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Sample records for adverse local tissue

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions at the Head-Neck Junction.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Herbert J

    2016-07-01

    Modular junctions in total hip arthroplasty are susceptible to mechanically assisted crevice corrosion, leading to the release of metal wear debris. Adverse local tissue reactions result from an immune-mediated biological reaction to this debris and can have a profound effect on the surrounding periarticular soft tissue envelope. Patients often present with pain or muscle weakness and demonstrate elevated serum cobalt and chromium levels. Serum inflammatory markers and synovial fluid tests help distinguish these reactions from deep infection in the majority of cases; however, the presence of amorphous material or fragmented cells can lead to difficulty in some cases. Advanced cross-sectional imaging is essential in establishing the diagnosis. Early revision surgery is generally the treatment of choice for symptomatic adverse local tissue reaction from corrosion at the modular head-neck junction. The existing stem is retained, and a new ceramic head is placed on the existing trunnion whenever possible. This strategy generally leads to short-term improvement of symptoms with reliable clinical outcomes; however, longer term results are presently lacking.

  2. Cobalt to Chromium Ratio is Not a Key Marker for Adverse Local Tissue Reaction (ALTR) in Metal on Metal Hips.

    PubMed

    Fehring, Thomas K; Carter, Joshua L; Fehring, Keith A; Odum, Susan M; Griffin, William L

    2015-09-01

    The diagnosis of adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) after metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoMTHA) presents a significant challenge. No single biomarker is specific for ALTR. The purpose of this study was to determine if the ratio of cobalt to chromium ions is useful for diagnosing ALTR in MoMTHA. In 89 bearing-related revision THAs, preoperative cobalt and chromium ion levels were compared to an intraoperative soft tissue damage grading scale. The average cobalt to chromium ratio was 2.96 (0-20). There was no correlation between the tissue scale and the cobalt to chromium ratio (R=0.095; P=0.41). Many variables affecting ion production/excretion mitigate the use of the ion ratio. The cobalt to chromium ratio is not a predictive biomarker for ALTR in MoMTHA.

  3. The Symmetry of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions in Patients with Bilateral Simultaneous and Sequential ASR Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Rami; Hussey, Daniel K; Donahue, Gabrielle S; Potter, Hollis G; Wallace, Robert; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Malchau, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether patients with bilateral metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements have symmetric adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) at follow-up. An MRI of both hips was performed at a mean time of six years after surgery in 43 patients. The prevalence and severity of ALTRs were found to be similar in simultaneous hips but differences were observed in sequential hips. The order and timing of sequential hip arthroplasties did not affect the severity of ALTRs. Thus, in addition to metal ion exposure from an earlier MoM implant other factors may also play a role in the progression of ALTRs. Bilateral implants should be given special consideration in risk stratification algorithms for management of patients with MoM hip arthroplasty.

  4. Adverse responses to local anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M M; Graham, R

    1984-11-01

    Progressive challenge was used to investigate twenty-seven patients with a history of an adverse response to local anaesthesia. True allergy was detected in only one patient. The method does not exclude reactions to additives and preservatives in local anaesthetics. If preservative-free local anaesthetics are used for subsequent exposure in patients with no response to progressive challenge, subsequent exposure is safe. The possibility that some of these patients may be reacting to preservatives in the solutions cannot be excluded by such testing. Where possible preservative-free local anaesthetic preparations should be used for subsequent anaesthesia.

  5. Adverse reactions triggered by dental local anesthetics: a clinical survey.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, E.; Goharian, S.; Katz, Y.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine patients completed a questionnaire focusing on adverse reactions to dental local anesthetics as manifested by 16 signs and symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the participants reported having at least 1 adverse reaction. It was found that most of the adverse reactions occurred within the first 2 hours following the injection of local anesthetics. Pallor, palpitations, diaphoresis, and dizziness were the most common adverse reactions reported in the study. The results pointed to a significant relationship between anxiety, gender, injection technique, and procedure with a higher incidence of adverse reactions. PMID:11432179

  6. Method for localizing heating in tumor tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; McCabe, Charles W.

    1977-04-12

    A method for a localized tissue heating of tumors is disclosed. Localized radio frequency current fields are produced with specific electrode configurations. Several electrode configurations are disclosed, enabling variations in electrical and thermal properties of tissues to be exploited.

  7. CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF LOCALIZED BCG ADVERSE EVENTS IN CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Thais das Neves Fraga; Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel de; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Weckx, Lily Yin

    2016-11-03

    BCG adverse events (BCG-AE) are rare conditions with no well-established treatment. This study aims to describe clinical characteristics and outcome of localized BCG-AE. Children with BCG-AEs who were treated at the Reference Center for Special Immunobiologicals of the Federal University of São Paulo from 2009 to 2011 were included. Patients were followed monthly until 3 months after healing. One hundred and twenty-seven patients with localized BCG-AE were followed: 67 (52.7%) had suppurative lymphadenitis; 30 (23.6%) injection-site abscess; five (3.9%) had enlarged lymph node > 3 cm; four (3.1%) had ulcer > 1 cm; and one (0.8%) had a local bacterial infection. Five patients (3.9%) had more than one BCG-AE simultaneously. Fifteen patients (11.8%) had atypical manifestations: seven wart-like lesions; five BCG reactivations; two other dermatologic lesions and one with vasomotor phenomenon. Isoniazid was used in 96 patients with typical BCG-AE (85.7%) until lesion resolution which took place 3.1 months later (in median); the healing rate was 90.6%. Patients with atypical manifestations had an individual approach. Regarding the outcome, 105/112 patients with typical AE and 13/15 patients with atypical AE had resolution of BCG-AE. Localized BCG-AE caused by BCG Moreau RJ had positive outcome when treated with a short course of isoniazid. Atypical BCG-AE are not infrequent.

  8. CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF LOCALIZED BCG ADVERSE EVENTS IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    MOREIRA, Thais das Neves Fraga; de MORAES-PINTO, Maria Isabel; COSTA-CARVALHO, Beatriz Tavares; GRUMACH, Anete Sevciovic; WECKX, Lily Yin

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BCG adverse events (BCG-AE) are rare conditions with no well-established treatment. This study aims to describe clinical characteristics and outcome of localized BCG-AE. Children with BCG-AEs who were treated at the Reference Center for Special Immunobiologicals of the Federal University of São Paulo from 2009 to 2011 were included. Patients were followed monthly until 3 months after healing. One hundred and twenty-seven patients with localized BCG-AE were followed: 67 (52.7%) had suppurative lymphadenitis; 30 (23.6%) injection-site abscess; five (3.9%) had enlarged lymph node > 3 cm; four (3.1%) had ulcer > 1 cm; and one (0.8%) had a local bacterial infection. Five patients (3.9%) had more than one BCG-AE simultaneously. Fifteen patients (11.8%) had atypical manifestations: seven wart-like lesions; five BCG reactivations; two other dermatologic lesions and one with vasomotor phenomenon. Isoniazid was used in 96 patients with typical BCG-AE (85.7%) until lesion resolution which took place 3.1 months later (in median); the healing rate was 90.6%. Patients with atypical manifestations had an individual approach. Regarding the outcome, 105/112 patients with typical AE and 13/15 patients with atypical AE had resolution of BCG-AE. Localized BCG-AE caused by BCG Moreau RJ had positive outcome when treated with a short course of isoniazid. Atypical BCG-AE are not infrequent. PMID:27828625

  9. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.

    1987-01-01

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line, and electrode arrangment are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heated region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed switches.

  10. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1985-05-20

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line and electrode arrangement are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heat region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed swtiches. 5 figs.

  11. 25 CFR 170.110 - How can State and local governments prevent discrimination or adverse impacts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can State and local governments prevent discrimination or adverse impacts? 170.110 Section 170.110 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Eligibility Consultation, Collaboration, Coordination § 170.110 How can State and local governments...

  12. Assessing local tissue edema in postmastectomy lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, H N

    2007-06-01

    Overall limb lymphedema can be assessed by several methods but none are suitable to determine local edema. Quantifying local edema could provide important information not previously available. Our goal was to determine the suitability of using the tissue dielectric constant (TDC) as and index of local tissue water to detect and quantify edema in postmastectomy patients with unilateral arm lymphedema. Segmental arm volume and TDC were measured in both arms of 18 women with unilateral lymphedema, and in 15 premenopausal and 15 postmenopausal controls. TDC was measured at a frequency of 300 MHz using open-ended coaxial probes with effective measuring depths of 0.5, 1.5, 2.5 and 5.0 mm. For patients and controls, absolute TDC depended on measurement depth but for any depth the TDC of lymphedematous segments was significantly greater than for non-affected contralateral arms (p<0.001). At a depth of 2.5 mm, the TDC ratio between arms for patients was 1.64+/-0.30 vs.1.04+/-0.04 for both control groups (p<0.001). No patient's TDC ratio was as low as 1.2 and no control subject's TDC ratio was as great as 1.2. Results suggest that this method is a good quantitative discriminator of the presence of lymphedema in patients with unilateral limb lymphedema.

  13. Functional brown adipose tissue limits cardiomyocyte injury and adverse remodeling in catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Thoonen, Robrecht; Ernande, Laura; Cheng, Juan; Nagasaka, Yasuko; Yao, Vincent; Miranda-Bezerra, Alexandre; Chen, Chan; Chao, Wei; Panagia, Marcello; Sosnovik, David E.; Puppala, Dheeraj; Armoundas, Antonis A.; Hindle, Allyson; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has well recognized thermogenic properties mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1); more recently, BAT has been demonstrated to modulate cardiovascular risk factors. To investigate whether BAT also affects myocardial injury and remodeling, UCP1-deficient (UCP1−/−) mice, which have dysfunctional BAT, were subjected to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. At baseline, there were no differences in echocardiographic parameters, plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or myocardial fibrosis between wild-type (WT) and UCP1−/− mice. Isoproterenol infusion increased cTnI and myocardial fibrosis and induced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in both WT and UCP1−/− mice. UCP1−/− mice also demonstrated exaggerated myocardial injury, fibrosis, and adverse remodeling, as well as decreased survival. Transplantation of WT BAT to UCP1−/− mice prevented the isoproterenol-induced cTnI increase and improved survival, whereas UCP1−/− BAT transplanted to either UCP1−/− or WT mice had no effect on cTnI release. After 3 days of isoproterenol treatment, phosphorylated AKT and ERK were lower in the LV's of UCP1−/− mice than in those of WT mice. Activation of BAT was also noted in a model of chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, and was correlated to LV dysfunction. Deficiency in UCP1, and accompanying BAT dysfunction, increases cardiomyocyte injury and adverse LV remodeling, and decreases survival in a mouse model of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. Myocardial injury and decreased survival are rescued by transplantation of functional BAT to UCP1−/− mice, suggesting a systemic cardioprotective role of functional BAT. BAT is also activated in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25968336

  14. LOCALIZATION OF ANTIGEN IN TISSUE CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Coons, Albert H.; Leduc, Elizabeth H.; Kaplan, Melvin H.

    1951-01-01

    The fate of three proteins, crystalline hen's egg albumin, crystalline bovine plasma albumin, and human plasma γ-globulin, was traced after intravenous injection into mice. This was done by preparing frozen sections of quick-frozen tissue, allowing what foreign protein might be present in the section to react with homologous antibody labelled with fluorescein, and examining the section under the fluorescence microscope. By this means, which employs the serological specificity of the protein as a natural "marker," all three of these proteins were found in the cells of the reticulo-endothelial system, the connective tissue, the vascular endothelium, the lymphocytes of spleen and lymph node, and the epithelium of the kidney tubules, the liver, and in very small amounts in the adrenal. The central nervous system was not studied. All three persisted longest in the reticulo-endothelial system and the connective tissue, and in the doses employed egg white (10 mg.) was no longer detectable after 1 day, bovine albumin (10 mg.) after 2 days, and human γ-globulin (4 mg.) after 6 days, although in a somewhat higher dose (10 mg.) human γ-globulin persisted longer than 8 days. Egg albumin differed from the others in not being detectable in the cells of the renal glomerulus. It was found that each of the three proteins was present in the nuclei of each cell type enumerated above, often in higher concentration than in the cytoplasm. Further, some of the nuclei not only contained antigen, soon after injection, but were also surrounded by a bright ring associated with the nuclear membrane. By means of photographic records under the fluorescence microscope of sections stained for antigen, and direct observation under the light microscope of the same field subsequently stained with hematoxylin and eosin, it could be determined that the antigen was not adsorbed to chromatin or nucleoli, but was apparently in solution in the nuclear sap. PMID:14803641

  15. Adverse event reporting and developments in radiation biology after normal tissue injury: International Atomic Energy Agency consultation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau . E-mail: Yuhchyau_chen@urmc.rochester.edu; Trotti, Andy; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Hay, John; O'Brien, Peter C.; El-Gueddari, Brahim; Salvajoli, Joao V.; Jeremic, Branislav

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Recent research has enhanced our understanding of radiation injury at the molecular-cellular and tissue levels; significant strides have occurred in standardization of adverse event reporting in clinical trials. In response, the International Atomic Energy Agency, through its Division of Human Health and its section for Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, organized a consultation meeting in Atlanta (October 2, 2004) to discuss developments in radiobiology, normal tissue reactions, and adverse event reporting. Methods and Materials: Representatives from cooperative groups of African Radiation Oncology Group, Curriculo Radioterapeutica Ibero Latino Americana, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group held the meeting discussion. Results: Representatives of major radiotherapy groups/organizations and prominent leaders in radiotherapy discussed current understanding of normal tissue radiobiologic effects, the design and implementation of future clinical and translational projects for normal tissue injury, and the standardization of adverse-event reporting worldwide. Conclusions: The consensus was to adopt NCI comprehensive adverse event reporting terminology and grading system (CTCAE v3.0) as the new standard for all cooperative group trials. Future plans included the implementation of coordinated research projects focusing on normal tissue biomarkers and data collection methods.

  16. Adverse Events in Connective Tissue Disease–Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Rennie L.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Praestgaard, Amy; Merkel, Peter A.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)–associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have a poorer prognosis compared to those with idiopathic PAH, but little is known about the differences in treatment-related adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) between these groups. This study was undertaken to characterize these differences. Methods Individual patient-level data from 10 randomized controlled trials of therapies for PAH were obtained from the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients diagnosed as having either CTD-associated PAH or idiopathic PAH were included. A treatment-by-diagnosis interaction term was used to examine whether the effect of treatment on occurrence of AEs differed between patients with CTD-associated PAH and those with idiopathic PAH. Studies were pooled using fixed-effect models. Results The study sample included 2,370 participants: 716 with CTD-associated PAH and 1,654 with idiopathic PAH. In the active treatment group compared to the placebo group, the risk of AEs was higher among patients with CTD-associated PAH than among those with idiopathic PAH (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.00–2.47 versus OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.69–1.26; P for interaction = 0.061), but there was no difference in the risk of SAEs in analyses adjusted for age, race, sex, hemodynamic findings, and laboratory values. Despite the higher occurrence of AEs in patients with CTD-associated PAH assigned to active therapy compared to those receiving placebo, the risk of drug discontinuation due to an AE was similar to that in patients with idiopathic PAH assigned to active therapy (P for interaction = 0.27). Conclusion Patients with CTD-associated PAH experienced more treatment-related AEs compared to those with idiopathic PAH in therapeutic clinical trials. These findings suggest that the overall benefit of advanced therapies for PAH may be attenuated by the greater frequency of AEs. PMID:26016953

  17. Renin dynamics in adipose tissue: adipose tissue control of local renin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Jason D; Krueth, Stacy B; Bernlohr, David A; Katz, Stephen A

    2009-02-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in a variety of adipose tissue functions, including tissue growth, differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. Although expression of all components necessary for a locally derived adipose tissue RAS has been demonstrated within adipose tissue, independence of local adipose RAS component concentrations from corresponding plasma RAS fluctuations has not been addressed. To analyze this, we varied in vivo rat plasma concentrations of two RAS components, renin and angiotensinogen (AGT), to determine the influence of their plasma concentrations on adipose and cardiac tissue levels in both perfused (plasma removed) and nonperfused samples. Variation of plasma RAS components was accomplished by four treatment groups: normal, DOCA salt, bilateral nephrectomy, and losartan. Adipose and cardiac tissue AGT concentrations correlated positively with plasma values. Perfusion of adipose tissue decreased AGT concentrations by 11.1%, indicating that adipose tissue AGT was in equilibrium with plasma. Cardiac tissue renin levels positively correlated with plasma renin concentration for all treatments. In contrast, adipose tissue renin levels did not correlate with plasma renin, with the exception of extremely high plasma renin concentrations achieved in the losartan-treated group. These results suggest that adipose tissue may control its own local renin concentration independently of plasma renin as a potential mechanism for maintaining a functional local adipose RAS.

  18. 25 CFR 170.110 - How can State and local governments prevent discrimination or adverse impacts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and adverse effects on tribes and Native American populations. (b) Examples of adverse effects include... excessive access to culturally or religiously sensitive areas; (3) Negatively affecting natural resources, trust resources, tribal businesses, religious, and cultural sites; (4) Harming indigenous plants...

  19. Measuring the local electrical conductivity of human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtari, M.; Emin, D.; Ellingson, B. M.; Woodworth, D.; Frew, A.; Mathern, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The electrical conductivities of freshly excised brain tissues from 24 patients were measured. The diffusion-MRI of the hydrogen nuclei of water molecules from regions that were subsequently excised was also measured. Analysis of these measurements indicates that differences between samples' conductivities are primarily due to differences of their densities of solvated sodium cations. Concomitantly, the sample-to-sample variations of their diffusion constants are relatively small. This finding suggests that non-invasive in-vivo measurements of brain tissues' local sodium-cation density can be utilized to estimate its local electrical conductivity.

  20. In vivo localization in Arabidopsis protoplasts and root tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung Hui; Lee, Yongjik; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, a large number of proteins are transported to their final destination after translation by a process called intracellular trafficking. Transient gene expression, either in plant protoplasts or in specific plant tissues, is a fast, flexible, and reproducible approach to study the cellular function of proteins, protein subcellular localizations, and protein-protein interactions. Here we describe the general method of protoplast isolation, polyethylene glycol-mediated protoplast transformation and immunostaining of protoplast or intact root tissues for studying the localization of protein in Arabidopsis.

  1. Local recurrence of soft tissue sarcoma following brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Gemer, L S; Trowbridge, D R; Neff, J; Lin, F; Reddy, E; Evans, R G; Hassanein, R

    1991-03-01

    Twenty-five patients with soft tissue sarcomas were treated with Ir192 implants following wide local excision at our institution between 1982 and 1987. External beam radiotherapy was given in addition to the implant in a majority of patients. The median follow-up in these 25 patients is 36 months (12 to 75 months). Twenty patients have had no evidence of local recurrence following their primary treatment (FFR = 80%). A multivariate analysis using stepwise logistic regression was used to predict failure in 3 years or less. Potential predictors examined included age, sex, tumor location, primary versus recurrent disease, grade, histology, surgical margins, implant only versus implant plus external beam, and a ratio of the volume of tissue which received 65 Gy (TV65) to the tumor volume (TV), that is (TV65/TV). The single variable which was significantly associated with local failure by 3 years was a TV65/TV of less than one. Once this variable was entered into the analysis, no other factor proved statistically significant. Our data suggest that when attempting local control of soft tissue sarcomas with brachytherapy, the volume of tissue receiving 65 Gy (TV65) from both implant and external beam must exceed the volume of the excised lesion (TV). Since the volume of a tumor can be readily determined prior to surgical excision either by CT or MRI scanning, pre-planning of the implant volume could potentially reduce the rate of local failure.

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  3. Fibrinolysis inhibitors adversely affect remodeling of tissues sealed with fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Lissy K; Vijayan Lal, Arthur; Uma Shankar, P R; Mohanty, Mira

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine if aprotinin and epsilon -amino caproic acid increases the quality of Fibrin glue. A rat model was used for tissues such as liver and skin while rabbits were used for application of glue in dura mater. Apposition of all the tissues, glued with fibrin was found to be good and remnants of the polymerized fibrin were seen even on the seventh day of application, though inhibitors were not incorporated with the glue. In skin, excessive amounts of fibrin remained as a result of addition of aprotinin and epsilon -amino caproic acid, as compared to the glue applied without any inhibitor. After dural sealing, the wound repair and new bone formation at craniotomy site progressed well in the fibrin glue applied area as compared to the commercially available glue that contained aprotinin. The adhesive strength of the glue without or with fibrinolysis inhibitors was found to be similar, after 1h grafts on rat back. The observations from this study suggests that the use of aprotinin with fibrin glue may not be required because, even liver tissue that is known to have high fibrinolytic activity was sealed and repaired well in the absence of plasminogen inhibitors. On the other hand, it was found that if inhibitors were added, nondegraded matrix remained in the tissue even after 15 days and affected migration of repair cells. Thus, the inhibition of fibrinolysis after fibrin glue application is found detrimental to wound healing.

  4. Ingestion of gallium phosphide nanowires has no adverse effect on Drosophila tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolfsson, Karl; Schneider, Martina; Hammarin, Greger; Häcker, Udo; Prinz, Christelle N.

    2013-07-01

    Engineered nanoparticles have been under increasing scrutiny in recent years. High aspect ratio nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires have raised safety concerns due to their geometrical similarity to asbestos fibers. III-V epitaxial semiconductor nanowires are expected to be utilized in devices such as LEDs and solar cells and will thus be available to the public. In addition, clean-room staff fabricating and characterizing the nanowires are at risk of exposure, emphasizing the importance of investigating their possible toxicity. Here we investigated the effects of gallium phosphide nanowires on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila larvae and/or adults were exposed to gallium phosphide nanowires by ingestion with food. The toxicity and tissue interaction of the nanowires was evaluated by investigating tissue distribution, activation of immune response, genome-wide gene expression, life span, fecundity and somatic mutation rates. Our results show that gallium phosphide nanowires applied through the diet are not taken up into Drosophila tissues, do not elicit a measurable immune response or changes in genome-wide gene expression and do not significantly affect life span or somatic mutation rate.

  5. Ingestion of gallium phosphide nanowires has no adverse effect on Drosophila tissue function.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Karl; Schneider, Martina; Hammarin, Greger; Häcker, Udo; Prinz, Christelle N

    2013-07-19

    Engineered nanoparticles have been under increasing scrutiny in recent years. High aspect ratio nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires have raised safety concerns due to their geometrical similarity to asbestos fibers. III-V epitaxial semiconductor nanowires are expected to be utilized in devices such as LEDs and solar cells and will thus be available to the public. In addition, clean-room staff fabricating and characterizing the nanowires are at risk of exposure, emphasizing the importance of investigating their possible toxicity. Here we investigated the effects of gallium phosphide nanowires on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila larvae and/or adults were exposed to gallium phosphide nanowires by ingestion with food. The toxicity and tissue interaction of the nanowires was evaluated by investigating tissue distribution, activation of immune response, genome-wide gene expression, life span, fecundity and somatic mutation rates. Our results show that gallium phosphide nanowires applied through the diet are not taken up into Drosophila tissues, do not elicit a measurable immune response or changes in genome-wide gene expression and do not significantly affect life span or somatic mutation rate.

  6. Local adverse effects associated with the use of inhaled corticosteroids in patients with moderate or severe asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Charleston Ribeiro; Almeida, Natalie Rios; Marques, Thamy Santana; Yamamura, Laira Lorena Lima; Costa, Lindemberg Assunção; Souza-Machado, Adelmir

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and characterize local adverse effects (in the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx) associated with the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) in patients with moderate or severe asthma. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving a convenience sample of 200 asthma patients followed in the Department of Pharmaceutical Care of the Bahia State Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Control Program Referral Center, located in the city of Salvador, Brazil. The patients were ≥ 18 years of age and had been using ICSs regularly for at least 6 months. Local adverse effects (irritation, pain, dry throat, throat clearing, hoarseness, reduced vocal intensity, loss of voice, sensation of thirst, cough during ICS use, altered sense of taste, and presence of oral candidiasis) were assessed using a 30-day recall questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 200 patients studied, 159 (79.5%) were women. The mean age was 50.7 ± 14.4 years. In this sample, 55 patients (27.5%) were using high doses of ICS, with a median treatment duration of 38 months. Regarding the symptoms, 163 patients (81.5%) reported at least one adverse effect, and 131 (65.5%) had a daily perception of at least one symptom. Vocal and pharyngeal symptoms were identified in 57 (28.5%) and 154 (77.0%) of the patients, respectively. The most commonly reported adverse effects were dry throat, throat clearing, sensation of thirst, and hoarseness. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported adverse effects related to ICS use were common among the asthma patients evaluated here. PMID:24068261

  7. Tissue distribution and subcellular localization of hyaluronan synthase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Törrönen, Kari; Nikunen, Kaisa; Kärnä, Riikka; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Rilla, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan synthases (HAS) are unique plasma membrane glycosyltransferases secreting this glycosaminoglycan directly to the extracellular space. The three HAS isoenzymes (HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3) expressed in mammalian cells differ in their enzymatic properties and regulation by external stimuli, but clearly distinct functions have not been established. To overview the expression of different HAS isoenzymes during embryonic development and their subcellular localization, we immunostained mouse embryonic samples and cultured cells with HAS antibodies, correlating their distribution to hyaluronan staining. Their subcellular localization was further studied by GFP-HAS fusion proteins. Intense hyaluronan staining was observed throughout the development in the tissues of mesodermal origin, like heart and cartilages, but also for example during the maturation of kidneys and stratified epithelia. In general, staining for one or several HASs correlated with hyaluronan staining. The staining of HAS2 was most widespread, both spatially and temporally, correlating with hyaluronan staining especially in early mesenchymal tissues and heart. While epithelial cells were mostly negative for HASs, stratified epithelia became HAS positive during differentiation. All HAS isoenzymes showed cytoplasmic immunoreactivity, both in tissue sections and cultured cells, while plasma membrane staining was also detected, often in cellular extensions. HAS1 had brightest signal in Golgi, HAS3 in Golgi and microvillous protrusions, whereas most of the endogenous HAS2 immunoreactivity was localized in the ER. This differential pattern was also observed with transfected GFP-HASs. The large proportion of intracellular HASs suggests that HAS forms a reserve that is transported to the plasma membrane for rapid activation of hyaluronan synthesis.

  8. Assessment on the adverse effects of Aminoglycosides and Flouroquinolone on sperm parameters and male reproductive tissue: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Khaki, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic therapies used in treatment of many diseases have adverse effects on fertility. This review analyzes previous comparative studies that surveyed the effects of two common groups of antibiotics on male fertility. Objective: To evaluate histo-pathological effects of fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides on sperm parameters and male reproductive tissue. Materials and Methods: Articles about the effects of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones on male infertility, sperm parameters, male reproductive tissue, and spermatogenesis in English and Persian languages published on Google Scholar and PubMed databases from January 2000 to December 2013 were assessed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of aminoglycosides or fluoroquinolones on sperm parameters, artificial insemination, and male reproductive tract or RCTs comparing aminoglycosides vs. fluoroquinolones were eligible for inclusion. For ascertaining the reliability of study, data were extracted independently and in duplicate by two investigators. Results: Sperm viability was decreased significantly with streptomycin, gentamicin, and neomycin (p<0.001). Sperm motility was decreased significantly with gentamicin and neomycin (p<0.05). Total sperm count was significantly decreased with ofloxacin, gentamicin, streptomycin, and neomycin (p<0.022). There was significant decrease in post-thawing motility with low dose and high dose of ciprofloxacin. Testis weight was decreased with gentamicin and ofloxacin significantly (p<0.011). There was significant decrease in seminal vesicle weight with gentamicin, neomycin, and ofloxacin (p<0.022). Furthermore, changes in epididymis weight, percentage of total apoptotic cells, and diameter of seminiferous tubule were significant with all drugs including streptomycin, gentamicin, neomycin, and ofloxacin (p<0.05). Conclusion: Streptomycin has less negative effects on cell’s apoptosis and sperm parameters as compared to other drugs. Gentamicin

  9. Local anesthetics inhibit tissue factor expression in activated monocytes via inhibition of tissue factor mRNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Ki Jun; Ahn, Wonsik; Han, Kyou-Sup; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Local anesthetics have been reported to have anticoagulant properties, but the mechanisms responsible for this action are poorly understood. Here, we evaluated the in vitro effects of 3 local anesthetics--lidocaine, ropivacaine, and bupivacaine--on the tissue factor expression by monocytes. Monocytes from peripheral blood were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of local anesthetics. All 3 local anesthetics inhibited the expression of tissue factor antigen and tissue factor activity in LPS-stimulated monocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner and reduced tissue factor messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in endothelial cells and a monocytic cell line. None of the 3 drugs induced apoptosis or affected the viability of monocytes. Our findings that local anesthetics inhibited the tissue factor induction in activated monocytes by inhibiting tissue factor mRNA level may demonstrate the feasibility of using local anesthetics in hypercoagulable and inflammatory conditions.

  10. Business oriented EU human cell and tissue product legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Vanderkelen, Alain; De Vos, Daniel; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Thomas; Ceulemans, Carl; Ectors, Nadine; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2013-12-01

    The transplantation of conventional human cell and tissue grafts, such as heart valve replacements and skin for severely burnt patients, has saved many lives over the last decades. The late eighties saw the emergence of tissue engineering with the focus on the development of biological substitutes that restore or improve tissue function. In the nineties, at the height of the tissue engineering hype, industry incited policymakers to create a European regulatory environment, which would facilitate the emergence of a strong single market for tissue engineered products and their starting materials (human cells and tissues). In this paper we analyze the elaboration process of this new European Union (EU) human cell and tissue product regulatory regime-i.e. the EU Cell and Tissue Directives (EUCTDs) and the Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product (ATMP) Regulation and evaluate its impact on Member States' health care systems. We demonstrate that the successful lobbying on key areas of regulatory and policy processes by industry, in congruence with Europe's risk aversion and urge to promote growth and jobs, led to excessively business oriented legislation. Expensive industry oriented requirements were introduced and contentious social and ethical issues were excluded. We found indications that this new EU safety and health legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems; since 30 December 2012 (the end of the ATMP transitional period) there is a clear threat to the sustainability of some lifesaving and established ATMPs that were provided by public health institutions and small and medium-sized enterprises under the frame of the EUCTDs. In the light of the current economic crisis it is not clear how social security systems will cope with the inflation of costs associated with this new regulatory regime and how priorities will be set with regard to reimbursement decisions. We argue that the ATMP Regulation should urgently be revised to focus on delivering

  11. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor for prediction of placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk women: AngioPred study

    PubMed Central

    Di Bartolomeo, Aurélie; Chauleur, Céline; Gris, Jean-Christophe; Chapelle, Céline; Noblot, Edouard; Laporte, Silvy

    2017-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to evaluate if the rate of tissue factor pathway inhibitor during pregnancy and following delivery could be a predictive factor for placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk women. Methods This was a prospective multicentre cohort study of 200 patients at a high risk of occurrence or recurrence of placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes conducted between June 2008 and October 2010. Measurements of tissue factor pathway inhibitor resistance (normalized ratio) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity were performed for the last 72 patients at 20, 24, 28, 32, and 36 weeks of gestation and during the postpartum period. Results Overall, 15 patients presented a placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcome. There was no difference in normalized tissue factor pathway inhibitor ratios between patients with and without placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes during pregnancy and in the post-partum period. Patients with placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes had tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity rates that were significantly higher than those in patients without at as early as 24 weeks of gestation. The same results were observed following delivery. Conclusion Among high-risk women, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity of patients with gestational vascular complications is higher than that in other patients. Hence, these markers could augment a screening strategy that includes an analysis of angiogenic factors as well as clinical and ultrasound imaging with Doppler measurement of the uterine arteries. PMID:28328938

  12. NBN gain is predictive for adverse outcome following image-guided radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Jenna; Zafarana, Gaetano; Chu, Kenneth C.; Ramnarine, Varune R.; Ishkanian, Adrian; Sendorek, Dorota H.S.; Pasic, Ivan; Lam, Wan L.; Jurisica, Igor; van der Kwast, Theo; Milosevic, Michael; Boutros, Paul C.; Bristow, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the use of clinical prognostic factors (PSA, T-category and Gleason score), 20-60% of localized prostate cancers (PCa) fail primary local treatment. Herein, we determined the prognostic importance of main sensors of the DNA damage response (DDR): MRE11A, RAD50, NBN, ATM, ATR and PRKDC. We studied copy number alterations in DDR genes in localized PCa treated with image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT; n=139) versus radical prostatectomy (RadP; n=154). In both cohorts, NBN gains were the most frequent genomic alteration (14.4 and 11% of cases, respectively), and were associated with overall tumour genomic instability (p<0.0001). NBN gains were the only significant predictor of 5yrs biochemical relapse-free rate (bRFR) following IGRT (46% versus 77%; p=0.00067). On multivariate analysis, NBN gain remained a significant independent predictor of bRFR after adjusting for known clinical prognostic variables (HR=3.28, 95% CI 1.56–6.89, Wald p-value=0.0017). No DDR-sensing gene was prognostic in the RadP cohort. In vitro studies correlated NBN gene overexpression with PCa cells radioresistance. In conclusion, NBN gain predicts for decreased bRFR in IGRT, but not in RadP patients. If validated independently, Nibrin gains may be the first PCa predictive biomarker to facilitate local treatment decisions using precision medicine approaches with surgery or radiotherapy. PMID:25415046

  13. Use of stationary focused ultrasound fields for characterization of tissue and localized tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, Brian Andrew

    Ultrasound-induced blood stasis has been observed for more than 30 years. The physical understanding of the phenomenon has not been fully explored. Analytical descriptions of the acoustic interaction with spheres in suspension have been derived but the physical implications and limitations have not been demonstrated. The analytical expressions will be tested against physical observations using numerical simulations. The simulations will begin with stationary spheres and continue with the inclusion of moving spheres and a moving suspending fluid. To date, experimental observations of acoustically induced blood stasis have been either in vitro or invasive. We demonstrate ultrasound-induced blood stasis in murine normal leg muscle versus tumor-bearing legs, observed through noninvasive measurements of optical spectroscopy, and discuss possible diagnostic uses for this effect of ultrasound. We derive the optimal optical wavelengths for measuring the effects of the ultrasound at small source detector separations. Using optical oximetry performed at the optimal wavelengths, we demonstrate that effects of ultrasound can be used to differentiate tumor from normal leg muscle tissue in mice. To provide a statistical analysis of the experiments, we propose a novel diagnostic algorithm that quantitatively differentiates tumor from nontumor with maximum specificity 0.83, maximum sensitivity 0.79, and area under receiver-operating-characteristics curve 0.90. Ultrasound has long been known to cause tissue heating when applied in high intensities. More recently, interest has arisen in the area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for localized tissue heating effects, specifically thermal ablation. All present techniques employ focused traveling high intensity acoustic waves to create a region of elevated temperature. Such high intensity traveling waves can be damaging to normal tissue in the vicinity of the focal region, and have demonstrated surface burns and caused

  14. Cellular localization and tissue distribution of endogenous DFCP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Nanao, Tomohisa; Koike, Masato; Yamaguchi, Junji; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Uchiyama, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for the maintenance of cellular metabolism. Once autophagy is induced in cells, the isolation membrane forms a so-called phagophore. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is one of several candidates for the membrane source for phagophores. Recently, LC3-positive isolation membranes were found to emerge from a DFCP1 (double FYVE domain-containing protein)-positive, ER-associated compartment called the omegasome. Although the GFP-tagged DFCP1 protein has been examined in cultured cells, little is known about the precise cellular and tissue distribution of this endogenous protein. To determine the expression of the endogenous DFCP1 protein, we produced antibodies specific to mouse DFCP1 protein. The antibody recognized both human and mouse DFCP1 proteins, both of which have molecular masses of approximately 87 kDa. In HeLa cells under normal conditions, immunoreactivity for DFCP1 was found dotted or tubular along Tom20-positive filamentous mitochondria and was only partially co-localized in the ER or Golgi apparatus. Moreover, under starved conditions, distinct DFCP1-positive structures became more dotted and scattered in the cytoplasm, while one part of the LC3-positive autophagosomes were immunopositive for DFCP1. These results indicate that an antibody raised against DFCP1 could be a useful tool in explaining the mechanism of phagophore formation from omegasome compartments.

  15. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in XRCC3 and Radiation-Induced Adverse Effects on Normal Tissue: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Zhe; Han, Fu-Jun; Liu, Min; Xia, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Wei-Yan; Dong, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) protein plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The relationship between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue remains inconclusive. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue. All eligible studies up to December 2014 were identified through a search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases. Seventeen studies involving 656 cases and 2193 controls were ultimately included in this meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced normal tissue adverse effects. We found that the XRCC3 p.Thr241Met (rs861539) polymorphism was significantly associated with early adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.31-3.01, P = 0.001). A positive association lacking statistical significance with late adverse effects was also identified (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 0.97-1.68, P = 0.08). In addition, the rs861539 polymorphism was significantly correlated with a higher risk of adverse effects induced by head and neck area irradiation (OR = 2.41, 95%CI: 1.49-3.89, p = 0.0003) and breast irradiation (OR = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.02-1.95, p = 0.04), whereas the correlation was not significant for lung irradiation or pelvic irradiation. Furthermore, XRCC3 rs1799794 polymorphism may have a protective effect against late adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 0.47, 95%CI: 0.26-0.86, P = 0.01). Well-designed large-scale clinical studies are required to further validate our results.

  16. Development of oral osteomucosal tissue constructs in vitro and localization of fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonates to hard and soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Bae, Susan; Sun, Shuting; Aghaloo, Tara; Oh, Ju-Eun; McKenna, Charles E; Kang, Mo K; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Tetradis, Sotirios; Park, No-Hee; Kim, Reuben H

    2014-08-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are anti-resorptive agents commonly used to treat bone-related diseases; however, soft tissue-related side-effects are frequently reported in some BP users, such as oral or gastrointestinal (GI) ulcerations. BPs are stable analogs of pyrophosphate and have high affinity to hydroxyapatite, allowing them to bind to the bone surfaces and exert suppressive effects on osteoclast functions. However, the underlying mechanisms as to how bone-seeking BPs also exert cytotoxic effects on soft tissue remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the localization of nitrogen-containing BPs (N-BPs) in hard and soft tissue using fluorescently-labeled N-BPs in vitro. We developed osteomucosal tissue constructs in vitro to recapitulate the hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity. A histological examination of the osteomucosal tissue constructs revealed a differentiated epithelium over the bone containing osteocytes and the periosteum, similar to that observed in the rat palatal tissues. Following treatment with the fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonate, AF647-ZOL, the osteomucosal constructs exhibited fluorescent signals, not only in the bone, but also in the epithelium. No fluorescent signals were observed from the control- or ZOL-treated constructs, as expected. Collectively, the data from the present study suggest that N-BPs localize to epithelial tissue and that such a localization and subsequent toxicity of N-BPs may be associated, at least in part, with soft tissue-related side-effects.

  17. Development of oral osteomucosal tissue constructs in vitro and localization of fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonates to hard and soft tissue

    PubMed Central

    BAE, SUSAN; SUN, SHUTING; AGHALOO, TARA; OH, JU-EUN; McKENNA, CHARLES E.; KANG, MO K.; SHIN, KI-HYUK; TETRADIS, SOTIRIOS; PARK, NO-HEE; KIM, REUBEN H.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are anti-resorptive agents commonly used to treat bone-related diseases; however, soft tissue-related side-effects are frequently reported in some BP users, such as oral or gastrointestinal (GI) ulcerations. BPs are stable analogs of pyrophosphate and have high affinity to hydroxyapatite, allowing them to bind to the bone surfaces and exert suppressive effects on osteoclast functions. However, the underlying mechanisms as to how bone-seeking BPs also exert cytotoxic effects on soft tissue remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the localization of nitrogen-containing BPs (N-BPs) in hard and soft tissue using fluorescently-labeled N-BPs in vitro. We developed osteomucosal tissue constructs in vitro to recapitulate the hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity. A histological examination of the osteomucosal tissue constructs revealed a differentiated epithelium over the bone containing osteocytes and the periosteum, similar to that observed in the rat palatal tissues. Following treatment with the fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonate, AF647-ZOL, the osteomucosal constructs exhibited fluorescent signals, not only in the bone, but also in the epithelium. No fluorescent signals were observed from the control- or ZOL-treated constructs, as expected. Collectively, the data from the present study suggest that N-BPs localize to epithelial tissue and that such a localization and subsequent toxicity of N-BPs may be associated, at least in part, with soft tissue-related side-effects. PMID:24920042

  18. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; Verhaart, R. F.; Verduijn, G. M.; Fortunati, V.; Rijnen, Z.; Franckena, M.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H&N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H&N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR10g) in the brains of 16 selected H&N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR10g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF.

  19. Localization of Legionella pneumophila in Tissue Using FITC-Conjugated Specific Antibody and a Background Stain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    Legionnaires ’ disease in tissue. N Engi J Med 1977; Manual of Clinical Microbiology. Third edition. Edited by EH 297:1218-1220 Lennette, A Balows, WJ Hausler...Pathologits P6 i U. S. A. Localization of Legionella pneumophila in Tissue Using FITC- Conjuga ted Specific Antibody and a Background Stain BARBARA S. LOWRY...kIstitute of Infectmau meth W.: Localization of Legieaelle jimewnophsila Ii, tissue Disease . Fort Detrick, Frederick, MAryland using FIT71C-coujugated

  20. Localization of IAA transporting tissue by tissue printing and autoradiography. [Coleus; maize

    SciTech Connect

    Mee-Rye Cha; Evans, M.L.; Hangarter, R.P. )

    1991-05-01

    Tissue printing on nitrocellulose membranes provides a useful technique for visualizing anatomical details of tissue morphology of cut ends of stem segments. Basal ends of Coleus stem and corn coleoptile segments that were transporting {sup 14}C-IAA were gently blotted onto DEAE-nitrocellulose for several minutes to allow {sup 14}C-IAA to efflux from the tissue. Because of the anion exchange properties of DEAE-nitrocellulose the {sup 14}C-IAA remains on the membrane at the point it leaves the transporting tissue. Autoradiography of the DEAE membrane allowed indirect visualization of the tissues preferentially involved in auxin transport. The authors observed that polar transport through the stem segments occurred primarily through or in association with vascular tissues. However, in Coleus stems, substantial amounts of the label appeared to move through the tissue by diffusion as well as by active transport.

  1. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in XRCC3 and Radiation-Induced Adverse Effects on Normal Tissue: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu-Zhe; Han, Fu-Jun; Liu, Min; Xia, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Wei-Yan; Dong, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) protein plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The relationship between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue remains inconclusive. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue. All eligible studies up to December 2014 were identified through a search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases. Seventeen studies involving 656 cases and 2193 controls were ultimately included in this meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced normal tissue adverse effects. We found that the XRCC3 p.Thr241Met (rs861539) polymorphism was significantly associated with early adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.31–3.01, P = 0.001). A positive association lacking statistical significance with late adverse effects was also identified (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 0.97–1.68, P = 0.08). In addition, the rs861539 polymorphism was significantly correlated with a higher risk of adverse effects induced by head and neck area irradiation (OR = 2.41, 95%CI: 1.49–3.89, p = 0.0003) and breast irradiation (OR = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.02–1.95, p = 0.04), whereas the correlation was not significant for lung irradiation or pelvic irradiation. Furthermore, XRCC3 rs1799794 polymorphism may have a protective effect against late adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 0.47, 95%CI: 0.26–0.86, P = 0.01). Well-designed large-scale clinical studies are required to further validate our results. PMID:26091483

  2. New insights into Fe localization in plant tissues

    PubMed Central

    Roschzttardtz, Hannetz; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Divol, Fanchon; Alcon, Carine; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering cellular iron (Fe) homeostasis requires having access to both quantitative and qualitative information on the subcellular pools of Fe in tissues and their dynamics within the cells. We have taken advantage of the Perls/DAB Fe staining procedure to perform a systematic analysis of Fe distribution in roots, leaves and reproductive organs of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, using wild-type and mutant genotypes affected in iron transport and storage. Roots of soil-grown plants accumulate iron in the apoplast of the central cylinder, a pattern that is strongly intensified when the citrate effluxer FRD3 is not functional, thus stressing the importance of citrate in the apoplastic movement of Fe. In leaves, Fe level is low and only detected in and around vascular tissues. In contrast, Fe staining in leaves of iron-treated plants extends in the surrounding mesophyll cells where Fe deposits, likely corresponding to Fe-ferritin complexes, accumulate in the chloroplasts. The loss of ferritins in the fer1,3,4 triple mutant provoked a massive accumulation of Fe in the apoplastic space, suggesting that in the absence of iron buffering in the chloroplast, cells activate iron efflux and/or repress iron influx to limit the amount of iron in the cell. In flowers, Perls/DAB staining has revealed a major sink for Fe in the anthers. In particular, developing pollen grains accumulate detectable amounts of Fe in small-size intracellular bodies that aggregate around the vegetative nucleus at the binuclear stage and that were identified as amyloplasts. In conclusion, using the Perls/DAB procedure combined to selected mutant genotypes, this study has established a reliable atlas of Fe distribution in the main Arabidopsis organs, proving and refining long-assumed intracellular locations and uncovering new ones. This “iron map” of Arabidopsis will serve as a basis for future studies of possible actors of iron movement in plant tissues and cell compartments. PMID:24046774

  3. Localized tissue mineralization regulated by bone remodelling: A computational approach

    PubMed Central

    Decco, Oscar; Adams, George; Cook, Richard B.; García Aznar, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a living tissue whose main mechanical function is to provide stiffness, strength and protection to the body. Both stiffness and strength depend on the mineralization of the organic matrix, which is constantly being remodelled by the coordinated action of the bone multicellular units (BMUs). Due to the dynamics of both remodelling and mineralization, each sample of bone is composed of structural units (osteons in cortical and packets in cancellous bone) created at different times, therefore presenting different levels of mineral content. In this work, a computational model is used to understand the feedback between the remodelling and the mineralization processes under different load conditions and bone porosities. This model considers that osteoclasts primarily resorb those parts of bone closer to the surface, which are younger and less mineralized than older inner ones. Under equilibrium loads, results show that bone volumes with both the highest and the lowest levels of porosity (cancellous and cortical respectively) tend to develop higher levels of mineral content compared to volumes with intermediate porosity, thus presenting higher material densities. In good agreement with recent experimental measurements, a boomerang-like pattern emerges when plotting apparent density at the tissue level versus material density at the bone material level. Overload and disuse states are studied too, resulting in a translation of the apparent–material density curve. Numerical results are discussed pointing to potential clinical applications. PMID:28306746

  4. Localized tissue mineralization regulated by bone remodelling: A computational approach.

    PubMed

    Berli, Marcelo; Borau, Carlos; Decco, Oscar; Adams, George; Cook, Richard B; García Aznar, José Manuel; Zioupos, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a living tissue whose main mechanical function is to provide stiffness, strength and protection to the body. Both stiffness and strength depend on the mineralization of the organic matrix, which is constantly being remodelled by the coordinated action of the bone multicellular units (BMUs). Due to the dynamics of both remodelling and mineralization, each sample of bone is composed of structural units (osteons in cortical and packets in cancellous bone) created at different times, therefore presenting different levels of mineral content. In this work, a computational model is used to understand the feedback between the remodelling and the mineralization processes under different load conditions and bone porosities. This model considers that osteoclasts primarily resorb those parts of bone closer to the surface, which are younger and less mineralized than older inner ones. Under equilibrium loads, results show that bone volumes with both the highest and the lowest levels of porosity (cancellous and cortical respectively) tend to develop higher levels of mineral content compared to volumes with intermediate porosity, thus presenting higher material densities. In good agreement with recent experimental measurements, a boomerang-like pattern emerges when plotting apparent density at the tissue level versus material density at the bone material level. Overload and disuse states are studied too, resulting in a translation of the apparent-material density curve. Numerical results are discussed pointing to potential clinical applications.

  5. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for localization in target tissues exhibiting a regional PH shift relative to surrounding tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, M.; Kung, H. F.

    1984-10-02

    A radiopharmaceutical chemical compound comprising a radioactive isotope, other than an isotope of iodine, in chemical combination with at least one amine group. The compound has a lipophilicity sufficiently high at a pH of 7.6 to permit passage of the compound from the blood of a mammal into a target organ or tissue and sufficiently low at a pH of 6.6 to prevent rapid return of the compound from the target organ or tissue to the blood. The compound has a percent protein binding of less than ninety percent. A method for selectively depositing a radiopharmaceutical compound in at least one target tissue or organ of a mammal, which tissue or organ has a significantly different intracellular pH than the blood of the mammal, by introducing the compound of the invention into the bloodstream of the mammal.

  6. Tissue localization of Drosophila melanogaster insulin receptor transcripts during development.

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, R S; Rosen, O M

    1988-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster insulin receptor (Drosophila insulin receptor homolog [dIRH]) is similar to its mammalian counterpart in deduced amino acid sequence, subunit structure, and ligand-stimulated protein tyrosine kinase activity. The function of this receptor in D. melanogaster is not yet known. However, a role in development is suggested by the observations that levels of insulin-stimulated kinase activity and expression of dIRH mRNA are maximal during Drosophila midembryogenesis. In this study, a 2.9-kilobase (kb) cDNA clone corresponding to both the dIRH tyrosine kinase domain and some of the 3' untranslated sequence was used to determine the tissue distribution of dIRH mRNA during development. Two principal mRNAs of 11 and 8.6 kb hybridized with the dIRH cDNA in Northern (RNA) blot analysis. The abundance of the 8.6-kb mRNA increased transiently in early embryos, whereas the 11-kb species was most abundant during midembryogenesis. A similar pattern of expression was previously determined by Northern analysis, using a dIRH genomic clone (L. Petruzzelli, R. Herrera, R. Arenas-Garcia, R. Fernandez, M. J. Birnbaum, and O. M. Rosen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:4710-4714, 1986). In situ hybridization revealed dIRH transcripts in the ovaries of adult flies, in which the transcripts appeared to be synthesized by nurse cells for eventual storage as maternal RNA in the mature oocyte. Throughout embryogenesis, dIRH transcripts were ubiquitously expressed, although after midembryogenesis, higher levels were detected in the developing nervous system. Nervous system expression remained elevated throughout the larval stages and persisted in the adult, in which the cortex of the brain and ganglion cells were among the most prominently labeled tissues. In larvae, the imaginal disk cells exhibited comparatively high levels of dIRH mRNA expression. The broad distribution of dIRH mRNA in embryos and imaginal disks is compatible with a role for dIRH in anabolic processes

  7. Intracellular localization of lead in tissues of the mute swan.

    PubMed

    Birkhead, M; Luke, B; Mann, S

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ultrastructure of kidney, liver, blood and intestine of a lead-poisoned bird and compare these with tissues of a healthy bird. From these results it was hoped to reveal that any abnormalities observed were due to lead poisoning and consequently suitable sections were also selected for X-ray analysis. Renal intranuclear inclusions were present in the lead-poisoned swan. X-ray analysis clearly demonstrated that these granules consist of an amorphous mass of lead probably as lead phosphate. Large numbers of electron dense granules were observed in the liver of the lead-poisoned bird and occasionally in the healthy swans liver. X-ray analysis demonstrated that these granules contain iron. Some of the red blood cells of the lead-poisoned swan have opaque granules associated with the plasma membrane, these were not observed in the healthy swan.

  8. Short Telomeres in Key Tissues Initiate Local and Systemic Aging in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Madalena C.; Ferreira, Tânia; Carvalho, Tânia; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres shorten with each cell division and telomere dysfunction is a recognized hallmark of aging. Tissue proliferation is expected to dictate the rate at which telomeres shorten. We set out to test whether proliferative tissues age faster than non-proliferative due to telomere shortening during zebrafish aging. We performed a prospective study linking telomere length to tissue pathology and disease. Contrary to expectations, we show that telomeres shorten to critical lengths only in specific tissues and independently of their proliferation rate. Short telomeres accumulate in the gut but not in other highly proliferative tissues such as the blood and gonads. Notably, the muscle, a low proliferative tissue, accumulates short telomeres and DNA damage at the same rate as the gut. Together, our work shows that telomere shortening and DNA damage in key tissues triggers not only local dysfunction but also anticipates the onset of age-associated diseases in other tissues, including cancer. PMID:26789415

  9. Microwave dielectric measurements and tissue characteristics of the human brain: potential in localizing intracranial tissues.

    PubMed

    Axer, Hubertus; Grässel, David; Steinhauer, Matthias; Stöhr, Peter; John, Andreas; Coenen, Volker A; Jansen, Rolf H; von Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf

    2002-05-21

    This study describes the measurements of dielectric properties in the microwave range to differentiate various human central nervous structures. Using a vector network analyser transmission and reflection coefficients were measured from 500 MHz to 18 GHz in four human formalin fixed human brains. The positions of the electrodes were marked, and the tissue was histologically stained to visualize the myelo- and the cytoarchitecture as well as the nerve fibre orientation at the electrodes. The profiles of the transmission coefficients showed a characteristic minimum peak. In order to describe this peak, a mathematical function was fitted. Parameters derived from digital image processing were used to characterize the myelo- and cytoarchitecure of the tissue at the electrodes. A multiple regression model, with the frequency at the transmission peak minimum as a dependent variable and two tissue characteristics at the two electrodes as independent variables, showed a multiple regression coefficient of 0.765. A neural network model was able to estimate the frequency at the transmission peak minimum from the tissue characteristics at the electrode. The measurements of dielectric properties are well suited to differentiate distinct intracerebral structures. The method could be used for online monitoring of the needle's position during a stereotactic intervention in neurosurgery.

  10. Dependence of ultrasound echo decorrelation on local tissue temperature during ex vivo radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Schmidt, Daniel T; Rao, Marepalli B; Mast, T Douglas

    2016-03-21

    This study investigates echo decorrelation imaging, an ultrasound method for thermal ablation monitoring. The effect of tissue temperature on the mapped echo decorrelation parameter was assessed in radiofrequency ablation experiments performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Echo decorrelation maps were compared with corresponding tissue temperatures simulated using the finite element method. For both echo decorrelation imaging and integrated backscatter imaging, the mapped tissue parameters correlated significantly but weakly with local tissue temperature. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the ability of echo decorrelation and integrated backscatter to predict tissue temperature greater than 40, 60, and 80 °C. Significantly higher area under the ROC curve (AUROC) values were obtained for prediction of tissue temperatures greater than 40, 60, and 80 °C using echo decorrelation imaging (AUROC = 0.871, 0.948 and 0.966) compared to integrated backscatter imaging (AUROC = 0.865, 0.877 and 0.832).

  11. Stress and strain localization in stretched collagenous tissues via a multiscale modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Marino, Michele; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Mechanobiology of cells in soft collagenous tissues is highly affected by both tissue response at the macroscale and stress/strain localization mechanisms due to features at lower scales. In this paper, the macroscale mechanical behaviour of soft collagenous tissues is modelled by a three-level multiscale approach, based on a multi-step homogenisation technique from nanoscale up to the macroscale. Nanoscale effects, related to both intermolecular cross-links and collagen mechanics, are accounted for, together with geometric nonlinearities at the microscale. Moreover, an effective submodelling procedure is conceived in order to evaluate the local stress and strain fields at the microscale, which is around and within cells. Numerical results, obtained by using an incremental finite element formulation and addressing stretched tendinous tissues, prove consistency and accuracy of the model at both macroscale and microscale, confirming also the effectiveness of the multiscale modelling concept for successfully analysing physiopathological processes in biological tissues.

  12. A dark-field scanning spectroscopy platform for localized scatter and fluorescence imaging of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Laughney, Ashley M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-03-01

    Tissue ultra-structure and molecular composition provide native contrast mechanisms for discriminating across pathologically distinct tissue-types. Multi-modality optical probe designs combined with spatially confined sampling techniques have been shown to be sensitive to this type of contrast but their extension to imaging has only been realized recently. A modular scanning spectroscopy platform has been developed to allow imaging localized morphology and molecular contrast measures in breast cancer surgical specimens. A custom designed dark-field telecentric scanning spectroscopy system forms the core of this imaging platform. The system allows imaging localized elastic scatter and fluorescence measures over fields of up to 15 mm x 15 mm at 100 microns resolution in tissue. Results from intralipid and blood phantom measurements demonstrate the ability of the system to quantify localized scatter parameters despite significant changes in local absorption. A co-registered fluorescence spectroscopy mode is also demonstrated in a protophorphyrin-IX phantom.

  13. Precise anatomy localization in CT data by an improved probabilistic tissue type atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Astrid; Schadewaldt, Nicole; Schulz, Heinrich; Vik, Torbjørn; Bergtholdt, Martin; Bystrov, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Automated interpretation of CT scans is an important, clinically relevant area as the number of such scans is increasing rapidly and the interpretation is time consuming. Anatomy localization is an important prerequisite for any such interpretation task. This can be done by image-to-atlas registration, where the atlas serves as a reference space for annotations such as organ probability maps. Tissue type based atlases allow fast and robust processing of arbitrary CT scans. Here we present two methods which significantly improve organ localization based on tissue types. A first problem is the definition of tissue types, which until now is done heuristically based on experience. We present a method to determine suitable tissue types from sample images automatically. A second problem is the restriction of the transformation space: all prior approaches use global affine maps. We present a hierarchical strategy to refine this global affine map. For each organ or region of interest a localized tissue type atlas is computed and used for a subsequent local affine registration step. A three-fold cross validation on 311 CT images with different fields-of-view demonstrates a reduction of the organ localization error by 33%.

  14. Comparison of brain tissue and local cerebral venous gas tensions and pH.

    PubMed

    Edelman, G J; Hoffman, W E; Rico, C; Ripper, R

    2000-09-01

    Neurosurgical monitoring devices have recently become available which are capable of measuring cerebral tissue gas tensions and pH. Brain tissue sensors have not been conclusively demonstrated to correlate with other measurements of regional cerebral gas tensions or pH. The present study was undertaken to correlate sensor values for pO2, pCO2 and pH with blood samples taken concurrently from local cerebral veins. Adult mongrel dogs were anesthetized and a craniotomy was performed. A small gyral vein was isolated and cannulated. Adjacent to the venous catheter tip, a Neurotrend brain tissue probe was inserted in an intracortical location. Each subject received a sequence of manipulations in inspired oxygen and end tidal carbon dioxide conditions. Under each experimental condition, samples of arterial and gyral venous blood were obtained and blood gas analysis performed. Concurrent brain probe measurements of tissue pO2, pCO2 and pH were recorded. Statistical analysis determined that local tissue and cerebral venous blood values for pO2, pCO2 and pH were highly correlated (R(s) = 0.62-0.82; p < 0.001). This indicates that there exists a confirmable monotonic relationship between tissue values and conditions in the post-capillary venous bed. Tissue sensors such as the Neurotrend probe can offer reliable trend indications in brain tissue gas tensions and pH.

  15. Light-guided localization within tissue using biocompatible surgical suture fiber as an optical waveguide.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo June; Park, Kwan Seob; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2014-09-01

    In breast-conserving surgery, an optical wire is a useful surgical guiding tool to optically locate small lesions within the breast tissue. However, the use of a long silica glass fiber as the optical wire can be burdensome to patients because of its stiffness and nonbiocompatibility. We investigate the use of a biocompatible fiber for light localization in tissue. A surgical suture with a diameter of 400 μm and a few centimeters long is employed as the biocompatible optical waveguide to transport the visible laser light to the inner tissue site. Optical location is confirmed with glow ball-like red laser illumination at the tip of the suture embedded within a fresh chicken breast tissue. Effective optical power coupling to the suture is made by using a double-cladding fiber coupler. From this preliminary result, we realize practical light localization with biopolymer waveguides.

  16. MiRNA profiling provides insights on adverse effects of Cr(VI) in the midgut tissues of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Swati; Pandey, Ashutosh; Chowdhuri, Debapratim Kar

    2015-01-01

    Cr(VI), a well-known environmental chemical, is reported to cause various adverse effects on exposed organisms including genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Despite available information on the underlying mechanism of Cr(VI) induced toxicity, studies regarding toxicity modulation by epigenetic mechanisms are limited. It was therefore, hypothesized that the global miRNA profiling in Cr(VI) exposed Drosophila, a genetically tractable model organism, will provide information about mis-regulated miRNAs along with their targeted genes and relevant processes. Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R(+)) were exposed to 5.0-20.0 μg/ml of Cr(VI) for 24 and 48 h. Following miRNA profile analysis on an Agilent platform, 28 of the 36 differentially expressed miRNAs were found to be significantly mis-regulated targeting major biological processes viz., DNA damage repair, oxidation-reduction processes, development and differentiation. Down-regulation of mus309 and mus312 under DNA repair, acon to oxidation-reduction and pyd to stress activated MAPK cascade respectively belonging to these gene ontology classes concurrent with up-regulation of dme-miR-314-3p, dme-miR-79-3p and dme-miR-12-5p confirm their functional involvement against Cr(VI) exposure. These findings assume significance since majority of the target genes in Drosophila have functional homologues in humans. The study further recommends Drosophila as a model to explore the role of miRNAs in xenobiotic induced toxicity.

  17. Overview about the localization of nanoparticles in tissue and cellular context by different imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Anja; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Boreham, Alexander; Holzhausen, Cornelia; Mundhenk, Lars; Graf, Christina; Meinke, Martina C; Vogt, Annika; Hadam, Sabrina; Lademann, Jürgen; Rühl, Eckart; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Summary The increasing interest and recent developments in nanotechnology pose previously unparalleled challenges in understanding the effects of nanoparticles on living tissues. Despite significant progress in in vitro cell and tissue culture technologies, observations on particle distribution and tissue responses in whole organisms are still indispensable. In addition to a thorough understanding of complex tissue responses which is the domain of expert pathologists, the localization of particles at their sites of interaction with living structures is essential to complete the picture. In this review we will describe and compare different imaging techniques for localizing inorganic as well as organic nanoparticles in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments. The visualization techniques include well-established methods, such as standard light, fluorescence, transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy as well as more recent developments, such as light and electron microscopic autoradiography, fluorescence lifetime imaging, spectral imaging and linear unmixing, superresolution structured illumination, Raman microspectroscopy and X-ray microscopy. Importantly, all methodologies described allow for the simultaneous visualization of nanoparticles and evaluation of cell and tissue changes that are of prime interest for toxicopathologic studies. However, the different approaches vary in terms of applicability for specific particles, sensitivity, optical resolution, technical requirements and thus availability, and effects of labeling on particle properties. Specific bottle necks of each technology are discussed in detail. Interpretation of particle localization data from any of these techniques should therefore respect their specific merits and limitations as no single approach combines all desired properties. PMID:25671170

  18. Rapid OTAN method for localizing unsaturated lipids in lung tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Negi, D S; Stephens, R J

    1981-05-01

    The OTAN treatment, which is the only histochemical method available at present for the simultaneous localization of hydrophobic and hydrophilic unsaturated lipids in tissue sections, requires unduly long exposure to OsO4 and use of free-floating sections, which makes handling the sections difficult and often results in their loss or damage. Simple modifications using OsO4 treatment at 37 C and slide-mounted sections eliminate the practical drawbacks of the existing method and provide as good or better localization in less than one-eight of the time. The modified method is applicable to fixed as well as fresh frozen tissues.

