abstracts, Science Citation Index, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System website for relevant studies. Reference lists of retrieved articles were scanned for further studies. We included randomised and semi-randomised trials and comparative cohort studies if the report gave sufficient information for us to extract aluminium concentration, vaccine composition, and safety outcomes. Two reviewers extracted data in a standard way from all included studies and assessed the methodological quality of the studies. We identified 35 reports of studies and included three randomised trials, four semi-randomised trials, and one cohort study. We did a meta-analysis of data from five studies around two main comparisons (vaccines containing aluminium hydroxide vs no adjuvant in children aged up to 18 months and vaccines containing different types of aluminium vs no adjuvants in children aged 10-16 years). In young children, vaccines with aluminium hydroxide caused significantly more erythema and induration than plain vaccines (odds ratio 1.87 [95% CI 1.57-2.24]) and significantly fewer reactions of all types (0.21 [0.15-0.28]). The frequencies of local reactions of all types, collapse or convulsions, and persistent crying or screaming did not differ between the two cohorts of the trials. In older children, there was no association between exposure to aluminium-containing vaccines and onset of (local) induration, swelling, or a raised temperature, but there was an association with local pain lasting up to 14 days (2.05 [1.25-3.38]). We found no

  2. Assessment of causality of individual adverse events following immunization (AEFI): a WHO tool for global use.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Asturias, Edwin J; Balakrishnan, Madhava Ram; Halsey, Neal A; Law, Barbara; Zuber, Patrick L F

    2013-10-17

    Serious illnesses or even deaths may rarely occur after childhood vaccinations. Public health programs are faced with great challenges to establish if the events presenting after the administration of a vaccine are due to other conditions, and hence a coincidental presentation, rather than caused by the administered vaccines. Given its priority, the Global Advisory Committee for Vaccine Safety (GACVS) commissioned a group of experts to review the previously published World Health Organization (WHO) Adverse Event Following Immunization (AEFI) causality assessment methodology and aide-memoire, and to develop a standardized and user friendly tool to assist health care personnel in the processing and interpretation of data on individual events, and to assess the causality after AEFIs. We describe a tool developed for causality assessment of individual AEFIs that includes: (a) an eligibility component for the assessment that reviews the diagnosis associated with the event and identifies the administered vaccines; (b) a checklist that systematically guides users to gather available information to feed a decision algorithm; and (c) a decision support algorithm that assists the assessors to come to a classification of the individual AEFI. Final classification generated by the process includes four categories in which the event is either: (1) consistent; (2) inconsistent; or (3) indeterminate with respect of causal association; or (4) unclassifiable. Subcategories are identified to assist assessors in resulting public health decisions that can be used for action. This proposed tool should support the classification of AEFI cases in a standardized, transparent manner and to collect essential information during AEFI investigation. The algorithm should provide countries and health officials at the global level with an instrument to respond to vaccine safety alerts, and support the education, research and policy decisions on immunization safety.

  3. Adverse event detection (AED) system for continuously monitoring and evaluating structural health status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jinsik; Ha, Dong Sam; Inman, Daniel J.; Owen, Robert B.

    2011-03-01

    Structural damage for spacecraft is mainly due to impacts such as collision of meteorites or space debris. We present a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for space applications, named Adverse Event Detection (AED), which integrates an acoustic sensor, an impedance-based SHM system, and a Lamb wave SHM system. With these three health-monitoring methods in place, we can determine the presence, location, and severity of damage. An acoustic sensor continuously monitors acoustic events, while the impedance-based and Lamb wave SHM systems are in sleep mode. If an acoustic sensor detects an impact, it activates the impedance-based SHM. The impedance-based system determines if the impact incurred damage. When damage is detected, it activates the Lamb wave SHM system to determine the severity and location of the damage. Further, since an acoustic sensor dissipates much less power than the two SHM systems and the two systems are activated only when there is an acoustic event, our system reduces overall power dissipation significantly. Our prototype system demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  4. Ocular Adverse Events Associated with Antibody-Drug Conjugates in Human Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Joshua Seth; Miller, Paul E; Mannis, Mark J; Murphy, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews ocular adverse events (AEs) reported in association with administration of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) in human clinical trials. References reporting ocular toxicity or AEs associated with ADCs were collected using online publication searches. Articles, abstracts, or citations were included if they cited ocular toxicities or vision-impairing AEs with a confirmed or suspected association with ADC administration. Twenty-two references were found citing ocular or vision-impairing AEs in association with ADC administration. All references reported use of ADCs in human clinical trials for treatment of various malignancies. The molecular target and cytotoxic agent varied depending on the ADC used. Ocular AEs affected a diversity of ocular tissues. The most commonly reported AEs involved the ocular surface and included blurred vision, dry eye, and corneal abnormalities (including microcystic corneal disease). Most ocular AEs were not severe (≤ grade 2) or dose limiting. Clinical outcomes were not consistently reported, but when specified, most AEs improved or resolved with cessation of treatment or with ameliorative therapy. A diverse range of ocular AEs are reported in association with administration of ADCs for the treatment of cancer. The toxicologic mechanism(s) and pathogenesis of such events are not well understood, but most are mild in severity and reversible. Drug development and medical professionals should be aware of the clinical features of these events to facilitate early recognition and intervention in the assessment of preclinical development programs and in human clinical trials.

