Science.gov

Sample records for adverse growth conditions

  1. Plasmid load adversely affects growth and gluconic acid secretion ability of mineral phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium Enterobacter asburiae PSI3 under P limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Archana, G; Naresh Kumar, G

    2011-01-20

    Effect of the metabolic load caused by the presence of plasmids on mineral phosphate-solubilizing (MPS) Enterobacter asburiae PSI3, was monitored with four plasmid cloning vectors and one native plasmid, varying in size, nature of the replicon, copy number and antibiotic resistance genes. Except for one plasmid, the presence of all other plasmids in E. asburiae PSI3 resulted in the loss of the MPS phenotype as reflected by the failure to bring about a drop in pH and release soluble P when grown in media containing rock phosphate (RP) as the sole P source. When 100 μM soluble P was supplemented along with RP, the adverse effects of plasmids on MPS phenotype and on growth parameters was reduced for some plasmid bearing derivatives, as monitored in terms of specific growth rates, glucose consumed, gluconic acids yields and P released. When 10 mM of soluble P as the only P source, was added to the medium all transformants showed growth and pH drop comparable with native strain. It may be concluded that different plasmids impose, to varying extents, a metabolic load in the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium E. asburiae PSI3 and results in diminishing its growth and P-solubilizing ability in P deficient conditions. PMID:20171856

  2. HEPA Filter Performance under Adverse Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Alderman, Steven; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    This study involved challenging nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under a variety of conditions that can arise in Department of Energy (DOE) applications such as: low or high RH, controlled and uncontrolled challenge, and filters with physically damaged media or seals (i.e., leaks). Reported findings correlate filter function as measured by traditional differential pressure techniques in comparison with simultaneous instrumental determination of up and down stream PM concentrations. Additionally, emission rates and failure signatures will be discussed for filters that have either failed or exceeded their usable lifetime. Significant findings from this effort include the use of thermocouples up and down stream of the filter housing to detect the presence of moisture. Also demonstrated in the moisture challenge series of tests is the effect of repeated wetting of the filter. This produces a phenomenon referred to as transient failure before the tensile strength of the media weakens to the point of physical failure. An evaluation of the effect of particle size distribution of the challenge aerosol on loading capacity of filters is also included. Results for soot and two size distributions of KCl are reported. Loading capacities for filters ranged from approximately 70 g of soot to nearly 900 g for the larger particle size distribution of KCl. (authors)

  3. Management of Cattle Exposed to Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, Terry L; Griffin, Dee

    2015-07-01

    During periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort and performance are compromised. Use of alternative supplementation programs need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals reared outside during winter, strategies that increase animal space and environmental buffers need to be used to minimize effects of mud, wet conditions, and windchill. There are ample opportunities for livestock producers to enhance animal welfare and minimize the impact of environmental stress. PMID:26139190

  4. Word Learning under Adverse Listening Conditions: Context-Specific Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creel, Sarah C.; Aslin, Richard N.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of word learning have presented the items to listeners under ideal conditions. Here we ask how listeners learn new vocabulary items under adverse listening conditions. Would listeners form acoustically-specific representations that incorporated the noise, base their representations on noise-free language knowledge, or both? To…

  5. Cutaneous adverse reactions specific to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, I; Voiculescu, VM; Bacalbasa, N; Prie, BE; Cojocaru, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Classical antineoplastic therapy is encumbered by extensively studied adverse reactions, most often of systemic nature. The emergence of new generations of anticancer treatments, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, besides improving the response to treatment and the survival rate, is accompanied by the occurrence of new specific side effects, incompletely studied. These side effects are most often cutaneous (hand foot syndrome, acneiform reactions), and in some cases are extremely severe, requiring dose reduction or drug discontinuation. The prevention of the cutaneous adverse effects and their treatment require a close collaboration between the oncologist and the dermatologist. The occurrence of some of these skin adverse effects may be a favorable prognostic factor for the response to the cancer treatment and the overall survival. Abbreviations: EGFR = epidermal growth factor receptors; EGFRI = epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors PMID:26361513

  6. Quality of whey powders stored under adverse conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein concentrate powder (WPC) is exported by the U.S. and is included in emergency aid foods, but the bags sent overseas are usually stored without refrigeration and under elevated temperature and relative humidity (RH). The shelf life of WPC under adverse conditions must be known to preven...

  7. Uncertainty Comparison of Visual Sensing in Adverse Weather Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Chen, Lun-Chi; Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on flood-region detection using monitoring images. However, adverse weather affects the outcome of image segmentation methods. In this paper, we present an experimental comparison of an outdoor visual sensing system using region-growing methods with two different growing rules-namely, GrowCut and RegGro. For each growing rule, several tests on adverse weather and lens-stained scenes were performed, taking into account and analyzing different weather conditions with the outdoor visual sensing system. The influence of several weather conditions was analyzed, highlighting their effect on the outdoor visual sensing system with different growing rules. Furthermore, experimental errors and uncertainties obtained with the growing rules were compared. The segmentation accuracy of flood regions yielded by the GrowCut, RegGro, and hybrid methods was 75%, 85%, and 87.7%, respectively. PMID:27447642

  8. Hierarchically nanotextured surfaces maintaining superhydrophobicity under severely adverse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Tanmoy; Antonini, Carlo; Auf der Mauer, Matthias; Stamatopoulos, Christos; Tiwari, Manish K.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-07-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are highly desirable for a broad range of technologies and products affecting everyday life. Despite significant progress in recent years in understanding the principles of hydrophobicity, mostly inspired by surface designs found in nature, many man-made surfaces employ readily processable materials, ideal to demonstrate principles, but with little chance of survivability outside a very limited range of well-controlled environments. Here we focus on the rational development of robust, hierarchically nanostructured, environmentally friendly, metal-based (aluminum) superhydrophobic surfaces, which maintain their performance under severely adverse conditions. Based on their functionality, we superpose selected hydrophobic layers (i.e. self-assembled monolayers, thin films, or nanofibrous coatings) on hierarchically textured aluminum surfaces, collectively imparting high level robustness of superhydrophobicity under adverse conditions. These surfaces simultaneously exhibit chemical stability, mechanical durability and droplet impalement resistance. They impressively maintained their superhydrophobicity after exposure to severely adverse chemical environments like strong alkaline (pH ~ 9-10), acidic (pH ~ 2-3), and ionic solutions (3.5 weight% of sodium chloride), and could simultaneously resist water droplet impalement up to an impact velocity of 3.2 m s-1 as well as withstand standard mechanical durability tests.Superhydrophobic surfaces are highly desirable for a broad range of technologies and products affecting everyday life. Despite significant progress in recent years in understanding the principles of hydrophobicity, mostly inspired by surface designs found in nature, many man-made surfaces employ readily processable materials, ideal to demonstrate principles, but with little chance of survivability outside a very limited range of well-controlled environments. Here we focus on the rational development of robust, hierarchically

  9. Perceptual Learning of Speech under Optimal and Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xujin; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a remarkable ability to understand spoken language despite the large amount of variability in speech. Previous research has shown that listeners can use lexical information to guide their interpretation of atypical sounds in speech (Norris, McQueen, & Cutler, 2003). This kind of lexically induced perceptual learning enables people to adjust to the variations in utterances due to talker-specific characteristics, such as individual identity and dialect. The current study investigated perceptual learning in two optimal conditions: conversational speech (Experiment 1) vs. clear speech (Experiment 2), and three adverse conditions: noise (Experiment 3a) vs. two cognitive loads (Experiments 4a & 4b). Perceptual learning occurred in the two optimal conditions and in the two cognitive load conditions, but not in the noise condition. Furthermore, perceptual learning occurred only in the first of two sessions for each participant, and only for atypical /s/ sounds and not for atypical /f/ sounds. This pattern of learning and non-learning reflects a balance between flexibility and stability that the speech system must have to deal with speech variability in the diverse conditions that speech is encountered. PMID:23815478

  10. Speech perception with tactile support in adverse listening conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drullman, Rob; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W.

    2002-05-01

    Since long, different methods of vibrotactile stimulation have been used as an aid for speech perception by some people with severe hearing impairment. The fact that experiments have shown (limited) benefits proves that tactile information can indeed give some support. In our research program on multimodal interfaces, we wondered if normal hearing listeners could benefit from tactile information when speech was presented in adverse listening conditions. Therefore, we set up a pilot experiment with a male speaker against a background of one, two, four or eight competing male speakers or speech noise. Sound was presented diotically to the subjects and the speech-reception threshold (SRT) for short sentences was measured. The temporal envelope (0-30 Hz) of the speech signal was computed in real time and led to the tactile transducer (MiniVib), which was fixed to the index finger. First results show a significant drop in SRT of about 3 dB when using tactile stimulation in the condition of one competing speaker. In the other conditions no significant effects were found, but there is a trend of a decrease of the SRT when tactile information is given. We will discuss the results of further experiments.

  11. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA commitment to human space flight includes continuing to fly astronauts on the ISS until it is decommissioned as well as possibly returning astronauts to the moon or having astronauts venture to an asteroid or Mars. As missions leave low Earth orbit and explore deeper space, BHP supports and conducts research to enable a risk posture that considers the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders “acceptable given mitigations,” for pre-, in, and post-flight.The Human System Risk Board (HSRB) determines the risk of various mission scenarios using a likelihood (per person per year) by consequences matrix examining those risks across two categories—long term health and operational (within mission). Colors from a stoplight signal are used by HSRB and quickly provide a means of assessing overall perceived risk for a particular mission scenario. Risk associated with the current six month missions on the ISS are classified as “accepted with monitoring” while planetary missions, such as a mission to Mars, are recognized to be a “red” risk that requires mitigation to ensure mission success.Currently, the HSRB deems that the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric outcomes requires mitigation for planetary missions owing to long duration isolation and radiation exposure (see Table 1). While limited research evidence exists from spaceflight, it is well known anecdotally that the shift from the two week shuttle missions to the six month ISS missions renders the psychological stressors of space as more salient over longer duration missions. Shuttle astronauts were expected just to tolerate any stressors that arose during their mission and were successful at doing so (Whitmire et al, 2013). While it is possible to deal with stressors such as social isolation and to live with incompatible crewmembers for two weeks on shuttle, “ignoring it” is much less likely to be a successful coping mechanism

  12. Transport Across Chloroplast Membranes: Optimizing Photosynthesis for Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplasts are central to solar light harvesting and photosynthesis. Optimal chloroplast functioning is vitally dependent on a very intensive traffic of metabolites and ions between the cytosol and stroma, and should be attuned for adverse environmental conditions. This is achieved by an orchestrated regulation of a variety of transport systems located at chloroplast membranes such as porines, solute channels, ion-specific cation and anion channels, and various primary and secondary active transport systems. In this review we describe the molecular nature and functional properties of the inner and outer envelope and thylakoid membrane channels and transporters. We then discuss how their orchestrated regulation affects thylakoid structure, electron transport and excitation energy transfer, proton-motive force partition, ion homeostasis, stromal pH regulation, and volume regulation. We link the activity of key cation and anion transport systems with stress-specific signaling processes in chloroplasts, and discuss how these signals interact with the signals generated in other organelles to optimize the cell performance, with a special emphasis on Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species signaling. PMID:26597501

  13. Adverse Reaction to Cetuximab, an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Štulhofer Buzina, Daška; Martinac, Ivana; Ledić Drvar, Daniela; Čeović, Romana; Bilić, Ivan; Marinović, Branka

    2016-04-01

    Dear Editor, Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a new strategy in treatment of a variety of solid tumors, such as colorectal carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and pancreatic cancer (1). Cetuximab is a chimeric human-murine monoclonal antibody against EGFR. Cutaneous side effects are the most common adverse reactions occurring during epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRI) therapy. Papulopustular rash (acne like rash) develop with 80-86% patients receiving cetuximab, while xerosis, eczema, fissures, teleangiectasiae, hyperpigmentations, and nail and hair changes occur less frequently (2). The mechanism underlying these skin changes has not been established and understood. It seems EGFRI alter cell growth and differentiation, leading to impaired stratum corneum and cell apoptosis (3-5). An abdominoperineal resection of the rectal adenocarcinoma (Dukes C) was performed on a 43-year-old female patient. Following surgery, adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy was applied. After two years, the patient suffered a metastatic relapse. Abdominal lymphadenopathy was detected on multi-slice computer tomography (MSCT) images, with an increased value of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) tumor marker (maximal value 57 ng/mL). Hematological and biochemical tests were within normal limits, so first-line chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and a 5-fluorouracil (FOLFOX4) protocol was introduced. A wild type of the KRAS gene was confirmed in tumor tissue (diagnostic prerequisite for the introduction of EGFRI) and cetuximab (250 mg per m2 of body surface) was added to the treatment protocol. The patient responded well to the treatment with confirmed partial regression of the tumor formations. Three months after the patient started using cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, the patient presented with a papulopustular eruption in the seborrhoeic areas (Figure 1) and eczematoid reactions on the extremities

  14. 75 FR 8353 - Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... COMMISSION Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions February 16, 2010. AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Due to adverse weather conditions, the Federal Communications..., February 11, 2010. In recognition of the numerous closings and disruptions caused by the weather in...

  15. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  16. Functions of Nitric Oxide (NO) in Roots during Development and under Adverse Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The free radical molecule, nitric oxide (NO), is present in the principal organs of plants, where it plays an important role in a wide range of physiological functions. Root growth and development are highly regulated by both internal and external factors such as nutrient availability, hormones, pattern formation, cell polarity and cell cycle control. The presence of NO in roots has opened up new areas of research on the role of NO, including root architecture, nutrient acquisition, microorganism interactions and the response mechanisms to adverse environmental conditions, among others. Additionally, the exogenous application of NO throughout the roots has the potential to counteract specific damages caused by certain stresses. This review aims to provide an up-to-date perspective on NO functions in the roots of higher plants. PMID:27135326

  17. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss... for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program § 760.203 Eligible losses, adverse weather, and... weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, (including, but not...

  18. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss... for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program § 760.203 Eligible losses, adverse weather, and... weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, (including, but not...

  19. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss... for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program § 760.203 Eligible losses, adverse weather, and... weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, (including, but not...

  20. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss... for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program § 760.203 Eligible losses, adverse weather, and... weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, (including, but not...

  1. Fluorescence parameters of leaves of trees and shrubs during period of adverse weather conditions in Krasnoyarsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorueva, E. N.; Zavoruev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of adverse weather conditions (AWC) on the fluorescence parameters of leaves Prinsepia sinensis, Amelanchier florida, Crataegus chlorocarca is obtained. However, significant changes in the fluorescence of the leaves of Acer negundo, Betula pendula under AWC were not observed.

  2. ACCEPT: Introduction of the Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney A.; Santanu, Das; Janakiraman, Vijay Manikandan; Hosein, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of anomalies or adverse events is a challenging task, and there are a variety of methods which can be used to address the problem. In this paper, we introduce a generic framework developed in MATLAB (sup registered mark) called ACCEPT (Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox). ACCEPT is an architectural framework designed to compare and contrast the performance of a variety of machine learning and early warning algorithms, and tests the capability of these algorithms to robustly predict the onset of adverse events in any time-series data generating systems or processes.

  3. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors: A Review of Cutaneous Adverse Events and Management

    PubMed Central

    Chanprapaph, K.; Vachiramon, V.; Rattanakaemakorn, P.

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor inhibitors (EGFRI), the first targeted cancer therapy, are currently an essential treatment for many advance-stage epithelial cancers. These agents have the superior ability to target cancers cells and better safety profile compared to conventional chemotherapies. However, cutaneous adverse events are common due to the interference of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in the skin. Cutaneous toxicities lead to poor compliance, drug cessation, and psychosocial discomfort. This paper summarizes the current knowledge concerning the presentation and management of skin toxicity from EGFRI. The common dermatologic adverse events are papulopustules and xerosis. Less common findings are paronychia, regulatory abnormalities of hair growth, maculopapular rash, mucositis, and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. Radiation enhances EGFRI rash due to synergistic toxicity. There is a positive correlation between the occurrence and severity of cutaneous adverse effects and tumor response. To date, prophylactic systemic tetracycline and tetracycline class antibiotics have proven to be the most effective treatment regime. PMID:24723942

  4. Health Monitoring and Management for Manufacturing Workers in Adverse Working Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoya; Zhong, Miao; Wan, Jiafu; Yi, Minglun; Gao, Tiancheng

    2016-10-01

    In adverse working conditions, environmental parameters such as metallic dust, noise, and environmental temperature, directly affect the health condition of manufacturing workers. It is therefore important to implement health monitoring and management based on important physiological parameters (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature). In recent years, new technologies, such as body area networks, cloud computing, and smart clothing, have allowed the improvement of the quality of services. In this article, we first give five-layer architecture for health monitoring and management of manufacturing workers. Then, we analyze the system implementation process, including environmental data processing, physical condition monitoring and system services and management, and present the corresponding algorithms. Finally, we carry out an evaluation and analysis from the perspective of insurance and compensation for manufacturing workers in adverse working conditions. The proposed scheme will contribute to the improvement of workplace conditions, realize health monitoring and management, and protect the interests of manufacturing workers. PMID:27624491

  5. Comprehension of Familiar and Unfamiliar Native Accents under Adverse Listening Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adank, Patti; Evans, Bronwen G.; Stuart-Smith, Jane; Scott, Sophie K.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the relative processing cost associated with comprehension of an unfamiliar native accent under adverse listening conditions. Two sentence verification experiments were conducted in which listeners heard sentences at various signal-to-noise ratios. In Experiment 1, these sentences were spoken in a familiar or an…

  6. Growth Conditions and Rifampin Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Arthur L.; Gross, Gayle H.

    1979-01-01

    The susceptibility of Escherichia coli to rifampin was measured during unlimited growth in rich and poor media and during chemostat growth limited by the carbon source. During batch growth at low turbidities, the susceptibility of the bacteria increased as the growth rate decreased, consistent with the longer time available for drug penetration in the poorer media. During chemostat culture, the bacteria remained highly susceptible or became genetically resistant, dependent on the manner in which the bacteria were exposed to the antibiotic. If the concentration of rifampin was abruptly raised, susceptible cells were replaced by genetically resistant cells. However, if the concentration of antibiotic was raised slowly, the genetically susceptible cells continued to grow. This difference in response of chemostat cultures according to mode of drug administration was attributed to an inducible detoxification of the drug by the bacteria, because the susceptible genotype is maintained only when the concentration of rifampin is increased gradually and when a high population of cells is maintained. Direct evidence for the inactivation of the rifampin from the bioassay of culture supernatants is presented. PMID:371543

  7. Adverse Pregnancy Conditions, Infertility, and Future Cardiovascular Risk: Implications for Mother and Child

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Wei, Janet; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2016-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy conditions in women are common and have been associated with adverse cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes such as myocardial infarction and stroke. As risk stratification in women is often suboptimal, recognition of non-traditional risk factors such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and premature delivery has become increasingly important. Additionally, such conditions may also increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in the children of afflicted women. In this review, we aim to highlight these conditions, along with infertility, and the association between such conditions and various cardiovascular outcomes and related maternal risk along with potential translation of risk to offspring. We will also discuss proposed mechanisms driving these associations as well as potential opportunities for screening and risk modification. PMID:26037616

  8. Causal Factors and Adverse Conditions of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Jones, Sharon Monica

    2010-01-01

    The causal factors of accidents from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database and incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) database associated with loss of control (LOC) were examined for four types of operations (i.e., Federal Aviation Regulation Part 121, Part 135 Scheduled, Part 135 Nonscheduled, and Part 91) for the years 1988 to 2004. In-flight LOC is a serious aviation problem. Well over half of the LOC accidents included at least one fatality (80 percent in Part 121), and roughly half of all aviation fatalities in the studied time period occurred in conjunction with LOC. An adverse events table was updated to provide focus to the technology validation strategy of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project. The table contains three types of adverse conditions: failure, damage, and upset. Thirteen different adverse condition subtypes were gleaned from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), the FAA Accident and Incident database, and the NTSB database. The severity and frequency of the damage conditions, initial test conditions, and milestones references are also provided.

  9. Developing robust crop plants for sustaining growth and yield under adverse climatic changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural production and quality are expected to suffer from adverse changes in climatic conditions, including global warming, and this will affect worldwide human and animal food security. Global warming has been shown to negatively impact crop yield and therefore will affect sustainability of a...

  10. Assessment of the State of the Art of Flight Control Technologies as Applicable to Adverse Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary s.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Leone, Karen M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Withrow, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Literature from academia, industry, and other Government agencies was surveyed to assess the state of the art in current Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) aircraft technologies. Over 100 papers from 25 conferences from the time period 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. An assessment of the general state of the art in adaptive flight control is summarized first, followed by an assessment of the state of the art as applicable to 13 identified adverse conditions. Specific areas addressed in the general assessment include flight control when compensating for damage or reduced performance, retrofit software upgrades to flight controllers, flight control through engine response, and finally test and validation of new adaptive controllers. The state-of-the-art assessment applicable to the adverse conditions include technologies not specifically related to flight control, but may serve as inputs to a future flight control algorithm. This study illustrates existing gaps and opportunities for additional research by the NASA IRAC Project

  11. Algorithms for contours depicting static electric fields during adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1991-01-01

    A flexible and functional analytical tool is developed for the study of electric fields during adverse weather conditions. This tool is designed for use by members of the Atmospheric Science Group as part of their overall effort to appraise environmental conditions during these situations. It is also used to illustrate approaches open to those interested in the study of the physics of ambient electric field phenomena. Computer resources of KSC are coordinated with original software to produce contour interpretations of electric field data available from a grid of field mills spanning the region. Three model algorithms are presented and examples are given illustrating the system design, flexibility, and utility.

  12. Evaluation of adaptive dynamic range optimization in adverse listening conditions for cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Hussnain; Hazrati, Oldooz; Tobey, Emily A.; Hansen, John H. L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Adaptive Dynamic Range Optimization (ADRO) on speech identification for cochlear implant (CI) users in adverse listening conditions. In this study, anechoic quiet, noisy, reverberant, noisy reverberant, and reverberant noisy conditions are evaluated. Two scenarios are considered when modeling the combined effects of reverberation and noise: (a) noise is added to the reverberant speech, and (b) noisy speech is reverberated. CI users were tested in different listening environments using IEEE sentences presented at 65 dB sound pressure level. No significant effect of ADRO processing on speech intelligibility was observed. PMID:25190428

  13. Evaluation of adaptive dynamic range optimization in adverse listening conditions for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussnain; Hazrati, Oldooz; Tobey, Emily A; Hansen, John H L

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Adaptive Dynamic Range Optimization (ADRO) on speech identification for cochlear implant (CI) users in adverse listening conditions. In this study, anechoic quiet, noisy, reverberant, noisy reverberant, and reverberant noisy conditions are evaluated. Two scenarios are considered when modeling the combined effects of reverberation and noise: (a) noise is added to the reverberant speech, and (b) noisy speech is reverberated. CI users were tested in different listening environments using IEEE sentences presented at 65 dB sound pressure level. No significant effect of ADRO processing on speech intelligibility was observed. PMID:25190428

  14. Some effects of adverse weather conditions on performance of airplane antiskid braking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Mccarty, J. L.; Tanner, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of current antiskid braking systems operating under adverse weather conditions was analyzed in an effort to both identify the causes of locked-wheel skids which sometimes occur when the runway is slippery and to find possible solutions to this operational problem. This analysis was made possible by the quantitative test data provided by recently completed landing research programs using fully instrumented flight test airplanes and was further supported by tests performed at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility. The antiskid system logic for brake control and for both touchdown and locked-wheel protection is described and its response behavior in adverse weather is discussed in detail with the aid of available data. The analysis indicates that the operational performance of the antiskid logic circuits is highly dependent upon wheel spin-up acceleration and can be adversely affected by certain pilot braking inputs when accelerations are low. Normal antiskid performance is assured if the tire-to-runway traction is sufficient to provide high wheel spin-up accelerations or if the system is provided a continuous, accurate ground speed reference. The design of antiskid systems is complicated by the necessity for tradeoffs between tire braking and cornering capabilities, both of which are necessary to provide safe operations in the presence of cross winds, particularly under slippery runway conditions.

  15. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders: Evidence Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Williams, Thomas J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Schmidt, Lacey L.; Shea, Camille

    2016-01-01

    In April 2010, President Obama declared a space pioneering goal for the United States in general and NASA in particular. "Fifty years after the creation of NASA, our goal is no longer just a destination to reach. Our goal is the capacity for people to work and learn and operate and live safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time, ultimately in ways that are more sustainable and even indefinite." Thus NASA's Strategic Objective 1.1 emerged as "expand human presence into the solar system and to the surface of Mars to advance exploration, science, innovation, benefits to humanity, and international collaboration" (NASA 2015b). Any space flight, be it of long or short duration, occurs in an extreme environment that has unique stressors. Even with excellent selection methods, the potential for behavioral problems among space flight crews remain a threat to mission success. Assessment of factors that are related to behavioral health can help minimize the chances of distress and, thus, reduce the likelihood of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders arising within a crew. Similarly, countermeasures that focus on prevention and treatment can mitigate the cognitive or behavioral conditions that, should they arise, would impact mission success. Given the general consensus that longer duration, isolation, and confined missions have a greater risk for behavioral health ensuring crew behavioral health over the long term is essential. Risk, which within the context of this report is assessed with respect to behavioral health and performance, is addressed to deter development of cognitive and behavioral degradations or psychiatric conditions in space flight and analog populations, and to monitor, detect, and treat early risk factors, predictors and other contributing factors. Based on space flight and analog evidence, the average incidence rate of an adverse behavioral health event occurring during a space mission is relatively low for the

  16. Adverse psychosocial working conditions and minor psychiatric disorders among bank workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In most countries, the financial service sector has undergone great organizational changes in the past decades, with potential negative impact on bank workers' mental health. The aim of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders (MPD) among Brazilian bank workers and to investigate whether they are associated with an adverse psychosocial working environment. Methods A cross-sectional study of a random sample of 2,500 workers in a Brazilian state bank in 2008. The presence of MPD was determined by the General Health Questionnaire.(GHQ). Psychosocial work conditions were assessed by means of the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). The presence and magnitude of the independent associations between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions were determined by Prevalence Ratios, obtained by Poisson regression. Results From 2,337 eligible workers, 88% participated. The prevalence of MPD was greater among women (45% vs. 41%; p > 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, the prevalence of MPD was twice as high among bank workers exposed to high psychological demand and low control at work and under high effort and low reward working conditions. The lack of social support at work and the presence of over-commitment were also associated with higher prevalence of MPD. A negative interaction effect was found between over-commitment and effort-reward imbalance. Conclusion The prevalence of MPD is high among bank workers. The results reinforce the association between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions, assessed by the JCQ and ERI models. The direction of the interaction observed between over-commitment and ERI was contrary to what was expected. PMID:21062496

  17. Climate Change and Crop Exposure to Adverse Weather: Changes to Frost Risk and Grapevine Flowering Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mosedale, Jonathan R.; Wilson, Robert J.; Maclean, Ilya M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of grapevines in the UK and many other cool climate regions is expected to benefit from the higher growing season temperatures predicted under future climate scenarios. Yet the effects of climate change on the risk of adverse weather conditions or events at key stages of crop development are not always captured by aggregated measures of seasonal or yearly climates, or by downscaling techniques that assume climate variability will remain unchanged under future scenarios. Using fine resolution projections of future climate scenarios for south-west England and grapevine phenology models we explore how risks to cool-climate vineyard harvests vary under future climate conditions. Results indicate that the risk of adverse conditions during flowering declines under all future climate scenarios. In contrast, the risk of late spring frosts increases under many future climate projections due to advancement in the timing of budbreak. Estimates of frost risk, however, were highly sensitive to the choice of phenology model, and future frost exposure declined when budbreak was calculated using models that included a winter chill requirement for dormancy break. The lack of robust phenological models is a major source of uncertainty concerning the impacts of future climate change on the development of cool-climate viticulture in historically marginal climatic regions. PMID:26496127

  18. LEARNING TO BE BAD: ADVERSE SOCIAL CONDITIONS, SOCIAL SCHEMAS, AND CRIME

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Ronald L.; Burt, Callie Harbin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we develop and test a new approach to explain the link between social factors and individual offending. We argue that seemingly disparate family, peer, and community conditions lead to crime because the lessons communicated by these events are similar and promote social schemas involving a hostile view of people and relationships, a preference for immediate rewards, and a cynical view of conventional norms. Further, we posit that these three schemas are interconnected and combine to form a criminogenic knowledge structure that gives rise to situational interpretations legitimating criminal behavior. Structural equation modeling with a sample of roughly 700 hundred African American teens provided strong support for the model. The findings indicated that persistent exposure to adverse conditions such as community crime, discrimination, harsh parenting, deviant peers and low neighborhood collective efficacy increased commitment to the three social schemas. The three schemas were highly intercorrelated and combined to form a latent construct that strongly predicted increases in crime. Further, in large measure the effect of the various adverse conditions on increases in crime was indirect through their impact on this latent construct. We discuss the extent to which the social schematic model presented in the paper might be used to integrate concepts and findings from several of the major theories of criminal behavior. PMID:21760641

  19. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber: Adverse operating conditions test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures are described along with results of electrically heated tube and channel tests conducted to determine adverse operating condition limits for convectively cooled chambers typical of Space Shuttle Orbit Manuevering Engine designs. Hot-start tests were conducted with corrosion resistant steel and nickel tubes with both monomethylhydrazine and 50-50 coolants. Helium ingestion, in both bubble and froth form, was studied in tubular test sections. Helium bubble ingestion and burn-out limits in rectangular channels were also investigated.

  20. Neural Basis of Psychological Growth following Adverse Experiences: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takashi X; Jung, Minyoung; Kojima, Masahiko; Saito, Daisuke N; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Tomoda, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on the aftereffects of stressful or traumatic events has emphasized the negative outcomes from these experiences. However, the positive outcomes deriving from adversity are increasingly being examined, and such positive changes are described as posttraumatic growth (PTG). To investigate the relationship between basal whole-brain functional connectivity and PTG, we employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed the neural networks using independent component analysis in a sample of 33 healthy controls. Correlations were calculated between the network connectivity strength and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) score. There were positive associations between the PTGI scores and brain activation in the rostral prefrontal cortex and superior parietal lobule (SPL) within the left central executive network (CEN) (respectively, r = 0.41, p < 0.001; r = 0.49, p < 0.001). Individuals with higher psychological growth following adverse experiences had stronger activation in prospective or working memory areas within the executive function network than did individuals with lower psychological growth (r = 0.40, p < 0.001). Moreover, we found that individuals with higher PTG demonstrated stronger connectivity between the SPL and supramarginal gyrus (SMG). The SMG is one of the brain regions associated with the ability to reason about the mental states of others, otherwise known as mentalizing. These findings suggest that individuals with higher psychological growth may have stronger functional connectivity between memory functions within the CEN and social functioning in the SMG, and that their better sociality may result from using more memory for mentalizing during their daily social interactions. PMID:26291449

  1. Neural Basis of Psychological Growth following Adverse Experiences: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Masahiko; Saito, Daisuke N.; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Tomoda, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on the aftereffects of stressful or traumatic events has emphasized the negative outcomes from these experiences. However, the positive outcomes deriving from adversity are increasingly being examined, and such positive changes are described as posttraumatic growth (PTG). To investigate the relationship between basal whole-brain functional connectivity and PTG, we employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed the neural networks using independent component analysis in a sample of 33 healthy controls. Correlations were calculated between the network connectivity strength and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) score. There were positive associations between the PTGI scores and brain activation in the rostral prefrontal cortex and superior parietal lobule (SPL) within the left central executive network (CEN) (respectively, r = 0.41, p < 0.001; r = 0.49, p < 0.001). Individuals with higher psychological growth following adverse experiences had stronger activation in prospective or working memory areas within the executive function network than did individuals with lower psychological growth (r = 0.40, p < 0.001). Moreover, we found that individuals with higher PTG demonstrated stronger connectivity between the SPL and supramarginal gyrus (SMG). The SMG is one of the brain regions associated with the ability to reason about the mental states of others, otherwise known as mentalizing. These findings suggest that individuals with higher psychological growth may have stronger functional connectivity between memory functions within the CEN and social functioning in the SMG, and that their better sociality may result from using more memory for mentalizing during their daily social interactions. PMID:26291449

  2. Speech perception under adverse conditions: insights from behavioral, computational, and neuroscience research

    PubMed Central

    Guediche, Sara; Blumstein, Sheila E.; Fiez, Julie A.; Holt, Lori L.

    2014-01-01

    Adult speech perception reflects the long-term regularities of the native language, but it is also flexible such that it accommodates and adapts to adverse listening conditions and short-term deviations from native-language norms. The purpose of this article is to examine how the broader neuroscience literature can inform and advance research efforts in understanding the neural basis of flexibility and adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Specifically, we highlight the potential role of learning algorithms that rely on prediction error signals and discuss specific neural structures that are likely to contribute to such learning. To this end, we review behavioral studies, computational accounts, and neuroimaging findings related to adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Already, a few studies have alluded to a potential role of these mechanisms in adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Furthermore, we consider research topics in neuroscience that offer insight into how perception can be adaptively tuned to short-term deviations while balancing the need to maintain stability in the perception of learned long-term regularities. Consideration of the application and limitations of these algorithms in characterizing flexible speech perception under adverse conditions promises to inform theoretical models of speech. PMID:24427119

  3. Rural population growth and living conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, N; Zhu, C

    1991-01-01

    The problem of the effect of population growth on subsistence conditions is addressed by developing generalized premises, principles, and methods for quantifying standards or conditions for growth. This method is applied to 1989 data for Nanzheng Country, China. Background information is provided on an experiment made public in 1985 and implemented in 1986 by the Family Planning (FP) Department of Nanzheng County of Shaanxi Province in Hongmiao District in which the following conditions were placed on bearing a second child: 1) income must be 20% higher than the average village income level, and breeders must have an average income of not 400 yuan/year, crop planters not 300 yuan/year, textile weavers not 200 yuan/year, and industrial and subsidiary production workers not 400 yuan/year (generally 4 pigs or 100 chickens or ducks) or 2) 100 income-producing trees must be planted around he residential area/family plot or stony fields must be transformed into arable land under the contract responsibility system, or groves, orchards, or tea plantations must be planted. These conditions must be met one year prior to proposing to have a second child. The approval rate in 1986-88 was 88.7%, and the second parity rate was 78.4%. Deteriorated conditions had not yet occurred in this country when this proposal was made. The premises considered important in preparing assistance conditions were determined. 1) Conditions for population growth should be resolved within the area. 2) Subsistence conditions should be taken care of by the family. 3) There should be a centralized standard, not a family standard, such that living conditions/capita should not decrease because of population growth. Quantification is made expressing the relationship between subsistence and growth. The application of these conditions for households in Hongmiao District is that the average subsistence conditions need to be higher than other households by 12.3% for new population growth. The assumption is

  4. Bill E. Kunkle Interdisciplinary Beef Symposium: Animal welfare concerns for cattle exposed to adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, T L

    2014-12-01

    Increasing awareness of animal welfare has become a priority in food production systems involving animals. Under normal working environments, production practices are constantly evaluated to maintain optimum levels of animal well-being. However, during periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort, as well as animal performance, are often compromised. In the Midwest and Great Plains states, the heat waves of 1995, 1999, 2006, 2009, 2010, and 2013 were particularly difficult on animals reared in confinement, with documented cattle losses approaching 5,000 head each year. Additionally, during the summer of 2011, nearly 15,000 head of cattle across 5 states were lost as a result of heat stress. During prolonged periods of heat stress, lower conceptions rates are observed in livestock. In addition, animals reared in confinement buildings are often compromised because of limitations in ventilation systems. Under the opposite environmental spectrum, the winters of 1992 to 1993, 1996 to 1997, 1997 to 1998, 2006 to 2007, and 2008 to 2009 caused hardship for livestock producers, particularly for those rearing animals in an outdoor environment. During the winters of 1996 to 1997 and 2008 to 2009 up to 50% of the newborn calves were lost in many areas, with over 75,000 head of cattle lost in the northern plains states. Late fall and early winter snowstorms in 1992, 1997, 2006, and 2013 resulted in the loss of over 25,000 head of cattle each year in the Great Plains region of the United States. Economic losses from reduced performance of cattle experiencing severe environmental stress likely exceed losses associated with livestock death by 5- to 10-fold. Use of alternative supplementation programs may need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals

  5. Research on long-range laser active imaging system applied in adverse weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Zhi-gang; Liu, Meng-de; Yang, Li; Kabanov, V. V.; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Jie; Chu, Shi-bo; Yang, Jun-xian; Zhou, Yang

    2013-09-01

    A low-light level night vision device or thermal infrared imager belonging to passive imaging system is generally used in daily target detection and identification. But in adverse weather conditions of dark of night, poor atmospheric transmission characteristics or strong backscattering (fog, dust, rain, snow, etc.), even the most sensitive low-light level night vision could not provide enough image resolution for detecting and identifying targets, and the thermal infrared imager is also limited by low temperature contrast. A long-range laser active imaging system, in combination with high-power semiconductor pulsed lasers with collimation technology, receiving objective lens of large diameter, long focal length and narrow viewing angle, high-gain image intensifier CCD (ICCD) camera and range-gated synchronization control technology, is developed for long distance target detection and high resolution imaging in adverse weather conditions. The system composition and operating principle are introduced. The extremely powerful and efficient illuminators with collimation technology are able to deliver uniform beams, which are essential for illuminating targets at a distance and generating high-quality images. The particular receiving objective lens, ICCD camera and range-gated synchronization control technology could reduce strong backscattering signal and improve imaging signal-to-noise ratio. The laboratory and outfield experiments have been done to validate imaging effect and imaging quality. The results show that the minimum resolution is about 3-5cm, 10cm, and greater than 20 cm for target far from 1100m, 4700m, and 6700m respectively in dark of night. Furthermore, the minimum resolution could reach to 10cm and 20cm for target far from 2500m and 4800m respectively and the image is too blurred to accurately identify the target when observing the target far from 7200m in rainy condition.

  6. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  7. Determination and representation of electric charge distributions associated with adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithms are presented for determining the size and location of electric charges which model storm systems and lightning strikes. The analysis utilizes readings from a grid of ground level field mills and geometric constraints on parameters to arrive at a representative set of charges. This set is used to generate three dimensional graphical depictions of the set as well as contour maps of the ground level electrical environment over the grid. The composite, analytic and graphic package is demonstrated and evaluated using controlled input data and archived data from a storm system. The results demonstrate the packages utility as: an operational tool in appraising adverse weather conditions; a research tool in studies of topics such as storm structure, storm dynamics, and lightning; and a tool in designing and evaluating grid systems.

  8. Chosen risk level during car-following in adverse weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Hjelkrem, Odd André; Ryeng, Eirin Olaussen

    2016-10-01

    This study examines how precipitation, light conditions and surface conditions affect the drivers' risk perception. An indicator CRI (Chosen Risk Index) is defined, which describes the chosen risk level for drivers in a car-following situation. The dataset contains about 70 000 observations of driver behaviour and weather status on a rural road. Based on the theory of risk homeostasis and an assumption that driving behaviour in situations with daylight, dry road and no precipitation reflects drivers' target level of risk, generalised linear models (GLM) were estimated for cars and trucks separately to reveal the effect of adverse weather conditions on risk perception. The analyses show that both car and truck drivers perceive the highest risk when driving on snow covered roads. For car drivers, a snow covered road in combination with moderate rain or light snow are the factors which lowers the CRI the most. For trucks, snow cover and partially covered roads significantly lowers the CRI, while precipitation did not seem to impose any higher risk. Interaction effects were found for car drivers only. PMID:27454867

  9. Effect of exposure to adverse climatic conditions on production in Manchega dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    Ramón, M; Díaz, C; Pérez-Guzman, M D; Carabaño, M J

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effects of exposure to adverse weather conditions on milk production to assess the thermotolerance capability of the Manchega breed, a dairy sheep reared in the Mediterranean area, and the extent of decline in production outside the thermal comfort zone. To achieve this purpose, we merged data from the official milk recording of the breed with weather information and used to describe the cold and heat stress response for production traits. Production data consisted of 1,094,804 test-day records from the first 3 lactations of 177,605 ewes gathered between years 2000 to 2010. For each production trait and climate variable, the thermal load production response was characterized by the estimation of cold and heat stress thresholds that define a thermoneutral zone and the slopes of production decay outside this thermoneutral zone. Overall, we observed a comfort region between 10 and 22°C for daily average temperature, 18 and 30°C for daily maximum temperature, and from 9 to 18 units for a temperature-humidity index (THI) for all traits. Decline in production due to cold stress effects was of a greater magnitude than heat stress effects, especially for milk yield. Production losses ranged between 7 and 16 and from 0.2 to 0.6g/d per °C (or THI unit) for milk and for fat and protein yields, respectively. For heat stress, the observed decline in production was of 1 to 5 and 0.1 to 0.3g/d per °C (or THI unit) above the threshold for milk yield and for fat and protein yields, respectively. Highly productive animals showed a narrower comfort zone and higher slopes of decay. The study of lagged effects of thermal load showed how consequences of cold and heat stress are already visible in the first hours after exposure. Thus, production losses were due mainly to climate conditions on the day of control and the day before, with conditions on the previous days having a smaller effect. Annual economic losses due to thermal (cold and heat

  10. Minimal conditions for protocell stationary growth.

    PubMed

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We show that self-replication of a chemical system encapsulated within a membrane growing from within is possible without any explicit feature such as autocatalysis or metabolic closure, and without the need for their emergence through complexity. We use a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, and we investigate the protocell's capability for self-replication, for various numbers of reactions in the network. We elucidate the underlying mechanisms in terms of simple minimal conditions pertaining only to the topology of the embedded chemical reaction network. A necessary condition is that each moiety must be fed, and a sufficient condition is that each siphon is fed. Although these minimal conditions are purely topological, by further endowing conservative chemical reaction networks with thermodynamically consistent kinetics, we show that the growth rate tends to increase on increasing the Gibbs energy per unit molecular weight of the nutrient and on decreasing that of the membrane precursor. PMID:25951201

  11. Mycorrhiza Reduces Adverse Effects of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) on Growth of Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N.

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal roots are frequently colonized by fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l. – Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). These ascomycetes are common and widespread colonizers of tree roots. Some PAC strains reduce growth increments of their hosts but are beneficial in protecting roots against pathogens. Nothing is known about the effects of PAC on mycorrhizal fungi and the PAC-mycorrhiza association on plant growth, even though these two fungal groups occur closely together in natural habitats. We expect reduced colonization rates and reduced negative effects of PAC on host plants if roots are co-colonized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM). Depending on the temperature regime interactions among the partners in this tripartite ECM-PAC-plant system might also change. To test our hypotheses, effects of four PAC genotypes (two pathogenic and two non-pathogenic on the Norway spruce), mycorrhization by Laccaria bicolor (strain S238N) and two temperature regimes (19°C and 25°C) on the biomass of the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings were studied. Mycorrhization compensated the adverse effects of PAC on the growth of the Norway spruce at both temperatures. The growth of the Douglas-fir was not influenced either by PAC or mycorrhization at 19°C, but at 25°C mycorrhization had a similar protective effect as in the Norway spruce. The compensatory effects probably rely on the reduction of the PAC-colonization density by mycorrhizae. Temperature and the PAC strain only had a differential effect on the biomass of the Norway spruce but not on the Douglas-fir. Higher temperature reduced mycorrhization of both hosts. We conclude that ectomycorrhizae form physical and/or physiological barriers against PAC leading to reduced PAC-colonization of the roots. Additionally, our results indicate that global warming could cause a general decrease of mycorrhization making primary roots more accessible to other symbionts and

  12. Overcoming adverse weather conditions with a common optical path, multiple sensors, and intelligent image fusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Joseph; Piacentino, Michael; Caldwell, Brian

    2008-04-01

    Mission success is highly dependent on the ability to accomplish Surveillance, Situation Awareness, Target Detection and Classification, but is challenging under adverse weather conditions. This paper introduces an engineering prototype to address the image collection challenges using a Common Optical Path, Multiple Sensors and an Intelligent Image Fusion System, and provides illustrations and sample fusion images. Panavision's advanced wide spectrum optical design has permitted a suite of imagers to perform observations through a common optical path with a common field of view, thereby aligning images and facilitating optimized downstream image processing. The adaptable design also supports continuous zoom or Galilean lenses for multiple field of views. The Multiple Sensors include: (1) High-definition imaging sensors that are small, have low power consumption and a wide dynamic range; (2) EMCCD sensors that transition from daylight to starlight, even under poor weather conditions, with sensitivity down to 0.00025 Lux; and (3) SWIR sensors that, with the advancement in InGaAs, are able to generate ultra-high sensitivity images from 1-1.7μm reflective light and can achieve imaging through haze and some types of camouflage. The intelligent fusion of multiple sensors provides high-resolution color information with previously impossible sensitivity and contrast. With the integration of Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), real-time Image Processing and Fusion Algorithms can facilitate mission success in a small, low power package.

  13. Crystal growth under microgravity conditions with using of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feonychev, A.; Bondareva, N.

    The peculiarities of melt flows and crystal growth by the Bridgman and floating zone methods aboard spacecrafts under the action of steady axial or rotating magnetic field are considered. Steady magnetic field can minimize adverse effect of residual accelerations and vibrations on dopant segregation in crystals growing by the Bridgman method but it requires using strong magnetic fields, which induces specific oscillations. Under strong convection in terrestrial conditions steady magnetic field gives positive effect. Under growth of small-sized crystals by the floating zone method in microgravity conditions an use of steady magnetic field brings into dramatic increase of radial segregation due to convective vortex to free fluid surface. The flows being created by rotating magnetic field and resultant under combination of Marangoni convection with rotating magnetic field were studied for wide range of parameters including the regimes of oscillatory (turbulent) convection. Mathematical model and computer program was tested by published results of two experiments. The dependence of transition from laminar to oscillatory flow was obtained for different boundary conditions, geometric parameters of fluid and intensity of magnetic field. Specific oscillations with very low frequency and oscillations of the beating type had been discovered under the action rotating magnetic field on Marangoni convection. The mutual influence of rotating magnetic field and thermocapillary convection on flow stability was noted. Use of rotating magnetic field under crystal growth by floating zone method leads to reduction of azimuth velocity which is responsible for origin of oscillatory convection and striation of crystals. It was shown on concrete examples that there is a possibility to reduce radial segregation under optimization of rotating velocity and intensity of magnetic field. For the Bridgman method (in general for ampoule methods of crystal growth), the use of rotating magnetic

  14. Emerging role of angiogenin in stress response and cell survival under adverse conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuping; Hu, Guo-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenin (ANG), also known as ribonuclease (RNASE) 5, is a member of the vertebrate-specific, secreted RNASE superfamily. ANG was originally identified as a tumor angiogenic factor, but its biological activity has been extended from inducing angiogenesis to stimulating cell proliferation and more recently, to promoting cell survival. Under growth conditions, ANG is translocated to nucleus where it accumulates in nucleolus and stimulates ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription, thus facilitating cell growth and proliferation. Under stress conditions, ANG is accumulated in cytoplasmic compartments and modulates the production of tiRNA, a novel class of small RNA that is derived from tRNA and is induced by stress. tiRNA suppress global protein translation by inhibiting both cap-dependent and -independent translation including that mediated by weak IRESes. However, strong IRES-mediated translation, a mechanism often used by genes involved in pro-survival and anti-apoptosis, is not affected. Thus, ANG-mediated tiRNA reprogram protein translation, save anabolic energy, and promote cell survival. This recently uncovered function of ANG presents a novel mechanism of action in regulating cell growth and survival. PMID:22021078

  15. Local weather conditions have complex effects on the growth of blue tit nestlings.

    PubMed

    Mainwaring, Mark C; Hartley, Ian R

    2016-08-01

    Adverse weather conditions are expected to result in impaired nestling development in birds, but empirical studies have provided equivocal support for such a relationship. This may be because the negative effects of adverse weather conditions are masked by parental effects. Globally, ambient temperatures, rainfall levels and wind speeds are all expected to increase in a changing climate and so there is a need for a better understanding of the relationship between weather conditions and nestling growth. Here, we describe a correlative study that examined the relationships between local temperatures, rainfall levels and wind speeds and the growth of individual blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) nestlings in relation to their hatching order and sex. We found that changes in a range of morphological characters were negatively related to both temperature and wind speed, but positively related to rainfall. These patterns were further influenced by the hatching order of the nestlings but not by nestling sex. This suggests that the predicted changes in local weather conditions may have complex effects on nestling growth, but that parents may be able to mitigate the adverse effects via adaptive parental effects. We therefore conclude that local weather conditions have complex effects on avian growth and the implications for patterns of avian growth in a changing climate are discussed. PMID:27503711

  16. KCTD8 Gene and Brain Growth in Adverse Intrauterine Environment: A Genome-wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Manon; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Davey Smith, George; Gillis, Jesse; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Melka, Melkaye G.; Leonard, Gabriel; Pavlidis, Paul; Perron, Michel; Pike, G. Bruce; Richer, Louis; Schumann, Gunter; Timpson, Nicholas; Toro, Roberto; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka

    2012-01-01

    The most dramatic growth of the human brain occurs in utero and during the first 2 years of postnatal life. Genesis of the cerebral cortex involves cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis, all of which may be influenced by prenatal environment. Here, we show that variation in KCTD8 (potassium channel tetramerization domain 8) is associated with brain size in female adolescents (rs716890, P = 5.40 × 10−09). Furthermore, we found that the KCTD8 locus interacts with prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking vis-à-vis cortical area and cortical folding: In exposed girls only, the KCTD8 locus explains up to 21% of variance. Using head circumference as a proxy of brain size at 7 years of age, we have replicated this gene–environment interaction in an independent sample. We speculate that KCTD8 might modulate adverse effects of smoking during pregnancy on brain development via apoptosis triggered by low intracellular levels of potassium, possibly reducing the number of progenitor cells. PMID:22156575

  17. KCTD8 gene and brain growth in adverse intrauterine environment: a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Paus, Tomás; Bernard, Manon; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Davey Smith, George; Gillis, Jesse; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Melka, Melkaye G; Leonard, Gabriel; Pavlidis, Paul; Perron, Michel; Pike, G Bruce; Richer, Louis; Schumann, Gunter; Timpson, Nicholas; Toro, Roberto; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka

    2012-11-01

    The most dramatic growth of the human brain occurs in utero and during the first 2 years of postnatal life. Genesis of the cerebral cortex involves cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis, all of which may be influenced by prenatal environment. Here, we show that variation in KCTD8 (potassium channel tetramerization domain 8) is associated with brain size in female adolescents (rs716890, P = 5.40 × 10(-09)). Furthermore, we found that the KCTD8 locus interacts with prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking vis-à-vis cortical area and cortical folding: In exposed girls only, the KCTD8 locus explains up to 21% of variance. Using head circumference as a proxy of brain size at 7 years of age, we have replicated this gene-environment interaction in an independent sample. We speculate that KCTD8 might modulate adverse effects of smoking during pregnancy on brain development via apoptosis triggered by low intracellular levels of potassium, possibly reducing the number of progenitor cells. PMID:22156575

  18. Pathways from childhood abuse and other adversities to adult health risks: The role of adult socioeconomic conditions.

    PubMed

    Font, Sarah A; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), including child abuse, have been linked with poor health outcomes in adulthood. The mechanisms that explain these relations are less understood. This study assesses whether associations of ACEs and health risks are mediated by adult socioeconomic conditions, and whether these pathways are different for maltreatment than for other types of adversities. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 survey (N=29,229), we employ structural equation modeling to (1) estimate associations of the number and type of ACEs with five health risks-depression, obesity, tobacco use, binge drinking, and self-reported sub-optimal health; and (2) assess whether adult socioeconomic conditions-marriage, divorce and separation, educational attainment, income and insurance status-mediate those associations. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations between ACEs and health risks. At high numbers of ACEs, 15-20% of the association between number of ACEs and adult health risks was attributable to socioeconomic conditions. Associations of three ACEs (exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce, and residing with a person who was incarcerated) with health risks were nearly entirely explained by socioeconomic conditions in adulthood. However, child physical, emotional, and sexual abuse were significantly associated with several adult health risks, beyond the effects of other adversities, and socioeconomic conditions explained only a small portion of these associations. These findings suggest that the pathways to poor adult health differ by types of ACEs, and that childhood abuse is more likely than other adversities to have a direct impact. PMID:26059537

  19. Modeling Hematite Bioreduction under Growth Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Chen, C.; Yeh, G.; Burgos, W. D.; Mynyard, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    The focus of this work is on simulating and analyzing bioreduction kinetics of natural hematite-coated sand by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, under growth conditions with lactate as the electron donor. A reaction-based biogeochemical model was used. A series of batch experiments with different initial conditions were performed to determine the rate formulations/parameters for hematite bioreduction and related reactions. Three different kinetic reaction rate formations were used to model hematite bioreduction. The consistency of mass conservation equations was assessed. Assumptions regarding equilibrium reactions were also assessed. Column experiments focused on transient reactive transport were conducted under otherwise identical conditions, except that the flow rate was systematically varied. The determined rate formulations/parameters were systematically tested with these column experiments using a reactive biogeochemical transport model that coupled hydrologic transport and reactive biogeochemistry. The model simulated the hematite bioreduction of hematite-coated sand in column experiments reasonably well using rate formulation/parameters determined from batch experiments. This study supports the hypothesis that mechanistic-based reaction rates of batch experiments can be scaled up and ported to column experiments.

  20. Is growth-discordance in twins a substantial risk factor in adverse neonatal outcomes?

    PubMed

    Frezza, Simonetta; Gallini, Francesca; Puopolo, Maria; De Carolis, Maria P; D'Andrea, Vito; Guidone, Paola I; Luciano, Rita; Zuppa, Antonio A; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate whether growth discordance is an independent risk factor in the neonatal outcome of the smaller twin, all medical records of twin pregnancies delivered between 26 and 41 weeks during a 5-year period (January 2004-December 2008) were reviewed. Among the 49 selected twins, weight discordance was 15-20% in 7 infants, 21-30% in 16 infants, 31-40% in 16 infants and > 40% in 10 infants. No significant differences between the four groups were found with regards to obstetric complications and neonatal disease. Occurrence of birthweight below the 10th percentile and rate of admission to the neonatal intensive care unit significantly increased as intra-pair birthweight difference increased (p = .03). The > 40% discordant group had a significantly lower gestational age (p = .03), lower birthweight (p = .007) and a significantly higher mortality rate (4/10 versus 3/39 p = .04) in comparison with the other discordant groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that birthweight was the single independent and consistent factor associated with elevated risks of mortality. For every 250 g increase in birthweight, the risk for mortality decreased by about 84% [RR 0.16(CI 0.00-0.70)]. Gestational age was the most reliable predictor for major neonatal complications. For every 1-week increase in gestational age a significant decreased risk for all outcomes was found. Discordance alone should not be considered as a predictor for adverse neonatal outcome. Neonatal outcome in discordant twins appears to be related to gestational age and birthweight rather than to the degree of discordance. PMID:21962140

  1. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kimberley L.; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Sanchez, Jessica; Potma, Eric O.; Santos, Guaciara M.

    2015-01-01

    Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate, and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM) that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin, and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a “glass wastebasket.” Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins, and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction. PMID:26442066

  2. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kimberley L; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Sanchez, Jessica; Potma, Eric O; Santos, Guaciara M

    2015-01-01

    Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate, and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM) that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin, and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a "glass wastebasket." Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins, and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction. PMID:26442066

  3. Solidification under microgravity conditions - Dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Lograsso, T. A.; Rubinstein, E. R.; Winsa, E.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental approach and apparatus of a zero-gravity active crystal growth experiment to test dendritic growth theory at low supercoolings are discussed. The experiment consists of 20 experimental cycles. Estimates have been made as to how low gravitational accelerations would have to be reduced to observe convection-free dendritic growth at supercoolings from 0.01-1.0 K. The experiment requires temperature control of + or - 2 mK and photographic resolution of a few microns with a depth of field of + or - 6 mm. The thermostatic bath and temperature control system, photographic system, growth chamber, and dendrite detection system are described in detail.

  4. Neutralization of IL-8 Prevents the Induction of Dermatologic Adverse Events Associated with the Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Houtkamp, Mischa; Schuurhuis, Danita H.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Baadsgaard, Ole; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Skov, Lone

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of cancer. EGFR-targeted treatment is known to be associated with a high incidence of dermatological adverse reactions, including papulopustular rash, which can be dose-limiting and may affect compliance to treatment. Currently, the pathways involved in EGFR inhibitor-induced rash are poorly understood and few treatment options for this adverse event are available. Here, we developed a model for induction of papulopustular rash in healthy human volunteers by subcutaneous injection of the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody zalutumumab. The injection sites and surrounding skin were evaluated by a dermatologist for the presence or absence of papulopustular rash and skin biopsies were taken to confirm the macroscopical findings by immunohistochemistry. Locally injected zalutumumab induced a papulopustular rash, characterized by acute follicular neutrophil-rich hair follicle inflammation, and thus mimicked adverse events induced by systemic administration of EGFR inhibitors. In this model, we tested the hypothesis that neutrophils, attracted by IL-8, play a central role in the observed rash. Indeed, concomitant local repeat dose treatment with HuMab-10F8, a neutralizing human antibody against IL-8, reduced the rash. Inhibition of IL-8 can therefore ameliorate dermatological adverse events induced by treatment with EGFR inhibitors. PMID:22761877

  5. 30 CFR 285.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 285.816 Section 285.816 Mineral Resources..., pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or...

  6. Formation of aerobic granular sludge under adverse conditions: low DO and high ammonia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Hu; Lv, Lu; Wang, Qing; Jiang, Qipei

    2013-04-01

    In this study, two adverse environments: low dissolved oxygen (DO) and high ammonia concentration, were employed to investigate the morphology, interspecies quorum sensing, extracellular polymers (EPS) characterization and microbial communities in the formation of aerobic granular sludge. Results showed that low DO could promote filamentous bacterial outgrowth. Under high ammonia concentration aerobic granular sludge (AGS) could still be cultivated, although it was looser and lighter than the control group. During the early stage of the AGS cultivation process, Al-2 activity reached a peak value in all three reactors, and ultrasonic pre-treatment was not beneficial to the release of Al-2. During AGS formation, the production of polysaccharide exhibited increases from 12.2% to 40.3%, 49.6%, and 29.3%. And PS in R2 was the highest as the result of sludge bulking. PS/PN was 1.5 to approximately 8 in the three reactors. Three-dimensional EEM fuorescence spectroscopy variation indicated the change of protein in EPS, and the highest intensity of Peak T1 was obtained. The location shift of Peak T1 was not obvious, and Peaks A, C, and T2 shifted toward longer wavelengths (red shift) of 5 to approximately 60 nm, or shorter wavelengths (blue shift) of 10 to approximately 25 nm on the emission scale and/or excitation scale in all three reactors. This provided spectral information on the chemical structure changes. Bacteria in R3 had the highest species diversity, and all bacteria in beta-Proteobacteria were identified as genus Thauera, which suggested that simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred in R3. The filamentous bacteria in seed sludge and R2 were species-richer. There was a low abundance of filamentous bacteria in R1 and R3, which contributed to the granule structure stability. PMID:24620612

  7. Adverse foraging conditions may impact body mass and survival of a high Arctic seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harding, A.M.A.; Welcker, J.; Steen, H.; Hamer, K.C.; Kitaysky, A.S.; Fort, J.; Talbot, S.L.; Cornick, L.A.; Karnovsky, N.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Gremillet, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tradeoffs between current reproduction and future survival are widely recognized, but may only occur when food is limited: when foraging conditions are favorable, parents may be able to reproduce without compromising their own survival. We investigated these tradeoffs in the little auk (Alle alle), a small seabird with a single-egg clutch. During 2005-2007, we examined the relationship between body mass and survival of birds breeding under contrasting foraging conditions at two Arctic colonies. We used corticosterone levels of breeding adults as a physiological indicator of the foraging conditions they encountered during each reproductive season. We found that when foraging conditions were relatively poor (as reflected in elevated levels of corticosterone), parents ended the reproductive season with low body mass and suffered increased post-breeding mortality. A positive relationship between body mass and post-breeding survival was found in one study year; light birds incurred higher survival costs than heavy birds. The results of this study suggest that reproducing under poor foraging conditions may affect the post-breeding survival of long-lived little auks. They also have important demographic implications because even a small change in adult survival may have a large effect on populations of long-lived species. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  9. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  10. Eutectic growth under acoustic levitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. J.; Cao, C. D.; Lü, Y. J.; Wei, B.

    2002-12-01

    Samples of Pb-Sn eutectic alloy with a high density of 8.5×103 kg/m3 are levitated with a single-axis acoustic levitator, and containerlessly melted and then solidified in argon atmosphere. High undercoolings up to 38 K are obtained, which results in a microstructural transition of ``lamellas-broken lamellas-dendrites.'' This transition is further investigated in the light of the coupled zone for eutectic growth and the effects of ultrasound. The breaking of regular eutectic lamellas and suppression of gravity-induced macrosegregation of (Pb) and (Sn) dendrites are explained by the complicated internal flow inside the levitated drop, which is jointly induced by the shape oscillation, bulk vibration and rotation of the levitated drop. The ultrasonic field is also found to drive forced surface vibration, which subsequently excites capillary ripples and catalyzes nucleation on the sample surface.

  11. Eutectic growth under acoustic levitation conditions.

    PubMed

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-12-01

    Samples of Pb-Sn eutectic alloy with a high density of 8.5 x 10(3) kg/m(3) are levitated with a single-axis acoustic levitator, and containerlessly melted and then solidified in argon atmosphere. High undercoolings up to 38 K are obtained, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellas-broken lamellas-dendrites." This transition is further investigated in the light of the coupled zone for eutectic growth and the effects of ultrasound. The breaking of regular eutectic lamellas and suppression of gravity-induced macrosegregation of (Pb) and (Sn) dendrites are explained by the complicated internal flow inside the levitated drop, which is jointly induced by the shape oscillation, bulk vibration and rotation of the levitated drop. The ultrasonic field is also found to drive forced surface vibration, which subsequently excites capillary ripples and catalyzes nucleation on the sample surface. PMID:12513291

  12. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... corrective action to BOEM within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse effect. (b) Take remedial action...

  13. 30 CFR 285.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 285.816 Section 285.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU...: (a) Submit a plan of corrective action to MMS within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse...

  14. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... corrective action to BOEM within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse effect. (b) Take remedial action...

  15. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... corrective action to BOEM within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse effect. (b) Take remedial action...

  16. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions. PMID:27542493

  17. Performance evaluation of laser scanners through the atmosphere with adverse condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hespel, L.; Riviere, N.; Huet, T.; Tanguy, B.; Ceolato, R.