  19. Immunohistochemical localization of collagen type XI alpha1 and alpha2 chains in human colon tissue.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Kara B; Reimers, Aaron P; Luman, Sarah; Kronz, Joseph D; Fyffe, William E; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2008-03-01

    In previous studies, collagen XI mRNA has been detected in colon cancer, but its location in human colon tissue has not been determined. The heterotrimeric collagen XI consists of three alpha chains. While it is known that collagen XI plays a regulatory role in collagen fibril formation, its function in the colon is unknown. The characterization of normal human colon tissue will allow a better understanding of the variance of collagen XI in abnormal tissues. Grossly normal and malignant human colon tissue was obtained from pathology archives. Immunohistochemical staining with a 58K Golgi marker and alpha1(XI) and alpha2(XI) antisera was used to specifically locate their presence in normal colon tissue. A comparative bright field microscopic analysis showed the presence of collagen XI in human colon. The juxtanuclear, dot-like collagen XI staining in the Golgi apparatus of goblet cells in normal tissue paralleled the staining of the 58K Golgi marker. Ultra light microscopy verified these results. Staining was also confirmed in malignant colon tissue. This study is the first to show that collagen XI is present in the Golgi apparatus of normal human colon goblet cells and localizes collagen XI in both normal and malignant tissue. Although the function of collagen XI in the colon is unknown, our immunohistochemical characterization provides the foundation for future immunohistopathology studies of the colon.

  20. In vivo evaluation of copper release and acute local tissue reactions after implantation of copper-coated titanium implants in rats.

    PubMed

    Hoene, Andreas; Prinz, Cornelia; Walschus, Uwe; Lucke, Silke; Patrzyk, Maciej; Wilhelm, Lutz; Neumann, Hans-Georg; Schlosser, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Copper (Cu) based coatings can reduce infections for titanium (Ti) implants. However, Cu is also cytotoxic. To examine the balance of antibacterial versus adverse tissue effects, this study aimed at evaluating a Cu coating regarding in vivo Cu release and local inflammatory reactions for 72 h. TiAl6V4 plates received either plasma electrolytic oxidation only (Ti), or an additional galvanic Cu deposition (Ti-Cu). No Staphylococcus aureus were found in vitro on Ti-Cu after 24 h. Following simultaneous intramuscular implantation of two Ti and two Ti-Cu plates into nine rats, serum Cu was elevated until 48 h and residual Cu on explanted samples reduced accordingly after 48 h. Total and tissue macrophages around implants increased until 72 h for both series, and were increased for Ti-Cu. As numbers of total and tissue macrophages were comparable, macrophages were probably tissue-derived. MHC-class-II-positive cells increased for Ti-Cu only. T-lymphocytes had considerably lower numbers than macrophages, did not increase or differ between both series, and thus had minor importance. Tissue reactions increased beyond Cu release, indicating effects of either surface-bound Cu or more likely the implants themselves. Altogether, Ti-Cu samples possessed antibacterial effectiveness in vitro, released measurable Cu amounts in vivo and caused a moderately increased local inflammatory response, demonstrating anti-infective potential of Cu coatings.

  1. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to

  2. Functional Local Renin-Angiotensin System in Human and Rat Periodontal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Carlos F.; Morandini, Ana C.; Dionísio, Thiago J.; Faria, Flávio A.; Lima, Marta C.; Figueiredo, Caio M.; Colombini-Ishikiriama, Bella L.; Sipert, Carla R.; Maciel, Rubens P.; Akashi, Ana P.; Souza, Gabriela P.; Garlet, Gustavo P.; Rodini, Camila O.; Amaral, Sandra L.; Becari, Christiane; Salgado, Maria C.; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Matus, Isaac; Didier, Daniela N.; Greene, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    The initiation or progression of periodontitis might involve a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in periodontal tissue. The aim of this study was to further characterize the local RAS in human and rat periodontal tissues between healthy and periodontally-affected tissue. Components of the RAS were investigated using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments involving both human and Wistar rat periodontium. Although not upregulated when challenged with P. gingivalis-lipopolysaccharide, human gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts expressed RAS components. Likewise, healthy and inflamed human gingiva expressed RAS components, some of which were shown to be functional, yet no differences in expression were found between healthy and diseased gingiva. However, in inflamed tissue the immunoreactivity was greater for the AT1R compared to AT2R in fibroblasts. When compared to healthy tissue, ACE activity was increased in human gingiva from volunteers with gingivitis. Human-gingiva homogenates generated Ang II, Ang 1-9 and Ang 1-7 when incubated with precursors. In gingiva homogenates, Ang II formation from Ang I was nearly abolished only when captopril and chymostatin were combined. Ang 1-7 formation was significantly greater when human gingiva homogenates were incubated with chymostatin alone compared to incubation without any inhibitor, only captopril, or captopril and chymostatin. In rat gingiva, RAS components were also found; their expression was not different between healthy and experimentally induced periodontitis (EP) groups. However, renin inhibition (aliskiren) and an AT1R antagonist (losartan) significantly blocked EP-alveolar-bone loss in rats. Collectively, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that a local RAS system is not only present but is also functional in both human and rat periodontal tissue. Furthermore, blocking AT1R and renin can significantly prevent periodontal bone loss induced by EP in rats. PMID:26244896

  3. Characterization of a local renin-angiotensin system in rat gingival tissue

    PubMed Central

    Santos, C.F.; Akashi, A.E.; Dionísio, T.J.; Sipert, C.R.; Didier, D.N.; Greene, A.S.; Oliveira, S.H.P.; Pereira, H.J.; Becari, C.; Oliveira, E.B.; Salgado, M.C.O.

    2009-01-01

    Background Systemic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) promotes plasmatic production of angiotensin (Ang) II, which acts through interaction with specific receptors. There is growing evidence that local systems in various tissues and organs are capable of generating angiotensins independently of circulating RAS. The aims of this work were to: 1) study the expression and localization of RAS components in rat gingival tissue and 2) evaluate the in vitro production of Ang II and other peptides catalyzed by rat gingival tissue homogenates incubated with different Ang II precursors. Methods Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assessed mRNA expression. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis aimed to detect and localize renin. Standardized fluorimetric method with tripeptide Hippuryl-Histidyl-Leucine (Hip-His-Leu) was used to measure tissue ACE activity, while high performance liquid chromatography (HLPC) showed products formed after incubation of tissue homogenates with Ang I or tetradecapeptide renin substrate (TDP). Results mRNA for renin, angiotensinogen, ACE and Ang II receptors (AT1a, AT1b and AT2) was detected in gingival tissue; cultured gingival fibroblasts expressed renin, angiotensinogen and AT1a receptor. Renin was present in the vascular endothelium and intensely expressed in the epithelial basal layer of periodontally affected gingival tissue. ACE activity was detected (4.95±0.89 nmol His-Leu/g.min). When Ang I was used as substrate, Ang 1-9 (0.576±0.128 nmol/mg.min), Ang II (0.066±0.008 nmol/mg.min) and Ang 1-7 (0.111±0.017 nmol/mg.min) were formed, whereas these same peptides (0.139±0.031; 0.206±0.046 and 0.039±0.007 nmol/mg.min, respectively) and Ang I (0.973±0.139 nmol/mg.min) were formed when TDP was the substrate. Conclusion Results presented here clearly show existence of a local RAS in rat gingival tissue, which is capable of generating Ang II and other vasoactive peptides in vitro. PMID:19228099

  4. Staggered-grid PSTD on local Fourier basis and its applications to surface tissue modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming; Chen, Kun

    2010-04-26

    We introduce a high performance parallelization to the PSTD solution of Maxwell equations by employing the fast Fourier transform on local Fourier basis. Meanwhile a reformatted derivative operator allows the adoption of a staggered-grid such as the Yee lattice in PSTD, which can overcome the numerical errors in a collocated-grid when spatial discontinuities are present. The accuracy and capability of our method are confirmed by two analytical models. In two applications to surface tissue optics, an ultra wide coherent backscattering cone from the surface layer is found, and the penetration depth of polarization gating identified. Our development prepares a tool for investigating the optical properties of surface tissue structures.

  5. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Drew, Sally A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goals of this study were to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR and ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR and ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH.

  6. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Tristan M.; Sehgal, Priyanka D.; Drew, Sally A.; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goal of this study was to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR & ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR & ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH. PMID:23792768

  7. Computerized prediction of breast cancer risk: comparison between the global and local bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xiao Hui; Zheng, Bin

    2011-03-01

    We have developed and preliminarily tested a new breast cancer risk prediction model based on computerized bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry. In this study, we investigated and compared the performance difference of our risk prediction model when the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetrical features were extracted in two different methods namely (1) the entire breast area and (2) the mirror-matched local strips between the left and right breast. A testing dataset including bilateral craniocaudal (CC) view images of 100 negative and 100 positive cases for developing breast abnormalities or cancer was selected from a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database. To detect bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry, a set of 20 initial "global" features were extracted from the entire breast areas of two bilateral mammograms in CC view and their differences were computed. Meanwhile, a pool of 16 local histogram-based statistic features was computed from eight mirror-matched strips between the left and right breast. Using a genetic algorithm (GA) to select optimal features, two artificial neural networks (ANN) were built to predict the risk of a test case developing cancer. Using the leave-one-case-out training and testing method, two GAoptimized ANNs yielded the areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.754+/-0.024 (using feature differences extracted from the entire breast area) and 0.726+/-0.026 (using the feature differences extracted from 8 pairs of local strips), respectively. The risk prediction model using either ANN is able to detect 58.3% (35/60) of cancer cases 6 to 18 months earlier at 80% specificity level. This study compared two methods to compute bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry and demonstrated that bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry was a useful breast cancer risk indicator with high discriminatory power.

  8. Nickel localization on tissues of hyperaccumulator species of phyllanthus L. (Euphorbiaceae) from ultramafic areas of Cuba.

    PubMed

    Berazaín, R; de la Fuente, V; Sánchez-Mata, D; Rufo, L; Rodríguez, N; Amils, R

    2007-01-01

    Two species of perennial Phyllanthus (Euphorbiaceae) (Phyllanthus orbicularis and Phyllanthus discolor, both endemic to ultramafic areas of Cuba, and their natural hybrid, Phyllanthus xpallidus) were selected for metal localization microanalysis. Different plant tissues were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy-dispersive X-ray probe. All of the studied taxa are nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulators and significant concentrations of this element were found in different leaf and stem tissues. The highest Ni content was found in the laticifer tubes, whereas leaf epidermis Ni content resulted to be much more relevant in terms of total metal storage. Calcium and magnesium were found more evenly distributed in leaf and stem tissues.

  9. Dysregulation of Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Axes and NK Cell Tissue Localization during Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Bonanni, Valentina; Santoni, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic molecules that play key roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Upon signaling via their specific receptors, chemokines regulate tissue mobilization and trafficking of a wide array of immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Current research is focused on analyzing changes in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression during various diseases to interfere with pathological trafficking of cells or to recruit selected cell types to specific tissues. NK cells are a heterogeneous lymphocyte population comprising several subsets endowed with distinct functional properties and mainly representing distinct stages of a linear development process. Because of their different functional potential, the type of subset that accumulates in a tissue drives the final outcome of NK cell-regulated immune response, leading to either protection or pathology. Correspondingly, chemokine receptors, including CXCR4, CXCR3, and CX3CR1, are differentially expressed by NK cell subsets, and their expression levels can be modulated during NK cell activation. At first, this review will summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of chemokines to the localization and generation of NK cell subsets in homeostasis. How an inappropriate chemotactic response can lead to pathology and how chemokine targeting can therapeutically affect tissue recruitment/localization of distinct NK cell subsets will also be discussed.

  10. Dysregulation of Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Axes and NK Cell Tissue Localization during Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Bonanni, Valentina; Santoni, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic molecules that play key roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Upon signaling via their specific receptors, chemokines regulate tissue mobilization and trafficking of a wide array of immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Current research is focused on analyzing changes in chemokine/chemokine receptor expression during various diseases to interfere with pathological trafficking of cells or to recruit selected cell types to specific tissues. NK cells are a heterogeneous lymphocyte population comprising several subsets endowed with distinct functional properties and mainly representing distinct stages of a linear development process. Because of their different functional potential, the type of subset that accumulates in a tissue drives the final outcome of NK cell-regulated immune response, leading to either protection or pathology. Correspondingly, chemokine receptors, including CXCR4, CXCR3, and CX3CR1, are differentially expressed by NK cell subsets, and their expression levels can be modulated during NK cell activation. At first, this review will summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of chemokines to the localization and generation of NK cell subsets in homeostasis. How an inappropriate chemotactic response can lead to pathology and how chemokine targeting can therapeutically affect tissue recruitment/localization of distinct NK cell subsets will also be discussed. PMID:27766097

  11. Mapping local orientation of aligned fibrous scatterers for cancerous tissues using backscattering Mueller matrix imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Honghui; Sun, Minghao; Zeng, Nan; Du, E.; Liu, Shaoxiong; Guo, Yihong; Wu, Jian; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Polarization measurements are sensitive to the microstructure of tissues and can be used to detect pathological changes. Many tissues contain anisotropic fibrous structures. We obtain the local orientation of aligned fibrous scatterers using different groups of the backscattering Mueller matrix elements. Experiments on concentrically well-aligned silk fibers and unstained human papillary thyroid carcinoma tissues show that the m22, m33, m23, and m32 elements have better contrast but higher degeneracy for the extraction of orientation angles. The m12 and m13 elements show lower contrast, but allow us to determine the orientation angle for the fibrous scatterers along all directions. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere-cylinder scattering model indicate that the oblique incidence of the illumination beam introduces some errors in the orientation angles obtained by both methods. Mapping the local orientation of anisotropic tissues may not only provide information on pathological changes, but can also give new leads to reduce the orientation dependence of polarization measurements.

  12. Dynamic myosin activation promotes collective morphology and migration by locally balancing oppositional forces from surrounding tissue.

    PubMed

    Aranjuez, George; Burtscher, Ashley; Sawant, Ketki; Majumder, Pralay; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-06-15

    Migrating cells need to overcome physical constraints from the local microenvironment to navigate their way through tissues. Cells that move collectively have the additional challenge of negotiating complex environments in vivo while maintaining cohesion of the group as a whole. The mechanisms by which collectives maintain a migratory morphology while resisting physical constraints from the surrounding tissue are poorly understood. Drosophila border cells represent a genetic model of collective migration within a cell-dense tissue. Border cells move as a cohesive group of 6-10 cells, traversing a network of large germ line-derived nurse cells within the ovary. Here we show that the border cell cluster is compact and round throughout their entire migration, a shape that is maintained despite the mechanical pressure imposed by the surrounding nurse cells. Nonmuscle myosin II (Myo-II) activity at the cluster periphery becomes elevated in response to increased constriction by nurse cells. Furthermore, the distinctive border cell collective morphology requires highly dynamic and localized enrichment of Myo-II. Thus, activated Myo-II promotes cortical tension at the outer edge of the migrating border cell cluster to resist compressive forces from nurse cells. We propose that dynamic actomyosin tension at the periphery of collectives facilitates their movement through restrictive tissues.

  13. Fusion analysis of first episode depression: where brain shape deformations meet local composition of tissue.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mahdi; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Tahmasebi, Amir; Bosma, Rachael; Tong, Ryan; Hollenstein, Tom; Harkness, Kate; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Computational neuroanatomical techniques that are used to evaluate the structural correlates of disorders in the brain typically measure regional differences in gray matter or white matter, or measure regional differences in the deformation fields required to warp individual datasets to a standard space. Our aim in this study was to combine measurements of regional tissue composition and of deformations in order to characterize a particular brain disorder (here, major depressive disorder). We use structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data from young adults in a first episode of depression, and from an age- and sex-matched group of non-depressed individuals, and create population gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissue average templates using DARTEL groupwise registration. We obtained GM and WM tissue maps in the template space, along with the deformation fields required to co-register the DARTEL template and the GM and WM maps in the population. These three features, reflecting tissue composition and shape of the brain, were used within a joint independent-components analysis (jICA) to extract spatially independent joint sources and their corresponding modulation profiles. Coefficients of the modulation profiles were used to capture differences between depressed and non-depressed groups. The combination of hippocampal shape deformations and local composition of tissue (but neither shape nor local composition of tissue alone) was shown to discriminate reliably between individuals in a first episode of depression and healthy controls, suggesting that brain structural differences between depressed and non-depressed individuals do not simply reflect chronicity of the disorder but are there from the very outset.

  14. Fusion analysis of first episode depression: Where brain shape deformations meet local composition of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Mahdi; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Tahmasebi, Amir; Bosma, Rachael; Tong, Ryan; Hollenstein, Tom; Harkness, Kate; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Computational neuroanatomical techniques that are used to evaluate the structural correlates of disorders in the brain typically measure regional differences in gray matter or white matter, or measure regional differences in the deformation fields required to warp individual datasets to a standard space. Our aim in this study was to combine measurements of regional tissue composition and of deformations in order to characterize a particular brain disorder (here, major depressive disorder). We use structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data from young adults in a first episode of depression, and from an age- and sex-matched group of non-depressed individuals, and create population gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissue average templates using DARTEL groupwise registration. We obtained GM and WM tissue maps in the template space, along with the deformation fields required to co-register the DARTEL template and the GM and WM maps in the population. These three features, reflecting tissue composition and shape of the brain, were used within a joint independent-components analysis (jICA) to extract spatially independent joint sources and their corresponding modulation profiles. Coefficients of the modulation profiles were used to capture differences between depressed and non-depressed groups. The combination of hippocampal shape deformations and local composition of tissue (but neither shape nor local composition of tissue alone) was shown to discriminate reliably between individuals in a first episode of depression and healthy controls, suggesting that brain structural differences between depressed and non-depressed individuals do not simply reflect chronicity of the disorder but are there from the very outset. PMID:25610773

  15. Local tissue growth patterns underlying normal fetal human brain gyrification quantified in utero

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Corbett-Detig, James; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Existing knowledge of growth patterns in the living fetal human brain is based upon in utero imaging studies by MRI and ultrasound, which describe overall growth and provided mainly qualitative findings. However, formation of the complex folded cortical structure of the adult brain requires, in part, differential rates of regional tissue growth. To better understand these local tissue growth patterns, we applied recent advances in fetal MRI motion correction and computational image analysis techniques to 40 normal fetal human brains covering a period of primary sulcal formation (20-28 gestational weeks). Growth patterns were mapped by quantifying tissue locations that were expanding more or less quickly than the overall cerebral growth rate, which reveal increasing structural complexity. We detected increased local relative growth rates in the formation of the pre- and post-central gyri, right superior temporal gyrus and opercula, which differentiated between the constant growth rate in underlying cerebral mantle and the accelerating rate in the cortical plate undergoing folding. Analysis focused on the cortical plate revealed greater volume increases in parietal and occipital regions compared to the frontal lobe. Cortical plate growth patterns constrained to narrower age ranges showed that gyrification, reflected by greater growth rates, was more pronounced after 24 gestational weeks. Local hemispheric volume asymmetry was located in the posterior peri-Sylvian area associated with structural lateralization in the mature brain. These maps of fetal brain growth patterns construct a spatially specific baseline of developmental biomarkers with which to correlate abnormal development in the human. PMID:21414909

  16. Expression and tissue and subcellular localization of anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiling; Wang, Wei; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ping; Zhan, Jicheng; Huang, Weidong

    2011-04-01

    Anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) is one of the key enzymes in the biosynthesis of both anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins in grapevine. Although substantial researches have investigated ANS gene expression and regulation at the transcriptional level, little is yet known about protein expression and distribution in grapevine. Here, the expression and tissue and subcellular localization of ANS in different Cabernet sauvignon grapevine tissues were investigated by using the techniques of Western blotting, immunohistochemical localization, immuno-electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. The results showed that the ANS was expressed in the grape berries, leaves, stems, petioles, and leaf buds. In grape berry skin and flesh, ANS expression is developmental dependent. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ANS is primarily distributed in the exocarp, mesocarp, and seed of the fruit; in palisade and spongy tissues of the leaves; in the primary phloem and pith ray in the stems; and in the growth point and leaf primordium of the leaf buds. Furthermore, at the subcellular level, the ANS was mainly localized in the cytoplasm regardless of cell types and some ANS were also found in the nucleus in the mesocarp vascular bundle and leaf bud cells. This research will give further insight for the biosynthesis and regulation of different flavonoid compounds in grapevine.

  17. Langerhans Cells Maintain Local Tissue Tolerance in a Model of Systemic Autoimmune Disease1

    PubMed Central

    King, Jennifer K.; Philips, Rachael L.; Eriksson, Anna U.; Kim, Peter J.; Halder, Ramesh C.; Lee, Delphine J.; Singh, Ram Raj

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases such as lupus affect multiple organs, usually in a diverse fashion where only certain organs are affected in individual patients. It is unclear whether the ‘local’ immune cells play a role in regulating tissue specificity in relation to disease heterogeneity in systemic autoimmune diseases. Here, we used skin as a model to determine the role of tissue-resident dendritic cells in local and systemic involvement within a systemic lupus disease model. Skin-resident dendritic cells, namely Langerhans cells (LC), have been implicated in regulating tolerance or autoimmunity using elegant transgenic models, however, their role in local versus systemic immune regulation is unknown. We demonstrate that while lymphocytes from skin-draining lymph nodes of autoimmune-prone MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/lpr mice react spontaneously to a physiological skin self-Ag desmoglein-3, epicutaneous applications of desmoglein-3 induced tolerance that is dependent on LCs. Inducible ablation of LCs in adult, preclinical MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/lpr and MRL/MpJ-Fas+/+ mice resulted in increased autoantibodies against skin Ags and markedly accelerated lupus dermatitis with increased local macrophage infiltration, but had no effect on systemic autoantibodies such as anti-dsDNA Abs or disease in other organs such as kidneys, lung, and liver. Furthermore, skin-draining lymph nodes of LC-ablated MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/lpr mice had significantly fewer CD4+ T-cells producing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 than LC-intact controls. These results indicate that a skin-resident dendritic cell population regulates local tolerance in systemic lupus and emphasize the importance of the local immune milieu in preventing tissue-specific autoimmunity yet have no effect on systemic autoimmunity. PMID:26071559

  18. Comparative tissue transcriptomics reveal prompt inter-organ communication in response to local bacterial kidney infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucosal infections elicit inflammatory responses via regulated signaling pathways. Infection outcome depends strongly on early events occurring immediately when bacteria start interacting with cells in the mucosal membrane. Hitherto reported transcription profiles on host-pathogen interactions are strongly biased towards in vitro studies. To detail the local in vivo genetic response to infection, we here profiled host gene expression in a recent experimental model that assures high spatial and temporal control of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection within the kidney of a live rat. Results Transcriptional profiling of tissue biopsies from UPEC-infected kidney tissue revealed 59 differentially expressed genes 8 h post-infection. Their relevance for the infection process was supported by a Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. Early differential expression at 3 h and 5 h post-infection was of low statistical significance, which correlated to the low degree of infection. Comparative transcriptomics analysis of the 8 h data set and online available studies of early local infection and inflammation defined a core of 80 genes constituting a "General tissue response to early local bacterial infections". Among these, 25% were annotated as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) regulated. Subsequent experimental analyses confirmed a systemic increase of IFN-γ in rats with an ongoing local kidney infection, correlating to splenic, rather than renal Ifng induction and suggested this inter-organ communication to be mediated by interleukin (IL)-23. The use of comparative transcriptomics allowed expansion of the statistical data handling, whereby relevant data could also be extracted from the 5 h data set. Out of the 31 differentially expressed core genes, some represented specific 5 h responses, illustrating the value of comparative transcriptomics when studying the dynamic nature of gene regulation in response to infections. Conclusion Our hypothesis-free approach identified

  19. Electron-microscopic cytochemical localization of diamine and polyamine oxidases in pea and maize tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Furey MJ, 3. d.

    1991-01-01

    An electron-microscopic cytochemical method was used to localize diamine oxidase (DAO) in pea and polyamine oxidase (PAO) in maize (Zea mays L.). The method, based on the precipitation of amine-oxidase-generated H2O2 by CeCl3, was shown to be specific for DAO and PAO and permitted their localization in plant tissues with a high degree of resolution. Both enzymes are localized exclusively in the cell wall. Both DAO- and PAO-activity staining is most intense in the middle lamellar region of the wall and in cells exhibiting highly lignified walls. The oxidases could provide H2O2 for peroxidase-mediated cross-linking reactions in the cell wall and may, in this capacity, play a role in the regulation of plant growth.

  20. Comparison of TOA and RSS based techniques for RF localization inside human tissue.

    PubMed

    Khan, Umair I; Pahlavan, Kaveh; Makarov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Localization inside the human body using radio frequency (RF) transmission is gaining importance in a number of applications such as Capsule Endoscopy. The accuracy of RF localization depends on the technology adopted for this purpose. The two most common RF localization technologies use received signal strength (RSS) and time-of-arrival (TOA). This paper presents a comparison of the accuracy of TOA and RSS based localization inside human tissue. Analysis of the propagation of radio waves inside the human body is extremely challenging and computationally intensive. We use our proprietary finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique algorithm reported in [1] to simulate waveform transmissions inside the human body, which is almost 60 times faster than commercially available solvers used for similar purposes. The RSS and TOA of the waveforms are extracted for localization and the accuracies of the two methods are compared. The accuracy of each technique is compared with traditional CRLB commonly used for calculation of bounds for the performance of localization techniques.

  1. A compact and versatile microfluidic probe for local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cors, J. F.; Lovchik, R. D.; Delamarche, E.; Kaigala, G. V.

    2014-03-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) is a non-contact, scanning microfluidic technology for local (bio)chemical processing of surfaces based on hydrodynamically confining nanoliter volumes of liquids over tens of micrometers. We present here a compact MFP (cMFP) that can be used on a standard inverted microscope and assist in the local processing of tissue sections and biological specimens. The cMFP has a footprint of 175 × 100 × 140 mm3 and can scan an area of 45 × 45 mm2 on a surface with an accuracy of ±15 μm. The cMFP is compatible with standard surfaces used in life science laboratories such as microscope slides and Petri dishes. For ease of use, we developed self-aligned mounted MFP heads with standardized "chip-to-world" and "chip-to-platform" interfaces. Switching the processing liquid in the flow confinement is performed within 90 s using a selector valve with a dead-volume of approximately 5 μl. We further implemented height-compensation that allows a cMFP head to follow non-planar surfaces common in tissue and cellular ensembles. This was shown by patterning different macroscopic copper-coated topographies with height differences up to 750 μm. To illustrate the applicability to tissue processing, 5 μm thick M000921 BRAF V600E+ melanoma cell blocks were stained with hematoxylin to create contours, lines, spots, gradients of the chemicals, and multiple spots over larger areas. The local staining was performed in an interactive manner using a joystick and a scripting module. The compactness, user-friendliness, and functionality of the cMFP will enable it to be adapted as a standard tool in research, development and diagnostic laboratories, particularly for the interaction with tissues and cells.

  2. Dynamic morphometric characterization of local connective tissue network structure in humans using ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Helene M; Rizzo, Donna M; Fox, James R; Badger, Gary J; Wu, Junru; Konofagou, Elisa E; Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie; Bouffard, Nicole A; Krag, Martin H

    2007-01-01

    Background In humans, connective tissue forms a complex, interconnected network throughout the body that may have mechanosensory, regulatory and signaling functions. Understanding these potentially important phenomena requires non-invasive measurements of collagen network structure that can be performed in live animals or humans. The goal of this study was to show that ultrasound can be used to quantify dynamic changes in local connective tissue structure in vivo. We first performed combined ultrasound and histology examinations of the same tissue in two subjects undergoing surgery: in one subject, we examined the relationship of ultrasound to histological images in three dimensions; in the other, we examined the effect of a localized tissue perturbation using a previously developed robotic acupuncture needling technique. In ten additional non-surgical subjects, we quantified changes in tissue spatial organization over time during needle rotation vs. no rotation using ultrasound and semi-variogram analyses. Results 3-D renditions of ultrasound images showed longitudinal echogenic sheets that matched with collagenous sheets seen in histological preparations. Rank correlations between serial 2-D ultrasound and corresponding histology images resulted in high positive correlations for semi-variogram ranges computed parallel (r = 0.79, p < 0.001) and perpendicular (r = 0.63, p < 0.001) to the surface of the skin, indicating concordance in spatial structure between the two data sets. Needle rotation caused tissue displacement in the area surrounding the needle that was mapped spatially with ultrasound elastography and corresponded to collagen bundles winding around the needle on histological sections. In semi-variograms computed for each ultrasound frame, there was a greater change in the area under the semi-variogram curve across successive frames during needle rotation compared with no rotation. The direction of this change was heterogeneous across subjects. The frame

  3. Photobleaching as a tool to measure the local strain field in fibrous membranes of connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Jayyosi, C; Fargier, G; Coret, M; Bruyère-Garnier, K

    2014-06-01

    Connective tissues are complex structures which contain collagen and elastin fibers. These fiber-based structures have a great influence on material mechanical properties and need to be studied at the microscopic scale. Several microscopy techniques have been developed in order to image such microstructures; among them are two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy and second harmonic generation. These observations have been coupled with mechanical characterization to link microstructural kinematics to macroscopic material parameter evolution. In this study, we present a new approach to measure local strain in soft biological tissues using a side-effect of fluorescence microscopy: photobleaching. Controlling the loss of fluorescence induced by photobleaching, we create a pattern on our sample that we can monitor during mechanical loading. The image analysis allows three-dimensional displacements of the patterns at various loading levels to be computed. Then, local strain distribution is derived using the finite element discretization on a four-node element mesh created from our photobleached pattern. Photobleaching tests on a human liver capsule have revealed that this technique is non-destructive and does not have any impact on mechanical properties. This method is likely to have other applications in biological material studies, considering that all collagen-elastin fiber-based biological tissues possess autofluorescence properties and thus can be photobleached.

  4. Expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor and its cellular localization in myocardial tissues of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Tripta; Mishra, Baijayantimala; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Sharma, Mirnalini; Bahl, Ajay; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are common causes of morbidity and mortality in children and adults. Recently, the human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a common receptor for coxsackieviruses and adenoviruses, was discovered and its increased expression has been reported in patients with DCM and myocarditis. OBJECTIVE: To measure the expression of CAR in myocardial tissues of patients with DCM and its cellular localization in DCM cases. METHODS: Formalin-fixed myocardial tissues collected during autopsy from 26 cases of DCM, and 20 cases each of noncardiac disease and cardiac disease other than DCM were included as the test group, and control groups A and B, respectively. Expression of CAR was studied using immunohistochemical staining of myocardial tissue with a CAR-specific rabbit polyclonal antibody. CAR messenger RNA was semiquantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by agarose gel analysis and measurement of band intensity. RESULTS: CAR positivity in DCM cases was found to be 96% (25 of 26) compared with 30% in control group A and 40% in control group B. CAR was found to be expressed in myocytes, endothelial and interstitial cells; however, positivity in myocytes was significantly higher than in other cells in all groups. The site of CAR expression was predominantly the sarcolemma along with cytoplasm in cardiomyocytes. CONCLUSIONS: The present study highlighted the increased expression of CAR in DCM cases, with localization in myocytes and endothelial cells. PMID:23592932

  5. PHBV/PAM scaffolds with local oriented structure through UV polymerization for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yu; Wu, Gang; Wang, Yingjun

    2014-01-01

    Locally oriented tissue engineering scaffolds can provoke cellular orientation and direct cell spread and migration, offering an exciting potential way for the regeneration of the complex tissue. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) scaffolds with locally oriented hydrophilic polyacrylamide (PAM) inside the macropores of the scaffolds were achieved through UV graft polymerization. The interpenetrating PAM chains enabled good interconnectivity of PHBV/PAM scaffolds that presented a lower porosity and minor diameter of pores than PHBV scaffolds. The pores with diameter below 100  μm increased to 82.15% of PHBV/PAM scaffolds compared with 31.5% of PHBV scaffolds. PHBV/PAM scaffold showed a much higher compressive elastic modulus than PHBV scaffold due to PAM stuffing. At 5 days of culturing, sheep chondrocytes spread along the similar direction in the macropores of PHBV/PAM scaffolds. The locally oriented PAM chains might guide the attachment and spreading of chondrocytes and direct the formation of microfilaments via contact guidance.

  6. Local infection with oilseed rape mosaic virus promotes genetic rearrangements in systemic Arabidopsis tissue.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-05-10

    We have previously shown that local infection of tobacco plants with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) or oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV) results in a systemic increase in the homologous recombination frequency (HRF). Here, we analyzed what other changes in the genome are triggered by pathogen infection. For the analysis of HRF, mutation frequency (MF) and microsatellite instability (MI), we used three different transgenic Arabidopsis lines carrying β-glucuronidase (GUS)-based substrates in their genome. We found that local infection of Arabidopsis with ORMV resulted in an increase of all three frequencies, albeit to differing degrees. The most prominent increase was observed in microsatellite instability. The increase in HRF was the lowest, although still statistically significant. The analysis of methylation of the 35S promoter and transgene expression showed that the greater instability of the transgene was not attributed to these changes. Strand breaks brought about a significant increase in non-treated tissues of infected plants. The expression of genes associated with various repair processes, such as KU70, RAD51, MSH2, DNA POL α and DNA POL δ, was also increased. To summarize, our data demonstrate that local ORMV infection destabilizes the genome in systemic tissues of Arabidopsis plants in various ways resulting in large rearrangements, point mutations and microsatellite instability.

  7. CRLX101 nanoparticles localize in human tumors and not in adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue after intravenous dosing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.; Wiley, Devin T.; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Webster, Paul; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Davis, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics are being used to treat patients with solid tumors. Whereas nanoparticles have been shown to preferentially accumulate in solid tumors of animal models, there is little evidence to prove that intact nanoparticles localize to solid tumors of humans when systemically administered. Here, tumor and adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue biopsies are obtained through endoscopic capture from patients with gastric, gastroesophageal, or esophageal cancer who are administered the nanoparticle CRLX101. Both the pre- and postdosing tissue samples adjacent to tumors show no definitive evidence of either the nanoparticle or its drug payload (camptothecin, CPT) contained within the nanoparticle. Similar results are obtained from the predosing tumor samples. However, in nine of nine patients that were evaluated, CPT is detected in the tumor tissue collected 24–48 h after CRLX101 administration. For five of these patients, evidence of the intact deposition of CRLX101 nanoparticles in the tumor tissue is obtained. Indications of CPT pharmacodynamics from tumor biomarkers such as carbonic anhydrase IX and topoisomerase I by immunohistochemistry show clear evidence of biological activity from the delivered CPT in the posttreatment tumors. PMID:27001839

  8. Tissue characterization by imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenderka, Klaus V.; Gaertner, Tilio; Cobet, Ulrich; Zacharias, Mario; Heynemann, Hans

    2000-04-01

    Conventional B-scan systems only use the amplitude information of the backscattered signals for imaging. By imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient it is possible to improve the image contrast and to reduce system effects. Based on spectral analysis of rf echo signals, a procedure was developed to correct for system specific effects and to determine the relative backscatter coefficient. A new image with improved contrast results from grayscale or color coding of the frequency components of the relative backscatter coefficient. The method was applied to in vivo measurements of human prostate and transplanted kidney. For cancerous prostate tissue the relative backscatter coefficient is about 8 dB lower than for normal tissue regions. The results of the investigations on kidneys show no correlation to the current function of the organ. Certainly the different course of the frequency dependence of the relative backscatter coefficient of renal cortex and calices regions allows a contrast improvement. The method provides a system independent imaging procedure with improved image contrast for tissues with different scattering behavior and slightly reduced spatial resolution. Imaging the relative backscatter coefficient will not substitute the conventional B-mode image, but it is a useful tool providing additional information about the tissue state.

  9. The role of radiotherapy in the management of localized soft tissue sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Tiong, Siaw Sze; Dickie, Colleen; Haas, Rick L.; O’Sullivan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy (RT) and function-preserving surgery is the most usual contemporary approach in the management of soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Pre- and postoperative RT result in similar local control rates, as shown by a landmark trial in extremity STS. In this review, the role of RT in the management of extremity STS will be discussed, but STS in other sites, including retroperitoneal STS, will also be addressed. The focus will consider various aspects of RT including strategies to reduce the volume of tissue being irradiated, dose, scheduling, and the possible of omission of RT in selected cases. Finally, technology advances through the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided IMRT, intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) and particle therapy will also be discussed. PMID:27807504

  10. Use of Sertoli cell transplants to provide local immunoprotection for tissue grafts.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, Craig; Emerich, Dwaine F; Gores, Paul

    2004-06-01

    The recent success of allogeneic islet transplantation for the treatment of type I diabetes has renewed interest in cell therapy for diseases of secretory cell dysfunction. Unfortunately, widespread clinical use of cell transplantation is limited by tissue availability and the need for long-term immunosuppresion. Testicular Sertoli cells can confer local immunoprotection for co-transplanted cells and may provide a means of overcoming the obstacles associated with cell transplantation. Sertoli cell grafts protect islets in animal models of diabetes and can be transplanted into the brain to enhance regeneration and promote the survival of co-grafted tissues. This review describes the role that Sertoli cells normally play in testicular immunology, details the preclinical data using transplanted Sertoli cells in models of diabetes and Parkinson's disease and discusses some of the possible mechanisms involved in this phenomena, as well as the future of this technology.

  11. Localization of Brachyury (T) in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues during mouse gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Inman, Kimberly E; Downs, Karen M

    2006-10-01

    T-box gene family members have important roles during murine embryogenesis, gastrulation, and organogenesis. Although relatively little is known about how T-box genes are regulated, published gene expression studies have revealed dynamic and specific patterns in both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues of the mouse conceptus. Mutant alleles of the T-box gene Brachyury (T) have identified roles in formation of mesoderm and its derivatives, such as somites and the allantois. However, given the cell autonomous nature of T gene activity and conflicting results of gene expression studies, it has been difficult to attribute a primary function to T in normal allantoic development. We report localization of T protein by sectional immunohistochemistry in both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues during mouse gastrulation, emphasizing T localization within the allantois. T was detected in all previously reported sites within the conceptus, including the primitive streak and its derivatives, nascent embryonic mesoderm, the node and notochord, as well as notochord-associated endoderm and posterior neurectoderm. In addition, we have clarified T within the allantois, where it was first detected in the proximal midline of the late allantoic bud (approximately 7.5 days postcoitum, dpc) and persisted within an expanded midline domain until 6-somite pairs (s; approximately 8.5 dpc). Lastly, we have discovered several novel T sites, including the developing heart, visceral endoderm, extraembryonic ectoderm, and its derivative, chorionic ectoderm. Together, these data provide a unified picture of T in the mammalian conceptus, and demonstrate T's presence in unrelated cell types and tissues in highly dynamic spatiotemporal patterns in both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues.

  12. Local delivery of nitric oxide: targeted delivery of therapeutics to bone and connective tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Scott P.; Storm, Wesley L.; Koh, Ahyeon; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of injuries and disorders affecting bones and connective tissue is a significant challenge facing the medical community. A treatment route that has recently been proposed is nitric oxide (NO) therapy. Nitric oxide plays several roles in physiology with many conditions lacking adequate levels of NO. As NO is a radical, localized delivery via NO donors is essential to promoting biological activity. Herein, we review current literature related to therapeutic NO delivery in the treatment of bone, skin and tendon repair. PMID:22433782

  13. Integrated local binary pattern texture features for classification of breast tissue imaged by optical coherence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Sunhua; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Huang, Xiaolei; Xu, Ting; Xu, Tao; Zeng, Xianxu; Zhang, Zhan; Sheikine, Yuri; Connolly, James L; Fujimoto, James G; Zhou, Chao

    2017-03-08

    This paper proposes a texture analysis technique that can effectively classify different types of human breast tissue imaged by Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM). OCM is an emerging imaging modality for rapid tissue screening and has the potential to provide high resolution microscopic images that approach those of histology. OCM images, acquired without tissue staining, however, pose unique challenges to image analysis and pattern classification. We examined multiple types of texture features and found Local Binary Pattern (LBP) features to perform better in classifying tissues imaged by OCM. In order to improve classification accuracy, we propose novel variants of LBP features, namely average LBP (ALBP) and block based LBP (BLBP). Compared with the classic LBP feature, ALBP and BLBP features provide an enhanced encoding of the texture structure in a local neighborhood by looking at intensity differences among neighboring pixels and among certain blocks of pixels in the neighborhood. Fourty-six freshly excised human breast tissue samples, including 27 benign (e.g. fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease and usual ductal hyperplasia) and 19 breast carcinoma (e.g. invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ) were imaged with large field OCM with an imaging area of 10 × 10 mm(2) (10, 000 × 10, 000 pixels) for each sample. Corresponding H&E histology was obtained for each sample and used to provide ground truth diagnosis. 4310 small OCM image blocks (500 × 500 pixels) each paired with corresponding H&E histology was extracted from large-field OCM images and labeled with one of the five different classes: adipose tissue (n = 347), fibrous stroma (n = 2,065), breast lobules (n = 199), carcinomas (pooled from all sub-types, n = 1,127), and background (regions outside of the specimens, n = 572). Our experiments show that by integrating a selected set of LBP and the two new variant (ALBP and BLBP) features at multiple scales, the

  14. Localizing Organomercury Uptake And Accumulation in Zebrafish Larvae at the Tissue And Cellular Level

    SciTech Connect

    Korbas, M.; Blechinger, S.R.; Krone, P.H.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.

    2009-05-20

    Using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence mapping, we have examined the uptake and localization of organic mercury in zebrafish larvae. Strikingly, the greatest accumulation of methyl and ethyl mercury compounds was highly localized in the rapidly dividing lens epithelium, with lower levels going to brain, optic nerve, and various other organs. The data suggest that the reported impairment of visual processes by mercury may arise not only from previously reported neurological effects, but also from direct effects on the ocular tissue. This novel approach is a powerful tool for directly investigating the molecular toxicology of heavy metals, and should be equally applicable to the study of a wide range of elements in developing embryos.

  15. Structure and functionalization of mesoporous bioceramics for bone tissue regeneration and local drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, María; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Colilla, Montserrat

    2012-03-28

    This review article describes the importance of structure and functionalization in the performance of mesoporous silica bioceramics for bone tissue regeneration and local drug delivery purposes. Herein, we summarize the pivotal features of mesoporous bioactive glasses, also known as 'templated glasses' (TGs), which present chemical compositions similar to those of conventional bioactive sol-gel glasses and the added value of an ordered mesopore arrangement. An in-depth study concerning the possibility of tailoring the structural and textural characteristics of TGs at the nanometric scale and their influence on bioactive behaviour is discussed. The highly ordered mesoporous arrangement of cavities allows these materials to confine drugs to be subsequently released, acting as drug delivery devices. The functionalization of mesoporous silica walls has been revealed as the cornerstone in the performance of these materials as controlled release systems. The synergy between the improved bioactive behaviour and local sustained drug release capability of mesostructured materials makes them suitable to manufacture three-dimensional macroporous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Finally, this review tackles the possibility of covalently grafting different osteoinductive agents to the scaffold surface that act as attracting signals for bone cells to promote the bone regeneration process.

  16. “SP-G”, a Putative New Surfactant Protein – Tissue Localization and 3D Structure

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G) was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class. PMID:23094088

  17. Subtle CXCR3-Dependent Chemotaxis of CTLs within Infected Tissue Allows Efficient Target Localization.

    PubMed

    Ariotti, Silvia; Beltman, Joost B; Borsje, Rianne; Hoekstra, Mirjam E; Halford, William P; Haanen, John B A G; de Boer, Rob J; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2015-12-01

    It is well established how effector T cells exit the vasculature to enter the peripheral tissues in which an infection is ongoing. However, less is known regarding how CTLs migrate toward infected cells after entry into peripheral organs. Recently, it was shown that the chemokine receptor CXCR3 on T cells has an important role in their ability to localize infected cells and to control vaccinia virus infection. However, the search strategy of T cells for virus-infected targets has not been investigated in detail and could involve chemotaxis toward infected cells, chemokinesis (i.e., increased motility) combined with CTL arrest when targets are detected, or both. In this study, we describe and analyze the migration of CTLs within HSV-1-infected epidermis in vivo. We demonstrate that activated T cells display a subtle distance-dependent chemotaxis toward clusters of infected cells and confirm that this is mediated by CXCR3 and its ligands. Although the chemotactic migration is weak, computer simulations based on short-term experimental data, combined with subsequent long-term imaging indicate that this behavior is crucial for efficient target localization and T cell accumulation at effector sites. Thus, chemotactic migration of effector T cells within peripheral tissue forms an important factor in the speed with which T cells are able to arrive at sites of infection.

  18. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Felix; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G) was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class.

  19. Freezing of tissue-limits for the autoradiographic localization of diffusible substances.

    PubMed

    Frederik, P M; Busing, W M

    1979-11-01

    Frozen thin sections and sections from freeze-dried and embedded tissue are used for the autoradiographic localization of diffusible substances at the electron microscope level. The presence of ice crystals in such sections may limit the autoradiographic resolution. Ice crystals are formed during freezing and may grow during subsequent processing of tissue. The contribution of ice crystal growth to the final image was estimated by measuring the distribution of the ice crystal sizes in freeze-etch replicas and in sections from freeze-dried and embedded tissues. A surface layer (10-15 mu) without visible ice crystals was present in both preparations. Beneath this surface layer the diameter of ice crystals increased towards the interior with the same relationship between crystal size and distance from the surface in the freeze-etch preparation as in the freeze-dry preparation. Ice crystal growth occurring during a much longer time during freeze-drying compared to freeze-etching does not significantly contribute to the final image in the electron microscope. The formation of ice crystals during freezing determines to a large extent the image (and therefore the autoradiographic resolution) of freeze-dry preparations and this probably holds also for thin cryosections of which examples are given.

  20. Tissue heterogeneity as a mechanism for localized neural stimulation by applied electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. C.; Correia, L.; Salvador, R.; Basser, P. J.

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the heterogeneity of electrical conductivity as a new mechanism to stimulate excitable tissues via applied electric fields. In particular, we show that stimulation of axons crossing internal boundaries can occur at boundaries where the electric conductivity of the volume conductor changes abruptly. The effectiveness of this and other stimulation mechanisms was compared by means of models and computer simulations in the context of transcranial magnetic stimulation. While, for a given stimulation intensity, the largest membrane depolarization occurred where an axon terminates or bends sharply in a high electric field region, a slightly smaller membrane depolarization, still sufficient to generate action potentials, also occurred at an internal boundary where the conductivity jumped from 0.143 S m-1 to 0.333 S m-1, simulating a white-matter-grey-matter interface. Tissue heterogeneity can also give rise to local electric field gradients that are considerably stronger and more focal than those impressed by the stimulation coil and that can affect the membrane potential, albeit to a lesser extent than the two mechanisms mentioned above. Tissue heterogeneity may play an important role in electric and magnetic 'far-field' stimulation.

  1. Local tissue-weight-based nonrigid registration of lung images with application to regional ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, a new nonrigid image registration method is presented to align two volumetric lung CT datasets with an application to estimate regional ventilation. Instead of the sum of squared intensity difference (SSD), we introduce the sum of squared tissue volume difference (SSTVD) as the similarity criterion to take into account the variation of intensity due to respiration. This new criterion aims to minimize the local difference of tissue volume inside the lungs between two images scanned in the same session or over short periods of time, thus preserving the tissue weight of the lungs. Our approach is tested using a pair of volumetric lung datasets acquired at 15% and 85% of vital capacity (VC) in a single scanning session. The results show that the new SSTVD predicts a smaller registration error and also yields a better alignment of structures within the lungs than the normal SSD similarity measure. In addition, the regional ventilation derived from the new method exhibits a much more improved physiological pattern than that of SSD.

  2. Localized Ablation of Thyroid Tissue by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: an Alternative to Surgery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esnault, Olivier; Franc, Brigitte; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lacoste, Francois

    2006-05-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device to obtain a localised destruction of the thyroid with no damage to adjacent tissues. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The ewe model was used because its thyroid gland is easily accessible with ultrasound. The animals were anaesthetised with 10 mg / kg IV injection of Penthothal. The HIFU pulses were generated by a 3-MHz spherical transducer under ultrasound guidance. Macroscopic and microscopic tissue lesions were identified after formalin fixation of the anterior part of the ewe's neck. RESULTS: After determining the optimal instrument settings to obtain localized thyroid ablation, the repeatability of the method was evaluated using a HIFU prototype designed specifically for human use: in 13 ewes (26 treated lobes), an average of 20 (range: 14-27) ultrasound pulses (pulse duration: 3 s) per lobe covering a mean volume of 0.5 cm3 (range: 0.3-0.7 cm3) were delivered. The ewes were sacrificed 2-5 weeks after treatment delivery. No damage to the nerves, trachea, esophagus or muscle was observed. Only 3 ewes suffered superficial skin burns. The desired thyroid lesions were obtained in 25/26 treated lobes, as demonstrated by fibrotic tissues, which replaced necrotic areas. CONCLUSION: These results obtained in the ewe model show that thyroid lesions of defined volume can be induced safely and suggest that the HIFU device is now ready for human trials.

  3. Improved regulatory element prediction based on tissue-specific local epigenomic signatures

    PubMed Central

    He, Yupeng; Gorkin, David U.; Dickel, Diane E.; Nery, Joseph R.; Castanon, Rosa G.; Lee, Ah Young; Shen, Yin; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Ren, Bing; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate enhancer identification is critical for understanding the spatiotemporal transcriptional regulation during development as well as the functional impact of disease-related noncoding genetic variants. Computational methods have been developed to predict the genomic locations of active enhancers based on histone modifications, but the accuracy and resolution of these methods remain limited. Here, we present an algorithm, regulatory element prediction based on tissue-specific local epigenetic marks (REPTILE), which integrates histone modification and whole-genome cytosine DNA methylation profiles to identify the precise location of enhancers. We tested the ability of REPTILE to identify enhancers previously validated in reporter assays. Compared with existing methods, REPTILE shows consistently superior performance across diverse cell and tissue types, and the enhancer locations are significantly more refined. We show that, by incorporating base-resolution methylation data, REPTILE greatly improves upon current methods for annotation of enhancers across a variety of cell and tissue types. REPTILE is available at https://github.com/yupenghe/REPTILE/. PMID:28193886

  4. Ara12 subtilisin-like protease from Arabidopsis thaliana: purification, substrate specificity and tissue localization.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, John M U; Simpson, David J; Hyman, Stefan C; Ndimba, Bongani K; Slabas, Antoni R

    2003-02-15

    A C-terminal portion of Ara12 subtilisin-like protease (residues 542-757) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein bound to maltose binding protein. Polyclonal antisera raised against the expressed protein were used to examine the tissue specificity and subcellular localization of Ara12. The protease was found predominantly in the silique and stem of plants, but was hardly detectable in leaf and not seen in root tissue. The distribution observed using immunological techniques is different from that seen by an RNA analysis study, which demonstrated similar mRNA abundance in the stem and leaves. Using immunogold labelling, Ara12 was shown to have an extracellular localization and was found in the intercellular spaces in stem tissue. Ara12 protease was purified to homogeneity from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures by anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Proteolytic activity of Ara12 was inhibited by a number of serine protease inhibitors, but was almost unaffected by inhibitors of other catalytic classes of proteases. Optimal proteolytic activity was displayed under acidic conditions (pH 5.0). Ara12 activity was relatively thermostable and was stimulated in the presence of Ca2+ ions. Substrate specificity studies were conducted using a series of internally quenched fluorogenic peptide substrates. At the P1 position of substrates, hydrophobic residues, such as Phe and Ala, were preferred to Arg, whilst at the P1' position, Asp, Leu and Ala were most favoured. Possible functions of Ara12 are discussed in the light of the involvement of a number of plant subtilisin-like proteases in morphogenesis.

  5. Characterization of Aquaporin 4 Protein Expression and Localization in Tissues of the Dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Cutler, Christopher P; Harmon, Sheena; Walsh, Jonathon; Burch, Kia

    2012-01-01

    The role of aquaporin water channels such as aquaporin 4 (Aqp4) in elasmobranchs such as the dogfish Squalus acanthias is completely unknown. This investigation set out to determine the expression and cellular and sub-cellular localization of Aqp4 protein in dogfish tissues. Two polyclonal antibodies were generated (AQP4/1 and AQP4/2) and these showed somewhat different characteristics in Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Western blots using the AQP4/1 antibody showed two bands (35.5 and 49.5 kDa) in most tissues in a similar fashion to mammals. Liver had an additional band of 57 kDa and rectal gland two further faint bands of 37.5 and 38.5 kDa. However, unlike in mammals, Aqp4 protein was ubiquitously expressed in all tissues including gill and liver. The AQP4/2 antibody appeared much less specific in Western blots. Both antibodies were used in immunohistochemistry and showed similar cellular localizations, although the AQP4/2 antibody had a more restricted sub-cellular distribution compared to AQP4/1 and therefore appeared to be more specific for Aqp4. In kidney a sub-set of tubules were stained which may represent intermediate tubule segments (In-III-In-VI). AQP4/1 and AQP4/2 antibodies localized to the same tubules segments in serial sections although the intensity and sub-cellular distribution were different. AQP4/2 showed a basal or basolateral membrane distribution whereas AQP4/1 was often distributed throughout the whole cell including the nuclear region. In rectal gland and cardiac stomach Aqp4 was localized to secretory tubules but again AQP/1 and AQP/2 exhibited different sub-cellular distributions. In gill, both antibodies stained large cells in the primary filament and secondary lamellae. Again AQP4/1 antibody stained most or all the cell including the nucleus, whereas AQP4/2 had a plasma membrane or plasma membrane and cytoplasmic distribution. Two types of large mitochondrial rich transport cells are known to exist in elasmobranchs

  6. Salmon Thrombin as a Treatment to Attenuate Acute Pain and Promote Tissue Healing by Modulating Local Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    trauma and in association with the absence of pain . Early cleavage of PAR1 by thrombin may provide its anti- nociceptive properties. We were very...1-1002 TITLE: Salmon Thrombin as a Treatment to Attenuate Acute Pain and Promote Tissue Healing by Modulating Local Inflammation... Pain and 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Promote Tissue Healing by Modulating Local Inflammation 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-1002 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  7. Management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma after prior surgery and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Mylin A.; Ballo, Matthew T. . E-mail: mballo@mdanderson.org; Butler, Charles E.; Feig, Barry W.; Cormier, Janice N.; Lewis, Valerae O.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Pisters, Peter W.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome and treatment toxicity after wide local re-excision (WLE), with or without additional radiation therapy, for patients with isolated first local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcoma arising within a previously irradiated field. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 62 consecutive patients. All patients underwent prior resection and external beam radiation. For recurrent disease, 25 patients were treated with WLE alone, and 37 patients were treated with WLE and additional radiation (45- 64 Gy). In 33 patients, the radiation was delivered via an afterloaded brachytherapy, single-plane implant. Results: The 5-year disease specific and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 65% and 73%, respectively. Local control (LC) at 5 years was 51%, and on multivariate analysis, a positive surgical resection margin (p< 0.001) was associated with a lower rate of LC. Reirradiation was not associated with improved LC; however complications requiring outpatient or surgical management were more common in patients who had undergone reirradiation (80% vs. 17%, p < 0.001). Amputation was also more common in the subgroup of patients who underwent extremity reirradiation (35% with radiation vs. 11% without, p = 0.05), although only one amputation was performed to resolve a treatment complication. Conclusion: Conservative surgery alone results in LC in a minority of patients who have failed locally after previous excision and external beam radiation. Although selection biases and small patient numbers confound the analysis, local treatment intensification with additional radiation does not clearly improve outcome after surgical excision alone, and is associated with an increase in complications.

  8. Model assessment of individual tumor control rate and adverse effects in comparing locally advanced cervical cancer treatment using intracavitary with and without interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Keyur J; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Shankar, Viswanathan; Bodner, William; Garg, Madhur; Rivera, Amanda; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the modeled probability of tumor control and organ at risk toxicities in locally advanced cervical cancer in patients treated by external beam radiation plus brachytherapy using intracavitary combined with interstitial brachytherapy (IC/IS) vs. intracavitary brachytherapy (IC) alone. Material and methods Twenty cervical cancer patients with a mean HR-CTV volume of 47.4 cm3 and a mean width of 54 mm were planned with both IC/IS and IC brachytherapy alone. A probit model was utilized to model 3-year (3-yr) local control rate (LC), 3-yr cancer specific survival rate (CSS), and the adverse effect (AE) of the organ at risk by using a modeled data set from multiple institutions. Modeling results were used to estimate the LC, CSS, and AE of the treatments in this study. Results Using the IC/IS technique, an EQD2 increase of 12.3 Gy to D90 (from 76.1 Gy to 88.3 Gy) of HR-CTV is expected to increase 3-yr LC and 3-yr CSS by 12.5%, and 11.0%, respectively. Comparing IC/IS to IC alone, the expected G2+ AE were 7.7% vs. 7.9% for the bladder, and 5.9% vs. 6.8% for the rectum. Conclusions The IC/IS technique improved dose coverage to the HR-CTV without significantly increasing dose to 2 cm3 of the organ at risk (OAR) surrounding it. With different regimens of EBRT combined with BT, IC/IS can be used to increase the probability of LC and CSS, or decrease the risk of AE. PMID:28115959

  9. The novel antimicrobial peptide PXL150 in the local treatment of skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Myhrman, Emma; Håkansson, Joakim; Lindgren, Kerstin; Björn, Camilla; Sjöstrand, Veronika; Mahlapuu, Margit

    2013-04-01

    Dramatic increase in bacterial resistance towards conventional antibiotics emphasises the importance to identify novel, more potent antimicrobial therapies. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have emerged as a promising new group to be evaluated in therapeutic intervention of infectious diseases. Here we describe a novel AMP, PXL150, which demonstrates in vitro a broad spectrum microbicidal action against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including resistant strains. The potent microbicidal activity and broad antibacterial spectrum of PXL150 were not associated with any hemolytic activity. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) failed to develop resistance towards PXL150 during continued selection pressure. PXL150 caused a rapid depolarisation of cytoplasmic membrane of S. aureus, and dissipating membrane potential is likely one mechanism for PXL150 to kill its target bacteria. Studies in human cell lines indicated that PXL150 has anti-inflammatory properties, which might be of additional benefit. PXL150 demonstrated pronounced anti-infectious effect in an in vivo model of full thickness wounds infected with MRSA in rats and in an ex vivo model of pig skin infected with S. aureus. Subcutaneous or topical application of the peptide in rats did not lead to any adverse reactions. In conclusion, PXL150 may constitute a new therapeutic alternative for local treatment of infections, and further studies are warranted to evaluate the applicability of this AMP in clinical settings.

  10. PARAMETRIC STUDY OF TISSUE OPTICAL CLEARING BY LOCALIZED MECHANICAL COMPRESSION USING COMBINED FINITE ELEMENT AND MONTE CARLO SIMULATION.

    PubMed

    Vogt, William C; Shen, Haiou; Wang, Ge; Rylander, Christopher G

    2010-07-01

    Tissue Optical Clearing Devices (TOCDs) have been shown to increase light transmission through mechanically compressed regions of naturally turbid biological tissues. We hypothesize that zones of high compressive strain induced by TOCD pins produce localized water displacement and reversible changes in tissue optical properties. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel combined mechanical finite element model and optical Monte Carlo model which simulates TOCD pin compression of an ex vivo porcine skin sample and modified spatial photon fluence distributions within the tissue. Results of this simulation qualitatively suggest that light transmission through the skin can be significantly affected by changes in compressed tissue geometry as well as concurrent changes in tissue optical properties. The development of a comprehensive multi-domain model of TOCD application to tissues such as skin could ultimately be used as a framework for optimizing future design of TOCDs.

  11. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging: Characterizing the mechanical properties of tissues using their transient response to localized force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Congdon, Amy N.; Frinkely, Kristin D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2004-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging utilizes brief, high energy, focused acoustic pulses to generate radiation force in tissue, and conventional diagnostic ultrasound methods to detect the resulting tissue displacements in order to image the relative mechanical properties of tissue. The magnitude and spatial extent of the applied force is dependent upon the transmit beam parameters and the tissue attenuation. Forcing volumes are on the order of 5 mm3, pulse durations are less than 1 ms, and tissue displacements are typically several microns. Images of tissue displacement reflect local tissue stiffness, with softer tissues (e.g., fat) displacing farther than stiffer tissues (e.g., muscle). Parametric images of maximum displacement, time to peak displacement, and recovery time provide information about tissue material properties and structure. In both in vivo and ex vivo data, structures shown in matched B-mode images are in good agreement with those shown in ARFI images, with comparable resolution. Potential clinical applications under investigation include soft tissue lesion characterization, assessment of focal atherosclerosis, and imaging of thermal lesion formation during tissue ablation procedures. Results from ongoing studies will be presented. [Work supported by NIH Grant R01 EB002132-03, and the Whitaker Foundation. System support from Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.

  12. Unstable spiral waves and local Euclidean symmetry in a model of cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Christopher D.; Grigoriev, Roman O.

    2015-06-15

    This paper investigates the properties of unstable single-spiral wave solutions arising in the Karma model of two-dimensional cardiac tissue. In particular, we discuss how such solutions can be computed numerically on domains of arbitrary shape and study how their stability, rotational frequency, and spatial drift depend on the size of the domain as well as the position of the spiral core with respect to the boundaries. We also discuss how the breaking of local Euclidean symmetry due to finite size effects as well as the spatial discretization of the model is reflected in the structure and dynamics of spiral waves. This analysis allows identification of a self-sustaining process responsible for maintaining the state of spiral chaos featuring multiple interacting spirals.