  5. COMT Val158Met modulates the effect of childhood adverse experiences on the risk of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Arnt F A; Franke, Barbara; Ellenbroek, Bart; Cools, Alexander; de Jong, Cor A J; Buitelaar, Jan K; Verkes, Robbert-Jan

    2013-03-01

    Genetic factors and childhood adverse experiences contribute to the vulnerability to alcohol dependence. However, empirical data on the interplay between specific genes and adverse experiences are few. The COMT Val158Met and DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A genotypes have been suggested to affect both stress sensitivity and the risk for alcohol dependence. This study tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in COMT Val158Met and DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A interacts with childhood adverse experiences to predict alcohol dependence. Male abstinent alcohol-dependent patients (n = 110) and age-matched healthy male controls (n = 99) were genotyped for the COMT Val158Met and the DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A genotypes. Childhood adverse events were measured using three self-report questionnaires. Alcohol dependence severity, age of onset and duration of alcohol dependence were analyzed as secondary outcome measures. Statistical analysis involved logistic regression analysis and analysis of variance. Alcohol-dependent patients reported increased childhood adversity. The interaction between childhood adversity and the COMT Val158Met genotype added significantly to the prediction model. This gene-environment interaction was confirmed in the analysis of the secondary outcome measures, i.e. alcohol dependence severity, age of onset and duration of alcohol dependence. The DRD2/ANKK1 Taq1A genotype was not related to alcohol dependence, nor did it interact with childhood adversity in predicting alcohol dependence. This study provides evidence for a gene-environment interaction in alcohol dependence, in which an individual's sensitivity to childhood adverse experience is moderated by the COMT genotype. Exposed carriers of a low-activity Met allele have a higher risk to develop severe alcohol dependence than individuals homozygous for the Val allele.

  6. Infusion site adverse events in breast cancer patients receiving highly emetic chemotherapy with prophylactic anti-emetic treatment with aprepitant and fosaprepitant: A retrospective comparison

    PubMed Central

    TSUDA, TAKASHI; KYOMORI, CHISATO; MIZUKAMI, TAKURO; TANIYAMA, TOMOKO; IZAWA, NAOKI; HORIE, YOSHIKI; HIRAKAWA, MAMI; OGURA, TAKASHI; NAKAJIMA, TAKAKO EGUCHI; TSUGAWA, KOICHIRO; BOKU, NARIKAZU

    2016-01-01

    The incidences of infusion site adverse events in chemotherapy regimens, including anthracyclines with either fosaprepitant or aprepitant as the anti-emetic, were not highlighted in the randomized trial comparing aprepitant and fosaprepitant. The present retrospective analysis was performed in breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline-containing chemotherapy, a combination of epirubicin and cyclophosphamide with or without 5-fluorouracil as the adjuvant or neoadjuvant, at the outpatient infusion center of St. Marianna University Hospital (Kawasaki, Japan). Infusion site adverse events were retrospectively compared between the 3 months prior to and three months following switching from 3 day oral administration of aprepitant to intravenous infusion of fosaprepitant. A total of 62 patients were included in the aprepitant group and 38 in the fosaprepitant group. Of these patients, 26 (42%) in the aprepitant group and 36 patients (96%) in the fosaprepitant group experienced any grade of infusion site adverse events at least once (P<0.001). As an anti-emetic treatment for chemotherapy using anthracyclines, fosaprepitant may be associated with a higher risk of infusion site adverse events compared with aprepitant. PMID:27073673

  7. Infliximab in patients with psoriasis and other inflammatory diseases: evaluation of adverse events in the treatment of 168 patients*

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, João Roberto; Sanmiguel, Jessica; Cagnon, Giovana Viotto; Augusto, Marília Silveira Faeda; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Pozetti, Eurides Maria Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease with preference for skin and joints. The skin involvement occurs by hyperproliferation and abnormal differentiation of keratinocytes. It is associated with comorbidities, mainly related to the clinical manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. Increased TNF-alpha expression (TNF-α) is related to its pathophysiology. Infliximab is an intravenous drug that acts neutralizing the biological activity of TNF-α and prevents the binding of the molecule to the target cell receptor, inhibiting cell proliferation of psoriasis and other diseases mediated by TNF-α. A lot of infusion reactions have been described in the literature. Objective To evaluate the adverse effects of intravenous treatment with infliximab, analyzing patients with psoriasis compared to those with other chronic inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). Method Analysis of medical records and adverse events of 168 patients undergoing infliximab infusion for psoriasis and chronic inflammatory diseases treatment. Results 168 patients who have used infliximab were evaluated, 24 had psoriasis and 144 had chronic inflammatory diseases. Only 2 (8.3%) patients with psoriasis showed adverse events requiring treatment discontinuation, and just 6 (4.2%) female patients with chronic inflammatory diseases experienced adverse events. Conclusion Infliximab is a safe drug, with a low percentage of adverse events and there were more adverse events in women with chronic inflammatory diseases and in patients who received more infliximab infusions. PMID:27438197

  8. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Juan M.; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Ryan, Patrick B.; Shah, Nigam H.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies. PMID:27193236

  9. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research.

    PubMed

    Banda, Juan M; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Ryan, Patrick B; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-01-01

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies. PMID:27193236

  10. A Critical Approach to Evaluating Clinical Efficacy, Adverse Events and Drug Interactions of Herbal Remedies.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Angelo A; Hoon-Kim, Sung; Radhakrishnan, Rajan; Williamson, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses represent the uppermost ladders in the hierarchy of evidence. Systematic reviews/meta-analyses suggest preliminary or satisfactory clinical evidence for agnus castus (Vitex agnus castus) for premenstrual complaints, flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) for hypertension, feverfew (Tanacetum partenium) for migraine prevention, ginger (Zingiber officinalis) for pregnancy-induced nausea, ginseng (Panax ginseng) for improving fasting glucose levels as well as phytoestrogens and St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) for the relief of some symptoms in menopause. However, firm conclusions of efficacy cannot be generally drawn. On the other hand, inconclusive evidence of efficacy or contradictory results have been reported for Aloe vera in the treatment of psoriasis, cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) in cystitis prevention, ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) for tinnitus and intermittent claudication, echinacea (Echinacea spp.) for the prevention of common cold and pomegranate (Punica granatum) for the prevention/treatment of cardiovascular diseases. A critical evaluation of the clinical data regarding the adverse effects has shown that herbal remedies are generally better tolerated than synthetic medications. Nevertheless, potentially serious adverse events, including herb-drug interactions, have been described. This suggests the need to be vigilant when using herbal remedies, particularly in specific conditions, such as during pregnancy and in the paediatric population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26887532