    2011-11-01

    Using laser imaging systems to represent 3-D scene becomes a referent prospective technology in the areas of guidance and navigation. Measurements with high spatial resolution for significant range can be achieved, even in degraded visibility conditions such as the Brown-White Out, rain, fog, sandstorms... Moreover, this technology is well suited for assisted perception tasks (access to 3D information) and obstacle detection (telemetry of small objects). For airborne applications, it is very complementary to conventional enhanced vision systems such as Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) and millimeter wave radar to provide images of land in environments with limited visibility. It also offers a 3D mapping of land or a single location in relation to the environment, which means alone or coupled with others, can realign and secure real-time database of information used such in a synthetic vision system (SVS). The objective of the work is to assess the impact of degraded visibility conditions on the laser radiometric propagation of a 3D laser scanner as they directly influence the performance of the ladar system [1].

  18. Neonatal and fetal exposure to trans-fatty acid retards early growth and adiposity while adversely affecting glucose in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Kylie; Sajadian, Soraya; Jenkins, Kurt A.; Wilson, Martha D.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Wagner, Janice D.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2010-01-01

    Industrially produced trans fatty acids (TFAs) consumed in western diets are incorporated into maternal and fetal tissues, and are passed linearly to offspring via breast milk. We hypothesized that TFA exposure in utero and during lactation in infants would promote obesity and poor glycemic control as compared to unmodified fatty acids. We further hypothesized that in utero exposure alone may program for these outcomes in adulthood. To test this hypothesis we fed female C57/BL6 mice identical western diets that differed only in cis- or trans-isomers of C18:1 and then aimed to determine whether maternal transfer of TFAs through pregnancy and lactation alters growth, body composition and glucose metabolism. Mice were unexposed, exposed during pregnancy, during lactation, or throughout pregnancy and lactation to TFA. Body weight and composition (by computed tomography), and glucose metabolism we assessed at weaning and adulthood. TFA exposure through breast milk caused significant early growth retardation (p<0.001) and higher fasting glucose (p=0.01) but insulin sensitivity was not different. Elevated plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 in mice consuming TFA-enriched milk (p=0.02) may contribute to later catch-up growth, leanness and preserved peripheral insulin sensitivity observed in these mice. Mice exposed to TFA in utero underwent rapid early neonatal growth with TFA-free breast milk and had significantly impaired insulin sensitivity (p<0.05) and greater abdominal fat (p=0.01). We conclude that very early catch-up growth resulted in impaired peripheral insulin sensitivity in this model of diet-related fetal and neonatal programming. TFA surprisingly retarded growth and adiposity while still adversely affecting glucose metabolism. PMID:20650350

  19. The brain dynamics of rapid perceptual adaptation to adverse listening conditions.

    PubMed

    Erb, Julia; Henry, Molly J; Eisner, Frank; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-06-26

    Listeners show a remarkable ability to quickly adjust to degraded speech input. Here, we aimed to identify the neural mechanisms of such short-term perceptual adaptation. In a sparse-sampling, cardiac-gated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquisition, human listeners heard and repeated back 4-band-vocoded sentences (in which the temporal envelope of the acoustic signal is preserved, while spectral information is highly degraded). Clear-speech trials were included as baseline. An additional fMRI experiment on amplitude modulation rate discrimination quantified the convergence of neural mechanisms that subserve coping with challenging listening conditions for speech and non-speech. First, the degraded speech task revealed an "executive" network (comprising the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex), parts of which were also activated in the non-speech discrimination task. Second, trial-by-trial fluctuations in successful comprehension of degraded speech drove hemodynamic signal change in classic "language" areas (bilateral temporal cortices). Third, as listeners perceptually adapted to degraded speech, downregulation in a cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit was observable. The present data highlight differential upregulation and downregulation in auditory-language and executive networks, respectively, with important subcortical contributions when successfully adapting to a challenging listening situation. PMID:23804092

  20. Excessive Growth Hormone Expression in Male GH Transgenic Mice Adversely Alters Bone Architecture and Mechanical Strength

    PubMed Central

    Lim, S. V.; Marenzana, M.; Hopkinson, M.; List, E. O.; Kopchick, J. J.; Pereira, M.; Javaheri, B.; Roux, J. P.; Chavassieux, P.; Korbonits, M.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acromegaly have a higher prevalence of vertebral fractures despite normal bone mineral density (BMD), suggesting that GH overexpression has adverse effects on skeletal architecture and strength. We used giant bovine GH (bGH) transgenic mice to analyze the effects of high serum GH levels on BMD, architecture, and mechanical strength. Five-month-old hemizygous male bGH mice were compared with age- and sex-matched nontransgenic littermates controls (NT; n=16/group). Bone architecture and BMD were analyzed in tibia and lumbar vertebrae using microcomputed tomography. Femora were tested to failure using three-point bending and bone cellular activity determined by bone histomorphometry. bGH transgenic mice displayed significant increases in body weight and bone lengths. bGH tibia showed decreases in trabecular bone volume fraction, thickness, and number compared with NT ones, whereas trabecular pattern factor and structure model index were significantly increased, indicating deterioration in bone structure. Although cortical tissue perimeter was increased in transgenic mice, cortical thickness was reduced. bGH mice showed similar trabecular BMD but reduced trabecular thickness in lumbar vertebra relative to controls. Cortical BMD and thickness were significantly reduced in bGH lumbar vertebra. Mechanical testing of femora confirmed that bGH femora have decreased intrinsic mechanical properties compared with NT ones. Bone turnover is increased in favor of bone resorption in bGH tibia and vertebra compared with controls, and serum PTH levels is also enhanced in bGH mice. These data collectively suggest that high serum GH levels negatively affect bone architecture and quality at multiple skeletal sites. PMID:25646711

  1. Effect of boundary conditions on thermal plume growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, A.; Sboev, I.; Rybkin, K.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the influence of boundary conditions on the growth rate of convective plumes. Temperature and rate fields were studied in a rectangular convective cell heated by a spot heater. The results of the full-scale test were compared with the numerical data calculated using the ANSYS CFX software package. The relationship between the heat plume growth rate and heat boundary conditions, the width and height of the cell, size of heater for different kinds of liquid was established.

  2. Ice Crystal Growth Rates Under Upper Troposphere Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 m, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  3. Ice Particle Growth Under Conditions of the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 microns, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  4. Ice Particle Growth Rates Under Upper Troposphere Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 m, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  5. Burden of Giardia duodenalis Infection and Its Adverse Effects on Growth of Schoolchildren in Rural Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T.; Jani, Rohana; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Moktar, Norhayati; Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Mahmud, Rohela; Surin, Johari

    2013-01-01

    Background Giardia duodenalis infection and malnutrition are still considered as public health problems in many developing countries especially among children in rural communities. This study was carried out among Aboriginal (Orang Asli) primary schoolchildren in rural peninsular Malaysia to investigate the burden and the effects of Giardia infection on growth (weight and height) of the children. Methods/Findings Weight and height of 374 children aged 7–12 years were assessed before and after treatment of Giardia infection. The children were screened for Giardia parasite using trichrome staining technique. Demographic and socioeconomic data were collected via face-to-face interviews using a pre-tested questionnaire. Overall, 22.2% (83/374) of the children were found to be infected with Giardia. Nutritional status of children was assessed and the results showed that the mean weight and height were 23.9 kg (95% CI = 23.3, 24.5) and 126.6 cm (95% CI = 125.6, 127.5), respectively. Overall, the prevalence of severe underweight, stunting and wasting were 28.3%, 23.8% and 21.0%, respectively. Multiple linear regression analyses showed sex, Giardia infection and household monthly income as the significant determinants of weight while sex and level of mother's education were the significant determinants of height. Weight and height were assessed at 3 and 6 months after treatment of Giardia infection. It was found that Giardia infection has a significant association with the weight of children but not with height. Conclusions/Significance This study reveals high prevalence of Giardia infection and malnutrition among Aboriginal children in rural Malaysia and clearly highlights an urgent need to identify integrated measures to control these health problems in the rural communities. Essentially, proper attention should be given to the control of Giardia infection in Aboriginal communities as this constitutes one of the strategies to improve the nutritional status of

  6. Adiponectin supplementation in pregnant mice prevents the adverse effects of maternal obesity on placental function and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Aye, Irving L M H; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-10-13

    Mothers with obesity or gestational diabetes mellitus have low circulating levels of adiponectin (ADN) and frequently deliver large babies with increased fat mass, who are susceptible to perinatal complications and to development of metabolic syndrome later in life. It is currently unknown if the inverse correlation between maternal ADN and fetal growth reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. We tested the hypothesis that ADN supplementation in obese pregnant dams improves maternal insulin sensitivity, restores normal placental insulin/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and nutrient transport, and prevents fetal overgrowth. Compared with dams on a control diet, female C57BL/6J mice fed an obesogenic diet before mating and throughout gestation had increased fasting serum leptin, insulin, and C-peptide, and reduced high-molecular-weight ADN at embryonic day (E) 18.5. Placental insulin and mTORC1 signaling was activated, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) phosphorylation was reduced, placental transport of glucose and amino acids in vivo was increased, and fetal weights were 29% higher in obese dams. Maternal ADN infusion in obese dams from E14.5 to E18.5 normalized maternal insulin sensitivity, placental insulin/mTORC1 and PPARα signaling, nutrient transport, and fetal growth without affecting maternal fat mass. Using a mouse model with striking similarities to obese pregnant women, we demonstrate that ADN functions as an endocrine link between maternal adipose tissue and fetal growth by regulating placental function. Importantly, maternal ADN supplementation reversed the adverse effects of maternal obesity on placental function and fetal growth. Improving maternal ADN levels may serve as an effective intervention strategy to prevent fetal overgrowth caused by maternal obesity. PMID:26417088

  7. Adiponectin supplementation in pregnant mice prevents the adverse effects of maternal obesity on placental function and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Aye, Irving L. M. H.; Rosario, Fredrick J.; Powell, Theresa L.; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mothers with obesity or gestational diabetes mellitus have low circulating levels of adiponectin (ADN) and frequently deliver large babies with increased fat mass, who are susceptible to perinatal complications and to development of metabolic syndrome later in life. It is currently unknown if the inverse correlation between maternal ADN and fetal growth reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. We tested the hypothesis that ADN supplementation in obese pregnant dams improves maternal insulin sensitivity, restores normal placental insulin/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and nutrient transport, and prevents fetal overgrowth. Compared with dams on a control diet, female C57BL/6J mice fed an obesogenic diet before mating and throughout gestation had increased fasting serum leptin, insulin, and C-peptide, and reduced high-molecular-weight ADN at embryonic day (E) 18.5. Placental insulin and mTORC1 signaling was activated, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) phosphorylation was reduced, placental transport of glucose and amino acids in vivo was increased, and fetal weights were 29% higher in obese dams. Maternal ADN infusion in obese dams from E14.5 to E18.5 normalized maternal insulin sensitivity, placental insulin/mTORC1 and PPARα signaling, nutrient transport, and fetal growth without affecting maternal fat mass. Using a mouse model with striking similarities to obese pregnant women, we demonstrate that ADN functions as an endocrine link between maternal adipose tissue and fetal growth by regulating placental function. Importantly, maternal ADN supplementation reversed the adverse effects of maternal obesity on placental function and fetal growth. Improving maternal ADN levels may serve as an effective intervention strategy to prevent fetal overgrowth caused by maternal obesity. PMID:26417088

  8. Indium antimonide crystal growth experiment M562. [Skylab weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Witt, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    It was established that ideal diffusion controlled steady state conditions, never accomplished on earth, were achieved during the growth of Te-doped InSb crystals in Skylab. Surface tension effects led to nonwetting conditions under which free surface solidification took place in confined geometry. It was further found that, under forced contact conditions, surface tension effects led to the formation of surface ridges (not previously observed on earth) which isolated the growth system from its container. In addition, it was possible, for the first time, to identify unambiguously: the origin of segregation discontinuities associated with facet growth, the mode of nucleation and propagation of rotational twin boundaries, and the specific effect of mechanical-shock perturbations on segregation. The results obtained prove the advantageous conditions provided by outer space. Thus, fundamental data on solidification thought to be unattainable because of gravity-induced interference on earth are now within reach.

  9. Reported respiratory symptoms and adverse home conditions after 9/11 among residents living near the World Trade Center.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Reibman, Joan; Bowers, James; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Hwang, Syni-An

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated whether self-reported damage, dust, and odors in homes near the World Trade Center (WTC) after September 11, 2001, were related to increased rates of respiratory symptoms among residents and if multiple sources of exposure were associated with greater health risk. We mailed questionnaires to homes within 1.5 km of the WTC site (affected area) and in upper Manhattan (control area). Surveys asked about respiratory symptoms, unplanned medical visits, physician diagnoses, medication use, and conditions in the home after 9/11. Adverse home conditions were associated with new-onset (i.e., began after 9/11) and persistent (i.e., remained 1 year after 9/11) upper and lower respiratory symptoms in the affected area (Cumulative Incidence Ratios [CIRs] 1.20-1.71). Residents reporting longer duration of dust/odors or multiple sources of exposure had greater risk for symptoms compared to those reporting shorter duration and fewer sources. These data suggest that WTC-related contamination in the home after 9/11 was associated with new and persistent respiratory symptoms among residents living near the site. While we cannot eliminate potential biases related to self-reported data, we took strategies to minimize their impact, and the observed effects are biologically plausible. PMID:17530533

  10. Indoor exposure and adverse birth outcomes related to fetal growth, miscarriage and prematurity-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Patelarou, Evridiki; Kelly, Frank J

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarize existing epidemiological evidence of the association between quantitative estimates of indoor air pollution and all-day personal exposure with adverse birth outcomes including fetal growth, prematurity and miscarriage. We carried out a systematic literature search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases with the aim of summarizing and evaluating the results of peer-reviewed epidemiological studies undertaken in "westernized" countries that have assessed indoor air pollution and all-day personal exposure with specific quantitative methods. This comprehensive literature search identified 16 independent studies which were deemed relevant for further review and two additional studies were added through searching the reference lists of all included studies. Two reviewers independently and critically appraised all eligible articles using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tool. Of the 18 selected studies, 14 adopted a prospective cohort design, three were case-controls and one was a retrospective cohort study. In terms of pollutants of interest, seven studies assessed exposure to electro-magnetic fields, four studies assessed exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, four studies assessed PM2.5 exposure and three studies assessed benzene, phthalates and noise exposure respectively. Furthermore, 12 studies examined infant growth as the main birth outcome of interest, six examined spontaneous abortion and three studies assessed gestational age at birth and preterm delivery. This survey demonstrates that there is insufficient research on the possible association of indoor exposure and early life effects and that further research is needed. PMID:24896737

  11. Indoor Exposure and Adverse Birth Outcomes Related to Fetal Growth, Miscarriage and Prematurity—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Patelarou, Evridiki; Kelly, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarize existing epidemiological evidence of the association between quantitative estimates of indoor air pollution and all-day personal exposure with adverse birth outcomes including fetal growth, prematurity and miscarriage. We carried out a systematic literature search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases with the aim of summarizing and evaluating the results of peer-reviewed epidemiological studies undertaken in “westernized” countries that have assessed indoor air pollution and all-day personal exposure with specific quantitative methods. This comprehensive literature search identified 16 independent studies which were deemed relevant for further review and two additional studies were added through searching the reference lists of all included studies. Two reviewers independently and critically appraised all eligible articles using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tool. Of the 18 selected studies, 14 adopted a prospective cohort design, three were case-controls and one was a retrospective cohort study. In terms of pollutants of interest, seven studies assessed exposure to electro-magnetic fields, four studies assessed exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, four studies assessed PM2.5 exposure and three studies assessed benzene, phthalates and noise exposure respectively. Furthermore, 12 studies examined infant growth as the main birth outcome of interest, six examined spontaneous abortion and three studies assessed gestational age at birth and preterm delivery. This survey demonstrates that there is insufficient research on the possible association of indoor exposure and early life effects and that further research is needed. PMID:24896737

  12. Optimal Culture Conditions for Mycelial Growth of Lignosus rhinocerus

    PubMed Central

    Siti Murni, M.J.; Fauzi, D.; Abas Mazni, O.; Saleh, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lignosus rhinocerus is a macrofungus that belongs to Polyporaceae and is native to tropical regions. This highly priced mushroom has been used as folk medicine to treat diseases by indigenous people. As a preliminary study to develop a culture method for edible mushrooms, the cultural characteristics of L. rhinocerus were investigated in a range of culture media under different environmental conditions. Mycelial growth of this mushroom was compared on culture media composed of various carbon and nitrogen sources in addition to C/N ratios. The optimal conditions for mycelial growth were 30℃ at pH 6 and 7. Rapid mycelial growth of L. rhinocerus was observed on glucose-peptone and yeast extract peptone dextrose media. Carbon and nitrogen sources promoting mycelial growth of L. rhinocerus were glucose and potassium nitrate, respectively. The optimum C/N ratio was approximately 10 : 1 using 2% glucose supplemented as a carbon source in the basal media. PMID:22783083

  13. Fibroblast Growth Factor-9 Enhances M2 Macrophage Differentiation and Attenuates Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Infarcted Diabetic Heart

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Dinender K.; Singla, Reetu D.; Abdelli, Latifa S.; Glass, Carley

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated as a perpetrator of diabetes and its associated complications. Monocytes, key mediators of inflammation, differentiate into pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages upon infiltration of damaged tissue. However, the inflammatory cell types, which propagate diabetes progression and consequential adverse disorders, remain unclear. The current study was undertaken to assess monocyte infiltration and the role of fibroblast growth factor-9 (FGF-9) on monocyte to macrophage differentiation and cardioprotection in the diabetic infarcted heart. Db/db diabetic mice were assigned to sham, myocardial infarction (MI), and MI+FGF-9 groups. MI was induced by permanent coronary artery ligation and animals were subjected to 2D transthoracic echocardiography two weeks post-surgery. Immunohistochemical and immunoassay results from heart samples collected suggest significantly increased infiltration of monocytes (Mean ± SEM; MI: 2.02% ± 0.23% vs. Sham 0.75% ± 0.07%; p<0.05) and associated pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, MCP-1, and IL-6), adverse cardiac remodeling (Mean ± SEM; MI: 33% ± 3.04% vs. Sham 2.2% ± 0.33%; p<0.05), and left ventricular dysfunction (Mean ± SEM; MI: 35.4% ± 1.25% vs. Sham 49.19% ± 1.07%; p<0.05) in the MI group. Importantly, treatment of diabetic infarcted myocardium with FGF-9 resulted in significantly decreased monocyte infiltration (Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 1.39% ± 0.1% vs. MI: 2.02% ± 0.23%; p<0.05), increased M2 macrophage differentiation (Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 4.82% ± 0.86% vs. MI: 0.85% ± 0.3%; p<0.05) and associated anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and IL-1RA), reduced adverse remodeling (Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 11.59% ± 1.2% vs. MI: 33% ± 3.04%; p<0.05), and improved cardiac function (Fractional shortening, Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 41.51% ± 1.68% vs. MI: 35.4% ± 1.25%; p<0.05). In conclusion, our data suggest FGF-9 possesses novel therapeutic potential in its ability to

  14. Crystal growth of a binary compound semiconductor under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Y.; Ikegami, K.; Maekawa, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Yoda, S.; Kinoshita, K.

    We investigate the possibilities of growing a uniform binary compound crystal in space numerically, proposing a new crystal growth method. We develop a numerical calculation method of the growth of binary crystals. The calculation method is applied to the crystal growth analysis of an InAs-GaAs binary semiconductor and the effect of buoyancy convection induced under microgravity conditions on the crystal growth process is investigated. We find that the concentration field is disturbed and, as a result, the solution—crystal interface is deformed by buoyancy convection even when the gravitational acceleration is as low as 10 -6 g, which is supposed to be the gravity level in the International Space Station. We also find that the direction of residual gravity has a strong effect on the concentration field in the solution and the crystal growth process.

  15. Changes in alpine plant growth under future climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammig, A.; Jonas, T.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Rixen, C.

    2010-06-01

    Alpine shrub- and grasslands are shaped by extreme climatic conditions such as a long-lasting snow cover and a short vegetation period. Such ecosystems are expected to be highly sensitive to global environmental change. Prolonged growing seasons and shifts in temperature and precipitation are likely to affect plant phenology and growth. In a unique experiment, climatology and plant growth was monitored for almost a decade at 17 snow meteorological stations in different alpine regions along the Swiss Alps. Regression analyses revealed highly significant correlations between mean air temperature in May/June and snow melt out, onset of plant growth, and plant height. These correlations were used to project plant growth phenology for future climate conditions based on the gridded output of a set of regional climate models runs. Melt out and onset of growth were projected to occur on average 17 days earlier by the end of the century than in the control period from 1971-2000 under the future climate conditions of the low resolution climate model ensemble. Plant height and biomass production were expected to increase by 77% and 45%, respectively. The earlier melt out and onset of growth will probably cause a considerable shift towards higher growing plants and thus increased biomass. Our results represent the first quantitative and spatially explicit estimates of climate change impacts on future growing season length and the respective productivity of alpine plant communities in the Swiss Alps.

  16. Changes in alpine plant growth under future climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammig, A.; Jonas, T.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Rixen, C.

    2009-11-01

    Alpine shrub- and grasslands are shaped by extreme climatic conditions such as a long-lasting snow cover and a short vegetation period. Such ecosystems are expected to be highly sensitive to global environmental change. Prolonged growing seasons and shifts in temperature and precipitation are likely to affect plant phenology and growth. In a unique experiment, climatology and plant growth was monitored for almost a decade at 17 snow meteorological stations in different alpine regions along the Swiss Alps. Regression analyses revealed highly significant correlations between mean air temperature in May/June and snow melt-out, onset of plant growth, and plant height. These correlations were used to project plant growth phenology for future climate conditions based on the gridded output of a set of regional climate models runs. Melt-out and onset of growth were projected to occur on average 17 days earlier by the end of the century than in the control period from 1971-2000 under the future climate conditions of the low resolution climate model ensemble. Plant height and biomass production were expected to increase by 77% and 45%, respectively. The earlier melt-out and onset of growth will probably cause a considerable shift towards higher growing plants and thus increased biomass. Our results represent the first quantitative and spatially explicit estimates of climate change impacts on future growing season length and the respective productivity of alpine plant communities in the Swiss Alps.

  17. Systematic Review of the Risk of Adverse Outcomes Associated with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitors for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Labib Imran; Lin, Meng; Battistella, Marisa; Wiebe, Natasha; Reiman, Tony; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Thomas, Chandra; Tonelli, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenic therapy targeted at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is now used to treat several types of cancer. We did a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to summarize the adverse effects of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (VEGFi), focusing on those with vascular pathogenesis. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library until April 19, 2012 to identify parallel RCTs comparing a VEGFi with a control among adults with any cancer. We pooled the risk of mortality, vascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and thromboembolism), hypertension and new proteinuria using random-effects models and calculated unadjusted relative risk (RR). We also did meta-regression and assessed publication bias. We retrieved 83 comparisons from 72 studies (n = 38,078) on 11 different VEGFi from 7901 identified citations. The risk of mortality was significantly lower among VEGFi recipients than controls (pooled RR 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94 to 0.98, I2 = 0%, tau2 = 0; risk difference 2%). Compared to controls, VEGFi recipients had significantly higher risk of myocardial infarction (MI) (RR 3.54, 95% CI 1.61 to 7.80, I2 = 0%, tau2 = 0), arterial thrombotic events (RR 1.80, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.59, I2 = 0%, tau2 = 0); hypertension (RR 3.46, 95% CI 2.89 to 4.15, I2 = 58%, tau2 = 0.16), and new proteinuria (RR 2.51, 95% CI 1.60 to 3.94, I2 = 87%, tau2 = 0.65). The absolute risk difference was 0.8% for MI, 1% for arterial thrombotic events, 15% for hypertension and 12% for new proteinuria. Meta-regression did not suggest any statistically significant modifiers of the association between VEGFi treatment and any of the vascular events. Limitations include heterogeneity across the trials. Conclusions VEGFi increases the risk of MI, hypertension, arterial thromboembolism and proteinuria. The absolute magnitude of the excess risk appears

  18. Degenerate nonlinear programming with a quadratic growth condition.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2000-01-01

    We show that the quadratic growth condition and the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification (MFCQ) imply that local minima of nonlinear programs are isolated stationary points. As a result, when started sufficiently close to such points, an L1 exact penalty sequential quadratic programming algorithm will induce at least R-linear convergence of the iterates to such a local minimum. We construct an example of a degenerate nonlinear program with a unique local minimum satisfying the quadratic growth and the MFCQ but for which no positive semidefinite augmented Lagrangian exists. We present numerical results obtained using several nonlinear programming packages on this example and discuss its implications for some algorithms.

  19. Amplifying Learning through Sites of Pedagogical Practice: A Possible Effect of Working with Disciplinary Technologies in Schools Operating under Adverse Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Debra

    2005-01-01

    Schools located within communities experiencing high levels of social dislocation, educational disadvantage and student disengagement from learning are working under "adverse conditions". These schools face particular challenges when it comes to stabilising and sustaining wholeschool change aimed at improving students' learning outcomes. In this…

  20. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Wheat B2 Protein Imparting Adverse Temperature Tolerance and Influencing Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akanksha; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-01-01

    Genomic attempts were undertaken to elucidate the plant developmental responses to heat stress, and to characterize the roles of B2 protein in mediating those responses. A wheat expressed sequence tag for B2 protein was identified which was cloned and characterized to assess its functional relevance causing plant growth and development during stress adaptation. Here, we show that wheat B2 protein is highly expressed in root and shoot tissues as well as in developing seed tissues under high temperature stress conditions. Morphological studies of transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing gene encoding wheat B2 protein and Δb2 mutant plants were studied at major developmental stages. The stunted growth phenotype of mutant plants, together with hypocotyl and root elongation analysis of transgenic plants showed that B2 protein exhibits a crucial role in plant growth and development. Additional physiological analyses highlights the role of B2 protein in increased tolerance to heat and cold stresses by maintaining high chlorophyll content, strong activity of photosystem II and less membrane damage of overexpression transgenics as compared with the wild-type. Furthermore, the constitutive overexpression of TaB2 in Arabidopsis resulted in ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, these studies suggest a novel perspectives of B2 protein in plant development and in mediating the thermal stress tolerance. PMID:27242843

  1. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Wheat B2 Protein Imparting Adverse Temperature Tolerance and Influencing Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Akanksha; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-01-01

    Genomic attempts were undertaken to elucidate the plant developmental responses to heat stress, and to characterize the roles of B2 protein in mediating those responses. A wheat expressed sequence tag for B2 protein was identified which was cloned and characterized to assess its functional relevance causing plant growth and development during stress adaptation. Here, we show that wheat B2 protein is highly expressed in root and shoot tissues as well as in developing seed tissues under high temperature stress conditions. Morphological studies of transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing gene encoding wheat B2 protein and Δb2 mutant plants were studied at major developmental stages. The stunted growth phenotype of mutant plants, together with hypocotyl and root elongation analysis of transgenic plants showed that B2 protein exhibits a crucial role in plant growth and development. Additional physiological analyses highlights the role of B2 protein in increased tolerance to heat and cold stresses by maintaining high chlorophyll content, strong activity of photosystem II and less membrane damage of overexpression transgenics as compared with the wild-type. Furthermore, the constitutive overexpression of TaB2 in Arabidopsis resulted in ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, these studies suggest a novel perspectives of B2 protein in plant development and in mediating the thermal stress tolerance. PMID:27242843

  2. Antimicrobial Treatment Improves Mycobacterial Survival in Nonpermissive Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Turapov, Obolbek; Waddell, Simon J.; Burke, Bernard; Glenn, Sarah; Sarybaeva, Asel A.; Tudo, Griselda; Labesse, Gilles; Young, Danielle I.; Young, Michael; Andrew, Peter W.; Butcher, Philip D.; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobials targeting cell wall biosynthesis are generally considered inactive against nonreplicating bacteria. Paradoxically, we found that under nonpermissive growth conditions, exposure of Mycobacterium bovis BCG bacilli to such antimicrobials enhanced their survival. We identified a transcriptional regulator, RaaS (for regulator of antimicrobial-assisted survival), encoded by bcg1279 (rv1219c) as being responsible for the observed phenomenon. Induction of this transcriptional regulator resulted in reduced expression of specific ATP-dependent efflux pumps and promoted long-term survival of mycobacteria, while its deletion accelerated bacterial death under nonpermissive growth conditions in vitro and during macrophage or mouse infection. These findings have implications for the design of antimicrobial drug combination therapies for persistent infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. PMID:24590482

  3. Genotype and Neuropsychological Response Inhibition as Resilience Promoters for ADHD, ODD, and CD under Conditions of Psychosocial Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Friderici, Karen; Park, Leeyoung; Zucker, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas child personality, IQ, and family factors have been identified as enabling a resilient response to psychosocial adversity, more direct biological resilience factors have been less well delineated. This is particularly so for child ADHD, which has received less attention from a resilience perspective than have associated externalizing disorders. Children from two independent samples were classified as resilient if they avoided developing ADHD, ODD, or CD in the face of family adversity. Two protective factors were examined for their potential relevance to prefrontal brain development: neuropsychological response inhibition, as assessed by the Stop task, and a composite catecholamine genotype risk score. Resilient children were characterized in both samples by more effective response inhibition, although the effect in the second sample was very small. Genotype was measured in Sample 1, and a composite high risk genotype index was developed by summing presence of risk across markers on three genes expressed in prefrontal cortex: dopamine transporter, dopamine D4 receptor, and noradrenergic alpha 2 receptor. Genotype was a reliable resilience indicator against development of ADHD and CD, but not ODD, in the face of psychosocial adversity. Results illustrate potential neurobiological protective factors related to development of prefrontal cortex that may enable children to avoid developing ADHD and CD in the presence of psychosocial adversity. PMID:17705902

  4. Adversity-induced relapse of fear: neural mechanisms and implications for relapse prevention from a study on experimentally induced return-of-fear following fear conditioning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Scharfenort, R; Menz, M; Lonsdorf, T B

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of current treatments for anxiety disorders is limited by high relapse rates. Relapse of anxiety disorders and addiction can be triggered by exposure to life adversity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unexplored. Seventy-six healthy adults were a priori selected for the presence or absence of adverse experiences during childhood (CA) and recent past (RA; that is, past 12 months). Participants underwent fear conditioning (day 1) and fear extinction and experimental return-of-fear (ROF) induction through reinstatement (a model for adversity-induced relapse; day 2). Ratings, autonomic (skin conductance response) and neuronal activation measures (functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)) were acquired. Individuals exposed to RA showed a generalized (that is, not CS- specific) fear recall and ROF, whereas unexposed individuals showed differential (that is, CS+ specific) fear recall and ROF on an autonomic level despite no group differences during fear acquisition and extinction learning. These group differences in ROF were accompanied by corresponding activation differences in brain areas known to be involved in fear processing and differentiability/generalization of ROF (that is, hippocampus). In addition, dimensional measures of RA, CA and lifetime adversity were negatively correlated with differential skin conductance responses (SCRs) during ROF and hippocampal activation. As discriminating signals of danger and safety, as well as a tendency for overgeneralization, are core features in clinically anxious populations, these deficits may specifically contribute to relapse risk following exposure to adversity, in particular to recent adversity. Hence, our results may provide first and novel insights into the possible mechanisms mediating enhanced relapse risk following exposure to (recent) adversity, which may guide the development of effective pre- and intervention programs. PMID:27434492

  5. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-10-01

    . halepensis the lowest reductions. In contrast, the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) was significantly lower in A. unedo after the cold period. The leaf position played an important role in Q. ilex showing a stronger winter effect on sunlit leaves in comparison to shaded leaves. Our results generally agreed with the previous classifications of photoinhibition-tolerant (P. halepensis) and photoinhibition-avoiding (Q. ilex) species on the basis of their susceptibility to dynamic photoinhibition, whereas A. unedo was the least tolerant to photoinhibition, which was chronic in this species. Q. ilex and P. halepensis seem to follow contrasting photoprotective strategies. However, they seemed equally successful under the prevailing conditions exhibiting an adaptive advantage over A. unedo. These results show that our understanding of the dynamics of interspecific competition in Mediterranean ecosystems requires consideration of the physiological behaviour during winter which may have important implications for long-term carbon budgets and growth trends.

  6. Effect of lighting conditions on zebrafish growth and development.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Natalia; Vera, Luisa María; Foulkes, Nicholas Simon; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2014-04-01

    In the underwater environment, the properties of light (intensity and spectrum) change rapidly with depth and water quality. In this article, we have described how and to what extent lighting conditions can influence the development, growth, and survival of zebrafish. Fertilized eggs and the corresponding larvae were exposed to different visible light wavelengths (violet, blue, green, yellow, red, and white) in a 12-h light-12-h dark (LD) cycle until 30 days posthatching (dph), when the expression of morphometric parameters and growth (igf1a, igf2a)- and stress-related (crh and pomca) genes were examined. Another group of larvae was raised under constant darkness (DD) until 5 or 10 dph, after which they were transferred to a LD of white light. A third group remained under DD to investigate the effects of light deprivation upon zebrafish development. The results revealed that the hatching rate was highest under blue and violet light, while total length at 30 dph was greatest under blue, white, and violet light. Red light led to reduced feeding activity and poor survival (100% mortality). Larvae raised under constant white light (LL) showed a higher proportion of malformations, as did larvae raised under LD violet light. The expression of growth and stress factors was upregulated in the violet (igf1a, igf2a, pomca, and chr) and blue (igf2a) groups, which is consistent with the higher growth recorded and the higher proportion of malformations detected under the violet light. All larvae kept under DD died before 18 dph, but the survival rates improved in larvae transferred to LD at 5 dph and at 10 dph. In summary, these findings revealed that lighting conditions are crucial factors influencing zebrafish larval development and growth. PMID:24367902

  7. Media and growth conditions for induction of secondary metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Frisvad, Jens C

    2012-01-01

    Growth media and incubation conditions have a very strong influence of secondary metabolite production. There is no consensus on which media are the optimal for metabolite production, but a series of useful and effective media and incubation conditions have been listed here. Chemically well-defined media are suited for biochemical studies, but in order to get chemical diversity expressed in filamentous fungi, sources rich in amino acids, vitamins, and trace metals have to be added, such as yeast extract and oatmeal. A battery of solid agar media is recommended for exploration of chemical diversity as agar plug samples are easily analyzed to get an optimal representation of the qualitative secondary metabolome. Standard incubation for a week at 25°C in darkness is recommended, but optimal conditions have to be modified depending on the ecology and physiology of different filamentous fungi. PMID:23065607

  8. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-06-01

    previous to the frost event. The responses of Vc, max and Jmax were highly species-specific, where Q. ilex exhibited the highest and P. halepensis the lowest reductions. In contrast, the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) was significantly lower in A. unedo after the cold period. The leaf position played an important role in Q. ilex showing a comparatively stronger winter effect on sunlit leaves. Our results generally agreed with the previous classifications of photoinhibition-avoiding (P. halepensis) and photoinhibition-tolerant (Q. ilex) species on the basis of their susceptibility to dynamic photoinhibition, whereas A. unedo was the least tolerant to photoinhibition, which was chronic in this species. Q. ilex and P. halepensis seem to follow contrasting photoprotective strategies which are, however, equally successful under the prevailing conditions exhibiting an adaptive advantage over A. unedo in our study site. These results show that our understanding of the dynamics of interspecific competition in Mediterranean ecosystems requires consideration of the physiological behaviour during winter which may have important implications for long-term carbon budgets and growth trends.

  9. Optimal conditions of mycelia growth of Laetiporus sulphureus sensu lato

    PubMed Central

    Luangharn, Thatsanee; Karunarathna, Samantha C.; Hyde, Kevin D.; Chukeatirote, Ekachai

    2014-01-01

    Laetiporus sulphureus is an edible wood-rotting basidiomycete, growing on decaying logs, stumps, and trunks of many deciduous and coniferous tree species. This fungus produces relatively large striking yellowish or orange-coloured bracket-like fruitbodies. L. sulphureus is widely consumed as a nutritional food because of its fragrance and texture. In this study, two L. sulphureus strains, MFLUCC 12-0546 and MFLUCC 12-0547, isolated from Chiang Rai, Thailand, were investigated for optimal conditions of mycelia growth. Potato dextrose agar and malt extract agar were observed as the favourable medium for mycelia growth. The optimum pH and temperature for the mushroom mycelia were 6–8 and 25–30°C, respectively. PMID:25544934

  10. Effect of ocean acidification on growth and otolith condition of juvenile scup, Stenotomus chrysops.

    PubMed

    Perry, Dean M; Redman, Dylan H; Widman, James C; Meseck, Shannon; King, Andrew; Pereira, Jose J

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from human industrial activities are causing changes in global ocean carbonate chemistry, resulting in a reduction in pH, a process termed "ocean acidification." It is important to determine which species are sensitive to elevated levels of CO2 because of potential impacts to ecosystems, marine resources, biodiversity, food webs, populations, and effects on economies. Previous studies with marine fish have documented that exposure to elevated levels of CO2 caused increased growth and larger otoliths in some species. This study was conducted to determine whether the elevated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) would have an effect on growth, otolith (ear bone) condition, survival, or the skeleton of juvenile scup, Stenotomus chrysops, a species that supports both important commercial and recreational fisheries. Elevated levels of pCO2 (1200-2600 μatm) had no statistically significant effect on growth, survival, or otolith condition after 8 weeks of rearing. Field data show that in Long Island Sound, where scup spawn, in situ levels of pCO2 are already at levels ranging from 689 to 1828 μatm due to primary productivity, microbial activity, and anthropogenic inputs. These results demonstrate that ocean acidification is not likely to cause adverse effects on the growth and survivability of every species of marine fish. X-ray analysis of the fish revealed a slightly higher incidence of hyperossification in the vertebrae of a few scup from the highest treatments compared to fish from the control treatments. Our results show that juvenile scup are tolerant to increases in seawater pCO2, possibly due to conditions this species encounters in their naturally variable environment and their well-developed pH control mechanisms. PMID:26442471

  11. Growth management of vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides) under Mediterranean conditions.

    PubMed

    Dudai, N; Putievsky, E; Chaimovitch, D; Ben-Hur, M

    2006-10-01

    In spite of the advantages of Vetiver grass in light of environmental aspects, this plant is not used in the Mediterranean region. The objectives of the present study were: (i) to elucidate growth parameters and establishment of Vetiver under Mediterranean conditions suitable for its various environmental applications; and (ii) to develop management practices for growing vetiver under Mediterranean conditions. In greenhouse experiments conducted under controlled conditions it was found that, in general, increasing the minimum/maximum temperatures to 21-29 degrees C significantly increased plant height. In the Mediterranean region, this range of air temperatures is obtained mainly during the summer, from June to September. For air temperatures up to 15-23 degrees C the effect of day length on plant height was insignificant, whereas in air temperature >15-23 degrees C, the plant heights under long day conditions were significantly higher than under short day. The number of sprouts per plant increased exponentially with increasing air temperature, and was not significantly affected by the day length at any air temperature range. In open fields, the heights of irrigated vetiver plants were significantly higher than those of rain-fed plants. It was concluded that, once they were established, vetiver plants could survive the dry summer of the Mediterranean region under rain-fed conditions, but they would be shorter than under irrigation. Cutting or burning of the plant foliage during the spring did not improve the survival of vetiver during the dry summer. In order to obtain fast growth of vetiver and to increase the possibility of its using the rainwater, the plants should be planted in the winter, during February and March. However, under this regime, the vetiver plant cannot be used as a soil stabilizer during the first winter, because the plant is still small. In contrast, under irrigation it is advantageous to plant vetiver at the beginning of the summer; the plant

  12. Growth of immature Chironomus calligraphus in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Canteiro, Rita de Cássia S A; Albertoni, Edélti F

    2011-12-01

    Chironomidae larvae are important macroinvertebrates in limnic environments, but little knowledge exists about their biometrics development characteristics. This study aims to describe the immature Chironomus calligraphus Goeldi, 1905 under laboratory conditions by the accomplishment of thirteen egg masses from eggs eclosion to adults emergency, at controlled room temperature (25ºC) and photoperiod (12-12h). Larvae were feed ad libitum with "Alcon Basic - MEP 200 Complex" fish food and commercial dehydrated Spirulina. The postures had a mean length of 9 ± 1 mm (n = 13) and 348 ± 66 eggs. The brownish colored eggs with elliptical shape had length of 160.3 ± 17.7 µm (n = 130), being arranged as an organized string in a pseudo spiral form. The time duration from the first to the four instars were three, four, four and eight days, and the average length of a cephalic capsule to each one of the instars (66.3 ± 12.3 µm, 102.9 ± 22.1 µm, 159 ± 24.6 µm, 249.2 ± 29.7 µm, n = 456) were significantly different (ANOVA, p < 0.001). The Dyar’s Rule showed a constant growth rate, r = 1.5. Our results demonstrated that C. calligraphus is a species with short life cycle, low mortality rate, food adaptability, fast larval growth and easily maintained at laboratory, factors that allowed the use of this native species as a tool for ecotoxicological tests. PMID:21971596

  13. Fibroblast Growth Factors and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Promote Cardiac Reprogramming under Defined Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Muraoka, Naoto; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Sadahiro, Taketaro; Isomi, Mari; Haginiwa, Sho; Kojima, Hidenori; Umei, Tomohiko; Akiyama, Mizuha; Kuishi, Yuki; Kurokawa, Junko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ieda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by overexpression of cardiac transcription factors, including Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5; however, this process is inefficient under serum-based culture conditions, in which conversion of partially reprogrammed cells into fully reprogrammed functional iCMs has been a major hurdle. Here, we report that a combination of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2, FGF10, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), termed FFV, promoted cardiac reprogramming under defined serum-free conditions, increasing spontaneously beating iCMs by 100-fold compared with those under conventional serum-based conditions. Mechanistically, FFV activated multiple cardiac transcriptional regulators and converted partially reprogrammed cells into functional iCMs through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathways. Moreover, FFV enabled cardiac reprogramming with only Mef2c and Tbx5 through the induction of cardiac reprogramming factors, including Gata4. Thus, defined culture conditions promoted the quality of cardiac reprogramming, and this finding provides new insight into the mechanism of cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26626177

  14. Growth patterns for etiolated soybeans germinated under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Howard G.; Piastuch, William C.

    In the GENEX (GENe EXpression) spaceflight experiment (flown on STS-87), six surface sterilized soybean seeds ( Glycine max cv McCall) were inserted into each of 32 autoclaved plastic seed growth pouches containing an inner germination paper sleeve (for a total of 192 seeds). The pouches were stowed within a mid-deck locker until Mission Flight Day 10, at which time an astronaut added water to initiate the process of seed germination on-orbit and subsequently transferred them to four light-tight aluminum canisters called BRIC-60s (Biological Research In Canisters). We report here on the morphological characteristics of: (1) the recovered flight plants ( N = 177), (2) the corresponding ground control population ( N = 183), plus (3) additional controls grown on the ground under clinostat conditions ( N = 93). No significant morphological differences were found between the flight, ground control and clinorotated treatments for either the cotyledons or hypocotyls. There were, however, significantly longer primary roots produced in the flight population relative to the ground control population, which in turn had significantly longer primary roots than the clinorotated population. This same pattern was observed relative to the production of lateral roots (flight > control > clinorotated). Taken together with previous literature reports, we believe that there is now sufficient evidence to conclude that plants grown under conditions of microgravity will generally exhibit enhanced root production relative to their ground control counterparts. Some causes underlying this phenomenon are speculated on.

  15. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today. PMID:26573709

  16. Antagonistic Pleiotropy at the Human IL6 Promoter Confers Genetic Resilience to the Pro-Inflammatory Effects of Adverse Social Conditions in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H.; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E.; Irwin, Michael R.; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene × Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human IL6 promoter (rs1800795; IL6 –174 G/C) that interacts with adverse socioenvironmental conditions to promote chronic inflammation in older adults (elevated C-reactive protein). This study identifies a protective effect of the same polymorphism in 17- to 19-year-old adolescents confronting socioeconomic adversity. Over 60% of the environmental risk contribution to the IL6 × Socioeconomic Status interaction could be accounted for by interpersonal stress and adult role burden. Thus, the IL6 –174G allele does not represent an undifferentiated risk factor but instead sensitizes inflammatory biology to socioenvironmental conditions, conferring either genetic vulnerability or resilience depending on the developmental “somatic environment” that interacts with social conditions to influence gene expression. PMID:21639625

  17. Impact of growth conditions on transport behavior of E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this investigation is to determine the effect that growth solution has on cell surface properties and transport behavior of eleven E. coli isolates through saturated porous media. The two growth solutions used were a standard laboratory growth medium (LB) and a dairy manure extract soluti...

  18. Development and application of the adverse outcome pathway framework for understanding and predicting chronic toxicity: II. A focus on growth impairment in fish.

    PubMed

    Groh, Ksenia J; Carvalho, Raquel N; Chipman, James K; Denslow, Nancy D; Halder, Marlies; Murphy, Cheryl A; Roelofs, Dick; Rolaki, Alexandra; Schirmer, Kristin; Watanabe, Karen H

    2015-02-01

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) organize knowledge on the progression of toxicity through levels of biological organization. By determining the linkages between toxicity events at different levels, AOPs lay the foundation for mechanism-based alternative testing approaches to hazard assessment. Here, we focus on growth impairment in fish to illustrate the initial stages in the process of AOP development for chronic toxicity outcomes. Growth is an apical endpoint commonly assessed in chronic toxicity tests for which a replacement is desirable. Based on several criteria, we identified reduction in food intake to be a suitable key event for initiation of middle-out AOP development. To start exploring the upstream and downstream links of this key event, we developed three AOP case studies, for pyrethroids, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and cadmium. Our analysis showed that the effect of pyrethroids and SSRIs on food intake is strongly linked to growth impairment, while cadmium causes a reduction in growth due to increased metabolic demands rather than changes in food intake. Locomotion impairment by pyrethroids is strongly linked to their effects on food intake and growth, while for SSRIs their direct influence on appetite may play a more important role. We further discuss which alternative tests could be used to inform on the predictive key events identified in the case studies. In conclusion, our work demonstrates how the AOP concept can be used in practice to assess critically the knowledge available for specific chronic toxicity cases and to identify existing knowledge gaps and potential alternative tests. PMID:25456049

  19. A Comparison of Three Conditional Growth Percentile Methods: Student Growth Percentiles, Percentile Rank Residuals, and a Matching Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Seo, Dong Gi

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview and comparison of three conditional growth percentile methods; student growth percentiles, percentile rank residuals, and a nonparametric matching method. These approaches seek to describe student growth in terms of the relative percentile ranking of a student in relationship to students that had the same…

  20. Fixed and Growth Mindset in Education and How Grit Helps Students Persist in the Face of Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochanadel, Aaron; Finamore, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Students face a wealth of challenges in college for example a lack of support, sometimes making it difficult to persevere. However, in an academic environment that teaches grit and fosters growth, students can learn to persist. Those who believe intelligence is fixed and cannot be changed exert less effort to succeed. Students who persevere when…

  1. Rainbow trout resistance to bacterial cold-water disease is moderately heritable and is not adversely correlated with growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to estimate the heritabilities for and genetic correlations among resistance to bacterial cold-water disease and growth traits in a population of rainbow trout. Bacterial cold-water disease, a chronic disease of rainbow trout, is caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilu...

  2. Modeling the effect of adverse environmental conditions and clothing on temperature rise in a human body exposed to radio frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stephen M; McIntosh, Robert L; Iskra, Steve; Wood, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    This study considers the computationally determined thermal profile of a fully clothed, finely discretized, heterogeneous human body model, subject to the maximum allowable reference level for a 1-GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field for a worker, and also subject to adverse environmental conditions, including high humidity and high ambient temperature. An initial observation is that while electromagnetic fields at the occupational safety limit will contribute an additional thermal load to the tissues, and subsequently, cause an elevated temperature, the magnitude of this effect is far outweighed by that due to the conditions including the ambient temperature, relative humidity, and the type of clothing worn. It is envisaged that the computational modeling approach outlined in this paper will be suitably modified in future studies to evaluate the thermal response of a body at elevated metabolic rates, and for different body shapes and sizes including children and pregnant women. PMID:25314694

  3. Oligotrophic Bacteria Enhance Algal Growth under Iron-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Keshtacher-Liebso..., E.; Hadar, Y.; Chen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A Halomonas sp., a marine halophilic and oligotrophic bacterium, was grown on exudates of Dunaliella bardawil. The bacteria increased the solubility of Fe, thereby enhancing its availability to the algae. As a result, the algal growth rate increased. Because of these syntrophic relations, growth of the marine alga D. bardawil was facilitated at Fe levels that would otherwise induce Fe deficiency and inhibit algal growth. PMID:16535058

  4. One-against-All Weighted Dynamic Time Warping for Language-Independent and Speaker-Dependent Speech Recognition in Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions. PMID:24520317

  5. One-against-all weighted dynamic time warping for language-independent and speaker-dependent speech recognition in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions. PMID:24520317

  6. Storage of milk powders under adverse conditions. 2. Influence on the content of water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Ford, J E; Hurrell, R F; Finot, P A

    1983-05-01

    Storage of milk powder under unfavourable conditions accelerates the normally slow deterioration in nutritional quality. The effects of such storage on the water-soluble vitamin composition were examined. (a) Spray-dried whole milk containing 25 g water/kg was stored at 60 degrees and 70 degrees and sampled weekly to 9 weeks. (b) Spray-dried whole milk and skimmed milk were adjusted to contain 40 and 100 g water/kg and stored at 37 degrees in nitrogen and in oxygen. Samples were taken for analysis at intervals during storage. The samples were analysed for eight B-complex vitamins and ascorbic acid, and also for total lysine, 'reactive lysine' and 'lysine as lactulosyl-lysine'. Storage at 60 degrees caused rapid destruction of folic acid (53% loss at 4 weeks) and slower loss of thiamin, vitamin B6 and pantothenic acid (18% at 8 weeks). There was no change in the content of riboflavin, biotin, nicotinic acid and vitamin B12. At 70 degrees the rate of destruction of the four labile vitamins was much increased; 18% or less survived at 4 weeks. At 37 degrees and 40 g water/kg there was little change in total and 'reactive' lysine during storage for 57 d. Lactulosyl-lysine was demonstrably present but at low concentration. There was considerable loss of folate (72%) and ascorbate (91%) during storage for 30 d in O2, but no significant loss in N2. Thiamin fell by approximately 12% in 57 d, equally in O2 and N2. The content of the remaining vitamins was unchanged. At 100 g water/kg there were progressive Maillard changes. During 27 d in N2 the colour changed from cream to pale brown, but in O2 there was no perceptible colour change. Total lysine fell by 20% in 27 d, and 'reactive lysine' by 30%. Folate was stable during 16 d in N2, but largely (94%) destroyed in O2. Ascorbic acid was also destroyed in N2 as in O2. Thiamin fell by 41% in 27 d, equally in O2 and N2. Vitamin B6 was more labile, especially in N2, falling by 71% in 16 d. With skimmed-milk powder containing 100

  7. Deformation and crack growth response under cyclic creep conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    To increase energy efficiency, new plants must operate at higher and higher temperatures. Moreover, power generation equipment continues to age and is being used far beyond its intended original design life. Some recent failures which unfortunately occurred with serious consequences have clearly illustrated that current methods for insuring safety and reliability of high temperature equipment is inadequate. Because of these concerns, an understanding of the high-temperature crack growth process is very important and has led to the following studies of the high temperature failure process. This effort summarizes the results of some recent studies which investigate the phenomenon of high temperature creep fatigue crack growth. Experimental results which detail the process of creep fatigue, analytical studies which investigate why current methods are ineffective, and finally, a new approach which is based on the T{sup *}-integral and its ability to characterize the creep-fatigue crack growth process are discussed. The potential validity of this new predictive methodology is illustrated.

  8. Correlating electrical resistance to growth conditions for multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Chun; Amama, Placidus B.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2007-08-27

    A correlation between growth temperature and electrical resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) has been established by measuring the resistance of individual MWNTs grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 800, 900, and 950 deg. C. The lowest resistances were obtained mainly from MWNTs grown at 900 deg. C. The MWNT resistance is larger on average at lower (800 deg. C) and higher (950 deg. C) growth temperatures. The resistance of MWNTs correlated well with other MWNT quality indices obtained from Raman spectra. This study identifies a temperature window for growing higher-quality MWNTs with fewer defects and lower resistance by PECVD.

  9. Correlating electrical resistance to growth conditions for multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chun; Amama, Placidus B.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2007-08-01

    A correlation between growth temperature and electrical resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) has been established by measuring the resistance of individual MWNTs grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 800, 900, and 950°C. The lowest resistances were obtained mainly from MWNTs grown at 900°C. The MWNT resistance is larger on average at lower (800°C) and higher (950°C) growth temperatures. The resistance of MWNTs correlated well with other MWNT quality indices obtained from Raman spectra. This study identifies a temperature window for growing higher-quality MWNTs with fewer defects and lower resistance by PECVD.

  10. Conditions for super-adiabatic droplet growth after entrainment mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Shaw, Raymond; Xue, Huiwen

    2016-07-01

    Cloud droplet response to entrainment and mixing between a cloud and its environment is considered, accounting for subsequent droplet growth during adiabatic ascent following a mixing event. The vertical profile for liquid water mixing ratio after a mixing event is derived analytically, allowing the reduction to be predicted from the mixing fraction and from the temperature and humidity for both the cloud and environment. It is derived for the limit of homogeneous mixing. The expression leads to a critical height above the mixing level: at the critical height the cloud droplet radius is the same for both mixed and unmixed parcels, and the critical height is independent of the updraft velocity and mixing fraction. Cloud droplets in a mixed parcel are larger than in an unmixed parcel above the critical height, which we refer to as the "super-adiabatic" growth region. Analytical results are confirmed with a bin microphysics cloud model. Using the model, we explore the effects of updraft velocity, aerosol source in the environmental air, and polydisperse cloud droplets. Results show that the mixed parcel is more likely to reach the super-adiabatic growth region when the environmental air is humid and clean. It is also confirmed that the analytical predictions are matched by the volume-mean cloud droplet radius for polydisperse size distributions. The findings have implications for the origin of large cloud droplets that may contribute to onset of collision-coalescence in warm clouds.

  11. Conditions for super-adiabatic droplet growth after entrainment mixing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Fan; Shaw, Raymond; Xue, Huiwen

    2016-07-29

    Cloud droplet response to entrainment and mixing between a cloud and its environment is considered, accounting for subsequent droplet growth during adiabatic ascent following a mixing event. The vertical profile for liquid water mixing ratio after a mixing event is derived analytically, allowing the reduction to be predicted from the mixing fraction and from the temperature and humidity for both the cloud and environment. It is derived for the limit of homogeneous mixing. The expression leads to a critical height above the mixing level: at the critical height the cloud droplet radius is the same for both mixed and unmixedmore » parcels, and the critical height is independent of the updraft velocity and mixing fraction. Cloud droplets in a mixed parcel are larger than in an unmixed parcel above the critical height, which we refer to as the “super-adiabatic” growth region. Analytical results are confirmed with a bin microphysics cloud model. Using the model, we explore the effects of updraft velocity, aerosol source in the environmental air, and polydisperse cloud droplets. Results show that the mixed parcel is more likely to reach the super-adiabatic growth region when the environmental air is humid and clean. It is also confirmed that the analytical predictions are matched by the volume-mean cloud droplet radius for polydisperse size distributions. The findings have implications for the origin of large cloud droplets that may contribute to onset of collision–coalescence in warm clouds.« less

  12. Promoters maintain their relative activity levels under different growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Leeat; Zackay, Ora; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Barenholz, Uri; Dekel, Erez; Sasson, Vered; Aidelberg, Guy; Bren, Anat; Zeevi, Danny; Weinberger, Adina; Alon, Uri; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Most genes change expression levels across conditions, but it is unclear which of these changes represents specific regulation and what determines their quantitative degree. Here, we accurately measured activities of ∼900 S. cerevisiae and ∼1800 E. coli promoters using fluorescent reporters. We show that in both organisms 60–90% of promoters change their expression between conditions by a constant global scaling factor that depends only on the conditions and not on the promoter's identity. Quantifying such global effects allows precise characterization of specific regulation—promoters deviating from the global scale line. These are organized into few functionally related groups that also adhere to scale lines and preserve their relative activities across conditions. Thus, only several scaling factors suffice to accurately describe genome-wide expression profiles across conditions. We present a parameter-free passive resource allocation model that quantitatively accounts for the global scaling factors. It suggests that many changes in expression across conditions result from global effects and not specific regulation, and provides means for quantitative interpretation of expression profiles. PMID:24169404

  13. Promoters maintain their relative activity levels under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Keren, Leeat; Zackay, Ora; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Barenholz, Uri; Dekel, Erez; Sasson, Vered; Aidelberg, Guy; Bren, Anat; Zeevi, Danny; Weinberger, Adina; Alon, Uri; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Most genes change expression levels across conditions, but it is unclear which of these changes represents specific regulation and what determines their quantitative degree. Here, we accurately measured activities of ~900 S. cerevisiae and ~1800 E. coli promoters using fluorescent reporters. We show that in both organisms 60-90% of promoters change their expression between conditions by a constant global scaling factor that depends only on the conditions and not on the promoter's identity. Quantifying such global effects allows precise characterization of specific regulation-promoters deviating from the global scale line. These are organized into few functionally related groups that also adhere to scale lines and preserve their relative activities across conditions. Thus, only several scaling factors suffice to accurately describe genome-wide expression profiles across conditions. We present a parameter-free passive resource allocation model that quantitatively accounts for the global scaling factors. It suggests that many changes in expression across conditions result from global effects and not specific regulation, and provides means for quantitative interpretation of expression profiles. PMID:24169404

  14. Studies on Scenedesmus actus growth. I. Effect of autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions on the growth of scenedesmus acutus

    SciTech Connect

    Shamala, T.R.; Drawert, F.; Leupold, G.

    1982-06-01

    Among sugars, glucose and mannose were found to be the most suitable substrates for mixotrophic growth, uptake of galactose and its influence on growth was negligible, and sucrose and fructose occupied intermediary positions. The optimum temperature for sugar uptake was 30 degrees C both under light and in darkness. Enhancement in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolution rate, based on the utilization of substrates, was foremost in the presence of glucose, followed by mannose, sucrose, and fructose. Industrial by-products such as sugarcane molasses also were utilized to increase the algal growth under mixotrophic conditions. A maximum yield in biomass was obtained subsequent to the combined supply of sugarcane molasses with carbon dioxide to indoor as well as outdoor mixotrophic cultures. Doubling the carbon dioxide supply alone above a certain level, under autotrophic and mixotrophic outdoor conditions, did not produce a pronounced increase in the algal growth rate. The results on autotrophic and mixotrophic growth variations are discussed in this article. (Refs. 36).

  15. Plant Growth and Morphogenesis under Different Gravity Conditions: Relevance to Plant Life in Space.

    PubMed

    Hoson, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The growth and morphogenesis of plants are entirely dependent on the gravitational acceleration of earth. Under microgravity conditions in space, these processes are greatly modified. Recent space experiments, in combination with ground-based studies, have shown that elongation growth is stimulated and lateral expansion suppressed in various shoot organs and roots under microgravity conditions. Plant organs also show automorphogenesis in space, which consists of altered growth direction and spontaneous curvature in the dorsiventral (back and front) directions. Changes in cell wall properties are responsible for these modifications of growth and morphogenesis under microgravity conditions. Plants live in space with interesting new sizes and forms. PMID:25370193

  16. Urinary Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) • Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 7 (IGFBP7) Predicts Adverse Outcome in Pediatric Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Jens H.; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Waldherr, Sina; Pöschl, Johannes; Teufel, Ulrike; Westhoff, Timm H.; Fichtner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background The G1 cell cycle inhibitors tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) have been identified as promising biomarkers for the prediction of adverse outcomes including renal replacement therapy (RRT) and mortality in critically ill adult patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the prognostic value of urinary TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 in neonatal and pediatric AKI for adverse outcome has not been investigated yet. Methods The product of the urinary concentration of TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 ([TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7]) was assessed by a commercially available immunoassay (NephroCheck™) in a prospective cohort study in 133 subjects aged 0–18 years including 46 patients with established AKI according to pRIFLE criteria, 27 patients without AKI (non-AKI group I) and 60 apparently healthy neonates and children (non-AKI group II). AKI etiologies were: dehydration/hypovolemia (n = 7), hemodynamic instability (n = 7), perinatal asphyxia (n = 9), septic shock (n = 7), typical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS; n = 5), interstitial nephritis (n = 5), vasculitis (n = 4), nephrotoxic injury (n = 1) and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). Results When AKI patients were classified into pRIFLE criteria, 6/46 (13%) patients fulfilled the criteria for the category “Risk”, 13/46 (28%) for “Injury”, 26/46 (57%) for “Failure” and 1/46 (2%) for “Loss”. Patients in the “Failure” stage had a median 3.7-fold higher urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] compared to non-AKI subjects (P<0.001). When analyzed for AKI etiology, highest [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] values were found in patients with septic shock (P<0.001 vs. non-AKI I+II). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses in the AKI group revealed good performance of [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] in predicting 30-day (area under the curve (AUC) 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61–0.97) and 3-month mortality (AUC 0.84; 95% CI, 0.67–0.99) and moderate performance in predicting RRT

  17. Automated Diagnosis Of Conditions In A Plant-Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinger, Barry R.; Damiano, Alfred L.

    1995-01-01

    Biomass Production Chamber Operations Assistant software and hardware constitute expert system that diagnoses mechanical failures in controlled-environment hydroponic plant-growth chamber and recommends corrective actions to be taken by technicians. Subjects of continuing research directed toward development of highly automated closed life-support systems aboard spacecraft to process animal (including human) and plant wastes into food and oxygen. Uses Microsoft Windows interface to give technicians intuitive, efficient access to critical data. In diagnostic mode, system prompts technician for information. When expert system has enough information, it generates recovery plan.

  18. Graphene growth on SiC(000-1): optimization of surface preparation and growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Zachary R.; Jernigan, Glenn G.; Bussmann, Konrad M.; Nyakiti, Luke O.; Garces, Nelson Y.; Nath, Anindya; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Gaskill, D. K.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-09-01

    Graphene growth of high crystal quality and single-layer thickness can be achieved by low pressure sublimation (LPS) on SiC(0001). On SiC(0001), which is the C-terminated polar surface, there has been much less success growing uniform, single-layer films. In this work, a systematic study of surface preparation by hydrogen etching followed by LPS in an argon ambient was performed. Hydrogen etching is an important first step in the graphene growth process because it removes damage caused by polishing the substrate surface. However, for SiC(0001), etching at too high of a temperature or for too long has been found to result in pit formation due to the preferential etching of screw dislocations that intersect the surface. It was found that temperatures above 1450°C in 200mbar of hydrogen result in pitting of the surface, whereas etch temperatures at and below 1450°C can result in atomically at terraces of ~ 1 µm width. Following the hydrogen etch optimization, argon-mediated graphene growth was carried out at several different temperatures. For the growth experiments, pressure and growth time were both fixed. Regardless of growth temperature, all of the films were found to have non-uniform thickness. Further, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction measurements reveal that trace amounts of oxygen, which may be present during growth, significantly affects the graphene growth process on this polar surface.

