Science.gov

Sample records for adverse long-term effects

  1. Long-term antidepressant use: patient perspectives of benefits and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Claire; Gibson, Kerry; Read, John; Cowan, Ondria; Dehar, Tamsin

    2016-01-01

    Long-term antidepressant treatment has increased and there is evidence of adverse effects; however, little is known about patients’ experiences and views of this form of treatment. This study used mixed methods to examine patients’ views and experiences of long-term antidepressant treatment, including benefits and concerns. Data from 180 patients, who were long-term users of antidepressants (3–15 years), were extracted from an anonymous online survey of patients’ experiences of antidepressants in New Zealand. Participants had completed rating scales about the effectiveness of antidepressants, levels of depression before and during antidepressant use, quality of life, and perceived adverse effects. Two open-ended questions allowed participants to comment on personal experiences. The majority (89.4%) reported that antidepressants had improved their depression although 30% reported moderate-to-severe depression on antidepressants. Common adverse effects included withdrawal effects (73.5%), sexual problems (71.8%), and weight gain (65.3%). Adverse emotional effects, such as feeling emotionally numb (64.5%) and addicted (43%), were also common. While the majority of patients were pleased with the benefits of antidepressant treatment, many were concerned about these adverse effects. Some expressed a need for more information about long-term risks and increased information and support to discontinue. PMID:27528803

  2. Long-term antidepressant use: patient perspectives of benefits and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Claire; Gibson, Kerry; Read, John; Cowan, Ondria; Dehar, Tamsin

    2016-01-01

    Long-term antidepressant treatment has increased and there is evidence of adverse effects; however, little is known about patients' experiences and views of this form of treatment. This study used mixed methods to examine patients' views and experiences of long-term antidepressant treatment, including benefits and concerns. Data from 180 patients, who were long-term users of antidepressants (3-15 years), were extracted from an anonymous online survey of patients' experiences of antidepressants in New Zealand. Participants had completed rating scales about the effectiveness of antidepressants, levels of depression before and during antidepressant use, quality of life, and perceived adverse effects. Two open-ended questions allowed participants to comment on personal experiences. The majority (89.4%) reported that antidepressants had improved their depression although 30% reported moderate-to-severe depression on antidepressants. Common adverse effects included withdrawal effects (73.5%), sexual problems (71.8%), and weight gain (65.3%). Adverse emotional effects, such as feeling emotionally numb (64.5%) and addicted (43%), were also common. While the majority of patients were pleased with the benefits of antidepressant treatment, many were concerned about these adverse effects. Some expressed a need for more information about long-term risks and increased information and support to discontinue. PMID:27528803

  3. A Cohort Study on Long-Term Adverse Effects of Parental Drinking: Background and Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Ingunn Olea; Bukten, Anne; Storvoll, Elisabet E; Moan, Inger Synnøve; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Handal, Marte; Nordfjærn, Trond; Brunborg, Geir Scott; Rossow, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have addressed adverse outcomes in children of parents with alcohol abuse/dependence, less is known about the possible long-term effects of more normative patterns of parental alcohol consumption, including drinking at lower risk levels and heavy episodic or binge drinking. The extent of harm from parental drinking may therefore be underestimated. With this research proposal, we describe a project that aims to assess possible long-term adverse effects of parental drinking by combining survey and nationwide registry data. Advantages of a longitudinal general population cohort design include that it allows for detailed information on parental drinking through survey data and identification of possible negative long-term health and social outcomes from exposure to parental drinking 1–19 years after exposure through continuously updated nationwide registers. The rich information available from combining survey and registry data allows us to take into account important confounders, mediators, and moderators. PMID:26688663

  4. Adverse effects of meditation: a preliminary investigation of long-term meditators.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, D H

    1992-01-01

    Adverse effects of meditation were assessed in twenty-seven long term meditators (average 4.27 years) both retrospectively (time one) and prospectively at one month (time two) and six months (time three) following a meditation retreat. At both time one and time three subjects reported significantly more positive effects than negative from meditation. However, of the twenty-seven subjects, seventeen (62.9%) reported at least one adverse effect, and two (7.4%) suffered profound adverse effects. When subjects at time one were divided into three groups based on length of practice (16.7 months; 47.1 months; 105 months) there were no significant differences in adverse effects. How the data should be interpreted, and their implications both for the clinical and psychotherapeutic use of meditation as a relaxation/self-control strategy, and as a technique for facilitating personal and spiritual growth, are discussed. Limitations of the study and suggestions for future research are also offered.

  5. Beneficial versus adverse effects of long-term use of clenbuterol in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Dupont-Versteegden, E E; Katz, M S; McCarter, R J

    1995-12-01

    Long-term administration of the beta 2-adrenergic agonist clenbuterol in mdx mice was used to test the hypothesis that increasing contractile protein content in skeletal muscle will decrease the progression of muscular dystrophy. C57BL/10SNJ (control) and dystrophic (mdx) mice were given clenbuterol (1.0-1.5 mg/kg body weight/day) in the drinking water. Ventilatory function and morphological and functional characteristics of soleus (SOL) and diaphragm (DIA) muscles were evaluated. Clenbuterol administration was associated with increased SOL muscle weight, and SOL muscle weight to body weight ratio in control and mdx mice at both ages. There was a 22% increase in myosin concentration of mdx DIA at 1 year of age, correlating well with increased normalized active tension in mdx DIA at this age. Also, absolute tetanic tension increased in control and mdx SOL with clenbuterol at both ages. Ventilatory function was significantly impaired in mdx mice at both ages and clenbuterol administration did not alleviate this. Clenbuterol treatment was associated with a 30-40% increase in fatigability in DIA and SOL muscles of control and mdx mice at both ages. Furthermore, 1-year-old mdx mice receiving clenbuterol exhibited deformities in hindlimbs and spine. These results suggest that long-term clenbuterol treatment has a positive effect on muscle growth and force generation, but has adverse side effects such as increased muscle fatigability and development of deformities. PMID:7477069

  6. Hepatic and hematological adverse effects of long-term low-dose methotrexate therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Lily; Chatterjee, Suparna; Ghosh, Alakendu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Methotrexate (MTX) is the most commonly used cost-effective disease-modifying antirheumatoid drug (DMARD). Its main dose-limiting adverse effects are hepatic and hematopoietic. This cross-sectional, observational study evaluated the prevalence of hepatic and hematological adverse effects with long-term low-dose MTX therapy. Materials and Methods: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients taking ≤15 mg/week MTX for at least 2 years were enrolled from the rheumatology outpatient department. Demographic, disease, drug treatment profiles, and hematological and hepatic enzyme levels were noted. Results: Of the 204 patients enrolled, the frequency of raised alanine transaminase level (≥3-fold rise above the upper limit of normal) was 6.37% (95% confidence interval of 3.76–10.59) including two biopsy-proven hepatic fibrosis cases. About 5.4% had severe anemia (<8 g/dl) and 4.4% had leukopenia. Conclusion: Long-term low-dose MTX is safe in RA patients in the Indian population. The patterns of adverse effects were similar to those documented in earlier studies. However, our study results suggest that disease duration, cumulative MTX dose, concomitant DMARD intake are not risk factors associated with hepatic or hematological adverse effects.

  7. Prolonged Local Hypothermia Has No Long-Term Adverse Effect on the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Vipin, Ashwati; Kortelainen, Jukka; Al-Nashash, Hasan; Chua, Soo Min; Thow, Xinyuan; Manivannan, Janani; Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to be neuroprotective and is one of the most effective and promising first-line treatments for central nervous system (CNS) trauma. At present, induction of local hypothermia, as opposed to general hypothermia, is more desired because of its ease of application and safety; fewer side effects and an absence of severe complications have been noted. Local hypothermia involves temperature reduction of a small and specific segment of the spinal cord. Our group has previously shown the neuroprotective effect of short-term, acute moderate general hypothermia through improvements in electrophysiological and motor behavioral assessments, as well as histological examination following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We have also shown the benefit of using short-term local hypothermia versus short-term general hypothermia post-acute SCI. The overall neuroprotective benefit of hypothermia can be categorized into three main components: (1) induction modality, general versus local, (2) invasive, semi-invasive or noninvasive, and (3) duration of hypothermia induction. In this study, a series of experiments were designed to investigate the feasibility, long-term safety, as well as eventual complications and side effects of prolonged, semi-invasive, moderate local hypothermia (30°C±0.5°C for 5 and 8 hours) in rats with uninjured spinal cord while maintaining their core temperature at 37°C±0.5°C. The weekly somatosensory evoked potential and motor behavioral (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan) assessments of rats that underwent 5 and 8 hours of semi-invasive local hypothermia, which revealed no statistically significant changes in electrical conductivity and behavioral outcomes. In addition, 4 weeks after local hypothermia induction, histological examination showed no anatomical damages or morphological changes in their spinal cord structure and parenchyma. We concluded that this method of prolonged local hypothermia is feasible, safe, and has the