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in endometrial tissue of women with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Tohid; Ghaffari Novin, Marefat; Pakravesh, Jalil; Foghi, Khadijeh; Fadayi, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Gelareh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule that incorporates in many physiological processes of female reproductive system. Recent studies suggested the possible role of endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) enzyme in female infertility. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in endometrial tissue of women with unexplained infertility. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study a total of 18 endometrial tissues obtained from 10 women with unexplained infertility and 8 normal and fertile women by endometrial biopsy, 6 to 10 days after LH surge. Specimens were fixed in 4% paraformaldhyde fixative and frozen sectioned for semi-quantitative immunohistochemical evaluation using monoclonal anti-human eNOS antibody. Hematoxilin and Eosin was used for Histological dating. Results: Localization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase was seen in glandular and luminal epithelium, vascular endothelium and stroma in both fertile women and women with unexplained infertility. Although there were differences in immunoreactivity of glandular epithelium (p=0.44), vascular endothelium (p=0.60) and stroma (p=0.63) but only over-expression of eNOS in luminal epithelium (p=0.045) of women with unexplained infertility compared to fertile women was statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study suggests that changes in luminal expression of eNOS may influence receptivity of endometrium. PMID:25242984

  14. Improved immunoelectron microscopic method for localizing cytoskeletal proteins in Lowicryl K4M embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Loesser, K E; Doane, K J; Wilson, F J; Roisen, F J; Malamed, S

    1986-11-01

    We have modified the Lowicryl K4M low-temperature dehydration and embedding procedure for immunoelectron microscopy to provide improved ultrastructural detail and facilitate the localization of actin and tubulin in isolated rat adrenocortical cells, chick spinal cord with attached dorsal root ganglia (SC-DRG), and cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Cells and tissues were fixed for immunocytochemistry either in a mixture of 2% paraformaldehyde and 0.25% glutaraldehyde (0.1 M PIPES buffer, pH 7.3) or in a mixture of 0.3% glutaraldehyde and 1.0% ethyldimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide (0.1 M phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.3). Dehydration was in ethanol at progressively lower temperatures to -35 degrees C. Infiltration at -35 degrees C was followed by ultraviolet polymerization at -20 degrees C. Comparable samples were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in Epon 812 or Epon-Araldite. Post-embedding immunostaining of thin sections utilized commercially available monoclonal antibodies to tubulin and actin followed by the protein A-gold technique (Roth et al., Endocrinology 108:247, 1981). Actin immunoreactivity was observed at the periphery of mitochondria and between mitochondria and lipid droplets in rat adrenocortical cells and at the periphery of neuronal cell processes of SC-DRG. Tubulin immunoreactivity was associated with microtubules throughout neurites of cultured DRG. Our modified technique allows preservation of ultrastructural details as well as localization of antigens by immunoelectron microscopy.

  15. When incentives work too well: locally implemented pay for performance (P4P) and adverse sanctions towards home birth in Tanzania - a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite limited evidence of its effectiveness, performance-based payments (P4P) are seen by leading policymakers as a potential solution to the slow progress in reaching Millennium Development Goal 5: improved maternal health. This paper offers insights into two of the aspects that are lacking in the current literature on P4P, namely what strategies health workers employ to reach set targets, and how the intervention plays out when implemented by local government as part of a national programme that does not receive donor funding. Methods A total of 28 in-depth interviews (IDIs) with 25 individuals were conducted in Mvomero district over a period of 15 months in 2010 and 2011, both before and after P4P payments. Seven facilities, including six dispensaries and one health centre, were covered. Informants included 17 nurses, three clinical officers, two medical attendants, one lab technician and two district health administrators. Results Health workers reported a number of strategies to increase the number of deliveries at their facility, including health education and cooperation with traditional health providers. The staff at all facilities also reported that they had told the women that they would be sanctioned if they gave birth at home, such as being fined or denied clinical cards and/or vaccinations for their babies. There is a great uncertainty in relation to the potential health impacts of the behavioural changes that have come with P4P, as the reported strategies may increase the numbers, but not necessarily the quality. Contrary to the design of the P4P programme, payments were not based on performance. We argue that this was due in part to a lack of resources within the District Administration, and in part as a result of egalitarian fairness principles. Conclusions Our results suggest that particular attention should be paid to adverse effects when using external rewards for improved health outcomes, and secondly, that P4P may take on a

  16. Localized Orbital Mucosa-Associated Lymphoma Tissue Lymphoma Managed With Primary Radiation Therapy: Efficacy and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Jayant Sastri; Le, Lisa W.; Lapperriere, Normand J.; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Payne, David; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Sun, Alexander; Simpson, Rand; Tsang, Richard W.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and late effects of radiation therapy (RT) in localized primary orbital mucosa-associated lymphoma tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POML). Methods and Materials: From 1989 to 2007, 89 patients with Stage IE POML received RT. The median age was 56 years old. Sites involved conjunctiva (59 patients [66%]), lacrimal gland (20 patients [23%]), and soft tissue (10 patients [11%]). Megavoltage beam(s) was used in 91%, electrons in 7%, and orthovoltage in 2% of cases. The dose given was 25 Gy in 97% and 30 Gy in 3% of patients. Lens shielding was possible in 57% of patients. Results: The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Complete response or unconfirmed complete response was seen in 88 patients (99%). Relapse occurred in 22 patients (25%). First relapse sites were local (2 patients [9%]), in the contralateral orbit (5 patients [23%]), and distant (15 patients [68%]). The 7-year overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and local control (LC) rates were 91%, 96%, 64%, and 97%, respectively. Radiation-related late sequelae were documented in 40 patients (45%). Cataracts were observed in 22 patients (Grade 1 in 2 patients; Grade 3 in 20 patients). The incidence of Grade 3 cataract at 7 years was 25%. Other late sequelae (n = 28) were dry eye(s) (22 patients [Grade 1 in 14 patients; Grade 2 in 2 patients; Grade 3 in 2 patients; n/s in 4 patients), keratitis (3 patients), macular degeneration/cystoid edema (2 patients), and vitreous detachment (1 patient). Five patients developed Grade 3 noncataract late effects. Lens shielding reduced the incidence of Grade 3 cataract and all Grade {>=}2 late sequelae. Seventeen patients (16 with cataracts) underwent surgery; 23 patients were treated conservatively. The outcome for managing late effects was generally successful, with 30 patients completely improved, and 9 patients with persisting late sequelae (10%). Conclusions: POML responds favorably to moderate doses

  17. THE LOCALIZATION OF HOMOLGOUS PLASMA PROTEINS IN THE TISSUES OF YOUNG HUMAN BEINGS AS DEMONSTRATED WITH FLUORESCENT ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, David; Landing, Benjamin H.; Whipple, Ann

    1953-01-01

    Employing fluorescent antibodies for the detection of homologous plasma proteins in tissue sections, the distribution of plasma albumin, γ-globulin, β-lipoprotein, β1-metal-combining globulin, and fibrinogen has been studied in the tissues of infants and children. Plasma albumin, γ-globulin, and β1-metal-combining globulin were found in many cells and particularly cell nuclei, connective tissues and interstitial spaces, lymphatics, and blood vessels. β-Lipoprotein was found mostly in the nuclei of all cell types while fibrinogen was restricted largely to the lymphatic and vascular channels, connective tissues and the interstitial spaces. The widespread distribution of these plasma proteins in cells and connective tissues indicates the magnitude of the extravascular plasma protein pool which is in equilibrium with circulating plasma. Unfortunately, these results do not permit accurate localization of the sites of production of these plasma proteins, but do give some idea of their intimate relationship to the tissues. PMID:13022871

  18. Effects of local alpha2-adrenergic receptor blockade on adipose tissue lipolysis during prolonged systemic adrenaline infusion in normal man.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Lene; Enevoldsen, Lotte H; Stallknecht, Bente; Bülow, Jens

    2008-03-01

    During prolonged adrenaline infusion, lipolysis peaks within 30 min and thereafter tends to decline, and we hypothesized that the stimulation of local adipose tissue alpha2-adrenergic receptors accounts for this decline. The lipolytic effect of a prolonged intravenous adrenaline infusion combined with local infusion of the alpha2-blocker phentolamine in superficial and deep abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and in preperitoneal adipose tissue was studied in seven healthy subjects. The interstitial glycerol concentration in the three adipose tissue depots was measured by the microdialysis method. Regional adipose tissue blood flow was measured by the (133)Xe clearance technique. Regional glycerol output (lipolytic rate) was calculated from these measurements and simultaneous measurements of arterial glycerol concentrations. Adrenaline infusion increased lipolysis in all three depots (data previously published). Phentolamine infusion did not augment lipolysis in the subcutaneous depots while it increased the lipolytic rate in the preperitoneal depot. It is concluded that alpha2-adrenergic receptors do not have a significant effect on subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis during high circulating adrenaline concentrations, and the decrease in lipolysis in subcutaneous adipose tissue under prolonged adrenaline stimulation is thus not attributed to alpha2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of lipolysis. However, in the preperitoneal adipose tissue depot, alpha2-adrenergic receptor tone plays a role for the lipolytic rate obtained during prolonged adrenaline stimulation.

  19. Tissue Localization of a Submergence-Induced 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylic Acid Synthase in Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhongyi; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Rouan, Dominique; Michiels, Frank; Van Montagu, Marc; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    At least two 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase genes (ACS) are implicated in the submergence response of rice (Oryza sativa). Previously, the OS-ACS5 gene has been shown to be induced during short- as well as long-term complete submergence of seedlings and to be controlled by a balance of gibberellin and abscisic acid in both lowland and deepwater rice. This study demonstrates that OS-ACS5 mRNA is localized in specific tissues and cells both during normal development and in response to complete submergence. The temporal and spatial regulation of OS-ACS5 expression is presented by in situ hybridization and histochemical analysis of β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic rice carrying an OS-ACS5-gus fusion. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that in air-grown rice seedlings, OS-ACS5 was expressed at a low level in the shoot apex, meristems, leaf, and adventitious root primordia, and in vascular tissues of nonelongated stems and leaf sheaths. In response to complete submergence, the expression in vascular bundles of young stems and leaf sheaths was strongly induced. The results of histochemical GUS assays were consistent with those found by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Our findings suggest that OS-ACS5 plays a role in vegetative growth of rice under normal conditions and is also recruited for enhanced growth upon complete submergence. The possible implication of OS-ACS5 in root-shoot communication during submergence stress and its putative role in aerenchyma formation upon low-oxygen stress are discussed. PMID:12011339

  20. Extracellular localization of galectin-3 has a deleterious role in joint tissues.

    PubMed

    Janelle-Montcalm, Audrée; Boileau, Christelle; Poirier, Françoise; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Guévremont, Mélanie; Duval, Nicolas; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reboul, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    In this study we examine the extracellular role of galectin-3 (gal-3) in joint tissues. Following intra-articular injection of gal-3 or vehicle in knee joints of mice, histological evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone was performed. Further studies were then performed using human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes and subchondral bone osteoblasts, in which the effect of gal-3 (0 to 10 microg/ml) was analyzed. Osteoblasts were incubated in the presence of vitamin D3 (50 nM), which is an inducer of osteocalcin, encoded by an osteoblast terminal differentiation gene. Genes of interest mainly expressed in either chondrocytes or osteoblasts were analyzed with real-time RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays. Signalling pathways regulating osteocalcin were analyzed in the presence of gal-3. Intra-articular injection of gal-3 induced knee swelling and lesions in both cartilage and subchondral bone. On human OA chondrocytes, gal-3 at 1 microg/ml stimulated ADAMTS-5 expression in chondrocytes and, at higher concentrations (5 and 10 microg/ml), matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression. Experiments performed with osteoblasts showed a weak but bipolar effect on alkaline phosphatase expression: stimulation at 1 microg/ml or inhibition at 10 microg/ml. In the absence of vitamin D3, type I collagen alpha 1 chain expression was inhibited by 10 microg/ml of gal-3. The vitamin D3 induced osteocalcin was strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of gal-3, at both the mRNA and protein levels. This inhibition was mainly mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase. These findings indicate that high levels of extracellular gal-3, which could be encountered locally during the inflammatory process, have deleterious effects in both cartilage and subchondral bone tissues.

  1. [Frequency, etiology, localization and surgical treatment of war injuries with tissue defects].

    PubMed

    Jevtović, D; Pantelić, B; Kozarski, J; Novaković, M; Piscević, B; Milović, B; Gacević, M

    2000-01-01

    The retrospective analysis of 1,514 cases treated at the Clinic for Plastic Surgery and Burns of the Military Medical Academy in the period between 1991 and 1995, established that the percentage of the injuries caused by gunshots and those caused by explosives during the conflict in former Yugoslavia, was more or less the same. The injuries caused by gunshot more often occurred on the head, neck, arms and trunk. The injuries of the legs caused by the explosives were more frequent, and they occurred in 83% of the cases. All the plastic surgeons who took part in the treatment of patients and in preparing the surgeons of other specialties for the treatment applied the original classification of the war injuries according to the structure of the defects that had occurred, to standardize the approach to the planning of treatment and the treatment itself of the wounded. In the delayed primary or secondary treatment of the injuries with the tissue defects all known plastic and reconstructive methods were applied. In the cases requiring the covering of the the tissue defect with the full thickness skin, local skin, fasciocutaneous, fascioadipose or muscle flap was chosen. Distant pedicled direct flaps were used in cases when it was not possible to use a more suitable reconstructive method. Free skin, myocutaneous or complex microvascular flaps were applied in cases of more extensive defects or if a more suitable solution could not be found. Our experience in surgical treatment of war injuries with skin defects during the civil war in former Yugoslavia has shown that over 50% of all the injured patients required the treatment of a plastic surgeon in a definite surgical treatment of a war injury. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary in the majority of the injured, and the surgical team is composed according to the affected area and the extent of the injury.

  2. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  3. Laser-optical method of visualization the local net of tissue blood vessels and its biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, M. M.; Asimov, R. M.; Rubinov, A. N.

    2007-06-01

    New approach in laser-optical diagnostic methods of cell metabolism based on visualization the local net of tissue blood vessels is proposed. Optical model of laser - tissue interaction and algorithm of mathematical calculation of optical signals is developed. Novel technology of local tissue hypoxia elimination based on laser-induced photodissosiation of oxyhemoglobin in cutaneous blood vessels is developed. Method of determination of oxygen diffusion coefficient into tissue on the base of kinetics of tissue oxygenation TcPO II under the laser irradiation is proposed. The results of mathematical modeling the kinetic of oxygen distribution into tissue from arterial blood are presented. The possibility of calculation and determination of the level of TcPO II in zones with the disturbed blood microcirculation is demonstrated. The increase of the value of oxygen release rate more than for times under the irradiation by laser light is obtained. It is shown that the efficiency of laser-induced oxygenation by means of increasing oxygen concentration in blood plasma is comparable with the method of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) at the same time gaining advantages in local action. Different biomedical applications of developing method are discussed.

  4. Wild blueberry consumption attenuates local inflammation in the perivascular adipose tissue of obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Vendrame, Stefano; Tsakiroglou, Panagiotis; Kristo, Aleksandra S; Schuschke, Dale A; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy

    2016-10-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) has been shown to play important roles in regulating vascular tone and linking local and systemic vascular inflammation. We examined the impact of PVAT on phenylephrine-mediated vasoconstriction in the aorta of obese Zucker rats (OZR) and their lean littermates (LZR) by comparing aortic rings with or without PVAT. Subsequently we placed OZR and LZR on a control (C) or an 8% wild blueberry (WB) diet and evaluated the effect of WB consumption on such response. PVAT-released adipokine concentrations were also measured as a function of WB diet. Maximal constrictor force (Fmax) in aortic rings without PVAT was significantly lower in OZR-C compared with LZR-C (0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.71 ± 0.06 g, respectively). Following WB diet, Fmax significantly increased in OZR (0.54 ± 0.06 g). In aortas with intact PVAT, Fmax was significantly lower in all groups (0.31 ± 0.06 OZR-C, 0.30 ± 0.05 OZR-WB, 0.29 ± 0.03 LZR-C, and 0.30 ± 0.04 g LZR-WB), but no difference was observed between treatments. PVAT concentrations of monocyte chemoactractant protein 1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and adiponectin were significantly higher in OZR compared with LZR (+102%, +108%, and +45%, respectively). Following WB diet, PVAT concentrations of interleukin-8 were significantly lower in both OZR (-37%) and LZR (-30%), while adiponectin concentrations significantly increased in both OZR (+11%) and LZR (+16%). MCP-1 concentrations significantly decreased (-31%) in the PVAT of OZR with the WB diet. WB consumption appears to attenuate local inflammation in PVAT, which may impact systemic vascular inflammation and endothelial function.

  5. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Natalia P.; dos Reis Neto, Edgard Torres; Soares, Maria Roberta M. P.; Freitas, Daniele S.; Porro, Adriana; Ciconelli, Rozana M.; Pinheiro, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years) were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%), parasitic (23.5%), fungal (20.6%) and viral (8.8%) agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab. PMID:24141833

  6. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    PubMed Central

    Andreoni, D.

    2016-01-01

    Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to replace the missing bone, allowing for a prosthetic driven implant placement. Soft tissues deficiency was corrected by means of a combined epithelialized and subepithelial connective tissue graft. The 3-year clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated symmetric gingival levels of the upper canines, with physiological peri-implant probing depths and bone loss. Thus, the use of autogenous tissues combined with biomaterials might be considered a reliable technique in case of highly aesthetic demanding cases. PMID:27738534

  7. MRI tissue classification and bias field estimation based on coherent local intensity clustering: a unified energy minimization framework.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunming; Xu, Chenyang; Anderson, Adam W; Gore, John C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new energy minimization method for simultaneous tissue classification and bias field estimation of magnetic resonance (MR) images. We first derive an important characteristic of local image intensities--the intensities of different tissues within a neighborhood form separable clusters, and the center of each cluster can be well approximated by the product of the bias within the neighborhood and a tissue-dependent constant. We then introduce a coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) criterion function as a metric to evaluate tissue classification and bias field estimation. An integration of this metric defines an energy on a bias field, membership functions of the tissues, and the parameters that approximate the true signal from the corresponding tissues. Thus, tissue classification and bias field estimation are simultaneously achieved by minimizing this energy. The smoothness of the derived optimal bias field is ensured by the spatially coherent nature of the CLIC criterion function. As a result, no extra effort is needed to smooth the bias field in our method. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is robust to the choice of initial conditions, thereby allowing fully automatic applications. Our algorithm has been applied to high field and ultra high field MR images with promising results.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus-Associated Skin and Soft Tissue Infections: Anatomical Localization, Epidemiology, Therapy and Potential Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Olaniyi, Reuben; Pozzi, Clarissa; Grimaldi, Luca; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2016-10-16

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are among the most common infections worldwide. They range in severity from minor, self-limiting, superficial infections to life-threatening diseases requiring all the resources of modern medicine. Community (CA) and healthcare (HA) acquired SSTIs are most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus . They have variable presentations ranging from impetigo and folliculitis to surgical site infections (SSIs). Superficial SSTIs may lead to even more invasive infections such as bacteraemia and osteomyelitis. Here we describe the anatomical localization of the different SSTI associated with S. aureus, the virulence factors known to play a role in these infections, and their current epidemiology. Current prevention and treatment strategies are also discussed. Global epidemiological data show increasing incidence and severity of SSTIs in association with methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA). CA-SSTIs are usually less morbid compared to other invasive infections caused by S. aureus, but they have become the most prevalent, requiring a great number of medical interventions, extensive antibiotic use, and therefore a high cost burden. Recurrence of SSTIs is common after initial successful treatment, and decolonization strategies have not been effective in reducing recurrence. Furthermore, decolonization approaches may be contributing to the selection and maintenance of multi-drug resistant strains. Clinical studies from the early 1900s and novel autovaccination approaches suggest an alternative strategy with potential effectiveness: using vaccines to control S. aureus cutaneous infections.

  9. Immunohistochemical localization of human and simian immunodeficiency viral antigens in fixed tissue sections.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Baskin, G. B.; Benveniste, R.; Harris, C. A.; Nara, P. L.; Rhodes, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    Antigens of human (HIV) or simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV) were identified with polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies and avidin-biotin complex (ABC) immunohistochemistry in fixed surgical pathology and autopsy specimens of humans or monkeys with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. With B-5 fixative, viral antigens were readily detected in lymph nodes of 8 of 13 patients with follicular hyperplasia, but in only 1 of 12 patients with follicular atrophy. Antigen was detected in follicular dendritic reticular cells and rare blastlike cells, extracellularly, and in postcapillary venules, medullary lymphocytes, sinus histiocytes, and macrophages in some lymph nodes. In the brain at autopsy, antigen could be found in gliomesenchymal-cell nodules, astrocytes, vascular endothelial cells, multinucleated cells, and astrocytes and macrophages associated with demyelination. In contrast, 4 rhesus monkeys with experimental SIV infection had abundant antigen in sinus histiocytes, macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells of lymph nodes and spleen and in thymic epithelial cells. Brain lesions of monkeys resembled those of humans, with antigen found in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Antibodies to HIV also were immunoreactive in formalin-fixed tissue sections of monkeys containing SIV antigens. The ABC technique provided a fast and efficient method for localizing HIV and SIV antigens in fixed surgical and autopsy specimens. These findings are consistent with those found with in situ hybridization, ultrastructural studies, frozen sections of lymph nodes, and permanent sections of brain. Images Figure 1 p[201]-b p[201]-c Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:3472469

  10. Local electronic structure and nanolevel hierarchical organization of bone tissue: theory and NEXAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlychev, A. A.; Avrunin, A. S.; Vinogradov, A. S.; Filatova, E. O.; Doctorov, A. A.; Krivosenko, Yu S.; Samoilenko, D. O.; Svirskiy, G. I.; Konashuk, A. S.; Rostov, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of native bone are carried out to understand relationships between its hierarchical organization and local electronic and atomic structure of the mineralized phase. The 3D superlattice model of a coplanar assembly of the hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocrystallites separated by the hydrated nanolayers is introduced to account the interplay of short-, long- and super-range order parameters in bone tissue. The model is applied to (i) predict and rationalize the HAP-to-bone spectral changes in the electronic structure and (ii) describe the mechanisms ensuring the link of the hierarchical organization with the electronic structure of the mineralized phase in bone. To check the predictions the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) at the Ca 2p, P 2p and O 1s thresholds is measured for native bone and compared with NEXAFS for reference compounds. The NEXAFS analysis has demonstrated the essential hierarchy induced HAP-to-bone red shifts of the Ca and P 2p-to-valence transitions. The lowest O 1s excitation line at 532.2 eV in bone is assigned with superposition of core transitions in the hydroxide OH-(H2O) m anions, Ca2+(H2O) n cations, the carboxyl groups inside the collagen and [PO4]2- and [PO4]- anions with unsaturated P-O bonds.

  11. Analytical and numerical quantification and comparison of the local electric field in the tissue for different electrode configurations

    PubMed Central

    Čorović, Selma; Pavlin, Mojca; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2007-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy and gene electrotransfer are novel promising treatments employing locally applied high electric pulses to introduce chemotherapeutic drugs into tumor cells or genes into target cells based on the cell membrane electroporation. The main focus of this paper was to calculate analytically and numerically local electric field distribution inside the treated tissue in two dimensional (2D) models for different plate and needle electrode configurations and to compare the local electric field distribution to parameter U/d, which is widely used in electrochemotherapy and gene electrotransfer studies. We demonstrate the importance of evaluating the local electric field distribution in electrochemotherapy and gene electrotransfer. Methods We analytically and numerically analyze electric field distribution based on 2D models for electrodes and electrode configurations which are most widely used in electrochemotherapy and gene electrotransfer. Analytical calculations were performed by solving the Laplace equation and numerical calculations by means of finite element method in two dimensions. Results We determine the minimal and maximal E inside the target tissue as well as the maximal E over the entire treated tissue for the given electrode configurations. By comparing the local electric field distribution calculated for different electrode configurations to the ratio U/d, we show that the parameter U/d can differ significantly from the actual calculated values of the local electric field inside the treated tissue. By calculating the needed voltage to obtain E > U/d inside the target tissue, we showed that better electric field distribution can be obtained by increasing the number and changing the arrangement of the electrodes. Conclusion Based on our analytical and numerical models of the local electric field distribution we show that the applied voltage, configuration of the electrodes and electrode position need to be chosen specifically for

  12. AZD0530 in Treating Patients With Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  13. Expression pattern and localization of beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase in different tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, A; Wirtz, G M; Woggon, W D; Brugger, R; Wyss, M; Friedlein, A; Riss, G; Bachmann, H; Hunziker, W

    2001-01-01

    Beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase cleaves beta,beta-carotene into two molecules of retinal, and is the key enzyme in the metabolism of beta,beta-carotene to vitamin A. The enzyme has been known for more than 40 years, yet all attempts to purify the protein to homogeneity have failed. Recently, the successful cloning and sequencing of an enzyme with beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase activity from chicken, as well as from Drosophila, has been reported. Here, we describe in detail our attempt to enrich the chicken beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase to such an extent as to allow determination of partial amino acid sequences, which were then used to design degenerate oligonucleotides. Screening of a chicken duodenal expression library yielded a full-length clone containing a coding sequence of 1578 bp. Functional expression in Escherichia coli and in eukaryotic cell lines confirmed that we had cloned the first vertebrate dioxygenase that cleaves beta,beta-carotene at the central 15,15'-double bond. By performing a sequence homology search, the cDNA sequence of the mouse homologue was found as an expressed sequence tag (EST) in the gene bank. At the amino-acid level, the degree of homology between the chicken and mouse sequences is 81%. Thus beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase can be considered as being an enzyme that is evolutionarily rather well conserved. We established the expression pattern of beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase in chicken and mouse tissues with a combination of Northern blots and in situ hybridization. The mRNA for beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase was localized primarily in duodenal villi, as well as in liver and in tubular structures of lung and kidney. These new findings demonstrate that beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase is also expressed in epithelial structures, where it serves to provide the tissue-specific vitamin A supply. PMID:11237856

  14. A Localized In-Situ Hydrogel-Mediated Protein Digestion and Extraction Technique For On-Tissue Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Glenn A.; Nicklay, Joshua J.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    A simultaneous on-tissue proteolytic digestion and extraction method is described for the in-situ analysis of proteins from spatially distinct areas of a tissue section. The digestion occurs on-tissue within a hydrogel network, and peptides extracted from this gel are identified with liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS). The hydrogels are compatible with solubility agents (e.g. chaotropes and detergents) known to improve enzymatic digestion of proteins. Additionally, digestions and extractions are compatible with Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) experiments. As an example application, an initial IMS experiment was conducted to profile lipid species using a traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometer. On-tissue MS/MS was also performed on the same tissue section to identify lipid ions that showed spatial differences. Subsequently, the section underwent an on-tissue hydrogel digestion to reveal 96 proteins that co-localized to the rat brain cerebellum. Hematoxylin and Eosin (H & E) staining was then performed to provide additional histological information about the tissue structure. This technology provides a versatile workflow that can be used to correlate multiple complementary analytical approaches in the analysis of a single tissue section. PMID:23402265

  15. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  16. Role of lymphotoxin and homeostatic chemokines in the development and function of local lymphoid tissues in the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Carragher, Damian; Randall, Troy D

    2007-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs are strategically placed to recruit locally activated antigen presenting cells (APCs) as well as naïve, recirculating T and B cells. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs - separated B and T zones, populations of specialized stromal cells, high endothelial venules and lymphatic vessles - has also evolved to maximize encounters between APCs and lymphocytes and to facilitate the expansion and differentiation of antigen-stimulated T and B cells. Many of the general mechanisms that govern the development and organization of secondary lymphoid organs have been identified over the last decade. However, the specific cellular and molecular interactions involved in the development and organization of each secondary lymphoid organ are slightly different and probably reflect the cell types available at that time and location. Here we review the mechanisms involved in the development, organization and function of local lymphoid tissues in the respiratory tract, including Nasal Associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT) and inducible Bronchus Associated Lymphoid Tissue (iBALT).

  17. The role of acetone in the [omim][BF4]-mediated adverse effects on tissues of mussels, human lymphocytes and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Goutas, Andreas; Karyda, Anna; Efthimiou, Ioanna; Antonopoulou, Maria; Drosopoulou, Elena; Vlastos, Dimitrios; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Dailianis, Stefanos

    2017-03-24

    The present study investigated [omim][BF4]-mediated adverse effects on biological models widely used in toxicological studies. Specifically, mussels of the genus Mytilus, human lymphocytes and fruit flies of the species Drosophila melanogaster, were exposed to [omim][BF4] at concentrations ranging from micro- to milligrams per liter, with or without the presence of acetone as a carrier solvent and thereafter [omim][BF4]-mediated adverse effects were analyzed appropriately (stress indices, such as lipid peroxidation byproducts, acetylcholinesterase/AChE activity and micronucleus/MN formation frequency, in mussel gills, Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus/CBMN assay and SMART test in human lymphocytes and fruit flies respectively). LC-MS-TOF analysis was also performed for elucidating [omim][BF4] mode of action in the presence of the carrier solvent. The results showed the toxic potential of [omim][BF4], as well as acetone's ability to attenuate [omim][BF4]-mediated toxicity in almost all cases, probably due to the significant effect of acetone on the hydrophilic-lipophilic character and the viscosity of [omim][BF4], as well as its interaction and permeability on the cell membranes. The slight involvement of acetone in the attenuation of [omim][BF4]-mediated genotoxic effects on D. melanogaster could be due to species feeding experimental conditions, thus favoring the induction of antioxidant defense system against the [omim][BF4]-mediated effects in all cases.

  18. THE ULTRASTRUCTURAL LOCALIZATION OF THE ISOZYMES OF ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE IN MURINE TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitriou, J. M.; Van Duijn, P.

    1970-01-01

    Two isozymes of aspartate aminotransferase have been demonstrated biochemically. One isozyme is found in the mitochondrial fraction of the cytoplasm, the other ("soluble") in the supernatant. Both isozymes can be demonstrated by the cytochemical technique of Lee and Torack, as reported in the preceding report. Aldehyde fixation rapidly inactivates both isozymes, especially the soluble one. Inactivation can be delayed by addition of ketoglutarate to the fixative. The ketoglutarate probably competes with the fixative for the active site of the enzyme, thus protecting that region of the molecule. This enables adequate tissue preservation with enough remaining enzymatic activity to be demonstrated by the precipitation of oxaloacetate as the lead salt from a medium containing α-ketoglutaric acid aspartic acid, and lead nitrate. Electron-opaque material was found not only in mitochondria but, as the result of substrate protection, on the plasma membranes of many cells including erythrocytes and bacteria, the limiting membrane of peroxisomes, and the transverse tubular system of striated muscle. Occasional centrioles, neurotubules, tubules in the tails of spermatozoa, the A-I band junction in myofibrils of striated muscle, and the ground substance between cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum in intestinal goblet cells also showed precipitate. In all cases, replacement of L-aspartic acid by D-aspartic acid in the medium resulted in unstained sections. The sensitivity of extramitochondrial sites to fixation, the need of ketoglutarate as an agent for protecting the enzymatic activity during the fixation process, and the known presence of only soluble isozyme in erythrocytes indicate that enzymatic activity at these sites can be attributed to the soluble isozyme. Localization of the soluble isozyme on the plasma membrane may be related to possible involvement in depolarization phenomena, amino acid transport, or synthesis of plasma membrane-bound mucopolysaccharides. PMID

  19. Capillary transport of H2 gas generated locally in renal tissue.

    PubMed

    Kirkebø, A; Oien, A H; Aukland, K

    1983-01-01

    Previous measurements by microspheres have shown a higher blood flow in outer cortex and a lower blood flow in inner cortex than found by diffusible tracers. During vasodilation microspheres have indicated a disproportionate increase in deep cortical blood flow, whereas diffusible tracer distributions remained unchanged. These discrepancies could possibly be explained by a variable net inward transport of diffusible tracers in postglomerular vessels, the transport existing in control, but disappearing during vasodilation. To test this hypothesis H2 gas was produced electrolytically for 1 s at a platinum electrode in midcortex and the resulting gas concentration curve measured polarographically at two electrodes placed above and below the source. Analysis of a mathematical model showed that the ratio of the curve maxima at the two electrodes (Cmo/Cmi) would best reveal a radial net transport. Average Cmo/Cmi at 25 positions in 7 clamped dog kidneys was close to unity, but rose to 1.24 at control flow. During acetylcholine infusion Cmo/Cmi rose to 1.68. Local washout rates at the two electrodes increased equally. Calculations indicated a small outwardly directed net transport in control (3 X 10(-4) cm/s), becoming slightly reinforced during vasodilation (5 X 10(-4) cm/s). Thus the control transport direction is opposite to the hypothesis, and the change during vasodilation was estimated to be too small to explain the disparity between diffusible tracer uptake and microsphere distribution in control. H2 concentration maximum was obtained earlier under control flow than in the clamped kidney, indicating an increase in apparent D of the gas in tissue from 3 X 10(-5) cm2/s to 5 X 10(-5) cm2/s, probably due to mixing of H2 gas in the capillary net work.

  20. A hemolysis study of an intravascular blood cooling system for localized organ tissue cooling.

    PubMed

    Merrill, T L; Mingin, T; Merrill, D R; Botbyl, J; Akers, J E

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia can reduce both ischemic and reperfusion injury arising after strokes and heart attacks. New localized organ cooling systems offer a way to reduce tissue damage more effectively with fewer side effects. To assess initial blood safety of our new organ cooling system, the CoolGuide Cooling System (CCS), we investigated safe operating conditions and configurations from a hemolysis perspective. The CCS consists of a peristaltic pump, a custom-built external heat exchanger, a chiller, biocompatible polyvinyl cellulose (PVC) tubing, and a control console. The CCS cools and circulates autologous blood externally and re-delivers cooled blood to the patient through a conventional catheter inserted directly into the organ at risk. Catheter configurations used included: a 7F guide catheter only, a 7F guide with a 0.038" wire inserted through the center and advanced 2 cm distal to the catheter distal tip, a 6F guide catheter only and a 6F guide with a 0.014" guidewire similarly inserted through the center. Using porcine blood, an in vitro test rig was used to measure the degree of hemolysis generation, defined as the percentage change in free hemoglobin, adjusted for total hemoglobin and hematocrit, between exiting and entering blood. The highest degree of hemolysis generation was 0.11±0.04%, based on the average behavior with a 6F catheter and a 0.014" guidewire configuration at a blood flow rate of approximately 130 mL/min. In terms of average percentage free hemoglobin exiting the system, based on total hemoglobin, the highest value measured was 0.17%±0.03%, using this 6F and 0.014" guidewire configuration. This result is significantly below the most stringent European guideline of 0.8% used for blood storage and transfusion. This study provides initial evidence showing hemolysis generation arising from the CoolGuide Cooling System is likely to be clinically insignificant.

  1. IL-15 concentrations in skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue in lean and obese humans: local effects of IL-15 on adipose tissue lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Joseph R; Maples, Jill M; Hickner, Robert C

    2015-06-15

    Animal/cell investigations indicate that there is a decreased adipose tissue mass resulting from skeletal muscle (SkM) IL-15 secretion (e.g., SkM-blood-adipose tissue axis). IL-15 could regulate fat mass accumulation in obesity via lipolysis, although this has not been investigated in humans. Therefore, the purpose was to examine whether SkM and/or subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) IL-15 concentrations were correlated with SCAT lipolysis in lean and obese humans and determine whether IL-15 perfusion could induce lipolysis in human SCAT. Local SkM and abdominal SCAT IL-15 (microdialysis) and circulating IL-15 (blood) were sampled in lean (BMI: 23.1 ± 1.9 kg/m(2); n = 10) and obese (BMI: 34.7 ± 3.5 kg/m(2); n = 10) subjects at rest/during 1-h cycling exercise. Lipolysis (SCAT interstitial glycerol concentration) was compared against local/systemic IL-15. An additional probe in SCAT was perfused with IL-15 to assess direct lipolytic responses. SkM IL-15 was not different between lean and obese subjects (P = 0.45), whereas SCAT IL-15 was higher in obese vs. lean subjects (P = 0.02) and was correlated with SCAT lipolysis (r = 0.45, P = 0.05). Exercise increased SCAT lipolysis in lean and obese (P < 0.01), but exercise-induced SCAT lipolysis changes were not correlated with exercise-induced SCAT IL-15 changes. Microdialysis perfusion resulting in physiological IL-15 concentrations in the adipose tissue interstitium increased lipolysis in lean (P = 0.04) but suppressed lipolysis in obese (P < 0.01). Although we found no support for a human IL-15 SkM-blood-adipose tissue axis, IL-15 may be produced in/act on the abdominal SCAT depot. The extent to which this autocrine/paracrine IL-15 action regulates human body composition remains unknown.

  2. Localization of porcine CD29 transcripts and protein in pig cells and tissues by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Marín, Angeles; Moreno, Angela; de la Mulas, Juana Martín; Millán, Yolanda; Morera, Luis; Barbancho, Manuel; Llanes, Diego; Garrido, Juan J

    2005-04-08

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell adhesion proteins with major roles in a variety of biological processes ranging from cell migration to tissue organization, immune and non-immune defense mechanisms and oncogenic transformation. Members of the beta(1) integrin subfamily are composed of a beta(1) subunit (CD29) non-covalently associated with different alpha subunits to constitute a group of transmembrane glycoproteins that participate in many physiologically important events. Here, we have studied the CD29 expression in porcine tissues and cells at two different levels: expression of the CD29 mRNA by RT-PCR and localization of the protein by immunohistochemistry. CD29 transcripts were detected in a variety of tissues and cells: platelets, PBMC, granulocytes, alveolar macrophages, smooth muscle, intestine, lung, liver, spleen, lymph node, skin, testis, heart, kidney and bone marrow. Our results suggest that CD29 gene transcription occurs in all organs examined, although with different intensities. The precise localization of CD29 protein in paraffin-embedded tissues was detected by using a specific polyclonal antibody indicating that its expression is limited to smooth muscle, epithelium cells, endothelium of blood vessels and myeloid cells and is no detectable in cells of the lymphoid lineage. The distribution of the CD29 in normal tissues provide insight into the physiological function of the porcine beta(1) integrins and should be of importance in understanding the role of this integrin family in pathological processes.

  3. [Effect of lipiodol emulsion and local hyperthermia on hepatic tissue blood flow in rabbits with VX-2 liver tumor].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Tada, I; Okada, K; Kim, Y I; Kobayashi, M

    1988-08-01

    The effect of intra-arterial infusion of lipiodol-emulsion and local hyperthermia on tissue blood flow was examined in experimental hepatic tumor and normal liver of rabbits. VX-2 tumor was implanted in liver of rabbit. The tissue blood flow was estimated by hydrogen gas clearance method when the tumor grew to about 2 cm. Tissue blood flow in tumor (64.5 ml/min/100 g) was significantly less than in normal liver (90.8 ml/min/100 g) (p less than 0.005). The intra-arterial infusion of lipiodol-emulsion did not alter the flow in either tissue. However, the addition of hyperthermia induced a substantial rise of tissue blood flow in normal liver (35% increase, from 93.8 to 127 ml/min/100 g) when compared with in VX-2 tumor (8.9% increase, from 65.1 to 71.8 ml/min/100 g). These were accompanied by a selective heating of liver tumor; the tumor temperature rose to 43 degrees C, although that of normal liver remained at 38 degrees C. Our results suggested that a specific temperature rise of liver tumor after infusion of lipiodol-emulsion and local heating might be related to a different response of microcirculation in tumor and normal liver to the hyperthermia.

  4. Cixutumumab and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Undifferentiated High Grade Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Childhood Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma With Mixed Embryonal and Alveolar Features; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Malignant Adult Hemangiopericytoma; Malignant Childhood Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

  5. Agouti revisited: transcript quantification of the ASIP gene in bovine tissues related to protein expression and localization.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Elke; Komolka, Katrin; Kuzinski, Judith; Maak, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Beside its role in melanogenesis, the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) has been related to obesity. The potentially crucial role in adipocyte development makes it a tempting candidate for economic relevant, fat related traits in farm animals. The objective of our study was to characterize the mRNA expression of different ASIP transcripts and of putative targets in different bovine tissues, as well as to study consequences on protein abundance and localization. ASIP mRNA abundance was determined by RT-qPCR in adipose and further tissues of cattle representing different breeds and crosses. ASIP mRNA was up-regulated more than 9-fold in intramuscular fat of Japanese Black cattle compared to Holstein (p<0.001). Further analyses revealed that a transposon-derived transcript was solely responsible for the increased ASIP mRNA abundance. This transcript was observed in single individuals of different breeds indicating a wide spread occurrence of this insertion at the ASIP locus in cattle. The protein was detected in different adipose tissues, skin, lung and liver, but not in skeletal muscle by Western blot with a bovine-specific ASIP antibody. However, the protein abundance was not related to the observed ASIP mRNA over-expression. Immuno-histochemical analyses revealed a putative nuclear localization of ASIP additionally to the expected cytosolic signal in different cell types. The expression of melanocortin receptors (MCR) 1 to 5 as potential targets for ASIP was analyzed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous fat. Only MC1R and MC4R were detected indicating a similar receptor expression like in human adipose tissue. Our results provide evidence for a widespread expression of ASIP in bovine tissues at mRNA and, for the first time, at protein level. ASIP protein is detectable in adipocytes as well as in further cells of adipose tissue. We generated a basis for a more detailed investigation of ASIP function in peripheral tissues of various mammalian species.

  6. Enterotoxemia in the goat: the humoral response and local tissue reaction following vaccination with two different bacterin-toxoids.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T E; Butler, D G; Bell, J A

    1983-04-01

    A vaccination trial involving 72 goats was designed to compare the epsilon antitoxin titres and local reactions at the injection sites, of two commercial enterotoxemia vaccines. Three dosage regimens were used for each vaccine (12 goats per group). Although no significant differences were noted in humoral immune response between the two vaccines (P = 0.05), one vaccine regime resulted in low titres (P = 0.05) on two occasions. Local tissue reactions at injection sites persisted for six months in 53% of the goats regardless of vaccine used or dosage administered. No immunological basis for the reported differences in vaccine efficacy between sheep and goats was observed in this trial.

  7. Specific localization of the respiratory alternative oxidase in meristematic and xylematic tissues from developing soybean roots and hypocotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Hilal, M; Castagnaro, A; Moreno, H; Massa, E M

    1997-01-01

    We used tissue printing and specific immunostaining to examine the localization of the alternative oxidase (AOX) protein in correlation with measurements of AOX capacity. Selected root and hypocotyl regions were analyzed during the first 14 d of growth. It is shown that AOX protein is localized in the apical meristem and in developing xylem. The temporal pattern of expression is coincident with the evolution of AOX capacity. Data suggest that AOX expression is linked to xylem differentiation. Since heat is a major product of the alternative pathway, we speculate that thermogenesis is implicated in morphogenesis. PMID:9414560

  8. Localized Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Long-Term Outcome in 86 Patients With 104 Treated Eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Ken; Murakami, Naoya; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Tobinai, Kensei; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history, behavior of progression, prognostic factors, and treatment-related adverse effects of primary ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POAML). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six patients with histologically proven stage I POAML treated with radiation therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo between 1990 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 56 years (range, 18-85 years). The median dose administered was 30 Gy (range, 30-46 Gy). Seventy-seven patients (90%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Results: The median follow-up duration was 9 years (range, 0.9-22 years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.6% and 93.5%, respectively, and no patients died of lymphoma. Patients with tumor sizes ≥4 cm showed a greater risk of contralateral relapse (P=.012). Six patients with contralateral relapse were seen and treated by radiation therapy alone, and all the lesions were controlled well, with follow-up times of 3 to 12 years. There was 1 case of local relapse after radiation therapy alone, and 3 cases of relapse occurred in a distant site. Cataracts developed in 36 of the 65 eyes treated without lens shielding and in 12 of the 39 patients with lens shielding (P=.037). Conclusions: The majority of patients with POAML showed behavior consistent with that of localized, indolent diseases. Thirty gray of local irradiation seems to be quite effective. The initial bilateral involvement and contralateral orbital relapses can be also controlled with radiation therapy alone. Lens shielding reduces the risk of cataract.

  9. Intra-abdominal fat. Part I. The images of the adipose tissue localized beyond organs

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Unaltered fat is a permanent component of the abdominal cavity, even in slim individuals. Visceral adiposity is one of the important factors contributing to diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and certain neoplasms. Moreover, the adipose tissue is an important endocrine and immune organ of complex function both when normal and pathological. Its role in plastic surgery, reconstruction and transplantology is a separate issue. The adipose tissue has recently drawn the attention of research institutes owing to being a rich source of stem cells. This review, however, does not include these issues. The identification of fat is relatively easy using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. It can be more difficult in an ultrasound examination for several reasons. The aim of this paper is to present various problems associated with US imaging of unaltered intra-abdominal fat located beyond organs. Based on the literature and experience, it has been demonstrated that the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity has variable echogenicity, which primarily depends on the amount of extracellular fluid and the number of connective tissue septa, i.e. elements that potentiate the number of areas that reflect and scatter ultrasonic waves. The normal adipose tissue presents itself on a broad gray scale: from a hyperechoic area, through numerous structures of lower reflection intensity, to nearly anechoic regions mimicking the presence of pathological fluid collections. The features that facilitate proper identification of this tissue are: sharp margins, homogeneous structure, high compressibility under transducer pressure, no signs of infiltration of the surrounding structures and no signs of vascularization when examined with the color and power Doppler. The accumulation of fat tissue in the abdominal cavity can be generalized, regional or focal. The identification of the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity using ultrasonography is not always easy. When in doubt, the

  10. Intra-abdominal fat. Part I. The images of the adipose tissue localized beyond organs.

    PubMed

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2015-09-01

    Unaltered fat is a permanent component of the abdominal cavity, even in slim individuals. Visceral adiposity is one of the important factors contributing to diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and certain neoplasms. Moreover, the adipose tissue is an important endocrine and immune organ of complex function both when normal and pathological. Its role in plastic surgery, reconstruction and transplantology is a separate issue. The adipose tissue has recently drawn the attention of research institutes owing to being a rich source of stem cells. This review, however, does not include these issues. The identification of fat is relatively easy using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. It can be more difficult in an ultrasound examination for several reasons. The aim of this paper is to present various problems associated with US imaging of unaltered intra-abdominal fat located beyond organs. Based on the literature and experience, it has been demonstrated that the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity has variable echogenicity, which primarily depends on the amount of extracellular fluid and the number of connective tissue septa, i.e. elements that potentiate the number of areas that reflect and scatter ultrasonic waves. The normal adipose tissue presents itself on a broad gray scale: from a hyperechoic area, through numerous structures of lower reflection intensity, to nearly anechoic regions mimicking the presence of pathological fluid collections. The features that facilitate proper identification of this tissue are: sharp margins, homogeneous structure, high compressibility under transducer pressure, no signs of infiltration of the surrounding structures and no signs of vascularization when examined with the color and power Doppler. The accumulation of fat tissue in the abdominal cavity can be generalized, regional or focal. The identification of the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity using ultrasonography is not always easy. When in doubt, the

  11. Characterization of the Distance Relationship Between Localized Serotonin Receptors and Glia Cells on Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Jacak, Jaroslaw; Schaller, Susanne; Borgmann, Daniela; Winkler, Stephan M

    2015-08-01

    We here present two new methods for the characterization of fluorescent localization microscopy images obtained from immunostained brain tissue sections. Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images of 5-HT1A serotonin receptors and glial fibrillary acidic proteins in healthy cryopreserved brain tissues are analyzed. In detail, we here present two image processing methods for characterizing differences in receptor distribution on glial cells and their distribution on neural cells: One variant relies on skeleton extraction and adaptive thresholding, the other on k-means based discrete layer segmentation. Experimental results show that both methods can be applied for distinguishing classes of images with respect to serotonin receptor distribution. Quantification of nanoscopic changes in relative protein expression on particular cell types can be used to analyze degeneration in tissues caused by diseases or medical treatment.

  12. Expression profile of the aromatase enzyme in the Xenopus brain and localization of estradiol and estrogen receptors in each tissue.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Junshin; Koshimizu, Kouta; Nakagawa, Tadahiko

    2013-12-01

    Estradiol (E2) with the strongest bioactivity of the estrogens, is synthesized by the cytochrome p450 aromatase enzyme and plays a key role in sex differentiation of the vertebrate's gonads. In Xenopus, aromatase mRNA is highly expressed in the brain rather than in the gonad during sex differentiation. In this study, we analyzed the stage change, tissue specificity, and localization of the aromatase expression in the Xenopus brain. Regardless of the sex difference, expression level of aromatase was remarkably higher in the brain than in other tissues during the early stages of brain morphogenesis and was observed in the formation regions of the choroid plexus of cerebral ventricle and the paleocortex and olfactory bulb of the prosencephalon. However, E2 concentrations in each tissue indicated a different localization of aromatase and were seen in the heart at almost double the level as seen in the brain. In addition, while aromatase expression level in the brain was increasing, E2 in the whole body began to increase at the same stage. Since the expression level of estrogen receptor α also corresponded to localization of E2, these results may imply that the E2 synthesized by the high aromatase expression in the choroid plexus, which generates cerebrospinal fluid, circulates to the heart and acts through ERα.

  13. Comprehensive approach to breast cancer detection using light: photon localization by ultrasound modulation and tissue characterization by spectral discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Fay A.; Tomlinson, Harold W.; Brooksby, Glen W.

    1993-09-01

    A new technique called Ultrasound Tagging of Light (UTL) for imaging breast tissue is described. In this approach, photon localization in turbid tissue is achieved by cross- modulating a laser beam with focussed, pulsed ultrasound. Light which passes through the ultrasound focal spot is `tagged' with the frequency of the ultrasound pulse. The experimental system uses an Argon-Ion laser, a single PIN photodetector, and a 1 MHz fixed-focus pulsed ultrasound transducer. The utility of UTL as a photon localization technique in scattering media is examined using tissue phantoms consisting of gelatin and intralipid. In a separate study, in vivo optical reflectance spectrophotometry was performed on human breast tumors implanted intramuscularly and subcutaneously in nineteen nude mice. The validity of applying a quadruple wavelength breast cancer discrimination metric (developed using breast biopsy specimens) to the in vivo condition was tested. A scatter diagram for the in vivo model tumors based on this metric is presented using as the `normal' controls the hands and fingers of volunteers. Tumors at different growth stages were studied; these tumors ranged in size from a few millimeters to two centimeters. It is expected that when coupled with a suitable photon localization technique like UTL, spectral discrimination methods like this one will prove useful in the detection of breast cancer by non-ionizing means.

  14. Localized BIA identifies structural and pathophysiological changes in soft tissue after post-traumatic injuries in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Nescolarde, L; Yanguas, J; Lukaski, H; Rodas, G; Rosell-Ferrer, J

    2014-01-01

    Localized bioimpedance (BIA) was measured with a single frequency phase-sensitive analyzer at 50 kHz in three post-traumatic types of injuries on four professional soccer players: (1) myositis ossificans, (2) intramuscular seroma and (3) trochanteric (hip) bursitis. Normal reference value (no injury) was obtained from the contra lateral not injured limb at a mirror-like location of the injury. The relative variations resistance (R) and reactance (Xc) at the time of injury was confronted with the not injured values. Relative variations between acute measurements and post medication ones on intramuscular seroma and bursitis have been computed. In intramuscular seroma and trochanteric bursitis we have obtained a percent of change between injury data and after medical intervention. On myositis ossificans, localized BIA showed a 7-8 % decrease in Xc whereas the percent of change of R was negligible (1 %). These percent of changes are in concordance with histological evidence. In the case of a presence of seroma or the lower thigh and trochanteric bursitis, the soft tissue cavity accumulates fluid. Post-injury localized BIA, relative with respect to non-injured side, confirmed sizeable soft tissue destruction evidenced by 50 % decrease of Xc and 24-31 % decrease of R due to interstitial fluid accumulation. Once the seroma and the blood in the bursitis was removed the localized the immediate post-injury BIA parameters increased as follows: a) intramuscular seroma + 10 % on R and + 74 % of Xc; b) trochanteric bursitis + 20 % of R and +24 % of Xc. Localized BIA other than classifying soft tissue injuries, can be useful to understand the pathophysiology and structural impairments of other kind of injuries and to understand their behavior.

  15. Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

  16. Local recurrence and assessment of sentinel lymph node biopsy in deep soft tissue leiomyosarcoma of the extremities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leiomyosarcoma of deep soft tissues of the extremities is a rare malignant tumour treated primarily by surgery. The incidence of local recurrence and lymph node metastasis is uncertain and it is not known whether a sentinel lymph node biopsy is indicated in these tumours. Methods A retrospective review of patients treated for extremity deep soft tissue leiomyosarcoma at our institution over a 10-year period was conducted. Patients developing local recurrence or lymph node metastasis were identified. The presence or absence of lymphatics in the primary tumours was assessed by immunohistochemical expression of LYVE-1 and podoplanin. Results 27 patients (mean age 62 years) were included in the study. 15 were female and 12 male. Lymph node metastasis was seen in only two cases (7%); intratumoural lymphatics were identified in the primary tumours of both these cases. Local recurrence occurred in 25.9% of cases despite complete excision and post-operative radiotherapy; the mean time to recurrence was 10.1 months. Conclusion On the basis of this study, we do not advocate sentinel lymph node biopsy in this group of patients except in those cases in which intratumoural lymphatics can be demonstrated. Close follow up is important especially for high grade leiomyosarcomas, particularly in the first year, as these tumours have a high incidence of local recurrence. PMID:22612847

  17. Localization and speciation of arsenic and trace elements in rice tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Euan; Kempson, Ivan; Juhasz, Albert L.; Weber, John; Skinner, William M.; Gräfe, Markus

    2009-09-14

    The consumption of arsenic (As) contaminated rice is an important exposure route for humans in countries where rice cultivation employs As contaminated irrigation water. Arsenic toxicity and mobility are a function of its chemical-speciation. The distribution and identification of As in the rice plant are hence necessary to determine the uptake, transformation and potential risk posed by As contaminated rice. In this study we report on the distribution and chemical-speciation of As in rice (Oryza sativa Quest) by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements of rice plants grown in As contaminated paddy water. Investigations of {mu}XRF images from rice tissues found that As was present in all rice tissues, and its presence correlated with the presence of iron at the root surface and copper in the rice leaf. X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of rice tissues identified that inorganic As was the predominant form of As in all rice tissues studied, and that arsenite became increasingly dominant in the aerial portion of the rice plant.

  18. Agouti Revisited: Transcript Quantification of the ASIP Gene in Bovine Tissues Related to Protein Expression and Localization

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Elke; Komolka, Katrin; Kuzinski, Judith; Maak, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Beside its role in melanogenesis, the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) has been related to obesity. The potentially crucial role in adipocyte development makes it a tempting candidate for economic relevant, fat related traits in farm animals. The objective of our study was to characterize the mRNA expression of different ASIP transcripts and of putative targets in different bovine tissues, as well as to study consequences on protein abundance and localization. ASIP mRNA abundance was determined by RT-qPCR in adipose and further tissues of cattle representing different breeds and crosses. ASIP mRNA was up-regulated more than 9-fold in intramuscular fat of Japanese Black cattle compared to Holstein (p<0.001). Further analyses revealed that a transposon-derived transcript was solely responsible for the increased ASIP mRNA abundance. This transcript was observed in single individuals of different breeds indicating a wide spread occurrence of this insertion at the ASIP locus in cattle. The protein was detected in different adipose tissues, skin, lung and liver, but not in skeletal muscle by Western blot with a bovine-specific ASIP antibody. However, the protein abundance was not related to the observed ASIP mRNA over-expression. Immuno-histochemical analyses revealed a putative nuclear localization of ASIP additionally to the expected cytosolic signal in different cell types. The expression of melanocortin receptors (MCR) 1 to 5 as potential targets for ASIP was analyzed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous fat. Only MC1R and MC4R were detected indicating a similar receptor expression like in human adipose tissue. Our results provide evidence for a widespread expression of ASIP in bovine tissues at mRNA and, for the first time, at protein level. ASIP protein is detectable in adipocytes as well as in further cells of adipose tissue. We generated a basis for a more detailed investigation of ASIP function in peripheral tissues of various mammalian species. PMID:22530003

  19. Expression, localization, and functional model of cholesterol transporters in lactating and nonlactating mammary tissues of murine, bovine, and human origin.

    PubMed

    Mani, Orlando; Körner, Meike; Sorensen, Martin T; Sejrsen, Kristen; Wotzkow, Carlos; Ontsouka, Corneille E; Friis, Robert R; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Albrecht, Christiane

    2010-08-01

    Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play a pivotal role in cellular lipid efflux. To identify candidate cholesterol transporters implicated in lipid homeostasis and mammary gland (MG) physiology, we compared expression and localization of ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCA7 and their regulatory genes in mammary tissues of different species during the pregnancy-lactation cycle. Murine and bovine mammary glands (MGs) were investigated during different functional stages. The abundance of mRNAs was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, transporter proteins were localized in murine, bovine, and human MGs by immunohistochemistry. In the murine MG, ABCA1 mRNA abundance was elevated during nonlactating compared with lactating stages, whereas ABCA7 and ABCA1 mRNA profiles were not altered. In the bovine MG, ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCA7 mRNAs abundances were increased during nonlactating stages compared with lactation. Furthermore, associations between mRNA levels of transporters and their regulatory genes LXRalpha, PPARgamma, and SREBPs were found. ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCA7 proteins were localized in glandular MG epithelial cells (MEC) during lactation, whereas during nonlactating stages, depending on species, the proteins showed distinct localization patterns in MEC and adipocytes. Our results demonstrate that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCA7 are differentially expressed between lactation and nonlactating stages and in association with regulatory genes. Combined expression and localization data suggest that the selected cholesterol transporters are universal MG transporters involved in transport and storage of cholesterol and in lipid homeostasis of MEC. Because of the species-specific expression patterns of transporters in mammary tissue, mechanisms of cholesterol homeostasis seem to be differentially regulated between species.

  20. The Local Tissue Environment During the September 29, 1989 Solar Particle Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M.-H. Y.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Simonsen, L. C.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Miller, J.

    2004-01-01

    The solar particle event (SPE) of September 29, 1989, produced an iron-rich spectrum with energies approaching 1 GeV/amu with an energy power index of 2.5. These high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the iron-rich SPEs challenge conventional methods of SPE shield design and assessment of astronaut risks. Shield and risk assessments are evaluated using the HZETRN code with computerized anatomical man (CAM) model for astronaut s body tissues. Since the HZE spectra decline rapidly with energy and HZE attenuation in materials is limited by their penetration power, details of the mass distributions about the sensitive tissues (shielding materials and the astronaut's body) are important determining factors of the exposure levels. Typical space suit and lightly shielded structures allow significant contributions from HZE components to some critical body tissues and have important implications on the models for risk assessment. Only a heavily shielded equipment room of a space vehicle or habitat provides sufficient shielding for the early response at sensitive organs from this event. The February 23, 1956 event of similar spectral characteristics and ten times this event may have important medical consequences without a well-shielded region.

  1. Prediction of Local Ultimate Strain and Toughness of Trabecular Bone Tissue by Raman Material Composition Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stüssi, Edgar; Müller, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate that bone mineral density correlates with fracture risk at the population level but does not correlate with individual fracture risk well. Current research aims to better understand the failure mechanism of bone and to identify key determinants of bone quality, thus improving fracture risk prediction. To get a better understanding of bone strength, it is important to analyze tissue-level properties not influenced by macro- or microarchitectural factors. The aim of this pilot study was to identify whether and to what extent material properties are correlated with mechanical properties at the tissue level. The influence of macro- or microarchitectural factors was excluded by testing individual trabeculae. Previously reported data of mechanical parameters measured in single trabeculae under tension and bending and its compositional properties measured by Raman spectroscopy was evaluated. Linear and multivariate regressions show that bone matrix quality but not quantity was significantly and independently correlated with the tissue-level ultimate strain and postyield work (r = 0.65–0.94). Principal component analysis extracted three independent components explaining 86% of the total variance, representing elastic, yield, and ultimate components according to the included mechanical parameters. Some matrix parameters were both included in the ultimate component, indicating that the variation in ultimate strain and postyield work could be largely explained by Raman-derived compositional parameters. PMID:25695083

  2. The inter-sample structural variability of regular tissue-engineered scaffolds significantly affects the micromechanical local cell environment

    PubMed Central

    Campos Marin, A.; Lacroix, D.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping techniques have been widely used in tissue engineering to fabricate scaffolds with controlled architecture. Despite the ability of these techniques to fabricate regular structures, the consistency with which these regular structures are produced throughout the scaffold and from one scaffold to another needs to be quantified. Small variations at the pore level can affect the local mechanical stimuli sensed by the cells thereby affecting the final tissue properties. Most studies assume rapid prototyping scaffolds as regular structures without quantifying the local mechanical stimuli at the cell level. In this study, a computational method using a micro-computed tomography-based scaffold geometry was developed to characterize the mechanical stimuli within a real scaffold at the pore level. Five samples from a commercial polycaprolactone scaffold were analysed and computational fluid dynamics analyses were created to compare local velocity and shear stress values at the same scaffold location. The five samples did not replicate the computer-aided design (CAD) scaffold and velocity and shear stress values were up to five times higher than the ones calculated in the CAD scaffold. In addition high variability among samples was found: at the same location velocity and shear stress values could be up to two times higher from sample to sample. This study shows that regular scaffolds need to be thoroughly analysed in order to quantify real cell mechanical stimuli so inspection methods should be included as part of the fabrication process. PMID:25844157

  3. Sequence, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of mRNA encoding a human glucose transporter-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Seino, Susumu; Imura, Hiroo; Seino, Yutaka; Eddy, R.L.; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Byers, M.G.; Shows, T.B.; Bell, G.I. )

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant DNA clones encoding a glucose transporter-like protein have been isolated from adult human liver and kidney cDNA libraries by cross-hybridization with the human HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter cDNA. Analysis of the sequence of this 524-amino acid glucose transporter-like protein indicates that is has 55.5% identity with the HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter as well as a similar structural organization. Studies of the tissue distribution of the mRNA coding for this glucose transporter-like protein in adult human tissues indicate that the highest amounts are present in liver with lower amounts in kidney and small intestine. The amounts of glucose transporter-like mRNA in other tissues, including colon, stomach, cerebrum, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, were below the level of sensitivity of our assay. The single-copy gene encoding this glucose transporter-like protein has been localized to the q26.1{yields}q26.3 region of chromosome 3.

  4. Chromium localization in plant tissues of Lycopersicum esculentum Mill using ICP-MS and ion microscopy (SIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangabeira, Pedro Antonio; Gavrilov, Konstantin L.; Almeida, Alex-Alan Furtado de; Oliveira, Arno Heeren; Severo, Maria Isabel; Rosa, Tiago Santana; Silva, Delmira da Costa; Labejof, Lise; Escaig, Françoise; Levi-Setti, Riccardo; Mielke, Marcelo Schramm; Loustalot, Florence Grenier; Galle, Pierre

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (HRI-SIMS) in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were utilised to determine specific sites of chromium concentration in tomato plant tissues (roots, stems and leaves). The tissues were obtained from plants grown for 2 months in hydroponic conditions with Cr added in a form chromium salt (CrCl 3·6H 2O) to concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/L. The chemical fixation procedure used permit to localize only insoluble or strongly bound Cr components in tomato plant tissue. In this work no quantitative SIMS analysis was made. HRI-SIMS analysis revealed that the transport of chromium is restricted to the vascular system of roots, stems and leaves. No Cr was detected in epidermis, palisade parenchyma and spongy parenchyma cells of the leaves. The SIMS-300 spectra obtained from the tissues confirm the HRI-SIMS observations. The roots, and especially walls of xylem vessels, were determined as the principal site of chromium accumulation in tomato plants.