  19. Performing Comparative Peptidomics Analyses of Salmonella from Different Growth Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Mottaz, Heather; Metz, Thomas O.; Ansong, Charles K.; Manes, Nathan P.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2010-01-08

    Host–pathogen interactions are complex competitions during which both the host and the pathogen adapt rapidly to each other in order for one or the other to survive. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a pathogen with a broad host range that causes a typhoid fever-like disease in mice and severe food poisoning in humans. The murine typhoid fever is a systemic infection in which S.typhimurium evades part of the immune system by replicating inside macrophages and other cells. The transition from a foodborne contaminant to an intracellular pathogen must occur rapidly in multiple,ordered steps in order for S. typhimurium to thrive within its host environment. Using S. typhimurium isolated from rich culture conditions and from conditions that mimic the hostile intracellular environment of the host cell, a native low molecular weight protein fraction, or peptidome, was enriched from cell lysates by precipitation with organic solvents. The enriched peptidome was analyzed by both LC–MS/MS and LC–MS-based methods, although several other methods are possible. Pre-fractionation of peptides allowed identification of small proteins and protein degradation products that would normally be overlooked. Comparison of peptides present in lysates prepared from Salmonella grown under different conditions provided a unique insight into cellular degradation processes as well as identification of novel peptides encoded in the genome but not annotated. The overall approach is detailed here as applied to Salmonella and is adaptable to a broad range of biological systems.

  20. Associations between childhood adversity, adult stressful life events, and past-year drug use disorders in the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bronwyn; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos; Stein, Dan J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress sensitization, whereby CA lowers tolerance to later stressors, has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the association between exposure to childhood adversities (CA) and drug use disorders in adulthood. However this mechanism remains untested. This paper begins to address this gap through exploring associations between CA exposure and stressful events in adulthood for predicting drug use disorders. We used data drawn from Wave 2 of the U.S. National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (n=34,653) to explore whether the association between past-year stressful life events and the 12-month prevalence of disordered cannabis, stimulant and opiate use varied by the number of types of CA that an individual was exposed to. Past-year stressful life events were associated with an increased risk of cannabis, stimulant and opiate use disorders among men and women. Exposure to CA was associated with increased risk for disordered cannabis use among men and women and opiate use among men only. Finally, we found significant associations between exposure to CA and past year stressful life events in predicting disordered drug use, but only for women in relation to disordered stimulant and opiate use. Findings are suggestive of possible stress sensitization effects in predicting disordered stimulant and opiate use among women. Implications of these findings for the prevention and treatment of drug use disorders and for future research are discussed. PMID:25134042

  1. Evaluation of condition indices for estimation of growth of largemouth bass and white crappie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, Steve; Childress, W. Michael

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of three condition indices-condition factor (K), relative condition (Kn), and relative weight (Wr)-to estimate annual growth rates of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and white crappies Pomoxis annularis collected during standardized autumn electrofishing and trap-net surveys of Texas reservoirs. Multiple-regression models for estimation of length increments from initial length (at the start of the growing season) and condition indices had R2 values of 0.63-0.76 for largemouth bass and 0.46-0.83 for white crappie. However, these models are not useful for indirect estimation ofgrowth rates because growth must be known (initial length equals length at capture minus estimated annual growth). Models based on length at capture and condition indices had R2 values of 0.22-0.68 for largemouth bass and less than 0.45 for white crappie. The low precision of models based on length at capture indicates that condition provides a weak basis for indirect estimation of growth rates from Texas reservoirs sampled during autumn and, therefore, is unreliable for detection of size-related growth phenomena such as "stockpiling" (size specific, density-dependent growth depression). Direct estimates of growth rates based on back-calculations or tagging data seem necessary for reliable detection of size-related growth patterns for largemouth bass and white crappies from Texas reservoirs.

  2. Growth of samarskite crystal under microgravity conditions (M-20)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takekawa, S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to grow single crystals of samarskite under microgravity conditions by the traveling solvent float zone (TSFZ) method, and to study the phase relations in the samarskite-related systems involving liquid phases by the slow cooling float zone (SCFZ) method. Samarskite is one of the minerals in a metamict state and is composed of Ca, Fe, Y, U, Th, Nb, Ta, O, etc. Alpha-particles radiating from uranium and/or thorium in the samarskite itself has destroyed its original structure without damaging its chemical composition and its external form. Consequently its structure was converted into a vitreous structure.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes Growth by CVD in Various Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Gorti, S.; Muntele, I.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT could be used in numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been engaged in synthesizing particular structural or dimensional MWCNT. This presentation will illustrate MWCNT synthesized on silicon substrates by thermal CVD. On the substrate, an array of catalysts is coated using sputtering deposition. A thin Ti buffer layer is also coated on some Si substrates prior to depositing catalyst particles. Nickel, cobalt or iron transition metals are used as catalysts for the MWCNT growth. Since the diameter of MWCNT depends on the size of catalyst particles, the catalyst particle size is investigated after annealed at various temperatures. MWCNT are grown on the substrate in the temperature range of 700 to 1000 C and the pressure range of 100 torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the MWCNT synthesis. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  4. Pathways towards risk: syndemic conditions mediate the effect of adversity on HIV risk behaviors among young men who have sex with men (YMSM).

    PubMed

    Herrick, Amy; Stall, Ron; Egan, James; Schrager, Sheree; Kipke, Michele

    2014-10-01

    Research shows that young men who have sex with men (YMSM) engage in higher rates of health risk behaviors and experience higher rates of negative health outcomes than their peers. The purpose of this study is to determine if the effects of adversity on HIV risk are mediated by syndemics (co-occurring health problems). Participants were 470 ethnically diverse YMSM ages 18 to 24 recruited between 2005 and 2006 and surveyed every 6 months for 24 months. Regression analyses examined the impact of adversity on syndemics (emotional distress, substance use, and problematic alcohol use) and the effects of both adversity and syndemics on HIV risk behaviors over time. Gay-related discrimination and victimization-among other adversity variables-were significantly associated with syndemics and condomless sex (CS). Syndemics mediated the effects of adversity on CS in all models. Adverse events impact HIV risk taking among YMSM through syndemics. These findings suggest that prevention programs aimed at reducing adversity may reduce both the synergistic effect of multiple psychosocial health problems and HIV risk taking. PMID:25146488

  5. Sputtered magnesium diboride thin films: Growth conditions and surface morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, April; Villegas, Brendon; Gu, J. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB 2) thin films were deposited on C-plane sapphire substrates by sputtering pure B and Mg targets at different substrate temperatures, and were followed by in situ annealing. A systematic study about the effects of the various growth and annealing parameters on the physical properties of MgB 2 thin films showed that the substrate temperature is the most critical factor that determines the superconducting transition temperature ( Tc), while annealing plays a minor role. There was no superconducting transition in the thin films grown at room temperature without post-annealing. The highest Tc of the samples grown at room temperature after the optimized annealing was 22 K. As the temperature of the substrate ( Ts) increased, Tc rose. However, the maximum Ts was limited due to the low magnesium sticking coefficient and thus the Tc value was limited as well. The highest Tc, 29 K, was obtained for the sample deposited at 180 °C, annealed at 620 °C, and was subsequently annealed a second time at 800 °C. Three-dimensional (3D) AFM images clearly demonstrated that the thin films with no transition, or very low Tc, did not have the well-developed MgB 2 grains while the films with higher Tc displayed the well-developed grains and smooth surface. Although the Tc of sputtered MgB 2 films in the current work is lower than that for the bulk and ex situ annealed thin films, this work presents an important step towards the fabrication of MgB 2 heterostructures using rather simple physical vapor deposition method such as sputtering.

  6. Decreasing electron flux through the cytochrome and/or alternative respiratory pathways triggers common and distinct cellular responses dependent on growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Kristina; Yin, Guangkun; Duncan, Owen; Law, Simon R; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Kaur, Parwinder; Meyer, Etienne; Wang, Yan; Small, Catherine Colas des Francs; Giraud, Estelle; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2015-01-01

    Diverse signaling pathways are activated by perturbation of mitochondrial function under different growth conditions.Mitochondria have emerged as an important organelle for sensing and coping with stress in addition to being the sites of important metabolic pathways. Here, responses to moderate light and drought stress were examined in different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant plants lacking a functional alternative oxidase (alternative oxidase1a [aox1a]), those with reduced cytochrome electron transport chain capacity (T3/T7 bacteriophage-type RNA polymerase, mitochondrial, and plastidial [rpoTmp]), and double mutants impaired in both pathways (aox1a:rpoTmp). Under conditions considered optimal for growth, transcriptomes of aox1a and rpoTmp were distinct. Under adverse growth conditions, however, transcriptome changes in aox1a and rpoTmp displayed a highly significant overlap and were indicative of a common mitochondrial stress response and down-regulation of photosynthesis. This suggests that the role of mitochondria to support photosynthesis is provided through either the alternative pathway or the cytochrome pathway, and when either pathway is inhibited, such as under environmental stress, a common, dramatic, and succinct mitochondrial signal is activated to alter energy metabolism in both organelles. aox1a:rpoTmp double mutants grown under optimal conditions showed dramatic reductions in biomass production compared with aox1a and rpoTmp and a transcriptome that was distinct from aox1a or rpoTmp. Transcript data indicating activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in aox1a:rpoTmp were supported by a proteomic analysis of over 200 proteins. Under optimal conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp plants seemed to switch on many of the typical mitochondrial stress regulators. Under adverse conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp turned off these responses and displayed a biotic stress response. Taken together, these results highlight the diverse signaling pathways activated by the

  7. Coexistence of Low Vitamin D and High Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 Plasma Levels Predicts an Adverse Outcome in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuñón, José; Cristóbal, Carmen; Tarín, Nieves; Aceña, Álvaro; González-Casaus, María Luisa; Huelmos, Ana; Alonso, Joaquín; Lorenzo, Óscar; González-Parra, Emilio; Mahíllo-Fernández, Ignacio; Pello, Ana María; Carda, Rocío; Farré, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) are related with cardiovascular disorders. We have investigated the relationship of calcidiol (vitamin D metabolite) and FGF-23 plasma levels with the incidence of adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods Prospective follow-up study of 704 outpatients, attending the departments of Cardiology of four hospitals in Spain, 6–12 months after an acute coronary event. Baseline calcidiol, FGF-23, parathormone, and phosphate plasma levels were assessed. The outcome was the development of acute ischemic events (any acute coronary syndrome, stroke, or transient ischemic attack), heart failure, or death. Cox regression adjusted for the main confounders was performed. Results Calcidiol levels showed a moderate-severe decrease in 57.3% of cases. Parathormone, FGF-23, and phosphate levels were increased in 30.0%, 11.5% and 0.9% of patients, respectively. Only 22.4% of patients had glomerular filtration rate<60 ml/min1.73 m2. After a mean follow-up was 2.15±0.99 years, 77 patients developed the outcome. Calcidiol (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.48–0.94; p = 0.021) and FGF-23 (HR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.04–1.23; p = 0.005) plasma levels predicted independently the outcome. There was a significant interaction between calcidiol and FGF-23 levels (p = 0.025). When the population was divided according to FGF-23 levels, calcidiol still predicted the outcome independently in patients with FGF-23 levels higher than the median (HR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.31–0.80; p = 0.003) but not in those with FGF-23 levels below this value (HR = 1.03; 95% CI = 0.62–1.71; p = 0.904). Conclusions Abnormalities in mineral metabolism are frequent in patients with stable coronary artery disease. In this population, low calcidiol plasma levels predict an adverse prognosis in the presence of high FGF-23 levels. PMID:24748388

  8. The Regularities of Fatigue Crack Growth in Airframes Elements at Real Operation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelko, Igors; Pavelko, Vitalijs

    The results of analytical and experimental researches concerning predicting of fatigue crack growth in the operating conditions are presented. First of all the main factors causing a fatigue damage initiation and growth are analyzed and divided to two groups. Common conditions of fatigue damage precise predicting are established. The problem of fatigue crack growth at the stresses of variable amplitude was analyzed and an approach of description of this process is performed. Two examples present the efficiency of this approach. Theory of fatigue crack growth indication and the crack growth indicator (CGI) are developed. There is planned and executed a flight experiment using CGI located on two aircraft An-24 and An-26. Results of crack growth in CGI at operational load allowed to evaluate the parameters of generalized Paris-Erdogan law and statistical properties of crack increment per flight.

  9. Numerical Studies of Fluid Flow in Microgravity Conditions for Confined Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Xavier; Ramírez-Piscina, Laureano; Casademunt, Jaume

    2001-03-01

    We study the convective flow induced by residual accelerations in microgravity conditions for different geometric arrangements which are relevant to crystal growth experiments. We consider both constant and oscillating acceleration and focus mostly on the transient relaxation dynamics. Results are relevant to estimate impact of more realistic residual accelerations in crystal growth experiments.

  10. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Methods and Results: Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth promoting effects...

  11. CovS inactivates CovR and is required for growth under conditions of general stress in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Tracy L; Scott, June R

    2004-06-01

    The gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) causes diseases ranging from mild and often self-limiting infections of the skin or throat to invasive and life-threatening illnesses. To cause such diverse types of disease, the GAS must be able to sense adverse environments and regulate its gene expression accordingly. The CovR/S two-component signal transduction regulatory system in GAS represses about 15% of the GAS genome, including many genes involved in virulence, in response to the environment. We report that CovR is still able to repress transcription from several promoters in the absence of the putative histidine kinase sensor for this system, CovS. We also show that a phosphorylation site mutant (D53A) of CovR is unable to repress gene expression. In addition, we report that a strain with a nonpolar mutation in CovS does not grow at a low pH, elevated temperature, or high osmolarity. The stress-related phenotypes of the CovS mutant were complemented by expression of covS from a plasmid. Selection for growth of a CovS mutant under stress conditions resulted in isolation of second-site mutations that inactivated covR, indicating that CovR and CovS act in the same pathway. Also, at 40 degrees C in the wild-type strain, CovR appeared to be less active on the promoter tested, which is consistent with the hypothesis that it was partially inactivated by CovS. We suggest that under mild stress conditions, CovS inactivates CovR, either directly or indirectly, and that this inactivation relieves repression of many GAS genes, including the genes needed for growth of GAS under stress conditions and some genes that are necessary for virulence. Growth of many gram-positive bacteria under multiple-stress conditions requires alteration of promoter recognition produced by RNA polymerase association with the general stress response sigma factor, sigma(B). We provide evidence that for GAS, which lacks a sigB ortholog, growth under stress

  12. CovS Inactivates CovR and Is Required for Growth under Conditions of General Stress in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Tracy L.; Scott, June R.

    2004-01-01

    The gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) causes diseases ranging from mild and often self-limiting infections of the skin or throat to invasive and life-threatening illnesses. To cause such diverse types of disease, the GAS must be able to sense adverse environments and regulate its gene expression accordingly. The CovR/S two-component signal transduction regulatory system in GAS represses about 15% of the GAS genome, including many genes involved in virulence, in response to the environment. We report that CovR is still able to repress transcription from several promoters in the absence of the putative histidine kinase sensor for this system, CovS. We also show that a phosphorylation site mutant (D53A) of CovR is unable to repress gene expression. In addition, we report that a strain with a nonpolar mutation in CovS does not grow at a low pH, elevated temperature, or high osmolarity. The stress-related phenotypes of the CovS mutant were complemented by expression of covS from a plasmid. Selection for growth of a CovS mutant under stress conditions resulted in isolation of second-site mutations that inactivated covR, indicating that CovR and CovS act in the same pathway. Also, at 40°C in the wild-type strain, CovR appeared to be less active on the promoter tested, which is consistent with the hypothesis that it was partially inactivated by CovS. We suggest that under mild stress conditions, CovS inactivates CovR, either directly or indirectly, and that this inactivation relieves repression of many GAS genes, including the genes needed for growth of GAS under stress conditions and some genes that are necessary for virulence. Growth of many gram-positive bacteria under multiple-stress conditions requires alteration of promoter recognition produced by RNA polymerase association with the general stress response sigma factor, σB. We provide evidence that for GAS, which lacks a sigB ortholog, growth under stress conditions

  13. A water use and growth model for Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, I.R.

    1992-12-31

    To investigate the environmental impact of plantation forestry using fast-growing tree species in southern India, a program of field studies was initiated in 1987 specifically to measure the water use, nutrient uptake and growth rates of the plantations. A water use and growth (WAG) model is proposed for calculating transpiration and growth of Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions. The model is based on the measured relationships between transpiration rate and basal cross-sectional area and soil moisture availability. The volume growth rate (in water-limited conditions) is assumed to be proportional to the volume of water transpired. The model is calibrated using (deuterium tracing) measurements of transpiration and measurements of growth recorded at the Puradal experimental plantation, Karnataka, southern India.

  14. Synthesis of graphene by chemical vapor deposition: effect of growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Dan; Ren, Mingwei; Li, Xing'ao; Huang, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Graphene has attracted a great deal of attention due to its extraordinary physical and chemical properties. But the control of growth of high-quality, large-area and inexpensive graphene is still the bottleneck for practical applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has become the most common method for graphene growth due to its high production and large area of product. However, it generally suffers from an uncontrollable carbon precipitation effect that leads to inhomogeneous growth and strongly dependent on to the growth conditions. Until now, scientists have struggled to synthesize higher quality, larger area graphene through changing the experimental conditions. In this review, the progress made in the last few years concerning the exploration of preparation graphene by CVD is summarized in three aspects (catalysts, precursors and experimental parameters) that influence graphene growth. PMID:24245104

  15. Growth Characteristics of Carbon Nanotubes on Oxidized Catalyst under Low-Pressure Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawaguchi, Daiki; Sato, Hideki; Hata, Koichi; Miyake, Hideto; Iida, Kazuo; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa

    2012-01-01

    Low-pressure alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition (LP-ACCVD), which is an ACCVD method at a lower pressure (<1 Pa) than that in the conventional method, has been attracting much interest because it enables the low-temperature growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, the growth rate of CNTs by LP-ACCVD is markedly low owing to its low growth pressure. To alleviate this problem, we have examined the influence of the catalyst preparation and CVD conditions on the properties of CNTs grown by LP-ACCVD. It has been found that the oxidation of catalyst enhances the growth of CNTs by LP-ACCVD. Furthermore, the low flow rate of the ethanol enhances the growth yield of CNTs at lower growth temperature, which is understood to be the result of sufficient gas heating on the substrate.

  16. Radiative defects in GaN nanocolumns: Correlation with growth conditions and sample morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, P.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Grandal, J.; Ristic, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.-A.; Calleja, E.

    2011-02-21

    Low-temperature photoluminescence is studied in detail in GaN nanocolumns (NCs) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under various conditions (substrate temperature and impinging Ga/N flux ratio). The relative intensities of the different emission lines, in particular those related to structural defects, appear to be correlated with the growth conditions, and clearly linked to the NC sample morphology. We demonstrate, in particular, that all lines comprised between 3.10 and 3.42 eV rapidly lose intensity when the growth conditions are such that the NC coalescence is reduced. The well-known line around 3.45 eV, characteristic of GaN NC samples, shows, however, a behavior that is exactly the opposite of the other lines, namely, for growth conditions leading to reduced NC coalescence, this line tends to become more prominent, thus proving to be intrinsic to individual GaN NCs.

  17. Extent of fungal growth on fiberglass duct liners with and without biocides under challenging environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Behzad S; Ross, Kristen

    2003-03-01

    Eight brands of fiberglass duct liners, including three that contained biocides, were exposed to challenging environmental conditions that would promote fungal growth. Twenty-four rectangular sheet metal ducts in three groups of eight ducts per group were lined with the eight selected liners. Each group of ducts was exposed to one of the three test conditions within an environmental chamber for a period of 15 days. These conditions were a) 75 percent RH, b) 75 percent RH plus water spray, c) 75 percent RH plus dry nutrient, and d) 75 percent RH plus water plus nutrient. Viable spores of Aspergillus niger were aerosolized into each duct as seed. On the 16th day, air and surface samples for fungal spores were collected from inside ducts. The results of air sampling using N6 sampler and visual inspection indicated that two out of three biocide-containing liners, Permacote and Toughgard, inhibited fungal growth but only under condition A. The third biocide-containing liner, Aeroflex Plus, was effective even when it was wet (conditions A and B). All three biocide-containing liners failed to inhibit fungal growth under conditions C and D. Among the five other types of liners that did not contain biocides, ATCO Flex with a smooth Mylar coating was more preferable, exhibiting lower fungal activity during conditions A, B, and C. All liners failed under condition D when nutrient and water were added together. Surface sampling using adhesive tape failed to produce representative results, apparently due to rough/porous surface of duct liners. It was concluded that duct liners with biocide treatment could be less promoting to microbial growth under high humidity as long as their surfaces remain clean and water-free. A liner with an impermeable and smooth surface seems to be less subject to microbial growth under most conditions than biocide-containing liners having porous and/or rough surfaces. PMID:12573965

  18. Disruption of the lower food web in Lake Ontario: Did it affect alewife growth or condition?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Gorman, R.; Prindle, S.E.; Lantry, J.R.; Lantry, B.F.

    2008-01-01

    From the early 1980s to the late 1990s, a succession of non-native invertebrates colonized Lake Ontario and the suite of consequences caused by their colonization became known as "food web disruption". For example, the native burrowing amphipod Diporeia spp., a key link in the profundal food web, declined to near absence, exotic predaceous cladocerans with long spines proliferated, altering the zooplankton community, and depth distributions of fishes shifted. These changes had the potential to affect growth and condition of planktivorous alewife Alosa pseudoharengus, the most abundant fish in the lake. To determine if food web disruption affected alewife, we used change-point analysis to examine alewife growth and adult alewife condition during 1976-2006 and analysis-of-variance to determine if values between change points differed significantly. There were no change points in growth during the first year of life. Of three change points in growth during the second year of life, one coincided with the shift in springtime distribution of alewife to deeper water but it was not associated with a significant change in growth. After the second year of life, no change points in growth were evident, although growth in the third year of life spiked in those years when Bythotrephes, the largest of the exotic cladocerans, was abundant suggesting that it was a profitable prey item for age-2 fish. We detected two change points in condition of adult alewife in fall, but the first occurred in 1981, well before disruption began. A second change point occurred in 2003, well after disruption began. After the springtime distribution of alewife shifted deeper during 1992-1994, growth in the first two years of life became more variable, and growth in years of life two and older became correlated (P < 0.05). In conclusion, food web disruption had no negative affect on growth and condition of alewife in Lake Ontario although it appears to have resulted in growth in the first two years of

  19. Intrauterine Growth Retardation (IUGR) as a Novel Condition of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Martín-Estal, I; de la Garza, R G; Castilla-Cortázar, I

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is an anabolic hormone with several biological activities, such as proliferation, mitochondrial protection, cell survival, tissue growth and development, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antifibrogenic and antiaging. This hormone plays an important role in embryological and postnatal states, being essential for normal foetal and placental growth and differentiation. During gestation, the placenta is one of the major sources of IGF-1, among other hormones. This intrauterine organ expresses IGF-1 receptors and IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs), which control IGF-1 activities. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is the second most frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, defined as the inability to achieve the expected weight for gestational age. Different studies have revealed that IUGR infants have placental dysfunction and low circulating levels of insulin, IGF-1, IGF-2 and IGFBPs. Such data suggest that IGF-1 deficiency in gestational state may be one of the major causes of foetal growth retardation. The aim of this review is to study the epidemiology, physiopathology and possible causes of IUGR. Also, it intends to study the possible role of the placenta as an IGF-1 target organ. The purpose is to establish if IUGR could be considered as a novel condition of IGF-1 deficiency and if its treatment with low doses of IGF-1 could be a suitable therapeutic strategy. PMID:26634242

  20. The oxidized state of the nanocomposite Carbo-Iron® causes no adverse effects on growth, survival and differential gene expression in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Weil, Mirco; Meißner, Tobias; Busch, Wibke; Springer, Armin; Kühnel, Dana; Schulz, Ralf; Duis, Karen

    2015-10-15

    For degradation of halogenated chemicals in groundwater Carbo-Iron®, a composite of activated carbon and nano-sized Fe(0), was developed (Mackenzie et al., 2012). Potential effects of this nanocomposite on fish were assessed. Beyond the contaminated zone Fe(0) can be expected to have oxidized and Carbo-Iron was used in its oxidized form in ecotoxicological tests. Potential effects of Carbo Iron in zebrafish (Danio rerio) were investigated using a 48 h embryo toxicity test under static conditions, a 96 h acute test with adult fish under semi-static conditions and a 34 d fish early life stage test (FELST) in a flow-through system. Particle diameters in test suspensions were determined via dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ranged from 266 to 497 nm. Particle concentrations were measured weekly in samples from the FELST using a method based on the count rate in DLS. Additionally, uptake of particles into test organisms was investigated using microscopic methods. Furthermore, effects of Carbo-Iron on gene expression were investigated by microarray analysis in zebrafish embryos. In all tests performed, no significant lethal effects were observed. Furthermore, Carbo-Iron had no significant influence on weight and length of fish as determined in the FELST. In the embryo test and the early life stage test, growth of fungi on the chorion was observed at Carbo-Iron concentrations between 6.3 and 25mg/L. Fungal growth did not affect survival, hatching success and growth. In the embryo test, no passage of Carbo-Iron particles into the perivitelline space or the embryo was observed. In juvenile and adult fish, Carbo-Iron was detected in the gut at the end of exposure. In juvenile fish exposed to Carbo-Iron for 29 d and subsequently kept for 5d in control water, Carbo-Iron was no longer detectable in the gut. Global gene expression in zebrafish embryos was not significantly influenced by Carbo-Iron. PMID:26042533

  1. Biomass and lipid production of a local isolate Chlorella sorokiniana under mixotrophic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Juntila, D J; Bautista, M A; Monotilla, W

    2015-09-01

    A local Chlorella sp. isolate with 97% rbcL sequence identity to Chlorella sorokiniana was evaluated in terms of its biomass and lipid production under mixotrophic growth conditions. Glucose-supplemented cultures exhibited increasing growth rate and biomass yield with increasing glucose concentration. Highest growth rate and biomass yield of 1.602 day(-1) and 687.5 mg L(-1), respectively, were achieved under 2 g L(-1) glucose. Nitrogen starvation up to 75% in the 1.0 g L(-1) glucose-supplemented culture was done to induce lipid accumulation and did not significantly affect the growth. Lipid content ranges from 20% to 27% dry weight. Nile Red staining showed more prominent neutral lipid bodies in starved mixotrophic cultures. C. sorokiniana exhibited enhanced biomass production under mixotrophy and more prominent neutral lipid accumulation under nitrogen starvation with no significant decrease in growth; hence, this isolate could be further studied to establish its potential for biodiesel production. PMID:25847795

  2. A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G

    2016-05-01

    To remediate indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of common indoor fungi is crucial. Indoor moisture conditions are commonly quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH is a major determinant of the availability of water in porous indoor surfaces that fungi grow on. The influence of steady-state RH on growth is well understood. Typically, however, the indoor RH constantly changes so that fungi have to endure frequent periods of alternating low and high RH. Knowledge of how common indoor fungi survive and are affected by the low-RH periods is limited. In particular, the specific effects of a drop in RH on the growth of the mycelium remain unclear. In this work, video microscopy was used to monitor hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates under controlled dynamic humidity conditions. The effect of a single period of low RH (RH = 50-90%) interrupting favourable conditions (RH = 97%) was tested. It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH. However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered. These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth. PMID:26996401

  3. Evaluation of Cronobacter Growth and Phenotypic Variation Under Modified Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Segars, Katharine; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil; Sulaiman, Irshad M

    2016-02-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen known to cause acute meningitis and necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates and immunocompromised individuals. It has been isolated from a wide range of food and environmental samples, and has been linked to outbreaks associated with powdered infant formula. This study was carried out to assess variations in growth conditions (temperature, pH, and sugar supplement) and to establish how these changes impact phenotypic characteristics for successful recovery and identification of Cronobacter, particularly for routine surveillance purposes. A total of six Cronobacter isolates were tested to evaluate the above growth conditions, including three ATCC Cronobacter reference and three environmental isolates obtained from regulatory sample screening. Although only slight changes in colony-forming units were observed across the pH range and the sugars tested, the morphology was significantly impacted by changes in these growth factors. Incubation between 30 and 50 °C resulted in growth after 24 h, and the growth was slower at ambient temperature and colony formation was most robust at 30 °C. Results of this study suggest that 30 °C may be suitable for recovery of some Cronobacter strains, and minor variations in growth conditions can alter colony morphology and appearance. Expression of unique biological characteristics based on phenotypic observations may be beneficial for differentiating various Cronobacter strains. PMID:26567034

  4. Oceanographic conditions govern shell growth of Arctica islandica (Bivalvia) in surface waters off Northeast Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marali, Soraya; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Shells of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica provide absolutely dated, highly resolved archives of environmental variability in the extratropical realm. Shell growth rates of contemporaneous A. islandica specimens are synchronized by one or several environmental factor(s), such as seawater temperature, food supply etc. Based on the growth synchrony, increment width records can be combined to composite chronologies. However, according to existing studies, A. islandica specimens from shallow waters do not show synchronous changes in shell growth and may thus not provide information about environmental conditions such as sea surface temperature. Here, we present the first statistically robust composite chronology of A. islandica from unpolluted surface waters (8-23 m) off Northeast Iceland. The complete record spans the time interval of 1835 to 2012. Times of enhanced shell growth coincide with periods of higher temperature and elevated food supply. Instrumental sea surface temperature (SST) during the growing season explains up to 43% of the variation in relative shell growth. However, the correlation strength varies over time. When the environmental conditions at the sampling site were stable over many consecutive years, i.e. one of the two major surface currents (the warm, nutrient-rich Irminger Current or the cold, nutrient-deficient East Icelandic Current) predominated the area over longer time intervals, the growth synchrony among coeval A. islandica weakened and the correlation between shell growth and SSTs was markedly reduced. Conversely, if the habitat was under the alternating influence of both ocean currents, shell growth was stronger correlated to each other and to SST. Thus, environmental variability is required to synchronize shell growth rates within an A. islandica population. This study further enlightens the relationship between bivalve shell growth and environmental variables.

  5. A NEW CONDITION FOR THE TRANSITION FROM RUNAWAY TO OLIGARCHIC GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Ormel, C. W.; Dullemond, C. P.; Spaans, M. E-mail: dullemon@mpia.de

    2010-05-01

    Accretion among macroscopic bodies of {approx}km size or larger is enhanced significantly due to gravitational focusing. Two regimes can be distinguished. Initially, the system experiences runaway growth, in which the gravitational focusing factors increase, and bodies at the high-mass tail of the distribution grow fastest. However, at some point, the runaway body dynamically heats its environment, gravitational focusing factors decrease, and runaway growth passes into oligarchic growth. Based on the results of recent simulations, we reconsider the runaway growth-oligarchy transition. In contrast to oligarchy, we find that runaway growth cannot be approximated with a two-component model (of small and large bodies) and that the criterion of Ida and Makino, which is frequently adopted as the start of oligarchy, is not a sufficient condition to signify the transition. Instead, we propose a new criterion based on timescale arguments. We then find a larger value for the runaway growth-oligarchy transition: from several hundreds of km in the inner disk regions up to {approx}10{sup 3} km for the outer disk. These findings are consistent with the view that runaway growth has been responsible for the size distribution of the present-day Kuiper Belt objects. Our finding, furthermore, outlines the proper initial conditions at the start of the oligarchy stage.

  6. Physiological activities associated with biofilm growth in attached and suspended growth bioreactors under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Iffat; Seher, Shama; Perveen, Irum; Saroj, Devendra P; Ahmed, Safia

    2015-01-01

    This research work evaluated the biofilm succession on stone media and compared the biochemical changes of sludge in attached and suspended biological reactors operated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Stones incubated (30±2°C) with activated sludge showed a constant increase in biofilm weight up to the fifth and seventh week time under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively, where after reduction (>80%) the most probable number index of pathogen indicators on ninth week was recorded. Reduction in parameters such as biological oxygen demand (BOD) (47.7%), chemical oxygen demand (COD, 41%), nitrites (60.2%), nitrates (105.5%) and phosphates (58.9%) and increase in dissolved oxygen (176.5%) of sludge were higher in aerobic attached growth reactors as compared with other settings. While, considerable reductions in these values were also observed (BOD, 53.8%; COD, 2.8%; nitrites, 28.6%; nitrates, 31.7%; phosphates, 41.4%) in the suspended growth system under anaerobic conditions. However, higher sulphate removal was observed in suspended (40.9% and 54.9%) as compared with biofilm reactors (28.2% and 29.3%). Six weeks biofilm on the stone media showed maximum physiological activities; thus, the operational conditions should be controlled to keep the biofilm structure similar to six-week-old biofilm, and can be used in fixed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment. PMID:25609155

  7. Growth and physiological condition of black ducks reared on acidified wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Haramis, G.M.; Chu, D.S.; Bunck, C.M.; Scanes, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Acid deposition has been identified as one of several possible factors contributing to the decline of some waterfowl populations in North America. In an effort to examine the effects of acidification on black duck (Anas rubripes) recruitment, growth and physiological condition were monitored in ducklings foraging for a 10-day trial (days 10-20 of life) on acidified (pH 5.0) and : circumneutral (pH 6.8) fish-free emergent wetlands. Acidification of these wetlands suppressed phytoplankton and algal growth, and reduced invertebrate biomass. Ducklings maintained on acidified wetlands grew poorly compared with ducklings reared on circumneutral wetlands, as evidenced by lower final body weight and culmen and tarsus length. Plasma growth hormone concentration was elevated and triiodothyronine levels were lower in stunted ducklings, in part substantiating impairment of growth-regulating processes. Ducklings exhibiting poor growth tended to have lower hematocrit, lower plasma protein, glucose, and cholesterol concentrations, and higher uric acid levels, presumably reflecting alterations in metabolism and development due to inanition. These findings suggest that acid deposition may lower food production in wetlands and ultimately impair duckling growth, condition, and survival.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa facilitates Campylobacter jejuni growth in biofilms under oxic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Culotti, Alessandro; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the growth of Campylobacter jejuni in biofilms with Pseudomonas aeruginosa under oxic flow conditions. We observed the growth of C. jejuni in mono-culture, deposited on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms, and co-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. In mono-culture, C. jejuni was unable to form biofilms. However, deposited C. jejuni continuously grew on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms for a period of 3 days. The growth of scattered C. jejuni clusters was strictly limited to the P. aeruginosa biofilm surface, and no intergrowth was observed. Co-culturing of C. jejuni and P. aeruginosa also enabled the growth of both organisms in biofilms, with C. jejuni clusters developing on the surface of the P. aeruginosa biofilm. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in the medium showed that P. aeruginosa biofilms depleted the effluent DO from 9.0 to 0.5 mg L(-1) 24 hours after inoculation. The localized microaerophilic environment generated by P. aeruginosa promoted the persistence and growth of C. jejuni. Our findings show that P. aeruginosa not only prolongs the survival of C. jejuni under oxic conditions, but also enables the growth of C. jejuni on the surface of P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:26610432

  9. Noninvasive Quantitative Measurement of Bacterial Growth in Porous Media under Unsaturated-Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, J. S.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-dependent growth of the luxCDABE reporter bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 was monitored noninvasively in quartz sand under unsaturated-flow conditions within a 45- by 56- by 1-cm two-dimensional light transmission chamber. The spatial and temporal development of growth were mapped daily over 7 days by quantifying salicylate-induced bioluminescence. A nonlinear model relating the rate of increase in light emission after salicylate exposure to microbial density successfully predicted growth over 4 orders of magnitude (r2 = 0.95). Total model-predicted growth agreed with growth calculated from the mass balance of the system by using previously established growth parameters of HK44 (predicted, 1.2 × 1012 cells; calculated, 1.7 × 1012 cells). Colonization expanded in all directions from the inoculation region, including upward migration against the liquid flow. Both the daily rate of expansion of the colonized zone and the population density of the first day's growth in each newly colonized region remained relatively constant throughout the experiment. Nonetheless, substantial growth continued to occur on subsequent days in the older regions of the colonized zone. The proportion of daily potential growth that remained within the chamber declined progressively between days 2 and 7 (from 97 to 13%). A densely populated, anoxic region developed in the interior of the colonized zone even though the sand was unsaturated and fresh growth medium continued to flow through the colonized zone. These data illustrate the potential of a light transmission chamber, bioluminescent bacteria, and sensitive digital camera technology to noninvasively study real-time hydrology-microbiology interactions associated with unsaturated flow in porous media. PMID:12089048

  10. Noninvasive Quantitative Measurement of Bacterial Growth in Porous Media Under Unsaturated-Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yarwood, Rocky; Rockhold, Mark L. ); Niemet, Mike; Selker, John S.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2002-07-01

    Glucose-dependent growth of the luxCDABE reporter bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 was monitored noninvasively in quartz sand under unsaturated-flow conditions within a 45- by 56- by 1-cm two-dimensional light transmission chamber. The spatial and temporal development of growth were mapped daily over 7 days by quantifying salicylate-induced bioluminescence. A nonlinear model relating the rate of increase in light emission after salicylate exposure to microbial density successfully predicted growth over 4 orders of magnitude (r{sup 2}=0.95). Total model-predicted growth agreed with growth calculated from the mass balance of the system by using previously determined growth parameters of HK44 (predicted, 1.2 x 10{sup 12} cells; calculated, 1.7 x 10{sup 12} cells). Colonization expanded in all directions from the inoculation region, including upward migration against the liquid flow. Both the daily rate of expansion of the colonized zone and the population density of the first day's growth in each newly colonized region remained relatively constant throughout the experiment. Nonetheless, substantial growth continued to occur on subsequent days in the older regions of the colonized zone. The proportion of daily potential growth that remained within the chamber declined progressively between days 2 and 7 (from 97 to 13%). A densely populated, anoxic region developed in the interior of the colonized zone even though the sand was unsaturated and fresh growth medium continued to flow through the colonized zone. These data illustrate the potential of a light transmission chamber, bioluminescent bacteria, and sensitive digital camera technology to noninvasively study real-time hydrology-microbiology interactions associated with unsaturated flow in porous media.

  11. Individual Differences in the Expression of Conditioned Fear Are Associated with Endogenous Fibroblast Growth Factor 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Richardson, Rick

    2016-01-01

    These experiments examined the relationship between the neurotrophic factor fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and individual differences in the expression of conditioned fear. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that rats naturally expressing low levels of contextual or cued fear have higher levels of hippocampal FGF2 relative to rats that express…

  12. ASSESSMENT OF FUNGAL GROWTH ON CEILING TILES UNDER ENVIRONMENTALLY CHARACTERIZED CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses investigation of the impact of the building environment on the ability of building materials to support microbial growth, using static chambers with defined relative humidity, temperature, and light conditions. he ability of fungi to grow on materials is well ...

  13. Using time-dependent models to investigate body condition and growth rate of the giant gartersnake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, P.S.; Wylie, G.D.; Halstead, B.J.; Casazza, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Identifying links between phenotypic attributes and fitness is a primary goal of reproductive ecology. Differences in within-year patterns of body condition between sexes of gartersnakes in relation to reproduction and growth are not fully understood. We conducted an 11-year field study of body condition and growth rate of the giant gartersnake Thamnophis gigas across 13 study areas in the Central Valley of California, USA. We developed a priori mixed effects models of body condition index (BCI), which included covariates of time, sex and snout-vent length and reported the best-approximating models using an information theoretic approach. Also, we developed models of growth rate index (GRI) using covariates of sex and periods based on reproductive behavior. The largest difference in BCI between sexes, as predicted by a non-linear (cubic) time model, occurred during the mating period when female body condition (0.014??0.001 se) was substantially greater than males (-0.027??0.002 se). Males likely allocated energy to search for mates, while females likely stored energy for embryonic development. We also provided evidence that males use more body energy reserves than females during hibernation, perhaps because of different body temperatures between sexes. We found GRI of male snakes was substantially lower during the mating period than during a non-mating period, which indicated that a trade-off existed between searching for mates and growth. These findings contribute to our understanding of snake ecology in a Mediterranean climate. ?? 2009 The Zoological Society of London.

  14. The Agony of Choice: How Plants Balance Growth and Survival under Water-Limiting Conditions1

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Hannes; Inzé, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    When confronted with water limitation, plants actively reprogram their metabolism and growth. Recently, it has become clear that growing tissues show specific and highly dynamic responses to drought, which differ from the well-studied responses in mature tissues. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in understanding shoot growth regulation in water-limiting conditions. Of special interest is the balance between maintained growth and competitiveness on the one hand and ensured survival on the other hand. A number of master regulators controlling this balance have been identified, such as DELLAs and APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR-type transcription factors. The possibilities of engineering or breeding crops that maintain growth in periods of mild drought, while still being able to activate protective tolerance mechanisms, are discussed. PMID:23766368

  15. Effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase for growth promotion of peas (Pisum sativum) under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahir, Z A; Munir, A; Asghar, H N; Shaharoona, B; Arshad, M

    2008-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to assess the effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane- 1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase for growth promotion of peas under drought conditions. Ten rhizobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of different crops (peas, wheat, and maize) were screened for their growth promoting ability in peas under axenic condition. Three rhizobacterial isolates, Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5), P. fluorescens (ACC-14), and P. putida biotype A (Q-7), were selected for pot trial on the basis of their source, ACC deaminase activity, root colonization, and growth promoting activity under axenic conditions. Inoculated and uninoculated (control) seeds of pea cultivar 2000 were sown in pots (4 seeds/pot) at different soil moisture levels (25, 50, 75, and 100% of field capacity). Results revealed that decreasing the soil moisture levels from 100 to 25% of field capacity significantly decreased the growth of peas. However, inoculation of peas with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase significantly decreased the "drought stress imposed effects" on growth of peas, although with variable efficacy at different moisture levels. At the lowest soil moisture level (25% field capacity), rhizobacterial isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5) was found to be more promising compared with the other isolates, as it caused maximum increases in fresh weight, dry weight, root length, shoot length, number of leaves per plant, and water use efficiency on fresh and dry weight basis (45, 150, 92, 45, 140, 46, and 147%, respectively) compared with respective uninoculated controls. It is highly likely that rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase might have decreased the drought-stress induced ethylene in inoculated plants, which resulted in better growth of plants even at low moisture levels. Therefore, inoculation with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase could be helpful in eliminating the inhibitory effects of drought stress on the

  16. Keratinocyte growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor are heparin-binding growth factors for alveolar type II cells in fibroblast-conditioned medium.

    PubMed Central

    Panos, R J; Rubin, J S; Csaky, K G; Aaronson, S A; Mason, R J

    1993-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mediate aspects of normal lung growth and development and are important in the restoration of normal alveolar architecture after lung injury. To determine if fibroblasts are a source of soluble growth factors for alveolar type II cells, we investigated the effect of fibroblast-conditioned medium (CM) on alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. Serum-free CM from confluent adult human lung fibroblasts was concentrated fivefold by lyophilization. Type II cells were isolated from adult rats by elastase dissociation and incubated with [3H]thymidine and varying dilutions of concentrated CM and serum from day 1 to 3 of culture. Stimulation of type II cell DNA synthesis by fibroblast-CM was maximal after 48 h of conditioning and required the presence of serum. The activity of the CM was eliminated by boiling and by treatment with trypsin, pepsin, or dithiothreitol and was additive with saturating concentrations of acidic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and insulin. The growth factor activity bound to heparin-Sepharose and was eluted with 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl. Neutralizing antibody studies demonstrated that the primary mitogens isolated in the 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl fractions were keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, fibroblast growth factor 7) and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), respectively. HGF/SF was demonstrated in the crude CM and KGF was detected in the 0.6 M NaCl eluent by immunoblotting. Northern blot analysis confirmed that the lung fibroblasts expressed both KGF and HGF/SF transcripts. Human recombinant KGF and HGF/SF induced a concentration- and serum-dependent increase in rat alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. We conclude that adult human lung fibroblasts produce at least two soluble heparin-binding growth factors, KGF and HGF/SF, which promote DNA synthesis and proliferation of rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. KGF and HGF/SF may be important stimuli for alveolar type II cell

  17. Kinetic modeling of growth and lipid body induction in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under heterotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Neha; Kumar, G Dinesh; Gupta, Ravi Prakash; Mathur, Anshu Shankar; Manikandan, B; Basu, Biswajit; Tuli, Deepak Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a mathematical model to describe the biomass and (total) lipid productivity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa NCIM 2738 under heterotrophic conditions. Biomass growth rate was predicted by Droop's cell quota model, while changes observed in cell quota (utilization) under carbon excess conditions were used for the modeling and predicting the lipid accumulation rate. The model was simulated under non-limiting (excess) carbon and limiting nitrate concentration and validated with experimental data for the culture grown in batch (flask) mode under different nitrate concentrations. The present model incorporated two modes (growth and stressed) for the prediction of endogenous lipid synthesis/induction and aimed to predict the effect and response of the microalgae under nutrient starvation (stressed) conditions. MATLAB and Genetic Algorithm were employed for the prediction and validation of the model parameters. PMID:27450124

  18. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    The analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for highly plastic stress field condition is presented in this paper. The flight hardware investigated is a large separation bolt that has a deep notch, which produces a large plastic zone at the notch root when highly loaded. Four test specimen configurations are analyzed in an attempt to match the elastic-plastic stress field and crack constraint conditions present in the separation bolt. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis is used to compare the stress fields and critical fracture parameters. Of the four test specimens analyzed, the modified double-edge notch tension - 3 (MDENT-3) most closely approximates the stress field, J values, and crack constraint conditions found in the flight hardware. The MDENT-3 is also most insensitive to load misalignment and/or load redistribution during crack growth.

  19. Clinically Relevant Growth Conditions Alter Acinetobacter baumannii Antibiotic Susceptibility and Promote Identification of Novel Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, Jennifer M.; Wozniak, Rachel A. F.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes that govern bacterial proliferation and survival in the host-environment(s) are likely to be vastly different from those that are required for viability in nutrient-rich laboratory media. Consequently, growth-based antimicrobial screens performed in conditions modeling aspects of bacterial disease states have the potential to identify new classes of antimicrobials that would be missed by screens performed in conventional laboratory media. Accordingly, we performed screens of the Selleck library of 853 FDA approved drugs for agents that exhibit antimicrobial activity toward the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii during growth in human serum, lung surfactant, and/or the organism in the biofilm state and compared those results to that of conventional laboratory medium. Results revealed that a total of 90 compounds representing 73 antibiotics and 17 agents that were developed for alternative therapeutic indications displayed antimicrobial properties toward the test strain in at least one screening condition. Of the active library antibiotics only four agents, rifampin, rifaximin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, exhibited antimicrobial activity toward the organism during all screening conditions, whereas the remainder were inactive in ≥ 1 condition; 56 antibiotics were inactive during serum growth, 25 and 38 were inactive toward lung surfactant grown and biofilm-associated cells, respectively, suggesting that subsets of antibiotics may outperform others in differing infection settings. Moreover, 9 antibiotics that are predominantly used for the treatment Gram-positive pathogens and 10 non-antibiotics lacked detectable antimicrobial activity toward A. baumannii grown in conventional medium but were active during ≥ 1 alternative growth condition(s). Such agents may represent promising anti-Acinetobacter agents that would have likely been overlooked by antimicrobial whole cell screening assays performed in traditional

  20. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  1. Auxin polar transport in arabidopsis under simulated microgravity conditions - relevance to growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Oka, M.; Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.; Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Ueda, J.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under simulated microgravity conditions was studied in relation to the growth and development. Seeds were germinated and allowed to grow on an agar medium in test tubes on a horizontal clinostat. Horizontal clinostat rotation substantially reduced the growth of inflorescence axes and the productivity of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotypes Landsberg erecta and Columbia), although it little affected seed germination, development of rosette leaves and flowering. The activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes decreased when Arabidopsis plants were grown on a horizontal clinostat from germination stage, being ca. 60% of 1 g control. On the other hand, the auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis grown in 1 g conditions was not affected when the segments were exposed to various gravistimuli, including 3-dimensional clinorotation, during transport experiments. Pin-formed mutant of Arabidopsis, having a unique structure of the inflorescence axis with no flower and extremely low levels of the activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes and endogenous auxin, did not continue its vegetative growth under clinostat rotation. These facts suggest that the development of the system of auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis is affected by microgravity, resulting in the inhibition of growth and development, especially during reproductive growth.

  2. High-throughput dental biofilm growth analysis for multiparametric microenvironmental biochemical conditions using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond H W; Cui, Xin; Guo, Weijin; Thorsen, Todd

    2016-04-26

    Dental biofilm formation is not only a precursor to tooth decay, but also induces more serious systematic health problems such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Understanding the conditions promoting colonization and subsequent biofilm development involving complex bacteria coaggregation is particularly important. In this paper, we report a high-throughput microfluidic 'artificial teeth' device offering controls of multiple microenvironmental factors (e.g. nutrients, growth factors, dissolved gases, and seeded cell populations) for quantitative characteristics of long-term dental bacteria growth and biofilm development. This 'artificial teeth' device contains multiple (up to 128) incubation chambers to perform parallel cultivation and analyses (e.g. biofilm thickness, viable-dead cell ratio, and spatial distribution of multiple bacterial species) of bacteria samples under a matrix of different combinations of microenvironmental factors, further revealing possible developmental mechanisms of dental biofilms. Specifically, we applied the 'artificial teeth' to investigate the growth of two key dental bacteria, Streptococci species and Fusobacterium nucleatum, in the biofilm under different dissolved gas conditions and sucrose concentrations. Together, this high-throughput microfluidic platform can provide extended applications for general biofilm research, including screening of the biofilm properties developing under combinations of specified growth parameters such as seeding bacteria populations, growth medium compositions, medium flow rates and dissolved gas levels. PMID:27045372

  3. Measurement of a tree growth condition by the hetero-core optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Hoshito; Akita, Shohei; Nishiyama, Michiko; Kumekawa, Norikazu; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-04-01

    Condition and growth of trees are considered to be important in monitoring global circulation with heat and water, additionally growth of trees are affected by CO2 and air pollutants. On the other hand, since growth of plants is affected by surrounding climates, it is expected that real-time monitoring of crop plants growing makes possible quantitative agricultural management. This study proposed methods in measuring tree growth using hetero-core optical fiber sensors which are suitable for long-term, remote and real-time monitoring in wide area due to their features such as independence from temperature fluctuation and weather condition in addition to advantages of an optical fiber. Two types of sensors were used for that purpose. One of them was a dendrometer which measured radial changes of a tree stem and the other was elastic sensor which was to measure growth of smaller tree such as crop plant. In our experiment, it was demonstrated that the dendrometer was capable of measuring the differences of tree growing trend in period of different seasons such as growing rates 2.08 mm between spring and summer and 0.21 mm between autumn and winter, respectively. Additionally, this study had proposed the method of measuring crop plant growing by the elastic sensor because of its compact and light design and monotonious changes in optical loss to the amount of expansion and contraction.

  4. Growth of Continuous Monolayer Graphene with Millimeter-sized Domains Using Industrially Safe Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xingyi; Zhong, Guofang; D'Arsié, Lorenzo; Sugime, Hisashi; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Robertson, Alex W; Robertson, John

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the growth of continuous monolayer graphene films with millimeter-sized domains on Cu foils under intrinsically safe, atmospheric pressure growth conditions, suitable for application in roll-to-roll reactors. Previous attempts to grow large domains in graphene have been limited to isolated graphene single crystals rather than as part of an industrially useable continuous film. With both appropriate pre-treatment of the Cu and optimization of the CH4 supply, we show that it is possible to grow continuous films of monolayer graphene with millimeter scale domains within 80 min by chemical vapour deposition. The films are grown under industrially safe conditions, i.e., the flammable gases (H2 and CH4) are diluted to well below their lower explosive limit. The high quality, spatial uniformity, and low density of domain boundaries are demonstrated by charge carrier mobility measurements, scanning electron microscope, electron diffraction study, and Raman mapping. The hole mobility reaches as high as ~5,7002 m(2) V(-1) s(-1) in ambient conditions. The growth process of such high-quality graphene with a low H2 concentration and short growth times widens the possibility of industrial mass production. PMID:26883292

  5. Unfolded protein response is required for Aspergillus oryzae growth under conditions inducing secretory hydrolytic enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway for adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In yeast UPR, Ire1 cleaves the unconventional intron of HAC1 mRNA, and the functional Hac1 protein translated from the spliced HAC1 mRNA induces the expression of ER chaperone genes and ER-associated degradation genes for the refolding or degradation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we constructed an ireA (IRE1 ortholog) conditionally expressing strain of Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus producing a large amount of amylolytic enzymes, and examined the contribution of UPR to ER stress adaptation under physiological conditions. Repression of ireA completely blocked A. oryzae growth under conditions inducing the production of hydrolytic enzymes, such as amylases and proteases. This growth defect was restored by the introduction of unconventional intronless hacA (hacA-i). Furthermore, UPR was observed to be induced by amylolytic gene expression, and the disruption of the transcriptional activator for amylolytic genes resulted in partial growth restoration of the ireA-repressing strain. In addition, a homokaryotic ireA disruption mutant was successfully generated using the strain harboring hacA-i as a parental host. These results indicated that UPR is required for A. oryzae growth to alleviate ER stress induced by excessive production of hydrolytic enzymes. PMID:26496881

  6. Growth of Continuous Monolayer Graphene with Millimeter-sized Domains Using Industrially Safe Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xingyi; Zhong, Guofang; D'Arsié, Lorenzo; Sugime, Hisashi; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Robertson, Alex W.; Robertson, John

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the growth of continuous monolayer graphene films with millimeter-sized domains on Cu foils under intrinsically safe, atmospheric pressure growth conditions, suitable for application in roll-to-roll reactors. Previous attempts to grow large domains in graphene have been limited to isolated graphene single crystals rather than as part of an industrially useable continuous film. With both appropriate pre-treatment of the Cu and optimization of the CH4 supply, we show that it is possible to grow continuous films of monolayer graphene with millimeter scale domains within 80 min by chemical vapour deposition. The films are grown under industrially safe conditions, i.e., the flammable gases (H2 and CH4) are diluted to well below their lower explosive limit. The high quality, spatial uniformity, and low density of domain boundaries are demonstrated by charge carrier mobility measurements, scanning electron microscope, electron diffraction study, and Raman mapping. The hole mobility reaches as high as ~5,700 cm2 V-1 s-1 in ambient conditions. The growth process of such high-quality graphene with a low H2 concentration and short growth times widens the possibility of industrial mass production.

  7. Growth of Continuous Monolayer Graphene with Millimeter-sized Domains Using Industrially Safe Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingyi; Zhong, Guofang; D'Arsié, Lorenzo; Sugime, Hisashi; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Robertson, Alex W.; Robertson, John

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the growth of continuous monolayer graphene films with millimeter-sized domains on Cu foils under intrinsically safe, atmospheric pressure growth conditions, suitable for application in roll-to-roll reactors. Previous attempts to grow large domains in graphene have been limited to isolated graphene single crystals rather than as part of an industrially useable continuous film. With both appropriate pre-treatment of the Cu and optimization of the CH4 supply, we show that it is possible to grow continuous films of monolayer graphene with millimeter scale domains within 80 min by chemical vapour deposition. The films are grown under industrially safe conditions, i.e., the flammable gases (H2 and CH4) are diluted to well below their lower explosive limit. The high quality, spatial uniformity, and low density of domain boundaries are demonstrated by charge carrier mobility measurements, scanning electron microscope, electron diffraction study, and Raman mapping. The hole mobility reaches as high as ~5,700 cm2 V−1 s−1 in ambient conditions. The growth process of such high-quality graphene with a low H2 concentration and short growth times widens the possibility of industrial mass production. PMID:26883292

  8. Growth and development in higher plants under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, T.; Yuda, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Yamashita, M.; Ueda, J.

    Growth and development of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Golden Cross Bantam) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions were intensively studied using a 3-dimensional clinostat as a simulator of weightlessness. Epicotyls of etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were the most oriented toward the direction far from cotyledons. Mesocotyls of etiolated maize seedlings grew at random and coleoptiles curved slightly during clinostat rotation. Clinostat rotation promoted the emergence of the 3rd internodes in etiolated pea seedlings, while it significantly inhibited the growth of the 1st internodes. In maize seedlings, the growth of coleoptiles was little affected by clinostat rotation, but that of mesocotyls was suppressed, and therefore, the emergence of the leaf out of coleoptile was promoted. Clinostat rotation reduced the osmotic concentration in the 1st internodes of pea seedlings, although it has little effect on the 2nd and the 3rd internodes. Clinostat rotation also reduced the osmotic concentrations in both coleoptiles and mesocotyls of maize seedlings. Cell-wall extensibilities of the 1st and the 3rd internodes of pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were significantly lower and higher as compared with those on 1 g conditions, respectively. Cell-wall extensibility of mesocotyls in seedlings grown on the clinostat also decreased. Changes in cell wall properties seem to be well correlated to the growth of each organ in pea and maize seedlings. These results suggest that the growth and development of plants is controlled under gravity on earth, and that the growth responses of higher plants to microgravity conditions are regulated by both cell-wall mechanical properties and osmotic properties of stem cells.

  9. Growth of Cronobacter spp. under dynamic temperature conditions occurring during cooling of reconstituted powdered infant formula.

    PubMed

    Kandhai, M C; Breeuwer, P; Gorris, L G M; Zwietering, M H; Reij, M W

    2009-12-01

    Reconstituted infant formulae are excellent growth media for Cronobacter spp. (formerly Enterobacter sakazakii) and other microorganisms that may be present in such products. Immediate consumption or rapid cooling and storage at a low temperature are therefore recommended as control measures to prevent microbial growth. Placing a container filled with reconstituted liquid formula in the refrigerator, however, does not mean that the temperature of the liquid is directly the same as the set-point of the refrigerator. This study describes the temperature profiles and methods to predict lag time and possible growth of Cronobacter spp. during the cooling process in three types of containers. The overall heat transfer coefficients (alpha) were determined and were shown to have a very large variability in both household refrigerators and an air-ventilated refrigerator equipped with a fan. A mathematical model was built to predict the growth of Cronobacter spp. under dynamic temperature conditions using three models for the lag time. The various estimations for the lag time had a remarkably strong impact on the predicted growth. The assumption of a constant k-value (k = lag time x specific growth rate = lambda x micro = 2.88) fitted the experimental data best. Predictions taking into account the large variability in heat transfer showed that proliferation of Cronobacter spp. during cooling may be prevented by limiting the volume to be cooled to portion size only, or by reconstituting at temperatures of 25 degrees C or lower. The model may also be used to predict growth in other situations where dynamic temperature conditions exist. PMID:20003730

  10. Nucleation and growth by diffusion under Ostwald-Freundlich boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2014-02-14

    The critical radius of a nucleus grown by diffusion in a solution is studied thermodynamically as well as kinetically. The thermodynamic growth equation called Zeldovich equation of classical nucleation theory and the kinetic diffusional growth equation combined with the Ostwald-Freundlich boundary condition lead to the same critical radius. However, it should be pointed out that the diffusional equation may lead to a kinetic critical radius that is different from the thermodynamic critical radius, thus indicating the possibility of kinetically controlling the critical radius of a nucleus.

  11. Effect of growth conditions on the quality of lead bromide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mazelsky, R.; Glicksman, M. E.; Coriell, S. R.; Duval, W. M. B.; Santoro, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    Single crystals of pure and doped lead bromide were grown by the Bridgman method in different convective conditions. The convection level was varied by changing the thermal and solutal Rayleigh number. The homogeneity in refractive index, and hence the optical quality, was estimated by examining the optical distortion, birefringence interferograms, and laser scattering through the crystal. The optical quality of the crystal varied significantly with the variation of convection level during the crystal growth. The critical concentration of the solute was estimated for several values of growth velocity by numerical analysis at the thermal gradient of 20 K/cm.

  12. Conditions of growth of open corrosion pits in stainless steels -- Electrochemical experiments on model pits

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, T.J.

    1998-12-31

    The effects of the most important variables on continued growth and repassivation of open macroscopic corrosion pits in stainless steel sheets were investigated using two different artificial pit configurations. The pit growth was activated under anodic polarization either by injecting concentrated chloride solution into the pit or by initially filling the pit with chromic chloride crystals (CrCl{sub 3}-6H{sub 2}O). Experiments were made on sheet specimens of stainless steels of type UNS S31603 (316L) or UNS S312.54 in bulk solutions containing chloride and/or sulfate ions. Various aspects of the test arrangements and pitting of stainless steels are discussed, including the electrolyte composition within the pits, repassivation potentials and the IR-drops associated with pit growth. It is demonstrated that using the artificial pit configurations the effects of the main variables affecting the conditions for growth and repassivation of open corrosion pits can be investigated quantitatively, including electrode potentials, temperature, and composition of the bulk solution. It is concluded that for continued growth of corrosion pits with ``large`` openings to the bulk solution, a strongly oxidizing environment is required, and that sulfate ions in amounts comparable to or in excess of that of chloride ions may stabilize pit growth.

  13. Biphasic kinetics of growth and bacteriocin production with Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 occur under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Neysens, Patricia; Messens, Winy; Gevers, Dirk; Swings, Jean; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-04-01

    Micro-organisms used during the production of fermented foods are subjected to several abiotic stresses. Microbial survival during these processes strongly depends on the ability of the cells to adapt and become more tolerant to the environmental conditions. Cultivation of Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471, a potential strain for use during type II sourdough fermentations, at low temperatures, unfavourable pH and high salt concentrations resulted in biphasic growth patterns. In addition, two separate bacteriocin peaks, as well as a dramatic change in cellular morphology, were observed. In general, an increase of the specific bacteriocin production occurred during the second growth phase. Finally, the observed sugar consumption profiles were affected by the applied fermentation temperature. Moreover, the highest bacteriocin activity occurred during maltose consumption at a low constant temperature of 28 degrees C and a constant pH of 5.4. Plate counts from both growth phases revealed the existence of two colony types. Irregular colonies were found to outnumber smoother colonies during the first growth phase, while the second growth phase was characterized by a greater number of smooth colonies. Electron microscopy was used to investigate the observed morphological switch at the single-cell level. Single, rod-shaped cells changed into elongated cells that grew in chains. Colony and cell morphology changes coincided with the biphasic growth pattern. PMID:12686649

  14. Fracture of Hydrided Zircaloy-4 Sheet under Through-Thickness Crack Growth Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, P.A.; Koss, D.A.; Motta, A.T.; Chan, K.S.

    2007-07-01

    The failure of thin-wall components such as fuel cladding may be caused by crack initiation on the component surface and subsequent crack growth through its thickness. This study has determined the fracture toughness of hydrided cold-worked stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet subject to through-thickness crack growth at 25 deg. C. The experimental approach utilizes a novel procedure in which a narrow linear strip of brittle hydride blister across the specimen width creates a well-defined pre-crack upon initial loading. The subsequent crack growth resistance is then characterized by four-point bending of the specimen and an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. At room temperature, the through-thickness fracture toughness (K{sub Q}) is sensitive to the orientation of the hydride platelets, and K{sub Q} {approx_equal} 25 MPavm for crack growth through a mixed in-plane/out-of-plane hydride field. In contrast, K{sub Q} is much higher ({approx_equal} 75 MPavm) when the hydride platelets are oriented predominantly in the plane of the sheet (and therefore normal to both the crack plane and the crack growth direction). The implication of these fracture toughness values to the fracture strain behavior of hydrided Zircaloy-4 under through-thickness crack growth conditions is illustrated. (authors)

  15. 3-D simulations to investigate initial condition effects on the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Malcolm J

    2008-01-01

    The effect of initial conditions on the growth rate of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing has been studied using carefully formulated numerical simulations. An integrated large-eddy simulation (ILES) that uses a finite-volume technique was employed to solve the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations with numerical dissipation. The initial conditions were chosen to test the dependence of the RT growth parameters ({alpha}{sub b}, {alpha}{sub s}) on variations in (a) the spectral bandwidth, (b) the spectral shape, and (c) discrete banded spectra. Our findings support the notion that the overall growth of the RT mixing is strongly dependent on initial conditions. Variation in spectral shapes and bandwidths are found to have a complex effect of the late time development of the RT mixing layer, and raise the question of whether we can design RT transition and turbulence based on our choice of initial conditions. In addition, our results provide a useful database for the initialization and development of closures describing RT transition and turbulence.