  8. Long-Term Adverse Effects of Low-Osmolar Compared With Iso-Osmolar Contrast Media After Coronary Angiography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Cheng; Tang, Adrian; Chang, Di; Lu, Chun-Qiang; Zhang, Shi-Jun; Ju, Shenghong

    2016-10-01

    The relative incidence of long-term adverse effects between low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM) and iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM) after coronary angiography is still unclear. We analyzed cardiology patients undergoing coronary angiography from January 2006 to July 2013 using either LOCM (iohexol, iopromide) or IOCM (iodixanol) at a single institution. For each contrast medium, primary (all-cause mortality, n = 6,992) and secondary outcomes (long-term renal injury and cardiovascular events beyond 90 days, n = 2,792) were recorded. Inverse probability weighing (IPW) was applied to minimize the selection bias between groups. Unadjusted all-cause mortality was significantly lower for LOCM versus IOCM (hazard ratio [HR] 0.28, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.34). After multivariate Cox regression or IPW, all-cause mortality became comparable and lost statistical significance. Chronic kidney disease subgroup had higher mortality risk when receiving LOCM compared with IOCM (regression adjusted HR 1.80, 95% CI 0.95 to 3.42; IPW-adjusted HR 1.57, 95% CI 0.99 to 2.48). In conclusion, after coronary angiography, patients receiving LOCM had comparable overall long-term mortality compared with IOCM after adjustment. LOCM tended to induce higher long-term mortality than IOCM in chronic kidney disease cohorts. PMID:27521223

  9. Long-term therapy in COPD: any evidence of adverse effect on bone?

    PubMed Central

    Langhammer, Arnulf; Forsmo, Siri; Syversen, Unni

    2009-01-01

    Patients with COPD have high risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Hip and vertebral fractures might impair mobility, and vertebral fractures further reduce lung function. This review discusses the evidence of bone loss due to medical treatment opposed to disease severity and risk factors for COPD, and therapeutic options for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in these patients. A review of the English-language literature was conducted using the MEDLINE database until June 2009. Currently used bronchodilators probably lack adverse effect on bone. Oral corticosteroids (OCS) increase bone resorption and decrease bone formation in a dose response relationship, but the fracture risk is increased more than reflected by bone densitometry. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) have been associated with both increased bone loss and fracture risk. This might be a result of confounding by disease severity, but high doses of ICS have similar effects as equipotent doses of OCS. The life-style factors should be modified, use of regular OCS avoided and use of ICS restricted to those with evidenced effect and probably kept at moderate doses. The health care should actively reveal risk factors, include bone densitometry in fracture risk evaluation, and give adequate prevention and treatment for osteoporosis. PMID:19888355

  10. Review of long-term adverse effects associated with the use of chemically-modified animal and nonanimal source hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Paul C; Fantasia, John E

    2007-01-01

    Although only recently introduced, chemically-modified hyaluronic acid dermal fillers have gained widespread acceptance as “redefining” dermal fillers in the fields of dermatology and cosmetic facial surgery. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers have a low overall incidence of long term side effects, occasional adverse outcomes, ranging from chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory reactions to classic foreign body-type granulomatous reactions have been documented. These long-term adverse events are reviewed. PMID:18225451

  11. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  12. Differential Susceptibility to Early Literacy Intervention in Children with Mild Perinatal Adversities: Short- and Long-Term Effects of a Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Kooy-Hofland, Verna A. C.; Van der Kooy, Jacoba; Bus, Adriana G.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bonsel, Gouke J.

    2012-01-01

    In a randomized control trial, the authors tested whether short- and long-term effects of an early literacy intervention are moderated by mild perinatal adversities in accordance with differential susceptibility theory. One-hundred 5-year-old children (58% male) who scored at or below the 30th percentile on early literacy measures were randomized…

  13. Long-term adverse effects after curative radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy: population-based nationwide register study

    PubMed Central

    Fridriksson, Jón Ö.; Folkvaljon, Yasin; Nilsson, Per; Robinson, David; Franck-Lissbrant, Ingela; Ehdaie, Behfar; Eastham, James A.; Widmark, Anders; Karlsson, Camilla T.; Stattin, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the risk of serious adverse effects after radiotherapy (RT) with curative intention and radical prostatectomy (RP). Materials and methods: Men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1997 and 2012 and underwent curative treatment were selected from the Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden. For each included man, five prostate cancer-free controls, matched for birth year and county of residency, were randomly selected. In total, 12,534 men underwent RT, 24,886 underwent RP and 186,624 were controls. Adverse effects were defined according to surgical and diagnostic codes in the National Patient Registry. The relative risk (RR) of adverse effects up to 12 years after treatment was compared to controls and the risk was subsequently compared between RT and RP in multivariable analyses. Results: Men with intermediate- and localized high-risk cancer who underwent curative treatment had an increased risk of adverse effects during the full study period compared to controls: the RR of undergoing a procedures after RT was 2.64 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.56–2.73] and after RP 2.05 (95% CI 2.00–2.10). The risk remained elevated 10–12 years after treatment. For all risk categories of prostate cancer, the risk of surgical procedures for urinary incontinence was higher after RP (RR 23.64, 95% CI 11.71–47.74), whereas risk of other procedures on the lower urinary tract and gastrointestinal tract or abdominal wall was higher after RT (RR 1.67, 95% CI 1.44–1.94, and RR 1.86, 95% CI 1.70–2.02, respectively). Conclusion: The risk of serious adverse effects after curative treatment for prostate cancer remained significantly elevated up to 12 years after treatment. PMID:27333148

  14. Adverse and long-term protective effects following oil-adjuvanted vaccination against Aeromonas salmonicida in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic measures against Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, the causative agent of furunculosis, have been an active field of research for decades, with studies mainly focused on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). In the present study we have examined the protective and adverse effects of mineral oil-adjuvanted injection vaccines on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). A commercial vaccine and an experimental auto vaccine, as well as their respective adjuvant formulations alone were used to evaluate their individual effects, both prior to and during an experimental waterborne infection challenge. Macro- and microscopic examination revealed signs of vaccine-induced adverse effects from 10 weeks to 14 months post vaccination. Both vaccines induced statistically significant protection during the experimental challenge (P=0.018 for both vaccines), as well as significantly elevated levels of specific circulating antibodies prior to and during the experimental challenge when compared to an unvaccinated control group. During the early, critical time points of the infection, both vaccines appeared to protect against pathological changes to the liver and spleen, which provides a probable explanation for the reduced mortality seen in the vaccinated groups. A significant correlation was found between the level of A. salmonicida-specific antibodies measured prior to challenge and the endpoint survival of each group after the experimental infection, and furthermore, the levels of these antibodies remained elevated for at least 14 months post vaccination. PMID:25281580

  15. Dose-Effect Relationships for Adverse Events After Cranial Radiation Therapy in Long-term Childhood Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, Irma W.E.M. van; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C.; Pal, Helena J.H. van der; Oldenburger, Foppe; Os, Rob M. van; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Schouten–van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N.; Kremer, Leontien C.M.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of clinical adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT), with the aim of assessing dose-effect relationships. Methods and Materials: The retrospective study cohort consisted of 1362 Dutch childhood cancer survivors, of whom 285 were treated with CRT delivered as brain irradiation (BI), as part of craniospinal irradiation (CSI), and as total body irradiation (TBI). Individual CRT doses were converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Survivors had received their diagnoses between 1966 and 1996 and survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. A complete inventory of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3.0 AEs was available from our hospital-based late-effect follow-up program. We used multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses to examine the EQD{sub 2} in relation to the prevalence and severity of AEs, correcting for sex, age at diagnosis, follow-up time, and the treatment-related risk factors surgery and chemotherapy. Results: There was a high prevalence of AEs in the CRT group; over 80% of survivors had more than 1 AE, and almost half had at least 5 AEs, both representing significant increases in number of AEs compared with survivors not treated with CRT. Additionally, the proportion of severe, life-threatening, or disabling AEs was significantly higher in the CRT group. The most frequent AEs were alopecia and cognitive, endocrine, metabolic, and neurologic events. Using the EQD{sub 2}, we found significant dose-effect relationships for these and other AEs. Conclusion: Our results confirm that CRT increases the prevalence and severity of AEs in childhood cancer survivors. Furthermore, analyzing dose-effect relationships with the cumulative EQD{sub 2} instead of total physical dose connects the knowledge from radiation therapy and radiobiology with the clinical experience.