  5. Detection and localization of rabbit hepatitis e virus and antigen in systemic tissues from experimentally intraperitoneally infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingjing; Zhao, Yue; She, Ruiping; Cao, Binbin; Xiao, Peng; Wu, Qiaoxing; Guo, Zhaojie; Ma, Longhuan; Soomro, Majid Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a novel genotype of HEV, and is considered to pose a risk of zoonotic transmission. Research into the systemic distribution of rabbit HEV in rabbits during different periods of infection has rarely been reported. To better understand this virus, we infected rabbits with second-passage rabbit HEV via an intraperitoneal route. After inoculation, the infection showed two types, temporary and constant infection. The detection of HEV RNA in the feces varied with time, and serum antigen correlated with fecal HEV RNA. Viremia only appeared 72 days after inoculation. The rabbits remained antibody negative throughout the experimental period. When HEV was localized, several organs besides the liver were HEV RNA positive. Tissue antigen was observed immunohistochemically in the different cells of various organs, especially in parts of the small intestine and the characteristic rabbit gut-associated lymphoid tissue. These data provide valuable information for future research into the pathogenesis of HEV.

  6. Tissue and cellular localization of tannins in Tunisian dates (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, Hédi; Alvarado, Camille; Bouchet, Brigitte; Kalthoum-Chérif, Jamila; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika; Guyot, Sylvain

    2014-07-16

    A histological approach including light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to provide accurate information on the localization of condensed tannins in the edible tissues and in the stone of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Light microscopy was carried out on fresh tissues after staining by 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) for a specific detection of condensed tannins. Thus, whether under light microscopy or transmission electron microscopy (TEM), results showed that tannins are not located in the epidermis but more deeply in the mesocarp in the vacuole of very large cells. Regarding the stones, tannins are found in a specific cell layer located at 50 μm from the sclereid cells of the testa.

  7. In Vivo Bioorthogonal Chemistry Enables Local Hydrogel and Systemic Pro-Drug To Treat Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to activate drugs only at desired locations avoiding systemic immunosuppression and other dose limiting toxicities is highly desirable. Here we present a new approach, named local drug activation, that uses bioorthogonal chemistry to concentrate and activate systemic small molecules at a location of choice. This method is independent of endogenous cellular or environmental markers and only depends on the presence of a preimplanted biomaterial near a desired site (e.g., tumor). We demonstrate the clear therapeutic benefit with minimal side effects of this approach in mice over systemic therapy using a doxorubicin pro-drug against xenograft tumors of a type of soft tissue sarcoma (HT1080). PMID:27504494

  8. Magnetic nanoparticle-based approaches to locally target therapy and enhance tissue regeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Richard; Sapir, Yulia; MacDonald, Cristin; Cohen, Smadar; Polyak, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic-based systems utilizing superparamagnetic nanoparticles and a magnetic field gradient to exert a force on these particles have been used in a wide range of biomedical applications. This review is focused on drug targeting applications that require penetration of a cellular barrier as well as strategies to improve the efficacy of targeting in these biomedical applications. Another focus of this review is regenerative applications utilizing tissue engineered scaffolds prepared with the aid of magnetic particles, the use of remote actuation for release of bioactive molecules and magneto–mechanical cell stimulation, cell seeding and cell patterning. PMID:22994959

  9. Cellular localization of ROS and NO in olive reproductive tissues during flower development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the signalling processes taking place during the interactions pollen-pistil in several plants. The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) is an important crop in Mediterranean countries. It is a dicotyledonous species, with a certain level of self-incompatibility, fertilisation preferentially allogamous, and with an incompatibility system of the gametophytic type not well determined yet. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether relevant ROS and NO are present in the stigmatic surface and other reproductive tissues in the olive over different key developmental stages of the reproductive process. This is a first approach to find out the putative function of these signalling molecules in the regulation of the interaction pollen-stigma. Results The presence of ROS and NO was analyzed in the olive floral organs throughout five developmental stages by using histochemical analysis at light microscopy, as well as different fluorochromes, ROS and NO scavengers and a NO donor by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The "green bud" stage and the period including the end of the "recently opened flower" and the "dehiscent anther" stages displayed higher concentrations of the mentioned chemical species. The stigmatic surface (particularly the papillae and the stigma exudate), the anther tissues and the pollen grains and pollen tubes were the tissues accumulating most ROS and NO. The mature pollen grains emitted NO through the apertural regions and the pollen tubes. In contrast, none of these species were detected in the style or the ovary. Conclusion The results obtained clearly demonstrate that both ROS and NO are produced in the olive reproductive organs in a stage- and tissue- specific manner. The biological significance of the presence of these products may differ between early flowering stages (defence functions) and stages where there is an intense

  10. Histochemical Demonstration and Localization of H2O2 in Organs of Higher Plants by Tissue Printing on Nitrocellulose Paper.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, P.

    1994-04-01

    A sensitive tissue-print assay for the detection and histological localization of H2O2 in freshly cut organ sections was developed by impregnating nitrocellulose paper with a mixture of Kl and soluble starch. H2O2 transferred from the cut surface of the section to the dried paper forms I2, which can be visualized by the intensely colored I2-starch complex. The detection limit of the assay is in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 mmol L-1 H2O2. Due to the rapid immobilization of H2O2 in the paper, very clear prints of the tissue distribution of H2O2 can be obtained with a spatial resolution on the level of single cells. The application of this rapid and simple assay is explored in five experimental examples demonstrating that the in vivo level of H2O2 varies strikingly in different tissues and can be regulated by developmental factors such as hormones, light, and wounding. The results show that: (a) In the hypocotyl of soybean (Glycine max L.) seedlings the apoplastic H2O2 level increases strongly from top to base, accompanied by characteristic changes in its histological distribution. (b) In the epicotyl of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings the induction of lateral expansion by ethylene is correlated with a depletion of H2O2 in the cell walls of the expanding tissues. (c) In the hypocotyl of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings H2O2 is primarily localized in a ring of parenchymatic tissue between xylem and cortex next to lignifying cells but not in the lignifying cells themselves. (d) In the hypocotyl of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings the light-mediated inhibition of elongation growth is correlated with a strong increase in H2O2 in the epidermis and in the vascular bundles. (e) Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers show high levels of H2O2 only in the outer cell layers but are able to accumulate H2O2 in the inner tissue upon wounding.

  11. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Anton V; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  12. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhov, Anton V.; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  13. Localization and activity of tissue bound cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in normal and lack of changes in psoriatic human skin.

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Organos, C E

    1976-12-01

    This study has been undertaken to elucidate the localization and the activity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) in psoriatic epidermis compared to normal. The results showed that the evaluation of cytochemical methods may be difficult because of the various factors which interfere with the reaction and the considerable amount of background staining. Additionally, only the tissue bound particulate enzyme fraction may be demonstrated by cytochemical means. Nevertheless, the method did reveal that the activity of PDE, if any, is localized on the cytoplasmic membranes of the cells, independent of their origin, and not on the cell surface. Moreover, no differences were found between normal and psoriatic skin. It seems, therefore, that the intracellular degradation of cAMP remains unaltered in psoriasis.

  14. Radial forearm flaps as durable soft tissue coverage for local nationals being treated in the field hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Kh; Jeffery, Sla

    2013-03-01

    The current conflict in Afghanistan has seen the increasing use of Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) in insurgency attacks. In addition to the coalition forces killed and injured from these devices, local national civilians are also injured. Injuries often include amputations, open fractures and large areas of skin affected by fragmentation. Local national access to long-term care after an IED injury is limited, and often when the patient leaves a coalition hospital this concludes the care the patient will receive. Definitive, durable treatment options are needed for these patients. In the IED-injured patient with open extremity wounds and open metacarpal fractures, pedicled radial forearm flaps offer a suitable soft tissue coverage option. Four cases are reported on IED- injured Afghan patients treated at a Role 3 hospital facility.

  15. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Helene; Alexiou, Christoph; Trahms, Lutz; Odenbach, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XμCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-μCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XμCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration.

  16. Immunocytochemical localization of carbonic anhydrase in the pseudobranch tissue of the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, S. M.; Mazlan, A. G.; Simon, K. D.; Delaunoy, J. P.; Laurent, P.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudobranch function has long interested scientists, but its role has yet to be elucidated. Several studies have suggested that pseudobranchs serve respiratory, osmoregulatory, and sensory functions. This work investigated the immunolocalization of pseudobranch carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the teleost fish species rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to clarify its physiological function. CA was purified from rainbow trout gills O. mykiss and specific antibodies were raised. Immunoblotting between tissue homogenates of pseudobranch and gill CA antibodies showed specific immunostaining with only one band corresponding to CA in the pseudobranch homogenate. Results of immunohistochemical technique revealed that CA was distributed within pseudobranch cells and more precisely in the apical parts (anti-vascular) of cells. The basal (vascular) parts of cells, tubular system, blood capillaries, and pillar cells were not immunostained. Immunocytochemistry confirmed these results and showed that some CA enzyme was cytoplasmic and the remainder was linked to membranous structures. The results also showed that the lacunar tissue layers did not display immunoperoxidase activity. Our results indicated that pseudobranch CA may have a function related to the extracellular medium wherein CA intervenes with the mechanism of stimulation of afferent nerve fibers. PMID:24510712

  17. Abnormal Localization and Tumor Suppressor Function of Epithelial Tissue-Specific Transcription Factor ESE3 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xing, Jie; Cheng, Rui; Shao, Ying; Li, Peng; Zhu, Shengtao; Zhang, Shutian

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers worldwide. The molecular mechanism of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is still poorly understood. ESE3 is a member of the Ets transcription family, which is only expressed in epithelial tissues and acts as a tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer. Our study aim was to confirm whether ESE3 is involved in the carcinogenesis of ESCC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ESE3 was mainly located in cell nuclei of normal tissues and the cytoplasm in ESCC tissues. Immunofluorescence and western blot analyses of the normal esophageal cell line HEEpiC and ESCC cell lines EC9706 TE-1, KYSE150, and KYSE410 confirmed these results. pEGFP-ESE3 and pcDNA3.1-V5/HisA-ESE3 plasmids were constructed for overexpression of ESE3 in EC9706 and KYSE150 cells. The stably transfected cells showed restoration of the nuclear localization of ESE3. EC9706 cells with re-localization of ESE3 to the nucleus showed inhibition of proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion. To explore the possible mechanism of the differences in localization of ESE3 in normal esophageal cells and ESCC cells, ESCC cell lines were treated with the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B, transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, PKC inhibitor sphinganine, P38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190, and CK II inhibitor TBCA. These reagents were chosen according to the well-known mechanisms of protein translocation. However, the localization of ESE3 was unchanged after these treatments. The sequence of ESE3 cDNA in ESCC cells was identical to the standard sequence of ESE3 in the NCBI Genebank database, indicating that there was no mutation in the coding region of ESE3 in ESCC. Taken together, our study suggests that ESE3 plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of ESCC through changes in subcellular localization and may act as a tumor suppressor gene in ESCC, although the mechanisms require further study.

  18. Primary Tumor Necrosis Predicts Distant Control in Locally Advanced Soft-Tissue Sarcomas After Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    MacDermed, Dhara M.; Miller, Luke L.; Peabody, Terrance D.; Simon, Michael A.; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; Montag, Anthony G.; Undevia, Samir D.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Various neoadjuvant approaches have been evaluated for the treatment of locally advanced soft-tissue sarcomas. This retrospective study describes a uniquely modified version of the Eilber regimen developed at the University of Chicago. Methods and Materials: We treated 34 patients (28 Stage III and 6 Stage IV) with locally advanced soft-tissue sarcomas of an extremity between 1995 and 2008. All patients received preoperative therapy including ifosfamide (2.5 g/m2 per day for 5 days) with concurrent radiation (28 Gy in 3.5-Gy daily fractions), sandwiched between various chemotherapy regimens. Postoperatively, 47% received further adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Most tumors (94%) were Grade 3, and all were T2b, with a median size of 10.3 cm. Wide excision was performed in 29 patients (85%), and 5 required amputation. Of the resected tumor specimens, 50% exhibited high (>=90%) treatment-induced necrosis and 11.8% had a complete pathologic response. Surgical margins were negative in all patients. The 5-year survival rate was 42.3% for all patients and 45.2% for Stage III patients. For limb-preservation patients, the 5-year local control rate was 89.0% and reoperation was required for wound complications in 17.2%. The 5-year freedom-from-distant metastasis rate was 53.4% (Stage IV patients excluded), and freedom from distant metastasis was superior if treatment-induced tumor necrosis was 90% or greater (84.6% vs. 19.9%, p = 0.02). Conclusions: This well-tolerated concurrent chemoradiotherapy approach yields excellent rates of limb preservation and local control. The resulting treatment-induced necrosis rates are predictive of subsequent metastatic risk, and this information may provide an opportunity to guide postoperative systemic therapies.

  19. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a lidocaine and tetracaine (7%/7%) cream for induction of local dermal anesthesia for facial soft tissue augmentation with hyaluronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Gold, Michael H

    2014-10-01

    Injection of dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation is a minimally invasive cosmetic procedure with growing popularity. However, patients often express concern about pain with such procedures. A topical anesthetic cream formulated with lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2006 and recently reintroduced to the market for use during superficial dermatological procedures. A Phase 3 study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream versus placebo cream when used to induce local dermal anesthesia during injections with hyaluronic acid. Mean visual analog scale scores significantly favored lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream. A significant percent of subjects also indicated that lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream provided adequate pain relief and that they would use lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream again. Investigators also rated lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream significantly better than placebo cream for providing adequate pain relief and on the assessment of pain scale. Lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream was safe and well tolerated with most subjects reporting no erythema, edema, or blanching. No related adverse events were reported with lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream; one related adverse event of erythema was reported with placebo cream. The results of this study indicate that lidocaine/tetracaine 7%7% cream is efficacious and safe at providing pain relief for soft tissue augmentation with hyaluronic acid.

  20. Metaproteomic identification of diazotrophic methanotrophs and their localization in root tissues of field-grown rice plants.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhihua; Okubo, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo; Kasahara, Yasuhiro; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Anda, Mizue; Ikeda, Seishi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-08-01

    In a previous study by our group, CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation were simultaneously activated in the roots of wild-type rice plants in a paddy field with no N input; both processes are likely controlled by a rice gene for microbial symbiosis. The present study examined which microorganisms in rice roots were responsible for CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation under the field conditions. Metaproteomic analysis of root-associated bacteria from field-grown rice (Oryza sativa Nipponbare) revealed that nitrogenase complex-containing nitrogenase reductase (NifH) and the alpha subunit (NifD) and beta subunit (NifK) of dinitrogenase were mainly derived from type II methanotrophic bacteria of the family Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp. Minor nitrogenase proteins such as Methylocella, Bradyrhizobium, Rhodopseudomonas, and Anaeromyxobacter were also detected. Methane monooxygenase proteins (PmoCBA and MmoXYZCBG) were detected in the same bacterial group of the Methylocystaceae. Because these results indicated that Methylocystaceae members mediate both CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation, we examined their localization in rice tissues by using catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The methanotrophs were localized around the epidermal cells and vascular cylinder in the root tissues of the field-grown rice plants. Our metaproteomics and CARD-FISH results suggest that CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation are performed mainly by type II methanotrophs of the Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp., inhabiting the vascular bundles and epidermal cells of rice roots.

  1. Tissue-specific expression and localization of safener-induced glutathione S-transferase proteins in Triticum tauschii.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Dean E; Zhang, Qin; Xu, Fangxiu; Vaughn, Kevin C

    2003-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) gene expression was examined in the coleoptile and new leaf tissue of etiolated shoots of the diploid wheat species Triticum tauschii (Coss.) Schmal., which is considered to be a progenitor and the D-genome donor to cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat Triticum aestivum L. GST expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity with a herbicide substrate) in these shoot tissues was examined in response to herbicide safener treatment. Two different antibody probes, raised against the same safener-inducible GST protein (TtGSTU1) but differing in their specificity, were utilized to determine tissue distribution and subcellular localization of GST proteins in etiolated shoots. GST transcripts, immunoreactive GST proteins, and herbicide-metabolizing activity were all highest in the coleoptile of etiolated, safener-treated T. tauschii shoots. Anti-GST immunolabeling was strongest in the outer epidermal and adjoining sub-epidermal cells in both coleoptiles and new leaves following safener treatment. Our data indicate that safeners protect grass crops from herbicide injury by dramatically inducing the expression of GST proteins in the outer cell layers of the coleoptile, which prevents the herbicide from reaching the sensitive new leaves of etiolated shoots as they emerge from the soil.

  2. Immunohistochemical Localization of Chromostatin and Pancreastatin, Chromogranin A-Derived Bioactive Peptides, in Normal and Neoplastic Neuroendocrine Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Noriko; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Aunis, Dominique; Tateishi, Kayoko; Miura, Wakako; Nagura, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    Despite the widespread distribution of chromogranin A (CgA) in neuroendocrine tissues, the biological function of CgA has not yet been elucidated. The primary amino acid sequence of CgA, elucidated by cDNA analysis, has been revealed to include several pairs of basic amino acid residues that are homologous to the bioactive peptides, such as pancreastatin (PST) and chromostatin (CST). Using antibodies for human PST and CST, the immunohistochemical localization of these peptides was investigated in neuroendocrine tissues, including human pituitary glands, pancreas, adrenal medulla, various types of neuroendocrine neoplasms (13 pheochromocytomas, 10 medullary thyroid carcinomas, 11 pancreatic endocrine tumors, and 19 carcinoid tumors), and the cell line QGP-1N derived from human somatostatin-producing pancreatic endocrine tumor. Variable immunoreactive intensities of PST and CST were seen, but both peptides were detectable in all neuroendocrine tissues and in most of the neoplasms. Immunoreactivity for both PST and CST was observed in 100 and 73%, respectively, of pancreatic endocrine tumors, all pheochromocytomas, and 80 and 40%, respectively, of medullary thyroid carcinomas, as well as all nonrectal carcinoid tumors. In rectal carcinoids, cells immunoreactive for PST and CST were sparse. The distribution of PST and CST was similar to that of CgA, and it is considered that these peptides are simultaneously processed from CgA, and may play roles in autocrine and paracrine regulation on various hormones in addition to their previously known functions.

  3. Ageing and chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea do not modify local brain tissue stiffness in healthy mice.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Ignasi; Menal, Maria José; Torres, Marta; Gozal, David; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Colell, Anna; Montserrat, Josep M; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-03-06

    Recent evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of Alzheimer´s disease (AD), with the latter promoting alterations in brain tissue stiffness, a feature of ageing. Here, we assessed the effects of age and intermittent hypoxia (IH) on brain tissue stiffness in a mouse model of OSA. Two-month-old and 18-month-old mice (N=10 each) were subjected to IH (20% O2 40s - 6% O2 20s) for 8 weeks (6h/day). Corresponding control groups for each age were kept under normoxic conditions in room air (RA). After sacrifice, the brain was excised and 200-micron coronal slices were cut with a vibratome. Local stiffness of the cortex and hippocampus were assessed in brain slices placed in an Atomic Force Microscope. For both brain regions, the Young's modulus (E) in each animal was computed as the average values from 9 force-indentation curves. Cortex E mean (±SE) values were 442±122Pa (RA) and 455±120 (IH) for young mice and 433±44 (RA) and 405±101 (IH) for old mice. Hippocampal E values were 376±62 (RA) and 474±94 (IH) for young mice and 486±93 (RA) and 521±210 (IH) for old mice. For both cortex and hippocampus, 2-way ANOVA indicated no statistically significant effects of age or challenge (IH vs. RA) on E values. Thus, neither chronic IH mimicking OSA nor ageing up to late middle age appear to modify local brain tissue stiffness in otherwise healthy mice.

  4. Local tissue temperature increase of a generic implant compared to the basic restrictions defined in safety guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Adamos; Christ, Andreas; Neufeld, Esra; Kuster, Niels

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if persons with implantable medical devices are intrinsically protected by the current electromagnetic safety guidelines. For inter-laboratory comparisons, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has defined a generic implant as consisting of an insulated wire with noninsulated tips, simulating active implants composed of a metallic case, and insulated wires with electric contacts at the tip. In this study, we determined the amplitude of the uniform electric fields induced in body tissues that cause a local increase in the tissue temperature by 1 °C in the presence of this generic implant for a wide range of frequencies and wire lengths. The field amplitudes were compared to the basic restrictions of the current exposure guidelines for both occupational and uncontrolled exposure. Results showed that a 1 °C temperature increase in the tissues around the tips of the generic implant can be reached for field strengths much smaller than 1% of those in the basic restrictions. The simulated results were validated by experimental evaluations. The impact of perfusion was investigated and was found to lead to a reduction in the local temperature peak by only 1.6-3 times. Additional simulations inside an inhomogeneous anatomical model were performed to ascertain whether similar heating as in the generic model was observed. The significant temperature elevations due to the presence of a generic implant indicate that demonstrating compliance with the basic restrictions might not be sufficient for persons with implants. Special considerations may be required, especially in the case of novel, emerging technologies that feature strong near-fields at frequencies below 10 MHz (e.g., wireless power-transfer systems).

  5. In situ localization and tissue distribution of ostreid herpesvirus 1 proteins in infected Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Martenot, Claire; Segarra, Amélie; Baillon, Laury; Faury, Nicole; Houssin, Maryline; Renault, Tristan

    2016-05-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays were conducted on paraffin sections from experimentally infected spat and unchallenged spat produced in hatchery to determine the tissue distribution of three viral proteins within the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Polyclonal antibodies were produced from recombinant proteins corresponding to two putative membrane proteins and one putative apoptosis inhibitor encoded by ORF 25, 72, and 87, respectively. Results were then compared to those obtained by in situ hybridization performed on the same individuals, and showed a substantial agreement according to Landis and Koch numeric scale. Positive signals were mainly observed in connective tissue of gills, mantle, adductor muscle, heart, digestive gland, labial palps, and gonads of infected spat. Positive signals were also reported in digestive epithelia. However, few positive signals were also observed in healthy appearing oysters (unchallenged spat) and could be due to virus persistence after a primary infection. Cellular localization of staining seemed to be linked to the function of the viral protein targeted. A nucleus staining was preferentially observed with antibodies targeting the putative apoptosis inhibitor protein whereas a cytoplasmic localization was obtained using antibodies recognizing putative membrane proteins. The detection of viral proteins was often associated with histopathological changes previously reported during OsHV-1 infection by histology and transmission electron microscopy. Within the 6h after viral suspension injection, positive signals were almost at the maximal level with the three antibodies and all studied organs appeared infected at 28h post viral injection. Connective tissue appeared to be a privileged site for OsHV-1 replication even if positive signals were observed in the epithelium cells of different organs which may be interpreted as a hypothetical portal of entry or release for the virus. IHC constitutes a suited method for analyzing the

  6. Persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in the nasopharynx of cattle: tissue-specific distribution and local cytokine expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tissues obtained post-mortem from cattle persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were analyzed to characterize the tissue-specific localization of FMDV and partial transcriptome profiles for selected immunoregulatory cytokines. Analysis of 28 distinct anatomic sites from 21 st...

  7. Tissue motion tracking at the edges of a radiation treatment field using local optical flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, P. T.; Pistorius, S.

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility and accuracy of tracking the motion of an intruding organ-at-risk (OAR) at the edges of a treatment field using a local optical flow analysis of electronic portal images. An intruding OAR was simulated by modifying the portal images obtained by irradiating a programmable phantom's lung tumour. A rectangular treatment aperture was assumed and the edges of the beam's eye view (BEV) were partitioned into clusters/grids according to the width of the multi-leaf collimators (MLC). The optical flow velocities were calculated and the motion accuracy in these clusters was analysed. A velocity error of 0.4 ± 1.4 mm/s with a linearity of 1.04 for tracking an object intruding at 10mm/s (max) was obtained.

  8. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  9. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival. This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival. TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT. PMID:27512857

  10. Localization and imaging of gangliosides in mouse brain tissue sections by laserspray ionization inlet[S

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alicia L.; Lietz, Christopher B.; Wager-Miller, James; Mackie, Ken; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    A new ionization method for the analysis of fragile gangliosides without undesired fragmentation or salt adduction is presented. In laserspray ionization inlet (LSII), the matrix/analyte sample is ablated at atmospheric pressure, and ionization takes place in the ion transfer capillary of the mass spectrometer inlet by a process that is independent of a laser wavelength or voltage. The softness of LSII allows the identification of gangliosides up to GQ1 with negligible sialic acid loss. This is of importance to the field of MS imaging, as undesired fragmentation has made it difficult to accurately map the spatial distribution of fragile ganglioside lipids in tissue. Proof-of-principle structural characterization of endogenous gangliosides using MSn fragmentation of multiply charged negative ions on a LTQ Velos and subsequent imaging of the GD1 ganglioside is demonstrated. This is the first report of multiply charged negative ions using inlet ionization. We find that GD1 is detected at higher levels in the mouse cortex and hippocampus compared with the thalamus. In LSII with the laser aligned in transmission geometry relative to the inlet, images were obtained in approximately 60 min using an inexpensive nitrogen laser. PMID:22262808

  11. Solar Particle Event Exposures and Local Tissue Environments in Free Space and on Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M. Y.; Shinn, J. L.; Singleterry, R. C.; Atwell, W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) are a concern to space missions outside Earth s geomagnetic field. The September 29, 1989 SPE is the largest ground-level event since February 23, 1956. It is an iron-rich event for which the spectra are well measured. Because ten times this event matches the ground level data of the February 1956 SPE, it is suggested that an event with ten-times the scaled spectra of the September 29, 1989 SPE be used as a worst case SPE for spacecraft design. For the worst case SPE, the input spectra were reconstructed using Nymmik's (1995) model for protons, the O and Fe ion spectra of Tylka et al. (1997) to evaluate the iron enhancement ratio, and the Solar Energetic Particle Baseline (SEPB) composition of McGuire et al. (1986) for the heavy ions. The necessary transport properties of the shielding materials and the astronaut s body tissues are evaluated using the HZETRN code. Three shield configurations (assumed to be aluminum) are considered: space suit taken as 0.3 g/sq cm, helmet/pressure vessel as 1 g/sq cm, and equipment room of 5 g/sq cm. A shelter is taken as 10 g/sq cm on the Martian surface. The effect of shielding due to the Martian atmosphere is included. The astronaut geometry is taken from the computerized anatomical man (CAM) model.

  12. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-08-01

    Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival.This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months.Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival.TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT.

  13. Surgical treatment of localized gingival recessions using coronally advanced flaps with or without subepithelial connective tissue graft

    PubMed Central

    Bellver-Fernández, Ricardo; Martínez-Rodriguez, Ana-María; Gioia-Palavecino, Claudio; Caffesse, Raul-Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background A coronally advanced flap with subepithelial connective tissue graft is the gold standard surgical treatment of gingival recessions, since it offers a higher probability of achieving complete root coverage compared with other techniques. However, optimum short- and middle-term clinical results have also been obtained with coronally advanced flaps alone. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the results obtained by the surgical treatment of localized gingival recessions using coronally advanced flaps with or without subepithelial connective tissue graft. Material and Methods The reduction of recession height was assessed, together with the gain in gingival attachment apical to the recession, and total reduction of recession, in a comparative study of two techniques. Twenty-two gingival recessions were operated upon: 13 in the control group (coronally advanced flap) and 9 in the test group (coronally advanced flap associated to subepithelial connective tissue graft). Results After 18 months, the mean reduction of recession height was 2.2 ± 0.8 mm in the control group and 2.3 ± 0.7 mm in the test group, with a mean gain in gingival attachment of 1.3 ± 0.9 mm and 2.3 ± 1.3 mm, respectively. In percentage terms, the mean reduction of recession height was 84.6 ± 19.6% in the control group and 81.7 ± 17.8% in the test group, with a mean gain in gingival attachment of 20.5 ± 37.4% and 184.4 ± 135.5%, respectively. Conclusions Significant reduction of gingival recession was achieved with both techniques, though the mean gain in gingival attachment (in mm and as a %) was greater in test group. Key words:Gingival recession, coronally advanced flap, subepthelial connective tissue graft. PMID:26595836

  14. Acrylic injectable and self-curing formulations for the local release of bisphosphonates in bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lorenzo, L M; Fernández, M; Parra, J; Vázquez, B; López-Bravo, A; Román, J San

    2007-11-01

    Two bisphosphonates (BPs), namely 1-hydroxy-2-[4-aminophenyl]ethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (APBP) and 1-hydroxy-2-[3-indolyl]ethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (IBP), have been synthesized and incorporated to acrylic injectable and self-curing formulations. Alendronic acid monosodium trihydrated salt (ALN) containing cement was formulated as control. These systems have potential applications in low density hard tissues affected by ailments characterized by a high osteoclastic resorption, i.e. osteoporosis and osteolysis. Values of curing parameters of APBP and IBP were acceptable to obtain pastes with enough fluency to be injected through a biopsy needle into the bone cavity. Working times ranged between 8 and 15 min and maximum temperature was around 50 degrees C. Cured systems stored for a month in synthetic body fluid had compressive strengths between 90 and 96 MPa and modulus between 1.2 and 1.3 GPa, which suggest mechanical stabilization after setting and in the short time. BPs were released in PBS at an initial rate depending on the corresponding chemical structure in the order ALN > APBP > IBP to give final concentrations in PBS of 2.21, 0.44, and 0.19 mol/mL for ALN, APBP, and IBP, respectively. Cytotoxicities of bisphosphonates were evaluated, IC(50) values being in the order APBP > ALN > IBP. Absence of cytotoxicity coming from leachables of the cured systems was observed in all cases independently of the BP. An improved cell growth and proliferation for the systems loaded with APBP and IBP compared with that loaded with ALN was observed, as assessed by measuring cell adhesion and proliferation, and total DNA content.

  15. Local tissue reaction after the application of topical hemostatic agents in a rat partial nephrectomy model.

    PubMed

    Chalupová, Marta; Suchý, Pavel; Pražanová, Gabriela; Bartošová, Ladislava; Sopuch, Tomáš; Havelka, Pavel

    2012-06-01

    Various hemostatics are used for renal surgical procedures. We investigated the hemostatic efficacy of cellulose derivatives on the model of partial nephrectomy in rats focusing on the local reaction of renal parenchyma. A total of 50 Wistar rats were divided into five groups of 10 animals each. Partial nephrectomy of the caudal pole without hilar vascular control was performed. Oxidized cellulose (OC), sodium salt of oxycellulose (OCN), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), dialdehyde cellulose (DAC), and gelatin-based hemostatic (C) were applied to the bleeding wounds. The time to hemostasis was monitored. Half of the animals were euthanized after 3 days, the second half 30 days from the experiment start date. The left kidney was excised and subjected to histopathological examination. The biochemical data was subjected to statistical analysis. The time to hemostasis in all groups was significantly less than in the C group (in OC p = 0.0057, OCN p = 0.0039, CMC and DAC p = 0.0001). In the C group, massive hemorrhages and necrosis did occur. In the OC and OCN groups, there were regenerative changes, a receding inflammatory reaction and hemorrhage. DAC caused an immune reaction and massive interstitial hemorrhages with biochemical signs of liver damage. Parenchyma in CMC revealed a reduction of necrosis and interstitial hemorrhages with regenerative processes. The most effective hemostatics were CMC and OC, achieving the best results both in the time to hemostasis, and for histopathological evaluation.

  16. Strontium localization in bone tissue studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Raffalt, Anders Christer; Stahl, Kenny

    2014-02-01

    Strontium has recently been introduced as a pharmacological agent for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. We determined the localization of strontium incorporated into bone matrix from dogs treated with Sr malonate by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A new approach for analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model and allowed the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone components to be estimated. Approximately 35-45% of the strontium present is incorporated into calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) by substitution of some of the calcium ions occupying highly ordered sites, and at least 30% is located at less ordered sites where only the first solvation shell is resolved, suggesting that strontium is surrounded by only oxygen atoms similar to Sr(2+) in solution. Strontium was furthermore shown to be absorbed in collagen in which it obtains a higher structural order than when present in serum but less order than when it is incorporated into CaHA. The total amount of strontium in the samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the amount of Sr was found to increase with increasing dose levels and treatment periods, whereas the relative distribution of strontium among the different components appears to be independent of treatment period and dose level.

  17. Synchronous heating of two local regions of a biological tissue phantom using automated targeting of phase conjugate ultrasound beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyansky, L. M.; Brysev, A. P.; Klopotov, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous heating of two local regions of an absorbing medium by phase conjugate ultrasound beams focused on them has been experimentally demonstrated. A polymeric biological tissue phantom with two small air cavities scattering sound has been used as the medium irradiated by a 5-MHz "probe" ultrasound beam. The scattered field is incident on a parametric device for ultrasonic wave phase conjugation. The conjugate and amplified field is self-adaptive focused on scatterers and heats the medium owing to the absorption of the ultrasonic energy. In this case, these regions are heated by about 5°C in 70 s. Only an insignificant increase in the temperature owing to the heat conduction effect is observed in the remaining volume of the phantom. The implemented effect can be used in medical applications of phase conjugate ultrasound beams.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility shift selected imaging (MESSI) and localized (1)H(2)O spectroscopy in living plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhong, K; Li, X; Shachar-Hill, Y; Picart, F; Wishnia, A; Springer, C S

    2000-11-01

    Maize root segments permeated with aqueous solutions of the paramagnetic agents GdDTPA(2-) or DyDTPA-BMA display two well-resolved NMR peaks corresponding to the signals from intracellular and extracellular (1)H(2)O, which arise from well-understood bulk magnetic susceptibility effects. This allows each component to be studied separately. Images obtained at each frequency with MESSI editing, and single- and multiple-voxel ('spectroscopic imaging') localized spectra, clearly indicate that the agents permeate into the interstitial spaces, and into the longitudinal (xylem/phloem) channels in the stele (core) of the root, confirming earlier assessments. We believe these are the first images of a multicellular tissue acquired in vivo exclusively from the intracellular water proton resonance. This method can be further exploited to study water transport in similar systems.

  19. Measurement of Local Partial Pressure of Oxygen in the Brain Tissue under Normoxia and Epilepsy with Phosphorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong; Bélanger, Samuel; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    In this work a method for measuring brain oxygen partial pressure with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy system is reported. When used in conjunction with a dendritic phosphorescent probe, Oxyphor G4, this system enabled minimally invasive measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution during 4-AP induced epileptic seizures. Investigating epileptic events, we characterized the spatio-temporal distribution of the "initial dip" in pO2 near the probe injection site and along nearby arterioles. Our results reveal a correlation between the percent change in the pO2 signal during the "initial dip" and the duration of seizure-like activity, which can help localize the epileptic focus and predict the length of seizure. PMID:26305777

  20. Metaproteomic Identification of Diazotrophic Methanotrophs and Their Localization in Root Tissues of Field-Grown Rice Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhihua; Okubo, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo; Kasahara, Yasuhiro; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Anda, Mizue; Ikeda, Seishi

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study by our group, CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation were simultaneously activated in the roots of wild-type rice plants in a paddy field with no N input; both processes are likely controlled by a rice gene for microbial symbiosis. The present study examined which microorganisms in rice roots were responsible for CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation under the field conditions. Metaproteomic analysis of root-associated bacteria from field-grown rice (Oryza sativa Nipponbare) revealed that nitrogenase complex-containing nitrogenase reductase (NifH) and the alpha subunit (NifD) and beta subunit (NifK) of dinitrogenase were mainly derived from type II methanotrophic bacteria of the family Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp. Minor nitrogenase proteins such as Methylocella, Bradyrhizobium, Rhodopseudomonas, and Anaeromyxobacter were also detected. Methane monooxygenase proteins (PmoCBA and MmoXYZCBG) were detected in the same bacterial group of the Methylocystaceae. Because these results indicated that Methylocystaceae members mediate both CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation, we examined their localization in rice tissues by using catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The methanotrophs were localized around the epidermal cells and vascular cylinder in the root tissues of the field-grown rice plants. Our metaproteomics and CARD-FISH results suggest that CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation are performed mainly by type II methanotrophs of the Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp., inhabiting the vascular bundles and epidermal cells of rice roots. PMID:24928870

  1. Molecular characterization of the gonadal kisspeptin system: Cloning, tissue distribution, gene expression analysis and localization in sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria).

    PubMed

    Fairgrieve, Marian R; Shibata, Yasushi; Smith, Elizabeth K; Hayman, Edward S; Luckenbach, J Adam

    2016-01-01

    The kisspeptin system plays pivotal roles in the regulation of vertebrate reproduction. Classically, kisspeptin produced in the brain stimulates brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone signaling, which in turn activates the pituitary-gonad axis. Expression of the kisspeptin system has also been documented in peripheral tissues, including gonads of mammals and fishes. However, the fish gonadal kisspeptin system remained uncharacterized. Herein we report identification and characterization of four kisspeptin system mRNAs (kisspeptin 1 (kiss1), kiss2, and G protein-coupled receptor 54-1 (gpr54-1) and gpr54-2) in sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria. Sablefish predicted protein sequences were highly similar to those of other marine teleosts, but less so to freshwater teleosts. Tissue distribution analyses revealed that all four kisspeptin-system transcripts were expressed in both brain and gonad. However, kiss2 was the predominant transcript in the gonads and the only transcript detected in ovulated eggs. Ontogenetic analysis of kiss2 expression in juvenile sablefish gonads demonstrated that levels were low during sex differentiation but increased with fish size and gonadal development. Dramatic increases in kiss2 mRNA occurred during primary oocyte growth, while levels remained relatively low in testes. In situ hybridization revealed that kiss2 mRNA was localized to cytoplasm of perinucleolus stage oocytes, suggesting it could play a local role in oogenesis or could be synthesized and stored within oocytes as maternal mRNA. This represents the first study to focus on the gonadal kisspeptin system in fishes and provides important tools for further investigation of both the gonadal and brain kisspeptin systems in sablefish.

  2. LPS challenge regulates gene expression and tissue localization of a Ciona intestinalis gene through an alternative polyadenylation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Aiti; Bonura, Angela; Parrinello, Daniela; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Longo, Valeria; Colombo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A subtractive hybridization strategy for the identification of differentially expressed genes was performed between LPS-challenged and naive Ciona intestinalis. This strategy allowed the characterization of two transcripts (Ci8short and Ci8long) generated by the use of two Alternative Polyadenylation sites. The Ci8long transcript contains a protein domain with relevant homology to several components of the Receptor Transporting Protein (RTP) family not present in the Ci8short mRNA. By means of Real Time PCR and Northern Blot, the Ci8short and Ci8long transcripts showed a different pattern of gene expression with the Ci8short mRNA being strongly activated after LPS injection in the pharynx. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that the activation of the APA site also influenced the tissue localization of the Ci8short transcript. This analysis showed that the Ci8long mRNA was expressed in hemocytes meanwhile the Ci8short mRNA was highly transcribed also in vessel endothelial cells and in the epithelium of pharynx. These findings demonstrated that regulation of gene expression based on different polyadenylation sites is an ancestral powerful strategy influencing both the level of expression and tissue distribution of alternative transcripts.

  3. Uptake and localization of /sup 131/I-labeled anti-calcitonin immunoglobulins in rat medullary thyroid carcinoma tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Gautvik, K.M.; Svindahl, K.; Skretting, A.; Stenberg, B.; Myhre, L.; Ekeland, A.; Johannesen, J.V.

    1982-09-15

    A medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MCT) which has been transplanted repeatedly under the kidney capsule of Wag/Rij rats secretes calcitonin (CT) spontaneously. From 10--20 weeks after transplantation, immunoreactive serum calcitonin (iCT) is abnormally elevated and continues to rise parallel to tumor growth. The immunoglobulin fraction of the rabbit anti-CT antiserum raised against intact synthetic hormone, was purified and iodinated electrolytically. Specific activities of /sup 131/I-labeled immunoglobulin of 0.008--0.014 mCi/microgram protein were obtained with 80% preservation of CT binding activity. Wag/Rig rats with MCT tumor and increased serum iCT concentrations received intravenous injections of /sup 131/I-labeled immunoglobulins (0.054--0.811 mCi). The distribution of radioactivity in the rats was followed for 14 days using external scintigraphy in combination with radioactivity measurements of blood and different organs at the end of the observation period. The distribution of /sup 113/mIn was used as a marker for blood distribution. When the radioactivity ratios (/sup 131/I//sup 113/mIn) in tumor and different organs were related to that of blood which was set equal to unity, tumor tissue contained 3--6 times higher activity. Nonhyperimmune rabbit immunoglobulins or rabbit antirat prolactin immunoglobulins were not concentrated in MCT tissue, nor did anti-CT immunoglobulins localize in rat prolactin adenomas.

  4. Noninvasive method for measuring local hemoglobin oxygen saturation in tissue using wide gap second derivative near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Myers, Dean E; Anderson, LeAnn D; Seifert, Roxanne P; Ortner, Joseph P; Cooper, Chris E; Beilman, Greg J; Mowlem, John D

    2005-01-01

    A simple continuous wave near-infrared algorithm for estimating local hemoglobin oxygen saturation in tissue (%StO2) is described using single depth attenuation measurements at 680, 720, 760, and 800 nm. Second derivative spectroscopy was used to reduce light scattering effects, chromophores with constant absorption, baseline/instrumentation drift, and movement artifacts. Unlike previous second derivative methods which focused primarily on measuring deoxyhemoglobin concentration; a wide 40 nm wavelength gap used for calculating second derivative attenuation significantly improved sensitivity to oxyhemoglobin absorption. Scaled second derivative attenuation at 720 nm was correlated to in vitro hemoglobin oxygen saturation to generate a %StO2 calibration curve. The calibration curve was insensitive to total hemoglobin, optical path length, and optical scattering. Measurement error due to normal levels of carboxyhemoglobin, methemoglobin, and water absorption were less than 10 %StO2 units. Severe methemoglobinemia or edema combined with low blood volume could cause StO2 errors to exceed 10 StO2 units. Both a broadband and commercial four-wavelength spectrometer (InSpectra) measured %StO2. The InSpectra tissue spectrometer readily detected limb ischemia on 26 human volunteers for hand, forearm, and leg muscles. A strong linear correlation, r2>0.93, between StO2 and microvascular %SO2 was observed for isolated animal hind limb, kidney, and heart.

  5. Molecular characterization, functional expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Illescas, Oscar; Carrero, Julio C; Bobes, Raúl J; Flisser, Ana; Rosas, Gabriela; Laclette, Juan P

    2012-12-01

    The fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) comprise a family of proteins that are widely expressed in animal cells and perform a variety of vital functions. Here, we report the identification, characterization, recombinant expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium FABP (TsFABP1). The TsFABP1 primary structure showed all the conserved residues characteristic of the subfamily iv of the intracellular Lipid-Binding Proteins (iLBPs), including those involved in the binding stabilization of the fatty acid molecule. Through a competitive binding assay we found that TsFABP1 is able to bind at least six different fatty acids with preference toward palmitic and stearic acid, suggesting that TsFABP1 is a member of the iLBP subfamily iv. Immunolocalization assays carried out on larval and adult tissues of four species of taeniids using anti-TsFABP1 hyperimmune sera produced in mice and rabbit, showed intense labeling in the tegument of the spiral canal and in subtegumental cytons of the larvae. These findings suggest that the spiral canal might be a major place for FA uptake in the developing scolex. In contrast, only subtegumental cytons in the adult worms stained positive. We propose that TsFABP1 is involved in the mechanism to mobilize fatty acids between compartments in the extensive syncytial tissue of taeniids. Protection assays carried out in a murine model of cysticercosis showed that subcutaneous immunization with TsFABP1 resulted in about 45% reduction of parasite load against an intraperitoneal challenge with Taenia crassiceps cysts. This reduction in parasite load correlated with the level of cellular and humoral immune responses against TsFABP1, as determined in spleen lymphocyte proliferation and ELISA testing.

  6. Supervised classification of brain tissues through local multi-scale texture analysis by coupling DIR and FLAIR MR sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, Enea; Veronese, Elisa; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Grisan, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    The automatic segmentation of brain tissues in magnetic resonance (MR) is usually performed on T1-weighted images, due to their high spatial resolution. T1w sequence, however, has some major downsides when brain lesions are present: the altered appearance of diseased tissues causes errors in tissues classification. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we employed two different MR sequences: fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and double inversion recovery (DIR). The former highlights both gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), the latter highlights GM alone. We propose here a supervised classification scheme that does not require any anatomical a priori information to identify the 3 classes, "GM", "WM", and "background". Features are extracted by means of a local multi-scale texture analysis, computed for each pixel of the DIR and FLAIR sequences. The 9 textures considered are average, standard deviation, kurtosis, entropy, contrast, correlation, energy, homogeneity, and skewness, evaluated on a neighborhood of 3x3, 5x5, and 7x7 pixels. Hence, the total number of features associated to a pixel is 56 (9 textures x3 scales x2 sequences +2 original pixel values). The classifier employed is a Support Vector Machine with Radial Basis Function as kernel. From each of the 4 brain volumes evaluated, a DIR and a FLAIR slice have been selected and manually segmented by 2 expert neurologists, providing 1st and 2nd human reference observations which agree with an average accuracy of 99.03%. SVM performances have been assessed with a 4-fold cross-validation, yielding an average classification accuracy of 98.79%.

  7. Localization of types I, II, and III collagen mRNAs in developing human skeletal tissues by in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Paraffin sections of human skeletal tissues were studied in order to identify cells responsible for production of types I, II, and III collagens by in situ hybridization. Northern hybridization and sequence information were used to select restriction fragments of cDNA clones for the corresponding mRNAs to obtain probes with a minimum of cross- hybridization. The specificity of the probes was proven in hybridizations to sections of developing fingers: osteoblasts and chondrocytes, known to produce only one type of fibrillar collagen each (I and II, respectively) were only recognized by the corresponding cDNA probes. Smooth connective tissues exhibited variable hybridization intensities with types I and III collagen cDNA probes. The technique was used to localize the activity of type II collagen production in the different zones of cartilage during the growth of long bones. Visual inspection and grain counting revealed the highest levels of pro alpha 1(II) collagen mRNAs in chondrocytes of the lower proliferative and upper hypertrophic zones of the growth plate cartilage. This finding was confirmed by Northern blotting of RNAs isolated from epiphyseal (resting) cartilage and from growth zone cartilage. Analysis of the osseochondral junction revealed virtually no overlap between hybridization patterns obtained with probes specific for type I and type II collagen mRNAs. Only a fraction of the chondrocytes in the degenerative zone were recognized by the pro alpha 1(II) collagen cDNA probe, and none by the type I collagen cDNA probe. In the mineralizing zone virtually all cells were recognized by the type I collagen cDNA probe, but only very few scattered cells appeared to contain type II collagen mRNA. These data indicate that in situ hybridization is a valuable tool for identification of connective tissue cells which are actively producing different types of collagens at the various stages of development, differentiation, and growth. PMID:3558480

  8. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Treatment with Thrombus Fragmentation and Local Fibrinolysis with Recombinant Human-Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Klaus Wilhelm; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Schnabel, Karl Jakob; Bongartz, Georg; Steinbrich, Wolfgang

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report the results of thrombus fragmentation in combination with local fibrinolysis using recombinant human-tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Methods: Five patients with massive pulmonary embolism were treated with thrombus fragmentation followed by intrapulmonary injection of rtPA. Clot fragmentation was performed with a guidewire, angiographic catheter, and balloon catheter. Three patients had undergone recent surgery; one of them received a reduced dosage of rtPA. Results: All patients survived and showed clinical improvement with a resultant significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the pulmonary blood pressure (mean systolic pulmonary blood pressure before treatment, 49 mmHg; 4 hr after treatment, 28 mmHg). Angiographic follow-up in three patients revealed a decrease in thrombus material and an increase in pulmonary perfusion. Two patients developed retroperitoneal hematomas requiring transfusion. Conclusion: Clot fragmentation and local fibrinolysis with rtPA was an effective therapy for massive pulmonary embolism. Bleeding at the puncture site was a frequent complication.

  9. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eunpi; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A.; Kurland, Brenda F.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  10. Adaptive localization of focus point regions via random patch probabilistic density from whole-slide, Ki-67-stained brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Yazan M; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Norul Huda; MdZin, Reena Rahayu; Omar, Khairuddin

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of whole-slide tissue for digital pathology images has been clinically approved to provide a second opinion to pathologists. Localization of focus points from Ki-67-stained histopathology whole-slide tissue microscopic images is considered the first step in the process of proliferation rate estimation. Pathologists use eye pooling or eagle-view techniques to localize the highly stained cell-concentrated regions from the whole slide under microscope, which is called focus-point regions. This procedure leads to a high variety of interpersonal observations and time consuming, tedious work and causes inaccurate findings. The localization of focus-point regions can be addressed as a clustering problem. This paper aims to automate the localization of focus-point regions from whole-slide images using the random patch probabilistic density method. Unlike other clustering methods, random patch probabilistic density method can adaptively localize focus-point regions without predetermining the number of clusters. The proposed method was compared with the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Our proposed method achieves a good performance, when the results were evaluated by three expert pathologists. The proposed method achieves an average false-positive rate of 0.84% for the focus-point region localization error. Moreover, regarding RPPD used to localize tissue from whole-slide images, 228 whole-slide images have been tested; 97.3% localization accuracy was achieved.

  11. Adaptive Localization of Focus Point Regions via Random Patch Probabilistic Density from Whole-Slide, Ki-67-Stained Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Yazan M.; MdZin, Reena Rahayu

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of whole-slide tissue for digital pathology images has been clinically approved to provide a second opinion to pathologists. Localization of focus points from Ki-67-stained histopathology whole-slide tissue microscopic images is considered the first step in the process of proliferation rate estimation. Pathologists use eye pooling or eagle-view techniques to localize the highly stained cell-concentrated regions from the whole slide under microscope, which is called focus-point regions. This procedure leads to a high variety of interpersonal observations and time consuming, tedious work and causes inaccurate findings. The localization of focus-point regions can be addressed as a clustering problem. This paper aims to automate the localization of focus-point regions from whole-slide images using the random patch probabilistic density method. Unlike other clustering methods, random patch probabilistic density method can adaptively localize focus-point regions without predetermining the number of clusters. The proposed method was compared with the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Our proposed method achieves a good performance, when the results were evaluated by three expert pathologists. The proposed method achieves an average false-positive rate of 0.84% for the focus-point region localization error. Moreover, regarding RPPD used to localize tissue from whole-slide images, 228 whole-slide images have been tested; 97.3% localization accuracy was achieved. PMID:25793010

  12. Expression and localization of inhibitor of differentiation (ID) proteins during tissue and vascular remodelling in the human corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Narayanan, Rachna; Giakoumelou, Sevasti; Boswell, Lyndsey; Hogg, Kirsten; Duncan, W Colin

    2013-02-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily are likely to have major roles in the regulation of tissue and vascular remodelling in the corpus luteum (CL). There are four inhibitor-of-differentiation (ID1-4) genes that are regulated by members of the TGF-β superfamily and are involved in the transcriptional regulation of cell growth and differentiation. We studied their expression, localization and regulation in dated human corpora lutea from across the luteal phase (n = 22) and after human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) administration in vivo (n = 5), and in luteinized granulosa cells (LGCs), using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. ID1-4 can be localized to multiple cell types in the CL across the luteal phase. Endothelial cell ID3 (P < 0.05) and ID4 (P < 0.05) immunostaining intensities peak at the time of angiogenesis but overall ID1 (P < 0.05) and ID3 (P < 0.05) expression peaks at the time of luteolysis, and luteal ID3 expression is inhibited by hCG in vivo (P < 0.01). In LGC cultures in vitro, hCG had no effect on ID1, down-regulated ID3 (P < 0.001), and up-regulated ID2 (P < 0.001) and ID4 (P < 0.01). Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) had no effect on ID4 expression but up-regulated ID1 (P < 0.01 to P < 0.005). BMP up-regulation of ID2 (P < 0.05) was additive to the hCG up-regulation of ID2 expression (P < 0.001), while BMP cancelled out the down regulative effect of hCG on ID3 regulation. As well as documenting regulation patterns specific for ID1, ID2, ID3 and ID4, we have shown that IDs are located and differentially regulated in the human CL, suggesting a role in the transcriptional regulation of luteal cells during tissue and vascular remodelling.

  13. Immunohistochemical detection and localization of new type gosling viral enteritis virus in paraformaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Zhu, Dekang; Luo, Qihui; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2009-08-15

    To determine the distribution and localization of new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV) in paraformaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of experimentally infected goslings, for the first time, an immunohistochemical (IHC) staining method was reported. Anti-NGVEV polyclonal serum was obtained from the rabbits immunized with purified NGVEV antigen, which was extracted by caprylic-ammonium sulphate method and purified through High-Q columns anion exchange chromatography. Three-day-old NGVEV-free goslings were orally inoculated with NGVEV-CN strain suspension as infection group and phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) as control group, respectively. The tissues were collected at sequential time points between 0.5 and 720h post inoculation (PI), and prepared for IHC staining and ultra-structural observation. The positive immunoreactivity could be readily detected in the lymphoid and gastrointestinal organs of infected goslings as early as 48 h PI, in the liver, kidney, pancreas and myocardium from 72 h, and in the cerebrum and cerebellum from 96 h, while it was hardly detected in the respiratory organs at any time. The positive staining reaction could be detected in NGVEV-infected goslings until 600 h PI, and no positive staining cell could be observed in the controls. The highest levels of viral antigen were found in the bursa of Fabricius (BF), thymus, proventriculus, gizzard and intestine tract, moreover, the liver, kidney, spleen, myocardium and pancreas were intensively and widely stained. The target cells had a ubiquitous distribution, especially included the epithelial cells, endothelial cells, superficial and crypt mucosal cells, glandular cells, fibrocytes, macrophages and lymphocytes, which served as the principal sites for antigen localization. The ultra-structural observation by transmission electron microscope (TEM) further indicated that NGVEV particles could be widely detected in the lymphoid and digestive organs of infected goslings from

  14. IgE-Binding Epitope Mapping and Tissue Localization of the Major American Cockroach Allergen Per a 2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mey-Fann; Chang, Chia-Wei; Song, Pei-Pong; Hwang, Guang-Yuh; Lin, Shyh-Jye

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cockroaches are the second leading allergen in Taiwan. Sensitization to Per a 2, the major American cockroach allergen, correlates with clinical severity among patients with airway allergy, but there is limited information on IgE epitopes and tissue localization of Per a 2. This study aimed to identify Per a 2 linear IgE-binding epitopes and its distribution in the body of a cockroach. Methods The cDNA of Per a 2 was used as a template and combined with oligonucleotide primers specific to the target areas with appropriate restriction enzyme sites. Eleven overlapping fragments of Per a 2 covering the whole allergen molecule, except 20 residues of signal peptide, were generated by PCR. Mature Per a 2 and overlapping deletion mutants were affinity-purified and assayed for IgE reactivity by immunoblotting. Three synthetic peptides comprising the B cell epitopes were evaluated by direct binding ELISA. Rabbit anti-Per a 2 antibody was used for immunohistochemistry. Results Human linear IgE-binding epitopes of Per a 2 were located at the amino acid sequences 57-86, 200-211, and 299-309. There was positive IgE binding to 10 tested Per a 2-allergic sera in 3 synthetic peptides, but none in the controls. Immunostaining revealed that Per a 2 was localized partly in the mouth and midgut of the cockroach, with the most intense staining observed in the hindgut, suggesting that the Per a 2 allergen might be excreted through the feces. Conclusions Information on the IgE-binding epitope of Per a 2 may be used for designing more specific diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to cockroach allergy. PMID:25749772

  15. Perlecan/HSPG2 and matrilysin/MMP-7 as indices of tissue invasion: tissue localization and circulating perlecan fragments in a cohort of 288 radical prostatectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Grindel, Brian; Li, Quanlin; Arnold, Rebecca; Petros, John; Zayzafoon, Majd; Muldoon, Mark; Stave, James; Chung, Leland W. K.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) cells use matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to degrade tissue during invasion. Perlecan/HSPG2 is degraded at basement membranes, in reactive stroma and in bone marrow during metastasis. We previously showed MMP-7 efficiently degrades perlecan. We now analyzed PCa tissue and serum from 288 prostatectomy patients of various Gleason grades to decipher the relationship between perlecan and MMP-7 in invasive PCa. In 157 prostatectomy specimens examined by tissue microarray, perlecan levels were 18% higher than their normal counterparts. In Gleason grade 4 tissues, MMP-7 and perlecan immunostaining levels were highly correlated with each other (average correlation coefficient of 0.52) in PCa tissue, regardless of grade. Serial sections showed intense, but non-overlapping, immunostaining for MMP-7 and perlecan at adjacent borders, reflecting the protease-substrate relationship. Using a capture assay, analysis of 288 PCa sera collected at prostatectomy showed elevated levels of perlecan fragments, with most derived from domain IV. Perlecan fragments in PCa sera were associated with overall MMP-7 staining levels in PCa tissues. Domain IV perlecan fragments were present in stage IV, but absent in normal, sera, suggesting perlecan degradation during metastasis. Together, perlecan fragments in sera and MMP-7 in tissues of PCa patients are measures of invasive PCa. PMID:26862737

  16. Perlecan/HSPG2 and matrilysin/MMP-7 as indices of tissue invasion: tissue localization and circulating perlecan fragments in a cohort of 288 radical prostatectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Grindel, Brian; Li, Quanlin; Arnold, Rebecca; Petros, John; Zayzafoon, Majd; Muldoon, Mark; Stave, James; Chung, Leland W K; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) cells use matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to degrade tissue during invasion. Perlecan/HSPG2 is degraded at basement membranes, in reactive stroma and in bone marrow during metastasis. We previously showed MMP-7 efficiently degrades perlecan. We now analyzed PCa tissue and serum from 288 prostatectomy patients of various Gleason grades to decipher the relationship between perlecan and MMP-7 in invasive PCa. In 157 prostatectomy specimens examined by tissue microarray, perlecan levels were 18% higher than their normal counterparts. In Gleason grade 4 tissues, MMP-7 and perlecan immunostaining levels were highly correlated with each other (average correlation coefficient of 0.52) in PCa tissue, regardless of grade. Serial sections showed intense, but non-overlapping, immunostaining for MMP-7 and perlecan at adjacent borders, reflecting the protease-substrate relationship. Using a capture assay, analysis of 288 PCa sera collected at prostatectomy showed elevated levels of perlecan fragments, with most derived from domain IV. Perlecan fragments in PCa sera were associated with overall MMP-7 staining levels in PCa tissues. Domain IV perlecan fragments were present in stage IV, but absent in normal, sera, suggesting perlecan degradation during metastasis. Together, perlecan fragments in sera and MMP-7 in tissues of PCa patients are measures of invasive PCa.

  17. Application of a novel and automated branched DNA in situ hybridization method for the rapid and sensitive localization of mRNA molecules in plant tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Andrew J.; Pence, Heather E.; Church, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A novel branched DNA detection technology, RNAscope in situ hybridization (ISH), originally developed for use on human clinical and animal tissues, was adapted for use in plant tissue in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations associated with traditional ISH assays. • Methods and Results: Zea mays leaf tissue was formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) and then probed with the RNAscope ISH assay for two endogenous genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Results from both manual and automated methods showed tissue- and cell-specific mRNA localization patterns expected from these well-studied genes. • Conclusions: RNAscope ISH is a sensitive method that generates high-quality, easily interpretable results from FFPE plant tissues. Automation of the RNAscope method on the Ventana Discovery Ultra platform allows significant advantages for repeatability, reduction in variability, and flexibility of workflow processes. PMID:25202621

  18. Mouse microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamuta, Makoto; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Hoogeveen, R.

    1996-04-15

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) catalyzes the transfer of triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, and phospholipid between membranes. It is essential for the secretion of apolipoprotein B from the cell. Mutations in MTP are a major cause of abetalipoproteinemia. The mouse is a popular animal model for lipoprotein metabolism. We have cloned and sequenced mouse MTP cDNA. The DNA-deduced amino acid sequence indicates that mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence indicates that mouse MTP contains 894 amino acids; the mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence identity to the hamster, human, and bovine sequences, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicates that mouse MTP mRNA is expressed at high levels in the small intestine and at substantially lower levels in the liver and that it is not detectable in six other tissues examined. The mouse MTP gene has been localized to the distal region of chromosome 3 by Southern blots of interspecific backcross panels using progeny derived from matings of (C57BL/6J x SPRET/Ei)F1 x SPRET/Ei. Comparison of MTP sequences from human, bovine, hamster, and mouse indicates that the C-terminal region of MTP is better conserved than its N-terminal region. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Preparing and Analyzing Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) Library for the Mammary Tissue of Local Turkish Kivircik Sheep.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir Ozgenturk, Nehir; Omeroglu Ulu, Zehra; Ulu, Salih; Un, Cemal; Ozdem Oztabak, Kemal; Altunatmaz, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Kivircik sheep is an important local Turkish sheep according to its meat quality and milk productivity. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression profiles of both prenatal and postnatal stages for the Kivircik sheep. Therefore, two different cDNA libraries, which were taken from the same Kivircik sheep mammary gland tissue at prenatal and postnatal stages, were constructed. Total 3072 colonies which were randomly selected from the two libraries were sequenced for developing a sheep ESTs collection. We used Phred/Phrap computer programs for analysis of the raw EST and readable EST sequences were assembled with the CAP3 software. Putative functions of all unique sequences and statistical analysis were determined by Geneious software. Total 422 ESTs have over 80% similarity to known sequences of other organisms in NCBI classified by Panther database for the Gene Ontology (GO) category. By comparing gene expression profiles, we observed some putative genes that may be relative to reproductive performance or play important roles in milk synthesis and secretion. A total of 2414 ESTs have been deposited to the NCBI GenBank database (GW996847-GW999260). EST data in this study have provided a new source of information to functional genome studies of sheep.

  20. Preparing and Analyzing Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) Library for the Mammary Tissue of Local Turkish Kivircik Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Omeroglu Ulu, Zehra; Ulu, Salih; Un, Cemal; Ozdem Oztabak, Kemal; Altunatmaz, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Kivircik sheep is an important local Turkish sheep according to its meat quality and milk productivity. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression profiles of both prenatal and postnatal stages for the Kivircik sheep. Therefore, two different cDNA libraries, which were taken from the same Kivircik sheep mammary gland tissue at prenatal and postnatal stages, were constructed. Total 3072 colonies which were randomly selected from the two libraries were sequenced for developing a sheep ESTs collection. We used Phred/Phrap computer programs for analysis of the raw EST and readable EST sequences were assembled with the CAP3 software. Putative functions of all unique sequences and statistical analysis were determined by Geneious software. Total 422 ESTs have over 80% similarity to known sequences of other organisms in NCBI classified by Panther database for the Gene Ontology (GO) category. By comparing gene expression profiles, we observed some putative genes that may be relative to reproductive performance or play important roles in milk synthesis and secretion. A total of 2414 ESTs have been deposited to the NCBI GenBank database (GW996847–GW999260). EST data in this study have provided a new source of information to functional genome studies of sheep. PMID:28239610

  1. Localization of tissue plasminogen activator in relation to morphologic changes in human saphenous veins used as coronary artery bypass autografts.