  11. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Frequency of Adverse Events in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Raffaele; Franzone, Anna; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Räber, Lorenz; Pilgrim, Thomas; Valgimigli, Marco; Stortecky, Stefan; Rat-Wirtzler, Julie; Silber, Sigmund; Serruys, Patrick W; Jüni, Peter; Heg, Dik; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Few data are available on the timing of adverse events in relation to the status of diabetes mellitus and the type of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We investigated this issue in diabetic and nondiabetic patients admitted with a diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS) or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Patient-level data from 6 studies (n = 16,601) were pooled and only patients with ACS are included (n = 9,492). Early (0 to 30 days), late (31 to 365 days), and overall (0 to 365 days) events were analyzed. Diabetes mellitus was present in 1,927 patients (20.3%). At 1 year, all-cause mortality was highest for diabetic patients with STEMI (13.4%), followed by diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS (10.3%), nondiabetic patients with STEMI (6.4%) and nondiabetic patients with NSTE-ACS (4.4%; p <0.001). Among patients with diabetes, there was a significant interaction (p <0.001) for STEMI versus NSTE-ACS in early compared with late mortality, due to an excess of early mortality associated with STEMI (9.3% vs 3.7%; hazard ratio 2.31, 95% CI 1.52 to 3.54, p <0.001). Compared with diabetic NSTE-ACS patients, diabetic patients with STEMI had an increased risk of early stent thrombosis (hazard ratio 2.26, 95% CI 1.48 to 3.44, p <0.001), as well as a significant interaction (p = 0.009) in the risk of target lesion revascularization between the early and late follow-up. The distribution of fatal and nonfatal events according to the type of ACS was not influenced by diabetic status. In conclusion, diabetes in ACS setting confers a worse prognosis with 1-year mortality >10% in both STEMI and NSTE-ACS. Notwithstanding the high absolute rates, the temporal distribution of adverse events related to the type of ACS is similar between diabetic and nondiabetic patients.

  12. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Frequency of Adverse Events in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Raffaele; Franzone, Anna; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Räber, Lorenz; Pilgrim, Thomas; Valgimigli, Marco; Stortecky, Stefan; Rat-Wirtzler, Julie; Silber, Sigmund; Serruys, Patrick W; Jüni, Peter; Heg, Dik; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Few data are available on the timing of adverse events in relation to the status of diabetes mellitus and the type of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We investigated this issue in diabetic and nondiabetic patients admitted with a diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS) or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Patient-level data from 6 studies (n = 16,601) were pooled and only patients with ACS are included (n = 9,492). Early (0 to 30 days), late (31 to 365 days), and overall (0 to 365 days) events were analyzed. Diabetes mellitus was present in 1,927 patients (20.3%). At 1 year, all-cause mortality was highest for diabetic patients with STEMI (13.4%), followed by diabetic patients with NSTE-ACS (10.3%), nondiabetic patients with STEMI (6.4%) and nondiabetic patients with NSTE-ACS (4.4%; p <0.001). Among patients with diabetes, there was a significant interaction (p <0.001) for STEMI versus NSTE-ACS in early compared with late mortality, due to an excess of early mortality associated with STEMI (9.3% vs 3.7%; hazard ratio 2.31, 95% CI 1.52 to 3.54, p <0.001). Compared with diabetic NSTE-ACS patients, diabetic patients with STEMI had an increased risk of early stent thrombosis (hazard ratio 2.26, 95% CI 1.48 to 3.44, p <0.001), as well as a significant interaction (p = 0.009) in the risk of target lesion revascularization between the early and late follow-up. The distribution of fatal and nonfatal events according to the type of ACS was not influenced by diabetic status. In conclusion, diabetes in ACS setting confers a worse prognosis with 1-year mortality >10% in both STEMI and NSTE-ACS. Notwithstanding the high absolute rates, the temporal distribution of adverse events related to the type of ACS is similar between diabetic and nondiabetic patients. PMID:27289296

  13. Focus on: human adverse events to companion animal spot-ons and sprays.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the Veterinary Products Committee has taken great interest in the number of human adverse events reported following the use of companion animal products that are applied topically to prevent and treat parasite infestations. One particular question it has is whether the legal category of some of these products means that current point of sale advice is insufficient to influence pet owner behaviour in preventing these incidents. This article by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) seeks to respond to these concerns, and to remind veterinary professionals of their responsibility to inform clients how to use the products supplied to them in a manner that is safe, not only for their pets, but also for themselves. PMID:25556134

  14. Constructing Clinical Decision Support Systems for Adverse Drug Event Prevention: A Knowledge-based Approach.

    PubMed

    Koutkias, Vassilis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Stalidis, George; Lazou, Katerina; Collyda, Chrysa; Chazard, Emmanuel; McNair, Peter; Beuscart, Regis; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2010-11-13

    A knowledge-based approach is proposed that is employed for the construction of a framework suitable for the management and effective use of knowledge on Adverse Drug Event (ADE) prevention. The framework has as its core part a Knowledge Base (KB) comprised of rule-based knowledge sources, that is accompanied by the necessary inference and query mechanisms to provide healthcare professionals and patients with decision support services in clinical practice, in terms of alerts and recommendations on preventable ADEs. The relevant Knowledge Based System (KBS) is developed in the context of the EU-funded research project PSIP (Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in Medication). In the current paper, we present the foundations of the framework, its knowledge model and KB structure, as well as recent progress as regards the population of the KB, the implementation of the KBS, and results on the KBS verification in decision support operation.