  16. Germline glutathione S-transferase variants in breast cancer: Relation to diagnosis and cutaneous long-term adverse effects after two fractionation patterns of radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Edvardsen, Hege . E-mail: Hege.Edvardsen@rr-research.no; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Grenaker Alnaes, Grethe Irene B.Sc.; Bohn, Mona; Erikstein, Bjorn; Helland, Aslaug; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Fossa, Sophie Dorothea

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To explore whether certain glutathione S-transferase (GST) polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer or the level of radiation-induced adverse effects after two fractionation patterns of adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The prevalence of germline polymorphic variants in GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTT1 was determined in 272 breast cancer patients and compared with that in a control group of 270 women from the general population with no known history of breast cancer. The genetic variants were determined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction enzyme fragment analysis. In 253 of the patients surveyed for radiotherapy-induced side effects after a median observation time of 13.7 years (range, 7-22.8 years), the genotypes were related to the long-term effects observed after two fractionation patterns (treatment A, 4.3 Gy in 10 fractions for 156 patients; and treatment B, 2.5 Gy in 20 fractions for 97; both administered within a 5-week period). Results: None of the GST polymorphisms conferred an increased risk of breast cancer, either alone or in combination. Compared with treatment B, treatment A was followed by an increased level of moderate to severe radiation-induced side effects for all the endpoints studied (i.e., degree of telangiectasia, subcutaneous fibrosis and atrophy, lung fibrosis, costal fractures, and pleural thickening; p <0.001 for all endpoints). A significant association was found between the level of pleural thickening and the GSTP1 Ile105Val variant. Conclusion: The results of this study have illustrated the impact of hypofractionation on the level of adverse effects and indicated that the specific alleles of GSTP1, M1, and T1 studied here may be significant in determining the level of adverse effects after radiotherapy.

  17. An observational retrospective evaluation of 79 young men with long-term adverse effects after use of finasteride against androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chiriacò, G; Cauci, S; Mazzon, G; Trombetta, C

    2016-03-01

    Concern regarding adverse effects of finasteride is increasing. We aimed to determine the type and frequency of symptoms in men having long-term sexual and non-sexual side effects after finasteride treatment (a condition recently called post-finasteride syndrome, PFS) against androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Subjects were recruited at the Urology Unit of the Trieste University-Hospital, and from a dedicated website. Out of 79 participants, 34% were white Italians, mean age was 33.4 ± 7.60 years, mean duration of finasteride use was 27.3 ± 33.21 months; mean time from finasteride discontinuation was 44.1 ± 34.20 months. Symptoms were investigated by an ad hoc 100 questions' questionnaire, and by validated Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and Aging Male Symptom Scale (AMS) questionnaires. By ASEX questionnaire, 40.5% of participants declared getting and keeping erection very difficult, and 3.8% never achieved; reaching orgasm was declared very difficult by 16.5%, and never achieved by 2.5%. By the ad hoc questionnaire, the most frequent sexual symptoms referred were loss of penis sensitivity (87.3%), decreased ejaculatory force (82.3%), and low penile temperature (78.5%). The most frequent non-sexual symptoms were reduced feeling of life pleasure or emotions (anhedonia) (75.9%); lack of mental concentration (72.2%), and loss of muscle tone/mass (51.9%). We contributed to inform about symptoms of PFS patients; unexpectedly loss of penis sensitivity was more frequent than severe erectile dysfunction and loss of muscle tone/mass was affecting half of the subjects. Further studies are necessary to investigate the pathophysiological and biochemical pathways leading to the post-finasteride syndrome. PMID:26763726

  18. Long-term effects of sludge application to land

    SciTech Connect

    Geertsema, W.S. ); Knocke, W.R.; Novak, J.T.; Dove, D. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term environmental effects of applying alum sludge to land. Investigations at the original field site included soil analysis, soil water monitoring, groundwater monitoring, and analysis of tissues from pine needles. No long-term (30 months) effects were observed, and the authors conclude that alum coagulant sludges can be applied to forest lands at loading rates of at least 1.5 to 2.5% by dry weight without adverse effect.

  19. The long-term impact of adverse caregiving environments on epigenetic modifications and telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Blaze, Jennifer; Asok, Arun; Roth, Tania L.

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood is a sensitive period in which infant-caregiver experiences have profound effects on brain development and behavior. Clinical studies have demonstrated that infants who experience stress and adversity in the context of caregiving are at an increased risk for the development of psychiatric disorders. Animal models have helped to elucidate some molecular substrates of these risk factors, but a complete picture of the biological basis remains unknown. Studies continue to indicate that environmentally-driven epigenetic modifications may be an important mediator between adverse caregiving environments and psychopathology. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, which normally represses gene transcription, and microRNA processing, which interferes with both transcription and translation, show long-term changes throughout the brain and body following adverse caregiving. Recent evidence has also shown that telomeres (TTAGGG nucleotide repeats that cap the ends of DNA) exhibit long-term changes in the brain and in the periphery following exposure to adverse caregiving environments. Interestingly, telomeric enzymes and subtelomeric regions are subject to epigenetic modifications—a factor which may play an important role in regulating telomere length and contribute to future mental health. This review will focus on clinical and animal studies that highlight the long-term epigenetic and telomeric changes produced by adverse caregiving in early-life. PMID:25904853

  20. Long Term Transfer Effect of Metaphoric Allusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, David A.; Mateja, John A.

    A study was conducted to investigate the long term transfer effect of metaphoric allusion used to clarify unfamiliar subject matter. Forty-nine high school students were given unfamiliar prose materials variously augmented by metaphoric allusion. The subjects' immediate performance on a transfer task was compared to their performance on an…

  1. The long-term impact of early adversity on late-life psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Anda; Sudheimer, Keith; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Williams, Leanne M; O'Hara, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    Early adversity is a strong and enduring predictor of psychiatric disorders including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, substance abuse or dependence, and posttraumatic stress disorder. However, the mechanisms of this effect are not well understood. The purpose of this review is to summarize and integrate the current research knowledge pertaining to the long-term effects of early adversity on psychiatric disorders, particularly in late life. We explore definitional considerations including key dimensions of the experience such as type, severity, and timing of adversity relative to development. We then review the potential biological and environmental mediators and moderators of the relationships between early adversity and psychiatric disorders. We conclude with clinical implications, methodological challenges and suggestions for future research. PMID:23443532

  2. Long Term Physical Health Consequences of Adverse Childhood Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Monnat, Shannon M.; Chandler, Raeven Faye

    2015-01-01

    This study examined associations between adverse childhood family experiences and adult physical health using data from 52,250 US adults aged 18–64 from the 2009–2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). We found that experiencing childhood physical, verbal, or sexual abuse, witnessing parental domestic violence, experiencing parental divorce, and living with someone who was depressed, abused drugs or alcohol, or who had been incarcerated were associated with one or more of the following health outcomes: self-rated health, functional limitations, diabetes, and heart attack. Adult socioeconomic status and poor mental health and health behaviors significantly mediated several of these associations. The results of this study highlight the importance of family-based adverse childhood experiences on adult health outcomes and suggest that adult SES and stress-related coping behaviors may be crucial links between trauma in the childhood home and adult health. PMID:26500379

  3. Long-term effects of sibling incest.

    PubMed

    Daie, N; Witztum, E; Eleff, M

    1989-11-01

    Although sexual abuse of children is recognized as a serious problem, sibling incest has received relatively little attention. A distinction has been made between power-oriented sibling incest and nurturance-oriented incest. The authors review the relevant literature and present four clinical examples. The cases illustrate the broad range of sibling incest and demonstrate its effects, including the long-term consequences for the perpetrator. Lasting difficulties in establishing and maintaining close relationships, especially sexual ones, are prominent features of each case. Without denying the occurrences of benign sex-play between siblings, the authors emphasize exploitation and abuse as pathogenic aspects of sibling incest.