    PubMed Central

    Glas-Greenwalt, P; Dalton, B C; Astrup, T

    1975-01-01

    Employing the histochemical fibrin slide technique, we studied the localization of fibrinolytically active sites in relation to morphologic changes in saphenous veins used as coronary artery bypass autografts. Of veins from 100 patients undergoing surgery for coronary heart disease, 63 samples revealed well-demarcated intimal fibrinolytic activity. Distinct foci of lysis were present in the media and adventitia of all vein samples corresponding to the distribution of the vasa vasorum. Graft specimens obtained by autopsy from 13 patients surviving from 30 minutes to 13 days revealed considerable intimal damage with loss of fibrinolytic activity. Medial fibrinolytic activity disappeared early concomitant with disorganization of the medial muscle fibers, followed by necrosis, atrophy and fibrous transformation of the muscular structures. Adventitial activity disappeared later. One reoperation sample obtained after 8 weeks in situ showed moderate proliferative intimal fibrosis without an apparent neo-intima and without fibrinolytic activity, and one section showed evidence of valve cusp fibrosis, while most of the media had been replaced by fibrous tissue. Numerous foci of "medial" -adventitial fibrinolytic activity indicated presence of vascular structures in the venous wall. The fibrin slide technique is a convenient tool for studying the process of revascularization. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Figs. 5a-d. Fig. 6. Figs. 7a and b. Figs. 8a and b. PMID:1079445

  2. A Potential Nanofiber Membrane Device for Filling Surgical Residual Cavity to Prevent Glioma Recurrence and Improve Local Neural Tissue Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Daoxiang; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Gu, Shuying; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel device with nanofiber membrane capable of sustained release of temozolomide (TMZ) and neuron growth factor (NGF). An improved bio-availability of TMZ and NGF in surroundings proximal to the device was expected to be attained for a prolonged period of time. The device was developed by integrating TMZ-doped polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber (TP) membrane and NGF-coated PCL (NGFP) membrane using sodium alginate hydrogel. TP was prepared by direct electrospinning of TMZ/PCL. NGFP membrane was developed by layer-by-layer assembling technology. The incorporation of TMZ-doped nanofiber and NGFP nanofiber in the device was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The number of NGF layer in NGF-coated PCL membrane could be readily measured with energy spectrum analysis. The in vitro release study showed that TP-NGFP-TP membrane could efficiently liberate TMZ to inhibit the growth of C6 glioma cells, and sufficient NGF to induce the differentiation of PC12 neuron cells over four weeks. Such TP-NGFP-TP membrane device can be employed as a tampon to fill up surgical residual cavity and afford residual glioma removal, structural support, hemostasis, and local neural tissue reconstruction in the surgical treatment of glioma. The study opens a horizon to develop multifunctional biomaterial device for maximized glioma treatment efficacy. PMID:27548322

  3. Localization of pro-alpha 2(V) collagen transcripts in the tissues of the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulos, K; Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1992-10-01

    Correct assembly of fibrillar collagen networks plays a critical role in animal morphogenesis. Very little is known about the contribution of the so-called minor fibrillar collagens (types V and XI) to fibrillogenesis. Here we examined the developmental expression of the mouse pro-alpha 2(V) collagen gene (col5a2) after the cloning and sequencing of cDNAs that cover the entire length of the message. Transcripts of col5a2, detectable as early as 9 days of gestation, localize with distinct patterns in the tissues of day 12.5 and day 16.5 fetuses. The earlier developmental stage is characterized by low and diffuse col5a2 expression in the peritoneal membranes and intestinal and craniofacial mesenchymes. The later stage exhibits higher and more restricted col5a2 mRNA accumulation in primary ossified regions, perichondrium, joints, tendon, atrioventricular valve of the heart, and selected portions of the head. A parallel analysis using a cartilage-specific pro-alpha 1(II) collagen (col2a1) probe confirmed that these two collagen genes are transcribed in a mutually exclusive manner during mouse embryogenesis. On the other hand, the developmental pattern of col5a2 expression closely resembles that of the type I collagen, thus further substantiating the notion that these macromolecules cooperate in the formation of fibrillar networks in non-cartilaginous matrices.

  4. Adverse effects of extra-articular corticosteroid injections: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To estimate the occurrence and type of adverse effects after application of an extra-articular (soft tissue) corticosteroid injection. Methods A systematic review of the literature was made based on a PubMed and Embase search covering the period 1956 to January 2010. Case reports were included, as were prospective and retrospective studies that reported adverse events of corticosteroid injection. All clinical trials which used extra-articular corticosteroid injections were examined. We divided the reported adverse events into major (defined as those needing intervention or not disappearing) and minor ones (transient, not requiring intervention). Results The search yielded 87 relevant studies:44 case reports, 37 prospective studies and 6 retrospective studies. The major adverse events included osteomyelitis and protothecosis; one fatal necrotizing fasciitis; cellulitis and ecchymosis; tendon ruptures; atrophy of the plantar fat was described after injecting a neuroma; and local skin effects appeared as atrophy, hypopigmentation or as skin defect. The minor adverse events effects ranged from skin rash to flushing and disturbed menstrual pattern. Increased pain or steroid flare after injection was reported in 19 studies. After extra-articular injection, the incidence of major adverse events ranged from 0-5.8% and that of minor adverse events from 0-81%. It was not feasible to pool the risk for adverse effects due to heterogeneity of study populations and difference in interventions and variance in reporting. Conclusion In this literature review it was difficult to accurately quantify the incidence of adverse effects after extra-articular corticosteroid injection. The reported adverse events were relatively mild, although one fatal reaction was reported. PMID:20836867

  5. Peripheral Tissue Homing Receptor Control of Naïve, Effector, and Memory CD8 T Cell Localization in Lymphoid and Non-Lymphoid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Peske, J. David; Engelhard, Victor Henry

    2013-01-01

    T cell activation induces homing receptors that bind ligands on peripheral tissue vasculature, programing movement to sites of infection and injury. There are three major types of CD8 effector T cells based on homing receptor expression, which arise in distinct lymphoid organs. Recent publications indicate that naïve, effector, and memory T cell migration is more complex than once thought; while many effectors enter peripheral tissues, some re-enter lymph nodes (LN), and contain central memory precursors. LN re-entry can depend on CD62L or peripheral tissue homing receptors. Memory T cells in LN tend to express the same homing receptors as their forebears, but often are CD62Lneg. Homing receptors also control CD8 T cell tumor entry. Tumor vasculature has low levels of many peripheral tissue homing receptor ligands, but portions of it resemble high endothelial venules (HEV), enabling naïve T cell entry, activation, and subsequent effector activity. This vasculature is associated with positive prognoses in humans, suggesting it may sustain ongoing anti-tumor responses. These findings reveal new roles for homing receptors expressed by naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cells in controlling entry into lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. PMID:23966998

  6. Tissue localization, shedding, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) following inoculation of 4 week-old feeder pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) emerged in the U.S. in April 2013 and caused significant losses to the swine industry. The purpose of this investigation was to determine tissue localization, shedding patterns, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of PEDV following inocu...

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Pulmonary Metastases From Soft-Tissue Sarcomas: Excellent Local Lesion Control and Improved Patient Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Sughosh; Corbin, Kimberly S.; Milano, Michael T.; Philip, Abraham; Sahasrabudhe, Deepak; Jones, Carolyn

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with pulmonary metastases (PM) from soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) have historically been treated with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Since 2001, we have treated PM with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We postulated that SBRT for PM from STS would yield excellent local control (LC) and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients with PM from STS, diagnosed between 1990 and 2006 at University of Rochester, were retrospectively reviewed. Most patients received multimodality treatment comprising of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation. SBRT used the Novalis ExacTrac patient positioning platform, vacuum bag immobilization, and relaxed end-expiratory breath hold techniques. Results: Leiomyosarcoma (23%), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (19%), and synovial sarcoma (15%) were the most common histologies. Forty-eight percent initially presented with PM, whereas 52% developed PM at a median of 0.7 (0.3-7.3) years after initial diagnosis. Median follow-up from diagnosis of PM was 0.9 (0.3-7.3) years. Fifteen patients underwent SBRT to 74 lesions. Median number of lesions treated was 4 (1-16) per patient and 3.5 (1-6) per session. Preferred dose and fractionation was 50 Gy in 5 Gy fractions. Three-year LC was 82%. No patients experienced Grade {>=}3 toxicity. Median OS was 2.1 (0.8-11.5) years for patients treated with SBRT, and 0.6 (0.1-7.8) years for those who never received SBRT (p = 0.002). Conclusions: SBRT provides excellent LC of PM and may extend OS. SBRT should be considered for all patients with PM from STS, particularly those who are not surgical candidates. Further investigation is warranted to establish criteria for the use of SBRT for STS patients with PM.

  8. Micro- and nano-carrier systems: The non-invasive and painless local administration strategies for disease therapy in mucosal tissues.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Wang, Lingwei; Yao, Yingyi; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Xiaoli; Li, Xue; Wang, Hanjie; Zhang, Xuening; Gong, Xiaoqun; Chang, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mucus is a viscoelastic and adhesive obstacle which protects vaginas, eyes and other mucosal surfaces against foreign pathogens. Numerous diseases that affect the mucosa could be afforded prophylactic and therapeutic treatments with fewer systemic side effects if drugs and genes could be sufficiently delivered to the target mucosal tissues. But drugs and genes are trapped effectively like other pathogens and rapidly removed by mucus clearance mechanism. The emergence of micro- and nano-delivery technologies combined with the realization of non-invasive and painless administration routes brings new hope for the treatment of disease. For retained drugs and genes to mucosal tissues, carriers must increase retention time in the mucus to make full contact with epithelial cells and be transported to target tissues. This review focuses on the current development of micro- and nano-carriers to improve the localized therapeutic efficiency of targeted and sustained drug and gene delivery in mucosal tissues.

  9. The Role of Irradiation in the Management of Locally Recurrent Non-Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity/Trunkal Locations

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Michael P.; Lucas, David R.; Miller, Peter R.; Kraut, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Patients who have had initial curative intent therapy for non-metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, and who subsequently relapse at the initial site without evidence of metastatic disease, have various options regarding local treatment. The treatment options available will be determined by the extent of relapse, previous therapy rendered, and patient characteristics. We reported on a series of 31 patients treated initially with only surgery for extremity/trunkal high-grade soft tissue sarcoma and then seen for recurrence at our institution between 1980 and 1999. Local re-treatment consisted of combined modality therapy, most often aggressive surgical debulking/resection and irradiation, in an effort to reduce the need for amputation and, where anatomically allowable, to maintain a functional limb. We report our results in re-establishing local control, subsequent survival, and complication rates. Methods: Thirty-one patients with locally recurrent, non-metastatic high-grade soft tissue sarcoma, (excluding extraabdominal desmoid) were retrospectively reviewed to determine local control, survival, and complication rates associated with the relapsed disease. All patients had multimodality re-treatment most often utilizing aggressive surgical debulking and irradiation. The irradiation consisted of either external beam alone, brachytherapy alone, or a combination of external beam and brachytherapy. Nine patients also received multi-agent, multi-cycle chemotherapy using various regimens. In addition, the impact of surgical margin at the time of re-resection (gross versus microscopic disease), radiation treatment type, total radiation dose delivered, size of relapse, histological sub-type, sex and age, were evaluated to determine if they had any impact on the re-establishment of local control and subsequent survival. Results: Local control was re-established in 25 of 31 (80.6%) patients. Two additional patients with isolated local relapse after irradiation were

  10. Persistent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection in the Nasopharynx of Cattle; Tissue-Specific Distribution and Local Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Juan M.; Smoliga, George R.; O’Donnell, Vivian; Brito, Barbara P.; Stenfeldt, Carolina; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Arzt, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Tissues obtained post-mortem from cattle persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were analyzed to characterize the tissue-specific localization of FMDV and partial transcriptome profiles for selected immunoregulatory cytokines. Analysis of 28 distinct anatomic sites from 21 steers infected with FMDV serotype A, O or SAT2, had the highest prevalence of overall viral detection in the dorsal nasopharynx (80.95%) and dorsal soft palate (71.43%). FMDV was less frequently detected in laryngeal mucosal tissues, oropharyngeal mucosal sites, and lymph nodes draining the pharynx. Immunomicroscopy indicated that within persistently infected mucosal tissues, FMDV antigens were rarely detectable within few epithelial cells in regions of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Transcriptome analysis of persistently infected pharyngeal tissues by qRT-PCR for 14 cytokine genes indicated a general trend of decreased mRNA levels compared to uninfected control animals. Although, statistically significant differences were not observed, greatest suppression of relative expression (RE) was identified for IP-10 (RE = 0.198), IFN-β (RE = 0.269), IL-12 (RE = 0.275), and IL-2 (RE = 0.312). Increased relative expression was detected for IL-6 (RE = 2.065). Overall, this data demonstrates that during the FMDV carrier state in cattle, viral persistence is associated with epithelial cells of the nasopharynx in the upper respiratory tract and decreased levels of mRNA for several immunoregulatory cytokines in the infected tissues. PMID:25996935

  11. Localization of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) and Methylobacterium extorquens genes of strawberry flavor biosynthesis in strawberry tissue by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nasopoulou, Constantina; Pohjanen, Johanna; Koskimäki, Janne J; Zabetakis, Ioannis; Pirttilä, Anna Maria

    2014-08-15

    Strawberry flavor is one of the most popular fruit flavors worldwide, with numerous applications in the food industry. In addition, the biosynthetic origin of the most important strawberry flavor components, such as 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-2H-furan-3-one (DMHF), is a challenging research area. DMHF's precursor, 2-hydroxy-propanal (or lactaldehyde), is biosynthesized by the endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens (M. extorquens). In particular, the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes of M. extorquens are involved in the biogenesis of DMHF precursors since they have the capacity to oxidize the strawberry-derived 1,2-propanediol to lactaldehyde. In this study, the expression of the endophytic ADH and the plant DMHF biosynthesis genes was examined in the tissues of raw and ripe strawberry receptacles by in situ hybridization. The presence of endophytic bacteria was studied in the same tissues by probes targeting bacterial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid. Hybridization signals of probes specific for endophytic ADH and plant DMHF biosynthesis genes, as well as bacteria-specific probes, were detected in the same locations. The probes were localized near the plasma membranes or intercellular spaces of cortical and vascular tissues of the receptacle, and intracellularly in the tissues of achenes. By localizing the expression of the endophytic methanol ADH and plant DMHF biosynthesis genes to the same tissues, we have reinforced our original hypothesis that an intimate symbiotic relationship between strawberry and endophytic cells exists and leads to the biosynthesis of DMHF.

  12. Effects of Diaspirin Crosslinked Hemoglobin (DCLHb) on microcirculation and local tissue pO2 of striated skin muscle following resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Hungerer, Sven; Nolte, Dirk; Botzlar, Andreas; Messmer, Konrad

    2006-01-01

    The hemoglobin based oxygen carrier (HBOC) Diaspirin Crosslinked Hemoglobin (DCLHb) has been developed to substitute not only the blood volume, but also to restore the oxygen-carrying properties of blood during hemorrhagic shock. However, it has been suggested that HBOCs may enhance the formation of free oxygen radicals through the release of free iron ions via the Haber-Weiss reaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DCLHb on the microcirculation, leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction and local tissue oxygenation in striated skin muscle of Syrian golden hamsters during and after resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. In particular we focused on the local tissue oxygenation after resuscitation with DCLHb (hemoglobin content 10 g%) compared to resuscitation using autologous blood diluted to a hemoglobin content of 10 g%. Hemorrhagic shock was induced for 45 minutes by bleeding the animals at a rate of 33 ml/kg BW maintaining a mean arterial pressure of 30 +/- 5 mmHg. Animals were resuscitated either with 33 ml/kg BW 6% Dextran-60.000 or with 10 g% DCLHb. The control group received shed blood diluted with Ringers to a hemoglobin content of 10 g%. Intravital microscopy was used for investigation of the microcirculatory parameters and a multiwire platinum surface electrode for measurement of local tissue pO2 in striated skin muscle in the dorsal skinfold chamber of Syrian golden hamsters. Resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock with 10 g% AUB revealed significant increase of leukocytes rolling in postcapillary venules at 30 to 120 minutes after resuscitation compared to baseline values. DCLHb turned out to reduce the number of firmly adherent leukocytes after resuscitation compared to 10 g% AUB. Microvascular permeability as an indicator for functional endothelial integrity revealed no significant differences between the groups. DCLHb and 10 g% AUB led to a significant increase in local tissue oxygenation after resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock

  13. Alteration of local adipose tissue trace element homeostasis as a possible mechanism of obesity-related insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tinkov, Alexey A; Sinitskii, Anton I; Popova, Elizaveta V; Nemereshina, Olga N; Gatiatulina, Evgenia R; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of association between obesity and the related metabolic disturbances in general and insulin resistance in particular are extensively studied. Taking into account a key role of adipose tissue insulin resistance in the development of systemic obesity-related insulin resistance, the estimation of mechanisms linking increased adiposity and impaired insulin signaling in adipocytes will allow to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to treatment of these states. A number of trace elements like chromium, zinc, and vanadium have been shown to take part in insulin signaling via various mechanisms. Taking into account a key role of adipocyte in systemic carbohydrate homeostasis it can be asked if trace element homeostasis in adipose tissue may influence regulatory mechanisms of glucose metabolism. We hypothesize that caloric excess through currently unknown mechanisms results in decreased chromium, vanadium, and zinc content in adipocytes. Decreased content of trace elements in the adipose tissue causes impairment of intra-adipocyte insulin signaling subsequently leading to adipose tissue insulin resistance. The latter significantly contributes to systemic insulin resistance and further metabolic disruption in obesity. It is also possible that decreased adipose tissue trace element content is associated with dysregulation of insulin-sensitizing and proinflammatory adipokines also leading to insulin resistance. We hypothesize that insulin resistance and adipokine dysbalance increase the severity of obesity subsequently aggravating alteration of adipose tissue trace element balance. Single indications of high relative adipose tissue trace element content, decreased Cr, V, and Zn content in obese adipose tissue, and tight association between fat tissue chromium, vanadium, and zinc levels and metabolic parameters in obesity may be useful for hypothesis validation. If our hypothesis will be confirmed by later studies, adipose tissue chromium

  14. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  15. Age and proximity to local ore-smelters as determinants of tissue metal levels in beaver (Castor canadensis) of the sudbury (Ontario) area.

    PubMed

    Hillis, T L; Parker, G H

    1993-01-01

    An examination of tissue metal levels in Sudbury-area beaver (Castor canadensis) revealed that animals in the vicinity of the local ore-smelters contained elevated burdens of Ni and Pb in the liver and kidneys. Tissue concentrations averaged 1.5- to 2.5-fold higher than background values and are believed to reflect accumulations resulting through food chain contamination. Tissue levels of Cu, Cd and Zn did not vary in relation to distance from source. Tissue Cd levels were uniformly elevated throughout the four populations examined and are believed to reflect an enhanced level of food chain transfer occurring on the poorly buffered, acid-sensitive soils of the area. Burden: body weight correlations indicated that tissue concentrations of Cd increased whereas Cu levels decreased as a function of animal age. Most striking among these age-related trends was the disproportionate uptake of Cd by renal tissues, resulting in 10-fold higher burdens than those present within the liver.

  16. Local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators of limb tissue hyperemia in the heat-stressed human at rest and during small muscle mass exercise

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Scott T.; Trangmar, Steven J.; Kalsi, Kameljit K.; Rakobowchuk, Mark; Banker, Devendar S.; Lotlikar, Makrand D.; Ali, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Limb tissue and systemic blood flow increases with heat stress, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that heat stress-induced increases in limb tissue perfusion are primarily mediated by local temperature-sensitive mechanisms. Leg and systemic temperatures and hemodynamics were measured at rest and during incremental single-legged knee extensor exercise in 15 males exposed to 1 h of either systemic passive heat-stress with simultaneous cooling of a single leg (n = 8) or isolated leg heating or cooling (n = 7). Systemic heat stress increased core, skin and heated leg blood temperatures (Tb), cardiac output, and heated leg blood flow (LBF; 0.6 ± 0.1 l/min; P < 0.05). In the cooled leg, however, LBF remained unchanged throughout (P > 0.05). Increased heated leg deep tissue blood flow was closely related to Tb (R2 = 0.50; P < 0.01), which is partly attributed to increases in tissue V̇O2 (R2 = 0.55; P < 0.01) accompanying elevations in total leg glucose uptake (P < 0.05). During isolated limb heating and cooling, LBFs were equivalent to those found during systemic heat stress (P > 0.05), despite unchanged systemic temperatures and hemodynamics. During incremental exercise, heated LBF was consistently maintained ∼0.6 l/min higher than that in the cooled leg (P < 0.01), with LBF and vascular conductance in both legs showing a strong correlation with their respective local Tb (R2 = 0.85 and 0.95, P < 0.05). We conclude that local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators in limb tissue perfusion regulation both at rest and during small-muscle mass exercise in hyperthermic humans. PMID:25934093

  17. Tissue Localization and Extracellular Matrix Degradation by PI, PII and PIII Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: Clues on the Mechanisms of Venom-Induced Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Cristina; Escalante, Teresa; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Rucavado, Alexandra; Morazán, Diego; Macêdo, Jéssica Kele A.; Calvete, Juan J.; Sanz, Libia; Nourshargh, Sussan; Gutiérrez, José María; Fox, Jay W.

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom hemorrhagic metalloproteinases (SVMPs) of the PI, PII and PIII classes were compared in terms of tissue localization and their ability to hydrolyze basement membrane components in vivo, as well as by a proteomics analysis of exudates collected in tissue injected with these enzymes. Immunohistochemical analyses of co-localization of these SVMPs with type IV collagen revealed that PII and PIII enzymes co-localized with type IV collagen in capillaries, arterioles and post-capillary venules to a higher extent than PI SVMP, which showed a more widespread distribution in the tissue. The patterns of hydrolysis by these three SVMPs of laminin, type VI collagen and nidogen in vivo greatly differ, whereas the three enzymes showed a similar pattern of degradation of type IV collagen, supporting the concept that hydrolysis of this component is critical for the destabilization of microvessel structure leading to hemorrhage. Proteomic analysis of wound exudate revealed similarities and differences between the action of the three SVMPs. Higher extent of proteolysis was observed for the PI enzyme regarding several extracellular matrix components and fibrinogen, whereas exudates from mice injected with PII and PIII SVMPs had higher amounts of some intracellular proteins. Our results provide novel clues for understanding the mechanisms by which SVMPs induce damage to the microvasculature and generate hemorrhage. PMID:25909592

  18. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  19. Expression, tissue localization and synergy of antimicrobial peptides and proteins in the immune response of the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Paulina; de Lorgeril, Julien; Gueguen, Yannick; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Bachère, Evelyne

    2012-07-01

    Diverse families of antimicrobial peptides and proteins have been described in oysters. We investigated here how antimicrobials are involved in the immune response against a pathogenic strain of Vibrio splendidus. Oyster antimicrobials were shown to display a wide variety of expression profiles in hemocyte populations and tissues. Oyster defensins are constitutively expressed in specific tissues such as mantle (Cg-Defm) or hemocytes (Cg-Defhs), while Cg-BPI is inducible and Cg-Prp appears down-regulated in hemocytes upon infection. The migratory behavior of hemocytes that express the different antimicrobials was found to be involved in the oyster response to a pathogenic Vibrio infection. Indeed, it contributes to colocalize several antimicrobials that were shown here to have synergistic activities. We propose that such a synergy, which was evidenced both within and between families of antimicrobials, might compensate for the low concentration of antimicrobials in oyster tissues.

  20. NADPH Thioredoxin Reductase C Is Localized in Plastids of Photosynthetic and Nonphotosynthetic Tissues and Is Involved in Lateral Root Formation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Ferrández, Julia; Pascual, María Belén; González, Maricruz; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    Plastids are organelles present in photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic plant tissues. While it is well known that thioredoxin-dependent redox regulation is essential for leaf chloroplast function, little is known of the redox regulation in plastids of nonphotosynthetic tissues, which cannot use light as a direct source of reducing power. Thus, the question remains whether redox regulation operates in nonphotosynthetic plastid function and how it is integrated with chloroplasts for plant growth. Here, we show that NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC), previously reported as exclusive to green tissues, is also expressed in nonphotosynthetic tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana, where it is localized to plastids. Moreover, we show that NTRC is involved in maintaining the redox homeostasis of plastids also in nonphotosynthetic organs. To test the relationship between plastids of photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic tissues, transgenic plants were obtained with redox homeostasis restituted exclusively in leaves or in roots, through the expression of NTRC under the control of organ-specific promoters in the ntrc mutant. Our results show that fully functional root amyloplasts are not sufficient for root, or leaf, growth, but fully functional chloroplasts are necessary and sufficient to support wild-type rates of root growth and lateral root formation. PMID:22505729

  1. Localization of telomerase hTERT protein in frozen sections of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and tumor margin tissues.

    PubMed

    Fabricius, Eva-Maria; Kruse-Boitschenko, Ute; Khoury, Reem; Wildner, Gustav-Paul; Raguse, Jan-Dirk; Klein, Martin; Hoffmeister, Bodo

    2009-12-01

    In previous studies we demonstrated telomerase activity in frozen tissues from BCC and their tumor-free margins by the PCR ELISA. In this study we examined in the same frozen sections immunohistochemical presence of hTERT in the nucleus. After fixation in acetone and methanol followed by steaming we used for visualization the antigen-antibody reactions by APAAP. This was the best method of preparation of the frozen sections in our preliminary hTERT-study with squamous cell carcinomas. This study was supplemented with antibodies against Ki-67, nucleolin, common leucocyte antigen CD45 and mutated p53. The immunoreactive scores were determined and included the comparison with telomerase activity. The investigation of hTERT expression was performed in the tissues of 41 patients with BCC and control tissues of 14 patients without tumor. Eleven commercial antibodies were used for a nuclear staining of hTERT expression. With the anti-hTERT antibodies we looked for both satisfactory distribution and intensity of immunohistochemical labeling in the carcinomas and in the squamous epithelia of the tumor centers, of the tumor-free margins and of the control tissues. The hTERT expression in the BCC was distributed heterogeneously. The score values established by the anti-hTERT antibodies used were variably or significantly increased. In the stroma they tended to be negative, so we disregarded stroma hTERT. Proof of hTERT did not differ uniformly from telomerase activity. We compared the high with the lower median hTERT values in the Kaplan-Meier curve. Patients with lower hTERT scores in the center or tumor margin as shown by some of the antibodies suffered relapse earlier. Finally, we compared the hTERT expression in BCC tissues with the hTERT scores in HNSCC tissues from our previous study. Only one anti-hTERT antibody (our Ab 7) yielded significantly higher scores in BCC than in HNSCC.

  2. Tissue Specific Localization of Pectin–Ca2+ Cross-Linkages and Pectin Methyl-Esterification during Fruit Ripening in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    PubMed Central

    Hyodo, Hiromi; Terao, Azusa; Furukawa, Jun; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Satoh, Shinobu; Iwai, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Fruit ripening is one of the developmental processes accompanying seed development. The tomato is a well-known model for studying fruit ripening and development, and the disassembly of primary cell walls and the middle lamella, such as through pectin de-methylesterified by pectin methylesterase (PE) and depolymerization by polygalacturonase (PG), is generally accepted to be one of the major changes that occur during ripening. Although many reports of the changes in pectin during tomato fruit ripening are focused on the relation to softening of the pericarp or the Blossom-end rot by calcium (Ca2+) deficiency disorder, the changes in pectin structure and localization in each tissues during tomato fruit ripening is not well known. In this study, to elucidate the tissue-specific role of pectin during fruit development and ripening, we examined gene expression, the enzymatic activities involved in pectin synthesis and depolymerisation in fruit using biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses, and uronic acids and calcium (Ca)-bound pectin were determined by secondary ion-microprobe mass spectrometry. These results show that changes in pectin properties during fruit development and ripening have tissue-specific patterns. In particular, differential control of pectin methyl-esterification occurs in each tissue. Variations in the cell walls of the pericarp are quite different from that of locular tissues. The Ca-binding pectin and hairy pectin in skin cell layers are important for intercellular and tissue–tissue adhesion. Maintenance of the globular form and softening of tomato fruit may be regulated by the arrangement of pectin structures in each tissue. PMID:24236073

  3. IMMUNOCYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF STACHYLYSIN IN STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM SPORES AND SPORE-IMPACTED MOUSE AND RAT LUNG TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachylysin is a proteinaceous hemolytic agent that is producted by S. chartarum. Stachylysin was found, using immunohistochemistical and immunocytochemical methods, to be localized in S. chartarum spores/mycelia primarily in the inner wall suggesting that it is constitutively ...

  4. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  5. Tissue printing for myrosinase activity in roots of turnip and Japanese radish and horseradish: a technique for localizing myrosinases.

    PubMed

    Hara, M; Eto, H; Kuboi, T

    2001-02-05

    A method for analyzing the tissue distribution of myrosinase activity in Brassicaceous plants was developed. This technique is based on 'tissue printing' to visualize enzyme activity. The freshly-cut surface (transverse direction) of the root of three species, Japanese radish (Raphanus sativus), turnip (Brassica campestris) and Japanese horseradish (wasabi, Wasabia japonica), was pressed onto a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) filter to immobilize the proteins onto the membrane. The sites of myrosinase activity on the membranes were visualized by the sinigrin-glucose oxidase-peroxidase system. Signals for myrosinase activity were observed in both the epidermis and vascular cambium of the root of the Japanese radish, turnip and wasabi. Measurement of myrosinase activity in protein extracts indicated that the level of myrosinase activity in the peeling, which consisted of the epidermis, cortex and vascular cambium, was much higher than that in the peeled root of the three species. These results support the image that myrosinase activity, obtained in tissue printing, corresponded well with the tissue distribution of myrosinase activity.

  6. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  7. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  8. Osteoclastogenesis in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of periprosthetic osteolysis patients and the phenotype of T cells localized in periprosthetic tissues.

    PubMed

    Roato, Ilaria; Caldo, Davide; D'Amico, Lucia; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Godio, Laura; Patanè, Salvatore; Astore, Franco; Grappiolo, Guido; Boggio, Maurizio; Scagnelli, Roberto; Molfetta, Luigi; Ferracini, Riccardo

    2010-10-01

    Arthroplasty is a very successful medical procedure. Failures depend on aseptic loosening caused by periprosthetic osteolysis, where T cells have a contradictory role. We analyzed osteoclastogenesis in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures of periprosthetic osteolysis patients and the phenotype of T cells localized in periprosthetic tissues. We enrolled 45 subjects with periprosthetic osteolysis (15), stable prosthesis (15) and healthy controls (15). We performed PBMC cultures to study osteoclastogenesis. Osteoclasts and T cell phenotype were examined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and flow citometry. Periprosthetic osteolysis patients showed spontaneous osteoclastogenesis, which was inhibited by RANK-Fc and T cell depletion. In periprosthetic osteolysis patients' PBMC cultures, CD4 and CD8 T cells increased and CD8 T cells did not express CD25. In periprosthetic tissues T cells were close to osteoclasts, suggesting their interaction. Local CD8 T cells showed a regulatory phenotype, expressing CD25 and FoxP3, while CD4 T cells did not express activation markers. Our data suggest that, in an early stage of periprosthetic osteolysis, T cells may promote osteoclastogenesis, whereas subsequently osteoclasts activate FoxP3/CD8 T cells, which inhibit CD4 effector T cells. This mechanism may explain the previous finding of non-active T cells in periprosthetic tissues.

  9. Bioluminescence imaging of chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections reveals tissue-specific parasite dynamics and heart disease in the absence of locally persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michael D; Fortes Francisco, Amanda; Taylor, Martin C; Burrell-Saward, Hollie; McLatchie, Alex P; Miles, Michael A; Kelly, John M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections lead to cardiomyopathy in 20–30% of cases. A causal link between cardiac infection and pathology has been difficult to establish because of a lack of robust methods to detect scarce, focally distributed parasites within tissues. We developed a highly sensitive bioluminescence imaging system based on T. cruzi expressing a novel luciferase that emits tissue-penetrating orange-red light. This enabled long-term serial evaluation of parasite burdens in individual mice with an in vivo limit of detection of significantly less than 1000 parasites. Parasite distributions during chronic infections were highly focal and spatiotemporally dynamic, but did not localize to the heart. End-point ex vivo bioluminescence imaging allowed tissue-specific quantification of parasite loads with minimal sampling bias. During chronic infections, the gastro-intestinal tract, specifically the colon and stomach, was the only site where T. cruzi infection was consistently observed. Quantitative PCR-inferred parasite loads correlated with ex vivo bioluminescence and confirmed the gut as the parasite reservoir. Chronically infected mice developed myocarditis and cardiac fibrosis, despite the absence of locally persistent parasites. These data identify the gut as a permissive niche for long-term T. cruzi infection and show that canonical features of Chagas disease can occur without continual myocardium-specific infection. PMID:24712539

  10. Mechanisms for the control of local tissue blood flow during thermal interventions: influence of temperature‐dependent ATP release from human blood and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Scott T.; Trangmar, Steven J.; Ali, Leena; Lotlikar, Makrand D.; González‐Alonso, José

    2017-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Skin and muscle blood flow increases with heating and decreases with cooling, but the temperature‐sensitive mechanisms underlying these responses are not fully elucidated. What is the main finding and its importance? We found that local tissue hyperaemia was related to elevations in ATP release from erythrocytes. Increasing intravascular ATP augmented skin and tissue perfusion to levels equal or above thermal hyperaemia. ATP release from isolated erythrocytes was altered by heating and cooling. Our findings suggest that erythrocytes are involved in thermal regulation of blood flow via modulation of ATP release. Local tissue perfusion changes with alterations in temperature during heating and cooling, but the thermosensitivity of the vascular ATP signalling mechanisms for control of blood flow during thermal interventions remains unknown. Here, we tested the hypotheses that the release of the vasodilator mediator ATP from human erythrocytes, but not from endothelial cells or other blood constituents, is sensitive to both increases and reductions in temperature and that increasing intravascular ATP availability with ATP infusion would potentiate thermal hyperaemia in limb tissues. We first measured blood temperature, brachial artery blood flow and plasma [ATP] during passive arm heating and cooling in healthy men and found that they increased by 3.0 ± 1.2°C, 105 ± 25 ml min−1 °C−1 and twofold, respectively, (all P < 0.05) with heating, but decreased or remained unchanged with cooling. In additional men, infusion of ATP into the brachial artery increased skin and deep tissue perfusion to levels equal or above thermal hyperaemia. In isolated erythrocyte samples exposed to different temperatures, ATP release increased 1.9‐fold from 33 to 39°C (P < 0.05) and declined by ∼50% at 20°C (P < 0.05), but no changes were observed in cultured human endothelial cells, plasma or serum samples. In

  11. Localization of human acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) in macrophages and in various tissues.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, N; Miyazaki, A; Takeya, M; Horiuchi, S; Chang, C C; Chang, T Y; Takahashi, K

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the distribution of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) in various human tissues, we examined tissues of autopsy cases immunohistochemically. ACAT-1 was demonstrated in macrophages, antigen-presenting cells, steroid hormone-producing cells, neurons, cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, mesothelial cells, epithelial cells of the urinary tracts, thyroid follicles, renal tubules, pituitary, prostatic, and bronchial glands, alveolar and intestinal epithelial cells, pancreatic acinar cells, and hepatocytes. These findings showed that ACAT-1 is present in a variety of human tissues examined. The immunoreactivities are particularly prominent in the macrophages, steroid hormone-producing cells, followed by hepatocytes, and intestinal epithelia. In cultured human macrophages, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that ACAT-1 was located mainly in the tubular rough endoplasmic reticulum; immunoblot analysis showed that the ACAT-1 protein content did not change with or without cholesterol loading; however, on cholesterol loading, about 30 to 40% of the total immunoreactivity appeared in small-sized vesicles. These vesicles were also enriched in 78-kd glucose-regulated protein (GRP 78), a specific marker for the endoplasmic reticulum. Immunofluorescent microscopy demonstrated extensive colocalization of ACAT-1 and GRP 78 signals in both the tubular and vesicular endoplasmic reticulum before and after cholesterol loading. These results raise the possibility that foam cell formation may activate an endoplasmic reticulum vesiculation process, producing vesicles enriched in the ACAT-1 protein.

  12. Gene Therapy to Promote Thromboresistance: Local Overexpression of Tissue Plasminogen Activator to Prevent Arterial Thrombosis in an in vivo Rabbit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, J. M.; Kattash, M.; Li, J.; Yuksel, E.; Kuo, M. D.; Lussier, M.; Weinfeld, A. B.; Saxena, R.; Rabinovsky, E. D.; Thung, S.; Woo, S. L. C.; Shenaq, S. M.

    1999-02-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) catalyzes the rate-limiting initial step in the fibrinolytic cascade. Systemic infusion of tPA has become the standard of care for acute myocardial infarction. However, even the relatively short-duration protocols currently employed have encountered significant hemorrhagic complications, as well as complications from rebound thrombosis. Gene therapy offers a method of local high-level tPA expression over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhage and local rebound thrombosis. To examine the impact of local tPA overexpression, an adenoviral vector expressing tPA was created. The construct was characterized functionally in vitro, and the function of the vector was confirmed in vivo by delivery to the rabbit common femoral artery. Systemic coagulation parameters were not perturbed at any of the doses examined. The impact of local overexpression of tPA on in vivo thrombus formation was examined subsequently in a stasis/injury model of arterial thrombosis. The construct effectively prevented arterial thrombosis in treated animals, whereas viral and nonviral controls typically developed occluding thrombi. This construct thus offers a viable technique for promoting a locally thromboresistant small-caliber artery.

  13. Feasibility and Safety of Local Treatment with Recombinant Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor in a Rat Model of Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; Hofstra, Jorrit J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Levi, Marcel M; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary coagulopathy is intrinsic to pulmonary injury including pneumonia. Anticoagulant strategies could benefit patients with pneumonia, but systemic administration of anticoagulant agents may lead to suboptimal local levels and may cause systemic hemorrhage. We hypothesized nebulization to provide a safer and more effective route for local administration of anticoagulants. Therefore, we aimed to examine feasibility and safety of nebulization of recombinant human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (rh-TFPI) in a well-established rat model of Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae pneumonia. Thirty minutes before and every 6 hours after intratracheal instillation of S. pneumonia causing pneumonia, rats were subjected to local treatment with rh-TFPI or placebo, and sacrificed after 42 hours. Pneumonia was associated with local as well as systemic activation of coagulation. Nebulization of rh-TFPI resulted in high levels of rh-TFPI in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which was accompanied by an attenuation of pulmonary coagulation. Systemic rh-TFPI levels remained undetectable, and systemic TFPI activity and systemic coagulation were not affected. Histopathology revealed no bleeding in the lungs. We conclude that nebulization of rh-TFPI seems feasible and safe; local anticoagulant treatment with rh-TFPI attenuates pulmonary coagulation, while not affecting systemic coagulation in a rat model of S. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  14. Proteomic identification of fucosylated haptoglobin alpha isoforms in ascitic fluids and its localization in ovarian carcinoma tissues from Mexican patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic disease due to delayed diagnosis, and ascites production is a characteristic of patients in advanced stages. The aim of this study was to perform the proteomic analysis of ascitic fluids of Mexican patients with ovarian carcinoma, in order to detect proteins with a differential expression pattern in the continuing search to identify biomarkers for this disease. Methods Samples were collected from 50 patients from the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología of México under informed consent and with approval of the bioethics and scientific committees. After elimination of abundant proteins (Albumin/IgGs) samples were processed for 2D electrophoresis and further protein identification by Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Molecules of interest were followed by western blot and lectin binding assays, and their tissue location by histo-immunofluorescence and confocal analysis. Results and discussion An area with a differential expression pattern among samples was located in the 2D gels. Identified proteins were 6 alpha 1 isoforms and 1 alpha 2 isoform of Haptoglobin, and 2 isoforms of Transthyretin. While Transthyretin isoforms were constitutively expressed in all samples, clear differences in the expression pattern of Haptoglobin alpha isoforms were found. Moreover, increased levels of fucosylation of Haptoglobin alpha isoforms analyzed in 40 samples by Aleuria aurantia lectin binding by 1D overlay assay showed a positive correlation with advanced stages of the disease. Tissue detection of Haptoglobin and its fucosylated form, by histo-immunofluorescence in biopsies of ovarian cancer, also showed a correlation with ovarian cancer progression. Moreover, results show that fucosylated Haptoglobin is produced by tumor cells. Conclusions Increased numbers of highly fucosylated Haptoglobin alpha isoforms in ascitic fluids and the presence of fucosylated Haptoglobin in tumor tissues of ovarian cancer Mexican patients

  15. Increase in volume of dental local anaesthetic solution while maintaining the tissue lidocaine and adrenaline concentration does not increase acute postoperative pain after gingivectomy.

    PubMed

    Hanvold, K I; Vigen, E C; Jorkjend, L; Aass, A M; Skoglund, L A

    2008-04-01

    A randomised, single-blind, within-patient, crossover study was done in 45 patients (29 women and 16 men, mean age 49 years, range 37-71) who had bilateral "identical" gingivectomies. On one occasion a standard volume of local anaesthetic containing 2% lidocaine and 1/80,000 adrenaline was infiltrated into the mucosal tissue before operation. On the other, double the standard volume with 1% lidocaine and 1/160,000 adrenaline was infiltrated. The intensity of postoperative pain was recorded by the patients on a 100 mm visual analogue scale every hour for an 11-hour observation period. The time courses and the sum of pain intensity after injection of the double and standard volumes did not differ significantly. Doubling the volume of local anaesthetic while maintaining the total lidocaine and adrenaline concentration that was infiltrated does not influence the intensity of acute pain after gingivectomy.

  16. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  17. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F.; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)—fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting. PMID:27367051

  18. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeshu; Pei, Jing; Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P; Martin, Edward W; Hitchcock, Charles L; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)-fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting.

  19. Experimental study of the possibility of 3D localization of the compact gamma-sources in soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikova, A. K.; Belyaev, V. N.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Kantserov, V. A.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    To determine the depth of the area of radiopharmaceutical accumulation a method of simultaneous recording of two lines of gamma rays of different energies and quantitative comparison of the intensity of these lines on the surface of the patient's body is provided. Since the coefficient of linear absorption of gamma radiation in the medium depends not only on the characteristics of the medium, but also on the gamma radiation energy, the intensity of gammas of different energies is attenuated differently after passing through the same absorber layer (soft tissues). Thus, the quantitative comparison of the relative intensities of gamma lines on the surface of the patient's body allows to determine the depth of area of the accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical. The result is achieved by analyzing the energy spectrum of the source, obtained with a semiconductor spectrometer, by measuring the ratio of areas of the absorption peaks of the radioisotope and defining the depth of gamma source using the calibration dependence between the areas ratio and the medium layer thickness. The most widely used medical radioisotope technetium-99m has two gamma-lines - 140 keV and 18.5keV, which allows one to apply the proposed method to search for the sentinel lymph nodes and non-palpable malignant tumors in the soft tissues.

  20. Tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells continuously patrol skin epithelia to quickly recognize local antigen.

    PubMed

    Ariotti, Silvia; Beltman, Joost B; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Hoekstra, Mirjam E; van Beek, Anna E; Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Ritsma, Laila; van Rheenen, Jacco; Marée, Athanasius F M; Zal, Tomasz; de Boer, Rob J; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N

    2012-11-27

    Recent work has demonstrated that following the clearance of infection a stable population of memory T cells remains present in peripheral organs and contributes to the control of secondary infections. However, little is known about how tissue-resident memory T cells behave in situ and how they encounter newly infected target cells. Here we demonstrate that antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells that remain in skin following herpes simplex virus infection show a steady-state crawling behavior in between keratinocytes. Spatially explicit simulations of the migration of these tissue-resident memory T cells indicate that the migratory dendritic behavior of these cells allows the detection of antigen-expressing target cells in physiologically relevant time frames of minutes to hours. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence for the identification of rare antigen-expressing epithelial cells by skin-patrolling memory T cells in vivo. These data demonstrate the existence of skin patrol by memory T cells and reveal the value of this patrol in the rapid detection of renewed infections at a previously infected site.

  1. Tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells continuously patrol skin epithelia to quickly recognize local antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ariotti, Silvia; Beltman, Joost B.; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Hoekstra, Mirjam E.; van Beek, Anna E.; Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Ritsma, Laila; van Rheenen, Jacco; Marée, Athanasius F. M.; Zal, Tomasz; de Boer, Rob J.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; Schumacher, Ton N.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that following the clearance of infection a stable population of memory T cells remains present in peripheral organs and contributes to the control of secondary infections. However, little is known about how tissue-resident memory T cells behave in situ and how they encounter newly infected target cells. Here we demonstrate that antigen-specific CD8+ T cells that remain in skin following herpes simplex virus infection show a steady-state crawling behavior in between keratinocytes. Spatially explicit simulations of the migration of these tissue-resident memory T cells indicate that the migratory dendritic behavior of these cells allows the detection of antigen-expressing target cells in physiologically relevant time frames of minutes to hours. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence for the identification of rare antigen-expressing epithelial cells by skin-patrolling memory T cells in vivo. These data demonstrate the existence of skin patrol by memory T cells and reveal the value of this patrol in the rapid detection of renewed infections at a previously infected site. PMID:23150545

  2. Lkb1 controls brown adipose tissue growth and thermogenesis by regulating the intracellular localization of CRTC3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Tizhong; Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Pengpeng; Li, Zhiguo; Jiang, Qingyang; Bi, Pengpeng; Yue, Feng; Yang, Gongshe; Wang, Yizhen; Liu, Xiaoqi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy through Ucp1-mediated uncoupled respiration and its activation may represent a therapeutic strategy to combat obesity. Here we show that Lkb1 controls BAT expansion and UCP1 expression in mice. We generate adipocyte-specific Lkb1 knockout mice and show that, compared with wild-type littermates, these mice exhibit elevated UCP1 expression in BAT and subcutaneous white adipose tissue, have increased BAT mass and higher energy expenditure. Consequently, KO mice have improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and are more resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Deletion of Lkb1 results in a cytoplasm to nuclear translocation of CRTC3 in brown adipocytes, where it recruits C/EBPβ to enhance Ucp1 transcription. In parallel, the absence of Lkb1 also suppresses AMPK activity, leading to activation of the mTOR signalling pathway and subsequent BAT expansion. These data suggest that inhibition of Lkb1 or its downstream signalling in adipocytes could be a novel strategy to increase energy expenditure in the context of obesity, diabetes and other metabolic diseases. PMID:27461402

  3. Fat-water MRI is sensitive to local adipose tissue inflammatory changes in a diet-induced obesity mouse model at 15T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Henry H.; Webb, Corey D.; Gruen, Marnie L.; Hasty, Alyssa H.; Gore, John C.; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    In obesity, fat-water MRI (FWMRI) methods provide valuable information about adipose tissue (AT) distribution. AT is known to undergo complex metabolic and endocrine changes in association with chronic inflammation including iron overloading. Here, we investigate the potential for FWMRI parameters (fat signal fraction (FSF), local magnetic field offset, and T2*) to be sensitive to AT inflammatory changes in an established diet-induced obesity mouse model. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on a low fat (LFD) or a high fat diet (HFD). 3D multi- gradient-echo MRI at 15.2T was performed at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after diet onset. A 3D fat-water separation algorithm and additional processing was used to generate FSF, local field offset, and T2* maps. We examined these parameters in perirenal AT ROIs from HFD and LFD mice. Results: The data suggest that FSF, local field offset, and T2* can differentiate time course behavior between inflamed and control AT (increasing FSF, decreasing local field offset, increasing followed by decreasing T2*). The biophysical mechanisms of these observed changes are not well understood and require further study. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first evidence that FWMRI can provide biomarkers sensitive to AT inflammation, and that FWMRI has the potential for longitudinal non-invasive assessment of AT inflammation in obesity.

  4. WE-EF-BRA-12: Magnetic Resonance- Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Localized Ablation of Head and Neck Tissue Structures: A Feasibility Study in An Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Partanen, A; Ellens, N; Noureldine, S; Tufano, R; Burdette, E; Farahani, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is feasible in the head and neck [1]. This study aims to expand upon these findings to assess the feasibility of treatment planning and monitoring via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance using a clinical MR-guided HIFU platform. Methods: Two 31 kg pigs were anaesthetized, shaved, and positioned prone on the HIFU table (Sonalleve, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland). The necks were acoustically coupled to the integrated transducer using gel pads and degassed water. MR imaging verified acoustic coupling and facilitated target selection in the thyroid and thymus. Targets were thermally ablated with 130–200 W of acoustic power over a period of 16 s at a frequency of 1.2 MHz while being monitored through real-time, multi-planar MR-thermometry. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was used to assess treatment efficacy. Post-treatment, animals were euthanized and sonicated tissues were harvested for histology assessment. Results: MR-thermometry, post-contrast-imaging, and gross pathology demonstrated that the system was capable of causing localized thermal ablation in both the thyroid and the thymus without damaging the aerodigestive tract. In one animal, superficial bruising was observed in the ultrasound beam path. Otherwise, there were no adverse events. Analysis of the tissue histology found regions of damage consistent with acute thermal injury at the targeted locations. Conclusion: It is feasible to use a clinical MR-guided HIFU platform for extracorporeal ablation of porcine head and neck tissues. MR guidance and thermometry are sufficient to target and monitor treatment in the thyroid region, despite the presence of the inhomogeneous aerodigestive tract. Further study is necessary to assess efficacy and survival using a tumor model, and to examine what modifications should be made to the transducer positioning system and associated patient positioning aids to adapt it for clinical head and neck targets

  5. Tissue localization and regulation by juvenile hormone of human allergen Bla g 4 from the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.).

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Gore, J C; Redding, K O; Vailes, L D; Chapman, M D; Schal, C

    2005-01-01

    The German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.), produces several potent protein aeroallergens, including Bla g 4, a approximately 20 kDa lipocalin. RT-PCR, Northern analyses and in situ hybridization showed that Bla g 4 is expressed only in the adult male reproductive system. Western blotting and ELISA with rBla g 4 antiserum detected immunoreactivity in the utricles and the conglobate gland, but not in other tissues of the male reproductive system. The Bla g 4 protein content of males increased from adult emergence to day 14, but during copulation Bla g 4 was depleted in the male and transferred to the female within the spermatophore. Topical application of juvenile hormone III stimulated Bla g 4 production by both conglobate gland and utricles.

  6. Registration-based estimates of local lung tissue expansion compared to xenon-CT measures of specific ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Christensen, Gary E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Bodas, Shalmali V.

    2008-01-01

    The main function of the respiratory system is gas exchange. Since many disease or injury conditions can cause biomechanical or material property changes that can alter lung function, there is a great interest in measuring regional lung ventilation and regional specific volume change. We describe a registration-based technique for estimating local lung expansion from multiple respiratory-gated CT images of the thorax. The degree of regional lung expansion is measured using the Jacobian (a function of local partial derivatives) of the registration displacement field, which we show is directly related to specific volume change. We compare the ventral-dorsal patterns of lung expansion estimated across five pressure changes to a xenon CT based measure of specific ventilation in five anesthetized sheep studied in the supine orientation. Using 3D image registration to match images acquired at 10 cm H2O and 15 H2O airway pressures gave the best match between the average Jacobian and the xenon CT specific ventilation (linear regression, average r2 = 0.73). PMID:18501665

  7. Registration-based estimates of local lung tissue expansion compared to xenon CT measures of specific ventilation.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Joseph M; Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Christensen, Gary E; Hoffman, Eric A; Bodas, Shalmali V

    2008-12-01

    The main function of the respiratory system is gas exchange. Since many disease or injury conditions can cause biomechanical or material property changes that can alter lung function, there is a great interest in measuring regional lung ventilation and regional specific volume change. We describe a registration-based technique for estimating local lung expansion from multiple respiratory-gated CT images of the thorax. The degree of regional lung expansion is measured using the Jacobian (a function of local partial derivatives) of the registration displacement field, which we show is directly related to specific volume change. We compare the ventral-dorsal patterns of lung expansion estimated across five pressure changes to a xenon CT based measure of specific ventilation in five anesthetized sheep studied in the supine orientation. Using 3D image registration to match images acquired at 10 cm H(2)O and 15 cm H(2)O airway pressures gave the best match between the average Jacobian and the xenon CT specific ventilation (linear regression, average r(2)=0.73).

  8. Local variations in 14C - How is bomb-pulse dating of human tissues and cells affected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenström, Kristina; Skog, Göran; Nilsson, Carl Magnus; Hellborg, Ragnar; Svegborn, Sigrid Leide; Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören

    2010-04-01

    Atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the late 1950s and early 1960s almost doubled the amount of 14C in the atmosphere. The resulting 14C "bomb-pulse" has been shown to provide useful age information in e.g. forensic and environmental sciences, biology and the geosciences. The technique is also currently being used for retrospective cell dating in man, in order to provide insight into the rate of formation of new cells in the human body. Bomb-pulse dating relies on precise measurements of the declining 14C concentration in atmospheric CO 2 collected at clean-air sites. However, it is not always recognized that the calculations can be complicated in some cases by significant local variations in the specific activity of 14C in carbon in the air and foodstuff. This paper presents investigations of local 14C variations in the vicinities of nuclear installations and laboratories using 14C. Levels of 14C in workers using this radioisotope are also discussed.

  9. A simple, non-invasive and inexpensive method for evaluating the displacement of local tissue surfaces: from vascular changes to muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Roatta, S; Deriu, F; Artusio, E; Passatore, M

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, very inexpensive method of estimating tissue displacements of various origin that is easy and fast to set up. This technique utilizes an inductive proximity sensor (IPS), which is a non-contact length transducer measuring the distance between its probe and a metal target. Its working principle is based on the electromagnetic coupling originating between the sensor probe, a source of high-frequency magnetic field, and the metal target where parasitic currents take place. The linear working range of the IPS model used here is 0.1 to 6 mm probe-target distance, its resolution is about 2 microns. The IPS has been employed on rabbits and humans to measure the displacement of a target glued to the skin of various body areas with respect to the fixed probe of the sensor. Its high resolution, together with an extensive working range, allows the evaluation of numerous physiological events which produce displacements ranging from 2 microns -- to 9 mm, reflecting either tissue volume changes or movements. In particular, an interesting application is to monitor, through volume variations, the extent and the time course of local vascular modifications induced by manoeuvres which elicit changes in vasomotor tone; vascular filling, tissue swelling etc. Therefore, this measure may be considered a 'surface plethysmography' record. In addition, the contractions of skeletal muscles, under either isotonic or isometric conditions, can be estimated through this sensor. This system may therefore find applications for research purposes and practical demonstrations to students.

  10. Measurement of local strains in intervertebral disc anulus fibrosus tissue under dynamic shear: contributions of matrix fiber orientation and elastin content.

    PubMed

    Michalek, Arthur J; Buckley, Mark R; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Cohen, Itai; Iatridis, James C

    2009-10-16

    Shear strain has been implicated as an initiator of intervertebral disc anulus failure, however a clear, multi-scale picture of how shear strain affects the tissue microstructure has been lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure microscale deformations in anulus tissue under dynamic shear in two orientations, and to determine the role of elastin in regulating these deformations. Bovine AF tissue was simultaneously shear loaded and imaged using confocal microscopy following either a buffer or elastase treatment. Digital image analysis was used to track through time local shear strains in specimens sheared transversely, and stretch and rotation of collagen fiber bundles in specimens sheared circumferentially. The results of this study suggest that sliding does not occur between AF plies under shear, and that interlamellar connections are governed by collagen and fibrilin rather than elastin. The transverse shear modulus was found to be approximately 1.6 times as high in plies the direction of the collagen fibers as in plies across them. Under physiological levels of in-plane shear, fiber bundles stretched and re-oriented linearly. Elastin was found to primarily stiffen plies transversely. We conclude that alterations in the elastic fiber network, as found with IVD herniation and degeneration, can therefore be expected to significantly influence the AF response to shear making it more susceptible to micro failure under bending or torsion loading.

  11. In situ hybridization for the detection and localization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in the intestinal tissues from naturally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Kim, O; Chae, C

    2000-01-01

    Detection and localization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was studied by in situ hybridization with a nonradioactive digoxigenin-labeled probe in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 10 naturally infected piglets. A 377-base pair cDNA probe for viral RNA encoding the membrane proteins of PEDV cell-culture-adapted strain V215/78 was generated by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In the retrospective study of pigs from herds with diarrhea, the 10 piglets naturally infected with PEDV had positive signals for PEDV by in situ hybridization. When intestinal tissues were hybridized with the PEDV probe, a strong signal was seen in the villus enterocytes of jejunum and ileum but not in the cecum and colon. Positive cells typically had dark brown reaction products in the cytoplasm. Scattered epithelial cells along the ileal Peyer's patches dome areas contained viral RNA. In one piglet, hybridization signal was also found in the duodenum. PEDV was not demonstrated in tissues outside of the intestinal tract. These findings indicate that jejunal and ileal villus enterocytes are the main target of PEDV replication during epizootic outbreaks of the disease.

  12. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  13. Cadmium (Cd) Localization in Tissues of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), and Its Phytoremediation Potential for Cd-Contaminated Soils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifan; Zhao, Ye; Fan, Lidong; Xing, Liteng; Yang, Yujie

    2015-12-01

    Phytoremediation using economically valuable, large biomass, non-edible plants is a promising method for metal-contaminated soils. This study investigated cotton's tolerance for Cd and remediation potential through analyzing Cd bioaccumulation and localization in plant organs under different soil Cd levels. Results showed cotton presents good tolerance when soil Cd concentration ≤20.26 mg kg(-1). Cotton had good Cd accumulation ability under low soil Cd levels (<1.26 mg kg(-1)), with a TF value (the ratio of Cd concentration in stem to root) above 1. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis indicated cotton leaf transpiration played a key role in extracting soil Cd, while roots and stems were the main compartments of Cd storage. Cd complexation to other organic constituents in root and stem cell sap could be a primary detoxifying strategy. Therefore, cotton is a potential candidate for phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soils.

  14. Lipolytic enzymes in bovine thyroid tissue. I. Subcellular localization, purification and characterization of acid phospholipase A1.

    PubMed

    De Wolf, M; Lagrou, A; Hilderson, H J; Dierick, W

    1978-12-01

    In mammalian cells the catabolism of membrane phosphoglycerides proceeds probably entirely through a deacylation pathway catalysed by phospholipase A and lysophospholipase (Wise & Elwyn, 1965). In the initial attack of diacylphosphoglycerides by phospholipase A two enzymatic activities with different positional specificities have been distinguished: phospholipase A1 (phosphatidate 1-acyl hydrolase EN 3.1.1.32) and phospholipase A2 (phosphatidate 2-acyl hydrolase EN 3.1.1.4) (Van Deenen & De Haas, 1966). Studies on these intracellular phospholipases were mainly concerned with their subcellular localization. Only occasionally more detailed enzymatic investigations have been conducted on them, in contrast to export phospholipases e.g. from snake venom, bee venom and porcine pancreas, which have been extensively investigated (Brockerhoff & Jensen 1974a). In a previous paper (De Wolf et al., 1976a), the presence of phospholipase A1 and phospholipase A2 activities in bovine thyroid was demonstrated, using 1-[9, 10-3H] stearoyl-2-[1-14C] linoleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine as a substrate. Optimal activity was observed in both instances at pH 4. Addition of the anionic detergent sodium taurocholate increased the A2 type activity and decreased the A1 type activity suggesting the presence of different enzymes. The lack of influence of Ca2+-ions and EDTA and the acid pH optima could suggest lysosomal localization. In this paper the subcellular distribution of both acid phospholipase activities is described as well as a purification scheme for phospholipase A1. Some characteristics of the purified enzyme preparation are discussed.

  15. Cellular localization and levels of pectins and arabinogalactan proteins in olive (Olea europaea L.) pistil tissues during development: implications for pollen-pistil interaction.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Cynthia; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Castro, Antonio J; Zienkiewicz, Krzysztof; Majewska-Sawka, Anna; Rodríguez-García, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Cell wall components in the pistil are involved in cell-cell recognition, nutrition and regulation of pollen tube growth. The aim of this work was to study the level, whole-organ distribution, and subcellular localization of pectins and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) in the olive developing pistil. Western blot analyses and immunolocalization with fluorescence and electron microscopy were carried out using a battery of antibodies recognizing different types of pectin epitopes (JIM7, JIM5, LM5, and LM6) and one anti-AGPs antibody (JIM13). In the olive pistil, highest levels of acid esterified and de-esterified pectins were observed at pollination. Moreover, pollination was accompanied by a slight decrease of the galactose-rich pectins pool, whereas arabinose-rich pectins were more abundant at that time. An increased expression of AGPs was also observed during pollination, in comparison to the pistil at the pre-anthesis stage. After pollination, the levels of pectins and AGPs declined significantly. Inmunofluorescence localization of pectins showed their different localization in the olive pistil. Pectins with galactose residues were located mainly in the cortical zones of the pistil, similar to the neutral pectins, which were found in the parenchyma and epidermis. In turn, the neutral pectins, which contain arabinose residues and AGPs, were localized predominantly in the stigmatic exudate, in the cell wall of secretory cells of the stigma, as well as in the transmitting tissue of the pistil during the pollination period. The differences in localization of pectins and AGPs are discussed in relation to their roles during olive pistil developmental course.

  16. Effect of short-term hyperinsulinemia on the localization and expression of endothelin receptors A and B in lamellar tissue of the forelimbs of horses

    PubMed Central

    Gauff, Felicia C.; Patan-Zugaj, Bianca; Licka, Theresia F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of short-term hyperinsulinemia on the localization and expression of endothelin receptor (ETR)-A and ETR-B in lamellar tissue of the forelimbs of horses. Samples Distal portion of 15 cadaveric forelimbs from healthy adult horses (1 limb/horse) obtained immediately after slaughter at an abattoir. Procedures Each forelimb was assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (perfused with autologous blood for 10 hours [control perfusion; n = 5], perfused with an insulin [142 ± 81 μU/mL] perfusate for 10 hours [insulinemic perfusion; 5], or not perfused [unperfused control; 5]). Immunohistochemical evaluation of lamellar tissue was performed to assess localization of ETR-A and ETR-B. Expression of ETR-A and ETR-B was measured semiquantitatively on a scale of 0 to 3 (0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = high-intensity staining) and quantitatively by means of gray value analysis with imaging software. Results In all specimens, ETR-A and ETR-B were localized in endothelium, smooth muscle cells, axons, and keratinocytes. Quantitative expression of ETR-A in the midportion of the primary epidermal lamellae for the insulinemic perfusion group (149 ± 16) was lower than that for the control perfusion group (158 ± 15). Expression of ETR-B in the primary epidermal lamellae tips for the insulinemic perfusion group (140 ± 29) was higher than that for the control perfusion group (114 ± 8). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Hyperinsulinemia caused significant changes in endothelin receptor expression, which suggested that ETR antagonists might be beneficial for treatment of laminitis in horses. PMID:24669922

  17. cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of myelodysplasia/Myeloid Leukemia Factor 2 (MLF2)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuefer, M.U.; Valentine, V.; Behm, F.G.