  16. Seed storage conditions change the germination pattern of clonal growth plants in Mediterranean salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Espinar, José L; García, Luis V; Clemente, Luis

    2005-07-01

    The effect of salinity level and extended exposure to different salinity and flooding conditions on germination patterns of three salt-marsh clonal growth plants (Juncus subulatus, Scirpus litoralis, and S. maritimus) was studied. Seed exposure to extended flooding and saline conditions significantly affected the outcome of the germination process in a different, though predictable, way for each species, after favorable conditions for germination were restored. Tolerance of the germination process was related to the average salinity level measured during the growth/germination season at sites where established individuals of each species dominated the species cover. No relationship was found between salinity tolerance of the germination process and seed response to extended exposure to flooding and salinity conditions. The salinity response was significantly related to the conditions prevailing in the habitats of the respective species during the unfavorable (nongrowth/nongermination) season. Our results indicate that changes in salinity and hydrology while seeds are dormant affect the outcome of the seed-bank response, even when conditions at germination are identical. Because these environmental-history-dependent responses differentially affect seed germination, seedling density, and probably sexual recruitment in the studied and related species, these influences should be considered for wetland restoration and management. PMID:21646131

  17. Seed storage conditions change the germination pattern of clonal growth plants in Mediterranean salt marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espinar, J.L.; Garcia, L.V.; Clemente, L.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of salinity level and extended exposure to different salinity and flooding conditions on germination patterns of three saltmarsh clonal growth plants (Juncus subulatus, Scirpus litoralis, and S. maritimus) was studied. Seed exposure to extended flooding and saline conditions significantly affected the outcome of the germination process in a different, though predictable, way for each species, after favorable conditions for germination were restored. Tolerance of the germination process was related to the average salinity level measured during the growth/germination season at sites where established individuals of each species dominated the species cover. No relationship was found between salinity tolerance of the germination process and seed response to extended exposure to flooding and salinity conditions. The salinity response was significantly related to the conditions prevailing in the habitats of the respective species during the unfavorable (nongrowth/nongermination) season. Our results indicate that changes in salinity and hydrology while seeds are dormant affect the outcome of the seed-bank response, even when conditions at germination are identical. Because these environmental-history-dependent responses differentially affect seed germination, seedling density, and probably sexual recruitment in the studied and related species, these influences should be considered for wetland restoration and management.

  18. Growth and Survival of Some Probiotic Strains in Simulated Ice Cream Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homayouni, A.; Ehsani, M. R.; Azizi, A.; Razavi, S. H.; Yarmand, M. S.

    A Completely Randomized Design (CRD) experiment was applied in triplicates to evaluate the survival of four probiotic strains in simulated ice cream conditions. The growth and survival rate of these probiotic strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum) in varying amount of sucrose (10, 15, 20 and 25%), oxygen scavenging components (0.05% L-cysteine and 0.05% L-ascorbate) and temperatures (4 and -20°C) during different periods of time (1, 2 and 3 months) were evaluated in MRS-broth medium. Optical density at 580 nm was used to measure growth. Lactobacilli strains proved to be highly resistant in comparison with Biffidobacteria strains. The viable cell number of Lactobacillus casei in different sucrose concentrations, different oxidoreduction potentials and refrigeration temperature was 1x1010, 2x108 and 5x107 cfu mL-1, respectively. Growth and survival rate of Lactobacillus casei showed to be the highest.

  19. Environmental conditions impacting juvenile Chinook salmon growth off central California: An ecosystem model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, J.; Huff, D. D.; Martin, B. T.; Jackson, D. W.; Edwards, C. A.; Rose, K. A.; Curchitser, E. N.; Hedstrom, K. S.; Lindley, S. T.; Wells, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    A fully coupled ecosystem model is used to identify the effects of environmental conditions and upwelling variability on growth of juvenile Chinook salmon in central California coastal waters. The ecosystem model framework consists of an ocean circulation submodel, a biogeochemical submodel, and an individual-based submodel for salmon. Simulation results indicate that years favorable for juvenile salmon growth off central California are characterized by particularly intense early season upwelling (i.e., March through May), leading to enhanced krill concentrations during summer near the location of ocean entry (i.e., Gulf of the Farallones). Seasonally averaged growth rates in the model are generally consistent with observed values and suggest that juvenile salmon emigrating later in the season (i.e., late May and June) achieve higher weight gains during their first 90 days of ocean residency.

  20. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  1. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Under Spectrum Loading in Various Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheevskiy, S.; Glinka, G.; Lee, E.

    2013-03-01

    model. The method can be also used to predict fatigue crack growth under constant amplitude and spectrum loading in various environmental conditions such as vacuum, air, and corrosive environment providing that appropriate limited constant amplitude fatigue crack growth data obtained in the same environment are available. The proposed methodology is equally suitable for fatigue analysis of smooth, notched, and cracked components.

  2. Relations between coenzyme A and presumptive acyl carrier protein in different conditions of streptococcal growth.

    PubMed

    Das, D N; Toennies, G

    1969-06-01

    Exploration of the specific role of cystine in the postexponential growth of Streptococcus faecalis led to an inquiry into the fate of cellular coenzyme A (CoA) and acyl carrier protein (ACP), both of which depend for their biosynthesis on cystine and pantothenate as precursors. In S. faecalis cells labeled by growth in the presence of (14)C-pantothenate, the label could be separated on the basis of solubility at pH 2.1 into two fractions of sharply differing metabolic characteristics. The fractions were not purified, but the soluble (14)C behaved analytically like CoA, and the insoluble (14)C was considered to represent an ACP-like entity on the basis of circumstantial evidence. The fate of these two fractions under various conditions of growth was studied. When the medium contained an excess of the needed precursors, the cellular content of CoA and ACP appeared to remain constant during exponential growth, and in a molar ratio of about 4 CoA to 1 ACP. Cellular ACP, once formed, appeared to be stable under these conditions, but CoA was degraded and replaced at the rate of approximately 20% per division period. With restrictive levels of pantothenate in the medium, initially formed CoA disappeared during growth, as a result, apparently of being converted to ACP. However, when the resulting CoA-depleted cells were returned to a medium containing enough pantothenate, resumption of normal growth was preceded by a lag period, during which rapid conversion of ACP to CoA appeared to take place. PMID:4977991

  3. Influence of bovine lactoferrin on the growth of selected probiotic bacteria under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Wen; Ku, Yu-We; Chu, Fang-Yi

    2014-10-01

    Bovine lactoferrin (bLf) is a natural glycoprotein, and it shows broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. However, reports on the influences of bLf on probiotic bacteria have been mixed. We examined the effects of apo-bLf (between 0.25 and 128 mg/mL) on both aerobic and anaerobic cultures of probiotics. We found that bLf had similar effects on the growth of probiotics under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, and that it actively and significantly (at concentrations of >0.25 mg/mL) retarded the growth rate of Bifidobacterium bifidum (ATCC 29521), B. longum (ATCC 15707), B. lactis (BCRC 17394), B. infantis (ATCC 15697), Lactobacillus reuteri (ATCC 23272), L. rhamnosus (ATCC 53103), and L. coryniformis (ATCC 25602) in a dose-dependent manner. Otherwise, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were 128 or >128 mg/mL against B. bifidum, B. longum, B. lactis, L. reuteri, and L. rhamnosus (ATCC 53103). With regard to MICs, bLf showed at least four-fold lower inhibitory effect on probiotics than on pathogens. Intriguingly, bLf (>0.25 mg/mL) significantly enhanced the growth of Rhamnosus (ATCC 7469) and L. acidophilus (BCRC 14065) by approximately 40-200 %, during their late periods of growth. Supernatants produced from aerobic but not anaerobic cultures of L. acidophilus reduced the growth of Escherichia coli by about 20 %. Thus, bLf displayed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the growth of most probiotic strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. An antibacterial supernatant prepared from the aerobic cultures may have significant practical use. PMID:24916115

  4. Influence of cell growth conditions and medium composition on EGFP photostability in live cells.

    PubMed

    Mamontova, Anastasia V; Bogdanov, Alexey M; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2015-05-01

    Photostability is a key characteristic of fluorescent proteins. It was recently demonstrated that green fluorescent protein (GFP) photobleaching in live cells can be suppressed by changes in medium composition. Here we show that Ham's F12 medium provides very high enhanced GFP (EGFP) photostability during fluorescence microscopy of live cells. This property of Ham's F12 medium is associated with decreased concentrations of riboflavin and pyridoxine, and increased concentrations of FeSO4, cyanocobalamine, lipoic acid, hypoxanthine, and thymidine compared with DMEM. We also found that the rate of EGFP photobleaching strongly depends on cell growth conditions such as cell density and the concentration of serum. We conclude that both imaging medium composition and the physiological state of the cells can strongly affect the photostability of fluorescent proteins. Thus, accurate comparison of the photostabilities of fluorescent proteins should be performed only in side-by-side analysis in identical cell growth conditions and media. PMID:25967905

  5. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  6. Monoraphidium sp. as an algal feedstock for biodiesel: Determining optimal growth conditions in wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Zachary William

    This thesis set out to investigate different conditions for growth of the freshwater algal species Monoraphidium sp. for use as a feedstock for biodiesel. The algae was inoculated into effluent gathered from a local water treatment plant and placed into 50gal mesocosms. Cells were grown at large scale in wastewater, harvested, and run through extractions to collect lipids (26%DW). The lipids were then turned into biodiesel. The algae also removed most of the pollutants in the wastewater, lowering nitrate and phosphate levels usually to less than 1mg/L. Erlenmeyer flask cultures (1L) were used to determine optimal growth conditions for temperature (10°C), light intensity (30microE/m2/sec with a 10 hour photoperiod), and initial inoculation density (1x104cells/mL). The addition of bicarbonate during the initial or exponential growth phase had no effect on growth. It was concluded that Monoraphidium sp. grown in USDA Hardiness Zone 5 is capable of producing biodiesel.

  7. Talc based exopolysaccharides formulation enhancing growth and production of Hellianthus annuus under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Tewari, S; Arora, K

    2014-01-01

    Stress tolerating strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PF07 possessing plant growth promoting activity was screened for the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS). EPS production was monitored in the cell free culture supernatant (CFCS) and extracted EPS was further purified by thin layer chromatography. EPS producing cells were taken to design talc based formulation and its efficacy was checked on oilseed crop sunflower (Hellianthus annuus), under in vivo saline conditions (soil irrigated with 125 mM of saline water). Application of bioformulation significantly enhanced the yield and growth attributes of the plant in comparison to control (untreated seeds) under stress and non—stress conditions. Germination rate, plant length, dry weight and seed weight increased remarkably. The above findings suggest the application and benefits of utilizing EPS formulation in boosting early seedling emergence, enhancing plant growth parameters, increasing seed weight and mitigating stress in saline affected regions. Such bioformulation may enhance RAS/RT (Root Adhering Soil to Root Tissue ratio), texture of the soil, increase porosity, improve uptake of nutrients, and hence may be considered as commercially important formulation for renovation of stressed sites and enhancing plant growth. PMID:25535716

  8. Influence of growth conditions on tin incorporation in GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre, F.; Raisin, C.; Abdalla, M.I.; Brenac, A.; Masson, J.M.

    1980-08-01

    Intentional perturbations applied to the growth parameters of Sn-doped GaAs layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been performed in order to investigate the tin incorporation mechanism. The start, the interruption, and the end of growth as well as a variation of fluxes or substrate temperature have been studied, using either the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurement of tin accumulation on the surface, or C-V derived free-carrier concentration profile versus any of these growth parameters. The theoretical model proposed by Wood and Joyce, based on a time-delayed incorporation mechanism, has been found to fit the observed results, especially for As-rich surface, provided that an incorporation mechanism of second order is assumed. For Ga-rich conditions (T/sub s/>580 /sup 0/C), a new result has been recognized, i.e., a significant reduction of carrier concentration as T/sub s/ is increased. The assumption of a partially acceptor nature of tin incident atoms under these growth conditions does not seem to fully explain this result. On the other hand, this may be better understood assuming a certain amount of tin atoms being re-evaporated in the high substrate temperature range. This behavior induces a temporarily weaker accumulation at the surface, and hence a relatively smaller incorporation rate.

  9. [Growth of the Orinoco Caiman (Crocodylus intermedius, Crocodylia: Crocodylidae) under two captivity conditions].

    PubMed

    Perez, Aldeima T T

    2008-03-01

    Growth of the Orinoco Caiman (Crocodylus intermedius, Crocodylia: Crocodylidae) under two captivity conditions. In order to determine the growth of Caiman of the Orinoco (Crocodylus intermedius) under two conditions of captivity, 40 specimens were raised during 11 months and 15 days in two circular tanks, with 28.3 m2 of surface area and a volume of 62.2 m3 in each tank. The tanks were built with concrete walls and guarded blocks covered internally with sheets of myrrhlike resin, and a roof of galvanized sheets. One tank was covered partially with the galvanized sheets (tank I), the other was totally covered (tank II). Twenty caimans were placed in each tank, and both groups were fed with 85% beef, 10% fresh fish, 5% hen eggs and a mixture of minerals and vitamins. The length and weight differed significantly between the groups (p < 0.001). Mean growth (103.0 +/- 6.81 cm) and weight (3 987 +/- 0.98 g) were higher in tank II, (tank I: 88.9 +/- 7.58 cm; 2 705 +/- 0.69 g). The greater growth in tank II reflects higher air and water temperatures. The survival rate was 97.5%. These results can be used for rearing caimans in captivity for conservation and commercial purposes. PMID:18624249

  10. Optimization of photobioreactor growth conditions for a cyanobacterium expressing mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins.

    PubMed

    Ketseoglou, Irene; Bouwer, Gustav

    2013-08-10

    An Anabaena strain (PCC 7120#11) that was genetically engineered to express Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis cry genes has shown good larvicidal activity against Anopheles arabiensis, a major vector of malaria in Africa. Response surface methodology was used to evaluate the relationship between key growth factors and the volumetric productivity of PCC 7120#11 in an indoor, flat-plate photobioreactor. The interaction of input CO₂ concentration and airflow rate had a statistically significant effect on the volumetric productivity of PCC 7120#11, as did the interaction of airflow rate and photosynthetic photon flux density. Model-based numerical optimization indicated that the optimal factor level combination for maximizing PCC 7120#11 volumetric productivity was a photosynthetic photon flux density of 154 μmol m⁻² s⁻¹ and air enriched with 3.18% (v/v) CO₂ supplied at a flow rate of 1.02 vessel volumes per minute. At the levels evaluated in the study, none of the growth factors had a significant effect on the median lethal concentration of PCC 7120#11 against An. arabiensis larvae. This finding is important because loss of mosquitocidal activity under growth conditions that maximize volumetric productivity would impact on the feasibility of using PCC 7120#11 in malaria vector control programs. The study showed the usefulness of response surface methodology for determination of the optimal growth conditions for a cyanobacterium that is genetically engineered to have larvicidal activity against malaria vectors. PMID:23732832

  11. Features of Scots pine radial growth in conditions of provenance trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, S.

    2012-12-01

    Provenance trial of Scots pine in Boguchany forestry of Krasnoyarsk krai is conducted on two different soils - dark-grey loam forest soil and sod-podzol sandy soil. Complex of negative factors for plant growth and development appears in dry conditions of sandy soil. It could results in decrease of resistance to diseases. Sandy soils in different climatic zones have such common traits as low absorbing capacity, poorness of elemental nutrition, low microbiological activity and moisture capacity, very high water permeability. But Scots pine trees growing in such conditions could have certain advantages and perspectives of use. In the scope of climate change (global warming) the study of Scots pine growth on sandy soil become urgent because of more frequent appearance of dry seasons. Purpose of the work is revelation of radial growth features of Scots pine with different origin in dry conditions of sandy soil and assessment of external factors influence. The main feature of radial growth of majority of studied pine provenances in conditions of sandy soil is presence of significant variation of increment with distinct decline in 25-years old with loss of tree rings in a number of cases. The reason of it is complex of factors: deficit of June precipitation and next following outbreak of fungal disease. Found «frost rings» for all trees of studied clymatypes in 1992 are the consequence of temperature decline from May 21 to June 2 - from 23 C degrees up to 2 C. Perspective climatypes with biggest radial increments and least sensitivity to fungal disease were revealed.

  12. Identification of sRNAs expressed by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae under disparate growth conditions.

    PubMed

    McClure, Ryan; Tjaden, Brian; Genco, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    In the last several years, bacterial gene regulation via small RNAs (sRNAs) has been recognized as an important mechanism controlling expression of essential proteins that are critical to bacterial growth and metabolism. Technologies such as RNA-seq are rapidly expanding the field of sRNAs and are enabling a global view of the "sRNAome" of several bacterial species. While numerous sRNAs have been identified in a variety of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, only a very small number have been fully characterized in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiological agent of the STD gonorrhea. Here we present the first analysis of N. gonorrhoeae specifically focused on the identification of sRNAs through RNA-seq analysis of the organism cultured under different in vitro growth conditions. Using a new computational program, Rockhopper, to analyze prokaryotic RNA-seq data obtained from N. gonorrhoeae we identified several putative sRNAs and confirmed their expression and size through Northern blot analysis. In addition, RNA was collected from four different growth conditions (iron replete and deplete, as well as with and without co-culture with human endocervical cells). Many of the putative sRNAs identified shoed varying expression levels relative to the different growth conditions examine or were detected only under certain conditions but not others. Comparisons of identified sRNAs with the regulatory pattern of putative mRNA targets revealed possible functional roles for these sRNAs. These studies are the first to carry out a global analysis of N. gonorrhoeae specifically focused on sRNAs and show that RNA-mediated regulation may be an important mechanism of gene control in this human pathogen. PMID:25221548

  13. Migration, neighborhoods, and networks: approaches to understanding how urban environmental conditions affect syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Egan, James E; Frye, Victoria; Kurtz, Steven P; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A

    2011-04-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM. PMID:21369730

  14. Migration, Neighborhoods, and Networks: Approaches to Understanding How Urban Environmental Conditions Affect Syndemic Adverse Health Outcomes Among Gay, Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Egan, James E.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM. PMID:21369730

  15. Characteristics of bacterial and fungal growth in plastic bottled beverages under a consuming condition model.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Maiko; Ohnishi, Takahiro; Araki, Emiko; Kanda, Takashi; Tomita, Atsuko; Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Kanji; Konuma, Hirotaka; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    Microbial contamination in unfinished beverages can occur when drinking directly from the bottle. Various microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens, are able to grow in these beverages at room temperature or in a refrigerator. In this study, we elucidated the characteristics of microorganism growth in bottled beverages under consuming condition models. Furthermore, we provide insight into the safety of partially consumed bottled beverages with respect to food hygiene. We inoculated microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens, into various plastic bottled beverages and analysed the dynamic growth of microorganisms as well as bacterial toxin production in the beverages. Eight bottled beverage types were tested in this study, namely green tea, apple juice drink, tomato juice, carbonated drink, sport drink, coffee with milk, isotonic water and mineral water, and in these beverages several microorganism types were used: nine bacteria including three toxin producers, three yeasts, and five moulds. Following inoculation, the bottles were incubated at 35°C for 48 h for bacteria, 25°C for 48 h for yeasts, and 25°C for 28 days for moulds. During the incubation period, the number of bacteria and yeasts and visible changes in mould-growth were determined over time. Our results indicated that combinations of the beverage types and microorganism species correlated with the degree of growth. Regarding factors that affect the growth and toxin-productivity of microorganisms in beverages, it is speculated that the pH, static/shaking culture, temperature, additives, or ingredients, such as carbon dioxide or organic matter (especially of plant origin), may be important for microorganism growth in beverages. Our results suggest that various types of unfinished beverages have microorganism growth and can include food borne pathogens and bacterial toxins. Therefore, our results indicate that in terms of food hygiene it is necessary to consume beverages immediately after opening

  16. Controlled growth of CNT in mesoporous AAO through optimized conditions for membrane preparation and CVD operation.

    PubMed

    Ciambelli, P; Arurault, L; Sarno, M; Fontorbes, S; Leone, C; Datas, L; Sannino, D; Lenormand, P; Du Plouy, S Le Blond

    2011-07-01

    Anodic aluminium oxide (RAAO) membranes with a mesoporous structure were prepared under strictly controlling experimental process conditions, and physically and chemically characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques. Commercial anodic aluminium oxide (CAAO) membranes were also investigated for comparison. We demonstrated that RAAO membranes have lower content of both water and phosphorus and showed better porosity shape than CAAO. The RAAO membranes were used for template growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) inside its pores by ethylene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in the absence of a catalyst. A composite material, containing one nanotube for each channel, having the same length as the membrane thickness and an external diameter close to the diameter of the membrane holes, was obtained. Yield, selectivity and quality of CNTs in terms of diameter, length and arrangement (i.e. number of tubes for each channel) were optimized by investigating the effect of changing the experimental conditions for the CVD process. We showed that upon thermal treatment RAAO membranes were made up of crystallized allotropic alumina phases, which govern the subsequent CNT growth, because of their catalytic activity, likely due to their Lewis acidity. The strict control of experimental conditions for membrane preparation and CNT growth allowed us to enhance the carbon structural order, which is a critical requisite for CNT application as a substitute for copper in novel nano-interconnects. PMID:21576783

  17. Controlled growth of CNT in mesoporous AAO through optimized conditions for membrane preparation and CVD operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambelli, P.; Arurault, L.; Sarno, M.; Fontorbes, S.; Leone, C.; Datas, L.; Sannino, D.; Lenormand, P.; Le Blond Du Plouy, S.

    2011-07-01

    Anodic aluminium oxide (RAAO) membranes with a mesoporous structure were prepared under strictly controlling experimental process conditions, and physically and chemically characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques. Commercial anodic aluminium oxide (CAAO) membranes were also investigated for comparison. We demonstrated that RAAO membranes have lower content of both water and phosphorus and showed better porosity shape than CAAO. The RAAO membranes were used for template growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) inside its pores by ethylene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in the absence of a catalyst. A composite material, containing one nanotube for each channel, having the same length as the membrane thickness and an external diameter close to the diameter of the membrane holes, was obtained. Yield, selectivity and quality of CNTs in terms of diameter, length and arrangement (i.e. number of tubes for each channel) were optimized by investigating the effect of changing the experimental conditions for the CVD process. We showed that upon thermal treatment RAAO membranes were made up of crystallized allotropic alumina phases, which govern the subsequent CNT growth, because of their catalytic activity, likely due to their Lewis acidity. The strict control of experimental conditions for membrane preparation and CNT growth allowed us to enhance the carbon structural order, which is a critical requisite for CNT application as a substitute for copper in novel nano-interconnects.

  18. Spherulitic Growth of Hematite Under Hydrothermal Conditions: Insights into the Growth Mechanism of Hematite Spherules at Meridiani Planum Mars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    Hematite-rich spherules were discovered embedded in sulfate-rich outcrop rock and as lag deposits of whole and broken spherules by the Opportunity rover at Meridiani Planem [1-6]. The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), which has a wider spectral range compared to the Mars Exploration Rover Mini-TES, provided an important constraint that hematite-rich spherules are dominated by emission along the crystallographic c-axis [7-10]. We have previously synthesized hematite spherules whose mineralogic, chemical, and crystallographic properties are strikingly similar to those for the hematite-rich spherules at Meridiani Planum [11]. The spherules were synthesized in the laboratory along with hydronium jarosite and minor hydronium alunite from Fe-Al-Mg-S-Cl acid sulfate solutions under hydrothermal conditions. The reaction sequence was (1) precipitation of hydronium jarosite, (2) jarosite dissolution and precipitation of hematite spherules, and (3) precipitation of hydronium alunite upon depletion of hydronium jarosite. The spherules exhibit a radial growth texture with the crystallographic c-axis aligned along the radial direction, so that thermal emission spectra have no hematite emissivity minimum at approx.390/cm similar to the emission spectra returned by MGS TES. The objective of this paper is to expand on our initial studies [11] to examine the morphological evolution during growth of spherules starting from sub-micrometer crystals to spherules many orders of magnitude in size.

  19. Mathematical modeling of growth of Salmonella in raw ground beef under isothermal conditions from 10 to 45 Degree C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop primary and secondary models to describe the growth of Salmonella in raw ground beef. Primary and secondary models can be integrated into a dynamic model that can predict the microbial growth under varying environmental conditions. Growth data of Salmonel...

  20. A Time-Dependent Numerical Model for Spherically Symmetric Hailstone Growth Thermodynamics under Constant Ambient Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozowski, E. P.; D'Amours, R.

    1980-08-01

    A model of spherical hailstone growth thermodynamics is presented, and used to examine the validity of the continuous growth and heat balance assumptions frequently employed in the `classical' hail growth models. The model is similar to the spherically symmetric model formulated by Macklin and Payne (1969), but solutions to the model equations are obtained by means of finite-difference numerical methods. In the model, we do not try to simulate the discrete accretion process of individual drops. Instead, we attempt to identify the implications of the discrete, time-dependent nature of the icing process, by examining the accretion of a thin uniform layer of supercooled water over the entire surface of the sphere. The heat transfer equations both with the air and within the hailstone axe then solved assuming radial symmetry. By the addition of several such layers, the finite growth of a spherical hailstone can be simulated. In the present paper, only growth in constant ambient conditions is considered. It is shown that there are large internal heat fluxes during the interval between the accretion of successive layers (typically 1 s), which cause the temperatures near the surface to oscillate several degrees above and below their time-mean value. Nevertheless, the time-averaged temperature over an accretion cycle is almost uniform throughout the hailstone and, when the environmental conditions are constant, is approximately equal to the equilibrium surface temperature predicted by the `classical' models. As the hailstone grows under constant environmental conditions, it continually adapts to the classical equilibrium temperature, warming up almost uniformly throughout. The time scale for this adjustment to a quasi-equilibrium state is found to be of the order of the internal diffusive time scale R2/k. It is speculated therefore that if the environmental conditions change slowly (over time scales large compared with R2/k) the hailstone thermodynamics will be adequately

  1. Tree growth and forest ecosystem functioning in Eurasia under extreme climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurer, Matthias; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Bryukhanova, Marina; Knorre, Anastasia; Nasyrov, Muhtor; Frank, David; Treydte, Kerstin; Sidorova, Olga; Siegwolf, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    The main goal of this study is to improve our understanding of the influence of a changing climate on trees in extreme conditions by a detailed analysis of the factors controlling tree-ring growth. We investigated forest ecosystems in regions that are very sensitive to climatic changes and where rapid and dramatic environmental and climatic changes are on-going, namely, the high latitude permafrost region in Central Siberia (Russia), the semi-arid dry areas in Central Asia (Uzbekistan) and high-altitude sites in the Alps (Switzerland). Tree-ring parameters studied were ring-width, density, cell number and structure and the ratio of carbon and oxygen isotopes. An important aspect of the work was the characterization of seasonal growth and water supply of trees. Intra-seasonal dynamics of tree-ring formation was correlated with monitored environmental factors, such as air and soil temperature and moisture, permafrost depth and the isotope composition of soil water, of precipitation, and of stream water. Intra-annual and long-term variability of the main tree-ring parameters were compared for the different regions. The results obtained help us to understand better tree-physiological processes valid under contrasting environmental conditions. For instance, the relationship between the onset of cell division in the cambium and the thermo-hydrological soil regime was used to determine the period of the year with the highest influence on the start of tree-ring formation. Seasonally resolved oxygen isotope depth profiles of soil water and concurrent xylem and leaf water measurements show the importance of time-lags between precipitation, leaf processes and growth. The data obtained are important for improving tree-ring growth models and estimating future tree growth under climate change. Funding: SNF SCOPES IZ73Z0_128035

  2. Rates of Root and Organism Growth, Soil Conditions, and Temporal and Spatial Development of the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    WATT, MICHELLE; SILK, WENDY K.; PASSIOURA, JOHN B.

    2006-01-01

    • Background Roots growing in soil encounter physical, chemical and biological environments that influence their rhizospheres and affect plant growth. Exudates from roots can stimulate or inhibit soil organisms that may release nutrients, infect the root, or modify plant growth via signals. These rhizosphere processes are poorly understood in field conditions. • Scope and Aims We characterize roots and their rhizospheres and rates of growth in units of distance and time so that interactions with soil organisms can be better understood in field conditions. We review: (1) distances between components of the soil, including dead roots remnant from previous plants, and the distances between new roots, their rhizospheres and soil components; (2) characteristic times (distance2/diffusivity) for solutes to travel distances between roots and responsive soil organisms; (3) rates of movement and growth of soil organisms; (4) rates of extension of roots, and how these relate to the rates of anatomical and biochemical ageing of root tissues and the development of the rhizosphere within the soil profile; and (5) numbers of micro-organisms in the rhizosphere and the dependence on the site of attachment to the growing tip. We consider temporal and spatial variation within the rhizosphere to understand the distribution of bacteria and fungi on roots in hard, unploughed soil, and the activities of organisms in the overlapping rhizospheres of living and dead roots clustered in gaps in most field soils. • Conclusions Rhizosphere distances, characteristic times for solute diffusion, and rates of root and organism growth must be considered to understand rhizosphere development. Many values used in our analysis were estimates. The paucity of reliable data underlines the rudimentary state of our knowledge of root–organism interactions in the field. PMID:16551700

  3. Simulating crop growth with Expert-N-GECROS under different site conditions in Southwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyda, Arne; Ingwersen, Joachim; Demyan, Scott; Gayler, Sebastian; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    When feedbacks between the land surface and the atmosphere are investigated by Atmosphere-Land surface-Crop-Models (ALCM) it is fundamental to accurately simulate crop growth dynamics as plants directly influence the energy partitioning at the plant-atmosphere interface. To study both the response and the effect of intensive agricultural crop production systems on regional climate change in Southwest Germany, the crop growth model GECROS (YIN & VAN LAAR, 2005) was calibrated based on multi-year field data from typical crop rotations in the Kraichgau and Swabian Alb regions. Additionally, the SOC (soil organic carbon) model DAISY (MÜLLER et al., 1998) was implemented in the Expert-N model tool (ENGEL & PRIESACK, 1993) and combined with GECROS. The model was calibrated based on a set of plant (BBCH, LAI, plant height, aboveground biomass, N content of biomass) and weather data for the years 2010 - 2013 and validated with the data of 2014. As GECROS adjusts the root-shoot partitioning in response to external conditions (water, nitrogen, CO2), it is suitable to simulate crop growth dynamics under changing climate conditions and potentially more frequent stress situations. As C and N pools and turnover rates in soil as well as preceding crop effects were expected to considerably influence crop growth, the model was run in a multi-year, dynamic way. Crop residues and soil mineral N (nitrate, ammonium) available for the subsequent crop were accounted for. The model simulates growth dynamics of winter wheat, winter rape, silage maize and summer barley at the Kraichgau and Swabian Alb sites well. The Expert-N-GECROS model is currently parameterized for crops with potentially increasing shares in future crop rotations. First results will be shown.

  4. High-quality and high-purity homoepitaxial diamond (100) film growth under high oxygen concentration condition

    SciTech Connect

    Teraji, Tokuyuki

    2015-09-21

    Defect formation during diamond homoepitaxial growth was sufficiently inhibited by adding oxygen simultaneously in the growth ambient with high concentration of 2%. A 30-μm thick diamond films with surface roughness of <2 nm were homoepitaxially deposited on the (100) diamond single crystal substrates with reasonable growth rate of approximately 3 μm h{sup −1} under the conditions of higher methane concentration of 10%, higher substrate temperature of ∼1000 °C, and higher microwave power density condition of >100 W cm{sup −3}. Surface characteristic patterns moved to an identical direction with growth thickness, indicating that lateral growth was dominant growth mode. High chemical purity represented by low nitrogen concentration of less than 1 ppb and the highest {sup 12}C isotopic ratio of 99.998% of the obtained homoepitaxial diamond (100) films suggest that the proposed growth condition has high ability of impurity control.

  5. Effect of different growth conditions on biomass increase in kefir grains.

    PubMed

    Guzel-Seydim, Z; Kok-Tas, T; Ertekin-Filiz, B; Seydim, A C

    2011-03-01

    Kefir is a functional dairy product and the effects of kefir consumption on health have been well documented. Kefir grains have naturally high numbers of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts and are used in manufacturing kefir. The biomass of kefir grains slowly increases after successive fermentations. The effects of adding whey protein isolate, modified whey protein (MWP, fat replacer; Carbery Inc., Cork, Ireland), or inulin to milk and different atmospheric conditions (ambient or 6% CO(2)) during fermentation on the increase in biomass of kefir grains were investigated. Reconstituted milks (10% milk powder) enriched with whey protein isolate (2%), MWP (2%), and inulin (2%) were inoculated with kefir grains and fermented in ambient and 6% CO(2) incubators at 25°C until a final pH of 4.6 was reached. Biomass increments of kefir grains were determined weekly over 30 d. Lactic acid bacteria and yeast contents of kefir grains were also determined. The highest biomass increase (392%) was found in kefir grains grown in milk supplemented with whey protein isolate under ambient atmospheric conditions. Application of CO(2) did not provide a significant supporting effect on the biomass of kefir grains. Addition of MWP significantly accelerated the formation of kefir grain biomass (223%). The use of whey protein isolate, MWP, or inulin in milk did not cause any adverse effects on the microbial flora of kefir grains. PMID:21338789

  6. Optimization of plant mineral nutrition under growth-limiting conditions in a lunar greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaets, I.; Voznyuk, T.; Kovalchuk, M.; Rogutskyy, I.; Lukashov, D.; Mytrokhyn, O.; Mashkovska, S.; Foing, B.; Kozyrovska, N.

    It may be assumed that the first plants in a lunar base will play a main role in forming a protosoil of acceptable fertility needed for purposively growing second generation plants like wheat, rice, tulips, etc. The residues of the first-generation plants could be composted and transformed by microorganisms into a soil-like substrate within a loop of regenerative life support system. The lunar regolith may be used as a substrate for plant growth at the very beginning of a mission to reduce its cost. The use of microbial communities for priming plants will allow one to facilitate adaption to stressful conditions and to support the plant development under growth limiting conditions. Well-defined plant-associated bacteria were used for growing three cultivars to colonize French marigold (Tagetes patula L.) in anorthosite, a substrate of low bioavailability, analogous to a lunar rock. The consortium was composed of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and the bacterium Paenibacillus sp. IMBG156 which stimulated seed germination, better plant development, and finally, the flowering of inoculated tagetes. In contrast, control plants grew poorly in the anorthosite and practically did not survive until flowering. Analysis of bacterial community composition showed that all species colonized plant roots, however, the rate of colonization depended on the allelopatic characteristics of marigold varieties. Bacteria of consortium were able to liberate some elements (Ca, Fe, Mn, Si, Ni, Cu, Zn) from substrate anorthosite. Plant colonization by mixed culture of bacterial strains resulted in the increase of accumulation of K, Mg, Mn by the plant and in the lowering of the level of toxic metal accumulation. It was assumed that a rationally assembled consortium of bacterial strains promoted germination of marygold seeds and supported the plant development under growth limiting conditions by means of bioleaching plant essential nutritional elements and by protecting the plant against

  7. Winter feeding, growth and condition of brown trout Salmo trutta in a groundwater-dominated stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, William E.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Ferrington, Leonard C., Jr.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Dieterman, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Winter can be a stressful period for stream-dwelling salmonid populations, often resulting in reduced growth and survival. Stream water temperatures have been identified as a primary mechanism driving reductions in fitness during winter. However, groundwater inputs can moderate water temperature and may reduce winter severity. Additionally, seasonal reductions in prey availability may contribute to decreased growth and survival, although few studies have examined food webs supporting salmonids under winter conditions. This study employed diet, stable isotope, and mark-recapture techniques to examine winter (November through March) feeding, growth, and condition of brown troutSalmo trutta in a groundwater-dominated stream (Badger Creek, Minnesota, USA). Growth was greater for fish ≤ 150 mm (mean = 4.1 mg g−1 day−1) than for those 151–276 mm (mean = 1.0 mg g−1 day−1) during the winter season. Overall condition from early winter to late winter did not vary for fish ≤150 mm (mean relative weight (Wr) = 89.5) and increased for those 151–276 mm (mean Wr = 85.8 early and 89.4 late). Although composition varied both temporally and by individual, brown trout diets were dominated by aquatic invertebrates, primarily Amphipods, Dipterans, and Trichopterans. Stable isotope analysis supported the observations of the dominant prey taxa in stomach contents and indicated the winter food web was supported by a combination of allochthonous inputs and aquatic macrophytes. Brown trout in Badger Creek likely benefited from the thermal regime and increased prey abundance present in this groundwater-dominated stream during winter.

  8. Conditional Cooperativity of Toxin - Antitoxin Regulation Can Mediate Bistability between Growth and Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Cataudella, Ilaria; Sneppen, Kim; Gerdes, Kenn; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    Many toxin-antitoxin operons are regulated by the toxin/antitoxin ratio by mechanisms collectively coined “conditional cooperativity”. Toxin and antitoxin form heteromers with different stoichiometric ratios, and the complex with the intermediate ratio works best as a transcription repressor. This allows transcription at low toxin level, strong repression at intermediate toxin level, and then again transcription at high toxin level. Such regulation has two interesting features; firstly, it provides a non-monotonous response to the concentration of one of the proteins, and secondly, it opens for ultra-sensitivity mediated by the sequestration of the functioning heteromers. We explore possible functions of conditional regulation in simple feedback motifs, and show that it can provide bistability for a wide range of parameters. We then demonstrate that the conditional cooperativity in toxin-antitoxin systems combined with the growth-inhibition activity of free toxin can mediate bistability between a growing state and a dormant state. PMID:24009488

  9. Conditional cooperativity of toxin - antitoxin regulation can mediate bistability between growth and dormancy.

    PubMed

    Cataudella, Ilaria; Sneppen, Kim; Gerdes, Kenn; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    Many toxin-antitoxin operons are regulated by the toxin/antitoxin ratio by mechanisms collectively coined "conditional cooperativity". Toxin and antitoxin form heteromers with different stoichiometric ratios, and the complex with the intermediate ratio works best as a transcription repressor. This allows transcription at low toxin level, strong repression at intermediate toxin level, and then again transcription at high toxin level. Such regulation has two interesting features; firstly, it provides a non-monotonous response to the concentration of one of the proteins, and secondly, it opens for ultra-sensitivity mediated by the sequestration of the functioning heteromers. We explore possible functions of conditional regulation in simple feedback motifs, and show that it can provide bistability for a wide range of parameters. We then demonstrate that the conditional cooperativity in toxin-antitoxin systems combined with the growth-inhibition activity of free toxin can mediate bistability between a growing state and a dormant state. PMID:24009488

  10. Modeling of Macroscopic/Microscopic Transport and Growth Phenomena in Zeolite Crystal Solutions Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatsonis, Nikos A.; Alexandrou, Andreas; Shi, Hui; Ongewe, Bernard; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Crystals grown from liquid solutions have important industrial applications. Zeolites, for instance, a class of crystalline aluminosilicate materials, form the backbone of the chemical process industry worldwide, as they are used as adsorbents and catalysts. Many of the phenomena associated with crystal growth processes are not well understood due to complex microscopic and macroscopic interactions. Microgravity could help elucidate these phenomena and allow the control of defect locations, concentration, as well as size of crystals. Microgravity in an orbiting spacecraft could help isolate the possible effects of natural convection (which affects defect formation) and minimize sedimentation. In addition, crystals will stay essentially suspended in the nutrient pool under a diffusion-limited growth condition. This is expected to promote larger crystals by allowing a longer residence time in a high-concentration nutrient field. Among other factors, the crystal size distribution depends on the nucleation rate and crystallization. These two are also related to the "gel" polymerization/depolymerization rate. Macroscopic bulk mass and flow transport and especially gravity, force the crystals down to the bottom of the reactor, thus forming a sedimentation layer. In this layer, the growth rate of the crystals slows down as crystals compete for a limited amount of nutrients. The macroscopic transport phenomena under certain conditions can, however, enhance the nutrient supply and therefore, accelerate crystal growth. Several zeolite experiments have been performed in space with mixed results. The results from our laboratory have indicated an enhancement in size of 30 to 70 percent compared to the best ground based controls, and a reduction of lattice defects in many of the space grown crystals. Such experiments are difficult to interpret, and cannot be easily used to derive empirical or other laws since many physical parameters are simultaneously involved in the process

  11. Biocontrol agents promote growth of potato pathogens, depending on environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Cray, Jonathan A; Connor, Mairéad C; Stevenson, Andrew; Houghton, Jonathan D R; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Cooke, Louise R; Hallsworth, John E

    2016-05-01

    There is a pressing need to understand and optimize biological control so as to avoid over-reliance on the synthetic chemical pesticides that can damage environmental and human health. This study focused on interactions between a novel biocontrol-strain, Bacillus sp. JC12GB43, and potato-pathogenic Phytophthora and Fusarium species. In assays carried out in vitro and on the potato tuber, the bacterium was capable of near-complete inhibition of pathogens. This Bacillus was sufficiently xerotolerant (water activity limit for growth = 0.928) to out-perform Phytophthora infestans (~0.960) and challenge Fusarium coeruleum (~0.847) and Fusarium sambucinum (~0.860) towards the lower limits of their growth windows. Under some conditions, however, strain JC12GB43 stimulated proliferation of the pathogens: for instance, Fusarium coeruleum growth-rate was increased under chaotropic conditions in vitro (132 mM urea) by >100% and on tubers (2-M glycerol) by up to 570%. Culture-based assays involving macromolecule-stabilizing (kosmotropic) compatible solutes provided proof-of-principle that the Bacillus may provide kosmotropic metabolites to the plant pathogen under conditions that destabilize macromolecular systems of the fungal cell. Whilst unprecedented, this finding is consistent with earlier reports that fungi can utilize metabolites derived from bacterial cells. Unless the antimicrobial activities of candidate biocontrol strains are assayed over a full range of field-relevant parameters, biocontrol agents may promote plant pathogen infections and thereby reduce crop yields. These findings indicate that biocontrol activity, therefore, ought to be regarded as a mode-of-behaviour (dependent on prevailing conditions) rather than an inherent property of a bacterial strain. PMID:26880001

  12. Effect of growth conditions on microbial activity and iron-sulfide production by Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender; Hayes, Kim F; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-05-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can produce iron sulfide (FeS) solids with mineralogical characteristics that may be beneficial for a variety of biogeochemical applications, such as long-term immobilization of uranium. In this study, the growth and metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, one of the best-studied SRB species, were comprehensively monitored in batch studies, and the biogenic FeS solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Controlling the pH by varying the initial pH, the iron-to-sulfate ratio, or the electron donor - affected the growth of D. vulgaris and strongly influenced the formation and growth of FeS solids. In particular, lower pH (from initial conditions or a decrease caused by less sulfate reduction, FeS precipitation, or using pyruvate as the electron donor) produced larger-sized mackinawite (Fe1+xS). Greater accumulation of free sulfide, from more sulfate reduction by D. vulgaris, also led to larger-sized mackinawite and particularly stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite (Fe3S4) when the free sulfide concentration was 29.3mM. Furthermore, sufficient free Fe(2+) led to the additional formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2·8(H2O)]. Thus, microbially relevant conditions (initial pH, choice of electron donor, and excess or deficiency of sulfide) are tools to generate biogenic FeS solids of different characteristics. PMID:24675611

  13. Survival, growth and condition of freshwater mussels: effects of municipal wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Nobles, Trey; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae) are among the most imperiled group of organisms in the world, with nearly 65% of North American species considered endangered. Anthropogenic disturbances, including altered flow regimes, habitat alteration, and pollution, are the major driver of this group's decline. We investigated the effects of tertiary treated municipal wastewater effluent on survivorship, growth, and condition of freshwater mussels in experimental cages in a small Central Texas stream. We tested the effluent effects by measuring basic physical parameters of native three ridge mussels (Amblema plicata) and of non-native Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea), before and after 72-day exposure at four sites above and below a municipal wastewater treatment plant outfall. Survivorship and growth of the non-native Asian clams and growth and condition indices of the native three ridge mussels were significantly higher at the reference site above the outfall than in downstream sites. We attribute this reduction in fitness below the outfall to elevated nutrient and heavy metal concentrations, and the potential presence of other untested-for compounds commonly found in municipal effluent. These results, along with an absence of native mussels below the discharge, indicate a significant negative impact of wastewater effluent on both native and non-native mussels in the stream. PMID:26042840

  14. Survival, Growth and Condition of Freshwater Mussels: Effects of Municipal Wastewater Effluent

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Trey; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae) are among the most imperiled group of organisms in the world, with nearly 65% of North American species considered endangered. Anthropogenic disturbances, including altered flow regimes, habitat alteration, and pollution, are the major driver of this group's decline. We investigated the effects of tertiary treated municipal wastewater effluent on survivorship, growth, and condition of freshwater mussels in experimental cages in a small Central Texas stream. We tested the effluent effects by measuring basic physical parameters of native three ridge mussels (Amblema plicata) and of non-native Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea), before and after 72-day exposure at four sites above and below a municipal wastewater treatment plant outfall. Survivorship and growth of the non-native Asian clams and growth and condition indices of the native three ridge mussels were significantly higher at the reference site above the outfall than in downstream sites. We attribute this reduction in fitness below the outfall to elevated nutrient and heavy metal concentrations, and the potential presence of other untested-for compounds commonly found in municipal effluent. These results, along with an absence of native mussels below the discharge, indicate a significant negative impact of wastewater effluent on both native and non-native mussels in the stream. PMID:26042840

  15. A review on the effects of environmental conditions on growth and toxin production of Ostreopsis ovata.

    PubMed

    Pistocchi, R; Pezzolesi, L; Guerrini, F; Vanucci, S; Dell'aversano, C; Fattorusso, E

    2011-03-01

    Since the end of the 1990s the occurrence of blooms of the benthic dinoflagellates Ostreopsis spp. is spreading in many tropical and temperate regions worldwide, sometimes causing benthonic biocenosis suffering and occasional human distress. Ostreopsis ovata has been found to produce palytoxin-like compounds, a class of highly potent toxins. As general, the highest abundances of Ostreopsis spp. are recorded during warmer periods characterized by high temperature, salinity, and water column stability. Moreover, as these cells are easily resuspended in the water column, the role of hydrodynamism in the blooms development and decline has been highlighted. The environmental conditions appear, therefore, to be one of the main factors determining the proliferation of these species as testified by several field surveys. Laboratory studies on the effect of environmental parameters on growth and toxicity of O. ovata are rather scarce. With regard to the effects of temperature, culture results indicate that different strains blooming along Italian coasts displayed different optima, in accordance to blooming periods, and that higher toxin levels correlated with best growth conditions. Additionally, in relation to an Adriatic strain, cell growth positively correlated with the increase in salinity, while toxicity was lowest at the highest salinity value (i.e. 40). For the same strain, both nitrogen and phosphorus limitation determined a decrease in cell toxicity showing different behaviour with respect to many other toxic dinoflagellates. PMID:20920514

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth of water vapor on meteoric smoke particle analogues at mesospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, Mario; Duft, Denis; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sub 2 nm meteoric smoke particles (MSP) produced from the ablation and recondensation of meteoric material are believed to be the major kind of nuclei causing the formation of water ice particles in the mesopause of Earth at heights of 80-90 km. These so called noctiLucent clouds (NLC) are frequently detected during polar summer, whereas the microphysical nucleation process and subsequent growth on such small particles are understood only poorly. Parameterizing these processes results in large uncertainties especially due to a lack of experimental data on desorption energies and critical saturation for the activation of nucleation under realistic mesospheric conditions, which states the need of laboratory measurements. We produce charged nanometer sized (2-3 nm) MSP analogues in a microwave plasma particle source and transfer them to a novel linear ion trap which allows us to trap the particles under typical mesospheric temperatures and H2O concentrations. The adsorption of H2O molecules on the particles surface followed by nucleation and growth can be examined by analyzing the mass distribution of the particles with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer as function of the residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this contribution we present such measurements for single positively as well as negatively charged particles which allow us to determine the desorption energy of water vapor on the investigated nanoparticles as well as the critical saturation needed to activate nucleation and subsequent growth.

  17. Response of the bacterial symbiont Holospora caryophila to different growth conditions of its host.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Michele; Lanzoni, Olivia; Fokin, Sergei I; Schrallhammer, Martina; Petroni, Giulio

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies on bacterial symbionts of ciliates have shown that some symbionts can be maintained relatively well under standard laboratory conditions whereas others are frequently lost, especially when the host is cultivated at a high division rate. In this study, the variation in infection level by the endosymbiont Holospora caryophila within its host population Paramecium octaurelia was investigated in response to three alimentary treatments and a subsequent starvation phase. The response of the ciliates was determined as a nearly exponential growth rate with different slopes in each treatment, proportional to the amount of food received. The initial infection level was higher than 90%. After 24 days of exponential host's growth, the prevalence remained stable at approximately 90% in all treatments, even after a subsequent starvation phase of 20 days. However, at intermediate time-points in both the feeding and the starvation phase, fluctuations in the presence of the intracellular bacteria were observed. These results show that H. caryophila is able to maintain its infection under the tested range of host growth conditions, also due to the possibility of an effective re-infection in case of partial loss. PMID:25635695

  18. Analyses of Fatigue Crack Growth and Closure Near Threshold Conditions for Large-Crack Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A plasticity-induced crack-closure model was used to study fatigue crack growth and closure in thin 2024-T3 aluminum alloy under constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold testing procedures. Two methods of calculating crack-opening stresses were compared. One method was based on a contact-K analyses and the other on crack-opening-displacement (COD) analyses. These methods gave nearly identical results under constant-amplitude loading, but under threshold simulations the contact-K analyses gave lower opening stresses than the contact COD method. Crack-growth predictions tend to support the use of contact-K analyses. Crack-growth simulations showed that remote closure can cause a rapid rise in opening stresses in the near threshold regime for low-constraint and high applied stress levels. Under low applied stress levels and high constraint, a rise in opening stresses was not observed near threshold conditions. But crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) were of the order of measured oxide thicknesses in the 2024 alloy under constant-R simulations. In contrast, under constant-K(sub max) testing the CTOD near threshold conditions were an order-of-magnitude larger than measured oxide thicknesses. Residual-plastic deformations under both constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold simulations were several times larger than the expected oxide thicknesses. Thus, residual-plastic deformations, in addition to oxide and roughness, play an integral part in threshold development.

  19. A spectroscopy-based detector to monitor tomato growth condition in greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ce; Li, Minzan; Cui, Di

    2008-12-01

    A spectroscopy-based detector is developed to measure the nitrogen and chlorophyll content of tomato leaves and then to predict the growth condition of tomato plants in greenhouse. The detector uses two wavebands, 527 nm and 762 nm, since it is proved that these wavebands are sensitive to nitrogen and chlorophyll content in plant leaves by previous field test. The detector contains: A Y-type optic fiber, two silicon photocells, a signal processing unit, and a MCU. Light reflection from tomato leaves is transmitted by the Y-type optic fiber to the surface of the silicon photo cells, which transfer optical signal into electrical signal. Then the analog signal is amplified to conform to the TTL level signal standard and finally converted to digital signal by MAX186. After that, the MCU carries on a series of actions, including data calculating, displaying and storage. Using the measured data, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is calculated to estimate the nitrogen and chlorophyll content in plant leaves. The result is directly displayed on an LCD screen. Users have an option in saving data, either into a USB-memory stick or into a database over the PC serial port. The detector is portable, inexpensive, and convenient, which make it meet farmers' need in China. The performance test shows that the growth model works very well, and the device has high accuracy in predicting the growth condition of tomato plants in greenhouse.

  20. Growth of oil accumulating microalga Neochloris oleoabundans under alkaline-saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Santos, A M; Janssen, M; Lamers, P P; Evers, W A C; Wijffels, R H

    2012-01-01

    The effect of elevated pH and salt concentration on the growth of the freshwater microalga Neochloris oleoabundans was investigated. A study was conducted in 24-well plates on the design of a growth medium and subsequently applied in a photobioreactor. An artificial seawater medium with reduced Ca(2+) and PO(4)(3-) could prevent mineral precipitation at high pH levels. Growth was characterized in this new medium at pH 8.1 and at pH 10.0, with 420 mM of total salts. Specific growth rates of 0.08 h(-1) at pH 8.1 and 0.04 h(-1) at pH 10.0 were obtained under controlled turbidostat cultivation. The effect of nitrogen starvation on lipid accumulation was also investigated. Fatty acids content increased not only with nitrogen limitation but also with a pH increase (up to 35% in the dry biomass). Fluorescence microscopy gave visual proof that N. oleoabundans accumulates oil bodies when growing in saline conditions at high pH. PMID:22115529

  1. Mathematical model of Chlorella minutissima UTEX2341 growth and lipid production under photoheterotrophic fermentation conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, JinShui; Rasa, Ehsan; Tantayotai, Prapakorn; Scow, Kate M.; Yuan, HongLi; Hristova, Krassimira R.

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the cost of algal biomass production, mathematical model was developed for the first time to describe microalgae growth, lipid production and glycerin consumption under photoheterotrophic conditions based on logistic, Luedeking–Piret and Luedeking–Piret-like equations. All experiments were conducted in a 2 L batch reactor without considering CO2 effect on algae’s growth and lipid production. Biomass and lipid production increased with glycerin as carbon source and were well described by the logistic and Luedeking–Piret equations respectively. Model predictions were in satisfactory agreement with measured data and the mode of lipid production was growth-associated. Sensitivity analysis was applied to examine the effects of certain important parameters on model performance. Results showed that S0, the initial concentration of glycerin, was the most significant factor for algae growth and lipid production. This model is applicable for prediction of other single cell algal species but model testing is recommended before scaling up the fermentation of process. PMID:21115343

  2. Pathways of Thriving and Resilience: Growth Responses to Adversity and Trauma in Two Cambodian Communities: A Comparative Study between Lowell, Massachusetts and Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Cheryl D.

    This qualitative study investigated individual, contextual, and cultural factors that promote trauma-related resilience and positive growth among Cambodian survivors of the Pol Pot regime who reside in Phnom Penh, Cambodia and Lowell, Massachusetts. A thriving paradigm framed semi-structured interviews that were conducted with 21 Cambodians in…

  3. Thermal and solutal conditions at the tips of a directional dendritic growth front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Mccay, Mary H.; Hopkins, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The line-of-sight averaged, time-dependent dendrite tip concentrations for the diffusion dominated vertical directional solidification of a metal model (ammonium chloride and water) were obtained by extrapolating exponentially fit diffusion layer profiles measured using a laser interferometer. The tip concentrations were shown to increase linearly with time throughout the diffusion dominated growth process for an initially stagnant dendritic array. The process was terminated for the cases chosen by convective breakdown suffered when the conditionally stable diffusion layer exceeded the critical Rayleigh criteria. The transient tip concentrations were determined to significantly exceed the values predicted for steady state, thus producing much larger constitutional undercoolings. This has ramifications for growth speeds, arm spacings and the dendritic structure itself.

  4. Residual Gases in Crystal Growth Systems: Their Origin, Magnitude, and Dependence on the Processing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Residual gases present in closed ampoules may affect different crystal growth processes. Their presence may affect techniques requiring low pressures and affect the crystal quality in different ways. For that reason a good understanding and control of formation of residual gases may be important for an optimum design and meaningful interpretation of crystal growth experiments. Our extensive experimental and theoretical study includes degassing of silica glass and generation of gases from various source materials. Different materials processing conditions, like outgassing under vacuum, annealing in hydrogen, resublimation, different material preparation procedures, multiple annealings, different processing times, and others were applied and their effect on the amount and composition of gas were analyzed. The experimental results were interpreted based on theoretical calculations on diffusion in silica glass and source materials and thermochemistry of the system. Procedures for a reduction of the amount of gas are also discussed.

  5. Combined therapy with COX-2 inhibitor and 20-HETE inhibitor reduces colon tumor growth and the adverse effects of ischemic stroke associated with COX-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hoda, Md Nasrul; Zheng, Xuan; Li, Weiguo; Luo, Pengcheng; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Seki, Tsugio; Ergul, Adviye; Wang, Mong-Heng

    2014-09-15

    20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), Cyp4a-derived eicosanoid, is a lipid mediator that promotes tumor growth, as well as causing detrimental effects in cerebral circulation. We determined whether concurrent inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 20-HETE affects colon tumor growth and ischemic stroke outcomes. The expression of Cyp4a and COXs and production of 20-HETE and PGE2 were determined in murine colon carcinoma (MC38) cells. We then examined the effects of combined treatment with rofecoxib, a potent COX-2 inhibitor, and HET0016, a potent Cyp4a inhibitor, on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells. Subsequently, we tested the effects of HET0016 plus rofecoxib in MC38 tumor and ischemic stroke models. Cyp4a and COXs are highly expressed in MC38 cells. Respectively, HET0016 and rofecoxib inhibited 20-HETE and PGE2 formation in MC38 cells. Moreover, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 had greater inhibitory effects on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells than did rofecoxib alone. Importantly, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 provided greater inhibition on tumor growth than did rofecoxib alone in MC38 tumor-bearing mice. Prolonged treatment with rofecoxib selectively induced circulating 20-HETE levels and caused cerebrovascular damage after ischemic stroke, whereas therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 attenuated 20-HETE levels and reduced rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes during anti-tumor therapy. Thus these results demonstrate that combination therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 provides a new treatment of colon tumor, which can not only enhance the anti-tumor efficacy of rofecoxib, but also reduce rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes. PMID:24990856

  6. Wear of surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings for hip prostheses under adverse conditions with the head loading on the rim of the cup.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Ian; Williams, Sophie; Isaac, Graham; Hatto, Peter; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2013-04-01

    Clinical studies have found high wear rates, elevated ion levels and high revision rates of large-diameter metal-on-metal surface replacement bearings in some patients, which have been associated with edge loading of the head on the rim of the cup. We have simulated increased wear and ion levels in metal-on-metal bearings in vitro by introducing variations in translational and rotational positioning of the components, which reproduces stripe wear on the femoral head, cup rim wear and clinically relevant large as well as small wear particles. There is interest in technologies such as surface engineering, which might reduce metal wear and the release of wear particles and ions. Reduced wear with surface-engineered surface replacements compared to metal-on-metal controls has been reported under standard walking conditions with correctly aligned and concentric components. In this in vitro study, the wear of chromium nitride surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings under conditions of microseparation associated with translational and rotational malpositioning of the components was investigated and the results were compared with a previously reported study of metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. Simulations were conducted using our unique hip simulation microseparation methodologies, which reproduce accelerated wear in metal-on-metal bearings and have previously been clinically validated with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings had evidence of head contact on the rim of the cup, which produced stripe wear on the femoral head. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings (two without stripe and two with stripe wear) had lower wear than the previously reported high wearing metal-on-metal bearings. At 2 million cycles, two of the surface-engineered bearings had substantially increased wear rates, four times higher than the high wear rates previously reported for metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. There was

  7. Crystal Growth of Hen Egg-White Lysozyme (HEWL) under Various Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weichun; Xu, Jin; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Koizumi, Masako; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Zhou, Ru; Li, Ang; Fu, Yuying

    2013-08-01

    Motivated by the enhancement of protein quality under microgravity condition, the behaviors of crystal growth under various gravity conditions have been monitored via Foton Satellite and parabolic flight. We found that the normal growth rate and the step velocity would be enhanced only at high protein concentration. Although the difference of diffusion between monomer lysozyme molecule and main impurity species in HWEL dimer may be able to explain this enhancement in long period at high protein concentration, it is not valid at low lysozyme concentration and it can't explain the results obtained by parabolic flight, in which microgravity condition maintained only about 20 s. In order to compromise this contradiction, cluster, universal existing in protein solution, has been picked up. The dynamic light scattering technique figured out dimer is served as the seed for cluster formation. Due to its large size, cluster keeps still under microgravity. Via this mechanism, the purification of lysozyme above crystal surface has been achieved. We also found the two supergravity (˜1.5 g) periods immediately before and after microgravity period have different effects on the step velocity. The pre-MG period depresses the step velocity while the post-MG enhances it. This odd phenomenon ascribes to two factors: (1) the flow rate modification and (2) the purity of protein solution immediate above crystal surface.