  4. Effect on short- and long-term major adverse cardiac events of statin treatment in patients with acute myocardial infarction and renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang Yup; Bae, Eun Hui; Choi, Joon Seok; Kim, Chang Seong; Park, Jeong Woo; Ma, Seong Kwon; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Soo Wan

    2012-05-15

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) reduce major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We investigated the effectiveness of statin therapy in reducing MACE in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and renal dysfunction (RD). In the present retrospective study of 12,853 patients with AMI, the patients were categorized into 4 groups: group I, statin therapy and no RD (estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)); group II, neither statin therapy nor RD; group III, statin therapy and RD; group IV, no statin therapy but RD. The primary end points were death and complications during the hospital course. The secondary end points were MACE during 1 year of follow-up after AMI. Significant differences in the composite MACE during 12 months of follow-up were observed among the 4 groups (group I, 11.7%; group II, 19.0%; group III, 26.7%; and group IV, 45.5%; p <0.001). In a Cox proportional hazards model, mortality at 12 months increased stepwise from group II to IV compared to group I. Moreover, MACE-free survival in the severe RD group (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) was also greater in the statin-treated group. In conclusion, statin therapy reduced MACE at 1 year of follow-up in patients with AMI regardless of RD.

  5. Long-term effects of dynamic aortomyoplasty.

    PubMed

    Chachques, J C; Haab, F; Cron, C; Fischer, E C; Grandjean, P; Bruneval, P; Acar, C; Jebara, V A; Fontaliran, F; Carpentier, A F

    1994-07-01

    Aortomyoplasty consists of wrapping the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) around the ascending aorta and electrostimulating it during diastole. The ascending aorta will act as an ectopic neo-ventricle compressed during diastole, thus reproducing the effects of long-term diastolic counterpulsation. In 5 goats, the right LDM was transferred to the thoracic cavity after removal of the second rib. The ascending aorta was enlarged by a pericardial patch and wrapped with the LDM. Postoperative electrostimulation was delivered in a counterpulsating manner. Hemodynamic studies were performed at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Percent increase in the subendocardial viability index (diastolic pressure-time index/systolic tension-time index) was calculated using unassisted and assisted cardiac cycles with the stimulator off versus the stimulator on at a 1:1 ratio in the basal state and after acute heart failure was induced by the administration of high doses of propranolol hydrochloride. Diastolic counterpulsation of the ascending aorta resulted in significant improvement in the subendocardial viability index long term, both in basal state conditions and after induced cardiac failure. During heart failure, aortomyoplasty increased the cardiac output and decreased systemic vascular resistance. Histopathologic studies up to 24 months showed preservation of the histologic structure of the aortic wall and no evidence of thromboembolism. Tight adhesions developed between the aortic wall (including the pericardial patch) and the LDM. The diameters of the enlarged aortas showed no significant differences compared with diameters immediately postoperatively. In conclusion, aortomyoplasty produces chronic diastolic augmentation with preservation of aortic structure. After induction of heart failure, aortomyoplasty offers efficient circulatory support.

  6. Long Term Effects of Food Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop chronic arthritis. Brain and nerve damage A Listeria infection can lead to meningitis, an inflammation of ... brain. If a newborn infant is infected with Listeria , long-term consequences may include mental retardation, seizures, ...

  7. Adverse events among nurse aides in long-term care facilities in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man-Ling; Perng, Shoa-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between the incidence of adverse events and related factors among nurse aides in long-term settings in Taiwan. Of 213 nurse aides, 54.93% experienced an adverse event during the previous year. Four variables, including institution type, certification, years of work experience as a nurse aide, and job type, were found to be associated with the occurrence of adverse events. Findings suggested that health care managers provide training to nurse aides with a specific focus on maintaining quality care. PMID:24375108

  8. Effects of long-term dietary nitrate supplementation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hezel, Michael P.; Liu, Ming; Schiffer, Tomas A.; Larsen, Filip J.; Checa, Antonio; Wheelock, Craig E.; Carlström, Mattias; Lundberg, Jon O.; Weitzberg, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Background Inorganic nitrate (NO3-) is a precursor of nitric oxide (NO) in the body and a large number of short-term studies with dietary nitrate supplementation in animals and humans show beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, exercise efficiency, host defense and ischemia reperfusion injury. In contrast, there is a long withstanding concern regarding the putative adverse effects of chronic nitrate exposure related to cancer and adverse hormonal effects. To address these concerns we performed in mice, a physiological and biochemical multi-analysis on the effects of long-term dietary nitrate supplementation. Design 7 week-old C57BL/6 mice were put on a low-nitrate chow and at 20 weeks-old were treated with NaNO3 (1 mmol/L) or NaCl (1 mmol/L, control) in the drinking water. The groups were monitored for weight gain, food and water consumption, blood pressure, glucose metabolism, body composition and oxygen consumption until one group was reduced to eight animals due to death or illness. At that point remaining animals were sacrificed and blood and tissues were analyzed with respect to metabolism, cardiovascular function, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Results Animals were supplemented for 17 months before final sacrifice. Body composition, oxygen consumption, blood pressure, glucose tolerance were measured during the experiment, and vascular reactivity and muscle mitochondrial efficiency measured at the end of the experiment with no differences identified between groups. Nitrate supplementation was associated with improved insulin response, decreased plasma IL-10 and a trend towards improved survival. Conclusions Long term dietary nitrate in mice, at levels similar to the upper intake range in the western society, is not detrimental. PMID:26068891

  9. Swedish children with celiac disease comply well with a gluten-free diet, and most include oats without reporting any adverse effects: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Tapsas, Dimitrios; Fälth-Magnusson, Karin; Högberg, Lotta; Hammersjö, Jan-Åke; Hollén, Elisabet

    2014-05-01

    The only known treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet (GFD), which initially meant abstention from wheat, rye, barley, and oats. Recently, oats free from contamination with wheat have been accepted in the GFD. Yet, reports indicate that all celiac disease patients may not tolerate oats. We hypothesized that celiac children comply well with a GFD and that most have included oats in their diet. A food questionnaire was used to check our patients; 316 questionnaires were returned. Mean time on the GFD was 6.9 years, and 96.8% of the children reported that they were trying to keep a strict GFD. However, accidental transgressions occurred in 263 children (83.2%). In 2 of 3 cases, mistakes took place when the patients were not at home. Symptoms after incidental gluten intake were experienced by 162 (61.6%) patients, mostly (87.5%) from the gastrointestinal tract. Small amounts of gluten (<4 g) caused symptoms in 38% of the cases, and 68% reported symptoms during the first 3 hours after gluten consumption. Oats were included in the diet of 89.4% of the children for a mean of 3.4 years. Most (81.9%) ate purified oats, and 45.3% consumed oats less than once a week. Among those who did not consume oats, only 5.9% refrained because of symptoms. General compliance with the GFD was good. Only the duration of the GFD appeared to influence adherence to the diet. Most patients did not report adverse effects after long-term consumption of oats.

  10. Long-Term and Transitory Interference Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Howard I.; Weiss, Jay M.

    1976-01-01

    If animals receive inescapable electric shocks, their subsequent avoidance-escape learning is poor. This phenomenon, which can be called "the interference effect", was studied in four experiments. (Editor)

  11. Evaluating RTI's Effectiveness over the Long Term

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    No matter how one formally define response to intervention (RTI), most definitions contain common components: scientific, research-based instruction; the use of learning rate and level as the basis for determining effectiveness of intervention; and decisions about intensity and duration of interventions based on a student's response to…

  12. Biogeochemistry: Long-term effects of permafrost thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, Donatella

    2016-09-01

    Carbon emissions from the Arctic tundra could increase drastically as global warming thaws permafrost. Clues now obtained about the long-term effects of such thawing on carbon dioxide emissions highlight the need for more data.