    1996-07-15

    A fusion gene between nucleophosmin (NPM) and myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1) and myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1) is formed by a recurrent t(3;5)(q25.1;q34) in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. Here we report the identification of a novel gene, MLF2, which contains an open reading frame of 744 bp encoding a 248-amino-acid protein highly related to the previously identified MLF1 protein (63% similarity, 40% identity). In contrast to the tissue-restricted expression pattern of MLF1, and MLF2 messenger RNA is expressed ubiquitously. The MLF2 gene locus was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 12p13, a chromosomal region frequently involved in translocations and deletions in acute leukemias of lymphoid or myeloid lineage. In a physical map of chromosome 12, MLF2 was found to reside on the yeast artificial chromosome clone 765b9. Southern blotting analysis of malignant cell DNAs prepared from a series of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases with translocations involving chromosome arm 12p, as well as a group of acute myeloid leukemias with various cytogenetic abnormalities, failed to reveal MLF2 gene rearrangements. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  18. The human serotonin N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.87) gene (AANAT): Structure, chromosomal localization, and tissue expression

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, S.L.; Bernard, M.; Roseboom, P.H.

    1996-05-15

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, AA-NAT, HGMW-approved symbol AANAT;EC 2.3.1.87) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin synthesis and controls the night/day rhythm in melatonin production in the vertebrate pineal gland. We have found that the human AA-NAT gene spans {approx}2.5 kb, contains four exons, and is located at chromosome 17q25. The open reading frame encodes a 23.2-kDa protein that is {approx}80% identical to sheep and rat AA-NAT. The AA-NAT transcript ({approx}1 kb) is highly abundant in the pineal gland and is expressed at lower levels in the retina and in the Y79 retinoblastoma cell line. AA-NAT mRNA is also detectable at low levels in several brain regions and the pituitary gland, but not in several peripheral tissues examined. Brain and pituitary AA-NAT could modulate serotonin-dependent aspects of human behavior and pituitary function. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  19. The biogenesis protein PEX14 is an optimal marker for the identification and localization of peroxisomes in different cell types, tissues, and species in morphological studies.

    PubMed

    Grant, Phillip; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Karnati, Srikanth; Berg, Timm; Stelzig, Ingra; Nenicu, Anca; Kuchelmeister, Klaus; Crane, Denis I; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2013-10-01

    Catalase and ABCD3 are frequently used as markers for the localization of peroxisomes in morphological experiments. Their abundance, however, is highly dependent on metabolic demands, reducing the validity of analyses of peroxisomal abundance and distribution based solely on these proteins. We therefore attempted to find a protein which can be used as an optimal marker for peroxisomes in a variety of species, tissues, cell types and also experimental designs, independently of peroxisomal metabolism. We found that the biogenesis protein peroxin 14 (PEX14) is present in comparable amounts in the membranes of every peroxisome and is optimally suited for immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy. Using antibodies against PEX14, we could visualize peroxisomes with almost undetectable catalase content in various mammalian tissue sections (submandibular and adrenal gland, kidney, testis, ovary, brain, and pancreas from mouse, cat, baboon, and human) and cell cultures (primary cells and cell lines). Peroxisome labeling with catalase often showed a similar tissue distribution to the mitochondrial enzyme mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (both responsible for the degradation of reactive oxygen species), whereas ABCD3 exhibited a distinct labeling only in cells involved in lipid metabolism. We increased the sensitivity of our methods by using QuantumDots™, which have higher emission yields compared to classic fluorochromes and are unsusceptible to photobleaching, thereby allowing more exact quantification without artificial mistakes due to heterogeneity of individual peroxisomes. We conclude that PEX14 is indeed the best marker for labeling of peroxisomes in a variety of tissues and cell types in a consistent fashion for comparative morphometry.

  20. Coagulation alterations due to local fibrinolytic therapy with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rauber, Klaus; Heidinger, Kathrin S.; Kemkes-Matthes, Bettina

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the systemic effects of local fibrinolytic therapy with low-dose recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA). Methods. Ten patients received intrathrombal infusion of 20 mg rt-PA and heparin for local thrombolysis and had subsequent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Eight controls underwent PTA and received heparin alone. We measured t-PA, D-Dimer, and fibrinogen levels before, directly after, and 20, 40, and 60 min and 24 hr after therapy. Results. In the thrombolysis group the t-PA level peaked immediately after infusion and then declined within 1 hr. D-Dimer increased and remained elevated, whereas in the control group only t-PA levels increased, and only after 24 hr. Fibrinogen remained within the normal range in both groups. Eight of ten patients in the thrombolysis group and seven of eight with PTA had clinical improvement after the procedure. Conclusions. The increase in D-Dimer in the rt-PA group indicates a good local fibrinolytic effect. The fact that fibrinogen levels remained unchanged indicates that there is a lack of systemic fibrinogenolysis.

  1. Local shear conditions and platelet aggregates regulate the incorporation and activity of circulating tissue factor in ex-vivo thrombi.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Viji; Vele, Oana; Nemerson, Yale

    2002-11-01

    The presence of thrombogenic blood-borne or circulating tissue factor (cTF) has recently been demonstrated. These observations have implicated cTF to be a key determinant of thrombus propagation by depositing on platelets in nascent thrombi. Previously, we detected cTF by detergent solubilization and addition of phospholipids. We now report the direct demonstration of TF activity in ex-vivo thrombi. Collagen-coated substrates were exposed to native blood at shear rates of 0, 650, and 2,000 s(-1) for 10 min in a modified rotating Teflon cone and plate viscometer. Substrates were then gently rinsed to remove 'loose' (unadherent) components of blood. cTF activity was measured by adding a solution containing 10 nM FVIIa, 100 nM FX, and 5 mM CaCl(2) to the substrates exposed to blood. Samples of this mixture were obtained at intervals for 30 min and the amount of Xa generated was quantified by adding a chromogenic substrate, Spectrozyme Xa, and measuring the increase in OD at 405 nm. Our studies show that a minimal amount of generated Xa (approximately 1nM) can be measured from ex-vivo thrombi. Static and shear samples generated the same amount of Xa, with the exception of blood subjected to 650 s(-1) shear. At 650 s(-1) shear rate, the amount of Xa generated reached a maximum of 4 nM at 5 min and then decreased to approximately 1 nM. Immunohistological stains and fluorescent images demonstrate the presence of cTF antigen at 650 s(-1) wall shear rate.

  2. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or ‘bathing solution’ ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r2 = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r2 = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature. PMID:22227202

  3. Reconstruction of defects involving the Achilles tendon and local soft tissues: a quick solution for a lingering problem.

    PubMed

    Soons, J; Rakhorst, H A; Ruettermann, M; Luijsterburg, A J M; Bos, P K; Zöphel, O T

    2015-02-01

    A total of seven patients (six men and one woman) with a defect in the Achilles tendon and overlying soft tissue underwent reconstruction using either a composite radial forearm flap (n = 3) or an anterolateral thigh flap (n = 4). The Achilles tendons were reconstructed using chimeric palmaris longus (n = 2) or tensor fascia lata (n = 2) flaps or transfer of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (n = 3). Surgical parameters such as the rate of complications and the time between the initial repair and flap surgery were analysed. Function was measured objectively by recording the circumference of the calf, the isometric strength of the plantar flexors and the range of movement of the ankle. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) questionnaire was used as a patient-reported outcome measure. Most patients had undergone several previous operations to the Achilles tendon prior to flap surgery. The mean time to flap surgery was 14.3 months (2.1 to 40.7). At a mean follow-up of 32.3 months (12.1 to 59.6) the circumference of the calf on the operated lower limb was reduced by a mean of 1.9 cm (sd 0.74) compared with the contralateral limb (p = 0.042). The mean strength of the plantar flexors on the operated lower limb was reduced to 88.9% of that of the contralateral limb (p = 0.043). There was no significant difference in the range of movement between the two sides (p = 0.317). The mean ATRS score was 72 points (sd 20.0). One patient who had an initial successful reconstruction developed a skin defect of the composite flap 12 months after free flap surgery and this resulted in recurrent infections, culminating in transtibial amputation 44 months after reconstruction. These otherwise indicate that reconstruction of the Achilles tendon combined with flap cover results in a successful and functional reconstruction.

  4. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-03-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or 'bathing solution' ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature.

  5. Glutathione S-transferases in human renal cortex and neoplastic tissue: enzymatic activity, isoenzyme profile and immunohistochemical localization.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, V; Benzie, A A; Veitch, J M; Murray, G I; Rowe, J D; Hawksworth, G M

    1998-05-01

    1. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in the cytosol of renal cortex and tumours from eight men and eight women was measured using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a substrate. GST activities ranged from 685 to 2192 nmol/min/mg protein in cortex (median 1213) and from non-detectable (minimum 45) to 2424 nmol/min/mg protein in tumours (median 469). The activities in the tumours were lower than those in the normal cortices (p < 0.05). 2. In men, the activity in the cortical cytosol was in all cases higher than that measured in the corresponding tumours (p < 0.05). In women, the difference in activity between cortices and tumours was not significantly different (p > 0.05). 3. The age of the patients ranged from 42 to 81 years (median 62) and was not found to play a role in the levels of GST activity observed in cortex or in renal tumours from either sex. 4. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that GST-alpha was the predominant form expressed both in normal cortex and tumour and probably accounted for most of the GST activity present in these samples. GST-mu and GST-phi were expressed in both tumours and normal cortex and, while in some cases the level of expression in the cortices was higher than that found in the tumours, the reverse was also observed. Within the GST-mu class, GST M1/M2 was only detected in one sample (tumour), which showed the highest overall expression of GST-mu. GSTM3 was the predominant isoenzyme of the mu class in normal and tumour tissue, whereas GTM4 and GSTM5 were not detected. 5. These differences could have functional significance where xenobiotics or cytotoxic drugs are specific substrates for the different classes of GSTs.

  6. Distinguishing hazards and harms, adverse drug effects and adverse drug reactions : implications for drug development, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance, biomarkers, and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2013-03-01

    The terms 'adverse drug effects' and 'adverse drug reactions' are commonly used interchangeably, but they have different implications. Adverse drug reactions arise when a compound (e.g. a drug or metabolite, a contaminant or adulterant) is distributed in the same place as a body tissue (e.g. a receptor, enzyme, or ion channel), and the encounter results in an adverse effect (a physiological or pathological change), which results in a clinically appreciable adverse reaction. Both the adverse effect and the adverse reaction have manifestations by which they can be recognized: adverse effects are usually detected by laboratory tests (e.g. biochemical, haematological, immunological, radiological, pathological) or by clinical investigations (e.g. endoscopy, cardiac catheterization), and adverse reactions by their clinical manifestations (symptoms and/or signs). This distinction suggests five scenarios: (i) adverse reactions can result directly from adverse effects; (ii) adverse effects may not lead to appreciable adverse reactions; (iii) adverse reactions can occur without preceding adverse effects; (iv) adverse effects and reactions may be dissociated; and (v) adverse effects and reactions can together constitute syndromes. Defining an adverse drug reaction as "an appreciably harmful or unpleasant reaction, resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product" suggests a definition of an adverse drug effect: "a potentially harmful effect resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product, which constitutes a hazard and may or may not be associated with a clinically appreciable adverse reaction and/or an abnormal laboratory test or clinical investigation, as a marker of an adverse reaction."

  7. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  8. Colonization of epidermal tissue by Staphylococcus aureus produces localized hypoxia and stimulates secretion of antioxidant and caspase-14 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lone , Abdul G.; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, S.; Fransson, B.; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R.; Call, Douglas R.

    2015-08-31

    A partial-thickness epidermal explant model was colonized with GFP-expressing S. aureus and the pattern of S. aureus biofilm growth was characterized using electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Oxygen concentration in explants was quantified using microelectrodes. The relative effective diffusivity and porosity of the epidermis were determined using magnetic resonance imaging, while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in explant media was measured by using microelectrodes. Secreted proteins were identified and quantified using MSE mass spectrometry. We found that S. aureus biofilm grows predominantly in sebum-rich areas around hair follicles and associated skin folds. Dissolved oxygen was selectively depleted (2-3 fold) in these locations, but the relative effective diffusivity and porosity did not change between colonized and control epidermis. Histological analysis revealed keratinocyte damage across all the layers of colonized epidermis after four days of culture. The colonized explants released significantly (P< 0.01) more anti-oxidant proteins of both epidermal and S. aureus origin, consistent with elevated H2O2 concentration found in the media from the colonized explants (P< 0.001). Caspase-14 was also elevated significantly in media from infected explants. While H2O2 induces primary keratinocyte differentiation, caspase-14 is required for terminal keratinocyte differentiation and desquamation. These results are consistent with a localized biological impact from S. aureus in response to colonization of the skin surface.

  9. Colonization of Epidermal Tissue by Staphylococcus aureus Produces Localized Hypoxia and Stimulates Secretion of Antioxidant and Caspase-14 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Abdul G.; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, Susan; Fransson, Boel; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R.

    2015-01-01

    A partial-thickness epidermal explant model was colonized with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Staphylococcus aureus, and the pattern of S. aureus biofilm growth was characterized using electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The oxygen concentration in explants was quantified using microelectrodes. The relative effective diffusivity and porosity of the epidermis were determined using magnetic resonance imaging, while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in explant media was measured by using microelectrodes. Secreted proteins were identified and quantified using elevated-energy mass spectrometry (MSE). S. aureus biofilm grows predominantly in lipid-rich areas around hair follicles and associated skin folds. Dissolved oxygen was selectively depleted (2- to 3-fold) in these locations, but the relative effective diffusivity and porosity did not change between colonized and control epidermis. Histological analysis revealed keratinocyte damage across all the layers of colonized epidermis after 4 days of culture. The colonized explants released significantly (P < 0.01) more antioxidant proteins of both epidermal and S. aureus origin, consistent with elevated H2O2 concentrations found in the media from the colonized explants (P< 0.001). Caspase-14 was also elevated significantly in the media from the colonized explants. While H2O2 induces primary keratinocyte differentiation, caspase-14 is required for terminal keratinocyte differentiation and desquamation. These results are consistent with a localized biological impact from S. aureus in response to colonization of the skin surface. PMID:25987705

  10. Multivariate normal tissue complication probability modeling of gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of radio-induced gastrointestinal (GI) complications is affected by several factors other than the dose to the rectum such as patient characteristics, hormonal or antihypertensive therapy, and acute rectal toxicity. Purpose of this work is to study clinical and dosimetric parameters impacting on late GI toxicity after prostate external beam radiotherapy (RT) and to establish multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced GI complications. Methods A total of 57 men who had undergone definitive RT for prostate cancer were evaluated for GI events classified using the RTOG/EORTC scoring system. Their median age was 73 years (range 53–85). The patients were assessed for GI toxicity before, during, and periodically after RT completion. Several clinical variables along with rectum dose-volume parameters (Vx) were collected and their correlation to GI toxicity was analyzed by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (Rs). Multivariate logistic regression method using resampling techniques was applied to select model order and parameters for NTCP modeling. Model performance was evaluated through the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results At a median follow-up of 30 months, 37% (21/57) patients developed G1-2 acute GI events while 33% (19/57) were diagnosed with G1-2 late GI events. An NTCP model for late mild/moderate GI toxicity based on three variables including V65 (OR = 1.03), antihypertensive and/or anticoagulant (AH/AC) drugs (OR = 0.24), and acute GI toxicity (OR = 4.3) was selected as the most predictive model (Rs = 0.47, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.79). This three-variable model outperforms the logistic model based on V65 only (Rs = 0.28, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.69). Conclusions We propose a logistic NTCP model for late GI toxicity considering not only rectal irradiation dose but also clinical patient-specific factors. Accordingly, the risk of G1

  11. Neutrophil Accumulation in the Small Intestine Contributes to Local Tissue Destruction Following Combined Radiation and Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Stewart R; Chen, Michael M; Palmer, Jessica L; Wang, Lu; Ramirez, Luis; Plackett, Timothy P; Gamelli, Richard L; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Objective The threat of nuclear disaster makes combined radiation and thermal burn injury (CRI) a relevant topic when discussing modern trauma, as burn injuries are likely to occur with detonation of a conventional nuclear weapon. Previous studies in a murine model have shown that there is a breakdown of the gut epithelium and subsequent bacterial translocation into mesenteric lymph nodes after CRI. This study examines the early innate immune response of the small intestine following CRI. Methods Using a previously established murine model of 5 - 5.5Gy total body irradiation combined with 15% total body surface area burn, the injury response of the small intestine was examined at 24, 48 and 72hr by visual assessment, myeloperoxidase and cytokine measurement. Results At 24hr, intestinal damage as measured by villus blunting, crypt debris and decreased mitosis, was apparent in all injury groups but the derangements persisted out to 72hr only with CRI. The prolonged intestinal damage in CRI was accompanied by a 2-fold (p<0.05) elevation in myeloperoxidase activity over sham animals at 48hr and persisted as a 3-fold (p<0.05) elevation at 72hr post-injury. Corresponding levels of KC were 8-fold (p<0.05) higher than sham at 48hr with persistent elevation at 72hr. Conclusions An enhanced innate immune response, partially mediated by the influx of neutrophils into the gastrointestinal tract is contributing to the hyperinflammatory state seen following CRI. Attenuation of the local gastrointestinal inflammatory response may play a major role in managing victims following nuclear disaster. PMID:25501789

  12. An Effective Preoperative Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Target Volume for Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma and the Effect of Margin Width on Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bo Kyong; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Kirsch, David G.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Kobayashi, Wendy; Kung, Jong Hyun; Wolfgang, John A.; Doppke, Karen

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: There is little information on the appropriate three-dimensional (3D) preoperative radiotherapy (XRT) volume for extremity soft-tissue sarcomas (STS). We retrospectively analyzed the pattern of local failure (LF) to help elucidate optimal field design. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the 56 patients who underwent computed tomography-planned XRT for Stage I to III extremity STS between June 2000 and December 2006. Clinical target volume (CTV) included the T1 post-gadolinium-defined gross tumor volume with 1- to 1.5-cm radial and 3.5-cm longitudinal margins. Planning target volume expansion was 5 to 7 mm, and {>=}95% of dose was delivered to the planning target volume. Preoperative XRT was 44 to 50.4 Gy (median, 50). Postoperative boost of 10 to 20 Gy was given to 12 patients (6 with positive and 6 with close margins). Results: Follow-up ranged from 15 to 76 months (median, 41 months). The 5-year local control, freedom from distant metastasis, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 88.5%, 80.0%, 77.5% and 82.8%, respectively. Three patients (all with positive margin) experienced local failure (LF) as first relapse (2 isolated, 1 with distant failure), and 2 additional patients (all with margin<1 mm) had late LF after distant metastasis. The LFs were within the CTV in 3 patients and within and also extending beyond the CTV in 2 patients. Conclusions: These target volume definitions appear to be appropriate for most patients. No local recurrences were observed with surgical margins {>=}1 mm, and it appears that these may be adequate for patients with extremity STS treated with preoperative radiotherapy.

  13. Phase II Trial of Cetuximab and Conformal Radiotherapy Only in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer with Concurrent Tissue Sampling Feasibility Study1

    PubMed Central

    Rembielak, Agata I; Jain, Pooja; Jackson, Andrew S; Green, Melanie M; Santorelli, Gillian R; Whitfield, Gillian A; Crellin, Adrian; Garcia-Alonso, Angel; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Cullen, James; Taylor, M Ben; Swindell, Ric; West, Catharine M; Valle, Juan; Saleem, Azeem; Price, Patricia M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical data have indicated the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agent cetuximab (Erbitux) as a radiosensitizer in pancreatic cancer, but this has not been specifically addressed in a clinical study. We report the results of an original study initiated in 2007, where cetuximab was tested with radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced pancreatic cancer in a phase II trial (PACER). METHODS: Patients (n = 21) received cetuximab loading dose (400 mg/m2) and weekly dose (250 mg/m2) during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Toxicity and disease response end point data were prospectively assessed. A feasibility study of on-trial patient blood and skin sampling was incorporated. RESULTS: Treatment was well tolerated, and toxicity was low; most patients (71%) experienced acute toxicities of grade 2 or less. Six months posttreatment, stable local disease was achieved in 90% of evaluable patients, but only 33% were free from metastatic progression. Median overall survival was 7.5 months, and actuarial survival was 33% at 1 year and 11% at 3 years, reflecting swift metastatic progression in some patients but good long-term control of localized disease in others. High-grade acneiform rash (P = .0027), posttreatment stable disease (P = .0059), and pretreatment cancer antigen 19.9 (CA19.9) level (P = .0042) associated with extended survival. Patient skin and blood samples yielded sufficient RNA and good quality protein, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that cetuximab inhibits EGFR-mediated radioresistance to achieve excellent local control with minimal toxicity but does not sufficiently control metastatic progression in all patients. Translational studies of patient tissue samples may yield molecular information that may enable individual treatment response prediction. PMID:24772208

  14. Tissue damage drives co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 to direct Rev-erb sensitive wound repair in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Eichenfield, Dawn Z; Troutman, Ty Dale; Link, Verena M; Lam, Michael T; Cho, Han; Gosselin, David; Spann, Nathanael J; Lesch, Hanna P; Tao, Jenhan; Muto, Jun; Gallo, Richard L; Evans, Ronald M; Glass, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    Although macrophages can be polarized to distinct phenotypes in vitro with individual ligands, in vivo they encounter multiple signals that control their varied functions in homeostasis, immunity, and disease. Here, we identify roles of Rev-erb nuclear receptors in regulating responses of mouse macrophages to complex tissue damage signals and wound repair. Rather than reinforcing a specific program of macrophage polarization, Rev-erbs repress subsets of genes that are activated by TLR ligands, IL4, TGFβ, and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPS). Unexpectedly, a complex damage signal promotes co-localization of NF-κB, Smad3, and Nrf2 at Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers and drives expression of genes characteristic of multiple polarization states in the same cells. Rev-erb-sensitive enhancers thereby integrate multiple damage-activated signaling pathways to promote a wound repair phenotype. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13024.001 PMID:27462873

  15. Localization of collagen modifying enzymes on fibroblastic reticular cells and follicular dendritic cells in non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Ohe, Rintaro; Aung, Naing Ye; Meng, Hongxue; Kabasawa, Takanobu; Suto, Aya; Tamazawa, Nobuyuki; Yang, Suran; Kato, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the localization of collagen modifying enzymes (CMEs) on fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in non-neoplastic lymphoid tissues and various malignant lymphomas. The expression of prolyl 4-hydroxylase 1 (P4H1), lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) was frequently observed on FRCs and FDCs in the germinal center (GC), except for the mantle zone. The expression of CMEs was lower in most lymphomas than in their respective postulated normal counterparts. The ratio of transglutaminase II(+) FRCs/CD35(+) FDCs was also lower in follicular lymphomas (FL) than in other lymphomas. The mRNAs of some CMEs (P4H1, prolyl 4-hydroxylase 3, LH3, and heat shock protein 47) were confirmed in almost all lymphomas. These results indicate that lymphoma cell proliferation suppresses/decreases the number of CMEs expressing FRCs and FDCs in most lymphomas.

  16. Localization of collagen modifying enzymes on fibroblastic reticular cells and follicular dendritic cells in non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphoid tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ohe, Rintaro; Aung, Naing Ye; Meng, Hongxue; Kabasawa, Takanobu; Suto, Aya; Tamazawa, Nobuyuki; Yang, Suran; Kato, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the localization of collagen modifying enzymes (CMEs) on fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in non-neoplastic lymphoid tissues and various malignant lymphomas. The expression of prolyl 4-hydroxylase 1 (P4H1), lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) was frequently observed on FRCs and FDCs in the germinal center (GC), except for the mantle zone. The expression of CMEs was lower in most lymphomas than in their respective postulated normal counterparts. The ratio of transglutaminase II+ FRCs/CD35+ FDCs was also lower in follicular lymphomas (FL) than in other lymphomas. The mRNAs of some CMEs (P4H1, prolyl 4-hydroxylase 3, LH3, and heat shock protein 47) were confirmed in almost all lymphomas. These results indicate that lymphoma cell proliferation suppresses/decreases the number of CMEs expressing FRCs and FDCs in most lymphomas. PMID:26700650

  17. Patterns of Local Recurrence and Dose Fractionation of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in 462 Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity and Trunk Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jebsen, Nina L.; Engellau, Jacob; Engström, Katarina; Bauer, Henrik C.; Monge, Odd R.; Muren, Ludvig P.; Eide, Geir E.; Trovik, Clement S.; Bruland, Øyvind S.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of dose fractionation of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on local recurrence (LR) and the relation of LR to radiation fields. Methods and Materials: LR rates were analyzed in 462 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma who underwent surgical excision and adjuvant RT at five Scandinavian sarcoma centers from 1998 to 2009. Medical records were reviewed for dose fractionation parameters and to determine the location of the LR relative to the radiation portals. Results: Fifty-five of 462 patients developed a LR (11.9%). Negative prognostic factors included intralesional surgical margin (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08-20.0), high malignancy grade (HR: 5.82, 95% CI: 1.31-25.8), age at diagnosis (HR per 10 years: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03-1.56), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor histological subtype (HR: 6.66, 95% CI: 2.56-17.3). RT dose was tailored to margin status. No correlation between RT dose and LR rate was found in multiple Cox regression analysis. The majority (65%) of LRs occurred within the primary RT volume. Conclusions: No significant dose–response effect of adjuvant RT was demonstrated. Interestingly, patients given 45-Gy accelerated RT (1.8 Gy twice daily/2.5 weeks) had the best local outcome. A total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions seemed adequate following wide margin surgery. The risk of LR was associated with histopathologic subtype, which should be included in the treatment algorithm of adjuvant RT in soft tissue sarcoma.

  18. Infection Rate and Tissue Localization of Murine IL-12p40-Producing Monocyte-Derived CD103+ Lung Dendritic Cells during Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Taher, Chato; Chuquimia, Olga D.; Mazurek, Jolanta; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; Fernández, Carmen; Sköld, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Non-hematopoietic cells, including lung epithelial cells, influence host immune responses. By co-culturing primary alveolar epithelial cells and monocytes from naïve donor mice, we show that alveolar epithelial cells support monocyte survival and differentiation in vitro, suggesting a role for non-hematopoietic cells in monocyte differentiation during the steady state in vivo. CD103+ dendritic cells (αE-DC) are present at mucosal surfaces. Using a murine primary monocyte adoptive transfer model, we demonstrate that αE-DC in the lungs and pulmonary lymph nodes are monocyte-derived during pulmonary tuberculosis. The tissue localization may influence the functional potential of αE-DC that accumulate in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lungs. Here, we confirm the localization of αE-DC in uninfected mice beneath the bronchial epithelial cell layer and near the vascular wall, and show that αE-DC have a similar distribution in the lungs during pulmonary tuberculosis and are detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from infected mice. Lung DC can be targeted by M. tuberculosis in vivo and play a role in bacterial dissemination to the draining lymph node. In contrast to other DC subsets, only a fraction of lung αE-DC are infected with the bacterium. We also show that virulent M. tuberculosis does not significantly alter cell surface expression levels of MHC class II on infected cells in vivo and that αE-DC contain the highest frequency of IL-12p40+ cells among the myeloid cell subsets in infected lungs. Our results support a model in which inflammatory monocytes are recruited into the M. tuberculosis-infected lung tissue and, depending on which non-hematopoietic cells they interact with, differentiate along different paths to give rise to multiple monocyte-derived cells, including DC with a distinctive αE-DC phenotype. PMID:23861965

  19. Human placental Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-11-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the ..cap alpha.. subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (approx. = 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) lambdagt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1.

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme labeled with [3H]captopril. Tissue localizations and changes in different models of hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S K; Lynch, D R; Snyder, S H

    1987-01-01

    In vitro autoradiography with [3H]captopril was used to localize and quantitate angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in various tissues in two-kidney, one-clip (2K-1C) hypertension, one-kidney, one-clip (1K-1C) hypertension, desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertension, and a normotensive control group. There were no significant differences in mean systolic blood pressure among the hypertensive groups. Plasma renin activity (PRA) was highest in the 2K-1C group (6.20 +/- 2.17 ng/ml per h), intermediate in the 1K-1C group (2.19 +/- 0.62 ng/ml per h) and control group (3.20 +/- 0.53 ng/ml per h), and lowest in the DOCA-salt group (0.07 +/- 0.06 ng/ml per h). In the lungs, aorta, mesenteric arteries, and adrenal medulla, ACE labeling was highest in the 2K-1C group, intermediate in the 1K-1C and control groups, and lowest in the DOCA-salt group. ACE levels in these tissues correlated positively with PRA. In the kidney, anterior pituitary, testis, and choroid plexus of the brain, ACE levels correlated negatively with PRA, with lowest ACE levels in the 2K-1C group and highest levels in the DOCA-salt group. In the epididymis, posterior pituitary, and other regions of the brain, ACE levels did not differ significantly among the groups. Images PMID:3040809

  1. Meta-analysis reveals an association of PTPN22 C1858T with autoimmune diseases, which depends on the localization of the affected tissue.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Ibrahim, S; Petersen, F; Yu, X

    2012-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a strong susceptibility gene shared by many autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms underlying this relationship. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the association between PTPN22 polymorphism C1858T and autoimmune diseases. The results showed a remarkable pattern; PTPN22 C1858T was strongly associated with type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, immune thrombocytopenia, generalized vitiligo with concomitant autoimmune diseases, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, Graves' disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Addison's disease. By contrast, PTPN22 C1858T showed a negligible association with systemic sclerosis, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, pemphigus vulgaris, ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, Crohn's disease and acute anterior uveitis. Further analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups of diseases with regard to their targeted tissues: most autoimmune diseases showing an insignificant association with PTPN22 C1858T manifest in skin, the gastrointestinal tract or in immune privileged sites. These results showed that the association of PTPN22 polymorphism with autoimmune diseases depends on the localization of the affected tissue, suggesting a role of targeted organ variation in the disease manifestations.

  2. Tissue localization, shedding, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus following inoculation of 4-week-old feeder pigs.

    PubMed

    Niederwerder, Megan C; Nietfeld, Jerome C; Bai, Jianfa; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Breazeale, Barbara; Anderson, Joe; Kerrigan, Maureen A; An, Baoyan; Oberst, Richard D; Crawford, Kimberly; Lager, Kelly M; Madson, Darin M; Rowland, Raymond R R; Anderson, Gary A; Hesse, Richard A

    2016-11-01

    We determined tissue localization, shedding patterns, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) following inoculation of 4-week-old feeder pigs. Thirty-three pigs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups for the 42-day study: inoculated (group A; n = 23), contact transmission (group B; n = 5), and aerosol transmission (group C; n = 5). Contact transmission occurred rapidly to group B pigs whereas productive aerosol transmission failed to occur to group C pigs. Emesis was the first clinical sign noted at 3 days postinoculation (dpi) followed by mild to moderate diarrhea lasting 5 more days. Real-time PCR detected PEDV in fecal and nasal swabs, oral fluids, serum, and gastrointestinal and lymphoid tissues. Shedding occurred primarily during the first 2 weeks postinoculation, peaking at 5-6 dpi; however, some pigs had PEDV nucleic acid detected in swabs collected at 21 and 28 dpi. Antibody titers were measurable between 14 and 42 dpi. Although feces and intestines collected at 42 dpi were PEDV negative by PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, small intestines from 70% of group A pigs were PCR positive. Although disease was relatively mild and transient in this age group, the results demonstrate that 4-week-old pigs are productively infected and can sustain virus replication for several weeks. Long-term shedding of PEDV in subclinically affected pigs should be considered an important source for PEDV transmission.

  3. Differential subcellular distribution of glucose transporters GLUT1-6 and GLUT9 in human cancer: ultrastructural localization of GLUT1 and GLUT5 in breast tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Alejandro; Ulloa, Viviana; Rodríguez, Federico; Reinicke, Karin; Yañez, Alejandro J; García, María de los Angeles; Medina, Rodolfo A; Carrasco, Mónica; Barberis, Sofía; Castro, Tamara; Martínez, Fernando; Koch, Ximena; Vera, Juan Carlos; Poblete, María Teresa; Figueroa, Carlos D; Peruzzo, Bruno; Pérez, Fernando; Nualart, Francisco

    2006-06-01

    It has been proposed that the enhanced metabolic activity of tumor cells is accompanied by an increased expression of facilitative hexose transporters (GLUTs). However, a previous immunohistochemical analysis of GLUT1 expression in 154 malignant human neoplasms failed to detect the GLUT1 isoform in 87 tumors. We used 146 normal human tissues and 215 tumor samples to reassess GLUT1 expression. A similar number of samples were used to compare the expression of GLUT2-6 and 9. The classical expression of GLUT1-5 in different normal human tissues was confirmed, however, we were unable to detect GLUT2 in human pancreatic islet cells. GLUT6 was principally detected in testis germinal cells and GLUT9 was localized in kidney, liver, heart, and adrenal. In tumor samples, GLUT1, 2, and 5 were the main transporters detected. GLUT1 was the most widely expressed transporter, however, 42% of the samples had very low-to-negative expression levels. GLUT2 was detected in 31% of the samples, being mainly expressed in breast, colon, and liver carcinoma. GLUT5 was detected in 27% of breast and colon adenocarcinoma, liver carcinoma, lymphomas, and testis seminoma samples. In situ RT-PCR and ultrastructural immunohistochemistry confirmed GLUT5 expression in breast cancer. GLUT6 and 9 are not clearly over-expressed in human cancer. The extensive expression of GLUT2 and 5 (glucose/fructose and fructose transporters, respectively) in malignant human tissues indicates that fructose may be a good energy substrate in tumor cells. Our functional data obtained in vitro in different tumor cells support this hypothesis. Additionally, these results suggest that fructose uptake could be used for positron emission tomography imaging and, may possibly represent a novel target for the development of therapeutic agents in different human cancers.

  4. Local delivery of allogeneic bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for cutaneous wound healing in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Summer E; Kleinbeck, Kyle R; Cantu, David; Kim, Jaeyhup; Bentz, Michael L; Faucher, Lee D; Kao, W John; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-02-01

    Wound healing remains a major challenge in modern medicine. Bone marrow- (BM) and adipose tissue- (AT) derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are of great interest for tissue reconstruction due to their unique immunological properties and regenerative potential. The purpose of this study was to characterize BM and AT-MSCs and evaluate their effect when administered in a porcine wound model. MSCs were derived from male Göttingen Minipigs and characterized according to established criteria. Allogeneic BM- or AT-MSCs were administered intradermally (1 x 10(6) cells) into partial-thickness wounds created on female animals, and covered with Vaseline® gauze or fibrin in a randomized pattern. Animals were euthanized at 7, 10, 14 and 21 days. Tissues were analyzed visually for healing and by microscopic examination for epidermal development and remodelling. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of male DNA in the specimens. All wounds were healed by 14 days. MSC-injected wounds were associated with improved appearance and faster re-epithelialization compared to saline controls. Evaluation of rete ridge depth and architecture showed that MSC treatment promoted a faster rate of epidermal maturation. Male DNA was detected in all samples at days 7 and 10, suggesting the presence of MSCs. We showed the safety, feasibility and potential efficacy of local injection of allogeneic BM- and AT-MSCs for treatment of wounds in a preclinical model. Our data in this large animal model support the potential use of BM- and AT-MSC for treatment of cutaneous wounds through modulation of healing and epithelialization.

  5. Tissue- and cell-specific localization of galectins, β-galactose-binding animal lectins, and their potential functions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nio-Kobayashi, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Fifteen galectins, β-galactose-binding animal lectins, are known to be distributed throughout the body. We herein summarize current knowledge on the tissue- and cell-specific localization of galectins and their potential functions in health and disease. Galectin-3 is widely distributed in epithelia, including the simple columnar epithelium in the gut, stratified squamous epithelium in the gut and skin, and transitional epithelium and several regions in nephrons in the urinary tract. Galectin-2 and galectin-4/6 are gut-specific, while galectin-7 is found in the stratified squamous epithelium in the gut and skin. The reproductive tract mainly contains galectin-1 and galectin-3, and their expression markedly changes during the estrous/menstrual cycle. The galectin subtype expressed in the corpus luteum (CL) changes in association with luteal function. The CL of women and cows displays a "galectin switch" with coordinated changes in the major galectin subtype and its ligand glycoconjugate structure. Macrophages express galectin-3, which may be involved in phagocytotic activity. Lymphoid tissues contain galectin-3-positive macrophages, which are not always stained with the macrophage marker, F4/80. Subsets of neurons in the brain and dorsal root ganglion express galectin-1 and galectin-3, which may contribute to the regeneration of damaged axons, stem cell differentiation, and pain control. The subtype-specific contribution of galectins to implantation, fibrosis, and diabetes are also discussed. The function of galectins may differ depending on the tissues or cells in which they act. The ligand glycoconjugate structures mediated by glycosyltransferases including MGAT5, ST6GAL1, and C2GnT are important for revealing the functions of galectins in healthy and disease states.

  6. Localization and Distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in Citrus and Periwinkle by Direct Tissue Blot Immuno Assay with an Anti-OmpA Polyclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Fang; Duan, Yongping; Paul, Cristina; Brlansky, Ronald H.; Hartung, John S.

    2015-01-01

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CaLas), a non-cultured member of the α-proteobacteria, is the causal agent of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). Due to the difficulties of in vitro culture, antibodies against CaLas have not been widely used in studies of this pathogen. We have used an anti-OmpA polyclonal antibody based direct tissue blot immunoassay to localize CaLas in different citrus tissues and in periwinkle leaves. In citrus petioles, CaLas was unevenly distributed in the phloem sieve tubes, and tended to colonize in phloem sieve tubes on the underside of petioles in preference to the upper side of petioles. Both the leaf abscission zone and the junction of the petiole and leaf midrib had fewer CaLas bacteria compared to the main portions of the petiole and the midribs. Colonies of CaLas in phloem sieve tubes were more frequently found in stems with symptomatic leaves than in stems with asymptomatic leaves with an uneven distribution pattern. In serial sections taken from the receptacle to the peduncle, more CaLas were observed in the peduncle sections adjacent to the stem. In seed, CaLas was located in the seed coat. Many fewer CaLas were found in the roots, as compared to the seeds and petioles when samples were collected from trees with obvious foliar symptoms. The direct tissue blot immuno assay was adapted to whole periwinkle leaves infected by CaLas. The pathogen was distributed throughout the lateral veins and the results were correlated with results of qPCR. Our data provide direct spatial and anatomical information for CaLas in planta. This simple and scalable method may facilitate the future research on the interaction of CaLas and host plant. PMID:25946013

  7. Localization and Distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in Citrus and Periwinkle by Direct Tissue Blot Immuno Assay with an Anti-OmpA Polyclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fang; Duan, Yongping; Paul, Cristina; Brlansky, Ronald H; Hartung, John S

    2015-01-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CaLas), a non-cultured member of the α-proteobacteria, is the causal agent of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). Due to the difficulties of in vitro culture, antibodies against CaLas have not been widely used in studies of this pathogen. We have used an anti-OmpA polyclonal antibody based direct tissue blot immunoassay to localize CaLas in different citrus tissues and in periwinkle leaves. In citrus petioles, CaLas was unevenly distributed in the phloem sieve tubes, and tended to colonize in phloem sieve tubes on the underside of petioles in preference to the upper side of petioles. Both the leaf abscission zone and the junction of the petiole and leaf midrib had fewer CaLas bacteria compared to the main portions of the petiole and the midribs. Colonies of CaLas in phloem sieve tubes were more frequently found in stems with symptomatic leaves than in stems with asymptomatic leaves with an uneven distribution pattern. In serial sections taken from the receptacle to the peduncle, more CaLas were observed in the peduncle sections adjacent to the stem. In seed, CaLas was located in the seed coat. Many fewer CaLas were found in the roots, as compared to the seeds and petioles when samples were collected from trees with obvious foliar symptoms. The direct tissue blot immuno assay was adapted to whole periwinkle leaves infected by CaLas. The pathogen was distributed throughout the lateral veins and the results were correlated with results of qPCR. Our data provide direct spatial and anatomical information for CaLas in planta. This simple and scalable method may facilitate the future research on the interaction of CaLas and host plant.

  8. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  9. Adverse consequences of immunostimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The therapeutic uses of immunostimulatory agents are generally in the treatments of infections or cancer. The traditional example of vaccination is one form of immunostimulation used in the prevention of pathogenic infections or cancer (e.g., human papillomavirus vaccine). Recombinant cytokines are increasingly used to stimulate immune system function. For example, interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) and interleukin (IL)-2 have been used to treat chronic hepatitis C virus infection and metastatic melanoma, respectively. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies are used to target malignant cells for elimination via antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mechanisms or apoptosis, including the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-CD56 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, and the anti-erb2 receptor antibody trastuzumab used in the treatment of breast cancer. Finally, immunostimulation may develop via modulation of pathways involved in immune system regulation. For example, the anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody TGN1412 was developed as an agonist of regulatory T-cells for treatment of T-cell-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases or leukemias. A panel was convened to discuss potential toxicities associated with immunostimulation. At the Immunotoxicology IV meeting in 2006, a panel, moderated by Dr. Robert House (Dynport Vaccine Co., Frederick, MD), included Drs. Gary Burleson (Burleson Research Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, NC), Kenneth Hastings (US FDA, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research [CDER], Rockville, MD), Barbara Mounho (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA), Rafael Ponce (ZymoGenetics, Inc., Seattle, WA), Mark Wing (Huntington Life Sciences, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom), Lauren Black (Navigators Consulting, Sparks, NV) and Anne Pilaro (US FDA, CDER, Rockville, MD). This paper reviews the major identified toxicities associated with immunostimulation, including the acute phase response, cell and tissue abnormalities/injury, cytokine

  10. Tissue distribution and subcellular localization of trace metals in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis with special reference to the role of lysosomal granules in metal sequestration.

    PubMed

    Desouky, Mahmoud M A

    2006-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the cellular mechanisms, which govern metal sequestration and detoxification in gastropods. For this purpose the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis was exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of three species of metals (Al, Zn and Cd) for 30 days and the localization and fate of these metals were followed in different tissues of the snails. The measurement of relative distribution of metals between tissues revealed that the digestive gland and kidney account for most of the accumulated metals. Al and Cd (non-essential metals) were redistributed to the digestive gland, possibly because of the presence of specific binding entities in the digestive glands of the herein species. This study focuses on the role of intracellular metal-containing granules on metal sequestration. Three main types of granules were identified in the digestive gland cells namely small, green and yellow granules. The morphological examination and the progressive accumulation of elements within these granules revealed that they are developmental stages with the yellow granule being the mature one. The total number of these granules was found to be significantly increased upon exposure of the snails to Al only. This increase may be a response to the large amount of Al that is accumulated through feeding route of this grazing snail. X-ray microanalysis (XRMA) revealed that metals were localized in all three types of digestive gland granules. The increased amount of ligands (P and S) in the granules may give evidence for their role in metal sequestration. Levels of Al and P were positively correlated in the digestive gland granules. It is possible that aluminium is bound to phosphorus to render it insoluble and so to both immobilize it within the lysosome and to be excreted in a highly insoluble form. On the other hand, both Zn and Cd induced marked upregulation of S in mature (yellow) granules by 26- and 11-folds, respectively. The lysosomal

  11. A Multicenter Phase II Study of Local Radiation Therapy for Stage IEA Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphomas: A Preliminary Report From the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG)

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, Koichi Kagami, Yoshikazu; Higuchi, Keiko; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Shikama, Naoto; Nakazawa, Masanori; Fukuda, Ichiro; Nihei, Keiji; Ito, Kana; Teshima, Teruki; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Oguchi, Masahiko

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of moderate dose radiation therapy (RT) for mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in a prospective multicenter phase II trial. Methods and Materials: The subjects in this study were 37 patients with MALT lymphoma between April 2002 and November 2004. There were 16 male and 21 female patients, ranging in age from 24 to 82 years, with a median of 56 years. The primary tumor originated in the orbit in 24 patients, in the thyroid and salivary gland in 4 patients each, and 5 in the others. The median tumor dose was 30.6 Gy (range, 30.6-39.6 Gy), depending on the primary site and maximal tumor diameter. The median follow-up was 37.3 months. Results: Complete remission (CR) or CR/unconfirmed was achieved in 34 patients (92%). The 3-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local control probability were 100%, 91.9%, and 97.3%, respectively. Thirteen patients experienced Grade 1 acute toxicities including dermatitis, mucositis, and conjunctivitis. One patient developed Grade 2 taste loss. Regarding late toxicities, Grade 2 reactions including hypothyroidism, and radiation pneumonitis were observed in three patients, and Grade 3 cataract was seen in three patients. Conclusions: This prospective phase II study demonstrated that moderate dose RT was highly effective in achieving local control with acceptable morbidity in 37 patients with MALT lymphoma.

  12. Adverse Events of Auricular Therapy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Molassiotis, Alexander; Wang, Tao; Suen, Lorna K. P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the literature on adverse events associated with auricular therapy (AT). Case reports, case series, surveys, and all types of clinical trials reporting adverse events of AT were included. Relevant articles were mainly retrieved from 13 electronic databases and seven Chinese journals on complementary medicine. AT-related adverse events were reported in 32 randomized controlled trials, five uncontrolled clinical trials, four case reports, and two controlled clinical trials. For auricular acupuncture, the most frequently reported adverse events were tenderness or pain at insertion, dizziness, local discomfort, minor bleeding and nausea, and so forth. For auricular acupressure, local skin irritation and discomfort, mild tenderness or pain, and dizziness were commonly reported. Skin irritation, local discomfort, and pain were detected in auricular electroacupuncture, and minor infection was identified in auricular bloodletting therapy. Most of these events were transient, mild, and tolerable, and no serious adverse events were identified. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that AT is a relatively safe approach. Considering the patient's safety, prospective or retrospective surveys are needed in future research to gather practitioner-reported and patient-reported adverse events on AT, and the quality of adverse events reporting in future AT trials should be improved. PMID:25435890

  13. Adverse effects in lumbar spinal cord morphology and tissue biochemistry in Sprague Dawley male rats following exposure to a continuous 1-h a day 900-MHz electromagnetic field throughout adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kerimoğlu, Gökçen; Aslan, Ali; Baş, Orhan; Çolakoğlu, Serdar; Odacı, Ersan

    2016-12-01

    Cell phones, an indispensable element of daily life, are today used at almost addictive levels by adolescents. Adolescents are therefore becoming increasingly exposed to the effect of the electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted by cell phones. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exposure to a 900-MHz EMF throughout adolescence on the lumbar spinal cord using histopathological, immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques. Twenty-four Sprague Dawley (28.3-43.9g) aged 21days were included in the study. These were divided equally into three groups - control (CG), sham (SG) and electromagnetic (ELMAG). No procedure was performed on the CG rats until the end of the study. SG and ELMAG rats were kept inside an EMF cage (EMFC) for 1h a day every day at the same time between postnatal days 22 and 60. During this time, ELMAG rats were exposed to the effect of a 900-MHz EMF, while the SG rats were kept in the EMFC without being exposed to EMF. At the end of the study, the lumbar regions of the spinal cords of all rats in all groups were extracted. Half of each extracted tissue was stored at -80°C for biochemical analysis, while the other half was used for histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses. In terms of histopathology, a lumbar spinal cord with normal morphology was observed in the other groups, while morphological irregularity in gray matter, increased vacuolization and infiltration of white matter into gray matter were pronounced in the ELMAG rats. The cytoplasm of some neurons in the gray matter was shrunken and stained dark, and vacuoles were observed in the cytoplasms. The apoptotic index of glia cells and neurons were significantly higher in ELMAG compared to the other groups. Biochemical analysis revealed a significantly increased MDA value in ELMAG compared to CG, while SOD and GSH levels decreased significantly. In conclusion, our study results suggest that continuous exposure to a 900-MHz EMF for 1h a day through all stages of

  14. Remarkable Activation of the Complement System and Aberrant Neuronal Localization of the Membrane Attack Complex in the Brain Tissues of Scrapie-Infected Rodents.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yan; Chen, Cao; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Xiao, Kang; Wang, Jing; Chen, Li-Na; Sun, Jing; Gao, Chen; Shi, Qi; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-12-01

    As an integral part of the innate immunity, the complement system has been reported to involve in the pathogenesis of prion diseases (PrD). However, the states of expression and activity of complement proteins in experimental models of scrapie infection are still not fully understood. Herein, the state of complement activation, the presence, and distribution as well as localization of C3 and membrane attack complex (MAC) in the brains of several scrapie-infected rodents were comparatively assessed through various methodologies. Our data illustrated a significant increase in the total complement activity (CH50, U/ml) in several scrapie-infected rodent brains at the terminal stage and a time-dependent upregulation of C1q in 263K-infected hamsters during the incubation period, intimating the sustained and progressive activation of the classical pathway during PrD progression. Confocal microscopy revealed robust activation of C3 and its localization to various central nervous system (CNS) cells with differential morphology in the brain tissues of both 263K-infected hamsters and 139A-infected C57BL/6 mice at disease end stages. Dynamic analyses of MAC in the brains of 263K-infected hamsters and 139A-infected C57BL/6 mice demonstrated remarkably time-dependent deposition during the incubation period, which may highlight a persistently activated terminal complement components. Moreover, immunofluorescent assays (IFAs) showed that MAC-specific signals appeared to overlap with morphologically abnormal neurons rather than proliferative astrocytes or activated microglia throughout the CNS of both 263K-infected hamsters and 139A-infected C57BL/6 mice. Overall, these results indicate that the activation of the complement system and the subsequent localization of the complement components to neurons may be a hallmark during prion infection, which ultimately contribute to the neurodegeneration in PrD.

  15. Primary Radiation Therapy in Patients With Localized Orbital Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT Lymphoma)

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Seok Hyun; Choi, Byung Ock; Kim, Gi Won; Yang, Suk Woo; Hong, Young Seon; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kim, Yeon Sil

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with localized orbital marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 46 patients who were treated with RT for pathologically confirmed localized stage IE marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT. The radiation dose ranged from 21.6 to 45 Gy (median, 30.6 Gy) at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction. Median follow-up duration was 32.3 months (range, 3.1-113.6 months). Results: Forty-three patients (93%) achieved complete remission (CR), and three patients (7%) achieved partial remission (PR). Five-year relapse-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were 93%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among the patients with CR, two had recurrence at three sites. One patient relapsed locally and was successfully salvaged with reirradiation. The other patient relapsed in a distant site and was successfully treated with six cycles of CHOP chemotherapy. Late complications were noted in four patients. Two patients developed cataracts at 26 and 37 months after completion of RT. The other two patients developed nasolacrimal duct obstructions at 4 and 11 months after completion of RT. Conclusion: Our study showed that a modest dose of RT is an excellent treatment modality with low complication and recurrence rates. We suggest that a dose of 30.6 Gy is tolerable and sufficient for treating orbital MALT lymphoma. Even following recurrence, successful salvage is possible with RT or chemotherapy.

  16. Polycaprolactone-Coated 3D Printed Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: In Vitro Alendronate Release Behavior and Local Delivery Effect on In Vivo Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of in vitro alendronate (AD) release behavior through polycaprolactone (PCL) coating on in vivo bone formation using PCL-coated 3D printed interconnected porous tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds. Higher AD and Ca2+ ion release was observed at lower pH (5.0) than that at higher pH (7.4). AD and Ca2+ release, surface morphology, and phase analysis after release indicated a matrix degradation dominated AD release caused by TCP dissolution. PCL coating showed its effectiveness for controlled and sustained AD release. Six different scaffold compositions, namely, (i) TCP (bare TCP), (ii) TCP + AD (AD-coated TCP), (iii) TCP + PCL (PCL-coated TCP), (iv) TCP + PCL + AD, (v) TCP + AD + PCL, and (vi) TCP + AD + PCL + AD were tested in the distal femoral defect of Sprague–Dawley rats for 6 and 10 weeks. An excellent bone formation inside the micro and macro pores of the scaffolds was observed from histomorphology. Histomorphometric analysis revealed maximum new bone formation in TCP + AD + PCL scaffolds after 6 weeks. No adverse effect of PCL on bioactivity of TCP and in vivo bone formation was observed. All scaffolds with AD showed higher bone formation and reduced TRAP (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) positive cells activity compared to bare TCP and TCP coated with only PCL. Bare TCP scaffolds showed the highest TRAP positive cells activity followed by TCP + PCL scaffolds, whereas TCP + AD scaffolds showed the lowest TRAP activity. A higher TRAP positive cells activity was observed in TCP + AD + PCL compared to TCP + AD scaffolds after 6 weeks. Our results show that in vivo local AD delivery from PCL-coated 3DP TCP scaffolds could further induce increased early bone formation. PMID:24826838

  17. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors.

  18. Molecular characterization and in situ localization of endosymbiotic 16S ribosomal RNA and RuBisCO genes in the pogonophoran tissue.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sato, Makoto; Sasayama, Yuichi; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    Gutless pogonophorans are generally thought to live in symbiosis with methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). We identified a 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) and a ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxlase/oxygenase (RuBisCO, E.C.4.1.1.39) gene that encode the form I large subunit ( cbbL) from symbiont-bearing tissue of the pogonophoran Oligobrachia mashikoi. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence suggested that the pogonophoran endosymbiont belonged to the gamma-subdivision of Proteobacteria. The endosymbiont was most closely related to an uncultured bacterium from a hydrocarbon seep, forming a unique clade adjacent to the known methanotrophic 16S rDNA cluster. The RuBisCO gene from the pogonophoran tissue was closely related to those of the chemoautotrophic genera Thiobacillus and Hydrogenovibrio. Presence of the RuBisCO gene suggested a methanotrophic symbiosis because some methanotrophic bacteria are known to be capable of autotrophy via the Calvin cycle. In contrast, particulate and soluble methane monooxygenase genes ( pmoA and mmoX) and the methanol dehydrogenase gene ( mxaF), which are indicators for methanotrophs or methylotrophs, were not detected by repeated trial of polymerase chain reaction. For 16S rRNA and RuBisCO genes, endosymbiotic localizations were confirmed by in situ hybridization. These results support the possibilities that the pogonophoran host has a novel endosymbiont which belongs to the gamma-subdivision of Proteobacteria, and that the endosymbiont has the gene of the autotrophic enzyme RuBisCO.

  19. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  20. Modulation of bone ingrowth and tissue differentiation by local infusion of interleukin-10 in the presence of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Stuart; Trindade, Michael; Ma, Ting; Lee, Mel; Wang, Neal; Ikenou, Takashi; Matsuura, Ippe; Miyanishi, Keita; Fox, Nora; Regula, Donald; Genovese, Mark; Klein, John; Bloch, Dan; Smith, R Lane

    2003-04-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a cytokine that plays a major role in suppressing the inflammatory response, particularly cell-mediated immunity that is characteristic of the TH1 response. The purpose of this study was to determine whether local infusion of IL-10 could mitigate the suppression of bone ingrowth associated with polyethylene wear particles. Drug test chambers were implanted in the proximal tibia of 20 mature New Zealand White rabbits. The DTC provided a continuous 1 x 1 x 5-mm canal for tissue ingrowth. After a 6-week period for osseointegration, the DTC was then connected to an osmotic diffusion pump. IL-10 at doses of 0.1-100 ng/mL (0.25 microL/h) was infused with or without ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene particles (0.5 +/- 0.2 microm diameter, 10(12) particles/mL) present in the chamber for a 3- or 6-week period. The tissue in the chamber was harvested after each treatment; sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for morphometric analysis. Osteoclast-like cells were identified by immunohistochemical staining using a monoclonal antibody directed against the alpha chain of the vitronectin receptor, CD51. Osteoblasts were identified using alkaline phosphatase staining. In dose-response studies, infusion of 1 ng/mL IL-10 yielded the greatest bone ingrowth in the presence of particles. The addition of polyethylene particles evoked a marked foreign body reaction and fibrosis; bone ingrowth was significantly suppressed (p = 0.0003). Bone ingrowth was increased by over 48% with infusion of IL-10 for the final 3 weeks of a 6-week ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene particle exposure compared with particles alone (p = 0.027). IL-10 is a cytokine that plays a major role in suppressing the inflammatory response, especially cell-mediated immunity that is characteristic of the TH1 response. Local infusion of immune-modulating cytokines such as IL-10 may prove to be useful in abating particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis.

  1. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  2. The Effect of Active versus Passive Recovery Periods during High Intensity Intermittent Exercise on Local Tissue Oxygenation in 18 – 30 Year Old Sedentary Men

    PubMed Central

    Kerhervé, Hugo A.; Askew, Christopher D.; Solomon, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been proposed as a time-efficient format of exercise to reduce the chronic disease burden associated with sedentary behaviour. Changes in oxygen utilisation at the local tissue level during an acute session of HIIT could be the primary stimulus for the health benefits associated with this format of exercise. The recovery periods of HIIT effect the physiological responses that occur during the session. It was hypothesised that in sedentary individuals, local and systemic oxygen utilisation would be higher during HIIT interspersed with active recovery periods, when compared to passive recovery periods. Methods Twelve sedentary males (mean ± SD; age 23 ± 3 yr) completed three conditions on a cycle ergometer: 1) HIIT with passive recovery periods between four bouts (HIITPASS) 2) HIIT with active recovery periods between four bouts (HIITACT) 3) HIITACT with four HIIT bouts replaced with passive periods (REC). Deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb) in the vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GN) muscles and the pre-frontal cortex (FH), oxygen consumption (VO2), power output and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously during the three conditions. Results There was a significant increase in HHb at VL during bouts 2 (p = 0.017), 3 (p = 0.035) and 4 (p = 0.035) in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS. Mean power output was significantly lower in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS (p < 0.001). There was a significant main effect for site in both HIITPASS (p = 0.029) and HIITACT (p = 0.005). There were no significant differences in VO2 and HR between HIITPASS and HIITACT. Conclusions The increase in HHb at VL and the lower mean power output during HIITACT could indicate that a higher level of deoxygenation contributes to decreased mechanical power in sedentary participants. The significant differences in HHb between sites indicates the specificity of oxygen utilisation. PMID:27677081

  3. Soluble calcium-binding proteins (SCBPs) of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris: molecular characterization and localization by FISH in muscle and neuronal tissue.

    PubMed

    Thiruketheeswaran, Prasath; Kiehl, Ernst; D'Haese, Jochen

    2016-11-01

    Soluble calcium-binding proteins (SCBPs) of invertebrates probably serve like their vertebrate counterpart-the parvalbumins-as soluble relaxing factors in muscles. Three SCBP isoforms (SCBP1-3) have been isolated and biochemically characterized in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Huch et al. in J Comp Physiol B 158:325-334, 1988). For SCBP2, we found two isoforms named SCBP2a/2b. Both of them together with SCBP3 are present in the body wall muscle. In the gizzard solely, SCBP2b and no SCBP2a or SCBP3 could be detected. The coding sequences of all three isoforms consist of 534 bp for 178 amino acids and contain four EF-hand motifs, of which the second EF-hands are truncated. Recombinant proteins show heat stability and a Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift similar to the native proteins, indicating comparable calcium-binding properties. All three isoforms are encoded by three distinct and differentially expressed genes. The genes for SCBP2a, SCBP2b, and SCBP3 are interrupted by only one intron, inserting at nearly the same positions. Northern blot analysis revealed two mRNA transcripts for SCBP2 of approximately 1250 and 1500 kb and one transcript for SCBP3 of approximately 1250 kb. SCBP mRNA was localized by fluorescent in situ hybridization in the body wall and the gizzard. The distribution of the staining intensities resembles that for the myosin ATPase activity and indicates a correlation between the amount of SCBP and speed of muscle contraction. In addition, SCBP mRNA was localized within the nervous tissue, the cerebral and subesophageal ganglia and the ventral nerve cord.

  4. Undesirable and adverse effects of tooth-whitening products: a review.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Michel; Grootveld, Martin; Lynch, Edward

    2010-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is a powerful oxidising agent. It gives rise to agents known to be effective bleaching agents. The mechanisms of bleaching involve the degradation of the extracellular matrix and oxidation of chromophores located within enamel and dentin. However, H(2)O(2) produces also local undesirable effects on tooth structures and oral mucosa. In clinical conditions, the daily low-level doses used to produce tooth whitening never generate general acute and sub-acute toxic effects. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity only occur at concentrations that are never reached during dental treatments. Some transient adverse effects have been reported on the oral mucosa and the digestive tract if the product is swallowed. Local effects may occur on the oral mucosa and dental tissues during whitening, namely, pulp sensitivity, cervical resorption, release of selected components of dental restorative materials, and alteration of the enamel surface. Most of the local effects are dependent of the technique and concentration of the product so far used, but as the results of bleaching obtained are not stable, repeated treatments add to the adverse effects. The informed decision to administer or not and the control of bleaching effects should stand in the hand of dental surgeons and certainly not as it appears at present, as cosmetics sold without any restriction despite the potential health hazards of peroxides.

  5. Positive Feedback Loops for Factor V and Factor VII Activation Supply Sensitivity to Local Surface Tissue Factor Density During Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Balandina, A.N.; Shibeko, A.M.; Kireev, D.A.; Novikova, A.A.; Shmirev, I.I.; Panteleev, M.A.; Ataullakhanov, F.I.

    2011-01-01

    Blood coagulation is triggered not only by surface tissue factor (TF) density but also by surface TF distribution. We investigated recognition of surface TF distribution patterns during blood coagulation and identified the underlying molecular mechanisms. For these investigations, we employed 1), an in vitro reaction-diffusion experimental model of coagulation; and 2), numerical simulations using a mathematical model of coagulation in a three-dimensional space. When TF was uniformly immobilized over the activating surface, the clotting initiation time in normal plasma increased from 4 min to >120 min, with a decrease in TF density from 100 to 0.7 pmol/m2. In contrast, surface-immobilized fibroblasts initiated clotting within 3–7 min, independently of fibroblast quantity and despite a change in average surface TF density from 0.5 to 130 pmol/m2. Experiments using factor V-, VII-, and VIII-deficient plasma and computer simulations demonstrated that different responses to these two TF distributions are caused by two positive feedback loops in the blood coagulation network: activation of the TF–VII complex by factor Xa, and activation of factor V by thrombin. This finding suggests a new role for these reactions: to supply sensitivity to local TF density during blood coagulation. PMID:22004734

  6. cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of Ocp2, a gene encoding a putative transcription-associated factor predominantly expressed in the auditory organs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong; Thalmann, I.; Thalmann, R.