  8. Optimizing pentacene thin-film transistor performance: Temperature and surface condition induced layer growth modification

    PubMed Central

    Lassnig, R.; Hollerer, M.; Striedinger, B.; Fian, A.; Stadlober, B.; Winkler, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present in situ electrical and surface analytical, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on temperature and surface condition induced pentacene layer growth modifications, leading to the selection of optimized deposition conditions and entailing performance improvements. We prepared p++-silicon/silicon dioxide bottom-gate, gold bottom-contact transistor samples and evaluated the pentacene layer growth for three different surface conditions (sputtered, sputtered + carbon and unsputtered + carbon) at sample temperatures during deposition of 200 K, 300 K and 350 K. The AFM investigations focused on the gold contacts, the silicon dioxide channel region and the highly critical transition area. Evaluations of coverage dependent saturation mobilities, threshold voltages and corresponding AFM analysis were able to confirm that the first 3–4 full monolayers contribute to the majority of charge transport within the channel region. At high temperatures and on sputtered surfaces uniform layer formation in the contact–channel transition area is limited by dewetting, leading to the formation of trenches and the partial development of double layer islands within the channel region instead of full wetting layers. By combining the advantages of an initial high temperature deposition (well-ordered islands in the channel) and a subsequent low temperature deposition (continuous film formation for low contact resistance) we were able to prepare very thin (8 ML) pentacene transistors of comparably high mobility. PMID:26543442

  9. Growth conditions, elemental accumulation and induced physiological changes in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Diego A; Víllora, Gemma; Ruiz, Juan M; Romero, Luis

    2003-08-01

    Soils contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and other trace elements are now frequently used for vegetable growing. In this situation, heavy metals and trace elements from these polluted soils may accumulate in the agricultural plants being grown in them and thereby enter the human food chain. The objectives of this study are to elucidate the effects of growth conditions, manipulated by the crop covers, on the phytoaccumulation of elements, and to investigate the conceivable influences of these conditions on the plant biochemistry. In three consecutive years of field experiments, open air (T(0)), and floating rowcover treatments (T(1): perforated polyethylene 50 micrometers; T(2): polypropylene 17 gm(-2)) were used to produce different environmental conditions for the growth of Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa L. (Pekinensis group) cv. 'Nagaoka 50']. Five samplings (whole tops) were carried out from transplanting to harvest and measurements of B, Al, Ag, Si and Ca concentration as well as phenolics (orto-diphenols, total phenols and anthocyanins), pectic fractions, amino acids (histidine, phenylalanine and tyrosine) and polyphenol oxidase activity, were carried out in samples. The T(1) (perforated polyethylene sheet) gave greater B, Al, Ag and Si concentration and phytoextraction (in weight units) than the open-air control. These findings can help to develop new cost-effective techniques for phytoremediation as the application of plastic covers in the field. The build-up of heavy metals in those crops would make the product less suitable for human consumption. PMID:12781236

  10. Human conditions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a polypeptide hormone produced mainly by the liver in response to the endocrine GH stimulus, but it is also secreted by multiple tissues for autocrine/paracrine purposes. IGF-I is partly responsible for systemic GH activities although it possesses a wide number of own properties (anabolic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective actions). IGF-I is a closely regulated hormone. Consequently, its logical therapeutical applications seems to be limited to restore physiological circulating levels in order to recover the clinical consequences of IGF-I deficiency, conditions where, despite continuous discrepancies, IGF-I treatment has never been related to oncogenesis. Currently the best characterized conditions of IGF-I deficiency are Laron Syndrome, in children; liver cirrhosis, in adults; aging including age-related-cardiovascular and neurological diseases; and more recently, intrauterine growth restriction. The aim of this review is to summarize the increasing list of roles of IGF-I, both in physiological and pathological conditions, underlying that its potential therapeutical options seem to be limited to those proven states of local or systemic IGF-I deficiency as a replacement treatment, rather than increasing its level upper the normal range. PMID:23148873

  11. Growth conditions of 0-group plaice Pleuronectes platessa in the western Wadden Sea as revealed by otolith microstructure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Joana F. M. F.; Freitas, Vânia; de Paoli, Hélène; Witte, Johannes IJ.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2016-05-01

    Growth studies based on population-based growth estimates are limited by the fact that they do not take into account differences in age/size structure within the population. To overcome these problems, otolith microstructure analysis is often used to estimate individual growth. Here, we analyse growth of 0-group plaice in the western Wadden Sea in two years: a year preceded by a mild winter (1995) and a year preceded by a severe winter (1996). Growth was analysed by combining information on individual growth based on otolith analysis with predictions of maximum growth (= under optimal food conditions) based on a Dynamic Energy Budget model. Otolith analysis revealed that settlement occurred earlier in 1995 than in 1996. In both years, one main cohort was found, followed by a group of late settlers. No differences in mean length-at-age were found between these groups. DEB modelling suggested that growth was not maximal during the whole growing season: realized growth (the fraction of maximum growth realized by 0-group plaice) declined in the summer, although this decline was relatively small. In addition, late settling individuals exhibited lower realized growth than individuals from the main cohort. This study confirms that growth conditions for 0-group plaice are not optimal and that a growth reduction occurs in summer, as suggested in previous studies.

  12. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  13. OPTIMAL GROWTH CONDITIONS AND ANTIOXIDATIVE ACTIVITIES OF CYLINDROTHECA CLOSTERIUM (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE)(1).

    PubMed

    Affan, Abu; Heo, Soo-Jin; Jeon, You-Jin; Lee, Joon-Baek

    2009-12-01

    We isolated the unialgal strain of Cylindotheca closterium (Ehrenb.) Reimann et J. C. Lewin and produced an axenic strain using an antibiotic cocktail of enriched f/2 artificial seawater medium. The optimal growth conditions were estimated under 27 different combinations of temperature, salinity, and nutrients, and mass culture was performed based on the best specific growth conditions. Its antioxidant activities were determined from the extracts of methanol, water, and enzymes (proteases and carbohydrases). The maximum specific growth rate (μmax ) varied from 0.63 to 0.97 · d(-1) . The maximum cell density was 7.20 × 10(4) cells · mL(-1) , while the μmax was 0.82 · d(-1) in culture conditions of 20°C, 30 psu (practical salinity unit), and "F" nutrient concentrations on day 10 of the culture period. The scavenging rates for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical were 72.5% and 69.4% from Viscozyme and methanol extracts, respectively. The enzymatic extracts of C. closterium prepared by the hydrolyses of Amyloglucosidase (AMG) and Viscozyme showed 45.8% and 45.5% nitric-oxide-scavenging rates, slightly lower than the activity of alpha-tocopherol (α-tocopherol) but similar to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The extract from methanol and water showed 44.8% and 44.4% scavenging rates, statistically similar with BHT. The metal-chelating activities of the Kojizyme, Alcalase, methanol, Viscozyme, and Neutrase extracts were 67.1, 53.9, 53.2, 52.1, and 50.2 %, respectively, five to six times higher than the commercial antioxidants. The AMG, Viscozyme, and Neutrase extracts showed a remarkable linoleic acid peroxidation inhibition, which was higher than BHT and statistically similar with α-tocopherol. PMID:27032598

  14. Enhancement of Nitrate Uptake and Growth of Barley Seedlings by Calcium under Saline Conditions 1

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael R.; Aslam, Muhammad; Huffaker, Ray C.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of Ca2+ on NO3− assimilation in young barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) seedlings in the presence and absence of NaCl was studied. Calcium increased the activity of the NO3− transporter under saline conditions, but had little effect under nonsaline conditions. Calcium decreased the induction period for the NO3− transporter under both saline and nonsaline conditions but had little effect on its apparent Km for NO3− both in the presence and absence of NaCl. The enhancement of NO3− transport by Ca2+ under saline conditions was dependent on the presence of Ca2+ in the uptake solution along with the salt, since Ca2+ had no effect when supplied before or after salinity stress. Although Mn2+ and Mg2+ enhanced NO3− uptake under saline conditions, neither was as effective as Ca2+. In longer studies, increasing the Ca2+ concentration in saline nutrient solutions resulted in increases in NO3− assimilation and seedling growth. PMID:11539765

  15. Enhancement of nitrate uptake and growth of barley seedlings by calcium under saline conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Aslam, M.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of Ca2+ on NO3- assimilation in young barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) seedlings in the presence and absence of NaCl was studied. Calcium increased the activity of the NO3- transporter under saline conditions, but had little effect under nonsaline conditions. Calcium decreased the induction period for the NO3- transporter under both saline and nonsaline conditions but had little effect on its apparent Km for NO3- both in the presence and absence of NaCl. The enhancement of NO3- transport by Ca2+ under saline conditions was dependent on the presence of Ca2+ in the uptake solution along with the salt, since Ca2+ had no effect when supplied before or after salinity stress. Although Mn2+ and Mg2+ enhanced NO3- uptake under saline conditions, neither was as effective as Ca2+. In longer studies, increasing the Ca2+ concentration in saline nutrient solutions resulted in increases in NO3- assimilation and seedling growth.

  16. Influence of culture conditions on mycelial growth and bioluminescence of Gerronema viridilucens.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luiz F; Bastos, Erick L; Desjardin, Dennis E; Stevani, Cassius V

    2008-05-01

    Herein we describe a procedure for measuring the total light emission of the naturally bioluminescent tropical fungus Gerronema viridilucens and the optimization of culture conditions using multivariate factorial anova. Cultures growing on an agar surface in 35 mm Petri dishes at 90% humidity show optimal bioluminescence emission at 25 degrees C in the presence of 1.0% sugar cane molasses, 0.10% yeast extract and pH 6.0 (nonbuffered). Temperature and pH are the most important factors for both mycelial growth and bioluminescence. PMID:18355288

  17. Features of Scots pine radial growth in conditions of provenance trial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Sergey; Kuzmina, Nina

    2013-04-01

    Provenance trial of Scots pine in Boguchany forestry of Krasnoyarsk krai is conducted on two different soils - dark-grey loam forest soil and sod-podzol sandy soil. Complex of negative factors for plant growth and development appears in dry conditions of sandy soil. It could results in decrease of resistance to diseases. Sandy soils in different climatic zones have such common traits as low absorbing capacity, poorness of elemental nutrition, low microbiological activity and moisture capacity, very high water permeability. But Scots pine trees growing in such conditions could have certain advantages and perspectives of use. In the scope of climate change (global warming) the study of Scots pine growth on sandy soil become urgent because of more frequent appearance of dry seasons. Purpose of the work is revelation of radial growth features of Scots pine with different origin in dry conditions of sandy soil and assessment of external factors influence. The main feature of radial growth of majority of studied pine provenances in conditions of sandy soil is presence of significant variation of increment with distinct decline in 25-years old with loss of tree rings in a number of cases. The reason of it is complex of factors: deficit of June precipitation and next following outbreak of fungal disease. Found «frost rings» for all trees of studied clymatypes in 1992 are the consequence of temperature decline from May 21 to June 2 - from 23 down to 2 degree Celsius. Perspective climatypes with biggest radial increments and least sensitivity to fungal disease were revealed. Eniseysk and Vikhorevka (from Krasnoyarsk krai and Irkutsk oblast)provenances of pine have the biggest radial increments, the least sensitivity to Cenangium dieback and smallest increments decline. These climatypes are in the group of perspective provenances and in present time they are recommended for wide trial in the region for future use in plantation forest growing. Kandalaksha (Murmansk oblast

  18. In-Situ Monitoring of Particle Growth at PEMFC Cathode under Accelerated Cycling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, Erin L.; Setzler, Brian P.; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Fuller, Thomas F.

    2012-10-25

    An in-situ method to measure changes in catalyst particle size at the cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is demonstrated. Synchrotron X-rays, 58 keV, were used to measure the pair distribution function on an operating fuel cell and observe the growth of catalyst particles under accelerated degradation conditions. The stability of Pt/C and PtCo/C with different initial particle sizes was monitored over 3000 potential cycles. The increase in particle size was fit to a linear trend as a function of cycles. The most stable electrocatalyst was found to be the alloyed PtCo with the larger initial particle size.

  19. Petunia × hybrida floral scent production is negatively affected by high-temperature growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Cna'ani, Alon; Mühlemann, Joelle K; Ravid, Jasmin; Masci, Tania; Klempien, Antje; Nguyen, Thuong T H; Dudareva, Natalia; Pichersky, Eran; Vainstein, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Increasing temperatures due to changing global climate are interfering with plant-pollinator mutualism, an interaction facilitated mainly by floral colour and scent. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analyses revealed that increasing ambient temperature leads to a decrease in phenylpropanoid-based floral scent production in two Petunia × hybrida varieties, P720 and Blue Spark, acclimated at 22/16 or 28/22 °C (day/night). This decrease could be attributed to down-regulation of scent-related structural gene expression from both phenylpropanoid and shikimate pathways, and up-regulation of a negative regulator of scent production, emission of benzenoids V (EOBV). To test whether the negative effect of increased temperature on scent production can be reduced in flowers with enhanced metabolic flow in the phenylpropanoid pathway, we analysed floral volatile production by transgenic 'Blue Spark' plants overexpressing CaMV 35S-driven Arabidopsis thaliana production of anthocyanin pigments 1 (PAP1) under elevated versus standard temperature conditions. Flowers of 35S:PAP1 transgenic plants produced the same or even higher levels of volatiles when exposed to a long-term high-temperature regime. This phenotype was also evident when analysing relevant gene expression as inferred from sequencing the transcriptome of 35S:PAP1 transgenic flowers under the two temperature regimes. Thus, up-regulation of transcription might negate the adverse effects of temperature on scent production. PMID:25402319

  20. Exposure to coal combustion residues during metamorphosis elevates corticosterone content and adversely affects oral morphology, growth, and development in Rana sphenocephala

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.D.; Peterson, V.A.; Mendonca, M.T.

    2009-01-15

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are documented to negatively impact oral morphology, growth, and development in larval amphibians. It is currently unclear what physiological mechanisms may mediate these effects. Corticosterone, a glucocorticoid hormone, is a likely mediator because when administered exogenously it, like CCRs, also negatively influences oral morphology, growth, and development in larval amphibians. In an attempt to identify if corticosterone mediates these effects, we raised larval Southern Leopard Frogs, Rana sphenocephala, on either sand or CCR substrate and documented effects of sediment type on whole body corticosterone, oral morphology, and time to and mass at key metamorphic stages. Coal combustion residue treated tadpoles contained significantly more corticosterone than controls throughout metamorphosis. However, significantly more oral abnormalities occurred early in metamorphosis when differences in corticosterone levels between treatments were minimal. Overall, CCR-treated tadpoles took significantly more time to transition between key stages and gained less mass between stages than controls, but these differences between treatments decreased during later stages when corticosterone differences between treatments were greatest. Our results suggest endogenous increase in corticosterone content and its influence on oral morphology, growth and development is more complex than previously thought.

  1. Volatile organic compounds associated with microbial growth in automobile air conditioning systems.

    PubMed

    Rose, L J; Simmons, R B; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    2000-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds from Penicillium viridicatum and Methylobacterium mesophilicum growing on laboratory media and on component materials of automobile air conditioners were analyzed with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. P. viridicatum produced compounds such as 4-methyl thiazole, terpenes and alcohols, whereas M. mesophilicum produced dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, and chlorophenol with growth on laboratory media. In comparison with laboratory media, fewer volatiles were detected from colonized foam insulation materials. Biofilms of M. mesophilicum on aluminum evaporator components produced mainly dimethyl disulfide. These biofilms, after inoculation with P. viridicatum, produced offensive smelling alcohols and esters such as 2-methyl propanol, 3-penten-2-ol, and the ethyl ester of butanoic acid. The moisture and substrates innate to the automobile air conditioning systems provided an environment suitable for microbial biofilm development and odor production. Reduction of retained moisture in the air conditioning system coupled with use of less susceptible or antimicrobial substrates are advised for remediation of the noxious odors. PMID:10915209

  2. Pre-Emergency-Department Care-Seeking Patterns Are Associated with the Severity of Presenting Condition for Emergency Department Visit and Subsequent Adverse Events: A Timeframe Episode Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nan-Ping; Lai, K. Robert; Huang, Hsin-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients treated in Emergency Department (ED) visits can be treated at primary or urgent care sectors, despite the fact that a number of ED visitors seek other forms of care prior to an ED visit. However, little is known regarding how the pre-ED activity episodes affect ED visits. Objectives We investigated whether care-seeking patterns involve the use of health care services of various types prior to ED visits and examined the associations of these patterns with the severity of the presenting condition for the ED visit (EDVS) and subsequent events. Methods This retrospective observational study used administrative data on beneficiaries of the universal health care insurance program in Taiwan. The service type, treatment capacity, and relative diagnosis were used to classify pre-ED visits into 8 care types. Frequent pattern analysis was used to identify sequential care-seeking patterns and to classify 667,183 eligible pre-ED episodes into patterns. Generalized linear models were developed using generalized estimating equations to examine the associations of these patterns with EDVS and subsequent events. Results The results revealed 17 care-seeking patterns. The EDVS and likelihood of subsequent events significantly differed among patterns. The ED severity index of patterns differ from patterns seeking directly ED care (coefficients ranged from -0.05 to 0.13), and the odds-ratios for the likelihood of subsequent ED visits and hospitalization ranged from 1.18 to 1.86 and 1.16 to 2.84, respectively. Conclusions The pre-ED care-seeking patterns differ in severity of presenting condition and subsequent events that may represent different causes of ED visit. Future health policy maker may adopt different intervention strategies for targeted population to reduce unnecessary ED visit effectively. PMID:26030278

  3. Variation of the folding and dynamics of the Escherichia coli chromosome with growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Nastaran Hadizadeh; Guet, Calin C.; Johnson, Reid C.; Marko, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We examine whether the E. coli chromosome is folded into a self-adherent nucleoprotein complex, or alternately is a confined but otherwise unconstrained self-avoiding polymer. We address this through in vivo visualization, using an inducible GFP fusion to the nucleoid-associated protein Fis to non-specifically decorate the entire chromosome. For a range of different growth conditions, the chromosome is a compact structure that does not fill the volume of the cell, and which moves from the new pole to the cell center. During rapid growth, chromosome segregation occurs well before cell division, with daughter chromosomes coupled by a thin inter-daughter filament before complete segregation, whereas during slow growth chromosomes stay adjacent until cell division occurs. Image correlation analysis indicates that sub-nucleoid structure is stable on a one-minute timescale, comparable to the time scale for redistribution time measured for GFP-Fis after photobleaching. Optical deconvolution and writhe calculation analysis indicate that the nucleoid has a large-scale coiled organization rather than being an amorphous mass. Our observations are consistent with the chromosome having a self-adherent filament organization. PMID:23078205

  4. Refining the alkenone-pCO2 method: The role of algal growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Zhang, Y.; Huybers, P. J.; Pagani, M.

    2015-12-01

    The alkenone-pCO2 method based on carbon isotope fractionation during growth of haptophyte algae is one of the most widely used approaches to reconstruct atmospheric CO2 level in the Cenozoic. Based on the fractionation of stable carbon isotopes between dissolved CO2 and phytoplankton biomass, as represented by alkenone lipid biomarkers, this relationship (known as ɛp37:2) scales inversely with growth rate and cell volume to surface area ratio, and positively with CO2. Recently-published estimates for late Pleistocene CO2 levels, however, are poorly correlated with ice core CO2 records, suggesting that alkenone paleobarometry needs to be refined. Here we compiled published records over recent glacial-interglcial (G-IG) cycles and revised the relationship between algal growth rate, as expressed by the physiological parameter 'b', and dissolved phosphate concentration. We further show that the magnitude of change in ɛp37:2 over glacial-interglacial cycles at different sites is dependent on local nutrient conditions, highlighting the importance of constraining b for accurate CO2 estimates. The correlation between GDGT-2/3 ratio and back-calculated b at Ceara Rise (ODP Site 925) suggests that archaeal lipids could be used as proxies to calibrate b. Application of our variable-b method to reported data yields pCO2 estimates that are similar in both trends and magnitude to ice core-derived records.

  5. Effect of cloud microphysics on particle growth under mixed phase conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfitzenmaier, Lukas; Dufournet, Yann; Unal, Christine; Russchenberg, Herman; Myagkov, Alexander; Seifert, Patric

    2015-04-01

    Mixed phase clouds contain both ice particles and super-cooled cloud water droplets in the same volume of air. Currently, one of the main challenges is to observe and understand how ice particles grow by interacting with liquid water within the mixed-phase clouds. In the mid latitudes this process is one of the most efficient processes for precipitation formation. It is particularly important to understand under which conditions growth processes are most efficient within such clouds. The observation of microphysical cloud properties from the ground is one possible approach to study the liquid-ice interaction that play a role on the ice crystal growth processes. The study presented here is based on a ground-based multi-sensor technique. Dataset of this study was taken during the ACCEPT campaign (Analysis of the Composition of mixed-phase Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques) at Cabauw The Netherlands, autumn 2014. Measurements with the Transportable Atmospheric RAdar (TARA), S-band precipitation radar profiler, from the Delft Technical University, and Ka-band cloud radar systems were performed in cooperation with the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS), Leipzig, Germany. All the radar systems had full Doppler capabilities. In addition , TARA and one of the Ka-band radar systems had full polarimetric capabilities as well, in order to get information of the ice phase within mixed-phase cloud systems. Lidar, microwave radiometer and radiosonde measurements were combined to describe the liquid phase within such clouds. So a whole characterisation of microphysical processes within mixed-phase cloud systems could be done. This study shows how such a combination of instruments is used to: - Detect the liquid layer within the ice clouds - Describe the microphysical conditions for ice particle growth within mixed phase clouds based on cloud hydrometeor shape, size, number concentration obtained from measurements The project aims to observe

  6. The kinetics of dolomite reaction rim growth under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. G.; Abart, R.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    During burial and exhumation, rocks are simultaneously exposed to metamorphic reactions and tectonic stresses. Therefore, the reaction rate of newly formed minerals may depend on chemical and mechanical driving forces. Here, we investigate the reaction kinetics of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) rim growth by solid-state reactions experiments on oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions. Cylindrical samples of 3-5 mm length and 7 mm diameter were drilled and polished perpendicular to the rhombohedral cleavage planes of natural clear crystals. The tests were performed using a Paterson-type deformation apparatus at P = 400 MPa confining pressure, temperatures, T, between 750 and 850°C, and reaction durations, t, of 2 - 146 h to calculate the kinetic parameters of dolomite rim growth under isostatic stress conditions. For non-isostatic reaction experiments we applied in addition differential stresses, σ, up to 40 MPa perpendicular to the contact interface at T = 750°C for 4 - 171 h duration, initiating minor inelastic deformation of calcite. The thickness of the resulting dolomite reaction rims increases linearly with the square root of time, indicating a diffusion-controlled reaction. The rims consist of two different textural domains. Granular dolomite grains (≈ 2 -5 μm grain size) form next to calcite and elongated palisade-shaped grains (1-6 μm diameter) grow perpendicular to the magnesite interface. Texture measurements with the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicate that the orientations of dolomite grains are mainly influenced by the orientation of the calcite educt crystal, in particular in the granular rim. To some extent, the texture of dolomite palisades is also influenced by the orientation of magnesite. The thickness of the two individual layers increases with temperature. At 400 MPa isostatic pressure, T = 750°C and t = 29 hours, a 5 μm thick granular dolomite layer

  7. Proposal of a Simple Plant Growth System under Microgravity Conditions in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takehiro; Tsukamoto, Koya; Yamashita, Youichirou

    2012-07-01

    Plant culture in space has multiple functions for human life support such as providing food and purifying air and water. It is also suggested that crew can relieve their stress by watching growing plants and by enjoying fresh vegetable food during staying for several months in the International Space Station. Under such circumstances, it is an utmost importance to develop plant culture equipment that can be handled more easily by crew. This study aims to develop an easy-to-use plant growth system with modification of commercial household plant culture equipment. The item is equipped with a peltier device for cooling air and collecting water vapor in the growth room. The study was conducted to examine the performance of the equipment under microgravity conditions that were created by the parabolic airplane flights. As a result, the temperature of the peltier device was affected under the microgravity conditions due to the absence of heat convection. When an air flow was made with an air circulation fan, the temperature of the peltier device was stable to gravity changes. The water recycling method for an automatic nutrient solution supply system in the closed plant culture equipment under microgravity is proposed. In addition, a high output white LEDs showing a good performance for growing leafy vegetables will be introduced.

  8. Plasticity of Streptomyces coelicolor Membrane Composition Under Different Growth Conditions and During Development

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Nguyen, Don D.; Kapono, Clifford A.; Herron, Paul; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Sohlenkamp, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is a model actinomycete that is well known for the diversity of its secondary metabolism and its complex life cycle. As a soil inhabitant, it is exposed to heterogeneous and frequently changing environmental circumstances. In the present work, we studied the effect of diverse growth conditions and phosphate depletion on its lipid profile and the relationship between membrane lipid composition and development in S. coelicolor. The lipid profile from cultures grown on solid media, which is closer to the natural habitat of this microorganism, does not resemble the previously reported lipid composition from liquid grown cultures of S. coelicolor. Wide variations were also observed across different media, growth phases, and developmental stages indicating active membrane remodeling. Ornithine lipids (OL) are phosphorus-free polar lipids that were accumulated mainly during sporulation stages, but were also major components of the membrane under phosphorus limitation. In contrast, phosphatidylethanolamine, which had been reported as one of the major polar lipids in the genus Streptomyces, is almost absent under these conditions. We identified one of the genes responsible for the synthesis of OL (SCO0921) and found that its inactivation causes the absence of OL, precocious morphological development and actinorhodin production. Our observations indicate a remarkable plasticity of the membrane composition in this bacterial species, reveal a higher metabolic complexity than expected, and suggest a relationship between cytoplasmic membrane components and the differentiation programs in S. coelicolor. PMID:26733994

  9. Evaluation of experiments involving the study of plant orientation and growth under different gravitational conditions.

    PubMed

    Merkys, A J; Laurinavicius, R S; Svegzdiene, D V; Rakleviciene, D P; Jarosius, A V; Rupainiene, O J

    1989-01-01

    The manifestation of gravitropic reaction in plants has been considered from the phylogenetic point of view. A chart has been suggested according to which it is supposed that the first indications of the ability to identify the direction of the gravitational vector were inherent in the most ancient eukaryotes, which gave rise to green, brown, yellow-green, golden and diatomaceous algae as well as fungi. The experiments on the role of gravity in plant ontogenesis are being continued. The sum total of the data obtained in a number of experiments in space shows that under these conditions a structurally modified but normally functioning gravireceptive apparatus is formed. The data confirming the modification, under changed gravity, of the processes of integral and cellullar growth of the axial organs of seedlings as well as of the anatomo-morphological structure and developmental rates of plants during their prolonged growth in space are presented. It is assumed that this fact testifies to the presence of systems interacting with gravity during plant ontogenesis. At the same time the necessity for further experiments in order to differentiate an immediate biological effect of gravity from the ones conditioned by it indirectly due to the changes in the behavior of liquids and gases is pointed out. The methodological aspects of biological experiments in space as the main source of reliable information on the biological role of gravity are discussed. PMID:11537336

  10. Growth condition study of algae function in ecosystem for CO2 bio-fixation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David Dah-Wei; Ramaraj, Rameshprabu; Chen, Paris Honglay

    2012-02-01

    Algae niche play a crucial role on carbon cycle and have great potential for CO(2) sequestration. This study was to investigate the CO(2) bio-fixation by the high rate pond (HRP) to mimic the algae function of nature. All the reactors can keep CO(2) consumption efficiencies over 100%. The statistical analyses proved HRPs were close to the natural system from all the growth conditions. The HRP could show the "natural optimization as nature" to perform as well as the artificial reactor of continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). In the nutrition study, the carbon mass balance indicated CO(2) was the main carbon source. Accordingly, the HRPs can keep a neutral pH range to provide dissolved oxygen (DO), to promote total nitrogen (TN)/total phosphorous (TP) removal efficiencies and to demonstrate self-purification process. Furthermore, the observations of different nitrogen species in the reactors demonstrated that the major nitrogen source was decided by pH. This finding logically explained the complex nitrogen uptake by algae in nature. Consequently, this study took advantage of HRP to explore the processes of efficient CO(2) uptake with the corresponding growth condition in the ecosystem. Those results contributed the further understanding of the role of CO(2) bio-fixation in nature and demonstrated HRP could be a potential ecological engineering alternative. PMID:22196805

  11. Influence of Growth Conditions on Magnetite Nanoparticles Electro-Crystallized in the Presence of Organic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Mosivand, Saba; Monzon, Lorena M. A.; Kazeminezhad, Iraj; Coey, J. Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by electrocrystallization in the presence of thiourea or sodium butanoate as an organic stabilizer. The synthesis was performed in a thermostatic electrochemical cell containing two iron electrodes with an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate as electrolyte. The effects of organic concentration, applied potential and growth temperature on particle size, morphology, structure and magnetic properties were investigated. The magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, magnetometry and Mössbauer spectrometry. When the synthesis is performed in the presence of sodium butanoate at 60 °C, a paramagnetic ferric salt is obtained as a second phase; it is possible to avoid formation of this phase, increase the specific magnetization and improve the structure of the oxide particles by tuning the growth conditions. Room-temperature magnetization values range from 45 to 90 Am2kg−1, depending on the particle size, type of surfactant and synthesis conditions. Mössbauer spectra, which were recorded at 290 K for all the samples, are typical of nonstoichiometric Fe3−δO4, with a small excess of Fe3+, 0.05 ≤ δ ≤ 0.15. PMID:23685871

  12. Growth, chlorophyll fluorescence and mineral nutrition in the halophyte Tamarix gallica cultivated in combined stress conditions: Arsenic and NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sghaier, Dhouha Belhaj; Duarte, Bernardo; Bankaji, Insaf; Caçador, Isabel; Sleimi, Noomene

    2015-08-01

    Trace metal elements can cause various environmental and health issues due to their accumulation and integration in the food chain. In the present study, we determined the major toxic effects of arsenic on physiological behaviour of plants. For this propose, several combinations of high salinity and arsenic (As) concentrations were applied to the halophytic shrub, Tamarix gallica, by growing for three months with an irrigation solution supplemented with different concentrations of As (0, 200, 500 and 800M) with and without 200mM NaCl. The effect of the combined stress conditions on growth, physiological patterns and biochemical parameters were also assessed. The results demonstrated that T. gallica is a tolerant plant regarding arsenic. The photosynthesis apparatus Fo, Fm and Fv fluorescence, as well as Fv/Fm were not affected by As nor by As combined with salt. Likewise, pigment and nutrient (K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) contents were not affected either. However, the study results revealed that As adversely and significantly influenced the growth with increasing the concentration of As. Despite shoots growth reduction, the present research demonstrates that T. gallica is able to cope with high external concentrations of As (under 500μM) alone or in combination with NaCl. PMID:26093232

  13. A novel nucleoid protein of Escherichia coli induced under anaerobiotic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Jun; Yoshimura, Shige H; Takeyasu, Kunio; Ishihama, Akira

    2010-06-01

    A systematic search was performed for DNA-binding sequences of YgiP, an uncharacterized transcription factor of Escherichia coli, by using the Genomic SELEX. A total of 688 YgiP-binding loci were identified after genome-wide profiling of SELEX fragments with a high-density microarray (SELEX-chip). Gel shift and DNase-I footprinting assays indicated that YgiP binds to multiple sites along DNA probes with a consensus GTTNATT sequence. Atomic force microscope observation indicated that at low concentrations, YgiP associates at various sites on DNA probes, but at high concentrations, YgiP covers the entire DNA surface supposedly through protein-protein contact. The intracellular concentration of YgiP is very low in growing E. coli cells under aerobic conditions, but increases more than 100-fold to the level as high as the major nucleoid proteins under anaerobic conditions. An E. coli mutant lacking ygiP showed retarded growth under anaerobic conditions. High abundance and large number of binding sites together indicate that YgiP is a nucleoid-associated protein with both architectural and regulatory roles as the nucleoid proteins Fis and IHF. We then propose that YgiP is a novel nucleoid protein of E. coli under anaerobiosis and propose to rename it Dan (DNA-binding protein under anaerobic conditions). PMID:20156994

  14. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J.; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of 100 nm polystyrene particles (one uncoated and one with an amine functionalized surface) were used to measure the influence of surface type. In identically prepared conditioned medium, agglomeration was visible in all samples after 1 h, but was variable, indicating inter-sample variability in secretion rates and extracellular medium conditions. In samples conditioned for 1 h or more, ENP agglomeration rates varied significantly. Agglomerate size measured by DLS was well correlated with surface sequestered peptide number for uncoated but not for amine coated polystyrene ENPs. Amine-coated ENPs grew much faster and into larger agglomerates associated with fewer sequestered peptides, but including significant sequestered lactose dehydrogenase. We conclude that interference with extracellular peptide balance and oxidoreductase activity via sequestration is worthy of further study, as increased oxidative stress via this new mechanism may be important for cell toxicity. PMID:25533102

  15. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-02-01

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of 100 nm polystyrene particles (one uncoated and one with an amine functionalized surface) were used to measure the influence of surface type. In identically prepared conditioned medium, agglomeration was visible in all samples after 1 h, but was variable, indicating inter-sample variability in secretion rates and extracellular medium conditions. In samples conditioned for 1 h or more, ENP agglomeration rates varied significantly. Agglomerate size measured by DLS was well correlated with surface sequestered peptide number for uncoated but not for amine coated polystyrene ENPs. Amine-coated ENPs grew much faster and into larger agglomerates associated with fewer sequestered peptides, but including significant sequestered lactose dehydrogenase. We conclude that interference with extracellular peptide balance and oxidoreductase activity via sequestration is worthy of further study, as increased oxidative stress via this new mechanism may be important for cell toxicity. PMID:25533102

  16. Is ragweed pollen allergenicity governed by environmental conditions during plant growth and flowering?

    PubMed Central

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Ciappetta, Silvia; Gentili, Rodolfo; Asero, Riccardo; Citterio, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Pollen allergenicity is one of the main factors influencing the prevalence and/or severity of allergic diseases. However, how genotype and environment contribute to ragweed pollen allergenicity has still to be established. To throw some light on the factors governing allergenicity, in this work 180 ragweed plants from three Regions (Canada, France, Italy) were grown in both controlled (constant) and standard environmental conditions (seasonal changes in temperature, relative humidity and light). Pollen from single plants was characterized for its allergenic potency and for the underlying regulation mechanisms by studying the qualitative and quantitative variations of the main isoforms of the major ragweed allergen Amb a 1. Results showed a statistically higher variability in allergenicity of pollen from standard conditions than from controlled conditions growing plants. This variability was due to differences among single plants, regardless of their origin, and was not ascribed to differences in the expression and IgE reactivity of individual Amb a 1 isoforms but rather to quantitative differences involving all the studied isoforms. It suggests that the allergenic potency of ragweed pollen and thus the severity of ragweed pollinosis mainly depends on environmental conditions during plant growth and flowering, which regulate the total Amb a 1 content. PMID:27457754

  17. QTLs and candidate genes for rice root growth under flooding and upland conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing-Song; Yang, Ling; Mao, Chuan-Zao; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Wu, Ping

    2006-02-01

    To investigate the genetic factors underlying constitutive and adaptive root growth under different water-supply conditions, a double haploid (DH) population, derived from a cross between lowland rice variety IR64 and upland rice variety Azucena, with 284 molecular markers was used in cylindrical pot experiments. Several QTLs for seminal root length (SRL), adventitious root number (ARN) and total root dry weight (RW) respectively, under both flooding and upland conditions were detected. Two identical QTLs for SRL and RW were found under flooding and upland conditions. The relative parameters defined as the ratio of parameters under the two water-supply conditions were also used for QTL analysis. A comparative analysis among different genetic populations was performed for the QTLs for root traits and several consistent QTLs for root traits across genetic backgrounds were detected. Candidate genes for cell expansion and elongation were used for comparative mapping with the detected QTLs. Four cell wall-related expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for OsEXP2, OsEXP4, EXT and Xet were mapped on the intervals carrying the QTLs for root traits. PMID:16529298

  18. Is ragweed pollen allergenicity governed by environmental conditions during plant growth and flowering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Ciappetta, Silvia; Gentili, Rodolfo; Asero, Riccardo; Citterio, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    Pollen allergenicity is one of the main factors influencing the prevalence and/or severity of allergic diseases. However, how genotype and environment contribute to ragweed pollen allergenicity has still to be established. To throw some light on the factors governing allergenicity, in this work 180 ragweed plants from three Regions (Canada, France, Italy) were grown in both controlled (constant) and standard environmental conditions (seasonal changes in temperature, relative humidity and light). Pollen from single plants was characterized for its allergenic potency and for the underlying regulation mechanisms by studying the qualitative and quantitative variations of the main isoforms of the major ragweed allergen Amb a 1. Results showed a statistically higher variability in allergenicity of pollen from standard conditions than from controlled conditions growing plants. This variability was due to differences among single plants, regardless of their origin, and was not ascribed to differences in the expression and IgE reactivity of individual Amb a 1 isoforms but rather to quantitative differences involving all the studied isoforms. It suggests that the allergenic potency of ragweed pollen and thus the severity of ragweed pollinosis mainly depends on environmental conditions during plant growth and flowering, which regulate the total Amb a 1 content.

  19. Effects of climatic conditions and soil properties on Cabernet Sauvignon berry growth and anthocyanin profiles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo; He, Yan-Nan; Yue, Tai-Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Climatic conditions and soil type have significant influence on grape ripening and wine quality. The reported study was conducted in two "Cabernet Sauvignon (Vitis vinifera L.V)" vineyards located in Xinjiang, a semiarid wine-producing region of China during two vintages (2011 and 2012). The results indicate that soil and climate affected berry growth and anthocyanin profiles. These two localities were within a distance of 5 km from each other and had soils of different physical and chemical composition. For each vineyard, the differences of anthocyanin concentrations, and parameters concerning berry growth and composition between the two years could be explained by different climatic conditions. Soil effect was studied by investigation of differences in berry composition and anthocyanin profiles between the two vineyards in the same year, which could be explained mainly by the different soil properties, vine water and nitrogen status. Specifically, the soils with less water and organic matter produced looser clusters, heavier berry skins and higher TSS, which contributed to the excellent performance of grapes. Compared with 2011, the increases in anthocyanin concentrations for each vineyard in 2012 could be attributed to smaller number of extreme temperature (>35 °C) days and rainfall, lower vine water status and N level. The explanation for higher anthocyanin concentrations in grape skins from the soils with less water and organic matter could be the vine status differences, lighter berry weight and heavier skin weight at harvest. In particular, grapes from the soils with less water and organic matter had higher levels of 3'5'-substituded, O-methylated and acylated anthocyanins, which represented a positive characteristic conferring more stable pigmentation to the corresponding wine in the future. The present work clarifies the effects of climate and soil on berry growth and anthocyanin profiles, thus providing guidance for production of high-quality wine grapes

  20. Growth of praseodymium oxide on Si(111) under oxygen-deficient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, A.; Zielasek, V.; Baeumer, M.; Schmidt, Th.; Schowalter, M.; Schulz, Ch.; Rosenauer, A.; Falta, J.; Sandell, A.; Seifarth, O.; Schroeder, T.; Wollschlaeger, J.

    2009-07-15

    Surface science studies of thin praseodymium oxide films grown on silicon substrates are of high interest in view of applications in such different fields as microelectronics and heterogeneous catalysis. In particular, a detailed characterization of the growth and the final structure of the films are mandatory to achieve a fundamental understanding of such topics as oxygen mobility and defect structure, and their role for the electronic and chemical properties. In this paper, the MBE growth of praseodymium oxide films on Si(111) substrates was investigated at low-deposition rates (0.06 nm/min) and low-oxygen partial pressures (p(O{sub 2})<1x10{sup -10} mbar). To obtain insight into the structure and chemical composition of the growing film, spot profile analyzing low-energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED), transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron radiation-based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were applied. SPA-LEED reveals the formation of an initial closed layer followed by continuous roughening and formation of ordered three-dimensional structures. This result is in contrast to observations at higher-deposition rates, were a layer-by-layer growth was reported. XAS and XPS provide evidence that a continuous reaction takes place in the growing Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} film leading to the formation of silicate and silicide structures within the film. Combining all data, a consistent picture of the deposition of praseodymium oxide on Si(111) emerges which clearly shows that in contrast to higher-throughput molecular beam epitaxy conditions the reactivity of the growing film strongly influences the growth behavior at low-deposition rates and low pressures.

  1. Growth response of Casuarina equisetifolia Forst. rooted stem cuttings to Frankia in nursery and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, A; Chandrasekaran, K; Geetha, M; Kalaiselvi, R

    2013-11-01

    Casuarina equisetifolia Forst. is a tree crop that provides fuel wood, land reclamation, dune stabilization, and scaffolding for construction, shelter belts, and pulp and paper production. C. equisetifolia fixes atmospheric nitrogen through a symbiotic relationship with Frankia, a soil bacterium of the actinobacteria group. The roots of C. equisetifolia produce root nodules where the bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen, which is an essential nutrient for all plant metabolic activities. However, rooted stem cuttings of elite clones of C. equisetifolia by vegetative propagation is being planted by the farmers of Pondicherry as costeffective method. As the vegetative propagation method uses inert material (vermiculite) for rooting there is no chance for Frankia association. Therefore after planting of these stocks the farmers are applying 150 kg of di-ammonium phosphate (DAP)/acre/year. To overcome this fertilizer usage, the Frankia-inoculated rooted stem cuttings were propagated under nursery conditions and transplanted in the nutrient-deficient soils of Karaikal, Pondicherry (India), in this study. Under nursery experiments the growth and biomass of C. equisetifolia rooted stem cuttings inoculated with Frankia showed 3 times higher growth and biomass than uninoculated control. These stocks were transplanted and monitored for their growth and survival for 1 year in the nutrient-deficient farm land. The results showed that the rooted stem cuttings of C. equisetifolia significantly improved growth in height (8.8 m), stem girth (9.6 cm) and tissue nitrogen content (3.3 mg g-1) than uninoculated controls. The soil nutrient status was also improved due to inoculation of Frankia. PMID:24287654

  2. A comparison of hydrogen photoproduction by sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey; Patrusheva, Elena; Ghirardi, Maria L; Seibert, Michael; Tsygankov, Anatoly

    2007-03-10

    Continuous photoproduction of H(2) by the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is observed after incubating the cultures for about a day in the absence of sulfate and in the presence of acetate. Sulfur deprivation causes the partial and reversible inactivation of photosynthetic O(2) evolution in algae, resulting in the light-induced establishment of anaerobic conditions in sealed photobioreactors, expression of two [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the cells, and H(2) photoproduction for several days. We have previously demonstrated that sulfur-deprived algal cultures can produce H(2) gas in the absence of acetate, when appropriate experimental protocols were used (Tsygankov, A.A., Kosourov, S.N., Tolstygina, I.V., Ghirardi, M.L., Seibert, M., 2006. Hydrogen production by sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under photoautotrophic conditions. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 31, 1574-1584). We now report the use of an automated photobioreactor system to compare the effects of photoautotrophic, photoheterotrophic and photomixotrophic growth conditions on the kinetic parameters associated with the adaptation of the algal cells to sulfur deprivation and H(2) photoproduction. This was done under the experimental conditions outlined in the above reference, including controlled pH. From this comparison we show that both acetate and CO(2) are required for the most rapid inactivation of photosystem II and the highest yield of H(2) gas production. Although, the presence of acetate in the system is not critical for the process, H(2) photoproduction under photoautotrophic conditions can be increased by optimizing the conditions for high starch accumulation. These results suggest ways of engineering algae to improve H(2) production, which in turn may have a positive impact on the economics of applied systems for H(2) production. PMID:17275940

  3. Effects of Simulated Mars Conditions on the Survival and Growth of Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens▿

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Bonnie J.; Jenkins, David G.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens, two bacterial spacecraft contaminants known to replicate under low atmospheric pressures of 2.5 kPa, were tested for growth and survival under simulated Mars conditions. Environmental stresses of high salinity, low temperature, and low pressure were screened alone and in combination for effects on bacterial survival and replication, and then cells were tested in Mars analog soils under simulated Mars conditions. Survival and replication of E. coli and S. liquefaciens cells in liquid medium were evaluated for 7 days under low temperatures (5, 10, 20, or 30°C) with increasing concentrations (0, 5, 10, or 20%) of three salts (MgCl2, MgSO4, NaCl) reported to be present on the surface of Mars. Moderate to high growth rates were observed for E. coli and S. liquefaciens at 30 or 20°C and in solutions with 0 or 5% salts. In contrast, cell densities of both species generally did not increase above initial inoculum levels under the highest salt concentrations (10 and 20%) and the four temperatures tested, with the exception that moderately higher cell densities were observed for both species at 10% MgSO4 maintained at 20 or 30°C. Growth rates of E. coli and S. liquefaciens in low salt concentrations were robust under all pressures (2.5, 10, or 101.3 kPa), exhibiting a general increase of up to 2.5 orders of magnitude above the initial inoculum levels of the assays. Vegetative E. coli cells were maintained in a Mars analog soil for 7 days under simulated Mars conditions that included temperatures between 20 and −50°C for a day/night diurnal period, UVC irradiation (200 to 280 nm) at 3.6 W m−2 for daytime operations (8 h), pressures held at a constant 0.71 kPa, and a gas composition that included the top five gases found in the martian atmosphere. Cell densities of E. coli failed to increase under simulated Mars conditions, and survival was reduced 1 to 2 orders of magnitude by the interactive effects of desiccation, UV

  4. Adverse Socioeconomic Conditions and Oocyst-Related Factors Are Associated with Congenital Toxoplasmosis in a Population-Based Study in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Carellos, Ericka Viana Machado; de Andrade, Gláucia Manzan Queiroz; Vasconcelos-Santos, Daniel Vitor; Januário, José Nélio; Romanelli, Roberta Maia Castro; Abreu, Mery Natali Silva; da Silva, Fabiana Maria; Loures, Ivy Rosa Coelho; de Andrade, Juliana Queiroz; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Objective Congenital toxoplasmosis is a public health problem in Brazil. This study aimed to determine risk factors associated with congenital toxoplasmosis in Minas Gerais which is the second largest Brazilian State based on number of inhabitants, and its territorial extension is larger than that of France. Methods: Population-based case-control study to assess the association between congenital toxoplasmosis and maternal exposure to infection risk factors. The study included mothers/children participating in the Minas Gerais Newborn Screening Program. The cases consisted of 175 mothers of infected children, and the controls consisted of 278 mothers of children without suspected infection. The associations were assessed through binomial logistic regression with p≤0.05. Results The variables associated with lower probability of toxoplasmosis were: older mother age (OR = 0.89; CI95% = 0.85–0.93), higher level of education (OR = 0.85; CI95% = 0.78–0.92), access to potable water (OR = 0.21; CI95% = 0.08–0.51), and home with flush toilet (OR = 0.18; CI95% = 0.04–078). The variables associated with higher probability of infection were: cats in the neighborhood (OR = 2.27; CI95% = 1.27–4.06), owning or visiting homes with domestic cats (OR = 1.90; CI95% = 1.09–3.31), handling the soil (OR = 2.29; CI95% = 1.32–3.96), and eating fresh meat not previously frozen (OR = 3.97; CI95% = 2.17–7.25). After stratification according region of residence (rural or urban/peri-urban), home with flush toilet and consumption of treated water were protective against the disease only in the rural stratum. Conclusions In Minas Gerais, congenital toxoplasmosis has been associated with poor socioeconomic conditions. Considering maternal exposure to sources of Toxoplasma gondii, the predominating risk factors were those related to the ingestion of oocysts. It is expected that these results will contribute to

  5. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1992-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted comulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  6. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted cumulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  7. MYB10 and MYB72 are required for growth under iron-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine M; Hindt, Maria N; Schmidt, Holger; Clemens, Stephan; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2013-11-01

    Iron is essential for photosynthesis and is often a limiting nutrient for plant productivity. Plants respond to conditions of iron deficiency by increasing transcript abundance of key genes involved in iron homeostasis, but only a few regulators of these genes have been identified. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we searched for transcription factors that are induced within 24 hours after transferring plants to iron-deficient growth conditions. Out of nearly 100 transcription factors shown to be up-regulated, we identified MYB10 and MYB72 as the most highly induced transcription factors. Here, we show that MYB10 and MYB72 are functionally redundant and are required for plant survival in alkaline soil where iron availability is greatly restricted. myb10myb72 double mutants fail to induce transcript accumulation of the nicotianamine synthase gene NAS4. Both myb10myb72 mutants and nas4-1 mutants have reduced iron concentrations, chlorophyll levels, and shoot mass under iron-limiting conditions, indicating that these genes are essential for proper plant growth. The double myb10myb72 mutant also showed nickel and zinc sensitivity, similar to the nas4 mutant. Ectopic expression of NAS4 rescues myb10myb72 plants, suggesting that loss of NAS4 is the primary defect in these plants and emphasizes the importance of nicotianamine, an iron chelator, in iron homeostasis. Overall, our results provide evidence that MYB10 and MYB72 act early in the iron-deficiency regulatory cascade to drive gene expression of NAS4 and are essential for plant survival under iron deficiency. PMID:24278034

  8. Theoretical investigations of initial growth processes on semipolar AlN(11\\bar{2}2) surfaces under metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy growth condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Toru; Takemoto, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori

    2016-05-01

    The initial growth processes on semipolar AlN(11\\bar{2}2) surfaces, such as adsorption behavior of Al adatoms, are investigated on the basis of ab initio calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. By using surface phase diagrams, which are obtained by comparing the adsorption energy from ab initio calculations with gas-phase chemical potentials, we find that the adsorption of Al adatoms under H-poor condition is much easier than that under H-rich condition. Furthermore, our kinetic MC simulations demonstrate that the surface lifetime (diffusion length) of Al adatoms under H-poor condition is found to be four (two) orders of magnitude larger than that under H-rich condition. These differences implie that the growth under H-poor condition is much faster than that under H-rich condition, qualitatively consistent with the experimental results.

  9. Evaluation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake method for studying growth of spiroplasmas under various conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bastian, F.O.; Baliga, B.S.; Pollock, H.M.

    1988-10-01

    (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake and colony counts are quantitative and inexpensive methods for studying Spiroplasma growth. Using these techniques, we demonstrated subtle effects on the growth of suckling mouse cataract agent of medium alterations, inoculum size, and freezing of cultures. In addition, suckling mouse cataract agent multiplied more actively under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. These techniques have wide application for the study of Spiroplasma growth and will be useful for the development of a defined medium.

  10. FIS-dependent trans activation of stable RNA operons of Escherichia coli under various growth conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, L; Verbeek, H; Vijgenboom, E; van Drunen, C; Vanet, A; Bosch, L

    1992-01-01

    In Escherichia coli transcription of the tRNA operon thrU (tufB) and the rRNA operon rrnB is trans-activated by the protein FIS. This protein, which stimulates the inversion of various viral DNA segments, binds specifically to a cis-acting sequence (designated UAS) upstream of the promoter of thrU (tufB) and the P1 promoter of the rrnB operon. There are indications that this type of regulation is representative for the regulation of more stable RNA operons. In the present investigation we have studied UAS-dependent transcription activation of the thrU (tufB) operon in the presence and absence of FIS during a normal bacterial growth cycle and after a nutritional shift-up. In early log phase the expression of the operon rises steeply in wild-type cells, whereafter it declines. Concomitantly, a peak of the cellular FIS concentration is observed. Cells in the stationary phase are depleted of FIS. The rather abrupt increase of transcription activation depends on the nutritional quality of the medium. It is not seen in minimal medium. After a shift from minimal to rich medium, a peak of transcription activation and of FIS concentration is measured. This peak gets higher as the medium gets more strongly enriched. We conclude that a correlation between changes of the UAS-dependent activation of the thrU (tufB) operon and changes of the cellular FIS concentration under a variety of experimental conditions exists. This correlation strongly suggests that the production of FIS responds to environmental signals, thereby trans-activating the operon. Cells unable to produce FIS (fis cells) also show an increase of operon transcription in the early log phase and after a nutritional shift-up, albeit less pronounced than that wild-type cells. Presumably it is controlled by the ribosome feedback regulatory system. cis activation of the operon by the upstream activator sequence is apparent in the absence of FIS. This activation is constant throughout the entire growth cycle and is

  11. FIS-dependent trans activation of stable RNA operons of Escherichia coli under various growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L; Verbeek, H; Vijgenboom, E; van Drunen, C; Vanet, A; Bosch, L

    1992-02-01

    In Escherichia coli transcription of the tRNA operon thrU (tufB) and the rRNA operon rrnB is trans-activated by the protein FIS. This protein, which stimulates the inversion of various viral DNA segments, binds specifically to a cis-acting sequence (designated UAS) upstream of the promoter of thrU (tufB) and the P1 promoter of the rrnB operon. There are indications that this type of regulation is representative for the regulation of more stable RNA operons. In the present investigation we have studied UAS-dependent transcription activation of the thrU (tufB) operon in the presence and absence of FIS during a normal bacterial growth cycle and after a nutritional shift-up. In early log phase the expression of the operon rises steeply in wild-type cells, whereafter it declines. Concomitantly, a peak of the cellular FIS concentration is observed. Cells in the stationary phase are depleted of FIS. The rather abrupt increase of transcription activation depends on the nutritional quality of the medium. It is not seen in minimal medium. After a shift from minimal to rich medium, a peak of transcription activation and of FIS concentration is measured. This peak gets higher as the medium gets more strongly enriched. We conclude that a correlation between changes of the UAS-dependent activation of the thrU (tufB) operon and changes of the cellular FIS concentration under a variety of experimental conditions exists. This correlation strongly suggests that the production of FIS responds to environmental signals, thereby trans-activating the operon. Cells unable to produce FIS (fis cells) also show an increase of operon transcription in the early log phase and after a nutritional shift-up, albeit less pronounced than that wild-type cells. Presumably it is controlled by the ribosome feedback regulatory system. cis activation of the operon by the upstream activator sequence is apparent in the absence of FIS. This activation is constant throughout the entire growth cycle and is

  12. Soil texture and climatc conditions for biocrust growth limitation: a meta analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Subbotina, Mariia

    2015-04-01

    Along with afforestation, attempts have been made to combat desertification by managing soil crusts, and is has been reported that recovery rates of biocrusts are dependent on many factors, including the type, severity, and extent of disturbance; structure of the vascular plant community; conditions of adjoining substrates; availability of inoculation material; and climate during and after disturbance (Belnap & Eldridge 2001). Because biological soil crusts are known to be more stable on and to prefer fine substrates (Belnap 2001), the question arises as to how successful crust management practices can be applied to coarser soil. In previous studies we observed similar crust biomasses on finer soils under arid and on coarser soils under temperate conditions. We hypothesized that the higher water holding capacity of finer substrates would favor crust development, and that the amount of silt and clay in the substrate that is required for enhanced crust development would vary with changes in climatic conditions. In a global meta study, climatic and soil texture threshold values promoting BSC growth were derived. While examining literature sources, it became evident that the amount of studies to be incorporated into this meta analysis was reversely related to the amount of common environmental parameters they share. We selected annual mean precipitaion, mean temperature and the amount of silt and clay as driving variables for crust growth. Response variable was the "relative crust biomass", which was computed per literature source as the ratio between each individual crust biomass value of the given study to the study maximum value reported. We distinguished lichen, green algal, cyanobacterial and moss crusts. To quantify threshold conditions at which crust biomass responded to differences in texture and climate, we (I) determined correlations between bioclimatic variables, (II) calculated linear models to determine the effect of typical climatic variables with soil

  13. Estimating geographic variation on allometric growth and body condition of Blue Suckers with quantile regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, B.S.; Terrell, J.W.; Neely, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing our understanding of how environmental factors affect fish body condition and improving its utility as a metric of aquatic system health require reliable estimates of spatial variation in condition (weight at length). We used three statistical approaches that varied in how they accounted for heterogeneity in allometric growth to estimate differences in body condition of blue suckers Cycleptus elongatus across 19 large-river locations in the central USA. Quantile regression of an expanded allometric growth model provided the most comprehensive estimates, including variation in exponents within and among locations (range = 2.88–4.24). Blue suckers from more-southerly locations had the largest exponents. Mixed-effects mean regression of a similar expanded allometric growth model allowed exponents to vary among locations (range = 3.03–3.60). Mean relative weights compared across selected intervals of total length (TL = 510–594 and 594–692 mm) in a multiplicative model involved the implicit assumption that allometric exponents within and among locations were similar to the exponent (3.46) for the standard weight equation. Proportionate differences in the quantiles of weight at length for adult blue suckers (TL = 510, 594, 644, and 692 mm) compared with their average across locations ranged from 1.08 to 1.30 for southern locations (Texas, Mississippi) and from 0.84 to 1.00 for northern locations (Montana, North Dakota); proportionate differences for mean weight ranged from 1.13 to 1.17 and from 0.87 to 0.95, respectively, and those for mean relative weight ranged from 1.10 to 1.18 and from 0.86 to 0.98, respectively. Weights for fish at longer lengths varied by 600–700 g within a location and by as much as 2,000 g among southern and northern locations. Estimates for the Wabash River, Indiana (0.96–1.07 times the average; greatest increases for lower weights at shorter TLs), and for the Missouri River from Blair, Nebraska, to Sioux City, Iowa (0.90

  14. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism during Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian J.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes to virulence in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Furthermore, analyses of omics data in the context of the metabolic model indicated rewiring of the metabolic network to support pathways associated with virulence. For example, cellular concentrations of polyamines were perturbed, as well as the predicted capacity for secretion and uptake. PMID:23559334

  15. Differential Carbohydrate Recognition by Campylobacter jejuni Strain 11168: Influences of Temperature and Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; Tiralongo, Joe; Hartnell, Regan D.; Logue, Carie-Anne; Wilson, Jennifer C.; von Itzstein, Mark; Korolik, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenic clinical strain NCTC11168 was the first Campylobacter jejuni strain to be sequenced and has been a widely used laboratory model for studying C. jejuni pathogenesis. However, continuous passaging of C. jejuni NCTC11168 has been shown to dramatically affect its colonisation potential. Glycan array analysis was performed on C. jejuni NCTC11168 using the frequently passaged, non-colonising, genome sequenced (11168-GS) and the infrequently passaged, original, virulent (11168-O) isolates grown or maintained under various conditions. Glycan structures recognised and bound by C. jejuni included terminal mannose, N-acetylneuraminic acid, galactose and fucose. Significantly, it was found that only when challenged with normal oxygen at room temperature did 11168-O consistently bind to sialic acid or terminal mannose structures, while 11168-GS bound these structures regardless of growth/maintenance conditions. Further, binding of un-capped galactose and fucosylated structures was significantly reduced when C. jejuni was maintained at 25°C under atmospheric oxygen conditions. These binding differences identified through glycan array analysis were confirmed by the ability of specific lectins to competitively inhibit the adherence of C. jejuni to a Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Our data suggests that the binding of mannose and/or N-acetylneuraminic acid may provide the initial interactions important for colonisation following environmental exposure. PMID:19290056

  16. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism During Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-04-05

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Excitingly, we observed possible sequestration of metabolites recently suggested to have immune modulating roles. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Model-guided analysis suggested that alterations in metabolism prioritized other activities necessary for pathogenesis instead, such as lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  17. Growth Conditions Control the Elastic and Electrical Properties of ZnO Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Yongqiang; Wan, Jingchun; Warren, Oden L; Oh, Jason; Li, Ju; Ma, Evan; Shan, Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    Great efforts have been made to synthesize ZnO nanowires (NWs) as building blocks for a broad range of applications because of their unique mechanical and mechanoelectrical properties. However, little attention has been paid to the correlation between the NWs synthesis condition and these properties. Here we demonstrate that by slightly adjusting the NW growth conditions, the cross-sectional shape of the NWs can be tuned from hexagonal to circular. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra suggested that NWs with cylindrical geometry have a higher density of point defects. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) uniaxial tensile-electrical coupling tests revealed that for similar diameter, the Young's modulus and electrical resistivity of hexagonal NWs is always larger than that of cylindrical NWs, whereas the piezoresistive coefficient of cylindrical NWs is generally higher. With decreasing diameter, the Young's modulus and the resistivity of NWs increase, whereas their piezoresistive coefficient decreases, regardless of the sample geometry. Our findings shed new light on understanding and advancing the performance of ZnO-NW-based devices through optimizing the synthesis conditions of the NWs. PMID:26510098

  18. H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 Prime Higher Integrin α5β1 in Adverse pH Condition to Enhance Hypochlorhydria Vicious Cycle for Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Chang, Wei-Lun; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims H. pylori CagL amino acid polymorphisms such as Y58/E59 can increase integrin α5β1 expression and gastric cancer risk. Hypochlorhydria during chronic H. pylori infection promotes gastric carcinogenesis. The study test whether CagL-Y58/E59 isolates may regulate integrin α5β1 to translocate CagA via the type IV secretory system even under adverse pH conditions, and whether the integrin α5β1 expression primed by H. pylori is a pH-dependent process involving hypochlorhydria in a vicious cycle to promote gastric carcinogenesis. Methods The expressions of integrin α5 and β1, CagA phosphorylation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation of AGS cells exposed to CagL-Y58/E59 H. pylori, isogenic mutants, and different H. pylori CagL amino acid replacement mutants under different pH values were determined. Differences in the pepsinogen I/II ratio (indirectly indicating gastric acidity) and gastric integrin α5β1 expression were compared among the 172 H. pylori-infected patients with different cancer risks. Results Even under adversely low pH condition, H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 still keep active integrin β1 with stronger binding affinity, CagA translocation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation than the other mutants (p<0.05). The in vitro assay revealed higher priming of integrin α5β1 by H. pylori under elevated pH as hypochlorhydria (p<0.05). In the H. pylori-infected patients, the gastric integrin α5β1 expressions were higher in those with pepsinogen I/II ratio <6 than in those without (p<0.05). Conclusions H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 prime higher integrin under adverse pH and may involve to enhance hypochlorhydria vicious cycle for gastric carcinogenesis, and thus require an early eradication. PMID:24009701

  19. Growth conditions and environmental factors impact aerosolization but not virulence of Francisella tularensis infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Faith, Seth A.; Smith, Le'Kneitah P.; Swatland, Angela S.; Reed, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    In refining methodology to develop a mouse model for inhalation of Francisella tularensis, it was noted that both relative humidity and growth media impacted the aerosol concentration of the live vaccine strain (LVS) of F. tularensis. A relative humidity of less than 55% had a negative impact on the spray factor, the ratio between the concentration of LVS in the aerosol and the nebulizer. The spray factor was significantly higher for LVS grown in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth than LVS grown in Mueller–Hinton broth (MHb) or Chamberlain's chemically defined medium (CCDM). The variability between aerosol exposures was also considerably less with BHI. LVS grown in BHI survived desiccation far longer than MHb-grown or CCDM-grown LVS (~70% at 20 min for BHI compared to <50% for MHb and CCDM). Removal of the capsule by hypertonic treatment impacted the spray factor for CCDM-grown LVS or MHb-grown LVS but not BHI-grown LVS, suggesting the choice of culture media altered the adherence of the capsule to the cell membrane. The choice of growth media did not impact the LD50 of LVS but the LD99 of BHI-grown LVS was 1 log lower than that for MHb-grown LVS or CCDM-grown LVS. Splenomegaly was prominent in mice that succumbed to MHb- and BHI-grown LVS but not CCDM-grown LVS. Environmental factors and growth conditions should be evaluated when developing new animal models for aerosol infection, particularly for vegetative bacterial pathogens. PMID:23087911

  20. Growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinity: development and function of shoot hydraulic systems require saline conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoa T.; Stanton, Daniel E.; Schmitz, Nele; Farquhar, Graham D.; Ball, Marilyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Halophytic eudicots are characterized by enhanced growth under saline conditions. This study combines physiological and anatomical analyses to identify processes underlying growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinities ranging from fresh- to seawater conditions. Methods Following pre-exhaustion of cotyledonary reserves under optimal conditions (i.e. 50 % seawater), seedlings of A. marina were grown hydroponically in dilutions of seawater amended with nutrients. Whole-plant growth characteristics were analysed in relation to dry mass accumulation and its allocation to different plant parts. Gas exchange characteristics and stable carbon isotopic composition of leaves were measured to evaluate water use in relation to carbon gain. Stem and leaf hydraulic anatomy were measured in relation to plant water use and growth. Key Results Avicennia marina seedlings failed to grow in 0–5 % seawater, whereas maximal growth occurred in 50–75 % seawater. Relative growth rates were affected by changes in leaf area ratio (LAR) and net assimilation rate (NAR) along the salinity gradient, with NAR generally being more important. Gas exchange characteristics followed the same trends as plant growth, with assimilation rates and stomatal conductance being greatest in leaves grown in 50–75 % seawater. However, water use efficiency was maintained nearly constant across all salinities, consistent with carbon isotopic signatures. Anatomical studies revealed variation in rates of development and composition of hydraulic tissues that were consistent with salinity-dependent patterns in water use and growth, including a structural explanation for low stomatal conductance and growth under low salinity. Conclusions The results identified stem and leaf transport systems as central to understanding the integrated growth responses to variation in salinity from fresh- to seawater conditions. Avicennia marina was revealed as an obligate halophyte

  1. Comprehensive Study Of Duckweed Cultivation And Growth Conditions Under Controlled Eutrophication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, Alica; Sirotiak, Maroš; Fiala, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    The paper discussed the issue of eutrophication. The most conspicuous effect of eutrophication is the creation of dense blooms of noxious, foul-smelling phytoplankton that reduce water clarity and harm water quality. Nutrient concentration, temperature and pH of the water largely influence the growth rate and composition of duckweed in general, but it can be said that the temperature and solar irradiation are the most important factors. In order to compare the rate of biomass increase of duckweed biomass in natural conditions and in a laboratory grown sample was analysed by spectrophotometric methods in UV/VIS region (Spectrophotometer GENESYSTM) for the selected nutrients such as ammonium, ammonium nitrogen, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate.