  13. Long-Term Safety and Adverse Events of Risperidone in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellings, Jessica A.; Cardona, Alicia M.; Schroeder, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine long-term adverse events of risperidone in 19 children, adolescents, and adults with Pervasive Developmental Disorders and intellectual disability, continuing risperidone for a mean of 186.5 weeks, following a 46-week risperidone study. Nineteen individuals continued long-term follow-up after our…

  14. Evaluation of Late Adverse Events in Long-Term Wilms' Tumor Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, Irma van; Oldenburger, Foppe; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C.; Geenen, Maud M.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in long-term Wilms' tumor (WT) survivors, with special attention to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The single-center study cohort consisted of 185 WT survivors treated between 1966 and 1996, who survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. All survivors were invited to a late-effects clinic for medical assessment of AEs. AEs were graded for severity in a standardized manner. Detailed radiotherapy data enabled us to calculate the equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}) to compare radiation doses in a uniform way. Risk factors were evaluated with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: Medical follow-up was complete for 98% of survivors (median follow-up, 18.9 years; median attained age, 22.9 years); 123 survivors had 462 AEs, of which 392 had Grade 1 or 2 events. Radiotherapy to flank/abdomen increased the risk of any AE (OR, 1.08 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.04-1.13]). Furthermore, radiotherapy to flank/abdomen was associated with orthopedic events (OR, 1.09 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.05-1.13]) and second tumors (OR, 1.11 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.03-1.19]). Chest irradiation increased the risk of pulmonary events (OR, 1.14 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.06-1.21]). Both flank/abdominal and chest irradiation were associated with cardiovascular events (OR, 1.05 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.00-1.10], OR, 1.06 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.01-1.12]) and tissue hypoplasia (OR, 1.17 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.10-1.24], OR 1.10 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.03-1.18]). Conclusion: The majority of AEs, overall as well as in irradiated survivors, were mild to moderate. Nevertheless, the large amount of AEs emphasizes the importance of follow-up programs for WT survivors.

  15. [Monitoring sheet covering long-term chemotherapy to predict individual adverse reaction patterns for patients with gynecologic chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Doi, Chiaki; Iihara, Naomi; Kawazoe, Hitoshi; Fukuoka, Noriyasu; Houchi, Hitoshi; Kurosaki, Yuji; Morita, Shushi

    2007-06-01

    Monitoring the adverse reaction patterns specific to individual patients is important to avoid subsequent reactions. Gynecologic cancer chemotherapy is often implemented repeatedly with an altered protocol during prolonged terms. The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the efficacy of a worksheet that pharmacists can use to analyze adverse reaction patterns in individual patients with gynecologic chemotherapy. The worksheet which we developed consisted of multiple sections. One section is for necessary drug information for the proper use of antineoplastic agents. Another section is for the following items recorded by the pharmacists: a) patients' basic information such as stage of disease and protocol, b) state of implementation and break of chemotherapy and supportive therapy on calendar, and c) laboratory data and symptoms. We arranged the last item below the calendar and enabled pharmacists to easily assess individual adverse reactions coupled with the treatment course. Reviews of the developed worksheet indicated that the worksheet led to the convenient detection of individual adverse reaction patterns and effective prevention of additional adverse reactions. This monitoring sheet covering long-term chemotherapy which was designed to predict individual adverse reaction patterns will improve the individualization and safety of gynecologic chemotherapy.

  16. Serotonin deficiency alters susceptibility to the long-term consequences of adverse early life experience.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Benjamin D; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Tran, Ha L; Iyer, Akshita; Wetsel, William C; Caron, Marc G

    2015-03-01

    Brain 5-HT deficiency has long been implicated in psychiatric disease, but the effects of 5-HT deficiency on stress susceptibility remain largely unknown. Early life stress (ELS) has been suggested to contribute to adult psychopathology, but efforts to study the long-term consequences of ELS have been limited by a lack of appropriate preclinical models. Here, we evaluated the effects of 5-HT deficiency on several long-term cellular, molecular, and behavioral responses of mice to a new model of ELS that combines early-life maternal separation (MS) of pups and postpartum learned helplessness (LH) training in dams. Our data demonstrate that this paradigm (LH/MS) induces depressive-like behavior and impairs pup retrieval in dams. In addition, we show that brain 5-HT deficiency exacerbates anxiety-like behavior induced by LH/MS and blunts the effects of LH/MS on acoustic startle responses in adult offspring. Although the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear, following LH/MS, 5-HT-deficient animals had significantly less mRNA expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor in the amygdala than wild-type animals. In addition, 5-HT-deficient mice exhibited reduced mRNA levels of the 5-HT2a receptor and p11 in the hippocampus regardless of stress. LH/MS decreased the number of doublecortin+ immature neurons in the hippocampus in both wild-type (WT) and 5-HT-deficient animals. Our data emphasize the importance of complex interactions between genetic factors and early life experience in mediating long-term changes in emotional behavior. These findings may have important implications for our understanding of the combinatorial roles of 5-HT deficiency, ELS, and postpartum depression in the development of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  17. Serotonin deficiency alters susceptibility to the long-term consequences of adverse early life experience

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Benjamin D.; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Tran, Ha L.; Iyer, Akshita; Wetsel, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Brain 5-HT deficiency has long been implicated in psychiatric disease, but the effects of 5-HT deficiency on stress susceptibility remain largely unknown. Early life stress (ELS) has been suggested to contribute to adult psychopathology, but efforts to study the long-term consequences of ELS have been limited by a lack of appropriate preclinical models. Here, we evaluated the effects of 5-HT deficiency on several long-term cellular, molecular, and behavioral responses of mice to a new model of ELS that combines early-life maternal separation (MS) of pups and postpartum learned helplessness (LH) training in dams. Our data demonstrate that this paradigm (LH/MS) induces depressive-like behavior and impairs pup retrieval in dams. In addition, we show that brain 5-HT deficiency exacerbates anxiety-like behavior induced by LH/MS and blunts the effects of LH/MS on acoustic startle responses in adult offspring. Although the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear, following LH/MS, 5-HT-deficient animals had significantly less mRNA expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor in the amygdala than wild-type animals. In addition, 5-HT-deficient mice exhibited reduced mRNA levels of the 5-HT2a receptor and p11 in the hippocampus regardless of stress. LH/MS decreased the number of doublecortin+ immature neurons in the hippocampus in both wild-type (WT) and 5-HT-deficient animals. Our data emphasize the importance of complex interactions between genetic factors and early life experience in mediating long-term changes in emotional behavior. These findings may have important implications for our understanding of the combinatorial roles of 5-HT deficiency, ELS, and postpartum depression on the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25602134

  18. Long-Term Teacher Effects on Pupils' Learning Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressoux, Pascal; Bianco, Maryse

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that a teacher has a substantial impact on how much pupils learn. However, research on the long-term effects of teachers is scarce, and the results obtained so far are inconsistent. Some studies have concluded that teacher effects are relatively permanent, while others claim that they fade away more or less rapidly…

  19. Marijuana effects on long-term memory assessment and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Darley, C F; Tinklenberg, J R; Roth, W T; Vernon, S; Kopell, B S

    1977-05-01

    The ability of 16 college-educated male subjects to recall from long-term memory a series of common facts was tested during intoxication with marijuana extract calibrated to 0.3 mg/kg delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and during placebo conditions. The subjects' ability to assess their memory capabilities was then determined by measuring how certain they were about the accuracy of their recall performance and by having them predict their performance on a subsequent recognition test involving the same recall items. Marijuana had no effect on recall or recognition performance. These results do not support the view that marijuana provides access to facts in long-term storage which are inaccessible during non-intoxication. During both marijuana and placebo conditions, subjects could accurately predict their recognition memory performance. Hence, marijuana did not alter the subjects' ability to accurately assess what information resides in long-term memory even though they did not have complete access to that information.

  20. Human sperm chromosomes. Long-term effect of cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Genesca, A.; Caballin, M.R.; Miro, R.; Benet, J.; Bonfill, X.; Egozcue, J. )

    1990-06-01

    The long-term cytogenetic effect of radio- or chemotherapy or both on male germ cells was evaluated by study of the chromosomal abnormalities in spermatozoa of four men treated for cancer 5-18 years earlier. The cytogenetic analysis of 422 sperm metaphases showed no differences in the aneuploidy rate. The incidence of structural chromosome aberrations was 14.0%, however, which is much higher than in controls. Thus, the high incidence of structurally aberrant spermatozoa observed in our long-term study indicates that antitumoral treatments affect stem-cell spermatogonia and that aberrant cells can survive germinal selection and produce abnormal spermatozoa.

  1. Long-Term Effects of First-Grade Multitier Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Kim, Young-Suk; Wanzek, Jeanne; Petscher, Yaacov; Wagner, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term effects of 2 first-grade Response to Intervention (RTI) models (Dynamic and Typical RTI) on the reading performance of students in second and third grade. Participants included 419 first-grade students (352 in second grade and 278 in third grade after attrition). Students were classified based…

  2. The Long-Term Effects of Youth Unemployment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mroz, Thomas A.; Savage, Timothy H.