    1995-06-10

    We report the cloning of the Ocp2 gene encoding OCP-II from a guinea pig organ-of-Corti cDNA library. The predicted open reading frame encodes a protein of 163 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 18.6 kDa. A homology search revealed that Ocp2 shares significant sequence similarity with p15, a sub-unit of transcription factor SIII that regulates the activity of the RNA polymerase II elongation complex. The Ocp2 messenger RNA is expressed abundantly in the cochlea while not significantly in any other tissues examined, including brain, eye, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung, thigh muscle, and testis, demonstrating that the expression of this gene may be restricted to auditory organs. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the N-terminal region of OCP-II. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin-embedded sections of the cochlea showed that OCP-II is localized abundantly in nonsensory cells in the organ of Corti; in addition, it was also detected, at a lower concentration, in vestibular sensory organs, as well as auditory and vestibular brain stem nuclei. The Ocp2 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 4 as well as 11. Our results suggest that OCP-II may be involved in transcription regulation for the development or maintenance of specialized functions of the inner ear. 40 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Enhancement of periodontal tissue regeneration by locally controlled delivery of insulin-like growth factor-I from dextran-co-gelatin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fa-ming; Zhao, Yi-min; Wu, Hong; Deng, Zhi-hong; Wang, Qin-tao; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Qing; Dong, Guang-ying; Li, Kun; Wu, Zhi-fen; Jin, Yan

    2006-08-28

    The present work focused on the design of novel hydrogel microspheres based on both dextran- and gelatin-derived biomaterials, and discussed whether locally controlled delivery of IGF-I from dextran-co-gelatin hydrogel microspheres (DG-MP) was useful for periodontal regeneration enhancement. Microspheres were synthesized when gelatin was cooperating with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) derivatized dextrans (Dex-GMA) and the resultant DG-MP with a hydrogel character of which the cross-linking density could be controlled by the degree of substitution (DS, the number of methacrylates per 100 glucopyranose residues) of Dex-GMA. In this study, three types of DG-MP (DG-MP4.7, DG-MP6.3 and DG-MP7.8) obtained from gelatin and Dex-GMA (differing in DS: 4.7, 6.3 and 7.8 respectively) were prepared and characterized by swelling and degradation properties, drug release kinetics and biological capability in promoting tissue regeneration. By swelling in aqueous positively charged IGF-I solutions, the protein could be encapsulated in DG-MP by polyionic complexation with negatively charged acidic gelatin. No obvious influence of Dex-GMA's DS on DG-MP's configuration and size was observed, and the release and degraded properties showed no significant difference between three types of DG-MP in PBS buffer either. However, high DS of Dex-GMA could lower microsphere's swelling, prolong its degraded time and minimize IGF-I burst release markedly in dextranase-containing PBS, where IGF-I release from a slow release type of microspheres (DG-MP7.8) could be maintained more than 28 days, and an effective protein release kinetics without a significant burst but a relevantly constant release after the initial burst was achieved. IGF-I in DG-MP resulted in more new bone formation in the periodontal defects within 4 or 8 weeks than IGF-I in blood clot directly did (P < 0.01). The observed newly formation of periodontal tissues including the height and percentage of new bone and new cementum on the

  8. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Further Reduces Normal Tissue Exposure During Definitive Therapy for Locally Advanced Distal Esophageal Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Gomez, Daniel; Palmer, Matthew B.; Riley, Beverly A.; Mayankkumar, Amin V.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Dong, Lei; Zhu, X. Ronald; Likhacheva, Anna; Liao, Zhongxing; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously found that {<=} 75% of treatment failures after chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer appear within the gross tumor volume and that intensity-modulated (photon) radiotherapy (IMRT) might allow dose escalation to the tumor without increasing normal tissue toxicity. Proton therapy might allow additional dose escalation, with even lower normal tissue toxicity. In the present study, we compared the dosimetric parameters for photon IMRT with that for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unresectable, locally advanced, distal esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Four plans were created for each of 10 patients. IMPT was delivered using anteroposterior (AP)/posteroanterior beams, left posterior oblique/right posterior oblique (LPO/RPO) beams, or AP/LPO/RPO beams. IMRT was delivered with a concomitant boost to the gross tumor volume. The dose was 65.8 Gy to the gross tumor volume and 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume in 28 fractions. Results: Relative to IMRT, the IMPT (AP/posteroanterior) plan led to considerable reductions in the mean lung dose (3.18 vs. 8.27 Gy, p < .0001) and the percentage of lung volume receiving 5, 10, and 20 Gy (p {<=} .0006) but did not reduce the cardiac dose. The IMPT LPO/RPO plan also reduced the mean lung dose (4.9 Gy vs. 8.2 Gy, p < .001), the heart dose (mean cardiac dose and percentage of the cardiac volume receiving 10, 20, and 30 Gy, p {<=} .02), and the liver dose (mean hepatic dose 5 Gy vs. 14.9 Gy, p < .0001). The IMPT AP/LPO/RPO plan led to considerable reductions in the dose to the lung (p {<=} .005), heart (p {<=} .003), and liver (p {<=} .04). Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, IMPT for distal esophageal cancer lowered the dose to the heart, lung, and liver. The AP/LPO/RPO beam arrangement was optimal for sparing all three organs. The dosimetric benefits of protons will need to be tailored to each patient according to their specific cardiac and pulmonary risks. IMPT for

  9. Evaluation of Proper Usage of Glucocorticosteroid Inhalers and Their Adverse Effects in Asthmatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Mohammad Esmayil; Shafiifar, Afsaneh; Mashayekhi, Siminozar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequent use of corticosteroid inhalers (CSIs), especially at higher doses, has been accompanied by concern about both systemic and local adverse reactions. The local adverse reactions of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are considered to constitute infrequent and minor problems. However, while not usually serious, these local adverse reactions are of clinical importance. This study assessed the prevalence of local adverse reactions, their clinical features, role of inhaler devices and current measures that have been suggested to prevent the problem. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in YAS clinic in Tabriz on 500 asthmatic patients. A questionnaire about the patients’ demographic information, methods of using CSIs, local care after using CSIs, using spacer devices, doses of ICSs, and adverse reactions were filled then the patients were clinically examined for local adverse reactions. Results: Only 56% patients were using CSIs properly. In general, the incidence of complications was: oropharyngeal candidiasis 25.6%, laryngeal weakness 8.8%, choking 17.6%, tooth decay 15.2%, speechlessness 36.2%, taste decrease 20.8%, tongue burning 29.8% and tongue abrasion 27.8%. Conclusion: Persistent asthma can be effectively controlled with currently available CSIs. Although not life-threatening, local adverse reactions of ICSs are clinically significant and warrant attention. Use of spacer devices and changes in CSI usage, dosage amount and frequency and rinsing and gargling are the methods that have been used to reduce the incidence of local adverse reactions. PMID:27403173

  10. Localized Cell and Drug Delivery for Auditory Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Jeffrey L.; Chikar, Jennifer A.; Crumling, Mark A.; Raphael, Yehoash; Martin, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Localized cell and drug delivery to the cochlea and central auditory pathway can improve the safety and performance of implanted auditory prostheses (APs). While generally successful, these devices have a number of limitations and adverse effects including limited tonal and dynamic ranges, channel interactions, unwanted stimulation of non-auditory nerves, immune rejection, and infections including meningitis. Many of these limitations are associated with the tissue reactions to implanted auditory prosthetic devices and the gradual degeneration of the auditory system following deafness. Strategies to reduce the insertion trauma, degeneration of target neurons, fibrous and bony tissue encapsulation, and immune activation can improve the viability of tissue required for AP function as well as improve the resolution of stimulation for reduced channel interaction and improved place-pitch and level discrimination. Many pharmaceutical compounds have been identified that promote the viability of auditory tissue and prevent inflammation and infection. Cell delivery and gene therapy have provided promising results for treating hearing loss and reversing degeneration. Currently, many clinical and experimental methods can produce extremely localized and sustained drug delivery to address AP limitations. These methods provide better control over drug concentrations while eliminating the adverse effects of systemic delivery. Many of these drug delivery techniques can be integrated into modern auditory prosthetic devices to optimize the tissue response to the implanted device and reduce the risk of infection or rejection. Together, these methods and pharmaceutical agents can be used to optimize the tissue-device interface for improved AP safety and effectiveness. PMID:18573323

  11. Vascular tissue-specific gene expression of xylem sap glycine-rich proteins in root and their localization in the walls of metaxylem vessels in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Sakuta, C; Satoh, S

    2000-05-01

    Root-specific cDNAs of glycine-rich protein (cucumber root glycine rich protein-1 and -2; CRGRP-1 and CRGRP-2) were cloned previously by use of an antiserum raised against whole xylem sap of Cucumis sativus. The accumulation of the corresponding mRNA at high levels was detected in the root-hair zone of cucumber tap root [Sakuta et al. (1998) Plant Cell Physiol. 39: 1330]. The RNA gel blot analysis with the CRGRP-1- and -2-specific probes revealed that the CRGRP genes expressed only in root but not at all in aboveground organs. When the localization of these mRNAs were examined by in situ hybridization, CRGRP mRNAs were found only in the parenchyma cells in the central cylinder of young lateral roots and it was most abundant in the cells that surrounded xylem vessels in the root-hair zone of the tap root. In immunoblotting of xylem sap collected from cucumber stem with an antiserum raised against CRGRP-1 that had been produced in an E. coli expression system, the antibodies, which did not cross-react with GRP1.8 of kidney bean, reacted with two proteins, whose mobilities corresponded to those of proteins deduced from the CRGRP-1 and -2 cDNAs. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the CRGRPs accumulated specifically in the lignified walls of metaxylem vessels in the root, stem and leaf and in the lignified cell walls of perivascular fibers in cucumber stems. Immunostaining was also detected in the walls of metaxylem vessels and in the cell walls of adjacent sclerenchyma in the hypocotyl of kidney bean. These data clearly indicate that the novel glycine-rich proteins were produced in the vascular tissue of the root, transported systemically over a long distance via the xylem sap and immobilized in the walls of metaxylem vessels and sclerechyma cells in aboveground organs.

  12. The effect of NMDA-R antagonism on simultaneously acquired local field potentials and tissue oxygen levels in the brains of freely-moving rats.

    PubMed

    Kealy, John; Commins, Sean; Lowry, John P

    2017-01-11

    Non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists are known to induce psychosis-like symptoms in rodents. Administration of such compounds cause behavioural effects such as memory impairment and hyperlocomotion. Additionally, drugs such as phencyclidine (PCP), ketamine and MK-801 all cause distinctive increases in striatal local field potential (LFP) in the high frequency oscillation (HFO) band in the power spectrum (140-180 Hz). Amperometric sensors provide a means to measure tissue oxygen (tO2; a BOLD-like signal) in the brains of freely-moving rats while simultaneously acquiring LFP using the same electrode. Carbon paste electrodes were implanted into the striatum and hippocampus of male Wistar rats. Rats were administered with saline, ketamine (10 mg/kg), MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) and PCP (2.5 mg/kg) and recordings were made at 1 kHz using three different potentials (-650 mV to measure tO2; 0 mV and +700 mV as control conditions). NMDA receptor antagonism caused significant increases in tO2 in both the striatum and the hippocampus. Power spectrum analysis showed significant increases in HFO power in the striatum but not in the hippocampus. Conversely, there were significant decreases in delta and alpha power along with increases in theta and gamma power in the hippocampus that were absent in the striatum. This supports findings that LFP can be obtained from an amperometric sensor signal; allowing simultaneous acquisition of two translational biomarkers of neuronal activity (LFP and tO2).

  13. Two isoforms of the A subunit of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase in Lycopersicon esculentum: highly similar proteins but divergent patterns of tissue localization.

    PubMed

    Bageshwar, Umesh K; Taneja-Bageshwar, Suparna; Moharram, Hisham M; Binzel, Marla L

    2005-02-01

    The plant vacuolar H(+)-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase, EC 3.6.1.34) generates a H+ electro-chemical gradient across the tonoplast membrane. We isolated two full-length cDNA clones (VHA-A1 and VHA-A2) from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Large Cherry Red) coding for two isoforms of the V-ATPase catalytic subunit (V-ATPases A1 and A2). The cDNA clones encoding the two isoforms share 90% identity at the nucleotide level and 96% identity at the amino acid level. The 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, however, are highly diverse. Both V-ATPase A1 and A2 isoforms encode polypeptides of 623 amino acids, with calculated molecular masses of 68,570 and 68,715, respectively. The expression of VHA-A1 and accumulation of V-ATPase A1 polypeptide were ubiquitous in all tissues examined. In response to salinity, the abundances of both transcript (VHA-A1) and protein (V-ATPase A1) of the A1 isoform in leaves were nearly doubled. In contrast to the A1 isoform, VHA-A2 transcript and V-ATPase A2 polypeptide were only detected in abundance in roots, and in minor quantities in mature fruit. In roots, accumulation of transcripts and polypeptides did not change in response to salinity for either isoform. Subcellular localization indicated that the highest levels of both V-ATPase A1 and A2 isoforms were in the tonoplast. However, significant quantities of both isoforms were detected in membranes associated with endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi. Immunoprecipitation of dissociated V1 domains using isoform-specific antibodies showed that V1 domains consist of either V-ATPase A1 or A2 catalytic subunit isoforms.

  14. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  15. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  16. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  17. Reverse engineering adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Chipman, J Kevin; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. The application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) can be used to overcome these limitations. This approach was used to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas). Gene expression changes in FHM ovaries in response to seven different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions, were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. Potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide were examined using two mutual information-based methods to infer gene regulatory networks and potential AOPs. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict network paths from stressor to adverse outcome as candidate AOPs. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment, thus leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biological processes, biomarkers, or alternative endpoints that can be used to monitor an AOP. Finally, the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology were identified and a road map for the utilization of these tools presented.

  18. Data mining for signal detection of adverse event safety data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Chia; Tsong, Yi; Chen, James J

    2013-01-01

    The Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) is the primary database designed to support the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) postmarketing safety surveillance program for all approved drugs and therapeutic biologic products. Most current disproportionality analysis focuses on the detection of potential adverse events (AE) involving a single drug and a single AE only. In this paper, we present a data mining biclustering technique based on the singular value decomposition to extract local regions of association for a safety study. The analysis consists of collection of biclusters, each representing an association between a set of drugs with the corresponding set of adverse events. Significance of each bicluster can be tested using disproportionality analysis. Individual drug-event combination can be further tested. A safety data set consisting of 193 drugs with 8453 adverse events is analyzed as an illustration.

  19. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype.

  20. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed Central

    Reason, J

    1995-01-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  1. Adverse drug reactions: part II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must be effectively practiced by all health care providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  2. Adverse drug reactions: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  3. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  4. [Pain as adverse drug reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Schaffarzick, Daniel; Nagano, Marietta; Janowitz, Susanne Melitta; Schweitzer, Ekkehard

    2012-09-01

    We present a multidisciplinary (anaesthesiology--clinical pharmacy--bioinformatics) analysis of pain as possible adverse drug reaction taking different manifestations of pain, indication groups, relevance to the Austrian drug market and possible mechanistic influence of drugs on development and apprehension of pain into consideration.We designed an overview that shows how transmitters that play a part in nociception and antinociception can be influenced by drugs. This allows conclusions to the dolorigene potential of therapeutics.

  5. Thiocolchicoside: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Thiocolchicoside has long been used as a muscle relaxant, despite a lack of proven efficacy beyond the placebo effect. Its chemical structure consists of colchicine, a sugar (ose) and a sulphur-containing radical (thio), and its adverse effects are therefore likely to be similar to those of colchicine. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we reviewed the available data on the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. Liver injury, pancreatitis, seizures, blood cell disorders, severe cutaneous disorders, rhabdomyolysis and reproductive disorders have all been recorded in the French and European pharmacovigilance databases and in the periodic updates that the companies concerned submit to regulatory agencies. These data do not specify the frequency of the disorders nor do they identify the most susceptible patient populations. Thiocolchicoside is teratogenic in experimental animals and also damages chromosomes. Human data are limited to a follow-up of about 30 pregnant women (no major malformations) and reports of altered spermatogenesis, including cases of azoospermia. In practice, there is no justification for exposing patients to the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. It is better to use an effective, well-known analgesic for patients complaining of muscle pain, starting with paracetamol.

  6. Adverse food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Alie; van Hunsel, Florence; Bast, Aalt

    2015-12-01

    Food supplements and herbal products are increasingly popular amongst consumers. This leads to increased risks of interactions between prescribed drugs and these products containing bioactive ingredients. From 1991 up to 2014, 55 cases of suspected adverse drug reactions due to concomitant intake of health-enhancing products and drugs were reported to Lareb, the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre. An overview of these suspected interactions is presented and their potential mechanisms of action are described. Mainly during the metabolism of xenobiotics and due to the pharmacodynamics effects interactions seem to occur, which may result in adverse drug reactions. Where legislation is seen to distinct food and medicine, legislation concerning these different bioactive products is less clear-cut. This can only be resolved by increasing the molecular knowledge on bioactive substances and their potential interactions. Thereby potential interactions can be better understood and prevented on an individual level. By considering the dietary pattern and use of bioactive substances with prescribed medication, both health professionals and consumers will be increasingly aware of interactions and these interactive adverse effects can be prevented.

  7. SU-E-T-572: Normal Lung Tissue Sparing in Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, C; Ju, S; Ahn, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare normal lung-sparing capabilities of three advanced radiation therapy techniques for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) was performed in 10 patients with stage IIIb LA-NSCLC. The internal target volume (ITV); planning target volume (PTV); and organs at risks (OARs) such as spinal cord, total normal lung, heart, and esophagus were delineated for each CT data set. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), Tomohelical-IMRT (TH-IMRT), and TomoDirect-IMRT (TD-IMRT) plans were generated (total prescribed dose, 66 Gy in 33 fractions to the PTV) for each patient. To reduce the normal lung dose, complete and directional block function was applied outside the normal lung far from the target for both TH-IMRT and TD-IMRT, while pseudo- OAR was set in the same region for IMRT. Dosimetric characteristics of the three plans were compared in terms of target coverage, the sparing capability for the OAR, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Beam delivery efficiency was also compared. Results: TH-IMRT and TD-IMRT provided better target coverage than IMRT plans. Lung volume receiving ≥–30 Gy, mean dose, and NTCP were significant with TH-IMRT than with IMRT (p=0.006), and volume receiving ≥20–30 Gy was lower in TD-IMRT than in IMRT (p<0.05). Compared with IMRT, TH-IMRT had better sparing effect on the spinal cord (Dmax, NTCP) and heart (V45) (p<0.05). NTCP for the spinal cord, V45 and V60 for the heart, and Dmax for the esophagus were significantly lower in TD-IMRT than in IMRT. The monitor units per fraction were clearly smaller for IMRT than for TH-IMRT and TD-IMRT (p=0.006). Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, TH-IMRT gave superior PTV coverage and OAR sparing compared to IMRT. TH-IMRT provided better control of the lung volume receiving ≥5–30 Gy. The delivery time and monitor units were lower in TD-IMRT than in TH-IMRT.

  8. The Relationship Between Local Recurrence and Radiotherapy Treatment Volume for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy and Function Preservation Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Parent, Amy L.; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Svensson, Jon; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the geometric relationship between local recurrence (LR) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) volumes for soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients treated with function-preserving surgery and RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 768 (7.8%) STS patients treated with combined therapy within our institution from 1990 through 2006 developed an LR. Thirty-two received preoperative RT, 16 postoperative RT, and 12 preoperative RT plus a postoperative boost. Treatment records, RT simulation images, and diagnostic MRI/CT data sets of the original and LR disease were retrospectively compared. For LR location analysis, three RT target volumes were defined according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 29 as follows: (1) the gross tumor or operative bed; (2) the treatment volume (TV) extending 5 cm longitudinally beyond the tumor or operative bed unless protected by intact barriers to spread and at least 1-2 cm axially (the TV was enclosed by the isodose curve representing the prescribed target absorbed dose [TAD] and accounted for target/patient setup uncertainty and beam characteristics), and (3) the irradiated volume (IRV) that received at least 50% of the TAD, including the TV. LRs were categorized as developing in field within the TV, marginal (on the edge of the IRV), and out of field (occurring outside of the IRV). Results: Forty-nine tumors relapsed in field (6.4% overall). Nine were out of field (1.1% overall), and 2 were marginal (0.3% overall). Conclusions: The majority of STS tumors recur in field, indicating that the incidence of LR may be affected more by differences in biologic and molecular characteristics rather than aberrations in RT dose or target volume coverage. In contrast, only two patients relapsed at the IRV boundary, suggesting that the risk of a marginal relapse is low when the TV is appropriately defined. These data support the accurate delivery of optimal RT volumes in the most precise way using advanced

  9. Mesoporous silica particle-PLA-PANI hybrid scaffolds for cell-directed intracellular drug delivery and tissue vascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokry, Hussein; Vanamo, Ulriika; Wiltschka, Oliver; Niinimäki, Jenni; Lerche, Martina; Levon, Kalle; Linden, Mika; Sahlgren, Cecilia

    2015-08-01

    Instructive materials are expected to revolutionize stem cell based tissue engineering. As many stem cell cues have adverse effects on normal tissue homeostasis, there is a need to develop bioactive scaffolds which offer locally retained and cell-targeted drug delivery for intracellular release in targeted cell populations. Further, the scaffolds need to support vascularization to promote tissue growth and function. We have developed an electrospun PLA-PANI fiber scaffold, and incorporated mesoporous silica nanoparticles within the scaffold matrix to obtain cell-targeted and localized drug delivery. The isotropy of the scaffold can be tuned to find the optimal morphology for a given application and the scaffold is electroactive to support differentiation of contractile tissues. We demonstrate that there is no premature drug release from particles under physiological conditions over a period of one week and that the drug is released upon internalization of particles by cells within the scaffold. The scaffold is biocompatible, supports muscle stem cell differentiation and cell-seeded scaffolds are vascularized in vivo upon transplantation on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. The scaffold is a step towards instructive biomaterials for local control of stem cell differentiation, and tissue formation supported by vascularization and without adverse effects on the homeostasis of adjacent tissues due to diffusion of biological cues.Instructive materials are expected to revolutionize stem cell based tissue engineering. As many stem cell cues have adverse effects on normal tissue homeostasis, there is a need to develop bioactive scaffolds which offer locally retained and cell-targeted drug delivery for intracellular release in targeted cell populations. Further, the scaffolds need to support vascularization to promote tissue growth and function. We have developed an electrospun PLA-PANI fiber scaffold, and incorporated mesoporous silica nanoparticles within

  10. Co-localized confocal Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (CRS-OCT) for depth-resolved analyte detection in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Jason R.; Chuchuen, Oranat; Henderson, Marcus H.; Kim, Sanghoon; Rinehart, Matthew T.; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Wax, Adam; Katz, David F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of a combined confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument (CRS-OCT) capable of measuring analytes in targeted biological tissues with sub-100-micron spatial resolution. The OCT subsystem was used to measure depth-resolved tissue morphology and guide the acquisition of chemically-specific Raman spectra. To demonstrate its utility, the instrument was used to accurately measure depth-resolved, physiologically-relevant concentrations of Tenofovir, a microbicide drug used to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV, in ex vivo tissue samples. PMID:26114026

  11. Vaccine adverse events: separating myth from reality.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Sanford R

    2002-12-01

    Vaccines have turned many childhood diseases into distant memories in industrialized countries. However, questions have been raised about the safety of some vaccines because of rare but serious adverse effects that have been attributed to them. Pain, swelling, and redness at the injection site are common local reactions to vaccines. Fever and irritability may occur after some immunizations. Currently, no substantial evidence links measles-mumps-rubella vaccine to autism, or hepatitis B vaccine to multiple sclerosis. Thimerosal is being eliminated from routine childhood vaccines because of concerns that multiple immunizations with vaccines containing this preservative could exceed recommended mercury exposures. Family physicians should be knowledgeable about vaccines so that they can inform their patients of the benefits of immunization and any proven risks. If immunization rates fall, the incidence of vaccine-preventable illnesses may rise.

  12. Intrauterine Zika virus infection of pregnant immunocompetent mice models transplacental transmission and adverse perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Meghan S.; Lei, Jun; Shabi, Yahya; Baxter, Victoria K.; Crilly, Nathan P.; McLane, Michael; Griffin, Diane E.; Pekosz, Andrew; Klein, Sabra L.; Burd, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) crosses the placenta and causes congenital disease. Here we develop an animal model utilizing direct ZIKV inoculation into the uterine wall of pregnant, immunocompetent mice to evaluate transplacental transmission. Intrauterine inoculation at embryonic day (E) 10, but not E14, with African, Asian or American strains of ZIKV reduces fetal viability and increases infection of placental and fetal tissues. ZIKV inoculation at E10 causes placental inflammation, placental dysfunction and reduces neonatal brain cortical thickness, which is associated with increased activation of microglia. Viral antigen localizes in trophoblast and endothelial cells in the placenta, and endothelial, microglial and neural progenitor cells in the fetal brain. ZIKV infection of the placenta increases production of IFNβ and expression of IFN-stimulated genes 48 h after infection. This mouse model provides a platform for identifying factors at the maternal–fetal interface that contribute to adverse perinatal outcomes in a host with an intact immune system. PMID:28220786

  13. Intrauterine Zika virus infection of pregnant immunocompetent mice models transplacental transmission and adverse perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vermillion, Meghan S; Lei, Jun; Shabi, Yahya; Baxter, Victoria K; Crilly, Nathan P; McLane, Michael; Griffin, Diane E; Pekosz, Andrew; Klein, Sabra L; Burd, Irina

    2017-02-21

    Zika virus (ZIKV) crosses the placenta and causes congenital disease. Here we develop an animal model utilizing direct ZIKV inoculation into the uterine wall of pregnant, immunocompetent mice to evaluate transplacental transmission. Intrauterine inoculation at embryonic day (E) 10, but not E14, with African, Asian or American strains of ZIKV reduces fetal viability and increases infection of placental and fetal tissues. ZIKV inoculation at E10 causes placental inflammation, placental dysfunction and reduces neonatal brain cortical thickness, which is associated with increased activation of microglia. Viral antigen localizes in trophoblast and endothelial cells in the placenta, and endothelial, microglial and neural progenitor cells in the fetal brain. ZIKV infection of the placenta increases production of IFNβ and expression of IFN-stimulated genes 48 h after infection. This mouse model provides a platform for identifying factors at the maternal-fetal interface that contribute to adverse perinatal outcomes in a host with an intact immune system.

  14. Adverse Outcomes in Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roback, Howard B.

    2000-01-01

    Group forms of therapy have been growing at a rapid rate, in part because of their documented effectiveness and economic considerations such as managed care. It is therefore becoming increasingly important to assess the psychological risks of these interventions. The author provides an overview of the published literature and conference presentations on negative effects in adult outpatient groups. Although much of the literature on adverse outcomes in group therapy focuses on single risk factors (e.g., negative leader, group process, or patient characteristics), the author argues that an interactional model should be encouraged. Means of reducing casualties are also discussed, as well as methodological issues and research directions. PMID:10896735

  15. Adverse events after hepatitis A B combination vaccine.

    PubMed

    Woo, Emily Jane; Miller, Nancy B; Ball, Robert

    2006-03-24

    In May 2001, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Hepatitis A Inactivated and Hepatitis B Recombinant Vaccine (HEPAB) for immunization of adults. From May 2001 to September 2003, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) received 305 reports of adverse events after HEPAB. Many events were similar to those reported after the monovalent hepatitis A and B vaccines. Non-serious events included constitutional symptoms and local reactions. Serious events included neurologic, hepatobiliary, and dermatologic conditions, and detailed medical and epidemiological review did not suggest a clear pattern of evidence supporting a causal relationship with the vaccine, except for injection site reactions and some allergic reactions.

  16. Generation of effector cells that localize to mucosal tissues and form resident memory CD8 T cells is controlled by mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Sowell, Ryan T.; Rogozinska, Magdalena; Nelson, Christine E.; Vezys, Vaiva; Marzo, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are subject to frequent pathogen exposure and major sites for transmission of infectious disease. CD8 T cells play a critical role in controlling mucosa-acquired infections though their migration into mucosal tissues is tightly regulated. The mechanisms and signals that control the formation of tissue-resident memory CD8 T cells are poorly understood however, one key regulator of memory CD8 T cell differentiation, mTOR kinase, can be inhibited by rapamycin. We report that despite enhancing the formation of memory CD8 T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues, rapamycin inhibits the formation of resident memory CD8 T cells in the intestinal and vaginal mucosa. The ability of rapamycin to block formation of functional resident CD8 T cells in mucosal tissues protected mice from a model of CD8 T cell mediated lethal intestinal autoimmunity. These findings demonstrate an opposing role for mTOR in the formation of resident versus non-resident CD8 T cell immunity. PMID:25070853

  17. A Derivatization and Validation Strategy for Determining the Spatial Localization of Endogenous Amine Metabolites in Tissues using MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Manier, M. Lisa; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Reyzer, Michelle L.; Norris, Jeremy L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) studies increasingly focus on endogenous small molecular weight metabolites and consequently bring special analytical challenges. Since analytical tissue blanks do not exist for endogenous metabolites, careful consideration must be given to confirm molecular identity. Here we present approaches for the improvement in detection of endogenous amine metabolites such as amino acids and neurotransmitters in tissues through chemical derivatization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) IMS. Chemical derivatization with 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde (CA) was used to improve sensitivity and specificity. CA was applied to the tissue via MALDI sample targets precoated with a mixture of derivatization reagent and ferulic acid (FA) as a MALDI matrix. Spatial distributions of chemically derivatized endogenous metabolites in tissue were determined by high-mass resolution and MSn imaging mass spectrometry. We highlight an analytical strategy for metabolite validation whereby tissue extracts are analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS/MS to unambiguously identify metabolites and distinguish them from isobaric compounds. PMID:25044893

  18. "Adversative Conjunction": The Poetics of Linguistic Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    The general use of adversative conjunction in (primarily) English and U.S. poetry is outlined. The contention is that the adversative is not merely a grammatical convenience but sometimes a highly functional tool of rhetorical strategy. (36 references) (LB)

  19. The international serious adverse events consortium.

    PubMed

    Holden, Arthur L; Contreras, Jorge L; John, Sally; Nelson, Matthew R

    2014-11-01

    The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium is generating novel insights into the genetics and biology of drug-induced serious adverse events, and thereby improving pharmaceutical product development and decision-making.

  20. Approaches to localized NMR spectroscopy in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Garwood, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are developed which allow spatially localized spectra to be obtained from living tissue. The localization methods are noninvasive and exploit the enhanced sensitivity afforded by surface coil probes. Techniques are investigated by computer simulation and experimentally verified by the use of phantom samples. The feasibility and utility of the techniques developed in this research are demonstrated by /sup 31/P spatial localization experiments involving various in vivo organs. In the first part of the thesis, two feasible approaches to localized spectroscopy, which were developed by other laboratories are theoretically analyzed by computer simulation. An alternative approach is provided by the rotating frame zeugmatography experiment which affords chemical-shift spectra displayed as a function of penetration distance into the sample. The further modification of the rotating frame experiment is developed, the Fourier series window (FSW) approach, which utilizes various types of window functions to afford localization in one or a few tissue regions of interest with high sensitivity. Theoretical comparisons with depth pulse methods are also included, along with methods to refine adverse off-resonance behavior.

  1. Tissue Localization of Lymphocystis Disease Virus (LCDV) Receptor-27.8 kDa and Its Expression Kinetics Induced by the Viral Infection in Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Xiuzhen; Wu, Ronghua; Tang, Xiaoqian; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    The 27.8 kDa membrane protein expressed in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) gill cells was proved to be a receptor mediating lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) infection. In this study, SDS-PAGE and Western blotting demonstrated that 27.8 kDa receptor (27.8R) was shared by flounder and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIFA) and immunohistochemistry showed that 27.8R was widely expressed in tested tissues of healthy turbot. The indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated that 27.8R expression was relatively higher in stomach, gill, heart, and intestine, followed by skin, head kidney, spleen, blood cells, kidney and liver, and lower in ovary and brain in healthy turbot, and it was significantly up-regulated after LCDV infection. Meanwhile, real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that LCDV was detected in heart, peripheral blood cells, and head kidney at 3 h post infection (p.i.), and then in other tested tissues at 12 h p.i. LCDV copies increased in a time-dependent manner, and were generally higher in the tissues with higher 27.8R expression. Additionally, IIFA showed that 27.8R and LCDV were detected at 3 h p.i. in some leukocytes. These results suggested that 27.8R also served as a receptor in turbot, and LCDV can infect some leukocytes which might result in LCDV spreading to different tissues in turbot. PMID:26556346

  2. Interfractional Variations in the Setup of Pelvic Bony Anatomy and Soft Tissue, and Their Implications on the Delivery of Proton Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Trofimov, Alexei; Nguyen, Paul L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Wang, Yi; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Engelsman, Martijn; Merrick, Scott; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Wong, James R.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To quantify daily variations in the anatomy of patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma, to estimate their effect on dose distribution, and to evaluate the effectiveness of current standard planning and setup approaches employed in proton therapy. Methods: We used series of computed tomography data, which included the pretreatment scan, and between 21 and 43 in-room scans acquired on different treatment days, from 10 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Morristown Memorial Hospital. Variations in femur rotation angles, thickness of subcutaneous adipose tissue, and physical depth to the distal surface of the prostate for lateral beam arrangement were recorded. Proton dose distributions were planned with the standard approach. Daily variations in the location of the prescription isodose were evaluated. Results: In all 10 datasets, substantial variation was observed in the lateral tissue thickness (standard deviation of 1.7-3.6 mm for individual patients, variations of >5 mm from the planning computed tomography observed in all series), and femur rotation angle (standard deviation between 1.3{sup o} and 4.8{sup o}, with the maximum excursion exceeding 10{sup o} in 6 of 10 datasets). Shifts in the position of treated volume (98% isodose) were correlated with the variations in the lateral tissue thickness. Conclusions: Analysis suggests that, combined with image-guided setup verification, the range compensator expansion technique prevents loss of dose to target from femur rotation and soft-tissue deformation, in the majority of cases. Anatomic changes coupled with the uncertainties of particle penetration in tissue restrict possibilities for margin reduction in proton therapy of prostate cancer.

  3. Hyaluronidase inhibitors (sodium cromoglycate and sodium auro-thiomalate) reduce the local tissue damage and prolong the survival time of mice injected with Naja kaouthia and Calloselasma rhodostoma venoms.

    PubMed

    Yingprasertchai, Senee; Bunyasrisawat, Srisurat; Ratanabanangkoon, Kavi

    2003-11-01

    Experiments have been carried out to find potent inhibitors of hyaluronidases of Naja kaouthia (NK) and Calloselasma rhodostoma (CR) venoms with the aim of reducing local tissue damage and systemic toxicities caused by the venoms. Seven drugs/chemicals known to inhibit hyaluronidases were tested for their activity on venom enzymes. These were: sodium cromoglycate (SC), sodium aurothiomalate (SAT), apigenin, kaemferol, phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone and fenoprofen. The results showed that SC or SAT at 10 mM, completely inhibited the enzymes of both venoms. In in vivo experiments, SC or SAT, when incubated with NK venom prior to injection, significantly reduced edema and myonecrosis. In the case of CR venom, hemorrhage, in addition to edema and myonecrosis, was also significantly reduced. In the independent type experiment, SC or SAT were effective if injected within 1 min after the injection of venom. At longer time intervals of 3 and 10 min the inhibitors were effective in reducing some parameters of local tissue necrosis but the extent of inhibition was lower. SC and SAT at 256 and 195 microg/mouse, respectively, significantly prolonged the survival time of mice receiving lethal doses of NK. In the case of CR venoms, the two inhibitors not only prolonged the survival time but also prevented death of mice receiving lethal doses of the venom. The other inhibitors were poorly soluble in water and were studied only on enzyme inhibition and prolongation of survival time; they were mostly ineffective. Thus, SC and SAT when injected immediately at the sites of bites can reduce the systemic and local toxicity of NK and CR venoms. These results suggest that administration of these drugs at the site of venom injection may be useful in reducing venom-induced local tissue damage.

  4. FTIR imaging of brain tissue reveals crystalline creatine deposits are an ex vivo marker of localized ischemia during murine cerebral malaria: general implications for disease neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Mark J; Lee, Joonsup; El-Assaad, Fatima; McQuillan, James A; Carter, Elizabeth A; Grau, Georges E; Hunt, Nicholas H; Lay, Peter A

    2012-12-19

    Phosphocreatine is a major cellular source of high energy phosphates, which is crucial to maintain cell viability under conditions of impaired metabolic states, such as decreased oxygen and energy availability (i.e., ischemia). Many methods exist for the bulk analysis of phosphocreatine and its dephosphorylated product creatine; however, no method exists to image the distribution of creatine or phosphocreatine at the cellular level. In this study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging has revealed the ex vivo development of creatine microdeposits in situ in the brain region most affected by the disease, the cerebellum of cerebral malaria (CM) diseased mice; however, such deposits were also observed at significantly lower levels in the brains of control mice and mice with severe malaria. In addition, the number of deposits was observed to increase in a time-dependent manner during dehydration post tissue cutting. This challenges the hypotheses in recent reports of FTIR spectroscopic imaging where creatine microdeposits found in situ within thin sections from epileptic, Alzheimer's (AD), and amlyoid lateral sclerosis (ALS) diseased brains were proposed to be disease specific markers and/or postulated to contribute to the brain pathogenesis. As such, a detailed investigation was undertaken, which has established that the creatine microdeposits exist as the highly soluble HCl salt or zwitterion and are an ex-vivo tissue processing artifact and, hence, have no effect on disease pathogenesis. They occur as a result of creatine crystallization during dehydration (i.e., air-drying) of thin sections of brain tissue. As ischemia and decreased aerobic (oxidative metabolism) are common to many brain disorders, regions of elevated creatine-to-phosphocreatine ratio are likely to promote crystal formation during tissue dehydration (due to the lower water solubility of creatine relative to phosphocreatine). The results of this study have demonstrated that

  5. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    PubMed

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety.

  6. From the global to the local: possible pathways for the transduction of Indo-Sino-Tibetan cognitive-behavioral practices into site-specific, tissue-regenerative effects.

    PubMed

    Bushell, William C; Spector, Novera Herbert; Theise, Neil D

    2009-08-01

    While skepticism regarding the possibilities for a productive meeting (metaphorically or actual) between Western medicine and biology and older healing and health practices of traditional cultures may be prevalent, there are many theoretical points of meeting and much experimental data to suggest that cognitive-behavioral practices (C-Bp) of the latter may induce testable and reproducible phenomena for the former. Such modulation or modification of tissue regeneration by C-Bp presumably must work through systemic signaling of some kind. Several possible mechanisms for such signaling are recognized and will be reviewed here: humoral, neurological, cell trafficking, and bioelectromagnetic/energy mediated. Nonetheless, while cultures and techniques may be varied, human bodies are more alike than dissimilar. We indicate that great profit may be had for all participating cultures in establishing a common language, shared criteria for designing experiments and interpreting data, and cooperative goals for the promotion of tissue integrity and regeneration.

  7. Immunocytochemical localization and time course of appearance of an anionic peroxidase associated with suberization in wound-healing potato tuber tissue.

    PubMed

    Espelie, K E; Franceschi, V R; Kolattukudy, P E

    1986-06-01

    Thin sections of wound-healing potato tuber tissue were stained with rabbit antibody prepared against a suberization-associated anionic peroxidase and then stained with a goat anti-rabbit antibody-fluorescein conjugate. When these sections were examined with an epiilluminating fluorescence microscope, bright green fluorescent linear deposits were observed on the inner side of cell walls in the periderm layer. Initial deposits which were often not contiguous throughout the wall were first observed in some cells after 3 days of wound-healing and subsequently these layers became more pronounced so that all 6 day old periderm cells had green fluorescent layers on their inner walls. This fluorescence was not present in the walls of parenchyma cells or in the walls of periderm cells treated with preimmune serum and anti-rabbit IgG-FITC conjugate. Thin sections of wound-healing potato tissue which were stained with anti-peroxidase antibody and a goat anti-rabbit antibody-rhodamine conjugate exhibited a similar time course of development with a bright reddish-orange fluorescent layer observed on the inside wall of periderm cells. The production of this suberization-associated anionic peroxidase in wound-healing tissue was also demonstrated by an immunobinding dot blot assay which showed that the largest increase in the enzyme level occurred between 4 and 6 days of wound-healing. The present results support the hypothesis that this anionic peroxidase is involved in the deposition of the aromatic polymeric domain of suberin.

  8. Vitamin D mitigates the adverse effects of obesity on breast cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Swami, Srilatha; Krishnan, Aruna V; Williams, Jasmaine; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Albertelli, Megan A; Horst, Ronald L; Feldman, Brian J; Feldman, David

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer (BCa), insulin resistance, and vitamin D deficiency, and all contribute to increased synthesis of mammary estrogens, the drivers of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) BCa growth. As both dietary vitamin D and calcitriol treatments inhibit breast estrogen synthesis and signaling, we hypothesized that vitamin D would be especially beneficial in mitigating the adverse effects of obesity on ER+BCa. To assess whether obesity exerted adverse effects on BCa growth and whether vitamin D compounds could reduce these unfavorable effects, we employed a diet-induced obesity (DIO) model in ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice. Breast tumor cells originally from syngeneic Mmtv-Wnt1 transgenic mice were then implanted into the mammary fat pads of lean and obese mice. DIO accelerated the initiation and progression of the mammary tumors. Treatments with either calcitriol or dietary vitamin D reduced the adverse effects of obesity causing a delay in tumor appearance and inhibiting continued tumor growth. Beneficial actions of treatments with vitamin D or calcitriol on BCa and surrounding adipose tissue included repressed Esr1, aromatase, and Cox2 expression; decreased tumor-derived estrogen and PGE2; reduced expression of leptin receptors; and increased adiponectin receptors. We demonstrate that vitamin D treatments decreased insulin resistance, reduced leptin, and increased adiponectin signaling and also regulated the LKB1/AMPK pathway contributing to an overall decrease in local estrogen synthesis in the obese mice. We conclude that calcitriol and dietary vitamin D, acting by multiple interrelated pathways, mitigate obesity-enhanced BCa growth in a postmenopausal setting.

  9. Risk, mercury levels, and birds: relating adverse laboratory effects to field biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Gochfeld, M

    1997-11-01

    There is an abundance of field data on levels of mercury in a variety of organisms and there are a number of studies that demonstrate the adverse effects of mercury on laboratory animals, but few studies examine the relationship between the two. Thus it is often difficult to determine the ecological relevance of mercury concentrations found in nature, or to predict the ecosystem consequences of current levels. In this paper we review the levels in tissues that are associated with adverse effects in birds from laboratory studies and compare these with levels found in wild bird populations in the New York Bight to provide a basis for interpreting values in avian populations. We use feathers from fledgling birds which would have been fed on locally obtained food to eliminate the problem of where toxic burdens were acquired by more mobile adult birds. Laboratory studies indicate that in some species mercury levels of 1.5 ppm in eggs and/or 5 to 40 ppm in the feathers of birds are associated with adverse effects, including impaired reproduction. We report egg levels in birds that range as high as 3.8 ppm and feather levels that range as high as 10.3 ppm, although means are much lower. The levels in eggs of some wild birds in the New York Bight are within the range known to lower hatchability, embryo and chick survival, and chick weight, all variables that reduce reproductive success. Species with high egg levels include Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) and black skimmer (Rynchops niger). Levels in feathers of some young wild birds from the New York Bight are within the range associated with reduced hatchability of eggs, behavioral abnormalities of adults, and infertility. Species with dangerously elevated mercury levels in feathers include great egret (Ardea [=Egretta] alba), snowy egret [Egretta thula), and black skimmers.

  10. Fiducial-free CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single vertebral body metastases: acceptable local control and normal tissue tolerance with 5 fraction approach.

    PubMed

    Gill, Beant; Oermann, Eric; Ju, Andrew; Suy, Simeng; Yu, Xia; Rabin, Jennifer; Kalhorn, Christopher; Nair, Mani N; Voyadzis, Jean-Marc; Unger, Keith; Collins, Sean P; Harter, K W; Collins, Brian T

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective analysis examines the local control and toxicity of five-fraction fiducial-free CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single vertebral body (VB) metastases. All patients had favorable performance status (ECOG 0-1), oligometastatic disease, and no prior spine irradiation. A prescribed dose of 30-35 Gy was delivered in five fractions to the planning target volume (PTV) using the CyberKnife with X-sight spine tracking. Suggested maximum spinal cord and esophagus point doses were 30 and 40 Gy, respectively. A median 30 Gy (IQR, 30-35 Gy) dose was delivered to a median prescription isodose line of 70% (IQR, 65-77%) to 20 patients. At 34 months median follow-up (IQR, 25-40 months) for surviving patients, the 1- and 2-year Kaplan-Meier local control estimates were 80 and 73%, respectively. Two of the five local failures were infield in patients who had received irradiation to the gross tumor volume and three were paravertebral failures just outside the PTV in patients with prior corpectomy. No local failures occurred in patients who completed VB radiation alone. The 1- and 2-year Kaplan-Meier overall survival estimates were 80 and 57%, respectively. Most deaths were attributed to metastatic disease; one death was attributed to local recurrence. The mean maximum point doses were 26.4 Gy (SD, 5.1 Gy) to the spinal cord and 29.1 Gy (SD, 8.9 Gy) to the esophagus. Patients receiving maximum esophagus point doses greater than 35 Gy experienced acute dysphagia (Grade I/II). No spinal cord toxicity was documented. Five-fraction fiducial-free CyberKnife SBRT is an acceptable treatment option for newly diagnosed VB metastases with promising local control rates and minimal toxicity despite the close proximity of such tumors to the spinal cord and esophagus. A prospective study aimed at further enhancing local control by targeting the intact VB and escalating the total dose is planned.

  11. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  12. Rethinking the Measurement of Adversity.

    PubMed

    Mersky, Joshua P; Janczewski, Colleen E; Topitzes, James

    2017-02-01

    Research on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) has unified the study of interrelated risks and generated insights into the origins of disorder and disease. Ten indicators of child maltreatment and household dysfunction are widely accepted as ACEs, but further progress requires a more systematic approach to conceptualizing and measuring ACEs. Using data from a diverse, low-income sample of women who received home visiting services in Wisconsin ( N = 1,241), this study assessed the prevalence of and interrelations among 10 conventional ACEs and 7 potential ACEs: family financial problems, food insecurity, homelessness, parental absence, parent/sibling death, bullying, and violent crime. Associations between ACEs and two outcomes, perceived stress and smoking, were examined. The factor structure and test-retest reliability of ACEs was also explored. As expected, prevalence rates were high compared to studies of more representative samples. Except for parent/sibling death, all ACEs were intercorrelated and associated at the bivariate level with perceived stress and smoking. Exploratory factor analysis confirmed that conventional ACEs loaded on two factors, child maltreatment and household dysfunction, though a more complex four-factor solution emerged once new ACEs were introduced. All ACEs demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability. Implications and future directions toward a second generation of ACE research are discussed.

  13. Mesoporous silica particle-PLA-PANI hybrid scaffolds for cell-directed intracellular drug delivery and tissue vascularization.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Hussein; Vanamo, Ulriika; Wiltschka, Oliver; Niinimäki, Jenni; Lerche, Martina; Levon, Kalle; Linden, Mika; Sahlgren, Cecilia

    2015-09-14

    Instructive materials are expected to revolutionize stem cell based tissue engineering. As many stem cell cues have adverse effects on normal tissue homeostasis, there is a need to develop bioactive scaffolds which offer locally retained and cell-targeted drug delivery for intracellular release in targeted cell populations. Further, the scaffolds need to support vascularization to promote tissue growth and function. We have developed an electrospun PLA-PANI fiber scaffold, and incorporated mesoporous silica nanoparticles within the scaffold matrix to obtain cell-targeted and localized drug delivery. The isotropy of the scaffold can be tuned to find the optimal morphology for a given application and the scaffold is electroactive to support differentiation of contractile tissues. We demonstrate that there is no premature drug release from particles under physiological conditions over a period of one week and that the drug is released upon internalization of particles by cells within the scaffold. The scaffold is biocompatible, supports muscle stem cell differentiation and cell-seeded scaffolds are vascularized in vivo upon transplantation on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. The scaffold is a step towards instructive biomaterials for local control of stem cell differentiation, and tissue formation supported by vascularization and without adverse effects on the homeostasis of adjacent tissues due to diffusion of biological cues.

  14. The prognostic implication of the expression of EGFR, p53, cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and p16 in primary locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma cases: a tissue microarray study.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Monica Charlotte; Vidyasagar, M S; Fernandes, Donald; Guddattu, Vasudev; Mathew, Mary; Shergill, Ankur Kaur; Carnelio, Sunitha; Chandrashekar, Chetana

    2016-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas comprise a heterogeneous tumor cell population with varied molecular characteristics, which makes prognostication of these tumors a complex and challenging issue. Thus, molecular profiling of these tumors is advantageous for an accurate prognostication and treatment planning. This is a retrospective study on a cohort of primary locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas (n = 178) of an Indian rural population. The expression of EGFR, p53, cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and p16 in a cohort of primary locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas was evaluated. A potential biomarker that can predict the tumor response to treatment was identified. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor blocks of (n = 178) of histopathologically diagnosed cases of locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas were selected. Tissue microarray blocks were constructed with 2 cores of 2 mm diameter from each tumor block. Four-micron-thick sections were cut from these tissue microarray blocks. These tissue microarray sections were immunohistochemically stained for EGFR, p53, Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and p16. In this cohort, EGFR was the most frequently expressed 150/178 (84%) biomarker of the cases. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant association (p = 0.038) between expression of p53 and a poor prognosis. A Poisson regression analysis showed that tumors that expressed p53 had a two times greater chance of recurrence (unadjusted IRR-95% CI 2.08 (1.03, 4.5), adjusted IRR-2.29 (1.08, 4.8) compared with the tumors that did not express this biomarker. Molecular profiling of oral squamous cell carcinomas will enable us to categorize our patients into more realistic risk groups. With biologically guided tumor characterization, personalized treatment protocols can be designed for individual patients, which will improve the quality of life of these patients.

  15. OAE: The Ontology of Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A medical intervention is a medical procedure or application intended to relieve or prevent illness or injury. Examples of medical interventions include vaccination and drug administration. After a medical intervention, adverse events (AEs) may occur which lie outside the intended consequences of the intervention. The representation and analysis of AEs are critical to the improvement of public health. Description The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), previously named Adverse Event Ontology (AEO), is a community-driven ontology developed to standardize and integrate data relating to AEs arising subsequent to medical interventions, as well as to support computer-assisted reasoning. OAE has over 3,000 terms with unique identifiers, including terms imported from existing ontologies and more than 1,800 OAE-specific terms. In OAE, the term ‘adverse event’ denotes a pathological bodily process in a patient that occurs after a medical intervention. Causal adverse events are defined by OAE as those events that are causal consequences of a medical intervention. OAE represents various adverse events based on patient anatomic regions and clinical outcomes, including symptoms, signs, and abnormal processes. OAE has been used in the analysis of several different sorts of vaccine and drug adverse event data. For example, using the data extracted from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), OAE was used to analyse vaccine adverse events associated with the administrations of different types of influenza vaccines. OAE has also been used to represent and classify the vaccine adverse events cited in package inserts of FDA-licensed human vaccines in the USA. Conclusion OAE is a biomedical ontology that logically defines and classifies various adverse events occurring after medical interventions. OAE has successfully been applied in several adverse event studies. The OAE ontological framework provides a platform for systematic representation and analysis of

  16. Immunocytochemical Localization and Time Course of Appearance of an Anionic Peroxidase Associated with Suberization in Wound-Healing Potato Tuber Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Espelie, Karl E.; Franceschi, Vincent R.; Kolattukudy, P. E.

    1986-01-01

    Thin sections of wound-healing potato tuber tissue were stained with rabbit antibody prepared against a suberization-associated anionic peroxidase and then stained with a goat anti-rabbit antibody-fluorescein conjugate. When these sections were examined with an epiilluminating fluorescence microscope, bright green fluorescent linear deposits were observed on the inner side of cell walls in the periderm layer. Initial deposits which were often not contiguous throughout the wall were first observed in some cells after 3 days of wound-healing and subsequently these layers became more pronounced so that all 6 day old periderm cells had green fluorescent layers on their inner walls. This fluorescence was not present in the walls of parenchyma cells or in the walls of periderm cells treated with preimmune serum and anti-rabbit IgG-FITC conjugate. Thin sections of wound-healing potato tissue which were stained with anti-peroxidase antibody and a goat anti-rabbit antibody-rhodamine conjugate exhibited a similar time course of development with a bright reddish-orange fluorescent layer observed on the inside wall of periderm cells. The production of this suberization-associated anionic peroxidase in wound-healing tissue was also demonstrated by an immunobinding dot blot assay which showed that the largest increase in the enzyme level occurred between 4 and 6 days of wound-healing. The present results support the hypothesis that this anionic peroxidase is involved in the deposition of the aromatic polymeric domain of suberin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 and 15 PMID:16664843

  17. Compartmentalization of SIV Replication Within Secondary Lymphoid Tissues of Rhesus Macaques is Linked to Disease Stage and Inversely Related to Localization of Virus-Specific CTL1 2

    PubMed Central

    Connick, Elizabeth; Folkvord, Joy M.; Lind, Katherine T.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Miles, Brodie; Wilson, Nancy A.; Santiago, Mario L.; Schmitt, Kimberly; Stephens, Edward B.; Kim, Hyeon O.; Wagstaff, Reece; Li, Shengbin; Abdelaal, Hadia M.; Kemp, Nathan; Watkins, David I.; MaWhinney, Samantha; Skinner, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that HIV replication is concentrated in lymph node B cell follicles during chronic infection and that HIV-specific CTL fail to accumulate in large numbers at those sites. It is unknown whether these observations can be generalized to other secondary lymphoid tissues, or whether virus compartmentalization occurs in the absence of CTL. We evaluated these questions in SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques by quantifying SIV RNA+ cells and SIV-specific CTL in situ in spleen, lymph nodes and intestinal tissues obtained at several stages of infection. During chronic asymptomatic infection prior to simian AIDS (SAIDS), SIV-producing cells were more concentrated in follicular compared to extrafollicular regions of secondary lymphoid tissues. At day 14 of infection, when CTL have minimal impact on virus replication, there was no compartmentalization of SIV-producing cells. Virus compartmentalization was diminished in animals with SAIDS, which often have low frequency CTL responses. SIV-specific CTL were consistently more concentrated within extrafollicular regions of lymph node and spleen in chronically infected animals regardless of epitope specificity. Frequencies of SIV-specific CTL within follicular and extrafollicular compartments predicted SIV RNA+ cells within these compartments in a mixed model. Few SIV-specific CTL expressed the follicular homing molecule CXCR5 in the absence of the extrafollicular retention molecule CCR7, possibly accounting for the paucity of follicular CTL. These findings bolster the hypothesis that B cell follicles are immune privileged sites and suggest that strategies to augment CTL in B cell follicles could lead to improved viral control and possibly a functional cure for HIV infection. PMID:25362178

  18. Intra-Operative Tissue Oxygen Tension Is Increased by Local Insufflation of Humidified-Warm CO2 during Open Abdominal Surgery in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jean K.; Lindner, Pernilla; Tait, Noel; Maddocks, Tracy; Riepsamen, Angelique; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maintenance of high tissue oxygenation (PtO2) is recommended during surgery because PtO2 is highly predictive of surgical site infection and colonic anastomotic leakage. However, surgical site perfusion is often sub-optimal, creating an obstructive hurdle for traditional, systemically applied therapies to maintain or increase surgical site PtO2. This research tested the hypothesis that insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity would increase sub-peritoneal PtO2 during open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods 15 Wistar rats underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. Three sets of randomized cross-over experiments were conducted in which the abdominal cavity was subjected to alternating exposure to 1) humidified-warm CO2 & ambient air; 2) humidified-warm CO2 & dry-cold CO2; and 3) dry-cold CO2 & ambient air. Sub-peritoneal PtO2 and tissue temperature were measured with a polarographic oxygen probe. Results Upon insufflation of humidified-warm CO2, PtO2 increased by 29.8 mmHg (SD 13.3; p<0.001), or 96.6% (SD 51.9), and tissue temperature by 3.0°C (SD 1.7 p<0.001), in comparison with exposure to ambient air. Smaller, but significant, increases in PtO2 were seen in experiments 2 and 3. Tissue temperature decreased upon exposure to dry-cold CO2 compared with ambient air (-1.4°C, SD 0.5, p = 0.001). Conclusions In a rat model, insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity during open abdominal surgery causes an immediate and potentially clinically significant increase in PtO2. The effect is an additive result of the delivery of CO2 and avoidance of evaporative cooling via the delivery of the CO2 gas humidified at body temperature. PMID:25835954

  19. Rate of adverse reactions to more than 1 series of viscosupplementation.

    PubMed

    Webber, Tracy A; Webber, Anthony E; Matzkin, Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    Viscosupplementation, hyaluronic acid treatment, is an ancillary method for treating patients with symptomatic stage I or II osteoarthritis. Previous studies reported that local reactions occurred more frequently in patients receiving >1 course of treatment compared with patients receiving their first course of treatment. One (2%) of 42 first series patients and 4 (21%) of 19 of repeated series patients had adverse reactions severe enough to seek unscheduled care.This study was performed to determine whether patients receiving >1 series of viscosupplementation had an increased adverse reaction rate. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients who received >1 series of viscosupplementation during the study. A local adverse reaction was defined as acute swelling and pain in the knee, with no injury or trauma within 72 hours after hyaluronic acid injection.Twenty-eight knees received >1 series of viscosupplementation. The adverse reaction rate to second series injections was 1.28% (3.57% of knees). The adverse reaction rate to ≥3 series was 0.9% (6.67% of knees). This adverse reaction rate was significantly less than the 21% reported in previous studies for multiple series injections (z=-1.90; P<.05) and is not significantly different than the 2% rate of adverse reactions reported for first series injections. No significant difference existed in the adverse reaction rates between 2 series and ≥3 series of viscosupplementation.The current study suggests that the rate of adverse reaction was low at 1.28% of second series viscosupplementation.

  20. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Arpita K.; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30–90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells –c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess. PMID:27328820

  1. Modulation of MCP-1, TGF-β1, and α-SMA Expressions in Granulation Tissue of Cutaneous Wounds Treated with Local Vitamin B Complex: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli-Kläy, Carla P.; Lunardi, Laurelucia O.; Martinelli, Celso Ricardo; Lombardi, Tommaso; Soares, Edson G.; Martinelli, Celso

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin B complex can modulate the inflammatory response and activate wound healing. However, the action mechanisms involved in this process are still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of vitamin B complex on the modulation of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in granulation tissue growth. Cutaneous ulcers on Wistar rats were topically treated with vitamin B complex. MCP-1, TGF-β1, and α-SMA expressions were evaluated 24, 72, and 168 h after the treatment. Inflammatory cells were counted and collagen fibril staining was performed. After 24 h, more mononuclear cells (p ≤ 0.01) and a higher MCP-1 (p ≤ 0.05) and TGF-β1 (p ≤ 0.01) expression were observed. After 72 h, the number of fibroblasts and mononuclear cells (p ≤ 0.05) was elevated. After 168 h, an increased number of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, and blood vessels (p ≤ 0.01) as well as a strong intensity of collagen fibril staining were seen. At that point, the cells presented a higher TGF-β1 expression (p ≤ 0.05), and the size of the ulcer area was decreased (p ≤ 0.01). We can conclude that vitamin B complex may stimulate a positive modulation of MCP-1, TGF-β1, and α-SMA expressions in granulation tissue of cutaneous ulcers. PMID:27047929

  2. Expression of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Epicardial Fat: Link with Tissue Thickness and Local Insulin Resistance in Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Dozio, Elena; Vianello, Elena; Briganti, Silvia; Lamont, John; Tacchini, Lorenza; Schmitz, Gerd; Corsi Romanelli, Massimiliano Marco

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in adipose tissue has been associated with inflammation, adipocyte hypertrophy, and impaired insulin signal. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT), a visceral fat surrounding the myocardium, is potentially involved in the onset/progression of coronary artery disease (CAD). To date, the role of RAGE in EAT has not been explored much. We examined whether the RAGE expression in EAT was associated with EAT adiposity and metabolic dysfunctions normally found in CAD patients. EAT samples were obtained from 33 patients undergoing open-heart surgery. EAT expression of RAGE, GLUT4, adiponenctin, GLO1, HMGB1, TLR-4, and MyD88 was analyzed by microarray. EAT thickness was quantified by echocardiography. Anthropometric measures and clinical parameters were taken. BMI, HOMA-IR, and LAP indices were calculated. With increasing RAGE expression in EAT we observed increases in EAT thickness, reduced expression of GLUT4, adiponectin, and GLO1, and elevations of HMGB1, TLR-4, and MyD88. There were significant correlations between RAGE and EAT thickness and between RAGE and the genes. LAP was higher in patients with increased RAGE expression. Our data suggest that in CAD patients RAGE may be involved in promoting EAT adiposity and metabolic dysfunction, such as impaired insulin signaling.

  3. Modulation of MCP-1, TGF-β1, and α-SMA Expressions in Granulation Tissue of Cutaneous Wounds Treated with Local Vitamin B Complex: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Martinelli-Kläy, Carla P; Lunardi, Laurelucia O; Martinelli, Celso Ricardo; Lombardi, Tommaso; Soares, Edson G; Martinelli, Celso

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin B complex can modulate the inflammatory response and activate wound healing. However, the action mechanisms involved in this process are still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of vitamin B complex on the modulation of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in granulation tissue growth. Cutaneous ulcers on Wistar rats were topically treated with vitamin B complex. MCP-1, TGF-β1, and α-SMA expressions were evaluated 24, 72, and 168 h after the treatment. Inflammatory cells were counted and collagen fibril staining was performed. After 24 h, more mononuclear cells (p ≤ 0.01) and a higher MCP-1 (p ≤ 0.05) and TGF-β1 (p ≤ 0.01) expression were observed. After 72 h, the number of fibroblasts and mononuclear cells (p ≤ 0.05) was elevated. After 168 h, an increased number of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, and blood vessels (p ≤ 0.01) as well as a strong intensity of collagen fibril staining were seen. At that point, the cells presented a higher TGF-β1 expression (p ≤ 0.05), and the size of the ulcer area was decreased (p ≤ 0.01). We can conclude that vitamin B complex may stimulate a positive modulation of MCP-1, TGF-β1, and α-SMA expressions in granulation tissue of cutaneous ulcers.

  4. Local soft tissue musculoskeletal disorders and injuries. The role of physical and rehabilitation medicine physicians. The European perspective based on the best evidence. A paper by the UEMS-PRM Section Professional Practice Committee.