  2. A new fungal endophyte, Scolecobasidium humicola, promotes tomato growth under organic nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Rola S; Narisawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    A new fungal endophyte, Scolecobasidium humicola, was identified as a common dark septate endophytic fungal (DSE) species under both natural and agricultural conditions. This fungus was found to grow endophylically in the roots of tomato seedlings. Light microscopy of cross-sections of colonized tomato roots showed that the intercellular, pigmented hyphae of the fungus were mostly limited to the epidermal layer and formed outer mantle-like structures. Two isolates of S. humicola, H2-2 and F1-3, have shown the ability to increase plant biomass with an organic nitrogen source. This finding is the first report of S. humicola as an endophyte and could help to improve plant growth with organic nitrogen sources. PMID:24223848

  3. Lipid production on free fatty acids by oleaginous yeasts under non-growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobing; Jin, Guojie; Wang, Yandan; Shen, Hongwei; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2015-10-01

    Microbial lipids produced by oleaginous yeasts serve as promising alternatives to traditional oils and fats for the production of biodiesel and oleochemicals. To improve its techno-economics, it is pivotal to use wastes and produce high quality lipids of special fatty acid composition. In the present study, four oleaginous yeasts were tested to use free fatty acids for lipid production under non-growth conditions. Microbial lipids of exceptionally high fatty acid relative contents, e.g. those contained over 70% myristic acid or 80% oleic acid, were produced that may be otherwise inaccessible by growing cells on various carbon sources. It was found that Cryptococcus curvatus is a robust strain that can efficiently use oleic acid as well as even-numbered saturated fatty acids with carbon atoms ranging from 10 to 20. Our results provided new opportunity for the production of functional lipids and for the exploitation of organic wastes rich in free fatty acids. PMID:26159379

  4. Interactive effects of shelter and conspecific density shape mortality, growth, and condition in juvenile reef fish.

    PubMed

    Ford, John R; Shima, Jeffrey S; Swearer, Stephen E

    2016-06-01

    How landscape context influences density-dependent processes is important, as environmental heterogeneity can confound estimates of density dependence in demographic parameters. Here we evaluate 19 populations in a shoaling temperate reef fish (Trachinops caudimaculatus) metapopulation within a heterogeneous seascape (Port Phillip Bay, Australia) to show empirically that shelter availability and population density interact to influence juvenile mortality, growth and condition. Although heterogeneity in shelter availability obscured the underlying patterns of density dependence in different ways, the combination of habitat and its interaction with density were two to six times more important than density alone in explaining variation in demographic parameters for juveniles. These findings contradict many small-scale studies and highlight the need for landscape-scale observations of how density dependence interacts with resource availability and competition to better understand how demographic parameters influence the dynamics of metapopulations in heterogeneous environments. PMID:27459768

  5. Comorbid Medical Conditions in Friedreich Ataxia: Association With Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shinnick, Julianna E; Schadt, Kimberly; Strawser, Cassandra; Wilcox, Nicholas; Perlman, Susan L; Wilmot, George R; Gomez, Christopher M; Mathews, Katherine D; Yoon, Grace; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Hoyle, Chad; Subramony, S H; Yiu, Eppie M; Delatycki, Martin B; Brocht, Alicia F; Farmer, Jennifer M; Lynch, David R

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a progressive degenerative disease with neurologic and cardiac involvement. This study characterizes comorbid medical conditions in a large cohort of patients with Friedreich ataxia. Patient diagnoses were collected in a large natural history study of 641 subjects. Prevalence of diagnoses in the cohort with Friedreich ataxia was compared with prevalence in the population without Friedreich ataxia. Ten patients (1.6%) had inflammatory bowel disease, 3.5 times more common in this cohort of individuals with Friedreich ataxia than in the general population. Four subjects were growth hormone deficient, reflecting a prevalence in Friedreich ataxia that is 28 times greater than the general population. The present study identifies specific diagnoses not traditionally associated with Friedreich ataxia that are found at higher frequency in this disease. These associations could represent coincidence, shared genetic background, or potentially interactive disease mechanisms with Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27071470

  6. A New Fungal Endophyte, Scolecobasidium humicola, Promotes Tomato Growth under Organic Nitrogen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Rola S.; Narisawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    A new fungal endophyte, Scolecobasidium humicola, was identified as a common dark septate endophytic fungal (DSE) species under both natural and agricultural conditions. This fungus was found to grow endophylically in the roots of tomato seedlings. Light microscopy of cross-sections of colonized tomato roots showed that the intercellular, pigmented hyphae of the fungus were mostly limited to the epidermal layer and formed outer mantle-like structures. Two isolates of S. humicola, H2-2 and F1-3, have shown the ability to increase plant biomass with an organic nitrogen source. This finding is the first report of S. humicola as an endophyte and could help to improve plant growth with organic nitrogen sources. PMID:24223848

  7. Exploring growth conditions and Eu2+ concentration effects for KSr2I5:Eu scintillator crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stand, L.; Zhuravleva, M.; Camarda, G.; Lindsey, A.; Johnson, J.; Hobbs, C.; Melcher, C. L.

    2016-04-01

    Our current research is focused on understanding dopant optimization, growth rate, homogeneity and their impact on the overall performance of KSr2I5:Eu2+ single crystal scintillators. In this work we have investigated the effects of Eu2+ concentration in the potassium strontium iodide matrix, and we found that the concentration needed to maximize the light yield was 4 mol%. In order to assess the effects of the pulling rate, we grew single crystals at 12, 24 and 120 mm/day via the vertical Bridgman technique. For the sample sizes measured (5×5×5 mm3), we found that the crystal grown at the fastest rate of 120 mm/day showed a light yield within ~7% of the more slowly grown boules, and no significant change was observed in the energy resolution. Therefore, light yields from 88,000 to 96,000 ph/MeV and energy resolutions from 2.4 to 3.0% (at 662 keV) were measured for KSr2I5:Eu 4% over a relatively wide range of growth conditions. In order to assess the homogeneity of KSr2I5:Eu 4%, a newly developed micro-resolution X-ray technique was used to map the light yield as a function of excitation position. In the crystals that we studied, we did not observe any significant inhomogeneity other than a smooth gradient due to light collection and self absorption effects.

  8. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L; Hill, Richard P; Jones, Russell G; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O; Thompson, Craig B; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W

    2011-05-15

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  9. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T.; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K.; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D.; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L.; Hill, Richard P.; Jones, Russell G.; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O.; Thompson, Craig B.; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  10. Outer Membrane Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei From Diverse Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Mark A.; Zhao, Peng; Wells, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are closely related, aerosol-infective human pathogens that cause life-threatening diseases. Biochemical analyses requiring large-scale growth and manipulation at biosafety level 3 under select agent regulations are cumbersome and hazardous. We developed a simple, safe, and rapid method to prepare highly purified outer membrane (OM) fragments from these pathogens. Shotgun proteomic analyses of OMs by trypsin shaving and mass spectrometry identified >155 proteins, the majority of which are clearly outer membrane proteins (OMPs). These included: 13 porins, 4 secretins for virulence factor export, 11 efflux pumps, multiple components of a Type VI secreton, metal transport receptors, polysaccharide exporters, and hypothetical OMPs of unknown function. We also identified 20 OMPs in each pathogen that are abundant under a wide variety of conditions, including in serum and with macrophages, suggesting these are fundamental for growth and survival and may represent prime drug or vaccine targets. Comparison of the OM proteomes of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei showed many similarities but also revealed a few differences, perhaps reflecting evolution of B. mallei away from environmental survival toward host-adaptation. PMID:21391724

  11. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for a highly plastic 3-D stress field condition. The flight hardware investigated in this paper is a large separation bolt that fractures using pyrotechnics at the appointed time during the flight sequence. The separation bolt has a deep notch that produces a severe stress concentration and a large plastic zone when highly loaded. For this geometry, linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) techniques are not valid due to the large nonlinear stress field. Unfortunately, industry codes that are generally available for fracture mechanics analysis and fatigue crack growth (e.g. NASGRO (11) are limited to LEFM and are available for only a limited number of geometries. The results of LEFM based codes are questionable when used on geometries with significant plasticity. Therefore elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) techniques using the finite element method (FEM) were used to analyze the bolt and test coupons. scale flight hardware is very costly in t e r n of assets, laboratory resources, and schedule. Therefore to alleviate some of these problems, a series of novel test coupons were developed to simulate the elastic-plastic stress field present in the bolt.

  12. Optimization of culture conditions to obtain maximal growth of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Andrea V; Salazar, Beatriz E; Agudelo, María; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Zuluaga, Andres F; Vesga, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae, particularly penicillin-resistant strains (PRSP), constitute one of the most important causes of serious infections worldwide. It is a fastidious microorganism with exquisite nutritional and environmental requirements to grow, a characteristic that prevents the development of useful animal models to study the biology of the microorganism. This study was designed to determine optimal conditions for culture and growth of PRSP. Results We developed a simple and reproducible method for culture of diverse strains of PRSP representing several invasive serotypes of clinical and epidemiological importance in Colombia. Application of this 3-step culture protocol consistently produced more than 9 log10 CFU/ml of viable cells in the middle part of the logarithmic phase of their growth curve. Conclusion A controlled inoculum size grown in 3 successive steps in supplemented agar and broth under 5% CO2 atmosphere, with pH adjustment and specific incubation times, allowed production of great numbers of PRSP without untimely activation of autolysis mechanisms. PMID:15932633

  13. Influence of packaging conditions on natural microbial population growth of endive.

    PubMed

    Charles, Florence; Rugani, Nathalie; Gontard, Nathalie

    2005-05-01

    The influence of three packaging conditions, i.e., unmodified atmosphere packaging (UAP), passive modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), and active MAP, on the natural microbial population growth of endive was investigated at 20 degrees C. For UAP, endive was placed in macroperforated oriented polypropylene pouches that maintained gas composition close to that of air (21 kPa O2 and 0 kPa CO2) but also limited superficial product dehydration. For MAP, endive was placed in low-density polyethylene pouches that induced a 3 kPa O2 and 5 kPa CO2 equilibrium atmosphere composition. Steady state was reached after 25 h of storage with an oxygen absorbing packet (active MAP) compared with 100 h without the packet (passive MAP) and was maintained for 200 h. After 312 h of storage, both active and passive MAP reduced total aerobic mesophile, yeast, and mold population growth compared with endive in UAP. Active MAP accelerated and improved the inhibition of Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae, respectively, probably because of the rapid O2 depletion during the transition period. A shift in the Enterobacteriaceae subpopulation from Rhanella aquatilis to Enterobacter agglomerans was observed for both passive and active MAP. PMID:15895736

  14. Natural variation in Arabidopsis adaptation to growth at low nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    North, Kathryn Anne; Ehlting, Barbara; Koprivova, Anna; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2009-10-01

    Improving nutrient use efficiency of crop plants, especially at low input, is essential to ensure sustainable food production in the future. In order to address the genetic basis of nutrient use efficiency in a model system, growth of Arabidopsis ecotypes at normal and low nitrogen (N) supply was compared. The ecotypes differed significantly in the extent of growth reduction in limiting conditions. The fresh weight of Shahdara and Ws grown at 1mM nitrate was reduced by 30% compared to control, whereas Col-0 and Ga-0 were almost unaffected. Total N content was reduced in all ecotypes by 10-30%. The capacity to store nitrate correlated with the tolerance to low N; in Shahdara and Ws, but not in Col-0 and Ga-0, nitrate content on low N was significantly reduced compared to control nutrition. The mRNA levels for genes of nitrate uptake and assimilation were only moderately affected by the treatment. The transcript levels of nitrate reductase NIA1 and nitrite reductase were higher in the ecotypes tolerant to low N (Col-0 and Ga-0) with normal N nutrition but on low N they were reduced to a much higher extent than the sensitive ecotypes (Shahdara and Ws). It seems that a higher capacity to keep nitrate reserves at low N, perhaps due to the ability to turn down nitrate reduction rate, is responsible for a better tolerance of Col-0 and Ga-0 to low N supply. PMID:19628403

  15. Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase expression in both shoots and roots is conditioned by root growth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. J.; Ferl, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Arabidopsis Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene is constitutively expressed at low levels in the roots of young plants grown on agar media, and that the expression level is greatly induced by anoxic or hypoxic stresses. We questioned whether the agar medium itself created an anaerobic environment for the roots upon their growing into the gel. beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) expression driven by the Adh promoter was examined by growing transgenic Arabidopsis plants in different growing systems. Whereas roots grown on horizontal-positioned plates showed high Adh/GUS expression levels, roots from vertical-positioned plates had no Adh/GUS expression. Additional results indicate that growth on vertical plates closely mimics the Adh/GUS expression observed for soil-grown seedlings, and that growth on horizontal plates results in induction of high Adh/GUS expression that is consistent with hypoxic or anoxic conditions within the agar of the root zone. Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex is also highly induced by root penetration of the agar medium. This induction of Adh/GUS in shoot apex and roots is due, at least in part, to mechanisms involving Ca2+ signal transduction.

  16. Effects of culture conditions on growth and docosahexaenoic acid production from Schizochytrium limacinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Luying; Zhang, Xuecheng; Ren, Xueying; Zhu, Qinghua

    2008-02-01

    The effects of temperature, initial pH, salinity of culture medium, and carbon and nitrogen sources on growth and docosahexaenoic acid (C22: 6 n-3, DHA) production from Schizochytrium limacinum OUC88 were investigated in the present study. The results revealed that the optimal temperature, initial pH and salinity level of the medium for DHA production were 23°C, 7.0 and 18, respectively. Glucose was proved the best carbon source for the growth and DHA production from S. limacinum. Among the nitrogen sources tested, soybean cake hydrolysate, a cheap by-product, was found to be effective for the accumulation of DHA in S. limacinum cells. In addition, increasing the concentration of carbon sources in the medium caused a significant increase in cell biomass; however, accumulation of DHA in cells was mainly stimulated by the ratio of C/N in the medium. Under the optimal culture conditions, the maximum DHA yield achieved in flasks was 4.08 g L-1 after 5 d of cultivation.

  17. Temporal Evolution of Magma Flow Conditions during Dome Growth, Insights from Numerical Modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, L. A. C.; Collombet, M.; Pinel, V.

    2015-12-01

    Transitions from effusive to explosive regime at andesitic volcanoes are almost unpredictable at the moment. The reliability of empirical methods based on geophysical precursory patterns is still debated. A better understanding of the physical processes happening in the volcanic system before explosions and associated geophysical signals is needed. At andesitic volcanoes, dome building is often observed during the effusive phase. The weight of a forming dome is expected to have several effects: 1) It obviously induces a ground subsidence in the near field; 2) pressure increase at the top of the conduit causes magma properties and flow conditions evolution; 3) it increases pressure in the surrounding rock such decreasing rock permeability and thus gas loss through the conduit walls, possibly leading to gas pressurisation. Here we use numerical models that couple realistic magma flow conditions in the upper conduit with solid deformation, in 2D axisymmetry, to investigate all these effects. Subsiding effect due to the dome emplacement is simulated by a pressure loading of the rock surrounding the conduit. From realistic initial magma flow conditions in effusive regime (Collombet, 2009), we apply increasing pressure at the conduit top. Volatile solubility increases with pressure, then dome growth causes a decrease of magma porosity and permeability at the top of the conduit. This also causes a decrease of magma viscosity. From magma flow model, we extract pressure and shear stress conditions at the conduit wall, and apply them to the surrounding rock for ground deformation calculation . Darcy flow model is used to study the impacts of permeability decrease inside the conduit and in the surrounding rock on gas loss cinematics. Permeability decrease in the conduit and pressure increase in the surrounding rock cause gas pressurisation.

  18. Die another day: Fate of heat-treated Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 spores during storage under growth-preventing conditions.

    PubMed

    Mtimet, Narjes; Trunet, Clément; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are recognized as one of the most wet-heat resistant among aerobic spore-forming bacteria and are responsible for 35% of canned food spoilage after incubation at 55 °C. The purpose of this study was to investigate and model the fate of heat-treated survivor spores of G. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 in growth-preventing environment. G. stearothermophilus spores were heat-treated at four different conditions to reach one or two decimal reductions. Heat-treated spores were stored in nutrient broth at different temperatures and pH under growth-preventing conditions. Spore survival during storage was evaluated by count plating over a period of months. Results reveal that G. stearothermophilus spores surviving heat treatment lose their viability during storage under growth-preventing conditions. Two different subpopulations were observed during non-thermal inactivation. They differed according to the level of their resistance to storage stress, and the proportion of each subpopulation can be modulated by heat treatment conditions. Finally, tolerance to storage stress under growth-preventing conditions increases at refrigerated temperature and neutral pH regardless of heat treatment conditions. Such results suggest that spore inactivation due to heat treatment could be completed by storage under growth-preventing conditions. PMID:26919821

  19. How do sink and source activities influence the reproduction and vegetative growth of spring ephemeral herbs under different light conditions?

    PubMed

    Sunmonu, Ninuola; Kudo, Gaku

    2014-07-01

    Spring ephemeral herbs inhabiting deciduous forests commonly complete reproduction and vegetative growth before canopy closure in early summer. Effects of shading by early canopy closure on reproductive output and vegetative growth, however, may vary depending on the seasonal allocation patterns of photosynthetic products between current reproduction and storage for future growth in each species. To clarify the effects of sink-source balance on seed production and bulb growth in a spring ephemeral herb, Gagea lutea, we performed a bract removal treatment (source reduction) and a floral-bud removal treatment (sink reduction) under canopy and open conditions. Leaf carbon fixations did not differ between the forest and open sites and among treatments. Bract carbon fixations were also similar between sites but tended to decrease when floral buds were removed. Seed production was higher under open condition but decreased by the bract-removal treatment under both light conditions. In contrast, bulb growth was independent of light conditions and the bract-removal treatment but increased greatly by the bud-removal treatment. Therefore, leaves and bracts acted as specialized source organs for vegetative and reproductive functions, respectively, but photosynthetic products by bracts were flexibly used for bulb growth when plants failed to set fruits. Extension of bright period was advantageous for seed production (i.e., source limited) but not for vegetative growth (i.e., sink limited) in this species. PMID:24879401

  20. Growth and toxin production of Azadinium poporum strains in batch cultures under different nutrient conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifeng; Jiang, Baozhou; Chen, Huidan; Gu, Haifeng

    2016-05-01

    Azaspiracid-2 (AZA2) is the dominant toxin produced by Azadinium poporum strains AZDY06 and AZFC22 isolated from the South China Sea. Biomass and AZA2-production were examined within batch cultures with variation in experimental concentrations of nitrate (0, 88, 882, and 2647µM) or phosphate (0, 3.6, 36, and 109µM), different nitrogen sources (nitrate and urea) and media (f/2-Si, L1-Si, and K-Si) in the present study. Growth of both strains positively responded to nitrate or phosphate nutrients, but the growth status was significantly repressed by the highest additional level of phosphate (109µM). Both AZDY06 and AZFC22 grew well with higher specific growth rates, but with shorter growth periods, within f/2-Si medium spiked with urea than that within media spiked with nitrate. L1-Si medium with relatively high concentrations of trace metals was relatively favorable to both strains of A. poporum tested here. No obvious change within the toxin profile occurred in all cultures of both strains under the various nutrient conditions, although trace amounts of some suspicious derivatives of AZA2 occurred in some cultures. AZA2 cell quotas within both strains significantly (p<0.05) increased at the stationary phase under lower additional phosphate (0 and 3.6µM). Significant differences were not found within AZA2 cell quotas in cultures with additional nitrate ranging from 0 to 2647µM. The highest AZA2 cell quota and maximum AZA2 quantity per culture volume occurred in batch culture at the stationary phase under phosphate concentrations at 3.6µM. Neither A. poporum strain exhibited significant changes in AZA2 cell quotas within f/2-Si media spiked with urea or nitrate as nitrogen sources. The AZA2 cell quota of strain AZDY06 also did not change remarkably within f/2-Si, L1-Si, and K-Si media, however the AZA2 cell quota of strain AZFC22 within L1-Si medium was significantly (p<0.05) higher than that within f/2-Si medium. PMID:26820226

  1. A gene homologous to beta-type carbonic anhydrase is essential for the growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, S; Ohnishi, J; Hayashi, M; Ikeda, M

    2004-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the interconversion of CO(2) and bicarbonate. We focused on this enzyme in the amino acid-producing organism Corynebacterium glutamicum in order to assess the availability of bicarbonate for carboxylation reactions essential to growth and for those required for L-lysine overproduction. A whole-genome sequence revealed two genes encoding putative beta-type and gamma-type carbonic anhydrases in C. glutamicum. These genes encode polypeptides containing zinc ligands strictly conserved in each type of carbonic anhydrase and were designated bca and gca, respectively. Internal deletion of the chromosomal bca gene resulted in a phenotype showing severely reduced growth under atmospheric conditions (0.04% CO(2)) on both complete and minimal media. The growth defect of the Delta bca strain was restored under elevated CO(2) conditions (5% CO(2)). Introduction of the red alga Porphyridium purpureum carbonic anhydrase gene ( pca) could compensate for the bca deletion, allowing normal growth under an atmospheric level of CO(2). In contrast, the Delta gca strain behaved identically to the wild-type strain with respect to growth, irrespective of the CO(2) conditions. Attempts to increase the dosage of bca, gca, and pca in the defined L-lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum AHD-2 led to no discernable effects on growth and production. Northern blot analysis indicated that the bca transcript in strain AHD-2 and another L-lysine producer, C. glutamicum B-6, was present at a much higher level than in the wild-type strain, particularly during exponential growth phases. These results indicate that: (1) the bca product is essential to achieving normal growth under ordinary atmospheric conditions, and this effect is most likely due to the bca product's ability to maintain favorable intracellular bicarbonate/CO(2) levels, and (2) the expression of bca is induced during exponential growth phases and also in the case of L-lysine overproduction, both of which are

  2. Influence of rotating magnetic fields on THM growth of CdZnTe crystals under microgravity and ground conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelian, Carmen; Duffar, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    The influence of rotating magnetic fields (RMF) on species transport and interface stability during the growth of Cd0.96Zn0.04Te:In crystals by using the traveling heater method (THM), under microgravity and terrestrial conditions, is numerically investigated. The numerical results are compared to ground and space experiments. The modeling of THM under ground conditions shows very deleterious effects of the natural convection on the morphological stability of the growth interface. The vertical flow transports the liquid of low Te concentration from the dissolution interface to the growth interface, which is consequently destabilized. The suppression of this flow, in low-gravity conditions, results in higher morphological stability of the growth interface. Application of RMF induces a two flow cell pattern, which has a destabilizing effect on the growth interface. Simulations performed by varying the magnetic field induction in the range of 1 - 3 mT show optimal conditions for the growth with a stable interface at low strength of the magnetic field (B = 1 mT). Computations of indium distribution show a better homogeneity of crystals grown under purely diffusive conditions. Rotating magnetic fields of B = 1 mT induce low intensity convection, which generates concentration gradients near the growth interface. These numerical results are in agreement with experiments performed during the FOTON M4 space mission, showing good structural quality of Cd0.96Zn0.04Te crystals grown at very low gravity level. Applying low intensity rotating magnetic fields in ground experiments has no significant influence on the flow pattern and solute distribution. At high intensity of RMF (B = 50 mT), the buoyancy convection is damped near the growth front, resulting in a more stable advancing interface. However, convection is strengthening in the upper part of the liquid zone, where the flow becomes unsteady. The multi-cellular unsteady flow generates temperature oscillations, having

  3. Bridgman Crystal Growth of an Alloy with Thermosolutal Convection Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James E.; Garimella, Suresh V.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Abbaschian, Reza

    2000-01-01

    The solidification of a dilute alloy (bismuth-tin) under Bridgman crystal growth conditions is investigated. Computations are performed in two dimensions with a uniform grid. The simulation includes the species concentration, temperature and flow fields, as well as conduction in the ampoule. Fully transient simulations have been performed, with no simplifying steady state approximations. Results are obtained under microgravity conditions for pure bismuth, and for Bi-0.1 at.%Sn and Bi-1.0 at.%Sn alloys, and compared with experimental results obtained from crystals grown in the microgravity environment of space. For the Bi-1.0 at.%Sn case the results indicate that a secondary convective cell, driven by solutal gradients, forms near the interface. The magnitude of the velocities in this cell increases with time, causing increasing solute segregation at the solid/liquid interface. The concentration-dependence of the melting temperature is incorporated in the model for the Bi-1.0 at.%Sn alloy. Satisfactory correspondence is obtained between the predicted and experimental results in terms of solute concentrations in the solidified crystal.

  4. Solution conditions determine the relative importance of nucleation and growth processes in α-synuclein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Alexander K.; Galvagnion, Céline; Gaspar, Ricardo; Sparr, Emma; Vendruscolo, Michele; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Linse, Sara; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of amyloid fibrils by the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein is a hallmark of Parkinson disease. To characterize the microscopic steps in the mechanism of aggregation of this protein we have used in vitro aggregation assays in the presence of preformed seed fibrils to determine the molecular rate constant of fibril elongation under a range of different conditions. We show that α-synuclein amyloid fibrils grow by monomer and not oligomer addition and are subject to higher-order assembly processes that decrease their capacity to grow. We also find that at neutral pH under quiescent conditions homogeneous primary nucleation and secondary processes, such as fragmentation and surface-assisted nucleation, which can lead to proliferation of the total number of aggregates, are undetectable. At pH values below 6, however, the rate of secondary nucleation increases dramatically, leading to a completely different balance between the nucleation and growth of aggregates. Thus, at mildly acidic pH values, such as those, for example, that are present in some intracellular locations, including endosomes and lysosomes, multiplication of aggregates is much faster than at normal physiological pH values, largely as a consequence of much more rapid secondary nucleation. These findings provide new insights into possible mechanisms of α-synuclein aggregation and aggregate spreading in the context of Parkinson disease. PMID:24817693

  5. Inverted initial conditions: Exploring the growth of cosmic structure and voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontzen, Andrew; Slosar, Anže; Roth, Nina; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and explore "paired" cosmological simulations. A pair consists of an A and B simulation with initial conditions related by the inversion δA(x ,tinitial)=-δB(x ,tinitial) (underdensities substituted for overdensities and vice versa). We argue that the technique is valuable for improving our understanding of cosmic structure formation. The A and B fields are by definition equally likely draws from Λ CDM initial conditions, and in the linear regime evolve identically up to the overall sign. As nonlinear evolution takes hold, a region that collapses to form a halo in simulation A will tend to expand to create a void in simulation B. Applications include (i) contrasting the growth of A-halos and B-voids to test excursion-set theories of structure formation, (ii) cross-correlating the density field of the A and B universes as a novel test for perturbation theory, and (iii) canceling error terms by averaging power spectra between the two boxes. Generalizations of the method to more elaborate field transformations are suggested.

  6. Inverted initial conditions: Exploring the growth of cosmic structure and voids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pontzen, Andrew; Roth, Nina; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Slosar, Anze

    2016-05-18

    We introduce and explore “paired” cosmological simulations. A pair consists of an A and B simulation with initial conditions related by the inversion δA(x,tinitial) = –δB(x,tinitial) (underdensities substituted for overdensities and vice versa). We argue that the technique is valuable for improving our understanding of cosmic structure formation. The A and B fields are by definition equally likely draws from ΛCDM initial conditions, and in the linear regime evolve identically up to the overall sign. As nonlinear evolution takes hold, a region that collapses to form a halo in simulation A will tend to expand to create a void inmore » simulation B. Applications include (i) contrasting the growth of A-halos and B-voids to test excursion-set theories of structure formation, (ii) cross-correlating the density field of the A and B universes as a novel test for perturbation theory, and (iii) canceling error terms by averaging power spectra between the two boxes. Furthermore, generalizations of the method to more elaborate field transformations are suggested.« less

  7. Device and method for screening crystallization conditions in solution crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A device and method for detecting optimum protein crystallization conditions and for growing protein crystals in either 1g or microgravity environments comprising a housing, defining at least one pair of chambers for containing crystallization solutions is presented. The housing further defines an orifice therein for providing fluid communication between the chambers. The orifice is adapted to receive a tube which contains a gelling substance for limiting the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. The solutions are diffusively mixed over a period of time defined by the quantity of gelling substance sufficient to achieve equilibration and to substantially reduce density driven convection disturbances therein. The device further includes endcaps to seal the first and second chambers. One of the endcaps includes a dialysis chamber which contains protein solution in which protein crystals are grown. Once the endcaps are in place, the protein solution is exposed to the crystallization solutions wherein the solubility of the protein solution is reduced at a rate responsive to the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. This allows for a controlled approach to supersaturation and allows for screening of crystal growth conditions at preselected intervals.

  8. Device and Method for Screening Crystallization Conditions in Solution Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A device and method for detecting optimum protein crystallization conditions and for growing protein crystals in either 1 g or microgravity environments comprising a housing defining at least one pair of chambers for containing crystallization solutions. The housing further defines an orifice therein for providing fluid communication between the chambers. The orifice is adapted to receive a tube which contains a gelling substance for limiting the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. The solutions are diffusively mixed over a period of time defined by the quantity of gelling substance sufficient to achieve equilibration and to substantially reduce density driven convection disturbances therein. The device further includes endcaps to seal the first and second chambers. One of the endcaps includes a dialysis chamber which contains protein solution in which protein crystals are grown. Once the endcaps are in place. the protein solution is exposed to the crystallization solutions wherein the solubility of the protein solution is reduced at a rate responsive to the rate of diffusive mixing of the crystallization solutions. This allows for a controlled approach to supersaturation and allows for screening of crystal growth conditions at preselected intervals.

  9. Generation of Mice With a Conditional Allele for the Transforming Growth Factor Beta3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Doetschman, Thomas; Georgieva, Teodora; Li, Hongqi; Reed, Thomas D.; Grisham, Christina; Friel, Jacqueline; Estabrook, Mark A.; Gard, Connie; Sanford, L.P.; Azhar, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway is involved in embryonic development and several inherited and acquired human diseases. The gene for TGFβ3 (Tgfb3) encodes one of the three ligands for TGF b receptors. It is widely expressed in the embryo and its mutation or misexpression is found in human diseases. Tgfb3−/− mice die at birth from cleft palate, precluding functional studies in adults. Here, we generated mice in which exon 6 of Tgfb3 was flanked with LoxP sites (Tgfb3flox/flox). The adult mice were normal and fertile. EIIa-Cre-mediated deletion of exon 6 in Tgfb3flox/flox mice efficiently generated Tgfb3 conditional knockout (Tgfb3cko/cko) mice which died at birth from the same cleft palate defect as Tgfb3−/− mice, indicating that the conditional and knockout alleles are functionally equivalent. This Tgfb3cko allele will now enable studies of TGFβ3 function in different cell or tissue types in embryonic development and during adulthood. genesis 50:59-66, 2012. PMID:22223248

  10. Melt Convection Effects in the Bridgman Crystal Growth of an Alloy Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson James E.; Garimella, Suresh V.; deGroh, Henry C., III; Abbaschian, Reza

    1998-01-01

    The solidification of a dilute bismuth-tin alloy under Bridgman crystal growth conditions is investigated in support of NASA's MEPHISTO space shuttle flight experiment. Computations are performed in two-dimensions with a uniform grid. The simulation includes the species-concentration, temperature and flow fields, as well as conduction in the ampoule. Fully transient simulations have been performed; no simplifying steady state approximations are used. Results are obtained under microgravity conditions for pure bismuth, and Bismuth-0.1 at.% Sn and Bi-1.0 at.% Sn alloys. The concentration dependence of the melting temperature is neglected; the solid/liquid interface temperature is assumed to be the melting temperature of pure bismuth for all cases studied. For the Bi-1.0 at.% Sn case the results indicate that a secondary convective cell, driven by solutal gradients, forms near the interface. The magnitude of the velocities in this cell increases with time; this causes increasing solute segregation at the liquid/solid interface.

  11. Optimum scratch assay condition to evaluate connective tissue growth factor expression for anti-scar therapy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heekyung; Yong, Hyeyoung; Lee, Ae-Ri Cho

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate a potential anti-scar therapy, we first need to have a reliable in vitro wound model to understand dermal fibroblast response upon cell injury and how cytokine levels are changed upon different wound heal phases. An in vitro wound model with different scratch assay conditions on primary human foreskin fibroblast monolayer cultures was prepared and cytokine levels and growth properties were evaluated with the aim of determining optimum injury conditions and observation time. Morphological characteristics of differently scratched fibroblasts from 0 to 36 h post injury (1 line, 2 lines and 3 lines) were investigated. The expression of connective tissue growth factor, CTGF, which is a key mediator in hyper-tropic scarring, and relative intensity of CTGF as a function of time were determined by western blot and gelatin Zymography. After injury (1 line), CTGF level was increased more than 2-fold within 1 h and continuously increased up to 3-fold at 6 h and was leveled down to reach normal value at 36 h, at which cell migration was complete. In more serious injury (2 lines), higher expression of CTGF was observed. The down regulation of CTGF expression after CTGF siRNA/lipofectamine transfection in control, 1 line and 2 lines scratch conditions were 40%, 75% and 55%, respectively. As a model anti-CTGF based therapy, CTGF siRNA with different ratios of linear polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes (1:1, 1:5, 1:10, 1:20 and 1:30) were prepared and down-regulation efficacy of CTGF was evaluated with our optimized scratch assay, which is 1 line injury at 6 h post injury observation time. As the cationic linear PEI ratio increased, the down regulation efficacy was increased from 20% (1:20) to 55% (1:30). As CTGF level was increased to the highest at 6 h and leveled down afterwards, CTGF level at 6 h could provide the most sensitive response upon CTGF siRNA transfection. The scratch assay in the present study can be employed as a useful experimental tool to differentiate

  12. Influence of initial growth conditions and Mg-surfactant on the quality of GaN film grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junsong, Cao; Xin, Lü; Lubing, Zhao; Shuang, Qu; Wei, Gao

    2015-02-01

    The initial growth conditions of a 100 nm thick GaN layer and Mg-surfactant on the quality of the GaN epilayer grown on a 6H-SiC substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy have been investigated in this research. Experimental results have shown that a high V/III ratio and the initially low growth rate of the GaN layer are favorable for two-dimension growth and surface morphology of GaN and the formation of a smoother growth surface. Mg-surfactant occurring during GaN growth can reduce the dislocations density of the GaN epilayer but increase the surface RMS, which are attributed to the change of growth mode.

  13. Childhood Adversity, Timing of Puberty and Adolescent Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Strong, Carol; Tsai, Meng-Che; Lin, Chung-Ying; Cheng, Chung-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Childhood adversity contributes to depressive symptoms in adolescence, but far less research has focused on an Asian context. This study aims to identify the long-term impact of childhood adversity on adolescents' depressive symptoms and whether this association is moderated by gender and early pubertal timing in Taiwan. Data in this study are from the Taiwan Education Panel Survey, a longitudinal study that surveyed and followed 4261 junior high school students in year 2001 (at age 13) and three more waves (at ages 15, 17, and 18). Conditional latent growth model results show that having adversity is positively associated with the intercept, but negatively associated with the linear trend of changes of depressive symptoms in adolescence (p < .01). Early pubertal timing is only positively associated with baseline levels for boys (p < .01). Both adversity and early pubertal timing contributes to depressive symptoms when adolescents start junior high school. PMID:26206735

  14. Are oysters being bored to death? Influence of Cliona celata on Crassostrea virginica condition, growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Carroll, John M; O'Shaughnessy, Kathryn A; Diedrich, Grant A; Finelli, Christopher M

    2015-11-17

    The boring sponge Cliona celata is a nuisance species that can have deleterious effects on eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica growth, condition, and survival. Surprisingly, however, these effects have not been well documented and when examined, results have been equi-vocal. In this study, we provide a direct comparison of growth, condition, and survival of sponge-colonized and uncolonized oysters in southeast North Carolina in 2 separate experiments. In the first experiment, sponge-colonized oysters exhibited significantly slower growth rates, reduced condition, and lower survival relative to uncolonized oysters, although results may have been confounded by oyster source. In the second experiment, using smaller oysters from the same source population, growth rate was again significantly reduced in colonized oysters relative to uncolonized oysters, however neither condition nor survival differed. In field surveys of the same population, colonized individuals across a range of sizes demonstrated significantly reduced condition. Further, condition index was negatively correlated with sponge biomass, which was positively correlated with oyster size, suggesting that the impact of the sponge changes with ontogeny. By investigating clearance rates, tissue isotopic and nutrient content, as well as caloric value, this study provides further evidence that sponge presence causes the oysters to divert energy into costly shell maintenance and repair at the expense of shell and somatic growth. Thus, although variable, our results demonstrate negative impacts of sponge infestation on oyster demographics, particularly as oysters grow larger. PMID:26575154

  15. Selenium (Se) seed priming induced growth and biochemical changes in wheat under water deficit conditions.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Fahim; Ashraf, M Yasin; Ahmad, Rashid; Waraich, Ejaz Ahmad

    2013-02-01

    Insufficient stand establishment at early growth stages in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to drought stress is a major problem that limits overall efficiency and yield of crop. Priming of seed is an effective method for raising seed performance and improving tolerance of crops to abiotic stresses especially drought. The seeds of two local wheat cultivars (Kohistan-97 and Pasban-90) were soaked in distilled water or sodium selenate solutions of 25, 50, 75, and 100 μM for 1/2 or 1 h at 25 °C and later re-dried to their original moisture levels before sowing. One-hour priming significantly increased root length stress tolerance index, dry matter stress tolerance index, and total biomass of seedlings; however, no significant effect of changing duration of Se seed priming was observed on plant height stress tolerance index and shoot/root ratio. Among cultivars, Kohistan-97 was found to be more responsive to Se seed treatment as 1 h priming at 100 μM significantly increased its total biomass by 43 % as compared to control treatment. Although biomass of seedlings was not affected with Se seed priming under normal conditions, but it increased significantly with increase in rates of Se under drought stress conditions. One-hour priming at 75 μM increased the total sugar content and total free amino acids in both wheat cultivars. A more significant decrease in soluble proteins of seedlings was observed by 1 h priming than 1/2 h priming under drought stress conditions. PMID:23197374

  16. How do soil physical conditions for crop growth vary over time under established contrasting tillage regimes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, Paul; Stobart, Ron; Valentine, Tracy; George, Timothy; Morris, Nathan; Newton, Adrian; McKenzie, Blair

    2014-05-01

    -throughput. Samples are taken over the rooting zone in the topsoil, plough pan and subsoil. The first year's dataset from this comprehensive project will be presented. Early data identified plough pans under shallow non-inversion tillage that will limit root growth at all sites. Aggregate stabilities vary as expected, with plough soils at shallow depth being less stable than non-inversion tillage, but greater stability in plough soils at greater depth due to incorporated organic matter. Very rapidly following cultivation, the seedbeds coalesce, resulting in a more challenging physical environment for crop growth. We are exploring the mechanisms in soil structure temporal dynamics in greater detail, including the resilience of seedbeds to structural degradation through natural weathering and the action of plants. These profound differences in soil conditions will impact the root ideotype of crops for these different conditions. This has implications for the way in which breeding and genotype selection is performed in the future. Ultimately, we aim to identify crop varieties suited to local soil conditions and management, possibly with root traits that boost yields and soil physical quality.

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor promoter-based conditionally replicative adenoviruses for pan-carcinoma application

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, K; Reynolds, PN; Adachi, Y; Kaliberova, L; Uchino, J; Nakanishi, Y; Curiel, DT

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of advanced lung cancer is one of the major challenges in current medicine because of the high morbidity and mortality of the disease. Advanced stage lung cancer is refractory to conventional therapies and has an extremely poor prognosis. Thus, new therapeutic approaches are needed. Lung tumor formation depends on angiogenesis in which the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) produced by cancer cells plays a pivotal role. Neutralizing VEGF with a soluble VEGF receptor suppresses tumor growth; however, the anticancer effect with this therapy is weakened after the intratumoral vascular network is completed. In this study, we turned the expression of VEGF by tumors to therapeutic advantage using a conditionally replication-competent adenovirus (CRAd) in which the expression of E1 is controlled by the human VEGF promoter. This virus achieved good levels of viral replication in lung cancer cells and induced a substantial anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. As a further enhancement, the cancer cell killing effect was improved with tropism modification of the virus to express the knob domain of Ad3, which improved infectivity for cancer cells. These VEGF promoter-based CRAds also showed a significant cell killing effect for various types of cancer lines other than lung cancer. Conversely, the VEGF promoter has low activity in normal tissues, and the CRAd caused no damage to normal bronchial epithelial cells. Since tumor-associated angiogenesis via VEGF signalling is common in many types of cancers, these CRAds may be applicable to a wide range of tumors. We concluded that VEGF promoter-based CRAds have the potential to be an effective strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:17024232

  18. Nucleation and growth of crystals under cirrus and polar stratospheric cloud conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Queen, Brian; Teets, Edward; Fahey, James

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory studies examine phase changes of hygroscopic substances which occur as aerosol in stratosphere and troposphere (sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, nitric acid, sulfuric acid), under controlled conditions, in samples volume 1 to 10(exp -4) ml. Crystallization of salts from supersaturated solutions is examined by slowly evaporating a solution drop on a substrate, under controlled relative humidity, until self nucleation occurs; controlled nucleation of ice in a mm capillary U-tube gives a measured ice crystallization velocity at known supercooling. Two states of crystallization occur for regions where hydrates exist. It is inferred that all of the materials readily exist as supersaturated/supercooled solutions; the degree of metastability appears to be slightly enhanced by inclusion of aircraft produced soot. The crystallization velocity is taken as a measure of viscosity. Results suggest an approach to a glass transition at high molality, supersaturation and/or supercooling within the range of atmospheric interest. It is hypothesized that surface reactions occur more readily on solidified particles - either crystalline or glass, whereas volume reactions are more important on droplets with sufficiently low viscosity and volume diffusivity. Implications are examined for optical properties of such particles in the atmosphere. In a separate experiment, crystal growth was examined in a modified thermal vapor diffusion chamber over the range of cirrus temperature (-30 to -70 C) and under controlled supersaturation and air pressure. The crystals grew at a velocity of 1-2 microns/s, thickness 60-70 micron, in the form of thin column crystals. Design criteria are given for a system to investigate particle growth down to -100 C, (PSC temperatures) where nitric acid particles can be grown under similar control and in the form of hydrate crystals.

  19. Down-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor-signaling pathway by binding of GRP78/BiP to the receptor under glucose-starved stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Cai, B; Tomida, A; Mikami, K; Nagata, K; Tsuruo, T

    1998-11-01

    GRP78/BiP, a molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, is induced under such adverse conditions for cell survival as glucose starvation. Induction of GRP78 has been shown to coincide with G1 cell cycle arrest, which is an important cellular defense system. In this study, we investigated involvement of GRP78 in the mechanism of growth arrest by using human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Under a chemical stress condition with 2-deoxyglucose, GRP78 was induced 3-4-fold. In the stressed cells, an underglycosylated form of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was produced and the mature form was decreased. We found that the molecular chaperone GRP78 in the endoplasmic reticulum formed a stable complex with the underglycosylated EGFR but did not with the mature form. This complex formation occurred specifically under the stress conditions, and the complex was dissociated upon removal of the stress. Treatment of the GRP78-underglycosylated EGFR complex with ATP resulted in a release of the underglycosylated EGFR from GRP78, indicating that the complex could be formed through the chaperone function of GRP78. In accordance with the complex formation with endoplasmic reticulum-resident GRP78, the underglycosylated EGFR could not be translocated to the cell surface. As a result, EGF could not induce expression of cyclin D3, a G1 cyclin, in the stressed cells, whereas it did in non-stressed cells. These results indicated that, in the stressed cells, GRP78 participated in down-regulation of EGF-signaling pathway by forming a stable complex with EGFR and inhibiting EGFR translocation to the cell surface. PMID:9766525

  20. TRPM6 kinase activity regulates TRPM7 trafficking and inhibits cellular growth under hypomagnesic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Brandao, Katherine; Deason-Towne, Francina; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Perraud, Anne-Laure; Schmitz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The channel kinases TRPM6 and TRPM7 are both members of the melastatin related transient receptor potential (TRPM) subfamily of ion channels and the only known fusions of an ion channel pore with a kinase domain. TRPM6 and TRPM7 form functional, tetrameric channel complexes at the plasma membrane by heteromerization. TRPM6 was previously shown to cross-phosphorylate TRPM7 on threonine residues, but not vice versa. Genetic studies demonstrated that TRPM6 and TRPM7 fulfill non-redundant functions, and that each channel contributes uniquely to the regulation of Mg2+ homeostasis. Although there are indications that TRPM6 and TRPM7 can influence each other’s cellular distribution and activity, little is known about the functional relationship between these two channel-kinases. In the present study, we examined how TRPM6 kinase activity influences TRPM7 serine phosphorylation, intracellular trafficking, and cell surface expression of TRPM7, as well as Mg2+-dependent cellular growth. We found TRPM7 serine phosphorylation via the TRPM6 kinase, but no TRPM6 serine phosphorylation via the TRPM7 kinase. Intracellular trafficking of TRPM7 was altered in HEK-293 epithelial kidney cells and DT40 B cells in the presence of TRPM6 with intact kinase activity, independently of the availability of extracellular Mg2+, but TRPM6/7 surface labeling experiments indicate comparable levels of the TRPM6/7 channels at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, using a complementation approach in TRPM7-deficient DT40 B-cells, we demonstrated that wildtype TRPM6 inhibited cell growth under hypomagnesic cell culture conditions in cells co-expressing TRPM6 and TRPM7, however co-expression of a TRPM6 kinase dead mutant had no effect – a similar phenotype was also observed in TRPM6/7 co-expressing HEK-293 cells. Our results provide first clues about how heteromer formation between TRPM6 and TRPM7 influences the biological activity of these ion channels. We show that TRPM6 regulates TRPM7 intracellular

  1. Growth curve analysis of placental and fetal growth influenced by adjacent fetal sex status under crowded uterine conditions in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intrauterine position and sex of adjacent fetuses in litter bearing species have been implicated in physiological and behavioral differences in males and females. Our objective was to establish growth curves for fetal and placental weight gain as influenced by sex status of flanking fetuses under cr...

  2. Evaluation of viability and growth of Acetobacter senegalensis under different stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Rasoul; Delvigne, Frank; Babanezhad, Manoochehr; Thonart, Philippe

    2013-05-15

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are used in production of vinegars. During acetic acid fermentation, AAB encounter various aggressive conditions which may lead to a variety of cellular disorders. Previous researches mainly studied the influences of different carbon sources on tolerance of AAB to ethanol and acetic acid. In this study, different techniques were used comparatively to investigate the effects of preadaptation on the ability of A. senegalensis to tolerate ethanol and acetic acid. In general, the carbon sources used for preadaptation of A. senegalensis exhibited significant effects on the tolerance of cells to stressors. Flow-cytometric assessments of preadapted cells in ethanol showed that 87.3% of the cells perform respiration after exposure to a stress medium containing 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid. However, 58.4% of these preadapted cells could keep their envelope integrity under the stress condition. They could also grow rapidly (μmax=0.39/h) in the stress medium (E5A3) with a high yield (>80%). A. senegalensis grown in glucose exhibited a low tolerance to acetic acid. Analysis of their respiration capacity, membrane integrity and culturability revealed that almost all the population were dead after exposure to 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid. In contrast, exposure of A. senegalensis preadapted in a mixture of glucose and acetic acid to a stress medium containing 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid, exhibited an intact respiration system and cellular membrane integrity in 80.3% and 50.01% of cells, respectively. Moreover, just 24% of these cells could keep their culturability under that stress condition. In summary, cell envelope integrity, growth and culturability are more susceptible to pH and acetic acid stresses whereas respiration system is less subjected to damages under stress condition. In addition, preadaptation of A. senegalensis in a mixture of glucose and acetic acid enables it to tolerate and grow in ethanol and

  3. Growth of the acidophilic iron-sulfur bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans under Mars-like geochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauermeister, Anja; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2014-08-01

    The question of life on Mars has been in focus of astrobiological research for several decades, and recent missions in orbit or on the surface of the planet are constantly expanding our knowledge on Martian geochemistry. For example, massive stratified deposits have been identified on Mars containing sulfate minerals and iron oxides, which suggest the existence of acidic aqueous conditions in the past, similar to acidic iron- and sulfur-rich environments on Earth. Acidophilic organisms thriving in such habitats could have been an integral part of a possibly widely extinct Martian ecosystem, but remains might possibly even exist today in protected subsurface niches. The chemolithoautotrophic strain Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was selected as a model organism to study the metabolic capacities of acidophilic iron-sulfur bacteria, especially regarding their ability to grow with in situ resources that could be expected on Mars. The experiments were not designed to accurately simulate Martian physical conditions (except when certain single parameters such as oxygen partial pressure were considered), but rather the geochemical environment that can be found on Mars. A. ferrooxidans could grow solely on the minerals contained in synthetic Mars regolith mixtures with no added nutrients, using either O2 as an external electron acceptor for iron oxidation, or H2 as an external electron donor for iron reduction, and thus might play important roles in the redox cycling of iron on Mars. Though the oxygen partial pressure of the Martian atmosphere at the surface was not sufficient for detectable iron oxidation and growth of A. ferrooxidans during short-term incubation (7 days), alternative chemical O2-generating processes in the subsurface might yield microhabitats enriched in oxygen, which principally are possible under such conditions. The bacteria might also contribute to the reductive dissolution of Fe3+-containing minerals like goethite and hematite, which are

  4. Modelling the growth/no growth boundary of Zygosaccharomyces bailii in acidic conditions: a contribution to the alternative method to preserve foods without using chemical preservatives.

    PubMed

    Dang, T D T; Mertens, L; Vermeulen, A; Geeraerd, A H; Van Impe, J F; Debevere, J; Devlieghere, F

    2010-01-31

    The aim of the study was to develop mathematical models describing growth/no growth (G/NG) boundaries of the highly resistant food spoilage yeast-Zygosaccharomyces bailii-in different environmental conditions, taking acidified sauces as the target product. By applying these models, the stability of products with characteristics within the investigated pH, a(w) and acetic acid ranges can be evaluated. Besides, the well-defined no growth regions can be used in the development of guidelines regarding formulation of new shelf-stable foods without using chemical preservatives, which would facilitate the innovation of additive-free products. Experiments were performed at different temperatures and periods (22 degrees C for 45 and 60days, 30 degrees C for 45days) in 150 modified Sabouraud media characterized by high amount of sugars (glucose and fructose, 15% (w/v)), acetic acid (0.0-2.5% (v/v), 6 levels), pH (3.0-5.0, 5 levels) and a(w) (0.93-0.97, 5 levels). These time and temperature combinations were chosen as they are commonly applied for shelf-stable foods. The media were inoculated with ca. 4.5 log CFU/ml and yeast growth was monitored daily using optical density measurements. Every condition was examined in 20 replicates in order to yield accurate growth probabilities. Three separate ordinary logistic regression models were developed for different tested temperatures and incubation time. The total acetic acid concentration was considered as variable for all models. In general, when one intrinsic inhibitory factor became more stringent, the G/NG boundary shifted to less stressful conditions of the other two factors, resulting in enlarged no growth zones. Abrupt changes of growth probability often occurred around the transition zones (between growth and no growth regions), which indicates that minor variations in environmental conditions near the G/NG boundaries can cause a significant impact on the growth probability. When comparing growth after 45days between the

  5. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  6. Growth of specific muscle strength between 6 and 18 years in contrasting socioeconomic conditions.

    PubMed

    Henneberg, M; Brush, G; Harrison, G A

    2001-05-01

    The influence of sex, age, and socioeconomic conditions on specific grip strength of 6-18-year-old individuals was studied among 1,704 males and 1,956 females belonging to the so-called "Cape Coloured" community in the western part of South Africa. Half of the participants of both sexes came from communities in the Greater Cape Town area where living conditions are comparable to those of middle-class First World communities (high SES). The other half came from the poorest rural communities of Klein Karoo (low SES). Arm circumferences, triceps skinfold thickness, and grip strength of the right and of the left hand were greater in individuals from high SES at all ages. Females within each SES group had skinfolds thicker than males, especially at older ages, and were weaker. Specific grip strength (SS), estimated as grip strength per unit area of cross section of the fat-free arm, increased with age in each group, was greater in males, and was significantly lower in low SES groups, than in the high SES ones, especially during and after puberty. It seems that SES difference in SS will persist into adulthood. Sexual differences in SS can be attributed to hormonal differences; while the SS increase with age and the difference between SES groups find no clear explanation in current theories of muscle growth and development. Since the speed of neuromuscular reaction observed in our participants is slower among low SES individuals, it seems that the difference in neuromuscular control of strength may be responsible for our findings. Differences in muscle metabolism and hormonal regulation must also be considered. PMID:11309751

  7. Growth, differentiation and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under microgravity conditions (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, E. P.; Briarty, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this set of experiments is to quantify the structural and behavioral changes taking place in germinating seeds of the small plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The protocol to be used will involve germination of the seeds in orbit. Their growth will be followed by fixing and photographing samples of microgravity grown and 1 g control seedlings at intervals over 4 days. The different studies which will then be performed can be classified in relation to the parts of the plants involved. The first study will be an examination of the ultrastructure of the root statocytes, the cells containing gravity sensors, to determine whether their development proceeds normally under microgravity conditions. A second study will examine the differences in root and shoot development and orientation between normal wild type seedlings and those of an agravitropic mutant (aux-1) - one that does not respond normally to gravity. A third set of observations will be made on the structural changes occurring during reserve breakdown and utilization in the cells of the cotyledons, the storage organs of the seed. The fourth part of the work will be an examination of the statocytes present in the shoot and their development in microgravity. The final part of the study will give an answer to the debated question of whether the formation of the hypocotyl hook in seedlings is gravity dependent.

  8. A comprehensive siRNA screen for kinases that suppress macroautophagy in optimal growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Szyniarowski, Piotr; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Farkas, Thomas; Høyer-Hansen, Maria; Nylandsted, Jesper; Kallunki, Tuula; Jäättelä, Marja

    2011-08-01

    Macroautophagy is a catabolic process that maintains cellular homeostasis and protects cells against various external stresses including starvation. Except for the identification of the Akt-mTORC1 pathway as a major negative regulator, little is known about signaling networks that control macroautophagy under optimal growth conditions. Therefore, we screened a human kinome siRNA library for siRNAs that increase the number of autophagosomes in normally growing MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells, and identified 10 kinases as regulators of constitutive macroautophagy. Further analysis of these kinases with respect to the autophagic flux, kinase signaling and endolysosomal function identified WNK2 as a positive regulator of autophagosome maturation and nine others as macroautophagy inhibitors. The depletion of MK2, PACSIN1, DAPK2, CDKL3 and SCYL1 functioned upstream of Akt-mTORC1 pathway, whereas CSNK1A1, BUB1, PKLR and NEK4 suppressed autophagosome formation downstream or independent of mTORC1. Importantly, all identified kinases except for BUB1 regulated macroautophagy also in immortalized MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. The kinases identified here shed light to the complex regulation of macroautophagy and open new possibilities for its pharmacological manipulation. PMID:21508686

  9. Floridoside production by the red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria under different conditions of growth and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-12-01

    Floridoside is a compatible solute synthesized by red algae that has attracted considerable attention due to its promising antifouling and therapeutic properties. However, research on industrial applications of floridoside is hampered by limited compound availability and the development of a production process yielding high amounts of this glycoside has not been explored yet. In the present work, floridoside accumulation by the red microalgae Galdieria sulphuraria under different conditions was investigated in order to optimize the production of this glycoside in this microalgae. G. sulphuraria shows consider advantages over other red algae as potential industrial producer of floridoside due to its unicellular nature, its ability to grow heterotrophically in complete darkness and its acidophilic lifestyle. The main compatible solute accumulated by G. sulphuraria under salt stress was purified, identified as floridoside by (1)H-NMR and used as standard for quantification. Our results showed that applying the osmotic stress after the cells had grown first in medium with no salt resulted in higher floridoside yields compared to those obtained in cells growing under osmotic stress from the beginning. Among several parameters tested, the use of glycerol as carbon source for cell growth showed the most significant impact on floridoside accumulation, which reached a maximum of 56.8 mg/g dry biomass. PMID:27620735

  10. Containerless protein crystallization in floating drops: application to crystal growth monitoring under reduced nucleation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorber, Bernard; Giegé, Richard

    1996-10-01

    A micromethod was developed for the batch crystallization of proteins under conditions were the solution has no contact with the container walls. Drops of crystallization solutions (5 to 100 μl) are placed at the interface between two layers of inert and non-miscible silicone fluids contained in square glass or plastic cuvettes. The densities of the fluids are either lower or higher than those of the major precipitating agents of macromolecules, including aqueous solutions containing salts, polyethylene glycols or alcohols. Several proteins and a spherical plant virus were crystallized in the temperature range 4°C-20°C using this set-up. A thermostated device was built for the dynamic control of the temperature of crystallization drops and the monitoring of crystal growth by video-microscopy. In all cases, the habit of the crystals grown in floating drops are identical to those of controls grown in sealed glass tubes without silicone fluid. The comparison of the number of crystals in drops kept under one layer of fluid and in floating drops of the same volume indicates that heterogeneous nucleation is minimized when protein crystallization is performed in floating drops. The advantages and limitations of this novel containerless crystallization method are discussed.

  11. [Comparison of growth and field microclimate characteristics of broomcorn millet under different fertilization conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pan-pan; Zhou, Yu; Song, Hui; Qiao, Zhi-jun; Wang, Hai-gang; Zheng, Dian-feng; Feng, Bai-li

    2015-02-01

    A field experiment with two broomcorn millet varieties Longmi 8 (strong drought-resistant variety) and Jinmi 4 (drought-sensitive variety) was conducted to compare their differences in growth, field microclimate and photosynthetic capacity from anthesis to maturity under different fertility conditions. The results showed that, fertilization decreased canopy temperature, air temperature, soil temperature, illumination, but improved the relative humidity among broomcorn millet plants compared with the non-fertilization treatment. With an increase of the fertilizer level, the plant height, SPAD, LAI, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration in broomcorn millet showed an increasing trend, which of the high fertilization treatment were 9.2%, 15.1%, 56.6%, 17.8%, 24.6%, 14.2%, 29.7% higher than those of non-fertilization treatment, respectively. Compared with Jinmi 4, Longmi 8 showed a cold wet characteristic, with lower canopy temperature, air temperature, soil temperature; illumination, and higher plant height, LAI, SPAD and relative humidity during grain filling. Moreover, each photosynthetic index of Longmi 8 slowly decreased and extended the period of leaf photosynthetic function so as to accumulate more photosynthetic products. PMID:26094463

  12. Growth rate, organic carbon and nutrient removal rates of Chlorella sorokiniana in autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunjin; Park, Jeong-eun; Cho, Yong-Beom; Hwang, Sun-Jin

    2013-09-01

    This study sought to investigate the growth rate and organic carbon and nutrient removal efficiency of Chlorella sorokiniana under autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. Growth rates of the microalgae were 0.24 d(-1), 0.53 d(-1) and 0.44 d(-1) in autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions, respectively. The growth rate of C. sorokiniana was significantly higher for that grown under heterotrophic conditions. The nitrogen removal rates were 13.1 mg-N/L/day, 23.9 mg-N/L/day and 19.4 mg-N/L/day, respectively. The phosphorus removal rates reached to 3.4 mg-P/L/day, 5.6 mg-P/L/day and 5.1 mg-P/L/day, respectively. Heterotrophic conditions were superior in terms of the microalgae growth and removal of nitrogen and phosphorus compared to autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions, suggesting that microalgae cultured under this condition would be most useful for application in wastewater treatment systems. PMID:23850820

  13. Low Trap Density in InAs/High-k Nanowire Gate Stacks with Optimized Growth and Doping Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Babadi, Aein Shiri; Jacobsson, Daniel; Colvin, Jovana; Yngman, Sofie; Timm, Rainer; Lind, Erik; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2016-04-13

    In this paper, we correlate the growth of InAs nanowires with the detailed interface trap density (Dit) profile of the vertical wrap-gated InAs/high-k nanowire semiconductor-dielectric gate stack. We also perform the first detailed characterization and optimization of the influence of the in situ doping supplied during the nanowire epitaxial growth on the sequential transistor gate stack quality. Results show that the intrinsic nanowire channels have a significant reduction in Dit as compared to planar references. It is also found that introducing tetraethyltin (TESn) doping during nanowire growth severely degrades the Dit profile. By adopting a high temperature, low V/III ratio tailored growth scheme, the influence of doping is minimized. Finally, characterization using a unique frequency behavior of the nanowire capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics reveals a change of the dopant incorporation mechanism as the growth condition is changed. PMID:26978479

  14. Growth dynamics of geographically different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal isolates belonging to the 'Rhizophagus clade' under monoxenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Silvani, Vanesa Analía; Bidondo, Laura Fernández; Bompadre, María Josefina; Colombo, Roxana Paula; Pérgola, Mariana; Bompadre, Agustín; Fracchia, Sebastián; Godeas, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    The growth dynamics of extraradical mycelium and spore formation of 14 "Rhizophagus" isolates from different sites in Argentina were evaluated under monoxenic conditions. A modified Gompertz model was used to characterize the development of mycelium and spores for each isolate under the same conditions. The lag time, maximal growth rate and total quantity of both extraradical hyphae and spores were determined. Wide variability among isolates was detected, and all growth parameters were significantly altered by fungal isolate. Discriminant analysis differentiated isolates primarily based on the extent of extraradical hyphae produced, yet such differences did not conclusively correspond to phylogenetic relationships among closely related isolates based on partial SSU sequences. Given that the "Rhizophagus" isolates were grown under controlled conditions for many generations, the expression of phenotypic variability could be attributed to genetic differences that are not completely resolved by phylogenetic analysis employing the small ribosomal gene. PMID:24891409

  15. Description of the adhesive crystal growth under normal and micro-gravity conditions employing experimental and numerical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Shigenao; Ohno, Kentaro; Komiya, Atsuki; Sakai, Seigo

    2002-11-01

    Investigation of the crystal growth in solutions is closely related to effective and high quality production of medicine, food and new materials. In the present study, experiments and numerical simulations were performed to explain the mechanism of crystal growth from an aqueous solution. In the experiment, transient double diffusion fields were observed by using an accurate optical measuring system. In the numerical simulation, transient double diffusion fields were calculated by a numerical simulation code, applying initial and boundary conditions obtained by experiment. The results of numerical simulation show good agreement with experimental results. Taking these two approaches into consideration, it was considered that adhesive crystal growth was dominated by the temperature dependence of the solutal diffusion coefficient. The microscopic mechanism of adhesive crystal growth is almost the same between micro-gravity and normal gravity conditions; nevertheless, the macroscopic growth rate is different in each situation. Simulation of adhesive crystal growth can be performed easily using appropriate boundary conditions obtained by the present experiments.