    2006-01-01

    Using NLSY data, we examine the long-term effects of youth unemployment on later labor market outcomes. Involuntary unemployment may yield suboptimal investments in human capital in the short run. A theoretical model of dynamic human capital investment predicts a rational "catch-up" response. Using semiparametric techniques to control for the…

  3. Effects of Acute Exercise on Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labban, Jeffrey D.; Etnier, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of acute exercise on long-term memory, specifically the timing of exercise relative to the memory challenge. We assessed memory via paragraph recall, in which participants listened to two paragraphs (exposure) and recounted them following a 35-min delay. Participants (n = 48) were randomly assigned to one of…

  4. An Empirical Study of Long Term Effects of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnqvist, Kjell

    A large-scale study of Swedish men and women, each of whose intelligence level at age 13 was above the 25th percentile and whose father's education was only at the elementary level, was conducted in order to determine what educational level the participants had achieved and to study long-term effects of schooling. Subjects were sent questionnaires…

  5. Research on the Long-Term Effects of Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, George A.; Kleist, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Explores recent quantitative and qualitative studies of the long-term effects of child abuse, specifically, how abuse in childhood affects adulthood. Many studies associate various forms of abuse experienced in childhood with a wide range of psychological, behavioral, and relational problems in adulthood. Articles reviewed may inform marriage and…

  6. Prospective observational study protocol to investigate long-term adverse effects of methylphenidate in children and adolescents with ADHD: the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Drugs Use Chronic Effects (ADDUCE) study

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, S K; Carucci, S; Garas, P; Häge, A; Banaschewski, T; Buitelaar, J K; Dittmann, R W; Falissard, B; Hollis, C; Kovshoff, H; Liddle, E; McCarthy, S; Nagy, P; Neubert, A; Rosenthal, E; Sonuga-Barke, E; Wong, I; Zuddas, A; Coghill, D C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Methylphenidate is the most frequently used medication for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Europe. Following concerns about its safety, the European Commission called for research into the long-term effects of methylphenidate on children and adolescents with ADHD. The Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Drugs Use Chronic Effects (ADDUCE) research programme was designed to address this call. At the heart of this programme is a 2-year longitudinal naturalistic pharmacovigilance study being conducted in 27 European sites. Methods and analysis 3 cohorts of children and adolescents (aged 6–17) living in the UK, Germany, Italy and Hungary are being recruited: Group 1 (Medicated ADHD): 800 ADHD medication-naive children and adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD about to start methylphenidate treatment for the first time. Group 2 (Unmedicated ADHD): 400 children and adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD who have never been treated with ADHD medication and have no intention of beginning medication. Group 3 (Non-ADHD): 400 children and adolescents without ADHD who are siblings of individuals in either group 1 or 2. All participants will be assessed 5 times during their 2-year follow-up period for growth and development, psychiatric, neurological and cardiovascular health. The primary outcome measure will be the height velocity SD score. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for the study has been granted by the East of Scotland Research Ethics Service. Following this approval, patient information leaflets and consent forms were translated as necessary and submissions made by lead sites in each of the other 3 countries to their own ethics committees. Following ethical approval in each country, local ethical permissions at each site were sought and obtained as needed. The study's website (http://www.adhd-adduce.org/page/view/2/Home) provides information for researchers, participants and the general

  7. Dissociation of short- and long-term face memory: evidence from long-term recency effects in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bengner, T; Malina, T

    2007-07-01

    We tested whether memory deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are better described by a single- or dual-store memory model. To this aim, we analyzed the influence of TLE and proactive interference (PI) on immediate and 24-h long-term recency effects during face recognition in 16 healthy participants and 18 right and 21 left non-surgical TLE patients. PI in healthy participants or TLE erased the long-term recency effect, but left the immediate recency effect unaffected. Although the immediate recency effect was still visible in right TLE patients, the number of detected recency items during immediate recognition was decreased in right TLE compared to left TLE. Right TLE was also related to decreased detection of pre-recency items during delayed recognition compared to left TLE, and decreased detection of pre-recency items during immediate recognition under PI. The results show that the temporal lobes are necessary for the long-term recency effect, but not for the immediate recency effect, and thus speak for a dissociation of short- and long-term memory for faces. Right TLE is related to more severe long-term memory deficits than left TLE and is also related to additional short-term memory deficits for faces.

  8. Long-term Effectiveness of Online Anaphylaxis Education for Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Sandra; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Loh, Richard; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of an Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) anaphylaxis e-learning program compared to lectures or no training. Design. A controlled interrupted-time-series study of Australian pharmacists and pharmacy students who completed ASCIA anaphylaxis e-learning or lecture programs was conducted during 2011-2013. Effectiveness was measured using a validated test administered pretraining, posttraining, and 3 and 7 months after training. Assessment. All learning groups performed significantly better on all posttests compared to the pretest, and compared to a control group (p<0.001). The proportion of e-learners achieving the minimum standard for anaphylaxis knowledge improved from 45% at pretest to 87% at 7 months. Conclusion. The ASCIA e-learning program significantly increased anaphylaxis knowledge. The high proportion of participants achieving the minimum standard at 7 months indicates long-term knowledge change. PMID:25258441

  9. Frequency of changing enteral alimentation bags and tubing, and adverse clinical outcomes in patients in a long term care facility.

    PubMed

    Graham, S; McIntyre, M; Chicoine, J; Gerard, B; Laughren, R; Cowley, G; Morrison, J; Aoki, F Y; Nicolle, L E

    1993-01-01

    Enteral alimentation, given via nasogastric or gastrostomy tubes, is a well established practice to provide nutrition for patients with significant neurological injury. The frequency with which enteral feeding bags and tubes require change and potential adverse effects associated with bacterial contamination of tube feeds remain controversial. The authors studied different times between enteral feeding bag and tube changes, and the effect on adverse clinical outcomes in residents of a long term care facility. In the first study, residents were randomized to 24 h (n = 2), 48 h (n = 3) or 72 h (n = 6) tube feeding and bag changes with clinical status monitored in a standardized fashion for six months. In the second study, patients were randomized to 24 h (n = 6) or 72 h (n = 6) changes. Patient-days of follow-up were 382, 574 and 1000 for the three arms of the first study period and 556 and 496 for the two arms of the second study. No differences in potential clinical adverse events--including fever, gastrointestinal symptoms or pneumonia--were observed with different durations of tubing change. This study suggests it is appropriate to change alimentation tube and feeding bags every 72 h (rather than every 24 h). The less frequent changes will decrease supply costs and free nursing time for other activities.

  10. Dissociation of Short- and Long-Term Face Memory: Evidence from Long-Term Recency Effects in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengner, T.; Malina, T.

    2007-01-01

    We tested whether memory deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are better described by a single- or dual-store memory model. To this aim, we analyzed the influence of TLE and proactive interference (PI) on immediate and 24-h long-term recency effects during face recognition in 16 healthy participants and 18 right and 21 left non-surgical TLE…

  11. Effects of long-term atorvastatin treatment on cardiac aging

    PubMed Central

    HAN, LEI; LI, MINGGAO; LIU, XIN

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have reported that atorvastatin (AVT) may have an important role in the delay of cardiac aging. However, the mechanism by which AVT affects cardiac aging has not been established. In this study, a series of experiments were performed to investigate the effects of AVT treatment on the cardiovascular system and the associated mechanism. Wistar rats were administered AVT or saline for 4 months. Age-related changes in the hearts were measured at the end of the experiment. The results showed that compared with young rats, the aged rats had significant changes indicative of myocardial aging, including increased blood lipid 1evelss, increased body weight, cardiac hypertrophy, larger myocardial cells, irregular muscle fibers, fewer deeply stained nuclei, smaller intercellular spaces, a larger number of apoptotic cells and increased levels of lipofuscin in myocardial tissue. However, long-term AVT treatment was able to significantly delay or even reverse these aging-related changes. In addition, these effects showed a certain dose-dependence. In general, long-term AVT treatment reduces blood lipids, inhibits cardiac hypertrophy, suppresses cardiomyocyte apoptosis and lowers the level of oxidative stress to protect the heart from aging. PMID:24137254