    PubMed

    Oral, A; Ilieva, E M; Küçükdeveci, A A; Varela, E; Valero, R; Berteanu, M; Christodoulou, N

    2013-10-01

    One of the objectives of the Professional Practice Committee (PPC) of the Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) Section of the Union of European Medical Specialists (UEMS) is the development of the field of competence of PRM physicians in Europe. To achieve this objective, UEMS PRM Section PPC has adopted a systematic action plan of preparing a series of papers describing the role of PRM physicians in a number of disabling health conditions, based on the evidence of effectiveness of PRM interventions. Soft tissue musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and injuries are associated with significant pain and loss of function that may lead to significant disability. The aim of this paper is to define the role of PRM physician in the management of local soft tissue MSDs and injuries with their specific focus on assessing and improving function as well as participation in the community. The training of PRM specialists make them well equipped to successfully treat MSDs including soft tissue MSDs and injuries. PRM specialists may well meet the needs of patients with soft tissue MSDs and injuries using PRM approaches including 1) assessment based on the comprehensive model of functioning, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), that enable them to identify the areas of impaired functioning in order to apply necessary measures; 2) accurate diagnosis using instrumental diagnostic procedures in addition to clinical examination; 3) outcome measurements available to them; 4) evidence-based pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments; and finally 5) maintenance of social involvement including "return to work" based on restoration of function, all of which will eventually result in improved quality of life for patients with soft tissue MSDs and injuries.

  5. Hospital deaths and adverse events in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse events are considered a major international problem related to the performance of health systems. Evaluating the occurrence of adverse events involves, as any other outcome measure, determining the extent to which the observed differences can be attributed to the patient's risk factors or to variations in the treatment process, and this in turn highlights the importance of measuring differences in the severity of the cases. The current study aims to evaluate the association between deaths and adverse events, adjusted according to patient risk factors. Methods The study is based on a random sample of 1103 patient charts from hospitalizations in the year 2003 in 3 teaching hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology involved a retrospective review of patient charts in two stages - screening phase and evaluation phase. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between hospital deaths and adverse events. Results The overall mortality rate was 8.5%, while the rate related to the occurrence of an adverse event was 2.9% (32/1103) and that related to preventable adverse events was 2.3% (25/1103). Among the 94 deaths analyzed, 34% were related to cases involving adverse events, and 26.6% of deaths occurred in cases whose adverse events were considered preventable. The models tested showed good discriminatory capacity. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR 11.43) and the odds ratio adjusted for patient risk factors (OR 8.23) between death and preventable adverse event were high. Conclusions Despite discussions in the literature regarding the limitations of evaluating preventable adverse events based on peer review, the results presented here emphasize that adverse events are not only prevalent, but are associated with serious harm and even death. These results also highlight the importance of risk adjustment and multivariate models in the study of adverse events. PMID:21929810

  6. Characterizing "Adversity" of Pathology Findings in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The identification of adverse health effects has a central role in the development and risk/safety assessment of chemical entities and pharmaceuticals. There is currently a need for better alignment in the toxicologic pathology community regarding how nonclinical adversity is determined and characterized. The European Society of Toxicologic Pathology (ESTP) therefore coordinated a workshop in June 2015 to review available definitions of adversity, weigh determining and qualifying factors of adversity based on case examples, and recommend a practical approach to define and characterize adversity in toxicology reports. The international group of expert pathologists and toxicologists emphasized that a holistic, weight-of-evidence, case-specific approach should be followed for each adversity assessment. It was recommended that nonclinical adversity should typically be determined at a morphological level (most often the organ) in the pathology report and should refer specifically to the test species. Final adversity calls, integration of target pharmacology/pathway information, and consideration of human translation should generally be made in toxicology overview reports. Differences in interpretation and implications of adversity calls between (agro)chemical and pharmaceutical industries and among world regions were highlighted. The results of this workshop should serve a valuable prerequisite for future organ- or lesion-specific workshops planned by the ESTP. This

  7. Mevalonate-derived quinonemethide triterpenoid from in vitro roots of Peritassa laevigata and their localization in root tissue by MALDI imaging.

    PubMed

    Pina, Edieidia S; Silva, Denise B; Teixeira, Simone P; Coppede, Juliana S; Furlan, Maysa; França, Suzelei C; Lopes, Norberto P; Pereira, Ana Maria S; Lopes, Adriana A

    2016-03-04

    Biosynthetic investigation of quinonemethide triterpenoid 22β-hydroxy-maytenin (2) from in vitro root cultures of Peritassa laevigata (Celastraceae) was conducted using (13)C-precursor. The mevalonate pathway in P. laevigata is responsible for the synthesis of the quinonemethide triterpenoid scaffold. Moreover, anatomical analysis of P. laevigata roots cultured in vitro and in situ showed the presence of 22β-hydroxy-maytenin (2) and maytenin (1) in the tissues from transverse or longitudinal sections with an intense orange color. MALDI-MS imaging confirmed the distribution of (2) and (1) in the more distal portions of the root cap, the outer cell layers, and near the vascular cylinder of P. laevigata in vitro roots suggesting a role in plant defense against infection by microorganisms as well as in the root exudation processes.

  8. Mevalonate-derived quinonemethide triterpenoid from in vitro roots of Peritassa laevigata and their localization in root tissue by MALDI imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Edieidia S.; Silva, Denise B.; Teixeira, Simone P.; Coppede, Juliana S.; Furlan, Maysa; França, Suzelei C.; Lopes, Norberto P.; Pereira, Ana Maria S.; Lopes, Adriana A.

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthetic investigation of quinonemethide triterpenoid 22β-hydroxy-maytenin (2) from in vitro root cultures of Peritassa laevigata (Celastraceae) was conducted using 13C-precursor. The mevalonate pathway in P. laevigata is responsible for the synthesis of the quinonemethide triterpenoid scaffold. Moreover, anatomical analysis of P. laevigata roots cultured in vitro and in situ showed the presence of 22β-hydroxy-maytenin (2) and maytenin (1) in the tissues from transverse or longitudinal sections with an intense orange color. MALDI-MS imaging confirmed the distribution of (2) and (1) in the more distal portions of the root cap, the outer cell layers, and near the vascular cylinder of P. laevigata in vitro roots suggesting a role in plant defense against infection by microorganisms as well as in the root exudation processes. PMID:26943243

  9. Mevalonate-derived quinonemethide triterpenoid from in vitro roots of Peritassa laevigata and their localization in root tissue by MALDI imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, Edieidia S.; Silva, Denise B.; Teixeira, Simone P.; Coppede, Juliana S.; Furlan, Maysa; França, Suzelei C.; Lopes, Norberto P.; Pereira, Ana Maria S.; Lopes, Adriana A.

    2016-03-01

    Biosynthetic investigation of quinonemethide triterpenoid 22β-hydroxy-maytenin (2) from in vitro root cultures of Peritassa laevigata (Celastraceae) was conducted using 13C-precursor. The mevalonate pathway in P. laevigata is responsible for the synthesis of the quinonemethide triterpenoid scaffold. Moreover, anatomical analysis of P. laevigata roots cultured in vitro and in situ showed the presence of 22β-hydroxy-maytenin (2) and maytenin (1) in the tissues from transverse or longitudinal sections with an intense orange color. MALDI-MS imaging confirmed the distribution of (2) and (1) in the more distal portions of the root cap, the outer cell layers, and near the vascular cylinder of P. laevigata in vitro roots suggesting a role in plant defense against infection by microorganisms as well as in the root exudation processes.

  10. Does the Zone of Injury in Combat-Related Type III Open Tibia Fractures Preclude the Use of Local Soft Tissue Coverage?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    procedure. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2001;83:239 246. 6. Burgess AR, Poka A, Brumback RJ , et al. Management of open grade III tibial fractures. Orthop Clin...extremities with failed free flaps: a single institution’s experience over 25 years. Ann Plast Surg. 2007;59:18 21. 19. Fix RJ , Vasconez LO...of lower extremity defects: anatomic considerations. Surg Clin North Am. 1974;54:1337 1354. 22. Shepherd LE, Costigan WM, Gardocki RJ , et al. Local or

  11. Mechanisms of adverse drug reactions to biologics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Janet B

    2010-01-01

    Biologics encompass a broad range of therapeutics that include proteins and other products derived from living systems. Although the multiplicity of target organs often seen with new chemical entities is generally not seen with biologics, they can produce significant adverse reactions. Examples include IL-12 and an anti-CD28 antibody that resulted in patient deaths and/or long stays in intensive care units. Mechanisms of toxicities can be categorized as pharmacological or nonpharmacological, with most, excepting hypersensitivity reactions, associated with the interaction of the agent with its planned target. Unexpected toxicities generally arise as a result of previously unknown biology. Manufacturing quality is a significant issue relative to the toxicity of biologics. The development of recombinant technology represented the single biggest advance leading to humanized products with minimal or no contaminants in comparison to products purified from animal tissues. Nevertheless, the type of manufacturing process including choice of cell type, culture medium, and purification method can result in changes to the protein. For example, a change to the closure system for erythropoietin led to an increase in aplastic anemia as a result of changing the immunogenicity characteristics of the protein. Monoclonal antibodies represent a major class of successful biologics. Toxicities associated with these agents include those associated with the binding of the complementary determining region (CDR) with the target. First dose reactions or infusion reactions are generally thought to be mediated via the Fc region of the antibody activating cytokine release, and have been observed with several antibodies. Usually, these effects (flu-like symptoms, etc.) are transient with subsequent dosing. Although biologics can have nonpharmacologic toxicities, these are less common than with small molecule drugs.

  12. Potential adverse effects of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Whitten, P L; Lewis, C; Russell, E; Naftolin, F

    1995-03-01

    Evaluation of the potential benefits and risks offered by naturally occurring plant estrogens requires investigation of their potency and sites of action when consumed at natural dietary concentrations. Our investigations have examined the effects of a range of natural dietary concentrations of the most potent plant isoflavonoid, coumestrol, using a rat model and a variety of estrogen-dependent tissues and endpoints. Treatments of immature females demonstrated agonistic action in the reproductive tract, brain, and pituitary at natural dietary concentrations. Experiments designed to test for estrogen antagonism demonstrated that coumestrol did not conform to the picture of a classic antiestrogen. However, coumestrol did suppress estrous cycles in adult females. Developmental actions were examined by neonatal exposure of pups through milk of rat dams fed a coumestrol, control, or commercial soy-based diet during the critical period of the first 10 postnatal days or throughout the 21 days of lactation. The 10-day treatment did not significantly alter adult estrous cyclicity, but the 21-day treatment produced in a persistent estrus state in coumestrol-treated females by 132 days of age. In contrast, the 10-day coumestrol treatments produced significant deficits in the sexual behavior of male offspring. These findings illustrate the broad range of actions of these natural estrogens and the variability in potency across endpoints. This variability argues for the importance of fully characterizing each phytoestrogen in terms of its sites of action, balance of agonistic and antagonistic properties, natural potency, and short-term and long-term effects.

  13. Perspective on Lithotripsy Adverse Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Thomas; Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar

    2008-09-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an effective and without any doubt the least invasive procedure to treat upper urinary tract calculi. Acute complications are rarely reported and do not require specific treatment in most cases. However, one should be aware that energy levels sufficient for stone breakage are capable of damaging tissue as well, and significant hematoma—not only in the kidney but as well in surrounding organs—has been observed. Furthermore, only little is known about the long-term effects of SWL. Some authors have reported an increased incidence of hypertension and possibly also diabetes mellitus. Such chronic diseases—if indeed related to prior SWL—may be a late result of acute SWL-related trauma but the discussion on the underlying pathogenesis is controversial. Many factors have to be considered, such as the natural history of recurrent stone formers, technical principles of SWL, and differences in treatment protocols. Promising studies are currently underway to optimize stone breakage while limiting potential collateral damage. With this progress, SWL remains a safe treatment option for most urinary calculi.

  14. Strategic approaches to adverse outcome pathway development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are conceptual frameworks for organizing biological and toxicological knowledge in a manner that supports extrapolation of data pertaining to the initiation or early progression of toxicity to an apical adverse outcome that occurs at a level of org...

  15. Expression of cytochrome P450 CYP81A6 in rice: tissue specificity, protein subcellular localization, and response to herbicide application*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hai-ping; Edwards, Martin; Wang, Qi-zhao; Zhao, Hai-jun; Fu, Hao-wei; Huang, Jian-zhong; Gatehouse, Angharad; Shu, Qing-yao

    2015-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 gene CYP81A6 confers tolerance to bentazon and metsulfuron-methyl, two selective herbicides widely used for weed control in rice and wheat fields. Knockout mutants of CYP81A6 are highly susceptible to both herbicides. The present study aimed to characterize the CYP81A6 expression in rice. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses demonstrated that foliar treatment of bentazon (500 mg/L) greatly induced expression of CYP81A6 in both wild-type (Jiazhe B) and its knockout mutant (Jiazhe mB): a 10-fold increase at 9 h before returning to basal levels at 24 h in Jiazhe B, while in the mutant the expression level rose to >20-fold at 12 h and maintained at such high level up to 24 h post exposure. In contrast, metsulfuron-methyl (500 mg/L) treatment did not affect the expression of CYP81A6 in Jiazhe B within 80 h; thereafter the expression peaked at 120 h and returned gradually to basal levels by Day 6. We suggest that a metabolite of metsulfuron-methyl, 1H-2,3-benzothiazin-4-(3H)-one-2,2-dioxide, is likely to be responsible for inducing CYP81A6 expression, rather than the metsulfuron-methyl itself. Use of a promoter-GUS reporter construct (CYP81A6Pro::GUS) demonstrated that CYP81A6 was constitutively expressed throughout the plant, with the highest expression in the upper surfaces of leaves. Subcellular localization studies in rice protoplasts showed that CYP81A6 was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. These observations advance our understanding of CYP81A6 expression in rice, particularly its response to the two herbicides. PMID:25644466

  16. Comparison of localized versus systemic levels of Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), its tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and cytokines in tuberculous and non-tuberculous pleuritis patients.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Swetha; Babu, Subash; Das, Sulochana D

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), its tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection is important to understand the immune response at the site of infection. We compared the levels of MMPs, TIMPs and cytokines in plasma (BL) and pleural fluid (PF) of tuberculosis (TB) and non tuberculosis (NTB) patients. Comparison between BL and PF showed significantly higher levels of MMP-1, TIMP-1 and -3 in TB PF; of MMP-7, -8, -9 in BL of both groups. Also, levels of MMP-1,-8,-9 and TIMP-3 were significantly higher in TB PF compared to NTB. Cytokines INF-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 significantly increased in PF of both groups. A positive correlation of MMPs with TIMPs in TB, MMP-1 and -9 with IL-6 in TB PF and MMP-9 with IFN-γ in NTB PF was observed. This study implicates the possible usage of MMPs as bio-markers aiding diagnosis in TB pleuritis.

  17. Localization of serotoni (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) with partial purification and characterization of a serotonin binding protein in the intestinal tissue of the nematode Ascaris suum

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    An intracellular 5-HT binding protein (SBP) from intestinal tissue was partially purified and characterized. Binding of ({sup 3}H) 5-HT to the protein appeared to be Fe{sup +2}-sensitive and maximal (20.8pmol/mg protein) at 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}M Fe{sup +2} and 10{sup {minus}7}M ({sup 3}H) 5-HT. There were two 5-HT binding sites present at optimum Fe{sup +2} concentrations. The Bmax values of these sites were more sensitive to Fe{sup +2} than Kd values. Sulfhydryl reducing agents, cation chelators, Fe{sup +3}, Ca{sup +2} and antagonists of 5-HT uptake and storage inhibited binding of 5-HT to SBP. Gel exclusion chromatography indicated the presence of a 45Kda SBP that in 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}M Fe{sup +2} may form aggregates ranging in size from approximately 80 to >1000Kda. The data indicate these in vitro aggregates may correspond to the electron-opaque patches observed in situ. Ascaris suum may provide a model system to further elucidate the physiological role of analogous serotonin binding proteins that have been identified in mammalian systems.

  18. Dietary supplementation with Bifidobacterium lactis NCC2818 from weaning reduces local immunoglobulin production in lymphoid-associated tissues but increases systemic antibodies in healthy neonates.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Marie C; Patel, Dilip V; Fowler, Jenni; Duncker, Swantje; Zuercher, Adrian W; Mercenier, Annick; Bailey, Mick

    2013-10-01

    Weaning is associated with a major shift in the microbial community of the intestine, and this instability may make it more acquiescent than the adult microbiota to long-term changes. Modulation achieved through dietary interventions may have potentially beneficial effects on the developing immune system, which is driven primarily by the microbiota. The specific aim of the present study was to determine whether immune development could be modified by dietary supplementation with the human probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis NCC2818 in a tractable model of weaning in infants. Piglets were reared by their mothers before being weaned onto a solid diet supplemented with B. lactis NCC2818, while sibling controls did not receive supplementation. Probiotic supplementation resulted in a reduction in IgA (P<0·0005) and IgM (P<0·009) production by mucosal tissues but had no effect on IgG production (P>0·05). Probiotic-supplemented pigs had more mast cells than unsupplemented littermates (P<0·0001), although numbers in both groups were low. In addition, the supplemented piglets made stronger serum IgG responses to fed and injected antigens (P<0·05). The present findings are consistent with B. lactis NCC2818 reducing intestinal permeability induced by weaning, and suggest that the piglet is a valuable intermediate between rodent models and human infants. The results also strongly suggest that measures of the effect of probiotic supplementation on the immune system need to be interpreted carefully as proxy measures of health benefit. However, they are useful in developing an understanding of the mechanism of action of probiotic strains, an important factor in predicting favourable health outcomes of nutritional intervention.

  19. Cloning, developmental, and tissue-specific expression of sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyl transferase from Taraxacum officinale. Fructan localization in roots.

    PubMed

    Van den Ende, W; Michiels, A; Van Wonterghem, D; Vergauwen, R; Van Laere, A

    2000-05-01

    Sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyl transferase (1-SST) is the key enzyme initiating fructan synthesis in Asteraceae. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, we isolated the cDNA for 1-SST from Taraxacum officinale. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence showed very high homology to other Asteracean 1-SSTs (Cichorium intybus 86%, Cynara scolymus 82%, Helianthus tuberosus 80%), but homology to 1-SST from Allium cepa (46%) and Aspergillus foetidus (18%) was much lower. Fructan concentrations, 1-SST activities, 1-SST protein, and mRNA concentrations were compared in different organs during vegetative and generative development of T. officinale plants. Expression of 1-SST was abundant in young roots but very low in leaves. 1-SST was also expressed at the flowering stages in roots, stalks, and receptacles. A good correlation was found between northern and western blots showing transcriptional regulation of 1-SST. At the pre-flowering stage, 1-SST mRNA concentrations and 1-SST activities were higher in the root phloem than in the xylem, resulting in the higher fructan concentrations in the phloem. Fructan localization studies indicated that fructan is preferentially stored in phloem parenchyma cells in the vicinity of the secondary sieve tube elements. However, inulin-like crystals occasionally appeared in xylem vessels.

  20. Endothelin in normal lung tissue of newborn mammals: immunocytochemical distribution and co-localization with serotonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Seldeslagh, K A; Lauweryns, J M

    1993-10-01

    We demonstrated immunoreactivity for endothelins (ET)-1, -2, and -3 and for the precursor, big-ET-1, in the pulmonary diffuse neuroendocrine system (PDNES) of newborn cat, rat, hamster, and mouse. ET-like positive neuroepithelial bodies (NEB) were numerous in the intrapulmonary airways and the alveolar parenchyma. Single neuroendocrine cells (NEC) were less often labeled and mainly localized in the larger bronchi. ET-3-reactive neuronal elements were rarely observed. The intensity and number of immunostained NEB were highest for ET-3, followed in declining order by big-ET-1, ET-1, and ET-2. ET-like possessing NEB displayed interspecies differences. We conclude that ET-3 represents a neuroendocrine form of the ET peptide family. NEB expressing several ET isoforms can be grouped into NEB containing either big-ET-1 and ET-1 or ET-3 only. ET-like immunoreactivity was present in a subpopulation of serotonin (5HT)- and/or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-positive NEB. As ET, 5HT, and CGRP have potent pulmonary vaso- and/or bronchomotor effects, our observations suggest that they play a separate or synergistic role in regulatory function of the mammalian PDNES, exerting their influence by paracrine, endocrine, and neurocrine pathways or a combination of these.

  1. Cloning, Developmental, and Tissue-Specific Expression of Sucrose:Sucrose 1-Fructosyl Transferase from Taraxacum officinale. Fructan Localization in Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Van den Ende, Wim; Michiels, An; Van Wonterghem, Dominik; Vergauwen, Rudy; Van Laere, André

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyl transferase (1-SST) is the key enzyme initiating fructan synthesis in Asteraceae. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, we isolated the cDNA for 1-SST from Taraxacum officinale. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence showed very high homology to other Asteracean 1-SSTs (Cichorium intybus 86%, Cynara scolymus 82%, Helianthus tuberosus 80%), but homology to 1-SST from Allium cepa (46%) and Aspergillus foetidus (18%) was much lower. Fructan concentrations, 1-SST activities, 1-SST protein, and mRNA concentrations were compared in different organs during vegetative and generative development of T. officinale plants. Expression of 1-SST was abundant in young roots but very low in leaves. 1-SST was also expressed at the flowering stages in roots, stalks, and receptacles. A good correlation was found between northern and western blots showing transcriptional regulation of 1-SST. At the pre-flowering stage, 1-SST mRNA concentrations and 1-SST activities were higher in the root phloem than in the xylem, resulting in the higher fructan concentrations in the phloem. Fructan localization studies indicated that fructan is preferentially stored in phloem parenchyma cells in the vicinity of the secondary sieve tube elements. However, inulin-like crystals occasionally appeared in xylem vessels. PMID:10806226

  2. The 22 S cylinder particles of Xenopus laevis. II. Immunological characterization and localization of their proteins in tissues and cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Hügle, B; Kleinschmidt, J A; Franke, W W

    1983-11-01

    Cylinder-shaped particles of 10 nm diameter were isolated from nuclei of Xenopus laevis oocytes and purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation and DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. Antibodies to protein constituents of these isolated particles were elicited in guinea pigs and examined by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation techniques as well as by immunofluorescence microscopy. The antibodies reacted with only two out of the 12 constituent polypeptides characteristic for these particles when examined in the denatured state by the immunoblotting technique, including the largest component of Mr 30 000, but were able to precipitate the whole ensemble of these polypeptides in immunoprecipitation experiments, in agreement with the notion that these proteins form the 22 S particle complex. The antibodies displayed a rather narrow range of interspecies cross-reactivity, showing reaction with cells of other amphibia but not with avian and mammalian cells. In oocytes as well as in transcriptionally active somatic cells the antigen was localized in the nucleoplasm, excluding nucleoli, as well as in the cytoplasm, usually suggesting a higher concentration in the nucleoplasm. During mitosis, the proteins were dispersed throughout the cytoplasm whereas the chromosomes were negative. Inactive cells such as mature erythrocytes, spermatids and spermatozoa were negative. These immunolocalization findings support our conclusion based on fractionation studies that the cylindershaped particles and their protein constituents occur both in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm of a broad range of cell types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. F-type lectin from the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): purification, cDNA cloning, tissue expression and localization, and opsonic activity.

    PubMed

    Salerno, G; Parisi, M G; Parrinello, D; Benenati, G; Vizzini, A; Vazzana, M; Vasta, G R; Cammarata, M

    2009-08-01

    Recently described biochemical and structural aspects of fucose-binding lectins from the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and striped bass (Morone saxatilis) led to the identification of a novel lectin family ("F-type" lectins) characterized by a unique sequence motif and a characteristic structural fold. The F-type fold is shared not only with other members of this lectin family, but also with apparently unrelated proteins ranging from prokaryotes to vertebrates. Here we describe the purification, biochemical and molecular properties, and the opsonic activity of an F-type lectin (DlFBL) isolated from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) serum. DlFBL exhibits two tandemly arranged carbohydrate-recognition domains that display the F-type sequence motif. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that DlFBL is specifically expressed and localized in hepatocytes and intestinal cells. Exposure of formalin-killed Escherichia coli to DlFBL enhanced their phagocytosis by D. labrax peritoneal macrophages relative to the unexposed controls, suggesting that DlFBL may function as an opsonin in plasma and intestinal mucus.

  4. The adverse effects of kava.

    PubMed

    Kava, R

    2001-03-01

    In Fiji, kava is also known as yaqona or grog. A convenient sample of 300 kava drinkers in Nadi, Lautoka, Ba and Sigatoka were studied to see whether local people in Fiji experienced side effects of kava use. Because males usually consume kava in Fiji, we approached specific groups of people and asked them to participate in the survey. To evaluate the side effects of kava consumption, we interviewed housewives of male kava drinkers regarding specific effects of kava. We interviewed these housewives during kava drinking sessions since they were usually not taking part in the kava drinking. We also interviewed employers of these kava drinkers and the market vendors in Nadi Town since they were closely involved with kava drinkers. Wives of kava users felt deprived of basic family needs due to the amount of money spent on kava. In Urban schools, 64% males and 46.2% had tried kava. The present study aims to assess the prevalence of side effects of kava usage among a community sample of kava drinkers in Fiji and to compare the result with some of the side effects provided by other studies. The questionnaire also asked how much kava was consumed and the reasons. Since kava use is very much part of our everyday culture and existence, convincing people to change their behavior and kava consumption is a major tasks. I hope that this study would emphasize the need at a national level to educate people on the harmful effects of kava and the need for the health ministry to view very heavy kava intake as contributing to morbidity in Fiji.

  5. Synergistic childhood adversities and complex adult psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Karen T; Harris, William W; Putnam, Frank W

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies find a cumulative effect of different types of childhood adversities on increasing risk for serious adult mental and medical outcomes. This study uses the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication sample to investigate the cumulative impact of 8 childhood adversities on complex adult psychopathology as indexed by (a) number of lifetime diagnoses according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994); (b) number of 4 DSM-IV disorder categories (mood, anxiety, impulse control, and substance abuse disorders); and (c) coexistence of internalizing and externalizing disorders. Seven of the 8 childhood adversities were significantly associated with complex adult psychopathology. Individuals with 4 or more childhood adversities had an odds ratio of 7.3, 95% confidence interval [4.7, 11.7] for 4 disorder categories. Additive and multiplicative synergistic effects increasing adult psychopathology were found for specific pairwise combinations of childhood adversities. Synergistic patterns differed by gender suggesting that women are more impacted by sexual abuse and men by economic hardship. The absence of childhood adversities was protective, in that it significantly decreased an individual's risk for subsequent adult mental illness. The results support the clinical impression that increased childhood adversity is associated with more complex adult psychopathology.

  6. Engineering Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  7. [Management of adverse effects with antituberculosis chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Wada, Masako

    2011-02-01

    Tuberculosis has now become a curable disease with chemotherapy. So it is natural that the present issues in tuberculosis management are focused on how to complete standard chemotherapy. In this context, management of adverse effects constitutes an essential part of antituberculosis chemotherapy, as well as directly observed therapy. In this symposium, discussions were held about three major subjects on this issue. First, hepatotoxicity develops frequently and has sometimes fatal outcome, which makes it the most problematic adverse effect. "Management of hepatotoxicity during antituberculosis chemotherapy" was published by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis (JST) in 2006. Dr. Shinsho Yoshiba evaluated this recommendation and pointed out that the criteria for discontinuation of drug based on AST, ALT and bilirubin levels is too sensitive and the concept of predicting fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is lacking. He stressed the importance of monitoring serum prothrombin time for predicting FHF. Next, allergic drug reaction such as fever or skin rash often causes distress, although rarely fatal. As isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP) are key drugs for the cure, readministration of these drugs is often attempted by desensitization therapy. "Recommendation about desensitization therapy of antituberculosis drugs" was also published by JST in 1997. Dr. Yoshihiro Kobashi reported high success rates of 79 percent for INH and 75 percent for RFP according to this recommendation. He also reported correlated factor with the success, such as the longer period from the discontinuation to the desensitization therapy and lower doses of drugs at starting desensitization. Finally, we sometimes experience transient worsening of radiographical findings and general symptoms during antituberculosis chemotherapy. This is presumed to be due to allergic reaction to dead bacilli without requiring discontinuation of the drug. Differential diagnosis includes drug-induced pneumonia requring

  8. [Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. Risks and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Voigt, N; Heijman, J; Dobrev, D

    2014-03-01

    Adverse side effects of drugs are a significantly underestimated problem in modern medicine. In this review article, we summarize common adverse side effects of cardiovascular drugs. In particular, we highlight the factors promoting these adverse side effects in patients, including reduced hepatic or renal clearance in elderly patients that often requires dosage adjustment. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs (e.g. through the cytochrome P450 system or P-glycoproteins) can modify the plasma concentration of many compounds, thereby also increasing the likelihood of unwanted side effects. The most prominent cardiac side effects include arrhythmias, e.g. atrioventricular (AV) block, drug-induced long-QT syndrome and torsade de pointes and altered inotropy. Non-cardiac side effects are subsequently discussed grouped by drug class. A better understanding of the risks and side effects of cardiovascular drugs is expected to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with adverse side effects.

  9. Childhood adversities and psychosis: evidence, challenges, implications

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Craig; Gayer‐Anderson, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    There is a substantial body of research reporting evidence of associations between various forms of childhood adversity and psychosis, across the spectrum from experiences to disorder. This has been extended, more recently, to include studies of cumulative effects, of interactions with other factors, of specific effects, and of putative biological and psychological mechanisms. In this paper we evaluate this research and highlight the remaining methodological issues and gaps that temper, but do not dismiss, conclusions about the causal role of childhood adversity. We also consider the emerging work on cumulative, synergistic, and specific effects and on mechanisms; and discuss the broader implications of this line of research for our understanding of psychosis. We conclude that the current balance of evidence is that childhood adversities – particularly exposure to multiple adversities involving hostility and threat – do, in some people, contribute to the onset of psychotic experiences and psychotic disorders. PMID:27265690

  10. Childhood adversity: a review of measurement instruments.

    PubMed

    Burgermeister, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Measurement instruments are needed to stimulate research on the long-term outcomes of childhood adversity. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to locate, describe, and assess instruments to measure retrospective perceptions of childhood adversity. An electronic search of instruments was conducted using a combination of keywords that included child maltreatment, child trauma, and childhood stressful events. Nine instruments were located and described according to format, definition of childhood adversity as measured by the instrument, characteristics of the sample used in development and testing, reliability and validity evidence, and feasibility for use. Six out of the nine instruments were suitable for investigators who require a comprehensive measure of childhood adversity. Corroboration with independent sources and use of randomized samples are needed to improve upon reports of validity.

  11. RACIAL RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION AND ADVERSE BIRTH OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION. The disparity between black and white women's adverse birth outcomes has been subject to much investigation, yet the factors underlying its persistence remain elusive, which has encouraged research on neighborhood-level influences, including racial residential segr...

  12. Adverse Outcome Pathways: From Definition to Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge for both human health and ecological toxicologists is the transparent application of mechanistic (e.g., molecular, biochemical, histological) data to risk assessments. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework designed to meet this need. Specifical...

  13. Localization of blood-group-related linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine structure in different human tissues by Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II staining following endo-beta-galactosidase digestion.

    PubMed

    Ito, N; Kawahara, S; Hirano, Y; Morimura, Y; Nakajima, K; Uchida, K; Hirota, T

    1994-04-01

    Endo-beta-galactosidase from Escherichia freundii cleaves polylactosaminyl structures as follows: R-GlcNAc beta I-3Gal beta I-4GlcNac beta I-R' + H2O-->R-GlcNAc beta I-3Gal + GlcNAc beta I-R'. By staining with Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II following the enzyme digestion, the distribution of R-GlcNAc beta I-3Gal beta I-4GlcNAc can be demonstrated in tissue sections. This carbohydrate chain is one of the backbone structures carrying the blood-group-related antigens and, thus, localization of this structure may provide detailed information about the distribution of variants with different backbone structures. Various formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were stained by Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II with or without prior enzyme digestion and the reactivity of the agglutinin imparted by enzyme digestion was studied in the following tissues and cells: pancreatic acinar cells, gastric surface mucosae, duct cells and mucous cells of salivary glands and tracheal glands, surface epithelium of trachea, goblet cells of large intestine, columnar epithelium of uterine cervical glands, distal and collecting tubules of kidney, certain cells of anterior lobe and colloid of middle lobe of pituitary glands, epithelial reticular cells and Hassall's corpuscles of thymus and Kupffer cells of liver. In gastric surface mucosae, the reactivity of the agglutinin appeared in non-secretor individuals but not in the secretor individuals, and in mucous cells of salivary and tracheal glands the reactivity appeared in Le(a- b-) non-secretor individuals but not in Le(a + b-) non-secretor or secretor individuals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Design of Adverse Drug Events-Scorecards.

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Chazard, Emmanuel; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Hackl, Werner; Băceanu, Adrian; Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of Adverse Drug Event-Scorecards. The scorecards described are innovative and novel, not having previously been reported in the literature. The Scorecards provide organizations (e.g. hospitals) with summary information about Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) using a Web-based platform. The data used in the Scorecards are routinely updated and report on ADEs detected through data mining processes. The development of the ADE Scorecards is ongoing and they are currently undergoing clinical testing.

  15. [Allergies and adverse events associated with fluoroquinolones].

    PubMed

    Muller, Y; Andrey, D; Emonet, S; Harr, T; Spoerl, D

    2015-04-08

    The prescription ot fluoroquinolones has been constantly increasing over the past decade. consequently, an increasing number of hyper-sensitivity reactions and adverse events have been reported. The aim of the review is to discuss the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions either IgE (immediate) or T cells mediated (delayed). We will make an overview ofthe diagnostic tools available to detect such hypersensitivity reactions. Finally, the specific adverse events associated with fluoroquinolones, including tendinopathy, chondrotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy or retinal detachment will be discussed.

  16. Childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations.

    PubMed

    Fiddler, Maggie; Jackson, Judy; Kapur, Navneet; Wells, Adrian; Creed, Francis

    2004-01-01

    We assessed possible psychological mediators of the relationship between childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations among new outpatients at neurology, cardiology, and gastroenterology clinics. We assessed whether these differed in patients with and without organic disease that explained their symptoms. At first clinic visit we recorded Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS--anxiety and depression subscale scores), Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ--four subscales: consequences, cure, identity, timeline), Health Anxiety Questionnaire (total score), and Symptom Amplification Scale (total score). Subjects were divided into two groups according to whether they had experienced any type of childhood adversity using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Schedule. Outcome was the (log) number of medical consultations for 12 months before and 6 months after the index clinic visits. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine mediators; this was performed separately for patients with symptoms explained and not explained by organic disease. One-hundred and twenty-nine patients (61% response) were interviewed. Fifty-two (40.3%) had experienced childhood adversity; they made a median of 16 doctor visits compared with 10 for those without adversity (adjusted P=.026). IPQ identity score (number of symptoms attributed to the illness) and HAD depression scores were significantly associated with both childhood adversity and number of medical consultations and these variables acted as mediators between childhood adversity and frequency of consultation in the multiple regression analyses. This association was limited to patients with medically unexplained symptoms and was mediated by IPQ Identity Score (number of symptoms attributed to the patient's illness) and HAD depression score. Sexual abuse and overt neglect were the adversities most closely associated with frequent consultations. In patients with medically unexplained symptoms the association

  17. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalized Colombian children

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Agudelo, Daniela; Burgos-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Vaca, Claudia; Serrano-Meriño, Dolores Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The occurrence of adverse drug reactions is an important issue due to the lack of drug safety data in children. Objective: To describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Methods: A prospective cohort study based on intensive pharmacovigilance was conducted during six months in order to monitor the emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatients children under 6 years of age with at least one medication prescribed. The study was conducted in two pediatric wards of two hospitals located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Naranjo´s Algorithm was used to evaluate imputability, the modified Hartwig and Siegel assessment scale to establish severity and the Schumock and Thornton criteria to determine preventability. Results: Of a total of 772 monitored patients, 156 Adverse Drug Reactions were detected on 147 children. The cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions was 19.0% (147/772); the incidence density was 37.6 Adverse Drug Reactions per 1,000 patients-days (147/3,913). The frequency was higher in children under 2 years of age (12.7%). Emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions was higher in male patients (RR= 1.66; 95% CI= 1.22-2.22, p= 0.001) and in those who used systemic antibiotics (RR= 1.82; 95% CI= 1.17-2.82, p= 0.005). Conclusions: Adverse Drug Reactions are common among hospitalized children and represent an additional burden of morbidity and risk, particularly in those who used several medicines, including antibiotics. PMID:27821893

  18. Recognizing and reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L. M.; Colley, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Although physicians in practice are most likely to see patients with adverse drug reactions, they may fail to recognize an adverse effect or to attribute it to a drug effect and, when recognized, they may fail to report serious reactions to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To recognize and attribute an adverse event to a drug effect, physicians should review the patient's clinical course, looking at patient risk factors, the known adverse reactions to the suspected drug, and the likelihood of a causal relationship between the drug and the adverse event-based on the temporal relationship, response to stopping or restarting the drug, and whether other factors could explain the reaction. Once an adverse drug reaction has been identified, the patient should be informed and appropriate documentation made in the patient's medical record. Serious known reactions and all reactions to newly released drugs or those not previously known to occur (even if the certainty is low) should be reported to the FDA. PMID:1536067

  19. Smallpox vaccination and adverse reactions. Guidance for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Cono, Joanne; Casey, Christine G; Bell, David M

    2003-02-21

    persons aged < 18 years. In addition, history of Darier disease is a contraindication in a potential vaccinee and a contraindication if a household contact has active disease. In the event of a smallpox outbreak, outbreak-specific guidance will be disseminated by CDC regarding populations to be vaccinated and specific contraindications to vaccination. Vaccinia can be transmitted from a vaccinee's unhealed vaccination site to other persons by close contact and can lead to the same adverse events as in the vaccinee. To avoid transmission of vaccinia virus (found in the smallpox vaccine) from vaccinees to their close contacts, vaccinees should wash their hands with warm soapy water or hand rubs containing > or = 60% alcohol immediately after they touch their vaccination site or change their vaccination site bandages. Used bandages should be placed in sealed plastic bags and can be disposed of in household trash. Smallpox vaccine adverse reactions are diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination and history, and certain reactions can be managed by observation and supportive care. Adverse reactions that are usually self-limited include fever, headache, fatigue, myalgia, chills, local skin reactions, nonspecific rashes, erythema multiforme, lymphadenopathy, and pain at the vaccination site. Other reactions are most often diagnosed through a complete history and physical and might require additional therapies (e.g., VIG, a first-line therapy and cidofovir, a second-line therapy). Adverse reactions that might require further evaluation or therapy include inadvertent inoculation, generalized vaccinia (GV), eczema vaccinatum (EV), progressive vaccinia (PV), postvaccinial central nervous system disease, and fetal vaccinia. Inadvertent inoculation occurs when vaccinia virus is transferred from a vaccination site to a second location on the vaccinee or to a close contact. Usually, this condition is self-limited and no additional care is needed. Inoculations of the eye and eyelid

  20. Preoperative Radiation Therapy Followed by Reexcision May Improve Local Control and Progression-Free Survival in Unplanned Excisions of Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity and Chest-Wall

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Hina; Johnstone, Candice A.; Charlson, John A.; Hackbarth, Donald A.; Neilson, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The management for unplanned excision (UE) of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) has not been established. In this study, we compare outcomes of UE versus planned excision (PE) and determine an optimal treatment for UE in STS. Methods. From 2000 to 2014 a review was performed on all patients treated with localized STS. Clinical outcomes including local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier estimate. Univariate (UVA) and multivariate (MVA) analyses were performed to determine prognostic variables. For MVA, Cox proportional hazards model was used. Results. 245 patients were included in the analysis. 14% underwent UE. Median follow-up was 2.8 years. The LR rate was 8.6%. The LR rate in UE was 35% versus 4.2% in PE patients (p < 0.0001). 2-year PFS in UE versus PE patients was 4.2 years and 9.3 years, respectively (p = 0.08). Preoperative radiation (RT) (p = 0.01) and use of any RT for UE (p = 0.003) led to improved PFS. On MVA, preoperative RT (p = 0.04) and performance status (p = 0.01) led to improved PFS. Conclusions. UEs led to decreased LC and PFS versus PE in patients with STS. The use of preoperative RT followed by reexcision improved LC and PFS in patients who had UE of their STS. PMID:27803813

  1. Prognostic Value of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Beam Radiation Therapy for Locally Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Multicentric Long-Term Outcome Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Montero, Angel; Polo, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Carmen; Cuervo, Miguel; San Julian, Mikel; and others

    2014-01-01

    Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurrent soft tissue sarcoma (LR-STS) patients treated with a multidisciplinary approach. Methods and Materials: Patients with a histologic diagnosis of LR-STS (extremity, 43%; trunk wall, 24%; retroperitoneum, 33%) and no distant metastases who underwent radical surgery and intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT; median dose, 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. In addition, 62% received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT; median dose, 50 Gy). Results: From 1986 to 2012, a total of 103 patients from 3 Spanish expert IOERT institutions were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range, 2-311 months), 5-year local control (LC) was 60%. The 5-year IORT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were 73%, 43%, and 52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, no EBRT to treat the LR-STS (P=.02) and microscopically involved margin resection status (P=.04) retained significance in relation to LC. With regard to IORT in-field control, only not delivering EBRT to the LR-STS retained significance in the multivariate analysis (P=.03). Conclusion: This joint analysis revealed that surgical margin and EBRT affect LC but that, given the high risk of distant metastases, DFS remains modest. Intensified local treatment needs to be further tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant systemic therapy.

  2. TISSUE-Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Panduro, Marisella; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is responsible for defending an organism against the myriad of microbial invaders it constantly confronts. It has become increasingly clear that the immune system has a second major function: the maintenance of organismal homeostasis. Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important contributors to both of these critical activities, defense being the primary purview of Tregs circulating through lymphoid organs, and homeostasis ensured mainly by their counterparts residing in parenchymal tissues. This review focuses on so-called tissue Tregs. We first survey existing information on the phenotype, function, sustaining factors, and human equivalents of the three best-characterized tissue-Treg populations—those operating in visceral adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the colonic lamina propria. We then attempt to distill general principles from this body of work—as concerns the provenance, local adaptation, molecular sustenance, and targets of action of tissue Tregs, in particular. PMID:27168246

  3. Adverse events temporally associated with meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Yergeau, A; Alain, L; Pless, R; Robert, Y

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of severe adverse events temporally associated with meningococcal vaccines administered as part of a mass vaccination program. DESIGN: Retrospective descriptive study of events reported to a passive provincial surveillance system. SETTING: The province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS: The 1,198,751 individuals aged 6 months to 20 years who were vaccinated against meningococcal disease between Dec. 27, 1992, and Mar. 31, 1993. OUTCOME MEASURES: Total numbers and rates of severe adverse events, including allergic reactions, anaphylactic reactions, neurological events (other than abnormal crying and screaming) and other serious or unusual events. RESULTS: A total of 118 reports of severe adverse events were selected from the surveillance system. The most frequent were allergic reactions (9.2 per 100,000 doses). Few anaphylactic or neurologic reactions were reported (0.1 and 0.5 per 100,000 doses respectively). There were no reports of sequelae or of encephalopathy, meningitis or encephalitis. CONCLUSION: Meningococcal vaccines seem to be associated with fewer adverse events than have previously been reported. Existing surveillance programs are useful for determining the incidence of adverse events temporally associated with vaccines. PMID:8630839

  4. Putative adverse outcome pathways relevant to neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bal-Price, Anna; Crofton, Kevin M.; Sachana, Magdalini; Shafer, Timothy J.; Behl, Mamta; Forsby, Anna; Hargreaves, Alan; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lein, Pamela J.; Louisse, Jochem; Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne; Paini, Alicia; Rolaki, Alexandra; Schrattenholz, André; Suñol, Cristina; van Thriel, Christoph; Whelan, Maurice; Fritsche, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework provides a template that facilitates understanding of complex biological systems and the pathways of toxicity that result in adverse outcomes (AOs). The AOP starts with an molecular initiating event (MIE) in which a chemical interacts with a biological target(s), followed by a sequential series of KEs, which are cellular, anatomical, and/or functional changes in biological processes, that ultimately result in an AO manifest in individual organisms and populations. It has been developed as a tool for a knowledge-based safety assessment that relies on understanding mechanisms of toxicity, rather than simply observing its adverse outcome. A large number of cellular and molecular processes are known to be crucial to proper development and function of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). However, there are relatively few examples of well-documented pathways that include causally linked MIEs and KEs that result in adverse outcomes in the CNS or PNS. As a first step in applying the AOP framework to adverse health outcomes associated with exposure to exogenous neurotoxic substances, the EU Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM) organized a workshop (March 2013, Ispra, Italy) to identify potential AOPs relevant to neurotoxic and developmental neurotoxic outcomes. Although the AOPs outlined during the workshop are not fully described, they could serve as a basis for further, more detailed AOP development and evaluation that could be useful to support human health risk assessment in a variety of ways. PMID:25605028

  5. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  6. Is It Adverse, Nonadverse, Adaptive, or Artifact?

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Arun R; Kerlin, Roy L; Mann, Peter C; Everds, Nancy E; Sharma, Alok K; Myers, L Peyton; Steinbach, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    One of the principal challenges facing a toxicologic pathologist is to determine and differentiate a true adverse effect from a nonadverse or an adaptive response. Recent publications from the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and the European STP provide guidance for determining and communicating adversity in nonclinical toxicology studies. In order to provide a forum to inform and engage in a discussion on this important topic, a continuing education (CE) course was held during the 2016 STP Annual meeting in San Diego, CA. The lectures at this course provided guidance on determining and communicating adversity using case studies involving both clinical pathology and anatomic pathology. In addition, one talk also focused on data quality, study design, and interpretation of artifacts that could hinder the determination of adversity. The CE course ended with a talk on understanding adversity in preclinical studies and engaging the regulatory agencies in the decision-making process. This manuscript is designed to provide brief summaries of all the talks in this well-received CE course.

  7. Environmental adversity and uncertainty favour cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Andras, Peter; Lazarus, John; Roberts, Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    Background A major cornerstone of evolutionary biology theory is the explanation of the emergence of cooperation in communities of selfish individuals. There is an unexplained tendency in the plant and animal world – with examples from alpine plants, worms, fish, mole-rats, monkeys and humans – for cooperation to flourish where the environment is more adverse (harsher) or more unpredictable. Results Using mathematical arguments and computer simulations we show that in more adverse environments individuals perceive their resources to be more unpredictable, and that this unpredictability favours cooperation. First we show analytically that in a more adverse environment the individual experiences greater perceived uncertainty. Second we show through a simulation study that more perceived uncertainty implies higher level of cooperation in communities of selfish individuals. Conclusion This study captures the essential features of the natural examples: the positive impact of resource adversity or uncertainty on cooperation. These newly discovered connections between environmental adversity, uncertainty and cooperation help to explain the emergence and evolution of cooperation in animal and human societies. PMID:18053138

  8. Exposure and Dosimetry Considerations for Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) (NIH-AOP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk is a function of both of hazard and exposure. Toxicokinetic (TK) models can determine whether chemical exposures produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations. Whether or not the initial molecular event (MIE) in an Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) occurs depends on both e...

  9. Erythropoietin-mediated tissue protection: reducing collateral damage from the primary injury response.

    PubMed

    Brines, M; Cerami, A

    2008-11-01

    In its classic hormonal role, erythropoietin (EPO) is produced by the kidney and regulates the number of erythrocytes within the circulation to provide adequate tissue oxygenation. EPO also mediates other effects directed towards optimizing oxygen delivery to tissues, e.g. modulating regional blood flow and reducing blood loss by promoting thrombosis within damaged vessels. Over the past 15 years, many unexpected nonhaematopoietic functions of EPO have been identified. In these more recently appreciated nonhormonal roles, locally-produced EPO signals through a different receptor isoform and is a major molecular component of the injury response, in which it counteracts the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acutely, EPO prevents programmed cell death and reduces the development of secondary, pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced injury. Within a longer time frame, EPO provides trophic support to enable regeneration and healing. As the region immediately surrounding damage is typically relatively deficient in endogenous EPO, administration of recombinant EPO can provide increased tissue protection. However, effective use of EPO as therapy for tissue injury requires higher doses than for haematopoiesis, potentially triggering serious adverse effects. The identification of a tissue-protective receptor isoform has facilitated the engineering of nonhaematopoietic, tissue-protective EPO derivatives, e.g. carbamyl EPO, that avoid these complications. Recently, regions within the EPO molecule mediating tissue protection have been identified and this has enabled the development of potent tissue-protective peptides, including some mimicking EPO's tertiary structure but unrelated in primary sequence.

  10. Adverse health consequences of the Iraq War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2013-03-16

    The adverse health consequences of the Iraq War (2003-11) were profound. We conclude that at least 116,903 Iraqi non-combatants and more than 4800 coalition military personnel died over the 8-year course. Many Iraqi civilians were injured or became ill because of damage to the health-supporting infrastructure of the country, and about 5 million were displaced. More than 31,000 US military personnel were injured and a substantial percentage of those deployed suffered post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other neuropsychological disorders and their concomitant psychosocial problems. Many family members of military personnel had psychological problems. Further review of the adverse health consequences of this war could help to minimise the adverse health consequences of, and help to prevent, future wars.

  11. Standardizing drug adverse event reporting data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwei; Jiang, Guoqian; Li, Dingcheng; Liu, Hongfang

    2013-01-01

    Normalizing data in the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), an FDA database, would improve the mining capacity of AERS for drug safety signal detection. In this study, we aim to normalize AERS and build a publicly available normalized Adverse drug events (ADE) data source.he drug information in AERS is normalized to RxNorm, a standard terminology source for medication. Drug class information is then obtained from the National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Adverse drug events (ADE) are aggregated through mapping with the PT (Preferred Term) and SOC (System Organ Class) codes of MedDRA. Our study yields an aggregated knowledge-enhanced AERS data mining set (AERS-DM). The AERS-DM could provide more perspectives to mine AERS database for drug safety signal detection and could be used by research community in the data mining field.

  12. [Adverse reaction to not iodinated contrast].

    PubMed

    Palma-Gómez, Samuel; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; Amaro-Vivian, Laura Elizabeth; Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Adverse reactions to drugs are relatively frequent in clinical practice, and some of them can be life threatening. Reactions to contrast material (CM) represent an important percentage of these adverse reactions. It has been found that 70% of reactions to contrast material happen within the first five minutes of their administration. Despite the fact that hypersensitivity reactions are traditionally classified as non-allergic, in recent years investigators have reported positive skin prick tests in patients with immediate and late reactions to contrast material. This paper reports the case of a female patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has presented on two distinct occasions adverse reactions to contrast material. We discuss on the type of reaction, severity, suggested prophylaxis, prognosis and recommendations, keeping in mind the underlying disease and the need to have further image studies performed.

  13. Adverse events related to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

  14. Adverse perinatal events associated with ART.

    PubMed

    Skora, Daniel; Frankfurter, David

    2012-04-01

    Since the advent of ART, much research has focused on the potential adverse for resultant harm. Prematurity, low birth-weight, PIH, congenital malformations, and CP are closely tied to multiple gestation. With the increase in elective single embryo transfer, there will be a reduction in adversity related to multiple birth. It is understood that underlying causes of infertility, including advanced maternal age, PCOS, thyroid disease, and uterine fibroids, predispose to adverse outcomes. However, imprinting abnormalities do not appear to stem from multiple births, and thus the need to consider the association between fertility treatment and methylation disorders remains essential. These, as well as risks of multi-fetal gestation, must be discussed with patients when considering using assisted reproduction.

  15. Early Adverse Experiences and the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bick, Johanna; Nelson, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Children exposed to various forms of adversity early in life are at increased risk for a broad range of developmental difficulties, affecting both cognitive and emotional adjustment. We review a growing body of evidence suggesting that exposure to adverse circumstances affects the developing brain in ways that increase risk for a myriad of problems. We focus on two forms of adversity, one in which children are exposed to childhood maltreatment in family environments, and another in which children are exposed to extreme psychosocial deprivation in contexts of institutional rearing. We discuss ways in which each of these experiences represent violations of species-expected caregiving conditions, thereby imposing challenges to the developing brain. We also review emerging data pointing to the effectiveness of early intervention in remediating neurodevelopmental consequences associated with maltreatment or institutional rearing. We conclude by discussing implications of this work for public health efforts and highlight important directions for the field. PMID:26334107

  16. A study of a tissue equivalent gelatine based tissue substitute

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    A study of several tissue substitutes for use as volumetric dosimeters was performed. The tissue substitutes studied included tissue substitutes from previous studies and from ICRU 44. The substitutes were evaluated for an overall match to Reference Man which was used as a basis for this study. The evaluation was based on the electron stopping power, the mass attenuation coefficient, the electron density, and the specific gravity. The tissue substitute chosen also had to be capable of changing from a liquid into a solid form to maintain an even distribution of thermoluminesent dosimetry (TLD) powder and then back to a liquid for recovery of the TLD powder without adversely effecting the TLD powder. The gelatine mixture provided the closest match to the data from Reference Man tissue. The gelatine mixture was put through a series of test to determine it's usefulness as a reliable tissue substitute. The TLD powder was cast in the gelatine mixture and recovered to determine if the TLD powder was adversely effected. The distribution of the TLD powder after being cast into the gelatin mixture was tested in insure an even was maintained.

  17. A study of a tissue equivalent gelatine based tissue substitute

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    A study of several tissue substitutes for use as volumetric dosimeters was performed. The tissue substitutes studied included tissue substitutes from previous studies and from ICRU 44. The substitutes were evaluated for an overall match to Reference Man which was used as a basis for this study. The evaluation was based on the electron stopping power, the mass attenuation coefficient, the electron density, and the specific gravity. The tissue substitute chosen also had to be capable of changing from a liquid into a solid form to maintain an even distribution of thermoluminesent dosimetry (TLD) powder and then back to a liquid for recovery of the TLD powder without adversely effecting the TLD powder. The gelatine mixture provided the closest match to the data from Reference Man tissue. The gelatine mixture was put through a series of test to determine it`s usefulness as a reliable tissue substitute. The TLD powder was cast in the gelatine mixture and recovered to determine if the TLD powder was adversely effected. The distribution of the TLD powder after being cast into the gelatin mixture was tested in insure an even was maintained.

  18. Catheterization of Intestinal Loops in Ruminants Does Not Adversely Affect Loop Function

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, G Douglas; Kastelic, John P; Uwiera, Richard R E

    2010-01-01

    Catheterized intestinal loops may be a valuable model to elucidate key components of the host response to various treatments within the small intestine of ruminants. We examined whether catheterizing ileal loops in sheep affected the overall health of animals and intestinal function, whether a bacterial treatment could be introduced into the loops through the catheters, and whether broad-spectrum antibiotics could sterilize the loops. Escherichia coli cells transformed to express the GFP gene were introduced readily into the loops through the catheters, and GFP E. coli cells were localized within the injected loops. Catheterized loops, interspaces, and intact ileum exhibited no abnormalities in tissue appearance or electrical resistance. Expression of the IFNγ, IL1α, IL4, IL6, IL12p40, IL18, TGFβ1, and TNFα cytokine genes did not differ significantly among the intact ileum, catheterized loops, and interspaces, nor did the expression of the gene for inducible nitric oxide synthase. Broad-spectrum antibiotics administered during surgery did not sterilize the loops or interspaces and did not substantively change the composition of the microbiota. However, antibiotics reduced the overall number of bacterial cells within the loop and the relative abundance of community constituents. We concluded that catheterization of intestinal loops did not adversely affect health or loop function in sheep. Furthermore, allowing animals to recover fully from surgery and to clear pharmaceuticals will remove any confounding effects due to these factors, making catheterized intestinal loops a feasible model for studying host responses in ruminants. PMID:21262134

  19. Bullous pemphigoid: corticosteroid treatment and adverse effects in long-term care patients.

    PubMed

    Spivey, Justin; Nye, Ann Marie

    2013-07-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune bullous disease. It primarily presents in elderly patients older than 70 years of age. The presentation can vary with localized or generalized disease that variably affects mucosal tissue. Therapy primarily consists of administration of topical and systemic corticosteroids. Topical corticosteroids are effective with less adverse effects compared with systemic steroids. Other therapies, such as steroid-sparing agents and plasma exchanges, have been recommended and studied to some degree, but these require more evidence before they can be routinely recommended. A 68-year-old African-American female resident of a nursing facility develops a rash and is evaluated at a dermatology clinic. Since the resident has many medications and concomitant diseases, the physician at first suspected a drug rash. On subsequent visits, the resident undergoes multiple punch biopsies and is diagnosed with BP. Treatment is initiated with topical steroids, systemic steroids, and oral minocycline. On a follow-up visit, the resident is showing improvement of her BP. However, the resident's hypertension and hyperglycemia are now uncontrolled as a result of the discontinuation of hydrochlorothiazide and the initiation of steroid therapy. This case highlights the dangers of corticosteroids in patients, especially the elderly, who have multiple comorbidities.

  20. Adverse events of intravenous immunoglobulin infusions: a ten-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Shirley L.; Padua, Florecita R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is a biological product with adverse effects that appears to vary considerably among different IVIG preparations. Objectives To describe the adverse events of patients given intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. Method Data was collected on all patients receiving IVIG infusion at a tertiary hospital from January 2001 to December 2010. Descriptive statistics was used. Results 77 patients (45 males, 32 females) received IVIG infusions. Thirty two percent (n = 25) experienced adverse reactions. The most common indication was Kawasaki disease (85.7%) followed by immunodeficiency disorders (7.8%). Majority of the patients were children, with the highest frequency of infusions among those aged 2 to 8 years old (52%). 36 infusions were associated with occurrence of adverse effects. Fever was the most common adverse event (n = 11, 30.6%), followed by rash (n = 8, 22.2%) and chills (n = 7, 19.4%). Other adverse events were cyanosis (n = 3, 8.3%), hypotension (n = 2, 5.6%), hypothermia (n = 2, 5.6%), irritability (n = 1, 2.8%), vomiting (n = 1, 2.8%), and chest pain (n = 1, 2.8%). Adverse events were observed to occur most frequently within 1 to 6 h from onset of IVIG infusion. Among the various IVIG preparations available locally (Gammagard, Kiovig, Gamimune, Veno-S & IV Globulin S), Gammagard was the brand frequently used (50.7%). It also has the most number of adverse events, with 17 out of 41 (41.5%) infusions resulting in adverse reactions. Most of the reactions occurred with fast infusion rates, and clinical manifestations subsided when the rate of infusion was reduced. Conclusion In this study, thirty two percent of patients given IVIG infusions experienced adverse events. Fever was the most common manifestation. Symptoms occurred within 1 to 6 h from onset of infusion, were affected by fast infusion rates, and managed by reducing the rate of infusion. PMID:24260730

  1. Vascular tissue is the first site of damage in the TCDD-exposed fish embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, S.; Tillitt, D.; Hannink, M.

    1995-12-31

    The planar halogenated hydrocarbons (PHHs) are a group of environmental contaminants that exert adverse biological effects in most vertebrate organisms. Embryonic development is the most sensitive life stage to the effects of these compounds. The reason for the enhanced sensitivity to PHHs during early life stages is unknown. To study TCDD-induced embryotoxicity, a fish species the medaka was the organism of choice. The authors localized the initial site of tissue damage in the developing embryo and investigated the mechanism of TCDD-induced tissue damage. There were three parts to this study, (1) observation of morphological anomalies in the TCDD-treated embryo, (2) immunohistochemical detection of DNA damage in the tissues of TCDD-treated embryos, and (3) test the ability of an antioxidant to delay the onset of initial tissue damage. Morphological observations show that the first visual lesions that occur in the TCDD treated embryo occur at stage 36, about day 6 post fertilization. The lesions are localized in the cardiac vasculature. Immunohistochemical staining, using the terminal nucleotide transferase assay (TdT-assay) which detects DNA damage showed that the initial site of tissue damage was in the vasculature in the cardiac region. Tissue damage was detected in neural tissue and muscle tissue at later time points. TCDD is known to induce oxidative stress in a variety of organisms, therefore; the authors tested to see if oxidative stress may play a role in TCDD-induced embryotoxicity. The TCDD-treated embryos were cultured in the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and the morphological observations and TdT-assay were repeated. They found that NAC was able to delay the onset of tissue damage and NAC was able to reduce total mortality in the embryo. The results from this study indicate that the cardiac vasculature is the initial site of tissue damage.

  2. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  3. Reducing Adverse Impact: One City's Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Jeff

    Following a workshop on "Innovations in Employment Testing that Improve Validity and Reduce Adverse Impact," the City of Louisville (Kentucky) implemented a strategy to develop a comprehensive testing and recruiting program for police recruits. To improve candidate expectations and preparation, the following activities were undertaken:…

  4. Educational Leadership: The Uses of Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Jack

    1976-01-01

    Skepticism about the power of education challenges the educational administrator to (1) attain a better understanding of the sources of dissatisfaction and their implications for change, (2) learn to cope with adversity and make constructive use of it, and (3) define the leadership requirements needed to address education's problems. (MB)

  5. The adverse outcome pathway knowledge base

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid advancement of the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework has been paralleled by the development of tools to store, analyse, and explore AOPs. The AOP Knowledge Base (AOP-KB) project has brought three independently developed platforms (Effectopedia, AOP-Wiki, and AOP-X...

  6. Clinical spectrum of adverse reactions to tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Collins-Williams, C

    1985-01-01

    Tartrazine, a common additive in foods and drugs, often causes adverse reactions such as recurrent urticaria, angioedema, and asthma and is frequently implicated in hyperkinesis. This paper summarizes the recent literature on the subject and outlines a practical approach for the practicing physician to diagnose and treat these patients in an optimal manner.

  7. The Public Health Burden of Early Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlueter, Lisa J.; Watamura, Sarah Enos

    2017-01-01

    Severe and chronic stress in early childhood has enormous physical and mental health costs across an individual's lifespan. Unfortunately, exposure to early life adversity is common, and costs accrue to individuals and society. This article highlights several promising approaches to buffer children from the negative health consequences associated…

  8. [Analysis of Spontaneously Reported Adverse Events].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Observational study is necessary for the evaluation of drug effectiveness in clinical practice. In recent years, the use of spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) for adverse drug reactions has increased and they have become an important resource for regulatory science. SRS, being the largest and most well-known databases worldwide, are one of the primary tools used for postmarketing surveillance and pharmacovigilance. To analyze SRS, the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER) are reviewed. Authorized pharmacovigilance algorithms were used for signal detection, including the reporting odds ratio. An SRS is a passive reporting database and is therefore subject to numerous sources of selection bias, including overreporting, underreporting, and a lack of a denominator. Despite the inherent limitations of spontaneous reporting, SRS databases are a rich resource and data mining index that provide powerful means of identifying potential associations between drugs and their adverse effects. Our results, which are based on the evaluation of SRS databases, provide essential knowledge that could improve our understanding of clinical issues.

  9. Adverse skin reactions following intravitreal bevacizumab injection

    PubMed Central

    Ameen, S; Entabi, M; Lee, N; Stavrakoglou, A

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe two separate cases of skin eruption following intravitreal bevacizumab injection with evidence to suggest that these were adverse drug reactions to bevacizumab. The authors also discuss how each case was treated and report on the final outcome. PMID:22715260

  10. Due Process in Adverse Personnel Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriven, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A detailed checklist and timeline for ensuring due process are provided for adverse personnel actions, and the need to supplement this with expert, same-jurisdiction legal advice is stressed. This approach emphasizes the importance of treating due process as an ethical as well as a legal requirement. (SLD)