  15. Development of a Virtual Learning Environment addressing adverse events in nursing.

    PubMed

    Xelegati, Rosicler; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez

    2011-01-01

    The authors have developed a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) addressing the management of adverse events to promote continuing education for nurses, including the following themes: pressure ulcer, medication errors, phlebitis, fall, and loss of nasogastroenteral probes. The pedagogical framework was grounded on the information processing theory and this applied study used the Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) model to develop the program. The environment was developed with HTML language through Microsoft Office Word 2003®. The authors developed evaluation exercises in each module through the Hot Potatoes program, version 6.0 for Windows. The conclusion is that the methodology utilized was appropriate for achieving the proposed objectives. In the future, the authors will assess the developed product and verify the possibility of using it in nursing services. PMID:22030583

  16. The expert explorer: a tool for hospital data visualization and adverse drug event rules validation.

    PubMed

    Băceanu, Adrian; Atasiei, Ionuţ; Chazard, Emmanuel; Leroy, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    An important part of adverse drug events (ADEs) detection is the validation of the clinical cases and the assessment of the decision rules to detect ADEs. For that purpose, a software called "Expert Explorer" has been designed by Ideea Advertising. Anonymized datasets have been extracted from hospitals into a common repository. The tool has 3 main features. (1) It can display hospital stays in a visual and comprehensive way (diagnoses, drugs, lab results, etc.) using tables and pretty charts. (2) It allows designing and executing dashboards in order to generate knowledge about ADEs. (3) It finally allows uploading decision rules obtained from data mining. Experts can then review the rules, the hospital stays that match the rules, and finally give their advice thanks to specialized forms. Then the rules can be validated, invalidated, or improved (knowledge elicitation phase).

  17. Surveillance of adverse events following immunization in China: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Wu, Wendi; Li, Keli; Xu, Disha; Ye, Jiakai; Li, Li; Wang, Huaqing

    2015-07-31

    Surveillance for adverse events following immunization (AEFI) is an important component of any national immunization program. In the People's Republic of China (China), a populous, middle-income country, development of an AEFI surveillance system began in 2005. In 2008, the AEFI surveillance system was implemented as a nationwide, online system and called the Chinese National AEFI Information System (CNAEFIS). Since then, CNAEFIS has provided useful, national-level data on vaccine safety. National AEFI surveillance guidelines were issued jointly by the Ministry of Health and the China Food and Drug Administration in 2010. This article reviews the development, status, and key aspects of the Chinese AEFI surveillance system, and describes challenges and future plans for vaccine safety assessment in China.

  18. Embedding surveillance into clinical care to detect serious adverse events in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Seale, Anna C; Barsosio, Helen C; Koech, Angela; Berkley, James A

    2016-01-01

    Severe maternal complications in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa contribute to high maternal mortality and morbidity. Incidence data on severe maternal complications, life-threatening conditions, maternal deaths and birth outcomes are essential for clinical audit and to inform trial design of the types and frequency of expected severe adverse events (SAEs). However, such data are very limited, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. We set up standardized, systematic clinical surveillance embedded into routine clinical care in a rural county hospital in Kenya. Pregnant women and newborns are systematically assessed and investigated. Data are reported using a standardized Maternal Admission Record that forms both the hospital’s clinical record and the data collection tool. Integrating clinical surveillance with routine clinical care is feasible and should be expanded in sub-Saharan Africa, both for improving clinical practice and as a basis for intervention studies to reduce maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity where rates are highest. PMID:26254977

  19. Text Mining for Adverse Drug Events: the Promise, Challenges, and State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Rave; Callahan, Alison; Tamang, Suzanne; Low, Yen; Odgers, David; Finlayson, Sam; Jung, Kenneth; LePendu, Paea; Shah, Nigam H.

    2014-01-01

    Text mining is the computational process of extracting meaningful information from large amounts of unstructured text. Text mining is emerging as a tool to leverage underutilized data sources that can improve pharmacovigilance, including the objective of adverse drug event detection and assessment. This article provides an overview of recent advances in pharmacovigilance driven by the application of text mining, and discusses several data sources—such as biomedical literature, clinical narratives, product labeling, social media, and Web search logs—that are amenable to text-mining for pharmacovigilance. Given the state of the art, it appears text mining can be applied to extract useful ADE-related information from multiple textual sources. Nonetheless, further research is required to address remaining technical challenges associated with the text mining methodologies, and to conclusively determine the relative contribution of each textual source to improving pharmacovigilance. PMID:25151493

  20. Understanding the organisational context for adverse events in the health services: the role of cultural censorship

    PubMed Central

    Hart, E; Hazelgrove, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper responds to the current emphasis on organisational learning in the NHS as a means of improving healthcare systems and making hospitals safer places for patients. Conspiracies of silence have been identified as obstacles to organisational learning, covering error and hampering communication. In this paper we question the usefulness of the term and suggest that "cultural censorship", a concept developed by the anthropologist Robin Sherriff, provides a much needed insight into cultures of silence within the NHS. Drawing on a number of illustrations, but in particular the Ritchie inquiry into the disgraced gynaecologist Rodney Ledward, we show how the defining characteristics of cultural censorship can help us to understand how adverse events get pushed underground, only to flourish in the underside of organisational life. Key Words: cultural censorship; organisational culture; quality improvement; patient safety PMID:11743156