  12. Long term effects of chronic chlordiazepoxide (CDP) administration.

    PubMed

    Shemer, A; Tykocinski, O; Feldon, J

    1984-01-01

    Three experiments were carried out to test the long-term behavioral effects of 12 days administration of CDP (5 mg/kg/day) in rats. In the first two experiments, 4 weeks after the end of drug administration (CDP or placebo), and after 2 weeks of training to run a straight alley for food reward, animals were tested in extinction, i.e., following omission of reward (Expt. 1) or with punishment, i.e., 0.3 mA electric shock in addition to the food reward (Expt. 2). Drug-treated animals showed significantly increased resistance to extinction and to punishment compared with controls. In the third experiment, 10 weeks after drug administration, animals were exposed to 60 s of intense noise to induce audiogenic seizures. The convulsant metrazol was injected 5 min prior to successive sessions (10 min apart) with doses starting at 10 mg/kg an increased by 10 mg/kg each session up to 40 mg/kg. Drug-treated animals were significantly less susceptible to seizures than their placebo controls. These results suggest that chronic benzodiazepine treatment causes long-term neurochemical changes which are responsible for the observed behavioral effects. PMID:6433391

  13. Clinical and radiological assessment of effects of long-term corticosteroid therapy on oral health

    PubMed Central

    Beeraka, Swapna Sridevi; Natarajan, Kannan; Patil, Rajendra; Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Prathi, Venkata Sarath; Kolaparthi, Venkata Suneel Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Corticosteroids (Cs) are used widely for their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. They have the potential to cause dramatic improvement as well as produce equally dramatic adverse effects. The clinical misuse like over prescription of the drug should be avoided. Long-term administration may cause many adverse effects leading to impaired oral health. Oral health is usually not considered during management of patients on long-term corticosteroid therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the oral health status and radiological changes in the jaw bones of the patients under long-term corticosteroid therapy. Materials and Methods: Oral health of 100 patients under long-term corticosteroid therapy with a minimum of 3 months duration was compared with sex- and age-matched 100 healthy controls. The clinical examination included complete examination of the mouth and periodontal status. Radiographic evaluation of bone with the help of intra oral periapical radiograph and digital orthopantomograph and levels of serum calcium, alkaline phosphatase, and random blood sugar were assessed. ‘Chi-square test’, ‘Kolmogorov-Smirnov test’ and ‘Mann-Whitney U test’ were used for statistical analysis. P > 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Patients on steroids exhibited significantly higher levels of candidiasis and clinical attachment loss of the periodontal ligament, probing pocket depth. Bone density was significantly lower in the study group than that in the control group. Random blood glucose was significantly higher and significant lower levels of calcium were observed in patients on steroids. Conclusion: Long-term use of Cs may affect oral health adversely leading to candidiasis as well as impair bone metabolism leading to a considerable decrease in the mandibular bone mineral density. PMID:24348627

  14. Protein Carbamylation in Chronic Systolic Heart Failure: Relation to Renal Impairment and Adverse Long-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson Tang, W. H.; Shrestha, Kevin; Wang, Zeneng; Borowski, Allen G.; Troughton, Richard W.; Klein, Allan L.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein carbamylation, a post-translational modification promoted during uremia and catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) at sites of inflammation, is linked to altered protein structure, vascular dysfunction, and poor prognosis. We examine the relationship between plasma protein-bound homocitrulline (PBHCit) levels, a marker of protein lysine residue carbamylation, with cardio-renal function and long-term outcomes in chronic systolic heart failure. Methods and Results In 115 patients with chronic systolic HF (LVEF≤35%), we measured plasma PBHCit by quantitative mass spectrometry and performed comprehensive echocardiography with assessment of cardiac structure and performance. Adverse long-term events (death, cardiac transplant) were tracked for 5 years. In our study cohort, the median PBHCit level was 87 [IQR: 59, 128] μmol/mol Lysine. Higher plasma PBHcit levels were associated with poorer renal function (eGFR Spearman’s r= −0.37, p<0.001); cystatin C (r=0.31, p=0.001), and elevated plasma NT-proBNP levels (r= 0.26, 0.006), but not with markers of systemic inflammation or oxidant stress (hsCRP and MPO, p>0.10 for each). Furthermore, elevated plasma PBHCit levels were not related to indices of cardiac structure or function (p>0.10 for all examined) except modestly with increased right atrial volume index (RAVi; r=0.31, p=0.002). PBHCit levels predicted adverse long-term events (Hazard ratio [HR]: 1.8, 95% CI 1.3– 2.6, p<0.001), including following adjustment for age, eGFR, MPO and NT-proBNP (HR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2–3.1, p=0.006). Conclusions In chronic systolic HF, protein carbamylation is associated with poorer renal but not cardiac function, and portends poorer long-term adverse clinical outcomes even when adjusted for cardio-renal indices of adverse prognosis. PMID:23582087

  15. Long-term effects of microgravity and possible countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, James W.; Rummel, John D.

    1992-01-01

    The measures that can be taken to counteract the effect of long-term exposures to microgravity are discussed. It is noted that, although it was shown that specially designed exercise programs can counteract the effect of exposures of up to one year in space, is it questionable whether U.S. astronauts could or should have to maintain such regimes for extremely prolonged missions. The methods considered by NASA Life Sciences Division are to provide an artificial gravity environment by the generation of centrifugal forces by means of either the continuous rotation of the whole spacecraft or using a short-arm centrifuge on board a zero-g spacecraft. Results obtained in studies of these two methods are discussed, and the centrifuge research facility that is presently being developed by NASA is described.

  16. Effects of acute exercise on long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Labban, Jeffrey D; Etnier, Jennifer L

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of acute exercise on long-term memory, specifically the timing of exercise relative to the memory challenge. We assessed memory via paragraph recall, in which participants listened to two paragraphs (exposure) and recounted them following a 35-min delay. Participants (n = 48) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: exercise prior to exposure, exercise after exposure, or no-exercise. Exercise consisted of 30 min on a cycle ergometer including 20 min at moderate intensity. Only the exercise prior group recalled significantly more than the control group (p < .05). Differences among the exercise groups failed to reach significance (p = .09). Results indicated that acute exercise positively influenced recall and that exercise timing relative to memory task may have an impact on this effect.

  17. Long-term storage effects-up-date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The long-term effects of storing batteries over a period of years prior to their use in a synchronous orbit application are discussed. A previous experiment is discussed where life testing was performed on cells after having stored the battery for a period of three years with the cell shorted and at a temperature on the order of 5-10 C. The test consisted of performing a sequence of 10 simulated eclipse seasons (equivalent in cycling of five years in synchronous orbit). Results of this test indicated very little degradation and change in the physical and chemical conditions of the cell. The program was extended for an additional year (battery was stored for four years) under the same conditions and testing. The results of the four year storage (one exception) indicate that no further change occurred that is significant from the three year test.

  18. Long-Term Lunar Radiation Degradation Effects on Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; ORourke, Mary Jane; Koontz, Steve; Alred, John; Hill, Charles; Devivar, Rodrigo; Morera-Felix, Shakira; Atwell, William; Nutt, Steve; Sabbann, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is focused on developing technologies for extending human presence beyond low Earth orbit. These technologies are to advance the state-of-the-art and provide for longer duration missions outside the protection of Earth's magnetosphere. One technology of great interest for large structures is advanced composite materials, due to their weight and cost savings, enhanced radiation protection for the crew, and potential for performance improvements when compared with existing metals. However, these materials have not been characterized for the interplanetary space environment, and particularly the effects of high energy radiation, which is known to cause damage to polymeric materials. Therefore, a study focusing on a lunar habitation element was undertaken to investigate the integrity of potential structural composite materials after exposure to a long-term lunar radiation environment. An overview of the study results are presented, along with a discussion of recommended future work.

  19. Long term effects of irrigation with petrochemical industry wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, O.; Inam, A.; Samiullah; Siddiqi, R.H.

    1996-11-01

    Split plot designed field trials were conducted during 1988-1995 to study the long term effects of petrochemical industry wastewater on six crops and agricultural soils. It was observed that wastewater irrigation resulted in increased seed yield of all the crops selected, viz. wheat, triticale, chickpea, lentil and pigeonpea, except summer moong which showed a decrease in seed yield. Soil receiving the wastewater showed no significant changes in pH, total organic carbon, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, micro- and macro-nutrients and SAR. Thus, it may be concluded that treated refinery wastewater met the irrigational quality requirements as its physico-chemical characteristics were within the permissible limits. The same could be said for the accumulation of heavy metals in the soil as well as in the grains making the latter safe for human consumption. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Propofol effects on cerebellar long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan Young; Kim, Young Im; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Hyung Seo; Park, Youn Joon; Ha, Myung Sook; Jin, Yunju; Kim, Dong Kwan

    2015-11-16

    Propofol is an intravenously administered anesthetic that induces γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition in the central nervous system. It has been implicated in prolonged movement disorders. Since the cerebellum is important for motor coordination and learning, we investigated the potential effects of propofol on cerebellar circuitry. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in Wister rat cerebellar slices, we demonstrated that propofol administration impaired long-term depression from the parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell (PC) synapses (PF-LTD). Also, propofol reduced metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1)-mediated and group I mGluR agonist-induced slow currents in PCs. These results suggest that the propofol-induced PF-LTD impairment may be related to an alteration in mGluR1 signaling, which is essential to motor learning.