  16. Cold-water coral growth under extreme environmental conditions, the Cape Lookout area, NW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Davies, A. J.; Lavaleye, M. M. S.; Ross, S. W.; Seim, H.; Bane, J.; van Haren, H.; Bergman, M. J. N.; de Haas, H.; Brooke, S.; van Weering, T. C. E.

    2014-05-01

    day, which is the largest temperature variability as measured so far in a cold-water coral habitat. Warm events, related to Gulf Stream meanders, had the duration of roughly 1 week and the current during these events was directed to the NNE. The consequences of such events must be significant given the strong effects of temperature on the metabolism of cold-water corals. Furthermore, elevated acoustic backscatter values and high mass fluxes were also recorded during these events, indicating a second stressor that may affect the corals. The abrasive nature of sand in combination with strong currents might sand blast the corals. We conclude that cold-water corals near Cape Lookout live under extreme conditions that limit mound growth at present.

  17. Dynamics of Metal Partitioning at the Cell-Solution Interface: Implications for Toxicity Assessment under Growth-Inhibiting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Paquet, Nathalie; Lavoie, Michel; Fortin, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Metal toxicity toward microorganisms is usually evaluated by determining growth inhibition. To achieve a mechanistic interpretation of such toxic effects, the intricate coupling between cell growth kinetics and metal partitioning dynamics at the cell-solution interface over time must be considered on a quantitative level. A formalism is elaborated to evaluate cell-surface-bound, internalized, and extracellular metal fractions in the limit where metal uptake kinetics is controlled by internalization under noncomplexing medium conditions. Cell growth kinetics is tackled using the continuous logistic equation modified to include growth inhibition by metal accumulation to intracellular or cell surface sites. The theory further includes metal-proton competition for adsorption at cell-surface binding sites, as well as possible variation of cell size during exposure to metal ions. The formalism elucidates the dramatic impacts of initial cell concentration on metal bioavailability and toxicity over time, in agreement with reported algae bioassays. It further highlights that appropriate definition of toxicity endpoints requires careful inspection of the ratio between exposure time scale and time scale of metal depletion from bulk solution. The latter depends on metal internalization-excretion rate constants, microorganism growth, and the extent of metal adsorption on nonspecific, transporter, and growth inhibitory sites. As an application of the theory, Cd toxicity in the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata is interpreted from constrained modeling of cell growth kinetics and of interfacial Cd-partitioning dynamics measured under various exposure conditions. PMID:25945520

  18. Learning from adverse incidents involving medical devices.

    PubMed

    Amoore, John; Ingram, Paula

    While an adverse event involving a medical device is often ascribed to either user error or device failure, the causes are typically multifactorial. A number of incidents involving medical devices are explored using this approach to investigate the various causes of the incident and the protective barriers that minimised or prevented adverse consequences. User factors, including mistakes, omissions and lack of training, conspired with background factors--device controls and device design, storage conditions, hidden device damage and physical layout of equipment when in use--to cause the adverse events. Protective barriers that prevented or minimised the consequences included staff vigilance, operating procedures and alarms. PMID:12715578

  19. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  20. Laboratory Measurements on Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Water Vapor on Meteor Smoke Particle Analogues under Conditions of the Mesopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duft, D.; Nachbar, M.; Wilms, H.; Rapp, M.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water vapor on charged nanometer sized (radius< 2nm) meteor smoke particles (MSP) is believed to be the dominating nucleation process in the mesopause region leading to the formation of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC). However, application of classical nucleation theory to the cold conditions of the polar summer mesopause comprises large uncertainties giving rise to strongly variant model predictions of PMC formation. To reduce these uncertainties laboratory measurements of nucleation and growth rates are required. We use an electrodynamic trap to investigate the nucleation and growth of water vapor on singly charged sub-3nm MSP analogues in the laboratory under mesospheric conditions typical during PMC growth initiation. The particles are created in a microwave plasma particle source and stored in a quadrupole ion trap under mesospheric pressure and temperature, where they are subjected to the high supersaturation necessary for nucleation and growth on nanometer sized particles. The particle mass and mass change by water accretion is monitored with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer as a function of residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this contribution we present for the first time measurements of nucleation and growth rates of water vapor on MSP analogues with an initial radius between 1.5nm and 3 nm. Contact parameter, sticking coefficient as well as charge effects on vapor pressure of small particles at mesospheric conditions are presented. These parameters are essential for the microphysical understanding and further global model calculations of PMC formation.

  1. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum L.) as a function of growth under different conditions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sunil D; Tilak, Jai C; Acharya, R; Rajurkar, Nilima S; Devasagayam, T P A; Reddy, A V R

    2006-03-01

    The antioxidant activity of wheatgrass, which is consumed as a dietary supplement, was estimated at different levels. The methods employed include FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power), ABTS (2,2'-azobis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and DPPH (1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) assays. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of wheatgrass grown under different conditions over a period of 6, 7, 8, 10 and 15 days were used. Lipid peroxidation and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) were determined and utilized to check the potency of a few selected extracts. Different conditions used for growth were (1) tap water, (2) tap water with nutrients, (3) soil and tap water, and (4) soil with nutrients. For comparison, a commercially available wheatgrass tablet was analysed. To explain the reasons behind the observed differences, the total phenolic and flavonoid contents of the extracts were measured. These contents increased with growth under all the conditions. The ethanol extracts were found to have a higher phenolic and flavonoid content than the aqueous extracts. The highest FRAP values occurred on day 15 of growth under condition 4, the values being 0.463 and 0.573 mmol of ascorbic acid and Trolox equivalents/100 g fresh wheatgrass for aqueous and ethanol extracts, respectively. In the aqueous extracts no specific trend was observed with the DPPH assay for the different conditions nor for the growth period. In the case of ethanol extracts, however, it increased with the growth period and the wheatgrass grown in condition 4 was found to be the most effective. These extracts were also found to inhibit significantly ascorbate-Fe2+ induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver mitochondria. The ORAC values of aqueous and ethanol extracts of day 10 with condition 4 were found to be 39.9 and 48.2, respectively, being higher than those reported for many natural extracts or vegetables. PMID:16521113

  2. The Effects of Temperature and Nutritional Conditions on Mycelium Growth of Two Oyster Mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus cystidiosus)

    PubMed Central

    Hoa, Ha Thi

    2015-01-01

    The influences of temperature and nutritional conditions on the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (PO) and Pleurotus cystidiosus (PC) were investigated in laboratory experiment during the summer season of 2014. The results of the experiment indicated that potato dextrose agar (PDA) and yam dextrose agar (YDA) were the most suitable media for the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO while four media (PDA, YDA, sweet potato dextrose agar, and malt extract agar medium) were not significantly different in supporting mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC. The optimal temperature for mycelium growth of both oyster mushroom species was obtained at 28℃. Mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO was improved by carbon sources such as glucose, molasses, and at 1~5% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO was achieved the highest value. Whereas glucose, dextrose, and sucrose as carbon sources gave the good mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC, and at 1~3% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of PC was achieved the maximum value. Ammonium chloride concentrations at 0.03~0.09% and 0.03~0.05% also gave the greatest values in mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO and PC. Brown rice was found to be the most favourable for mycelium growth of two oyster mushroom species. In addition, sugarcane residue, acasia sawdust and corn cob were selected as favourable lignocellulosic substrate sources for mycelium growth of both oyster mushrooms. PMID:25892910

  3. The Effects of Temperature and Nutritional Conditions on Mycelium Growth of Two Oyster Mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus cystidiosus).

    PubMed

    Hoa, Ha Thi; Wang, Chun-Li

    2015-03-01

    The influences of temperature and nutritional conditions on the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (PO) and Pleurotus cystidiosus (PC) were investigated in laboratory experiment during the summer season of 2014. The results of the experiment indicated that potato dextrose agar (PDA) and yam dextrose agar (YDA) were the most suitable media for the mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO while four media (PDA, YDA, sweet potato dextrose agar, and malt extract agar medium) were not significantly different in supporting mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC. The optimal temperature for mycelium growth of both oyster mushroom species was obtained at 28℃. Mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PO was improved by carbon sources such as glucose, molasses, and at 1~5% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO was achieved the highest value. Whereas glucose, dextrose, and sucrose as carbon sources gave the good mycelium growth of oyster mushroom PC, and at 1~3% sucrose concentration, mycelium colony diameter of PC was achieved the maximum value. Ammonium chloride concentrations at 0.03~0.09% and 0.03~0.05% also gave the greatest values in mycelium colony diameter of mushroom PO and PC. Brown rice was found to be the most favourable for mycelium growth of two oyster mushroom species. In addition, sugarcane residue, acasia sawdust and corn cob were selected as favourable lignocellulosic substrate sources for mycelium growth of both oyster mushrooms. PMID:25892910

  4. Growth and condition of bluegills in Wisconsin lakes: effects of population density and lake pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, J.G.; Hanneman, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Growth and condition of bluegills epomis macrochirusfrom five acidic lakes (pH 5.1-6.0) and six circumneutral lakes (pH 6.7-7.5) in northern Wisconsin were compared. Although mean condition factors and mean back-calculated total lengths at ages 1 to 4 varied significantly among lakes, the differences were not related to lake pH. Rather, the ranks of mean condition factors and back-calculated lengths at ages 2, 3, and 4 were negatively correlated with relative density of bluegills among the lakes. Because of the dominating effect of density, growth rates and condition factors are not useful as indicators of chronic, pH-related stress on bluegill populations.

  5. Cold-water coral growth under extreme environmental conditions, the Cape Lookout area, NW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G.; Davies, A. J.; Lavaleye, M. J. N.; Ross, S. W.; Seim, H.; Bane, J.; van Haren, H.; Bergman, M.; de Haas, H.; Brooke, S.; van Weering, T.

    2013-12-01

    far in a cold-water coral habitat. Warm events, related to Gulf Stream meanders, had the duration of roughly one week and the current during these events was directed to the NNE. The consequences of such events must be significant given the strong effects of temperature on the metabolism of cold-water corals. Furthermore, elevated acoustic backscatter values and high mass fluxes were also recorded during these events, indicating a second stressor that may affect the corals. The abrasive nature of sand in combination with strong currents might sand blast the corals. We conclude that cold-water corals near Cape Lookout live under extreme conditions that limit mound growth at present.

  6. Energy Taxis Drives Campylobacter jejuni toward the Most Favorable Conditions for Growth

    PubMed Central

    Vegge, Christina S.; Brøndsted, Lone; Li, Yi-Ping; Bang, Dang D.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a serious food-borne bacterial pathogen in the developed world. Poultry is a major reservoir, and C. jejuni appears highly adapted to the gastrointestinal tract of birds. Several factors are important for chicken colonization and virulence, including a taxis mechanism for environmental navigation. To explore the mechanism of chemotaxis in C. jejuni, we constructed mutants with deletions of five putative mcp (methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein) genes (tlp1, tlp2, tlp3, docB, and docC). Surprisingly, the deletions did not affect the chemotactic behavior of the mutants compared to that of the parental strain. However, the tlp1, tlp3, docB, and docC mutant strains displayed a 10-fold decrease in the ability to invade human epithelial and chicken embryo cells, hence demonstrating that the corresponding proteins affect the host interaction. l-Asparagine, formate, d-lactate, and chicken mucus were identified as new attractants of C. jejuni, and we observed that chemical substances promoting tactic attraction are all known to support the growth of this organism. The attractants could be categorized as carbon sources and electron donors and acceptors, and we furthermore observed a correlation between an attractant's potency and its efficiency as an energy source. The tactic attraction was inhibited by the respiratory inhibitors HQNO (2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide) and sodium azide, which significantly reduce energy production by oxidative phosphorylation. These findings strongly indicate that energy taxis is the primary force in environmental navigation by C. jejuni and that this mechanism drives the organism toward the optimal chemical conditions for energy generation and colonization. PMID:19542337

  7. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.; Sabir, Jamal S.; Alfassi, Fahad A.; Hajarah, Nahid H.; Kabli, Saleh A.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Ashworth, Matt P.; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K.; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock. PMID:26440112

  8. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Inoculation to Enhance Vegetative Growth, Nitrogen Fixation and Nitrogen Remobilisation of Maize under Greenhouse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Khing Boon; Othman, Radziah; Abdul Rahim, Khairuddin; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H.

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) may provide a biological alternative to fix atmospheric N2 and delay N remobilisation in maize plant to increase crop yield, based on an understanding that plant-N remobilisation is directly correlated to its plant senescence. Thus, four PGPR strains were selected from a series of bacterial strains isolated from maize roots at two locations in Malaysia. The PGPR strains were screened in vitro for their biochemical plant growth-promoting (PGP) abilities and plant growth promotion assays. These strains were identified as Klebsiella sp. Br1, Klebsiella pneumoniae Fr1, Bacillus pumilus S1r1 and Acinetobacter sp. S3r2 and a reference strain used was Bacillus subtilis UPMB10. All the PGPR strains were tested positive for N2 fixation, phosphate solubilisation and auxin production by in vitro tests. In a greenhouse experiment with reduced fertiliser-N input (a third of recommended fertiliser-N rate), the N2 fixation abilities of PGPR in association with maize were determined by 15N isotope dilution technique at two harvests, namely, prior to anthesis (D50) and ear harvest (D65). The results indicated that dry biomass of top, root and ear, total N content and bacterial colonisations in non-rhizosphere, rhizosphere and endosphere of maize roots were influenced by PGPR inoculation. In particular, the plants inoculated with B. pumilus S1r1 generally outperformed those with the other treatments. They produced the highest N2 fixing capacity of 30.5% (262 mg N2 fixed plant−1) and 25.5% (304 mg N2 fixed plant−1) of the total N requirement of maize top at D50 and D65, respectively. N remobilisation and plant senescence in maize were delayed by PGPR inoculation, which is an indicative of greater grain production. This is indicated by significant interactions between PGPR strains and time of harvests for parameters on N uptake and at. % 15Ne of tassel. The phenomenon is also supported by the lower N content in tassels of maize treated

  9. Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Inoculation to Enhance Vegetative Growth, Nitrogen Fixation and Nitrogen Remobilisation of Maize under Greenhouse Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Khing Boon; Othman, Radziah; Abdul Rahim, Khairuddin; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) may provide a biological alternative to fix atmospheric N2 and delay N remobilisation in maize plant to increase crop yield, based on an understanding that plant-N remobilisation is directly correlated to its plant senescence. Thus, four PGPR strains were selected from a series of bacterial strains isolated from maize roots at two locations in Malaysia. The PGPR strains were screened in vitro for their biochemical plant growth-promoting (PGP) abilities and plant growth promotion assays. These strains were identified as Klebsiella sp. Br1, Klebsiella pneumoniae Fr1, Bacillus pumilus S1r1 and Acinetobacter sp. S3r2 and a reference strain used was Bacillus subtilis UPMB10. All the PGPR strains were tested positive for N2 fixation, phosphate solubilisation and auxin production by in vitro tests. In a greenhouse experiment with reduced fertiliser-N input (a third of recommended fertiliser-N rate), the N2 fixation abilities of PGPR in association with maize were determined by 15N isotope dilution technique at two harvests, namely, prior to anthesis (D50) and ear harvest (D65). The results indicated that dry biomass of top, root and ear, total N content and bacterial colonisations in non-rhizosphere, rhizosphere and endosphere of maize roots were influenced by PGPR inoculation. In particular, the plants inoculated with B. pumilus S1r1 generally outperformed those with the other treatments. They produced the highest N2 fixing capacity of 30.5% (262 mg N2 fixed plant-1) and 25.5% (304 mg N2 fixed plant-1) of the total N requirement of maize top at D50 and D65, respectively. N remobilisation and plant senescence in maize were delayed by PGPR inoculation, which is an indicative of greater grain production. This is indicated by significant interactions between PGPR strains and time of harvests for parameters on N uptake and at. % 15Ne of tassel. The phenomenon is also supported by the lower N content in tassels of maize treated with

  10. Conditions associated with Clostridium sporogenes growth as a surrogate for Clostridium botulinum in nonthermally processed canned butter.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R H; Dunn, M L; Ogden, L V; Jefferies, L K; Eggett, D L; Steele, F M

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the effect of butter composition and emulsion structure on growth and survival of Clostridium sporogenes, used as a surrogate for C. botulinum in canned butter. The lack of a thermal process step in commercially available canned butter raises questions of potential safety, because it is hermetically sealed and generally exhibits anaerobic growth conditions, which are optimal for Clostridium botulinum growth. Without thermal processing, low-acid canned foods must have inhibitory factors present to prevent C. botulinum growth. Some potential intrinsic inhibitory factors, or hurdles, within butter include: reduced water activity, acidity in cultured products, elevated salt content, and the micro-droplet nature of the aqueous phase in the butter emulsion. It was hypothesized that a normal, intact butter emulsion would have sufficient hurdles to prevent C. botulinum growth, whereas a broken butter emulsion would result in a coalesced aqueous phase that would allow for C. botulinum growth. Batch-churned butter was inoculated with C. sporogenes; butter samples with varying salt contents (0, 0.8, 1.6, and 2.4% wt/wt NaCl) were prepared and stored in coated steel cans for varying times (1 or 2 wk) and temperatures (22 or 41°C) to determine temperature and emulsion structure effects on C. sporogenes growth. Samples stored at 41°C showed a significant increase in C. sporogenes growth compared with those stored at 22°C. Furthermore, NaCl addition was found to have a significant effect on C. sporogenes growth, with 0.8% NaCl promoting more growth than 0%, but with decreases in growth observed at 1.6 and 2.4%. Uninoculated control plates were also found to have bacterial growth; this growth was attributed to other anaerobic bacteria present within the cream. It was concluded that removal of the hurdle created by the micro-droplet size of the emulsion aqueous phase could result in C. botulinum growth even at elevated salt

  11. ESTIMATATION OF GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN COOKED BEEF UNDER FLUCTUATING TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new concept for estimating the bacterial growth under temperature fluctuations was hypothesized and validated using Clostridium perfringens as a test organism. This new methodology was based on the Gompertz models to calculate the equivalent growth times under different temperatures, and estimate...

  12. Modeling potato root growth and water uptake under water stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) growth and yield are sensitive to drought starting at mild stress levels. Accurate simulation of root growth is critical for estimating water and nutrient uptake dynamics of major crops and improving agricultural decision support tools for natural resource management. ...

  13. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual grass Seed Production Under Field Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth regulator herbicides, such as 2,4-D, dicamba, picloram, and aminopyralid, are commonly used to control broadleaf weeds in grasslands, non-croplands and cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley). If applied to cereals at late growth stages, while the grasses are developing reproductive parts, the her...

  14. Adverse drug reactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, R E

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) - that is, unintended and harmful responses to medicines - are important to dermatologists because many present with cutaneous signs and because dermatological treatments can cause serious ADRs. The detection of ADRs to new drugs is often delayed because they have a long latency or are rare or unexpected. This means that ADRs to newer agents emerge only slowly after marketing. ADRs are part of the differential diagnosis of unusual rashes. A good drug history that includes details of drug dose, time-course of the reaction and factors that may make the patient more susceptible, will help. For example, Stevens-Johnson syndrome with abacavir is much commoner in patients with HLA-B*5701, and has a characteristic time course. Newer agents have brought newer reactions; for example, acneiform rashes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors such as erlotinib. Older systemic agents used to treat skin disease, including corticosteroids and methotrexate, cause important ADRs. The adverse effects of newer biological agents used in dermatology are becoming clearer; for example, hypersensitivity reactions or loss of efficacy from antibody formation and progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy due to reactivation of latent JC (John Cunningham) virus infections during efalizumab treatment. Unusual or serious harm from medicines, including ADRs, medication errors and overdose, should be reported. The UK Yellow Card scheme is online, and patients can report their own ADRs. PMID:25622648

  15. Linking Metabolism, Elemental Cycles, and Environmental Conditions in the Deep Biosphere: Growth of a Model Extremophile, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Under High-Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, G. C. M.; Cario, A.; Rogers, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    A majority of Earth's biosphere is hosted in subsurface environments where global-scale biogeochemical and energy cycles are driven by diverse microbial communities that operate on and are influenced by micro-scale environmental variables. While the subsurface hosts a variety of geochemical and geothermal conditions, elevated pressures are common to all subsurface ecosystems. Understanding how microbes adapt to and thrive in high-pressure environments is essential to linking microbial subsurface processes with global-scale cycles. Here we are using a model extremophile, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, to determine how elevated pressures affect the growth, metabolism, and physiology of subsurface microorganisms. A. fulgidus cycles carbon and sulfur via heterotrophic and autotrophic sulfate reduction in various high temperature and high-pressure niches including shallow marine vents, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and deep oil reservoirs. Here we report the results of A. fulgidus growth experiments at optimum temperature, 83°C, and pressures up to 600 bars. Exponential growth was observed over the entire pressure range, though growth rates were diminished at 500 and 600 bars compared to ambient pressure experimental controls. At pressures up to 400 bars, cell density yields and growth rates were at least as high as ambient pressure controls. Elevated pressures and extended incubation times stimulated cell flocculation, a common stress response in this strain, and cellular morphology was affected at pressures exceeding 400 bars. These results suggest that A. fulgidus continues carbon, sulfur and energy cycling unaffected by elevated pressures up to 400 bars, representing a variety of subsurface environments. The ability of subsurface organisms to drive biogeochemical cycles at elevated pressures is a critical link between the surface and subsurface biospheres and understanding how species-scale processes operate under these conditions is a vital part of global

  16. Growth condition dependence of photoluminescence polarization in (100) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Iba, Satoshi; Saito, Hidekazu; Yuasa, Shinji; Watanabe, Ken; Ohno, Yuzo

    2015-08-28

    We conducted systematic measurements on the carrier lifetime (τ{sub c}), spin relaxation time (τ{sub s}), and circular polarization of photoluminescence (P{sub circ}) in (100) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The τ{sub c} values are strongly affected by MBE growth conditions (0.4–9 ns), whereas the τ{sub s} are almost constant at about 0.13 ns. The result suggests that spin detection efficiency [τ{sub s}/(τ{sub c} + τ{sub s})], which is expected to be proportional to a steady-state P{sub circ}, is largely dependent on growth condition. We confirmed that the P{sub circ} has similar dependence on growth condition to those of τ{sub s}/(τ{sub c} + τ{sub s}) values. The study thus indicates that choosing the appropriate growth condition of the QW is indispensable for obtaining a high P{sub circ} from a spin-polarized light-emitting diode (spin-LED)

  17. EVALUATION OF FUNGAL GROWTH ON FIBERGLASS DUCT MATERIALS FOR VARIOUS MOISTURE, SOIL, USE, AND TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a series of experiments, each lasing 6 weeks, conducted in static environmental chambers to assess some of the conditions that may impact the ability of a variety of fiberglass materials to support the growth of a fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum. (NOTE:...

  18. DAMAGE POTENTIAL OF GRASSHOPPERS (ORTHOPTERA: ACRIDIDAE) ON EARLY GROWTH STAGES OF SMALL-GRAINS AND CANOLA UNDER SUBARCTIC CONDITIONS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small-grains, such as barley and oats, have been successfully grown under subarctic conditions but little is known about their response to herbivory by grasshoppers, especially during seedling stages. A growth chamber study quantified and characterized damage to above- and below-ground plant parts ...

  19. Growth and condition of juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch relate positively to species richness of trophically transmitted parasites.

    PubMed

    Losee, J P; Fisher, J; Teel, D J; Baldwin, R E; Marcogliese, D J; Jacobson, K C

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were first, to test the hypothesis that metrics of fish growth and condition relate positively to parasite species richness (S(R)) in a salmonid host; second, to identify whether S(R) differs as a function of host origin; third, to identify whether acquisition of parasites through marine v. freshwater trophic interactions was related to growth and condition of juvenile salmonids. To evaluate these questions, species diversity of trophically transmitted parasites in juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch collected off the coast of the Oregon and Washington states, U.S.A. in June 2002 and 2004 were analysed. Fish infected with three or more parasite species scored highest in metrics of growth and condition. Fish originating from the Columbia River basin had lower S(R) than those from the Oregon coast, Washington coast and Puget Sound, WA. Parasites obtained through freshwater or marine trophic interactions were equally important in the relationship between S(R) and ocean growth and condition of juvenile O. kisutch salmon. PMID:25271907

  20. A Miniature Condition in Brahman Cattle is Associated with a Single Nucleotide Mutation Within the Growth Hormone Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miniature Brahman cattle at the USDA ARS in Brooksville, FL have normal proportioned growth but are approximately 70% of normal mature height and weight when compared with Brahman cattle in the same heard. Pedigree analyses suggest that the condition is inherited as a recessive allele. The miniature...

  1. Collateral Adverse Outcomes After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Gundle, Kenneth; Hart, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Collateral adverse outcomes are the expected or unavoidable results of a procedure that is performed in a standard manner and typically experienced by the patient. Collateral adverse outcomes do not result from errors, nor are they rare. Collateral adverse outcomes occur as the direct result of a surgical procedure and must be accepted as a trade-off to attain the intended benefits of the surgical procedure. As such, collateral adverse outcomes do not fit into the traditional definition of a complication or adverse event. Examples of collateral adverse outcomes after lumbar spine arthrodesis include lumbar stiffness, postoperative psychological stress, postoperative pain, peri-incisional numbness, paraspinal muscle denervation, and adjacent-level degeneration. Ideally, a comparison of interventions for the treatment of a clinical condition should include information on both the negative consequences (expected and unexpected) and potential benefits of the treatment options. The objective evaluation and reporting of collateral adverse outcomes will provide surgeons with a more complete picture of invasive interventions and, thus, the improved ability to assess alternative treatment options. PMID:27049197

  2. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides

    PubMed Central

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions. PMID:27200041

  3. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    PubMed

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions. PMID:27200041

  4. Conditioning sulfidic mine waste for growth of Agrostis capillaris--impact on solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Viktor; Karlsson, Stefan; Grandin, Anna; Allard, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of the environment due to mining and mineral processing is an urgent problem worldwide. It is often desirable to establish a grass cover on old mine waste since it significantly decreases the production of leachates. To obtain sustainable growth, it is often necessary to improve several properties of the waste such as water-holding capacity, nutrient status, and toxicity. This can be done by addition of organic materials such as wood residues, e.g., compost. In this study, we focus on the solution chemistry of the leachates when a substrate containing historic sulfidic mine waste mixed with 30 % (volume) bark compost is overgrown by Agrostis capillaris. The pot experiments also included other growth-promoting additives (alkaline material, mycorrhiza, and metabolizable carbon) to examine whether a more sustainable growth could be obtained. Significant changes in the plant growth and in the leachates composition were observed during 8 weeks of growth. It was concluded that in this time span, the growth of A. capillaris did not affect the composition of the leachates from the pots. Instead, the composition of the leachates was determined by interactions between the bark compost and the mine waste. Best growth of A. capillaris was obtained when alkaline material and mycorrhiza or metabolizable carbon was added to the substrate. PMID:24519747

  5. Conditions for growth in one-person startups: a longitudinal study spanning eight years.

    PubMed

    Korunka, Christian; Kessler, Alexander; Frank, Hermann; Lueger, Manfred

    2011-08-01

    In the European Union, one-person businesses (OPBs) are increasingly regarded as an important alternative to dependent employment. From an economic policy standpoint, the growth potential of such businesses is especially attractive. This paper analyzes the growth potential of OPBs by postulating five key groups of enterprise growth predictors: personal traits, resources, strategy, industry, and organizational structures and systems. The framework model was adapted to suit the specific circumstances of OPBs. The model was tested using a longitudinal data set comprising 188 OPBs which were observed over a period of eight years. At the end of the observation period, the OPBs included in the study had an average of 1.33 employees. The gender of the founder, capital requirements at the time of establishment, and growth strategy proved to be the most important predictors of growth. In addition, human capital resources also tended to have a positive impact. The traits of the person founding the business were not found to affect growth. In summary, it is possible to draw empirically reliable conclusions about growth potential on the basis of the «seriousness» of an OPB startup project. PMID:21774899

  6. Effect of oxygen stress on growth and survival of Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes under different storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Qadiri, Hamzah; Sablani, Shyam S; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Al-Alami, Nivin; Govindan, Byju; Rasco, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the growth and survival of three foodborne pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes) in beef (7% fat) and nutrient broth under different oxygen levels. Samples were tested under anoxic (<0.5%), microoxic (6 to 8%), and oxic (20%) conditions during storage at 7 °C for 14 days and at 22 °C for 5 days. Two initial inoculum concentrations were used (1 and 2 log CFU per g of beef or per ml of broth). The results show that C. perfringens could grow in beef at 22 °C, with an increase of approximately 5 log under anoxic conditions and a 1-log increase under microoxic conditions. However, C. perfringens could not survive in beef held at 7 °C under microoxic and oxic storage conditions after 14 days. In an anoxic environment, C. perfringens survived in beef samples held at 7 °C, with a 1-log reduction. A cell decline was observed at 2 log under these conditions, with no surviving cells at the 1-log level. However, the results show that C. jejuni under microoxic conditions survived with declining cell numbers. Significant increases in L. monocytogenes (5 to 7 log) were observed in beef held at 22 °C for 5 days, with the lowest levels recovered under anoxic conditions. L. monocytogenes in refrigerated storage increased by a factor of 2 to 4 log. It showed the greatest growth under oxic conditions, with significant growth under anoxic conditions. These findings can be used to enhance food safety in vacuum-packed and modified atmosphere-packaged food products. PMID:25836393

  7. Growth Protocols for Etiolated Soybeans Germinated within BRIC-60 Canisters Under Spaceflight Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, H. G.; Sharek, J. A.; Johnson, K. M.; Stryjewski, E. C.; Prima, V. I.; Martynenko, O. I.; Piastuch, W. C.

    As part of the GENEX (Gene Expression) spaceflight experiment, protocols were developed to optimize the inflight germination and subsequent growth of 192 soybean (Glycine max cv McCall) seeds during STS-87. We describe a method which provided uniform growth and development of etiolated seedlings while eliminating root and shoot restrictions for short-term (4-7 day) experiments. Final seedling growth morphologies and the gaseous CO2 and ethylene levels present both on the last day in space and at the time of recovery within the spaceflight and ground control BRIC-60 canisters are presented

  8. Batch cultivation of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. 5: Characterization of poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate production under methane-dependent growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, N.N.; Hanna, M.L.; Taylor, R.T.

    1996-01-20

    Methanotrophs have promising applications in the bioremediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and in the production of a biopolymer, poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (PHB). Batch bioreactor culture conditions were studied for the accumulation of PHB by methane-grown Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, and to evaluate the effect of PHB on the bacterial capacity to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant. The PHB content of the washed and lyophilized cells was measured by gas chromatography (GC), after hydrochloric acid (HCl) propanolysis. A differential GC-based assay was developed for the monomer and the polymer of {beta}-hydroxybutyrate utilizing 1% and 10% HCl (v/v) reaction mixtures, respectively. During bioreactor growth in a Cu-deficient modified Higgins` medium, the cells accumulated PHB upon depletion of nitrate. A biomass yield of 3.2 g dry wt/L and a PHB accumulation of {approximately}10% (w/w) were reached after 140 to 160 h, without adversely affecting the propene or TCE epoxidation specific rate given by whole cells containing soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO). The TCE biotransformation capacity ({approximately}0.25 mg TCE oxidized/mg dry cell wt) of resting cells containing {approximately}10% PHB was consistently {approximately}1.6-fold greater than that of cells containing only {approximately}2% PHB. Higher levels (>10%) of accumulated PHB did not enhance this biotransformation capacity further.

  9. Whisker growth studies under conditions which resemble those available on an orbiting space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Herman H.

    1992-01-01

    Minimal funding was provided by NASA with one designated 'mission' being the clear demonstration of the relevance of previously supported whisker growth studies to microgravity research. While in one sense this work has shown the converse, namely, that ambient gravitational fields as high as 1 Earth normal have no relevance to growth of whiskers by hydrogen reduction of metal halides, a case is made that this does not demonstrate lack of relevance to microgravity research. On the contrary, the driving forces for this growth are precisely those which must be understood in order to understand growth in microgravity. The results described suggest that knowledge gained from this work may be highly fundamental to our understanding of the genesis of metal crystals. Time and money ran out before this work could be considered complete. At least another year's study and analysis will be required before publications could be justified.

  10. Recent advances in the modelling of crack growth under fatigue loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekoning, A. U.; Tenhoeve, H. J.; Henriksen, T. K.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth associated with cyclic (secondary) plastic flow near a crack front is modelled using an incremental formulation. A new description of threshold behaviour under small load cycles is included. Quasi-static crack extension under high load excursions is described using an incremental formulation of the R-(crack growth resistance)- curve concept. The integration of the equations is discussed. For constant amplitude load cycles the results will be compared with existing crack growth laws. It will be shown that the model also properly describes interaction effects of fatigue crack growth and quasi-static crack extension. To evaluate the more general applicability the model is included in the NASGRO computer code for damage tolerance analysis. For this purpose the NASGRO program was provided with the CORPUS and the STRIP-YIELD models for computation of the crack opening load levels. The implementation is discussed and recent results of the verification are presented.

  11. Germination and Growth of a Vegetable Exposed to Very Severe Environmental Conditions Experimentally Induced by High Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Takashi; Ikezawa, Shunjiro

    1982-09-01

    Ultra-high-voltage (UHV) transmission power lines are required in order to reduce transmission energy losses, and to transfer more power across long distances. However, the ecological and biological influence of UHV lines has not been documented well. Possible influences of UHV lines are: electro-magnetic field, ozone, NOx, and ion shower. The purpose of this study was to obtain information on the germination and growth of Raphanus sativus L.cv. Kaiware-daikon exposed to an experimental environment in which all the above influences at very severe intensity levels were working simultaneously. Several environmental conditions severer than those predicted for future UHV lines were set up, using a high voltage at 60 Hz. The germination and growth of this plant were suppressed under the experimental conditions used, the suppression being greater the severer the conditions. When the electric field is strong, corona discharge occurs at the tip of the plant.

  12. Real-time measurement of ice growth during simulated and natural icing conditions using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. J., Jr.; Kirby, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Results of tests to measure ice accretion in real-time using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques are presented. Tests conducted on a 10.2 cm diameter cylinder exposed to simulated icing conditions in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel and on an 11.4 cm diameter cylinder exposed to natural icing conditions in flight are described. An accuracy of + or - 0.5 mm is achieved for real-time ice thickness measurements. Ice accretion rate is determined by differentiating ice thickness with respect to time. Icing rates measured during simulated and natural icing conditions are compared and related to icing cloud parameters. The ultrasonic signal characteristics are used to detect the presence of surface water on the accreting ice shape and thus to distinguish between dry ice growth and wet growth. The surface roughness of the accreted ice is shown to be related to the width of the echo signal received from the ice surface.

  13. Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in Thymus of Mice under Normal Conditions and with Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Kisseleva, E P; Krylov, A V; Lyamina, I V; Kudryavtsev, I V; Lioudyno, V I

    2016-05-01

    In our study, we for the first time investigated a role for VEGF as a factor regulating transendothelial migration of murine thymocytes in vitro. Effects of VEGF were examined in a model of thymocyte migration across a monolayer of EA.hy 926 endothelial cells. We showed that VEGF enhanced transendothelial migration of murine thymocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. VEGF did not influence thymocytes, but rather acted on endothelial cells by upregulating surface expression of adhesion molecule ICAM-1 and downregulating activity of 5'-nucleotidase. Effects from VEGF were comparable with those from TNF-α. Because it is known that administration of VEGF to intact animals results in thymic atrophy, it was assumed that it might play a role in developing thymic involution during tumor growth. Enhanced egress of thymocytes to the periphery was considered as a plausible mechanism underlying effects of VEGF. However, we revealed no difference in parameters of in vitro transendothelial migration for thymocytes from animals bearing a transplantable hepatoma 22a compared to control animals. VEGF mRNA expression in lysates of thymic stroma was found to be upregulated in mice with grafted tumors, whereas at the protein level the amount of VEGF did not differ. While examining expression of VEGF receptors on thymocytes by flow cytometry, both VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 were not detected, whereas the percentage of Nrp-1-positive thymocytes in animals with hepatoma 22a was as high as in the control group. Thus, we were unable to confirm a hypothesis regarding participation of VEGF in developing thymic involution during progression of experimental hepatoma. However, a set of novel data concerning a role for VEGF in stimulating transendothelial migration of thymocytes in vitro was obtained, and it may be of significance for understanding mechanisms underlying thymus functioning as well as a role of this cytokine in preparing endothelial cells for egress

  14. Growth Modelling of Listeria monocytogenes in Korean Pork Bulgogi Stored at Isothermal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Ahn, Sin Hye; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop predictive models for the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in pork Bulgogi at various storage temperatures. A two-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes (ATCC 15313 and isolated from pork Bulgogi) was inoculated on pork Bulgogi at 3 Log CFU/g. L. monocytogenes strains were enumerated using general plating method on Listeria selective medium. The inoculated samples were stored at 5, 15, and 25℃ for primary models. Primary models were developed using the Baranyi model equations, and the maximum specific growth rate was shown to be dependent on storage temperature. A secondary model of growth rate as a function of storage temperature was also developed. As the storage temperature increased, the lag time (LT) values decreased dramatically and the specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes increased. The mathematically predicted growth parameters were evaluated based on the modified bias factor (B f ), accuracy factor (A f ), root mean square error (RMSE), coefficient of determination (R (2)), and relative errors (RE). These values indicated that the developed models were reliably able to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes in pork Bulgogi. Hence, the predictive models may be used to assess microbiological hygiene in the meat supply chain as a function of storage temperature. PMID:26761807

  15. Growth Modelling of Listeria monocytogenes in Korean Pork Bulgogi Stored at Isothermal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Ahn, Sin Hye; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop predictive models for the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in pork Bulgogi at various storage temperatures. A two-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes (ATCC 15313 and isolated from pork Bulgogi) was inoculated on pork Bulgogi at 3 Log CFU/g. L. monocytogenes strains were enumerated using general plating method on Listeria selective medium. The inoculated samples were stored at 5, 15, and 25℃ for primary models. Primary models were developed using the Baranyi model equations, and the maximum specific growth rate was shown to be dependent on storage temperature. A secondary model of growth rate as a function of storage temperature was also developed. As the storage temperature increased, the lag time (LT) values decreased dramatically and the specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes increased. The mathematically predicted growth parameters were evaluated based on the modified bias factor (Bf), accuracy factor (Af), root mean square error (RMSE), coefficient of determination (R2), and relative errors (RE). These values indicated that the developed models were reliably able to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes in pork Bulgogi. Hence, the predictive models may be used to assess microbiological hygiene in the meat supply chain as a function of storage temperature. PMID:26761807

  16. Modeling the impact of vapor thymol concentration, temperature, and modified atmosphere condition on growth behavior of Salmonella on raw shrimp.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Siyuan; Sheen, Shiowshuh; Pang, Yu-Hsin; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2015-02-01

    Salmonella is a microorganism of concern on a global basis for raw shrimp. This research modeled the impact of vapor thymol concentration (0, 0.8, and 1.6 mg/liter), storage temperature (8, 12, and 16°C), and modified atmosphere condition (0.04 as in the natural atmosphere and 59.5% CO2) against the growth behavior of a Salmonella cocktail (six strains) on raw shrimp. Lag time (hour) and maximum growth rate (log CFU per gram per hour), chosen as two growth indicators, were obtained through DMFit software and then developed into polynomial as well as nonlinear modified secondary models (dimensional and/or dimensionless), consisting of two or even three impact factors in the equations. The models were validated, and results showed that the predictive values from both models demonstrated good matches to the observed experimental values, yet the prediction based on lag time was more accurate than maximum growth rate. The information will provide the food industry with insight into the potential safety risk of Salmonella growth on raw shrimp under stressed conditions. PMID:25710144

  17. Abscisic acid regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin.

    PubMed

    Rowe, James H; Topping, Jennifer F; Liu, Junli; Lindsey, Keith

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating root development under drought conditions is an important question for plant biology and world agriculture. We examine the effect of osmotic stress on abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinin and ethylene responses and how they mediate auxin transport, distribution and root growth through effects on PIN proteins. We integrate experimental data to construct hormonal crosstalk networks to formulate a systems view of root growth regulation by multiple hormones. Experimental analysis shows: that ABA-dependent and ABA-independent stress responses increase under osmotic stress, but cytokinin responses are only slightly reduced; inhibition of root growth under osmotic stress does not require ethylene signalling, but auxin can rescue root growth and meristem size; osmotic stress modulates auxin transporter levels and localization, reducing root auxin concentrations; PIN1 levels are reduced under stress in an ABA-dependent manner, overriding ethylene effects; and the interplay among ABA, ethylene, cytokinin and auxin is tissue-specific, as evidenced by differential responses of PIN1 and PIN2 to osmotic stress. Combining experimental analysis with network construction reveals that ABA regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin. PMID:26889752

  18. X-ray diffraction study of the optimization of MgO growth conditions for magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    O, Se Young; Lee, Chan-Gyu; Shapiro, Alexander J.; Egelhoff, William F. Jr.; Mallett, Jonathan; Pong, Philip W. T.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Ruglovsky, Jennifer L.

    2008-04-01

    We have carried out a systematic study optimizing the MgO growth via preparation and sputtering conditions and underlayer structures. It was found that to prevent water vapor which is detrimental to MgO (200) growth, the chamber pressure needs to be reduced below 10{sup -8} Torr. Simple underlayers such as 5 nm CoFeB tend to give better MgO, but we have also succeeded in growing MgO on more complicated underlayers such as 1 Ta/20 Au/5 Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20} and 1 Ta/20 conetic (Ni{sub 77}Fe{sub 14}Cu{sub 5}Mo{sub 4})/1.5 Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20} (units in nanometers). We accomplished this by extensive baking of the deposition chamber and use of Ti-getter films. Short sputtering distance and high sputtering power were found to optimize MgO deposition. We found that both preparation and sputtering conditions have important effects on the MgO growth. X-ray diffraction analysis was used as the characterization tool for optimizing the MgO growth conditions.

  19. Growth and survival of blowfly Lucilia sericata larvae under simulated wound conditions: implications for maggot debridement therapy.

    PubMed

    Čičková, H; Kozánek, M; Takáč, P

    2015-12-01

    Maggot debridement therapy has become a well-established method of wound debridement. Despite its success, little information is available about the optimum duration of the treatment cycle and larval growth in wounds. This study examines the development of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larvae under two containment conditions (bagged and free range) under simulated wound conditions and assesses the impact of transport and further storage of larvae on their survival and growth. There was no significant difference in size between bagged and free-range larvae over the 72-h experimental period. Larvae grew fastest 8-24 h after inoculation and completed their growth at 40-48 h. Mortality rates were similar (0.12-0.23% per hour) in both containment conditions and did not differ significantly (P = 0.3212). Survival of free-range larvae was on average 16% lower than survival of bagged larvae. Refrigeration of larvae upon simulated delivery for > 1 day reduced their survival to < 50% and caused a reduction in growth of up to 30% at 12 h, but not at 48 h, of incubation. Therefore, it is recommended that free-range larvae are left in the wound for a maximum of 40-48 h, and bagged larvae for 48-72 h. Larvae should be used within 24 h of delivery to avoid high mortality caused by prolonged refrigeration. PMID:26382290

  20. Growth response and toxin concentration of cultured Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum to varying salinity and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Gedaria, Alice Ilaya; Luckas, Bernd; Reinhardt, Katrin; Azanza, Rhodora V

    2007-09-15

    The growth and toxin production of a Philippine Pyrodinium bahamense isolate in nutrient replete batch cultures were investigated under conditions affected by varying salinity, temperature and combined effects of salinity and temperature. Early exponential growth stage was reached after 7 days with a cell division rate of 0.26 div day(-1). The toxin content reached a peak of 298 fmol cell-1 at mid exponential phase and rapidly declined to 54 fmol cell-1 as it approached the death phase. Only three sets of toxins composed of STX, dcSTX and B1 were detected in which STX made up to 85-98 mol%toxincell-1. P. bahamense was able to grow in salinities and temperatures ranging from 26 per thousand to 36 per thousand and 23 to 36 degrees C, respectively. The optimum growth under varying salinity and temperature conditions was observed at 36 per thousand and 25 degrees C. Toxin content reached a peak of 376 fmol cell-1 at 25 degrees C and was lower (80-116 fmol cell-1) at higher temperatures (32-35 degrees C). Combined effects of salinity and temperature showed that P. bahamense was not able to grow at low salinity and temperature (i.e. below 26 per thousand-28 degrees C). Optimum growth was observed in higher salinities at all temperature conditions. PMID:17585981

  1. Joint use of soil moisture and vegetation growth condition by remote sensing on the agricultural drought monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Yang, Siquan; Huang, He; He, Haixia; Li, Suju; Cui, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing is one of important methods on the agricultural drought monitoring for its long-term and wide-area observations. The detection of soil moisture and vegetation growth condition are two widely used remote sensing methods on that. However, because of the time lag in the impact of water deficit on the crop growth, it is difficulty to indicate the severity of drought by once monitoring. It also cannot distinguish other negative impact on crop growth such as low temperature or solar radiation. In this paper, the joint use of soil moisture and vegetation growth condition detections was applied on the drought management during the summer of 2013 in Liaoning province, China, in which 84 counties were affected by agricultural drought. MODIS vegetation indices and land surface temperature (LST) were used to extract the drought index. Vegetation Condition Index (VCI), which only contain the change in vegetation index, and Vegetation Supply Water Index (VSWI), which combined the information of vegetation index and land surface temperature, were selected to compare the monitoring ability on drought during the drought period in Liaoning, China in 2014. It was found that VCI could be a good method on the loss assessment. VSWI has the information on the change in LST, which can indicate the spatial pattern of drought and can also be used as the early warning method in the study.

  2. [Antagonistic interactions between stress factors during the growth of microorganisms under conditions simulating the parameters of their natural ecotopes].

    PubMed

    Arzumanian, V G; Voronina, N A; Geĭdebrekht, O V; Shelemekh, O V; Plakunov, V K; Beliaev, S S

    2002-01-01

    Two stress factors, hypoxia (microaerobic conditions) and a high salt concentration, if applied simultaneously to aerobic microorganisms, display an antagonistic mode of interaction. As a result, the NaCl level that is usually optimal for moderate halophiles (5-6%) becomes optimal for the growth of weak halophiles (Rhodococcus erythropolis and Shewanella sp. CN32); the halotolerant yeast Yarrowia lypolytica acquires halophilic properties (with a growth optimum at a NaCl concentration of 10%), and the growth rate of the extremely halophilic Halobacterium salinarum increases at supraoptimal salt concentrations (25-34%). This phenomenon is apparently due to multiple changes in metabolic reactions. In particular, high salt concentrations suppress respiration and the formation of enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) that protect the cell from toxic oxygen species. Therefore, establishment of microaerobic conditions compensates for the loss of these protective mechanisms and enables cell growth at higher salt concentrations than under aerobic conditions. Of some importance can also be the increase in the intracellular concentrations of osmoprotectants caused by the suppression of their intracellular oxidation. The implications of this phenomenon for the ecophysiology of microorganisms (including oiloxidizing species) and for the classification of weak and moderate halophiles are discussed. PMID:12024812

  3. Changes in the Cytoplasmic Composition of Amino Acids and Proteins Observed in Staphylococcus aureus during Growth under Variable Growth Conditions Representative of the Human Wound Site

    PubMed Central

    Alreshidi, Mousa M.; Dunstan, R. Hugh; Gottfries, Johan; Macdonald, Margaret M.; Crompton, Marcus J.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Roberts, Tim K.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for a high proportion of nosocomial infections. This study was conducted to assess the bacterial responses in the cytoplasmic composition of amino acids and ribosomal proteins under various environmental conditions designed to mimic those on the human skin or within a wound site: pH6-8, temperature 35–37°C, and additional 0–5% NaCl. It was found that each set of environmental conditions elicited substantial adjustments in cytoplasmic levels of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, alanine and glycine (P< 0.05). These alterations generated characteristic amino acid profiles assessed by principle component analysis (PCA). Substantial alterations in cytoplasmic amino acid and protein composition occurred during growth under conditions of higher salinity stress implemented via additional levels of NaCl in the growth medium. The cells responded to additional NaCl at pH 6 by reducing levels of ribosomal proteins, whereas at pH 8 there was an upregulation of ribosomal proteins compared with the reference control. The levels of two ribosomal proteins, L32 and S19, remained constant across all experimental conditions. The data supported the hypothesis that the bacterium was continually responding to the dynamic environment by modifying the proteome and optimising metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27442022

  4. Testing phenotypic trade-offs in the chemical defence strategy of Scots pine under growth-limiting field conditions.

    PubMed

    Villari, Caterina; Faccoli, Massimo; Battisti, Andrea; Bonello, Pierluigi; Marini, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogens and herbivores through fine-tuned resource allocation, including trade-offs among resource investments to support constitutive and inducible defences. However, empirical research, especially concerning conifers growing under natural conditions, is still scarce. We investigated the complexity of constitutive and induced defences in a natural Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand under growth-limiting conditions typical of alpine environments. Phenotypic trade-offs at three hierarchical levels were tested by investigating the behaviour of phenolic compounds and terpenoids of outer bark and phloem. We tested resource-derived phenotypic correlations between (i) constitutive and inducible defences vs tree ring growth, (ii) different constitutive defence metabolites and (iii) constitutive concentration and inducible variation of individual metabolites. Tree ring growth was positively correlated only with constitutive concentration of total terpenoids, and no overall phenotypic trade-offs between different constitutive defensive metabolites were found. At the lowest hierarchical level tested, i.e., at the level of relationship between constitutive and inducible variation of individual metabolites, we found that different compounds displayed different behaviours; we identified five different defensive metabolite response types, based on direction and strength of the response, regardless of tree age and growth rate. Therefore, under growth-limiting field conditions, Scots pine appears to utilize varied and complex outer bark and phloem defence chemistry, in which only part of the constitutive specialized metabolism is influenced by tree growth, and individual components do not appear to be expressed in a mutually exclusive manner in either constitutive or inducible metabolism. PMID:25194142

  5. Phytochrome-imposed oscillations in PIF3 protein abundance regulate hypocotyl growth under diurnal light/dark conditions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Soy, Judit; Leivar, Pablo; González-Schain, Nahuel; Sentandreu, Maria; Prat, Salomé; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Arabidopsis seedlings display rhythmic growth when grown under diurnal conditions, with maximal elongation rates occurring at the end of the night under short-day photoperiods. Current evidence indicates that this behavior involves the action of the growth-promoting bHLH factors PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 5 (PIF5) at the end of the night, through a coincidence mechanism that combines their transcriptional regulation by the circadian clock with control of protein accumulation by light. To assess the possible role of PIF3 in this process, we have analyzed hypocotyl responses and marker gene expression in pif single- and higher-order mutants. The data show that PIF3 plays a prominent role as a promoter of seedling growth under diurnal light/dark conditions, in conjunction with PIF4 and PIF5. In addition, we provide evidence that PIF3 functions in this process through its intrinsic transcriptional regulatory activity, at least in part by directly targeting growth-related genes, and independently of its ability to regulate phytochrome B (phyB) levels. Furthermore, in sharp contrast to PIF4 and PIF5, our data show that the PIF3 gene is not subject to transcriptional regulation by the clock, but that PIF3 protein abundance oscillates under diurnal conditions as a result of a progressive decline in PIF3 protein degradation mediated by photoactivated phyB, and consequent accumulation of the bHLH factor during the dark period. Collectively, the data suggest that phyB-mediated, post-translational regulation allows PIF3 accumulation to peak just before dawn, at which time it accelerates hypocotyl growth, together with PIF4 and PIF5, by directly regulating the induction of growth-related genes. PMID:22409654

  6. Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on the Levels of Placental Growth Factor (PlGF) and Their Value for Predicting Short-Term Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barcelo, Antonia; Bauça, Josep Miquel; Yañez, Aina; Fueyo, Laura; Gomez, Cristina; de la Peña, Monica; Pierola, Javier; Rodriguez, Alberto; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Abad, Jorge; Mediano, Olga; Amilibia, Jose; Masdeu, Maria Jose; Teran, Joaquin; Montserrat, Josep Maria; Mayos, Mercè; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background Placental growth factor (PlGF) induces angiogenesis and promotes tissue repair, and plasma PlGF levels change markedly during acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Currently, the impact of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with AMI is a subject of debate. Our objective was to evaluate the relationships between PlGF levels and both the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and short-term outcomes after ACS in patients with and without OSA. Methods A total of 538 consecutive patients (312 OSA patients and 226 controls) admitted for ACS were included in this study. All patients underwent polygraphy in the first 72 hours after hospital admission. The severity of disease and short-term prognoses were evaluated during the hospitalization period. Plasma PlGF levels were measured using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Results Patients with OSA were significantly older and more frequently hypertensive and had higher BMIs than those without OSA. After adjusting for age, smoking status, BMI and hypertension, PlGF levels were significantly elevated in patients with OSA compared with patients without OSA (19.9 pg/mL, interquartile range: 16.6–24.5 pg/mL; 18.5 pg/mL, interquartile range: 14.7–22.7 pg/mL; p<0.001), and a higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was associated with higher PlGF concentrations (p<0.003). Patients with higher levels of PlGF had also an increased odds ratio for the presence of 3 or more diseased vessels and for a Killip score>1, even after adjustment. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with ACS, elevated plasma levels of PlGF are associated with the presence of OSA and with adverse outcomes during short-term follow-up. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01335087 PMID:26930634

  7. Optimizing cyanobacteria growth conditions in a sealed environment to enable chemical inhibition tests with volatile chemicals.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tylor J; Zahler, Jacob D; Baldwin, Emily L; Zhou, Ruanbao; Gibbons, William R

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are currently being engineered to photosynthetically produce next-generation biofuels and high-value chemicals. Many of these chemicals are highly toxic to cyanobacteria, thus strains with increased tolerance need to be developed. The volatility of these chemicals may necessitate that experiments be conducted in a sealed environment to maintain chemical concentrations. Therefore, carbon sources such as NaHCO3 must be used for supporting cyanobacterial growth instead of CO2 sparging. The primary goal of this study was to determine the optimal initial concentration of NaHCO3 for use in growth trials, as well as if daily supplementation of NaHCO3 would allow for increased growth. The secondary goal was to determine the most accurate method to assess growth of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 in a sealed environment with low biomass titers and small sample volumes. An initial concentration of 0.5g/L NaHCO3 was found to be optimal for cyanobacteria growth, and fed-batch additions of NaHCO3 marginally improved growth. A separate study determined that a sealed test tube environment is necessary to maintain stable titers of volatile chemicals in solution. This study also showed that a SYTO® 9 fluorescence-based assay for cell viability was superior for monitoring filamentous cyanobacterial growth compared to absorbance, chlorophyll α (chl a) content, and biomass content due to its accuracy, small sampling size (100μL), and high throughput capabilities. Therefore, in future chemical inhibition trials, it is recommended that 0.5g/L NaHCO3 is used as the carbon source, and that culture viability is monitored via the SYTO® 9 fluorescence-based assay that requires minimum sample size. PMID:27196637

  8. [Adverse reaction of pseudoephedrine].

    PubMed

    López Lois, G; Gómez Carrasco, J A; García de Frías, E

    2005-04-01

    We present a case of a 7 years old girl who developed an episode of myoclonic movements and tremors after being medicated with a not well quantified amount of a pseudoephedrine/antihistamine combination. We want to highlight the potential toxicity of pseudoephedrine, usually administered as part of cold-syrup preparations which are used for symptomatic treatment of upper respiratory tract cough and congestion associated with the common cold and allergic rhinitis. Although these products are generally considered to be safe either by physicians and parents, we can't underestimate the potential adverse events and toxic effects that can occur when administering these medications. PMID:15826569

  9. Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth of a plain carbon pipeline steel under conditions of cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation described was aimed at establishing the degree of compatibility between a plain carbon pipeline-type steel and hydrogen and also hydrogen-rich environments containing small additions of H2S, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, and natural gas at pressures near 1 atm. Test were carried out under conditions of static and cyclic loading; the subcritical crack growth was monitored. The rates of crack growth observed in the hydrogen and hydrogen-rich environments are compared with the crack rate observed in a natural gas environment to determine the compatibility of the present natural gas transmission system with gaseous hydrogen transport.

  10. MediaDB: A Database of Microbial Growth Conditions in Defined Media

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Matthew A.; Cassen, Victor; Heavner, Benjamin D.; Ajami, Nassim E.; Herrmann, Andrea; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Isolating pure microbial cultures and cultivating them in the laboratory on defined media is used to more fully characterize the metabolism and physiology of organisms. However, identifying an appropriate growth medium for a novel isolate remains a challenging task. Even organisms with sequenced and annotated genomes can be difficult to grow, despite our ability to build genome-scale metabolic networks that connect genomic data with metabolic function. The scientific literature is scattered with information about defined growth media used successfully for cultivating a wide variety of organisms, but to date there exists no centralized repository to inform efforts to cultivate less characterized organisms by bridging the gap between genomic data and compound composition for growth media. Here we present MediaDB, a manually curated database of defined media that have been used for cultivating organisms with sequenced genomes, with an emphasis on organisms with metabolic network models. The database is accessible online, can be queried by keyword searches or downloaded in its entirety, and can generate exportable individual media formulation files. The data assembled in MediaDB facilitate comparative studies of organism growth media, serve as a starting point for formulating novel growth media, and contribute to formulating media for in silico investigation of metabolic networks. MediaDB is freely available for public use at https://mediadb.systemsbiology.net. PMID:25098325

  11. The Pseudomonas fluorescens Siderophore Pyoverdine Weakens Arabidopsis thaliana Defense in Favor of Growth in Iron-Deficient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Trapet, Pauline; Avoscan, Laure; Klinguer, Agnès; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Chervin, Christian; Mazurier, Sylvie; Lemanceau, Philippe; Wendehenne, David; Besson-Bard, Angélique

    2016-05-01

    Pyoverdines are siderophores synthesized by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Under iron-limiting conditions, these high-affinity ferric iron chelators are excreted by bacteria in the soil to acquire iron. Pyoverdines produced by beneficial Pseudomonas spp. ameliorate plant growth. Here, we investigate the physiological incidence and mode of action of pyoverdine from Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12 on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. Pyoverdine was provided to the medium in its iron-free structure (apo-pyoverdine), thus mimicking a situation in which it is produced by bacteria. Remarkably, apo-pyoverdine abolished the iron-deficiency phenotype and restored the growth of plants maintained in the iron-deprived medium. In contrast to a P. fluorescens C7R12 strain impaired in apo-pyoverdine production, the wild-type C7R12 reduced the accumulation of anthocyanins in plants grown in iron-deficient conditions. Under this condition, apo-pyoverdine modulated the expression of around 2,000 genes. Notably, apo-pyoverdine positively regulated the expression of genes related to development and iron acquisition/redistribution while it repressed the expression of defense-related genes. Accordingly, the growth-promoting effect of apo-pyoverdine in plants grown under iron-deficient conditions was impaired in iron-regulated transporter1 and ferric chelate reductase2 knockout mutants and was prioritized over immunity, as highlighted by an increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea This process was accompanied by an overexpression of the transcription factor HBI1, a key node for the cross talk between growth and immunity. This study reveals an unprecedented mode of action of pyoverdine in Arabidopsis and demonstrates that its incidence on physiological traits depends on the plant iron status. PMID:26956666

  12. Defects in silicon effect on device performance and relationship to crystal growth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrzebski, L.

    1985-01-01

    A relationship between material defects in silicon and the performance of electronic devices will be described. A role which oxygen and carbon in silicon play during the defects generation process will be discussed. The electronic properties of silicon are a strong function of the oxygen state in the silicon. This state controls mechanical properties of silicon efficiency for internal gettering and formation of defects in the device's active area. In addition, to temperature, time, ambience, and the cooling/heating rates of high temperature treatments, the oxygen state is a function of the crystal growth process. The incorporation of carbon and oxygen into silicon crystal is controlled by geometry and rotation rates applied to crystal and crucible during crystal growths. Also, formation of nucleation centers for oxygen precipitation is influenced by the growth process, although there is still a controversy which parameters play a major role. All these factors will be reviewed with special emphasis on areas which are still ambiguous and controversial.

  13. Screening for adverse events.

    PubMed

    Karson, A S; Bates, D W

    1999-02-01

    Adverse events (AEs) in medical patients are common, costly, and often preventable. Development of quality improvement programs to decrease the number and impact of AEs demands effective methods for screening for AEs on a routine basis. Here we describe the impact, types, and potential causes of AEs and review various techniques for identifying AEs. We evaluate the use of generic screening criteria in detail and describe a recent study of the sensitivity and specificity of individual generic screening criteria and combinations of these criteria. In general, the most sensitive screens were the least specific and no small sub-set of screens identified a large percentage of adverse events. Combinations of screens that were limited to administrative data were the least expensive, but none were particularly sensitive, although in practice they might be effective since routine screening is currently rarely done. As computer systems increase in sophistication sensitivity will improve. We also discuss recent studies that suggest that programs that screen for and identify AEs can be useful in reducing AE rates. While tools for identifying AEs have strengths and weaknesses, they can play an important role in organizations' quality improvement portfolios. PMID:10468381

  14. Condensed tannin biosynthesis and polymerization synergistically condition carbon use, defense, sink strength and growth in Populus.