  1. Ontology-based knowledge management for personalized adverse drug events detection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Sun, Xingzhi; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Li, Bo; Li, Jing; Pan, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Since Adverse Drug Event (ADE) has become a leading cause of death around the world, there arises high demand for helping clinicians or patients to identify possible hazards from drug effects. Motivated by this, we present a personalized ADE detection system, with the focus on applying ontology-based knowledge management techniques to enhance ADE detection services. The development of electronic health records makes it possible to automate the personalized ADE detection, i.e., to take patient clinical conditions into account during ADE detection. Specifically, we define the ADE ontology to uniformly manage the ADE knowledge from multiple sources. We take advantage of the rich semantics from the terminology SNOMED-CT and apply it to ADE detection via the semantic query and reasoning. PMID:21893837

  2. ADEpedia: a scalable and standardized knowledge base of Adverse Drug Events using semantic web technology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqian; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    A source of semantically coded Adverse Drug Event (ADE) data can be useful for identifying common phenotypes related to ADEs. We proposed a comprehensive framework for building a standardized ADE knowledge base (called ADEpedia) through combining ontology-based approach with semantic web technology. The framework comprises four primary modules: 1) an XML2RDF transformation module; 2) a data normalization module based on NCBO Open Biomedical Annotator; 3) a RDF store based persistence module; and 4) a front-end module based on a Semantic Wiki for the review and curation. A prototype is successfully implemented to demonstrate the capability of the system to integrate multiple drug data and ontology resources and open web services for the ADE data standardization. A preliminary evaluation is performed to demonstrate the usefulness of the system, including the performance of the NCBO annotator. In conclusion, the semantic web technology provides a highly scalable framework for ADE data source integration and standard query service.

  3. Serious adverse events in randomized psychosocial treatment studies: Safety or Arbitrary Edicts?

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nancy M.; Roll, John M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.; Ball, Samuel A.; Stitzer, Maxine; Peirce, Jessica M.; Blaine, Jack; Kirby, Kimberly C.; McCarty, Dennis; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Human subjects protection policies developed for pharmaceutical trials are now being widely applied to psychosocial intervention studies. This study examined occurrences of serious adverse events (SAEs) reported in multicenter psychosocial trials of the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network. Substance abusing participants (N=1,687) were randomized to standard care or standard care plus either contingency management or motivational enhancement. Twelve percent of participants experienced one or more SAEs during the 27,198 person-weeks of follow-up. Of the 260 SAEs recorded, none were judged by the Data Safety Monitoring Board to be study related, and there were no significant differences between experimental and control conditions in SAE incidence rates. These data underscore the need to reconsider the rationale behind, and appropriate methods for, monitoring safety during psychosocial therapy trials. PMID:19045975

  4. Adverse drug events in a sentinel hospital in the State of Goiás, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Reis, Adriano Max Moreira; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Santos, Jânia Oliveira; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli

    2011-01-01

    This was a retrospective, descriptive and documental study with the aim of identifying adverse drug events which occurred in the medication administration process and to classify these medication errors. This study was developed in the internal medicine unit of a general hospital of Goiás, Brazil. Report books used by nursing staff from the period 2002 to 2007, were analyzed. A total of 230 medication errors were identified, most of which occurred in the preparation and administration of the medications (64.3%). Medication errors were of omission (50.9%), of dose (16.5%), of schedule (13.5%) and of administration technique (12.2%) and were more frequent with antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents (24.3%) and anti-infective agents (20.9%). It was found that 37.4% of drugs were high alert medications. Considering the medication errors detected it is important to promote a culture of safety in the hospital. PMID:21584386

  5. Adverse events following immunization: is this time for the use of WHO causality assessment?

    PubMed

    Tafuri, Silvio; Gallone, Maria Serena; Calabrese, Giulia; Germinario, Cinzia

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, public health authorities in industrialized countries have noted an increase in the numbers of parents choosing not to have their children vaccinated and in the activities of 'antivaccination' movements. Doubts about vaccine safety and lack of surveillance of adverse events following immunization (AEFI) are the most frequent themes proposed by antivaccination movements. This editorial aims to critically analyze the use of AEFI assessment procedures among national health authorities and public health researchers. In fact, the WHO recommended and published a systematic and standardized causality assessment process for serious AEFI, providing a method for individual causality assessment to be used by staff of national immunization programs, regulatory authorities and pharmacovigilance or surveillance departments. The last update was published in March 2013 but to date, an Internet search reveals no information or reports on AEFI surveillance that uses the WHO AEFI causality assessment.

  6. Dermatologic adverse events to chemotherapeutic agents, Part 2: BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jennifer Nam

    2014-03-01

    The advent of novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents and immunotherapies has dramatically changed the arena of cancer treatment in recent years. BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab are among the newer chemotherapy drugs that are being used at an increasing rate. Dermatologic adverse events to these medications are common, and it is important for dermatologists and oncologists alike to learn to recognize and treat such side effects in order to maintain both patients' quality of life and their anticancer treatment. This review describes the cutaneous side effects seen with BRAF inhibitors (eg, maculopapular eruption, photosensitivity, squamoproliferative growths, melanocytic proliferations), MEK inhibitors (eg, papulopustular eruption), and ipilimumab (eg, maculopapular eruption, vitiligo), with a mention of vismodegib and anti-PD-1 agents.

  7. Developmental regression and autism reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Woo, Emily Jane; Ball, Robert; Landa, Rebecca; Zimmerman, Andrew W; Braun, M Miles

    2007-07-01

    We report demographic and clinical characteristics of children reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) as having autism or another developmental disorder after vaccination. We completed 124 interviews with parents and reviewed medical records for 31 children whose records contained sufficient information to evaluate the child's developmental history. Medical record review indicated that 27 of 31 (87%) children had autism/ASD and 19 (61.3%) had evidence of developmental regression (loss of social, language, or motor skills). The proportion of VAERS cases of autism with regression was greater than that reported in population-based studies, based on the subset of VAERS cases with medical record confirmation. This difference may reflect preferential reporting to VAERS of autism with regression. In other respects, the children in this study appear to be similar to other children with autism. Further research might determine whether the pathogenesis of autism with developmental regression differs from that of autism without regression.

  8. Understanding the organisational context for adverse events in the health services: the role of cultural censorship.

    PubMed

    Hart, E; Hazelgrove, J

    2001-12-01

    This paper responds to the current emphasis on organisational learning in the NHS as a means of improving healthcare systems and making hospitals safer places for patients. Conspiracies of silence have been identified as obstacles to organisational learning, covering error and hampering communication. In this paper we question the usefulness of the term and suggest that "cultural censorship", a concept developed by the anthropologist Robin Sherriff, provides a much needed insight into cultures of silence within the NHS. Drawing on a number of illustrations, but in particular the Ritchie inquiry into the disgraced gynaecologist Rodney Ledward, we show how the defining characteristics of cultural censorship can help us to understand how adverse events get pushed underground, only to flourish in the underside of organisational life.

  9. ["Re-evaluation upon suspected event" is an approach for post-marketing clinical study: lessons from adverse drug events related to Bupleuri Radix preparations].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Xin; Sun, Hong-Feng; Yang, Xiao-Hui; Long, Hong-Zhu; Ye, Zu-Guang; Ji, Shao-Liang; Zhang, Li

    2014-08-01

    We revisited the "Xiao Chaihu Decoction event (XCHDE)" occurred in late 1980s in Japan and the Bupleuri Radix related adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports in China After careful review, comparison, analysis and evaluation, we think the interstitial pneumonitis, drug induced Liver injury (DILI) and other severe adverse drug envents (ADEs) including death happened in Japan is probably results from multiple factors, including combinatory use of XCHDE with interferon, Kampo usage under modern medicine theory guidance, and use of XCHD on the basis of disease diagnosis instead of traditional Chinese syndrome complex differentiation. There are less ADE case reports related to XCHD preparation in China compared to Japan, mostly manifest with hypersensitivity responses of skin and perfuse perspiration. The symptoms of Radix Bupleuri injection related ADEs mainly manifest hypersensitivity-like response, 2 cases of intravenous infusion instead of intramuscular injection developed hypokalemia and renal failure. One case died from severe hypersensitivity shock. In Chinese literatures, there is no report of the interstitial pneumonitis and DILI associated with XCHDG in Japan. So far, there is no voluntary monitoring data and large sample clinical research data available. The author elaborated the classification of "reevaluation" and clarified "re-evaluation upon events" included the reaction to the suspected safety and efficacy events. Based on the current status of the clinical research on the Radix Bupleuri preparations, the author points out that post-marketing "re-evaluation upon suspected event" is not only a necessity of continuous evaluation of the safety, efficacy of drugs, it is also a necessity for providing objective clinical research data to share with the international and domestic drug administrations in the risk-benefit evaluation. It is also the unavoidable pathway to culture and push the excellent species and famous brands of TCM to the international market, in

  10. ["Re-evaluation upon suspected event" is an approach for post-marketing clinical study: lessons from adverse drug events related to Bupleuri Radix preparations].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Xin; Sun, Hong-Feng; Yang, Xiao-Hui; Long, Hong-Zhu; Ye, Zu-Guang; Ji, Shao-Liang; Zhang, Li

    2014-08-01

    We revisited the "Xiao Chaihu Decoction event (XCHDE)" occurred in late 1980s in Japan and the Bupleuri Radix related adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports in China After careful review, comparison, analysis and evaluation, we think the interstitial pneumonitis, drug induced Liver injury (DILI) and other severe adverse drug envents (ADEs) including death happened in Japan is probably results from multiple factors, including combinatory use of XCHDE with interferon, Kampo usage under modern medicine theory guidance, and use of XCHD on the basis of disease diagnosis instead of traditional Chinese syndrome complex differentiation. There are less ADE case reports related to XCHD preparation in China compared to Japan, mostly manifest with hypersensitivity responses of skin and perfuse perspiration. The symptoms of Radix Bupleuri injection related ADEs mainly manifest hypersensitivity-like response, 2 cases of intravenous infusion instead of intramuscular injection developed hypokalemia and renal failure. One case died from severe hypersensitivity shock. In Chinese literatures, there is no report of the interstitial pneumonitis and DILI associated with XCHDG in Japan. So far, there is no voluntary monitoring data and large sample clinical research data available. The author elaborated the classification of "reevaluation" and clarified "re-evaluation upon events" included the reaction to the suspected safety and efficacy events. Based on the current status of the clinical research on the Radix Bupleuri preparations, the author points out that post-marketing "re-evaluation upon suspected event" is not only a necessity of continuous evaluation of the safety, efficacy of drugs, it is also a necessity for providing objective clinical research data to share with the international and domestic drug administrations in the risk-benefit evaluation. It is also the unavoidable pathway to culture and push the excellent species and famous brands of TCM to the international market, in