    PubMed

    Harding, Scott A; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Du, Lei; Nyamdari, Batbayar; Lindroth, Richard L; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark F; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2014-11-01

    The partitioning of carbon for growth, storage and constitutive chemical defenses is widely framed in terms of a hypothetical sink-source differential that varies with nutrient supply. According to this framework, phenolics accrual is passive and occurs in source leaves when normal sink growth is not sustainable due to a nutrient limitation. In assessing this framework, we present gene and metabolite evidence that condensed tannin (CT) accrual is strongest in sink leaves and sequesters carbon in a way that impinges upon foliar sink strength and upon phenolic glycoside (PG) accrual in Populus. The work was based on two Populus fremontii × angustifolia backcross lines with contrasting rates of CT accrual and growth, and equally large foliar PG reserves. However, foliar PG accrual was developmentally delayed in the high-CT, slow-growth line (SG), and nitrogen-limitation led to increased foliar PG accrual only in the low-CT, fast-growth line (FG). Metabolite profiling of developing leaves indicated comparatively carbon-limited amino acid metabolism, depletion of several Krebs cycle intermediates and reduced organ sink strength in SG. Gene profiling indicated that CT synthesis decreased as leaves expanded and PGs increased. A most striking finding was that the nitrogenous monoamine phenylethylamine accumulated only in leaves of SG plants. The potential negative impact of CT hyper-accumulation on foliar sink strength, as well as a mechanism for phenylethylamine involvement in CT polymerization in Populus are discussed. Starch accrual in source leaves and CT accrual in sink leaves of SG may both contribute to the maintenance of a slow-growth phenotype suited to survival in nutrient-poor habitats. PMID:24336515

  15. The Effect of Calcium Chloride on Growth, Photosynthesis, and Antioxidant Responses of Zoysia japonica under Drought Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chengbin; Li, Xuemei; Zhang, Lihong

    2013-01-01

    Few attempts have been made to study the alleviating effects of signal molecules on zoysiagrass (Zoysiajaponica) under drought stress. Calcium chloride has been shown to ameliorate the adverse effects of drought stress on many plants. It is necessary to investigate how to enhance drought tolerance of zoysiagrass using calcium chloride. The study elucidated the effects of calcium chloride on zoysiagrass under drought conditions by investigating the following parameters: biomass, chlorophyll (Chl) content, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), chlorophyll fluorescence, antioxidant enzymes, proline content, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Experimental conditions consisted of an aqueous CaCl2 solution at 5, 10, and 20 mM sprayed on zoysiagrass leaves for 3 d, following by an inducement of drought conditions by withholding water for 16 d. Under drought conditions, all CaCl2 pretreatments were found to increase the above-ground fresh biomass, as well as below-ground fresh and dry biomass. The resulting Chl (a, b, a+b) contents of the 5 and 10 mM CaCl2 pretreatment groups were higher than those of the control. In the later stages of drought conditions, the chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm was higher in leaves treated with 10 mM CaCl2 than in the leaves of the other two treatment groups. Zoysiagrass pretreated with 10 mM CaCl2 possessed both the maximum observed Pn and antioxidant enzyme activities. Meanwhile, lower MDA and proline contents were recorded in the plants pretreated with 5 and 10 mM CaCl2 under drought conditions. As a whole, the drought tolerance of zoysiagrass was improved to some extent by the application of a moderate calcium concentration. PMID:23844172

  16. The Induction of Metformin Inhibitory Effects on Tumor Cell Growth in Hypoxic Condition.

    PubMed

    Safari, Zohreh; Safaralizadeh, Reza; Seyedzadeh, Mir Hadi; Valinezad Orang, Ayla; Zare, Ahad; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Kardar, Gholam Ali

    2015-12-01

    It is aimed to evaluate the actual anti-cancerous effects of metformin on cancer cells in hypoxic condition. Non-cancerous cells (HEK293) and cancer cells (MCF-7) were cultured in both hypoxia and normoxia conditions and treated with different concentrations of metformin. The proliferation, apoptosis, and necrosis rate were assessed using MTT test and Annexin V assay. The S6K1 phosphorylation was assessed using western blotting. Zymography was used to measure the activity of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Metformin treatment inhibited proliferation of cancer cells in the optimal concentration of 10 mM under hypoxia condition, while it showed no effects on non-cancerous cell viability. The statistical analysis of MTT assay indicated that the pro-apoptotic function of metformin for cancer cells under hypoxia condition compared to normoxia was significant with different metformin concentrations (p<0.01). However, the effect of metformin treatments for non-cancerous cells under hypoxia condition compared to normoxia was not significant. Western-blot analysis indicated a significant decrease in S6K1 phosphorylation in cancer cells under hypoxia condition (p<0.05). Nevertheless, there was no considerable difference between normoxia and hypoxia conditions in non-cancerous cells. MMP-9 zymography analysis revealed that the highest inhibition of MMP-9 activity was observed in hypoxia condition by 20mM of metformin concentration only in cancer cell. The results indicate that in hypoxia condition metformin exerts its anti-cancerous function by inhibiting proliferation and tumor progression and inducing cell apoptosis more effectively than normoxia condition. In line with cancer cell conditions, most importantly hypoxic condition, metformin can be considered as a potential anti-cancerous drug. PMID:26725558

  17. Growth of Methanogens on a Mars Soil Simulant Under Simulated Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Bekkum, Curtis R.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2004-06-01

    Due to the hostile conditions at the surface, any life forms existing on Mars today would most likely inhabit a subsurface environment where conditions are potentially wetter and warmer, but organic compounds may be lacking and light energy for photosynthesis would be absent. Methanogens, members of the domain Archaea, are microorganisms from planet Earth that can grow under these relatively extreme conditions. We have demonstrated that certain methanogenic species can indeed grow on a Mars soil simulant, JSC Mars-1, with limited amounts of water, under conditions approaching a possible subsurface environment on Mars.

  18. Growth and activity of reservoir microorganisms under carbon capture and storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakoczy, Jana; Gniese, Claudia; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Carbon capture and storage is a technology to decelerate global warming by reducing CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. To ensure safe long-term storage of CO2 in the underground a number of factors need to be considered. One of them is microbial activity in storage reservoirs, which can lead to the formation of acidic metabolites, H2S or carbonates which then might affect injectivity, permeability, pressure build-up and long-term operability. Our research focused on the effect of high CO2 concentrations on growth and activity of selected thermophilic fermenting and sulphate-reducing bacteria isolated from deep reservoirs. Experiments with supercritical carbon dioxide at 100 bar completely inhibited growth of freshly inoculated cultures and also caused a rapid decrease of growth of a pre-grown culture. This demonstrated that supercritical carbon dioxide had a certain sterilizing effect on cells. This effect was not observed in control cultures with 100 bar of hydrostatic pressure. However, when provided with a surface for attachment, CO2-inhibited cells restarted growth after CO2 release. The same was observed for organisms able to form spores. Further experiments will examine physiological and molecular properties of the model organism allowing for prediction of its sensitivity and/or adaptability to carbon dioxide in potential future storage sites.

  19. Using N-Limiting Growth Conditions to Remove Atrazine from Groundwater: Laboratory Studies.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Typically, respiratory redox reactions are the driving mechanism behind in situ bioremediations that use a carbon substrate. This is because electron (e-) donor availability generally restricts subsurface microbial activity. Thus, microbial growth and respiration can be greatly stimulated by the a...

  20. Factors affecting growth and survival of the asiatic clam Corbicula sp. under controlled laboratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Double, D.D.; Daly, D.S.; Abernethy, C.S.

    1983-04-01

    Growth of Corbicula sp. was determined in relation to food supply, water temperature, and clam size as an aid to researchers conducting chronic effects toxicity studies. Water temperatures for the two 84-day test series were 10, 20, and 30/sup 0/C. Linear models provided good relationships (r/sup 2/ > 0.90) between clam shell length (SL), total weight (TW), and wet/dry tissue weights. Clam growth was minimal during low phytoplankton densities (approx. 300 cells/ml), and all three size groups lost weight at 20 and 30/sup 0/C. Mortality of small clams at 30/sup 0/C was 100% after 71 days. At phytoplankton densities > 1000 cells/ml, overall differences in growth with respect to clam size and temperature were detectable at p < 0.01; growth of all clam groups was greatest at 30/sup 0/C. Small clams exhibited the greatest absolute increase in mean shell length at all test temperatures, and weight gains were similar to those of medium and large clams.

  1. Using Nitrogen Limiting Growth Conditions to Remove Atrazine from Groundwater: Laboratory Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the past microbial redox reactions have been the driving mechanism behind in situ bioremediations that use a carbon substrate. This is because subsurface microbial activity is generally restricted by electron (e-) donor availability and microbial activity, growth and respiration, can be stimulat...

  2. Discovery of wall-selective carbon nanotube growth conditions via automated experimentation.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Hooper, Daylond; Perea-López, Nestor; Terrones, Mauricio; Maruyama, Benji

    2014-10-28

    Applications of carbon nanotubes continue to advance, with substantial progress in nanotube electronics, conductive wires, and transparent conductors to name a few. However, wider application remains impeded by a lack of control over production of nanotubes with the desired purity, perfection, chirality, and number of walls. This is partly due to the fact that growth experiments are time-consuming, taking about 1 day per run, thus making it challenging to adequately explore the many parameters involved in growth. We endeavored to speed up the research process by automating CVD growth experimentation. The adaptive rapid experimentation and in situ spectroscopy CVD system described in this contribution conducts over 100 experiments in a single day, with automated control and in situ Raman characterization. Linear regression modeling was used to map regions of selectivity toward single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotube growth in the complex parameter space of the water-assisted CVD synthesis. This development of the automated rapid serial experimentation is a significant progress toward an autonomous closed-loop learning system: a Robot Scientist. PMID:25299482

  3. Modeling Growth Kinetic Parameters of Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 on Homemade Mayonnaise Under Isothermal and Nonisothermal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Elias, Susana de Oliveira; Alvarenga, Verônica Ortiz; Longhi, Daniel Angelo; Sant'Ana, Anderson de Souza; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2016-08-01

    During the last decade, a specific strain of Salmonella Enteritidis (named SE86) has been identified as the major etiological agent responsible for salmonellosis in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil, and the main food vehicle was homemade mayonnaise (HM). This study aimed to model the growth prediction of SE86 on HM under isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. SE86 was inoculated on HM and stored at 7, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 37°C. Growth curves were built by fitting data to the Baranyi's DMFit, generating r(2) values greater than 0.98 for primary models. Secondary model was fitted with Ratkowsky equation, generating r(2) and root mean square error values of 0.99 and 0.016, respectively. Also, the growth of SE86 under nonisothermal conditions simulating abuse temperature during preparation, storage, and serving of HM was studied. Experimental data showed that SE86 did not grow on HM at 7°C for 30 days. At 10°C, no growth was observed until approximately 18 h, and the infective dose (assumed as 10(6) CFU/g) was reached after 8.1 days. However, the same numbers of SE86 were attained after 6 hours at 37°C. Experimental data demonstrated shorter lag times than those generated by ComBase Predictive Models, suggesting that SE86 is very well adapted for growing on HM. SE86 stored under nonisothermal conditions increased population to reach about 10(6) CFU/g after approximately 30 hours of storage. In conclusion, the developed model can be used to predict the growth of SE86 on HM under various temperatures, and considering this pathogen, HM can be produced if safe eggs are used and HM is stored below 7°C. PMID:26859536

  4. Non-limiting food conditions for growth and production of the copepod community in a highly productive upwelling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano, Rubén; Bustos-Ríos, Evelyn; Hidalgo, Pamela; Morales, Carmen E.

    2016-09-01

    Zooplankton production is critical for understanding marine ecosystem dynamics. This work estimates copepod growth and production in the coastal upwelling and coastal transition zones off central-southern Chile (~35 to 37°S) during a 3-year time series (2004, 2005, and 2006) at a fixed shelf station, and from spring-summer spatial surveys during the same period. To estimate copepod production (CP), we used species-biomasses and associated C-specific growth rates from temperature dependent equations (food-saturated) for the dominant species, which we assumed were maximal growth rates (gmax). Using chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for food conditions, we determined a size-dependent half-saturation constant with the Michaelis-Menten equation to derive growth rates (g) under the effect of food limitation. These food-dependent C-specific growth rates were much lower (<0.1 d-1) than those observed in the field for the dominant species, while gmax for same species, in the range of 0.19-0.23 d-1 better represented the necessary growth to attain observed adult sizes of at least two copepods, Paracalanus cf. indicus and Calanus chilensis. Copepod biomass (CB) and rates of maximal copepod production (CPmax) obtained with gmax were higher in the coastal upwelling zone (<50 km from shore), and correlated significantly to oceanographic variables associated with upwelling conditions. Both CPmax and gmax exhibited negative trends at the fixed station from 2004 to 2006 in association with increased duration of upwelling in the latter year. Annual CPmax ranged between 24 and 52 g C m-2 y-1 with a mean annual P/B ratio of 7.3. We concluded that interannual variation in copepod production resulted from factors and processes regulating copepod abundance and biomass in the absence of bottom-up control, allowing copepods to grow without limitation due to food resources.

  5. Impaired growth under iron-limiting conditions associated with the acquisition of colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    López-Rojas, Rafael; García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Labrador-Herrera, Gema; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Acquisition of colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii has been associated with reduced bacterial fitness and virulence, although the mechanisms underlying this fitness loss have not been well characterised. In this study, the role played by environmental iron levels on the growth and survival of colistin-resistant strains of A. baumannii was assessed. Growth assays with the colistin-susceptible ATCC 19606 strain and its colistin-resistant derivative RC64 [colistin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 64 mg/L] demonstrated that the strains grew similarly in rich laboratory medium (Mueller-Hinton broth), whereas RC64 demonstrated impaired growth compared with ATCC 19606 in human serum (>100-fold at 24 h). Compared with RC64, ATCC 19606 grew in the presence of higher concentrations of the iron-specific chelator 2,2'-bipyridine and grew more readily under iron-limiting conditions in solid and liquid media. In addition, iron supplementation of human serum increased the growth of RC64 compared with unsupplemented human serum to a greater extent than ATCC 19606. The ability of 11 colistin-resistant clinical isolates with mutations in the pmrB gene to grow in iron-replete and iron-limiting conditions was assessed, demonstrating that eight of the strains showed reduced growth under iron limitation. Individual mutations in the pmrB gene did not directly correlate with a decreased capacity for growth under iron limitation, suggesting that mutations in pmrB may not directly produce this phenotype. Together these results indicate that acquisition of colistin resistance in A. baumannii can be associated with a decreased ability to grow in low-iron environments. PMID:27179817

  6. Zinc toxicity to the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata decreases under phosphate limiting growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, C; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Smolders, E

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that phosphorus (P) deficiency can increase the sensitivity of microalgae to toxic trace metals, potentially due to reduced metal detoxification at low cell P quota. The existing evidence is, however, inconsistent. This study was set up to determine the combined effects of zinc (Zn) and P supplies on Zn and P bioaccumulation and growth of the green microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Zinc toxicity was investigated in (i) a 24h growth rate assay with cells varying in initial cell P quota (0.5-1.7% P on cell dry weight) with no supplemental P during Zn exposure (Expt. 1) and in (ii) a 48h growth assay initiated with cells at the end of a 14-days steady state culture at three P addition rates (RARs) between 0.8 and 1.6day(-1) (Expt.2). The solution Zn concentrations required to reduce final cell density by 10% relative to control (EbC10) were 5-fold (Expt.1) or 2-fold (Expt.2) lower at the highest P supply than at the lowest P supply, i.e. Zn was more toxic at higher P supply, in contrast with the suggestions from previous studies. Cell P quota increased with increasing Zn in the exposure solution (Expt.2), thereby partially overcoming P deficiency under moderate Zn toxicity compared to low Zn exposure. Similarly, cell Zn increased with increasing P supply, potentially induced by Zn-P complexation or precipitation inside the cell. A dynamic growth model accounting for effects of external Zn and internal P on the specific growth rate was calibrated to all data. This model shows that the effect of solution Zn on specific growth rate (ErC50) was statistically unaffected by cell P quota. In contrast, this model predicts that the EbC10 (i.e. EC10 based on cell numbers) varies with P supply because cell P depends on external P and Zn. Moreover, scenario analysis predicts even contrasting trends of the EbC10 with increasing P supply depending on the duration of the growth assay and the P supply scenario. Our data at two experimental

  7. Candida-streptococcal mucosal biofilms display distinct structural and virulence characteristics depending on growth conditions and hyphal morphotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, Martinna M.; Xu, Hongbin; Sobue, Takanori; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Cury, Altair; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Summary Candida albicans and Streptococci of the Mitis group form communities in multiple oral sites, where moisture and nutrient availability can change spatially or temporally. This study evaluated structural and virulence characteristics of Candida-streptococcal biofilms formed on moist or semidry mucosal surfaces, and tested the effects of nutrient availability and hyphal morphotype on dual-species biofilms. Three-dimensional models of the oral mucosa formed by immortalized keratinocytes on a fibroblast-embedded collagenous matrix were used. Infections were carried out using Streptococcus oralis strain 34, in combination with a C. albicans wild-type strain, or pseudohyphal-forming mutant strains. Increased moisture promoted a homogeneous surface biofilm by C. albicans. Dual biofilms had a stratified structure, with streptococci growing in close contact to the mucosa and fungi growing on the bacterial surface. Under semi-dry conditions, Candida formed localized foci of dense growth, which promoted focal growth of streptococci in mixed biofilms. Candida biofilm biovolume was greater under moist conditions, albeit with minimal tissue invasion, compared to semidry conditions. Supplementing the infection medium with nutrients under semidry conditions intensified growth, biofilm biovolume and tissue invasion/damage, without changing biofilm structure. Under these conditions, the pseudohyphal mutants and S. oralis formed defective superficial biofilms, with most bacteria in contact with the epithelial surface, below a pseudohyphal mass, resembling biofilms growing in moist environment. The presence of S. oralis promoted fungal invasion and tissue damage under all conditions. We conclude that moisture, nutrient availability, hyphal morphotype and presence of commensal bacteria influence the architecture and virulence characteristics of mucosal fungal biofilms. PMID:25754666

  8. Effect of carbon sources on growth and lipid accumulation of newly isolated microalgae cultured under mixotrophic condition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tse-Shih; Wu, Jane-Yii

    2015-05-01

    In order to produce microalgal lipids that can be transformed to biodiesel fuel, one isolate with high lipid content was identified as Chlorella sp. Y8-1. The growth and lipid productivity of an isolated microalga Chlorella sp. Y8-1 were investigated under different cultivation conditions, including autotrophic growth (CO2, with light), heterotrophic growth (sucrose, without light) and mixotrophic growth (organic carbon sources and CO2, with light). Mixotrophic Chlorella sp. Y8-1 showed higher lipid content (35.5±4.2%) and higher lipid productivity (0.01 g/L/d) than Chlorella sp. Y8-1 cultivated under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions on modified Walne medium. Fatty acid analysis of Chlorella sp. Y8-1 showed the major presence of palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2) and linolenic acids (C18:3). The main fatty acid compositions of the Chlorella sp. Y8-1 are appropriate for biodiesel production. PMID:25443671

  9. Growth, condition factor, and bioenergetics modeling link warmer stream temperatures below a small dam to reduced performance of juvenile steelhead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauter, S.T.; Connolly, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the growth and feeding performance of juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss using field measures and bioenergetics modeling. Juvenile steelhead populations were sampled from mid-June through August 2004 at study sites upstream and downstream of Hemlock Dam. The growth and diet of juvenile steelhead were determined for a warm (summer) and subsequent (late summer) transitional period at each study site. Empirical data on the growth and diet of juvenile steelhead and mean daily temperatures were used in a bioenergetics model to estimate the proportion of maximum consumption achieved by juvenile steelhead by site and period. Modeled estimates of feeding performance were better for juvenile steelhead at the upstream compared to the downstream site during both periods. The median condition factor of juvenile steelhead did not change over the summer at the upstream site, but showed a significant decline over time at the downstream site. A negative trend in median condition factor at the downstream site supported bioenergetics modeling results that suggested the warmer stream temperatures had a negative impact on juvenile steelhead. Bioenergetics modeling predicted a lower feeding performance for juvenile steelhead rearing downstream compared to upstream of Hemlock Dam although food availability appeared to be limited at both study sites during the warm period. Warmer water temperatures, greater diel variation, and change in diel pattern likely led to the reduced feeding performance and reduced growth, which could have affected the overall survival of juvenile steelhead downstream of Hemlock Dam. ?? 2010 by the Northwest Scientific Association.

  10. Media Compositions for Three-Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue.The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  11. Media Compositions for Three Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth Under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  12. Crack growth behavior under creep-fatigue conditions using compact and double edge notch tension-compression specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimha Chary, Santosh Balaji

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has recently developed a new standard for creep-fatigue crack growth testing, E 2760-10, that supports testing compact specimens, C(T), under load controlled conditions. C(T) specimens are commonly used for fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth testing under constant-load-amplitude conditions. The use of these specimens is limited to positive load ratios. They are also limited in the amount of crack growth data that can be developed at high stress intensity values due to accumulation of plastic and/or creep strains leading to ratcheting in the specimen. Testing under displacement control can potentially address these shortcomings of the load-controlled tests for which the C(T) geometry is unsuitable. A double edge notch tension-compression, DEN(T-C), specimen to perform displacement controlled creep-fatigue crack growth testing is developed and optimized with the help of finite element and boundary element analyses. Accurate expressions for estimating the fracture mechanics crack tip parameters such as the stress intensity parameter, K, the crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD), and the load-line displacement (LLD) are developed over a wide range of crack sizes for the DEN(T-C) specimen. A new compliance relationship for use in experimental testing has been developed by using the compliance form available in ASTM E-647 standard. Experimentally determined compliance value compared well with the new relation for C15 steel (AISI 1015) and P91 steel tested at room and elevated temperature conditions respectively. Fatigue crack growth rate data generated using the DEN(T-C) specimens on the two metallic materials are in good agreement with the data generated using standard compact specimens; thus validating the stress-intensity factor and the compliance equation for the double edge notch tension-compression specimen. The testing has shown that the DEN(T-C) specimen is prone to crack asymmetry issues. Through

  13. Growth and formation of the foreleg skeleton inbred mice and rats under conditions of hypo-, normo- and hyperdynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, B. I.; Antipov, Y. S.

    1980-01-01

    Inbred 1 month old males of C57B 1/6, CBA, CC57Br/Mw interlinear hybrid mice of the first generation and rats of the August and Wistar lines were subjected to conditions of hypo-, normo- and hyperdynamia for 2 months. The statistically reliable dependence is shown between mechanical underloadings and overloadings and macro microscopic changes in the hind limb skeleton of animals. Genetic determination of growth and formation of the forelimb skeleton is established. Hereditary susceptibility and the phenomenon of heterosis are preserved under all motor conditions.

  14. Treatment of “Bacterial Cystitis” in Fully Automatic Mechanical Models Simulating Conditions of Bacterial Growth in the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    O'Grady, F.; Mackintosh, I. P.; Greenwood, D.; Watson, B. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two fully automatic models are described in which growing cultures can be continuously diluted and periodically discharged producing conditions of growth resembling those of the infected urinary bladder. Both models generate a continuous record of the opacity of the growing culture and the second model also generates a record of the Eh. The effect of adding ampicillin to a sensitive strain of Escherichia coli growing in these conditions is described and the relation of the results to human therapy is discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4577943

  15. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  16. Influence of somatic cell count, body condition and lameness on follicular growth and ovulation in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Morris, M.J.; Walker, S.L.; Jones, D.N.; Routly, J.E.; Smith, R.F.; Dobson, H.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of somatic cell count (SCC), body condition score (BCS) or lameness score on ovarian follicular growth and ovulation in dairy cows. Seventy four animals 30–80 days post-partum were monitored for all three conditions before synchronization of ovarian follicular phases by administration of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) followed seven days later with prostaglandin F2alpha (PG). Ultrasonography of both ovaries twice daily throughout the follicular phase revealed that fewer animals with combined high SCC and lameness (4/9) ovulated compared to healthy animals (19/21; P = 0.006) or animals with only high SCC (11/11; P = 0.004) or only lameness (21/27; P = 0.06). Overall, regardless of the presence of other concurrent conditions, fewer lame cows ovulated than Non Lame animals (30/42 and 30/32; P = 0.015). Mean follicular growth and maximum follicular diameter were unaffected by any of the three conditions. However, dominant follicle growth and maximum diameter were greater in the 60 animals that ovulated compared to the 14 that did not; 1.83 ± 0.16 versus 0.96 ± 0.26 mm/day (P = 0.014) and 19.4 ± 0.4 versus 16.4 ± 1.2 mm (P = 0.003), respectively. In conclusion, lameness reduced the proportion of cows that ovulated and the synergistic effect of high SCC and lameness reduced that proportion further. However, follicular growth and maximum follicular diameter were unaffected by high SCC, low BCS or lameness. PMID:19059637

  17. High Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Si3N4 Specimens Subjected to Uniaxial and Biaxial Dynamic Fatigue Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1995-01-01

    The slow crack growth of a hot-pressed silicon nitride was determined at 1300 C in air using dynamic fatigue testing under both uniaxial and biaxial stress states. Good agreement in fatigue parameter exists between the data obtained from uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions. A reasonable prediction of dynamic fatigue from one stress state to another was made using the recently developed CARES/LIFE computer code.

  18. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  19. Effect of Commercial Cyanobacteria Products on the Growth and Antagonistic Ability of Some Bioagents under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    El-Mougy, Nehal S.; Abdel-Kader, Mokhtar M.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of blue-green algal compounds against the growth of either pathogenic or antagonistic microorganisms as well as their effect on the antagonistic ability of bioagents was studied under in vitro conditions. The present study was undertaken to explore the inhibitory effect of commercial algal compounds, Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix, against some soil-borne pathogens. In growth medium supplemented with these algal compounds, the linear growth of pathogenic fungi decreased by increasing tested concentrations of the two algal compounds. Complete reduction in pathogenic fungal growth was observed at 2% of both Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix. Gradual significant reduction in the pathogenic fungal growth was caused by the two bioagents and by increasing the concentrations of algal compounds Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix. The present work showed that commercial algal compounds, Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix, have potential for the suppression of soil-borne fungi and enhance the antagonistic ability of fungal, bacterial, and yeast bio-agents. PMID:24307948

  20. A Novel Liquid Medium for the Efficient Growth of the Salmonid Pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis and Optimization of Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Sergio H.; Henríquez, Vitalia; Gómez, Fernando A.; Martínez, Irene; Altamirano, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the bacterium that causes Piscirickettsiosis, a systemic disease of salmonid fish responsible for significant economic losses within the aquaculture industry worldwide. The growth of the bacterium for vaccine formulation has been traditionally accomplished by infecting eukaryotic cell lines, a process that involves high production costs and is time-consuming. Recent research has demonstrated that it is possible to culture pure P. salmonis in a blood containing (cell-free) medium. In the present work we demonstrate the growth of P. salmonis in a liquid medium free from blood and serum components, thus establishing a novel and simplified bacteriological medium. Additionally, the new media reported provides improved growth conditions for P. salmonis, where biomass concentrations of approximately 800 mg cell dry weight L−1 were obtained, about eight times higher than those reported for the blood containing medium. A 2- level full factorial design was employed to evaluate the significance of the main medium components on cell growth and an optimal temperature range of 23–27°C was determined for the microorganism to grow in the novel liquid media. Therefore, these results represent a breakthrough regarding P. salmonis research in order to optimize pure P. salmonis growth in liquid blood and serum free medium. PMID:24039723

  1. Listeria monocytogenes Scott A: Cell Surface Charge, Hydrophobicity, and Electron Donor and Acceptor Characteristics under Different Environmental Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Briandet, Romain; Meylheuc, Thierry; Maher, Catherine; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie Noëlle

    1999-01-01

    We determined the variations in the surface physicochemical properties of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A cells that occurred under various environmental conditions. The surface charges, the hydrophobicities, and the electron donor and acceptor characteristics of L. monocytogenes Scott A cells were compared after the organism was grown in different growth media and at different temperatures; to do this, we used microelectrophoresis and the microbial adhesion to solvents method. Supplementing the growth media with glucose or lactic acid affected the electrical, hydrophobic, and electron donor and acceptor properties of the cells, whereas the growth temperature (37, 20, 15, or 8°C) primarily affected the electrical and electron donor and acceptor properties. The nonlinear effects of the growth temperature on the physicochemical properties of the cells were similar for cells cultivated in two different growth media, but bacteria cultivated in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 6 g of yeast extract per liter (TSYE) were slightly more hydrophobic than cells cultivated in brain heart infusion medium (P < 0.05). Adhesion experiments conducted with L. monocytogenes Scott A cells cultivated in TSYE at 37, 20, 15, and 8°C and then suspended in a sodium chloride solution (1.5 × 10−1 or 1.5 × 10−3 M NaCl) confirmed that the cell surface charge and the electron donor and acceptor properties of the cells had an influence on their attachment to stainless steel. PMID:10583984

  2. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  3. Different effects of an extended photoperiod treatment on growth, gonadal function, and condition of hair coats in Thoroughbred yearlings reared under different climate conditions

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Tsuyoshi; MIZUKAMI, Hirotoshi; NAMBO, Yasuo; ISHIMARU, Mutsuki; MIYATA, Kenji; AKIYAMA, Kentaro; KOROSUE, Kenji; NAITO, Hiroshi; NAGAOKA, Kentaro; WATANABE, Gen; TAYA, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT One- to two-year-old Thoroughbred colts and fillies being reared in Miyazaki (warm climate) and Hidaka (cold climate), Japan, were administered extended photoperiod (EP) treatment between December 20 and the following April 10, and its effect on growth, endocrine changes, gonadal activation, and hair coat condition was investigated. In colts reared in Miyazaki, no effect of EP treatment was noted on the growth indices, including body weight (BW), height at withers (HW), girth, and cannon circumference (CC), whereas the BWs and CCs of fillies were significantly higher in the EP treatment group than the control. In Hidaka, the BWs and HWs of colts and HWs of fillies were significantly higher in the EP treatment group. Gonadal activation characterized by an increase in circulating hormone concentrations was earlier in the EP treatment group for fillies reared in Miyazaki [luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), progesterone (P4), and estradiol-17β (E2)] and in colts (LH, testosterone, and E2) and fillies (LH, FSH, P4, and E2) reared in Hidaka. Regardless of sex and climate, prolactin was significantly higher in the EP treatment group, whereas insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) was not. Initial ovulation occurred before April in more of the EP treatment group than the control regardless of the climate. Molting of the hair coat, examined in March, was advanced in the EP treatment group regardless of sex and climate. These results suggest that EP treatment may promote growth and gonadal activation in fillies reared in Miyazaki and in colts and fillies reared in Hidaka and that the effect may be mediated by prolactin. PMID:26858576

  4. Different effects of an extended photoperiod treatment on growth, gonadal function, and condition of hair coats in Thoroughbred yearlings reared under different climate conditions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Mizukami, Hirotoshi; Nambo, Yasuo; Ishimaru, Mutsuki; Miyata, Kenji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Korosue, Kenji; Naito, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    One- to two-year-old Thoroughbred colts and fillies being reared in Miyazaki (warm climate) and Hidaka (cold climate), Japan, were administered extended photoperiod (EP) treatment between December 20 and the following April 10, and its effect on growth, endocrine changes, gonadal activation, and hair coat condition was investigated. In colts reared in Miyazaki, no effect of EP treatment was noted on the growth indices, including body weight (BW), height at withers (HW), girth, and cannon circumference (CC), whereas the BWs and CCs of fillies were significantly higher in the EP treatment group than the control. In Hidaka, the BWs and HWs of colts and HWs of fillies were significantly higher in the EP treatment group. Gonadal activation characterized by an increase in circulating hormone concentrations was earlier in the EP treatment group for fillies reared in Miyazaki [luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), progesterone (P4), and estradiol-17β (E2)] and in colts (LH, testosterone, and E2) and fillies (LH, FSH, P4, and E2) reared in Hidaka. Regardless of sex and climate, prolactin was significantly higher in the EP treatment group, whereas insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) was not. Initial ovulation occurred before April in more of the EP treatment group than the control regardless of the climate. Molting of the hair coat, examined in March, was advanced in the EP treatment group regardless of sex and climate. These results suggest that EP treatment may promote growth and gonadal activation in fillies reared in Miyazaki and in colts and fillies reared in Hidaka and that the effect may be mediated by prolactin. PMID:26858576

  5. SCC CRACK GROWTH OF COLD-WORKED TYPE 316 SS IN SIMULATED BWR OXIDIZING AND HYDROGEN WATER CHEMISTRY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Andresen, Peter L.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2007-08-19

    There is considerable interest in the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in low electrochemical potential (ECP), light water reactor (LWR) environments. Crack growth measurements are presented for ~20% cold-worked, 316 and 316L stainless steels tested in 288°C high-purity water under oxidizing (2000 ppb O2) and hydrogen water chemistry (74-1560 ppb H2) conditions. High SCC crack-growth rates of ~1x10-7 mm/s at constant K were observed in one heat at low ECP, hydrogen water chemistry conditions. Crack morphologies for this heat were mixed intergranular (IG) and transgranular (TG) for all environments but with less TG cracking at the lowest K level tested. Comparisons made to a larger set of data on cold-worked stainless steels indicate that the SCC crack-growth rates from PNNL on this heat are at the high end of test data under low ECP, LWR conditions. Possible reasons for the higher observed SCC propagation rates in the cold-worked 316LSS heat are discussed.

  6. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  7. Growth and decay of runaway electrons above the critical electric field under quiescent conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Wesley, J. C.; Granetz, R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Zhang, J.; Crocker, N. A.; Austin, M. E.; Wingen, A.; Zhu, Y.

    2014-02-15

    Extremely low density operation free of error field penetration supports the excitation of trace-level quiescent runaway electron (RE) populations during the flat-top of DIII-D Ohmic discharges. Operation in the quiescent regime allows accurate measurement of all key parameters important to RE excitation, including the internal broadband magnetic fluctuation level. RE onset is characterized and found to be consistent with primary (Dreicer) generation rates. Impurity-free collisional suppression of the RE population is investigated by stepping the late-time main-ion density, until RE decay is observed. The transition from growth to decay is found to occur 3–5 times above the theoretical critical electric field for avalanche growth and is thus indicative of anomalous RE loss. This suggests that suppression of tokamak RE avalanches can be achieved at lower density than previously expected, though extrapolation requires predictive understanding of the RE loss mechanism and magnitude.

  8. Imaging growth of neurites in conditioned hydrogel by coherent anti-stokes raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Conovaloff, Aaron; Wang, Han-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Panitch, Alyssa

    2009-10-01

    Cultured DRGs in different gel scaffolds were analyzed using CA RS microscopy to determine its possible use as a label-free imaging option for tracking cellular growth in a gel scaffold. This study demonstrates for the first time the applicability of CA RS microscopy to the imaging of live neuronal cells in GAG hydrogels. By tuning the laser beating frequency, omega(p)-omega(s), to match the vibration of C-H bonds in the cell membrane, the CA RS signal yields detailed, high-quality images of neurites with single membrane detection sensitivity. The results demonstrate that CA RS imaging allows monitoring of cellular growth in a tissue scaffold over time, with a contrast that shows comparable cellular structures to those obtained using standard fluorescent staining techniques. These findings show the potential of CARS microscopy to assist in the understanding of organogenesis processes in a tissue scaffold. PMID:20539743

  9. Multi-wavelength resonance Raman spectroscopy of bacteria to study the effects of growth condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Grun, Jacob; Lunsford, Robert; Gillis, David; Nikitin, Sergei; Wang, Zheng

    2012-06-01

    We will examine the use of multi-wavelength UV resonance-Raman signatures to identify the effects of growth phase on different types of bacteria. Gram positive and gram-negative species, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Citrobacter koseri and Citrobacter braakii were grown to logarithmic and stationary phases in different culture media. Raman spectra of bacteria were obtained by sequential illumination of samples between 220 and 260 nm; a range which encompasses the resonance frequencies of cellular components. In addition to the information contained in the single spectrum, this two-dimensional signature contains information reflecting variations in resonance cross sections with illumination wavelength. Results of our algorithms in identifying the differences between these germs are discussed. Preliminary results indicate that growth affects the Raman signature, but not to an extent that would negate identification of the species.

  10. Blow-up properties in the parabolic problems with anisotropic nonstandard growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingchen; Yang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the parabolic problems with anisotropic nonstandard growth nonlinearities. We first give the existence and uniqueness of weak solutions in variable Sobolev spaces. Second, we use the energy methods to show the existence of blow-up solutions with negative or positive initial energy, respectively. Both the variable exponents and the coefficients make important roles in Fujita blow-up phenomena. Moreover, asymptotic properties of the blow-up solutions are determined.

  11. Complementarity effects on tree growth are contingent on tree size and climatic conditions across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-González, Jaime; Ruiz-Benito, Paloma; Ratcliffe, Sophia; Calatayud, Joaquín; Kändler, Gerald; Lehtonen, Aleksi; Dahlgren, Jonas; Wirth, Christian; Zavala, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Neglecting tree size and stand structure dynamics might bias the interpretation of the diversity-productivity relationship in forests. Here we show evidence that complementarity is contingent on tree size across large-scale climatic gradients in Europe. We compiled growth data of the 14 most dominant tree species in 32,628 permanent plots covering boreal, temperate and Mediterranean forest biomes. Niche complementarity is expected to result in significant growth increments of trees surrounded by a larger proportion of functionally dissimilar neighbours. Functional dissimilarity at the tree level was assessed using four functional types: i.e. broad-leaved deciduous, broad-leaved evergreen, needle-leaved deciduous and needle-leaved evergreen. Using Linear Mixed Models we show that, complementarity effects depend on tree size along an energy availability gradient across Europe. Specifically: (i) complementarity effects at low and intermediate positions of the gradient (coldest-temperate areas) were stronger for small than for large trees; (ii) in contrast, at the upper end of the gradient (warmer regions), complementarity is more widespread in larger than smaller trees, which in turn showed negative growth responses to increased functional dissimilarity. Our findings suggest that the outcome of species mixing on stand productivity might critically depend on individual size distribution structure along gradients of environmental variation. PMID:27571971

  12. Optimizing conditions for production of high levels of soluble recombinant human growth hormone using Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Savari, Marzieh; Zarkesh Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Edalati, Masoud; Biria, Davoud

    2015-10-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is synthesized and stored by somatotroph cells of the anterior pituitary gland and can effect on body metabolism. This protein can be used to treat hGH deficiency, Prader-Willi syndrome and Turner syndrome. The limitations in current technology for soluble recombinant protein production, such as inclusion body formation, decrease its usage for therapeutic purposes. To achieve high levels of soluble form of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) we used suitable host strain, appropriate induction temperature, induction time and culture media composition. For this purpose, 32 experiments were designed using Taguchi method and the levels of produced proteins in all 32 experiments were evaluated primarily by ELISA and dot blotting and finally the purified rhGH protein products assessed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques. Our results indicate that media, bacterial strains, temperature and induction time have significant effects on the production of rhGH. The low cultivation temperature of 25°C, TB media (with 3% ethanol and 0.6M glycerol), Origami strain and a 10-h induction time increased the solubility of human growth hormone. PMID:26151869

  13. Complementarity effects on tree growth are contingent on tree size and climatic conditions across Europe.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-González, Jaime; Ruiz-Benito, Paloma; Ratcliffe, Sophia; Calatayud, Joaquín; Kändler, Gerald; Lehtonen, Aleksi; Dahlgren, Jonas; Wirth, Christian; Zavala, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Neglecting tree size and stand structure dynamics might bias the interpretation of the diversity-productivity relationship in forests. Here we show evidence that complementarity is contingent on tree size across large-scale climatic gradients in Europe. We compiled growth data of the 14 most dominant tree species in 32,628 permanent plots covering boreal, temperate and Mediterranean forest biomes. Niche complementarity is expected to result in significant growth increments of trees surrounded by a larger proportion of functionally dissimilar neighbours. Functional dissimilarity at the tree level was assessed using four functional types: i.e. broad-leaved deciduous, broad-leaved evergreen, needle-leaved deciduous and needle-leaved evergreen. Using Linear Mixed Models we show that, complementarity effects depend on tree size along an energy availability gradient across Europe. Specifically: (i) complementarity effects at low and intermediate positions of the gradient (coldest-temperate areas) were stronger for small than for large trees; (ii) in contrast, at the upper end of the gradient (warmer regions), complementarity is more widespread in larger than smaller trees, which in turn showed negative growth responses to increased functional dissimilarity. Our findings suggest that the outcome of species mixing on stand productivity might critically depend on individual size distribution structure along gradients of environmental variation. PMID:27571971

  14. Growth and photosynthesis of Japanese flowering cherry under simulated microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugano, Mami; Ino, Yoshio; Nakamura, Teruko

    2002-01-01

    The photosynthetic rate, the leaf characteristics related to photosynthesis, such as the chlorophyll content, chlorophyll a/b ratio and density of the stomata, the leaf area and the dry weight in seedlings of Japanese flowering cherry grown under normal gravity and simulated microgravity conditions were examined. No significant differences were found in the photosynthetic rates between the two conditions. Moreover, leaf characteristics such as the chlorophyll content, chlorophyll a/b ratio and density of the stomata in the seedlings grown under the simulated microgravity condition were not affected. However, the photosynthetic product of the whole seedling under the simulated microgravity condition increased compared with the control due to its leaf area increase. The results suggest that dynamic gravitational stimulus controls the partitioning of the products of photosynthesis.

  15. Uniformity of environmental conditions and plant growth in a hydroponic culture system for use in a growth room with aerial CO2 control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessey, J. K.; York, E. K.; Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    A portable system of hydroponic culture was developed that maintained temperature, pH, and nutrient concentrations of circulating nutrient solutions. The hydroponic system is used within a controlled-environment room (CER) for control of aerial environment. The CER was equipped with an auto-calibrating system for atmospheric CO2 control. The control systems for the hydroponic chambers were able to maintain acidity within +/- 0.2 pH units and the temperature with +/- 0.5 degree C. Mixing time for the 200-liter volume of solution within a hydroponic chamber was less than 12 min. The CO2 control system was able to maintain aerial concentrations within +/- 10 ppm CO2 during the light period. The only gradient found to occur within the hydroponic chambers or CER was a slight gradient in aerial temperature along the length of hydroponic chambers. Growth of soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] was characterized during a 3-week period of vegetative development by leaf number and area, plant dry weight, total N content of plants, and N depletion from the nutrient solution. The growth characteristics among populations for three hydroponic chambers within the CER were not significantly different, and the percent standard errors of means of the measurements within populations from each chamber were nearly all less than 10%. Thus, the uniformity of plant growth reflected the uniformity of environmental conditions.

  16. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A.; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations. PMID:27091302

  17. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2016-01-01

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations. PMID:27091302

  18. Growth, condition, diet, and consumption rates of northern pike in three Arizona reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flinders, J.M.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Northern pike (Esox lucius L.) introductions are controversial in the western United States due to suspected impacts they might have on established sport fisheries and potential illegal introductions. Tbree Arizona reservoirs, Parker Canyon Lake, Upper Lake Mary and Long Lake were sampled to examine the diet, consumption dynamics, and growth of northern pike. Northern pike diets varied by season and reservoir. In Parker Canyon Lake, diets were dominated by rainbow trout in winter and spring and bluegill and green sunfish in the fall. In Long Lake the northern pike ate crayfish in spring and early summer and switched to young of the year common carp in summer and fall. Black crappie, golden shiners, and crayfish were the major prey in Upper Lake Mary during spring, but they switched to stocked rainbow trout in the fall. Northern pike growth was in the high range of growth reported throughout the United States. Estimated northern pike specific consumption rate (scr) of rainbow trout (g/g/d ?? 10-6) was greatest in Upper Lake Mary (scr = 329.1 ?? 23.7 g/g/d ?? 10-6) where stocked fingerling (280 mm TL) rainbow trout stocked in Long Lake (scr = 1.4 ?? 0.1 g/g/d ?? 10-6) and Parker Canyon Lake (scr = 287.2 ?? 15.1 g/g/d ?? 10-6) where catchable-sized rainbow trout were stocked. Managers should consider the cost-benefits of stocking fish >200 mm TL in lakes containing northern pike. ?? Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2008.

  19. Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Sofia: Growth in and Persistence on Eggs under Production and Retail Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Catherine M.; Duffy, Lesley L.; Subasinghe, Nela; Hogg, Geoff; Coventry, John; Fegan, Narelle

    2015-01-01

    Salmonellosis in Australia has been linked to eggs and egg products with specific serotypes associated with outbreaks. We compared attachment to and survival on egg shells and growth in eggs of two Salmonella serotypes, an egg outbreak associated Salmonella Typhimurium and a non-egg-associated Salmonella enterica ssp. II 1,4,12,27:b:[e,n,x] (S. Sofia). Experiments were conducted at combinations of 4, 15, 22, 37 and 42°C. No significant differences occurred between the serotypes in maximum growth rates, which were significantly greater (P < 0.001) in egg yolk (0.427 log10 CFU/mL/h) compared to whole egg (0.312 log10 CFU/mL/h) and egg white (0.029 log10 CFU/mL/h). Attachment to egg shells varied by time (1 or 20 min) and temperature (4, 22 and 42°C), with S. Typhimurium isolates attaching at higher levels (P < 0.05) than S. Sofia after 1 min at 4°C and S. Typhimurium ATCC 14028 attaching at higher (P < 0.05) levels at 22°C. Survival on egg shells was not significantly different across isolates. Salmonella serotypes behaved similarly regarding growth in egg contents, attachment to egg shells and survival on eggs, indicating that other factors more likely contributed to reasons for S. Typhimurium being implicated in multiple egg-associated outbreaks. PMID:26539536

  20. On the location of crack closure and the threshold condition for fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zaiken, E.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1984-08-01

    These experiments on ingot aluminum alloys provide further confirmation that the development of a threshold for the growth of long fatigue cracks is primarily associated with a reduction in local crack driving force due to crack closure in the wake of the crack tip. Moreover, based on studies of the change in K /SUB c1/ during progressive removal of the wake at threshold levels, it appears that although such closure is fairly evenly distributed over most of the crack length, more than 40% of the closure is confined to the near-tip region.

  1. Improbability of void growth in aluminum via dislocation nucleation under typical laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, L D; Warner, D H

    2012-01-20

    The rate at which dislocations nucleate from spherical voids subjected to shear loading is predicted from atomistic simulation. By employing the latest version of the finite temperature string method, a variational transition state theory approach can be utilized, enabling atomistic predictions at ordinary laboratory time scales, loads, and temperatures. The simulation results, in conjunction with a continuum model, show that the deformation and growth of voids in Al are not likely to occur via dislocation nucleation under typical loadings regardless of void size. PMID:22400757

  2. Growth and development of cultured carrot cells and embryos under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.; Dutcher, F. R.; Quinn, C. E.; Steward, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Morphogenetically competent proembryonic cells and well-developed somatic embryos of carrot at two levels of organization were exposed for 18.5 days to a hypogravity environment aboard the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 1129. It was confirmed that cultured totipotent cells of carrot can give rise to embryos with well-developed roots and minimally developed shoots. It was also shown that the space hypogravity environment could support the further growth of already-organized, later somatic embryonic stages and give rise to fully developed embryo-plantlets with roots and shoots.

  3. Comparison of growth and endocrine changes in Thoroughbred colts and fillies reared under different climate conditions.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Nambo, Yasuo; Ishimaru, Mutsuki; Naito, Hiroshi; Korosue, Kenji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Miyata, Kenji; Yamanobe, Akira; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Development and endocrine changes in Thoroughbreds colts and fillies were compared between those reared at two facilities of the Japan Racing Association, the Hidaka Training and Research Center (Hidaka) and Miyazaki Yearling Training Farm (Miyazaki). Thoroughbred colts and fillies born in Japan between 2003 and 2010 were used. Each colt group and filly group was divided into 2 groups, respectively, and raised in Hidaka or Miyazaki for 7 months from September at 1 year old to April at 2 years old. For the growth parameters, the body weight, height at withers, and girth and cannon circumferences were measured once a month. For parameters of endocrine function, circulating prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone, progesterone, and estradiol-17β levels were measured. Regarding growth, the rate of increase over the 7-month period was significantly higher in both colts and fillies raised in Miyazaki than in Hidaka in all 4 parameters: body weight, height at withers, and girth and cannon circumferences. The endocrine changes of the colts and fillies born in 2007 were as follows. In colts, although circulating prolactin tended to be higher in colts reared in Hidaka from October to April, circulating LH, FSH, testosterone, estradiol-17β and IGF-1 tended to be higher in colts reared in Miyazaki than in Hidaka, suggesting that the gonadotropin-releasing hormone-LH/FSH system and the growth hormone-IGF-1 system were more active in colts reared in Miyazaki as compared with those reared in Hidaka. In fillies, circulating prolactin tended to be higher in fillies reared in Hidaka in February and March, but no significant difference was noted in the serum LH, FSH, IGF-1, or progesterone level between the 2 groups. Circulating estradiol-17β tended to be higher in fillies reared in Miyazaki than in Hidaka in October and November. Regarding ovarian function, the initial ovulation occurred by the

  4. Options for transpiration water removal in a crop growth system under zero gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, C. C.; Kliss, M.; Yendler, B.; Borchers, B.; Yendler, Boris S.; Nguyen, Thoi K.; Waleh, Ahmad

    1991-01-01

    The operation of a microgravity crop-growth system is a critical feature of NASA's Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) development program. Transpiration-evolved water must be removed from the air that is recirculated in such a system, perhaps supplying potable water in the process. The present consideration of candidate systems for CELSS water removal gives attention to energy considerations and to a mechanical, inertial-operation water-separation system that was chosen due to the depth of current understanding of its operation.

  5. Flight Experiments of Physical Vapor Transport of ZnSe: Growth of Crystals in Various Convective Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A low gravity material experiment will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). The flight experiment will conduct crystal growths of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, such as ZnSeS and ZnSeTe, by physical vapor transport (PVT). The main objective of the project is to determine the relative contributions of gravity-driven fluid flows to the compositional distribution, incorporation of impurities and defects, and deviation from stoichiometry observed in the grown crystals as results of buoyancy-driven convection and growth interface fluctuations caused by irregular fluid-flows on Earth. The investigation consists of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research efforts and concurrent flight experimentation. The objectives of the ground-based studies are (1) obtain the experimental data and conduct the analyses required to define the optimum growth parameters for the flight experiments, (2) perfect various characterization techniques to establish the standard procedure for material characterization, (3) quantitatively establish the characteristics of the crystals grown on Earth as a basis for subsequent comparative evaluations of the crystals grown in a low-gravity environment and (4) develop theoretical and analytical methods required for such evaluations. ZnSe and related ternary compounds have been grown by vapor transport technique with real time in-situ non-invasive monitoring techniques. The grown crystals have been characterized extensively by various techniques to correlate the grown crystal properties with the growth conditions. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the PVT crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, especially the effects of different growth orientations related to gravity direction on the grown crystals.

  6. Applying Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory to simulate growth and bio-energetics of blue mussels under low seston conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosland, R.; Strand, Ø.; Alunno-Bruscia, M.; Bacher, C.; Strohmeier, T.

    2009-08-01

    A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model for simulation of growth and bioenergetics of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis) has been tested in three low seston sites in southern Norway. The observations comprise four datasets from laboratory experiments (physiological and biometrical mussel data) and three datasets from in situ growth experiments (biometrical mussel data). Additional in situ data from commercial farms in southern Norway were used for estimation of biometrical relationships in the mussels. Three DEB parameters (shape coefficient, half saturation coefficient, and somatic maintenance rate coefficient) were estimated from experimental data, and the estimated parameters were complemented with parameter values from literature to establish a basic parameter set. Model simulations based on the basic parameter set and site specific environmental forcing matched fairly well with observations, but the model was not successful in simulating growth at the extreme low seston regimes in the laboratory experiments in which the long period of negative growth caused negative reproductive mass. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the model was moderately sensitive to changes in the parameter and initial conditions. The results show the robust properties of the DEB model as it manages to simulate mussel growth in several independent datasets from a common basic parameter set. However, the results also demonstrate limitations of Chl a as a food proxy for blue mussels and limitations of the DEB model to simulate long term starvation. Future work should aim at establishing better food proxies and improving the model formulations of the processes involved in food ingestion and assimilation. The current DEB model should also be elaborated to allow shrinking in the structural tissue in order to produce more realistic growth simulations during long periods of starvation.

  7. Chloroplast Distribution in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Depends on Light Conditions during Growth.

    PubMed Central

    Trojan, A.; Gabrys, H.

    1996-01-01

    Chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana move in response to blue light. Sensitivity to light and the range of fluence rates to which the chloroplasts respond were found to be comparable to those of other higher plants studied. We investigated typical chloroplast distributions in Arabidopsis grown under three different light conditions:standard-light conditions, similar to natural light intensities; weak-light intensities, close to the compensation point of photosynthesis; and strong-light intensities, close to the saturation of the light-response curve of photosynthesis. We observed a striking difference in chloroplast arrangement in darkness between plants grown under weak- and strong-light conditions. There was a slight difference after weak-light pretreatment, and the arrangements of chloroplasts after strong-light pretreatment in both plant groups were very similar. These results support the ecological significance of chloroplast movements. PMID:12226297

  8. Profiling of lipid and glycogen accumulations under different growth conditions in the sulfothermophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Aoki, Motohide; Ju, Xiaohui; Ueda, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujiwara, Shoko; Umemura, Tomonari; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Minoda, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular red alga Galdieria sulphuraria grows efficiently and produces a large amount of biomass in acidic conditions at high temperatures. It has great potential to produce biofuels and other beneficial compounds without becoming contaminated with other organisms. In G. sulphuraria, biomass measurements and glycogen and lipid analyses demonstrated that the amounts and compositions of glycogen and lipids differed when cells were grown under autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions. Maximum biomass production was obtained in the mixotrophic culture. High amounts of glycogen were obtained in the mixotrophic cultures, while the amounts of neutral lipids were similar between mixotrophic and heterotrophic cultures. The amounts of neutral lipids were highest in red algae, including thermophiles. Glycogen structure and fatty acids compositions largely depended on the growth conditions. PMID:26595665

  9. The development of a preliminary correlation of data on oxide growth on 6061 aluminum under ANS thermal-hydraulic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, R.E.; Yoder, G.L.; West, C.D.; Montgomery, B.H.

    1990-06-01

    The corrosion of aluminum alloy 6061 is being studied in a special test loop facility under the range of thermal-hydraulic conditions appropriate for fuel plate operation in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor core. Experimental measurements describing the growth of the boehmite (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}H{sub 2}O) films on the exposed aluminum surfaces are now available for a range of coolant conditions and heat fluxes, and these results have been analyzed to demonstrate the influence of several important experimental variables. A subset of our data base particularly appropriate to the ANS conditions presently anticipated was used to develop a preliminary correlation based on an empirical oxidation model.

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi Polyamine Transporter: Its Role on Parasite Growth and Survival Under Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reigada, Chantal; Sayé, Melisa; Vera, Edward Valera; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Polyamines are polycationic compounds that play a critical role as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, T. cruzi is auxotrophic for polyamines because of its inability to synthesize putrescine due to the lack of both, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase; therefore, the intracellular availability of polyamines depends exclusively on transport processes. In this work, the polyamine transporter TcPAT12 was overexpressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes demonstrating that growth rates at different concentrations of polyamines strongly depend on the regulation of the polyamine transport. In addition, parasites overexpressing TcPAT12 showed a highly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and the trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole, which act by oxidative stress and interfering the synthesis of polyamine derivatives, respectively. Finally, the presence of putative polyamine transporters was analyzed in T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major genomes identifying 3-6 genes in these trypanosomatids. PMID:26983938

  11. Nuclear division cycle in Neurospora crassa hyphae under different growth conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Martegani, E; Levi, M; Trezzi, F; Alberghina, L

    1980-01-01

    Treatment with picolinic acid blocked Neurospora crassa nuclei in G1, and recovery from the treatment allowed a synchronous wave of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis to occur. Nuclei, which appeared as compact globular bodies during the period of blockage, assumed a ring shape during the following S phase, which was also maintained in the G2 phase. The proportion of compact globular nuclei was much higher in hyphae growing at lower rates, whereas that of ring nuclei increased when the hyphae were growing at higher rates. Horseshoe nuclei (probably mitotic nuclei) and double ring nuclei were also observed in growing hyphae, but their frequencies were low and fairly independent of the rate of growth. The length of the S phase of the Neurospora nuclear division cycle was determined to be about 30 min. From the frequencies of the phase-specific nuclear shapes, the durations of the G1 phase and the combined S plus G2 phases were calculated. The results showed that variations in the growth rates of the mycelia were mainly coupled with variations in the G1 phase of the nuclear division cycle. For mycelia growing in minimal sucrose, the lengths of all of the phases of the nuclear division cycle were estimated. Images PMID:6445357

  12. Effects of FeNi-phosphorus-carbon system on crystal growth of diamond under high pressure and high temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mei-Hua; Bi, Ning; Li, Shang-Sheng; Su, Tai-Chao; Zhou, Ai-Guo; Hu, Qiang; Jia, Xiao-Peng; Ma, Hong-An

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports the crystal growth of diamond from the FeNi-Carbon system with additive phosphorus at high pressures and high temperatures of 5.4-5.8 GPa and 1280-1360 °C. Attributed to the presence of additive phosphorus, the pressure and temperature condition, morphology, and color of diamond crystals change obviously. The pressure and temperature condition of diamond growth increases evidently with the increase of additive phosphorus content and results in the moving up of the V-shape region. The surfaces of the diamonds also become coarse as the additive phosphorus added in the growth system. Raman spectra indicate that diamonds grown from the FeNi-phosphorus-carbon system have more crystal defects and impurities. This work provides a new way to enrich the doping of diamond and improve the experimental exploration for future material applications. Project supported by the Doctoral Fund of Henan Polytechnic University, China (Grant Nos. B2013-013 and B2013-044) and the Research Projects of Science and Technology of the Education Department of Henan Province, China (Grant Nos. 14B430026 and 12A430010).

  13. Adverse antibiotic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bint, A J; Burtt, I

    1980-07-01

    There is enormous potential for drug interactions in patients who, today, often receive many drugs. Antibiotics are prominent amongst the groups of drugs commonly prescribed. Many interactions take place at the absorption stage. Antacids and antidiarrhoeal preparations, in particular, can delay and reduce the absorption of antibiotics such as tetracyclines and clindamycin, by combining with them in the gastrointestinal tract to form chelates or complexes. Other drugs can affect gastric motility, which in turn often controls the rate at which antibiotics are absorbed. Some broad spectrum antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora of the gut which may be related to malabsorption states. The potentiation of toxic side effects of one drug by another is a common type of interaction. Antibiotics which are implicated in this type of interaction are those which themselves possess some toxicity such as aminoglycosides, some cephalosporins, tetracyclines and colistin. Some of the most important adverse interactions with antibiotics are those which involve other drugs which have a low toxicity/efficacy ratio. These include anticoagulants such as warfarin, anticonvulsants such as phenytoin and phenobarbitone and oral antidiabetic drugs like tolbutamide. Risk of interaction arises when the metabolism of these drugs is inhibited by liver microsomal enzyme inhibitors such as some sulphonamides and chloramphenicol, or is enhanced by enzyme inducers such as rifampicin. PMID:6995091

  14. Autophagy inhibition in endogenous and nutrient-deprived conditions reduces dorsal root ganglia neuron survival and neurite growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Joseph-Patrick; Mearow, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral neuropathies can result in cytoskeletal changes in axons, ultimately leading to Wallerian degeneration and cell death. Recently, autophagy has been studied as a potential target for improving axonal survival and growth during peripheral nerve damage. This study investigates the influence of autophagy on adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron survival and axonal growth under control and nutrient deprivation conditions. Constitutive autophagy was modulated with pharmacological activators (rapamycin; Rapa) and inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin A1) in conjunction with either a nutrient-stable environment (standard culture medium) or a nutrient-deprived environment (Hank's balanced salt solution + Ca(2+) /Mg(2+) ). The results demonstrated that autophagy inhibition decreased cell viability and reduced neurite growth and branching complexity. Although autophagy was upregulated with nutrient deprivation compared with the control, it was not further activated by rapamycin, suggesting a threshold level of autophagy. Overall, both cellular and biochemical approaches combined to show the influence of autophagy on adult DRG neuron survival and growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018986

  15. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. Gas hydrate growth and stability conditioned by host sediment properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clennell, M.B.; Henry, P.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Thomas, M.

    2000-01-01

    The stability conditions of submarine gas hydrates (methane clathrates) are largely dictated by pressure, temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of the host sediments also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in the pores of a freezing soil, where capillary forces influence the energy balance. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments because of the excess internal phase pressure of small crystals with high surface curvature that coexist with liquid water in small pores. Therefore, the base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature, and so nearer to the seabed than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. The growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, sheets, and lenses in muds; cements in sand and ash layers) can be explained by a requirement to minimize the excess of mechanical and surface energy in the system.

  16. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence. PMID:23850228

  17. A revised inventory of Adverse Childhood Experiences.

    PubMed

    Finkelhor, David; Shattuck, Anne; Turner, Heather; Hamby, Sherry

    2015-10-01

    This study examines whether the items from the original Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) scale can be improved in their prediction of health outcomes by adding some additional widely recognized childhood adversities. The analyses come from the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence 2014, a telephone survey conducted from August 2013 through April 2014 with a nationally representative sample of 1,949 children and adolescents aged 10-17 and their caregivers who were asked about adversities, physical health conditions and mental health symptoms. The addition of measures of peer victimization, peer isolation/rejection, and community violence exposure added significantly to the prediction of mental health symptoms, and the addition of a measure of low socioeconomic status (SES) added significantly to the prediction of physical health problems. A revised version of the ACES scale is proposed. PMID:26259971

  18. CRITICAL FACTORS CONTROLLING VEGETATION GROWTH ON COMPLETED SANITARY LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study identifies some of the critical factors that affect tree and shrub growth on reclaimed sanitary landfill sites and determines which woody species are adaptable to the adverse growth conditions of such sites. Trees planted at the Edgeboro Landfill, East Brunswick, New J...

  19. Towards lag phase of microbial populations at growth-limiting conditions: The role of the variability in the growth limits of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-05-01

    The water activity (aw) growth limits of unheated and heat stressed Listeria monocytogenes individual cells were studied. The aw limits varied from 0.940 to 0.997 and 0.951 to 0.997 for unheated and heat stressed cells, respectively. Due to the above variability a decrease in aw results in the presence of a non-growing fraction in the population leading to an additional pseudo-lag in population growth. In this case the total apparent lag of the population is the sum of the physiological lag of the growing cells (time required to adjust to the new environment) and the pseudo-lag. To investigate the effect of aw on the above lag components, the growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes on tryptone soy agar with aw adjusted to values ranging from 0.997 to 0.940 was monitored. The model of B&R was fitted to the data for the estimation of the apparent lag. In order to estimate the physiological lag of the growing fraction of the inoculum, the model was refitted to the growth data using as initial population level the number of cells that were able to grow (estimated from the number of colonies formed on the agar at the end of storage) and excluding the rest data during the lag. The results showed that for the unheated cells the apparent lag was almost identical to the physiological lag for aw values ranging from 0.997 to 0.970, as the majority of the cells in the initial population was able to grow in these conditions. As the aw decreased from 0.970 to 0.940 however, the number of cells in the population which were able to grow, decreased resulting to an increase in the pseudo-lag. The maximum value of pseudo-lag was 13.1h and it was observed at aw=0.940 where 10% of the total inoculated cells were able to grow. For heat stressed populations a pseudo-lag started to increase at higher aw conditions (0.982) compared to unheated cells. In contrast to the apparent lag, a linear relation between physiological lag and aw was observed for both unheated and heat stressed cells. PMID

  20. Acute impact of tetracycline on the utilization of acetate by activated sludge sustained under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Kor-Bicakci, G; Ubay-Cokgor, E; Orhon, D

    2015-12-01

    The study evaluated acute impact of tetracycline on the biodegradation of acetate by microbial cultures acclimated to different growth conditions. Two fill/draw reactors were operated to obtain acclimated cultures at sludge ages of 2 and 10 days. Acclimated biomass seeding was used in two series of batch experiments. The first run served as control and others were started with tetracycline doses of 100mg/L and 400mg/L. Parallel batch reactors were also operated for oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurements. Acute impact was evaluated by model calibration of OUR, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and intracellular storage profiles. Exposure to tetracycline did not impair COD removal but induced a shift in acetate utilization toward polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) storage. This shift was more pronounced for fast growing biomass; it identified itself both in related process kinetics and the modified stoichiometry between the magnitude of acetate directly used for microbial growth and converted to PHB. PMID:26386418