  11. Text mining for the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System: medical text classification using informative feature selection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Michael D; Woo, Emily Jane; Markatou, Marianthi; Ball, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective The US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) collects spontaneous reports of adverse events following vaccination. Medical officers review the reports and often apply standardized case definitions, such as those developed by the Brighton Collaboration. Our objective was to demonstrate a multi-level text mining approach for automated text classification of VAERS reports that could potentially reduce human workload. Design We selected 6034 VAERS reports for H1N1 vaccine that were classified by medical officers as potentially positive (Npos=237) or negative for anaphylaxis. We created a categorized corpus of text files that included the class label and the symptom text field of each report. A validation set of 1100 labeled text files was also used. Text mining techniques were applied to extract three feature sets for important keywords, low- and high-level patterns. A rule-based classifier processed the high-level feature representation, while several machine learning classifiers were trained for the remaining two feature representations. Measurements Classifiers' performance was evaluated by macro-averaging recall, precision, and F-measure, and Friedman's test; misclassification error rate analysis was also performed. Results Rule-based classifier, boosted trees, and weighted support vector machines performed well in terms of macro-recall, however at the expense of a higher mean misclassification error rate. The rule-based classifier performed very well in terms of average sensitivity and specificity (79.05% and 94.80%, respectively). Conclusion Our validated results showed the possibility of developing effective medical text classifiers for VAERS reports by combining text mining with informative feature selection; this strategy has the potential to reduce reviewer workload considerably. PMID:21709163

  12. Discontinuation symptoms and taper/poststudy-emergent adverse events with desvenlafaxine treatment for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stuart A; Fava, Maurizio; Padmanabhan, Sudharshan K; Guico-Pabia, Christine J; Tourian, Karen A

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess discontinuation symptoms with desvenlafaxine (administered as desvenlafaxine succinate) treatment for major depressive disorder. Data were analyzed from nine 8-week, double-blind (DB), placebo-controlled studies of desvenlafaxine (50, 100, 200, or 400 mg/day; placebo, n = 319; desvenlafaxine, n = 578) and a relapse-prevention study [12-week, open-label (OL) 200 or 400 mg/day desvenlafaxine (n = 373); 6-month DB placebo (n = 73) or desvenlafaxine (n = 118)]. Rates of taper/poststudy-emergent adverse events were summarized. Discontinuation-Emergent Signs and Symptoms (DESS) checklist scores were analyzed in treatment completers at the end of OL and DB treatment. The most common (> or = 5%) taper/poststudy-emergent adverse events among desvenlafaxine patients were dizziness, nausea, headache, irritability, diarrhea, anxiety, abnormal dreams, fatigue, and hyperhidrosis. In the short-term studies, the highest DESS scores observed for desvenlafaxine groups occurred at first assessment after discontinuation of all active treatment (1.9-5.7). Desvenlafaxine 50- and 100-mg/day groups had significantly increased scores versus placebo (P values < or = 0.028). DESS scores increased significantly for patients discontinuing 12-week, OL desvenlafaxine 200 and 400 mg/day doses compared with those continuing desvenlafaxine (P values < or = 0.022). After the 6-month DB phase, DESS scores increased significantly compared with placebo for patients discontinuing 400 mg/day only (P = 0.029). In conclusion, cessation of desvenlafaxine use is associated with discontinuation symptoms after both short-term and long-term treatment.

  13. Patient-reported outcomes and the evolution of adverse event reporting in oncology.

    PubMed

    Trotti, Andy; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Setser, Ann; Basch, Ethan

    2007-11-10

    Adverse event (AE) reporting in oncology has evolved from informal descriptions to a highly systematized process. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the predominant system for describing the severity of AEs commonly encountered in oncology clinical trials. CTCAE clinical descriptors have been developed empirically during more than 30 years of use. The method of data collection is clinician based. Limitations of the CTC system include potential for incomplete reporting and limited guidance on data analysis and presentation methods. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) is a comprehensive medical terminology system used for regulatory reporting and drug labeling. MedDRA does not provide for severity ranking of AEs. CTC-based data presentations are the primary method of AE data reporting used in scientific journals and oncology meetings. Patient-reported outcome instruments (PROs) cover the subjective domain of AEs. Exploratory work suggests PROs can be used with a high degree of patient engagement and compliance. Additional studies are needed to determine how PROs can be used to complement current AE reporting systems. Potential models for integrating PROs into AE reporting are described in this review. AE reporting methods will continue to evolve in response to changing therapies and growing interest in measuring the impact of cancer treatment on health status. Although integration of PROs into AE reporting may ultimately improve the comprehensiveness and quality of collected data, it may also increase the administrative burden and cost of conducting trials. Therefore, care must be used when developing health outcomes and safety data collection plans. PMID:17991931

  14. Serious Adverse Events in the Canadian Registry of Children Receiving Palivizumab (CARESS) for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinghan Jenny; Chan, Parco; Paes, Bosco; Mitchell, Ian; Li, Abby; Lanctôt, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety and tolerability of palivizumab for RSV prophylaxis in high-risk children in everyday practice. Methods High-risk children prophylaxed against RSV infection were recruited into a prospective, observational, Canadian RSV Evaluation Study of Palivizumab (CARESS) registry with active, serious adverse event (SAE) monitoring from 2008 to 2013. SAE reports were systematically collected and assessed for severity and relationship to palivizumab. Data were analyzed by Chi-square or Fisher Exact Tests to examine group differences in proportions. Results 13025 infants received 57392 injections. Hospitalizations for respiratory-related illness (RIH) were reported in 915 patients, and SAEs other than RIH were reported in 52 patients. Of these, 6 (0.05%) patients had a total of 14 hypersensitivity reactions that were deemed possibly or probably related to palivizumab (incidence: 2.8 per 10,000 patient-months). The SAEs of 42 patients were assessed as not related to palivizumab. SAEs in the remaining 4 patients were not classifiable as their records were incomplete. There were no significant demographic predictors of SAE occurrence. Conclusions Under active surveillance, a small proportion of infants in the CARESS registry experienced SAEs that had a potential relationship with palivizumab and these appeared to be unpredictable in terms of onset. Palivizumab appears to be a safe and well-tolerated antibody for RSV prophylaxis in high-risk children in routine practice. PMID:26237402

  15. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Pneumoconiosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chieh-Sen; Ho, Shang-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pneumoconiosis is a parenchymal lung disease that develops through the inhalation of inorganic dust at work. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events are leading causes of mortality and adult disability worldwide. This retrospective cohort study investigated the association between pneumoconiosis, and cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events by using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data analyzed in this study was retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We selected 6940 patients with pneumoconiosis from the database as our study cohort. Another 27,760 patients without pneumoconiosis were selected and matched with those with pneumoconiosis according to age and sex as the comparison cohort. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses to determine the association between pneumoconiosis and the risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events after adjusting for medical comorbidities. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities, the patients with pneumoconiosis exhibited a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.24) than did those without pneumoconiosis. The incidence of hemorrhagic stroke was higher, but not significant, in the pneumoconiosis patients (HR 1.20, 95% CI 0.99–1.46). No statistically significant differences were observed between the pneumoconiosis and nonpneumoconiosis groups in acute coronary syndrome (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.95–1.26). The findings of this study reveal an association between pneumoconiosis and a higher risk of cerebrovascular events after adjustment for comorbidities. Healthcare providers should control the related risk factors for primary prevention of stroke in pneumoconiosis patients. PMID:26945404

  16. Validation of the Ability of SYNTAX and Clinical SYNTAX Scores to Predict Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Stent Implantation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, JiaYuan; Tang, Buzhou; Lin, YongQing; Ru, Ying; Wu, MaoXiong; Wang, Xiaolong; Chen, Qingcai; Chen, YangXin; Wang, JingFeng

    2016-10-01

    To compare the predicative ability of SYNTAX (Synergy between PCI with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery) and clinical SYNTAX scores for major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) after stent implantation in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Studies were identified by electronic and manual searches. Twenty-six studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled C-statistics of SYNTAX score for 1- and 5-year all-cause mortality (ACM) were 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.61-0.68) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.59-0.65), respectively, with weak heterogeneity. The 1- and 5-year ACM pooled C-statistics for clinical SYNTAX scores were significantly higher at 0.77 and 0.71, respectively (Ps < .05). Both scoring systems predicted 1- and 5-year MACE equally well. The pooled risk ratio of the SYNTAX score for predicting 1-year ACM per unit was 1.04 (95% CI: 1.03-1.05). Calibration analysis indicated SYNTAX scores overestimated the risk of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events in each risk stratum. The SYNTAX score demonstrated minimal discrimination in predicting 1- or 5-year adverse cardiovascular events after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with CAD. The clinical SYNTAX score could further improve the predictive capability for ACM but not MACE.

  17. Adverse childhood experiences of persons at risk for Huntington's disease or BRCA1/2 hereditary breast/ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, L B; van Duijn, E; Wolterbeek, R; Tibben, A

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is known to have a negative impact on family life. Offspring of HD patients may be exposed to adversity in childhood because of the parent's disease and its psychological consequences. BRCA1/2 hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA1/2) increases the risk for offspring of being exposed to parental disease or loss. Childhood adversity is associated with psychopathology and various other problems in later life. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) before age 16 were assessed in adults at 50% risk for HD (n = 74) or BRCA1/2 (n = 82) and in controls (n = 101), using the Negative Life Events Scale. Mean number and occurrence of ACEs were compared between groups. The odds of having experienced adversity in childhood were higher in HD offspring and BRCA1/2 offspring than in controls. HD offspring reported a higher mean number of ACEs than controls or BRCA1/2 offspring. In HD offspring, the prevalence of parental disease and parental dysfunction experienced before age 16 was higher than in controls. In BRCA1/2 offspring, the prevalence of parental loss before age 16 was higher than in controls. This study indicates that 53% of HD offspring and 45% of BRCA1/2 offspring are exposed to adversity in childhood or adolescence. The relevance of these findings for counseling in predictive testing programs, reproductive decision-making, and child rearing matters is discussed.

  18. The Prevalence of Childhood Adversity among Healthcare Workers and Its Relationship to Adult Life Events, Distress and Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maunder, Robert G.; Peladeau, Nathalie; Savage, Diane; Lancee, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the prevalence of childhood adversity among healthcare workers and if such experiences affect responses to adult life stress. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted of a 2003 study of 176 hospital-based healthcare workers, which surveyed lifetime traumatic events, recent life events, psychological distress, coping,…

  19. Bisphosphonates and Risk of Cardiovascular Events: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Rogers, James R.; Fulchino, Lisa A.; Kim, Caroline A.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Kim, Seoyoung C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Some evidence suggests that bisphosphonates may reduce atherosclerosis, while concerns have been raised about atrial fibrillation. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the effects of bisphosphonates on total adverse cardiovascular (CV) events, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and CV death in adults with or at risk for low bone mass. Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE through July 2014 identified 58 randomized controlled trials with longer than 6 months in duration that reported CV events. Absolute risks and the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effects odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of total CV events, atrial fibrillation, MI, stroke, and CV death were estimated. Subgroup analyses by follow-up duration, population characteristics, bisphosphonate types, and route were performed. Results Absolute risks over 25–36 months in bisphosphonate-treated versus control patients were 6.5% versus 6.2% for total CV events; 1.4% versus 1.5% for atrial fibrillation; 1.0% versus 1.2% for MI; 1.6% versus 1.9% for stroke; and 1.5% versus 1.4% for CV death. Bisphosphonate treatment up to 36 months did not have any significant effects on total CV events (14 trials; ORs [95% CI]: 0.98 [0.84–1.14]; I2 = 0.0%), atrial fibrillation (41 trials; 1.08 [0.92–1.25]; I2 = 0.0%), MI (10 trials; 0.96 [0.69