  1. Long-term adverse outcomes in survivors of childhood bone sarcoma: the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, M M; Frobisher, C; Guha, J; Wong, K; Kelly, J; Winter, D L; Sugden, E; Duncan, R; Whelan, J; Reulen, R C; Hawkins, M M

    2015-01-01

    Background: With improved survival, more bone sarcoma survivors are approaching middle age making it crucial to investigate the late effects of their cancer and its treatment. We investigated the long-term risks of adverse outcomes among 5-year bone sarcoma survivors within the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Methods: Cause-specific mortality and risk of subsequent primary neoplasms (SPNs) were investigated for 664 bone sarcoma survivors. Use of health services, health and marital status, alcohol and smoking habits, and educational qualifications were investigated for survivors who completed a questionnaire. Results: Survivors were seven times more likely to experience all-cause mortality than expected, and there were substantial differences in risk depending on tumour type. Beyond 25 years follow-up the risk of dying from all-causes was comparable to the general population. This is in contrast to dying before 25 years where the risk was 12.7-fold that expected. Survivors were also four times more likely to develop a SPN than expected, where the excess was restricted to 5–24 years post diagnosis. Increased health-care usage and poor health status were also found. Nonetheless, for some psychosocial outcomes survivors were better off than expected. Conclusions: Up to 25 years after 5-year survival, bone sarcoma survivors are at substantial risk of death and SPNs, but this is greatly reduced thereafter. As 95% of all excess deaths before 25 years follow-up were due to recurrences and SPNs, increased monitoring of survivors could prevent mortality. Furthermore, bone and breast SPNs should be a particular concern. Since there are variations in the magnitude of excess risk depending on the specific adverse outcome under investigation and whether the survivors were initially diagnosed with osteosarcoma or Ewing sarcoma, risks need to be assessed in relation to these factors. These findings should provide useful evidence for risk stratification and updating

  2. Quality of life in Brazilian obese adolescents: effects of a long-term multidisciplinary lifestyle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lofrano-Prado, Mara Cristina; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Prado, Wagner Luiz do; de Piano, Aline; Caranti, Danielle Arisa; Tock, Lian; Carnier, June; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Dâmaso, Ana R

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity has adverse physical, social, and economic consequences that can negatively affect quality of life (QOL). Thus the aim of this study was to verify the effects of a long-term multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention on QOL, body image, anxiety, depression and binge eating in obese adolescents. Methods Sixty-six obese adolescents (41 girls and 25 boys; BMI: 35.62 ± 4.18 kg/m2) were recruited from the Multidisciplinary Obesity Intervention Program outpatient clinic, and were submitted to a multidisciplinary lifestyle therapy (short-term = 12 weeks and long-term = 24 weeks), composed of medical, dietary, exercise and psychological programs. Validated self-report questionnaires were used to assess symptoms of anxiety Trait/State (STAI); depression (BDI); binge eating (BES), body image dissatisfaction (BSQ) and QOL (SF-36). Data were analyzed by means of scores; comparisons were made by ANOVA for repeated measures, and Tukey's test as post-hoc and Students T test. Results Long-term therapy decreased depression and binge eating symptoms, body image dissatisfaction, and improved QOL in girls, whereas, for boys, 24 weeks, were effective to reduce anxiety trait/state and symptoms of binge eating, and to improve means of dimensions of QOL (p < .05). Conclusion A long-term multidisciplinary lifestyle therapy is effective to control psychological aspects and to improve QOL in obese adolescents. PMID:19575801

  3. Long term effectiveness of antimalarial drugs in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Avina-Zubieta, J; Galindo-Rodriguez, G.; Newman, S.; Suarez-Almazor, M.; Russell, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to compare the long term effectiveness between chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ).
METHODS—Medical charts of all patients seen by eight rheumatologists practising in two tertiary care centres and starting antimalarial treatment between January 1985 and December 1993 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, disease, and treatment information were collected. The main outcome measures were the cause of and the time to the discontinuation of antimalarial drugs resulting from all causes, principally toxicity or inefficacy, or both. Bivariate analysis including t tests and χ2 tests were used to assess differences between means and proportions respectively. Survival curves were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression) was used to adjust for potential confounders.
RESULTS—After all medical records were reviewed, 1042 eligible cases were identified. From these, 940 (90%) had usable information and they represent the cohort. Five hundred and fifty eight had rheumatoid arthritis, 178 had systemic lupus erythematosus, 127 had palindromic arthritis, and 77 had other diagnoses. Fifty seven per cent of the patients received CQ and 43% HCQ. The proportion of patients with side effects taking HCQ and CQ was 15% and 28% respectively (p=0.001). Using Cox regression model to adjust for age at the onset of antimalarial treatment, physician differences, sex, disease type, disease duration before treatment, and rank selection, there were no differences in the hazard ratio (HR) for overall discontinuations between CQ and HCQ. While the HR for discontinuations because of toxicity was lower for HCQ (HR= 0.6, 95% CI 0.4, 0.9), the HR for discontinuations because of inefficacy was significantly higher for HCQ (HR= 1.4, 95% CI 1.1, 1.9).
CONCLUSIONS—After adjusting for time and several confounders HCQ was less toxic but less effective than CQ. Only one case of probable

  4. [The effects of long-term sedation on intestinal function].

    PubMed

    Zielmann, S; Grote, R

    1995-12-01

    by enteric tube in 30%, 35%, and 15% of cases, respectively. In group 3 deep sedation was necessary because of elevated intracranial pressure. In groups 4, 5, and 6, piritramide was administered for analgesia, and normal enteric tube feeding was achieved in 70%, 75%, and 90% of cases. The best results were seen in group 6, and these elderly patients needed smaller amounts of piritramide for analgesia. In groups 7, 8, 9, and 10, ketamine was given for analgesia, and complete enteric tube feeding was carried out in 75%, 30%, 45%, and 60% of these patients. The best results in the ketamine groups were found in combination with midazolam as the sedating drug; however, the patients in group 7 did not have elevated intracranial pressure, in contrast to the patients in groups 8, 9, and 10. The last group received the combination of sufentanil, midazolam and methohexitone to achieve a deep sedation. The rate of normal enteric tube feeding in these patients with severe head trauma was 30%. CONCLUSIONS. In patients with severe head trauma who need deep sedation to prevent dangerous high intracranial pressure, gastrointestinal motility disorders are very commonly found. The results obtained suggest that ketamine should be regarded as the analgesic drug of choice, combined with propofol rather than a high-dose barbiturate therapy. The combination of ketamine with midazolam and GABA is an unusual strategy for long-term sedation, which resulted from our own clinical studies directed at an effective and well-tolerated regime for this high-risk patient group. Obviously, high-dose barbiturates and short-acting opioids, especially when combined, make enteric tube feeding more difficult. Therefore, we recommend piritramide or ketamine for analgesia. The basic sedating drug is midazolam, in special cases combined with or replaced by propofol. The position of GABA in long-term sedation is not yet clear, but a lack of side effects on the gastrointestinal tract became evident in this stud

  5. Narp regulates long-term aversive effects of morphine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Reti, Irving M.; Crombag, Hans S.; Takamiya, Kogo; Sutton, Jeffrey M.; Guo, Ning; Dinenna, Megan L.; Huganir, Richard L.; Holland, Peter C.; Baraban, Jay M.

    2008-01-01

    Although long-lasting effects of drug withdrawal are thought to play a key role in motivating continued drug use, the mechanisms mediating this type of drug-induced plasticity are unclear. As Narp is an immediate early gene product that is secreted at synaptic sites and binds to AMPA receptors, it has been implicated in mediating enduring forms of synaptic plasticity. In previous studies, we found that Narp is selectively induced by morphine withdrawal in the extended amygdala, a group of limbic nuclei that mediate aversive behavioral responses. Accordingly, in this study, we evaluated whether long-term aversive effects of morphine withdrawal are altered in Narp KO mice. We found that acute physical signs of morphine withdrawal are unaffected by Narp deletion. However, Narp KO mice acquire and sustain more aversive responses to the environment conditioned with morphine withdrawal than WT controls. Paradoxically, Narp KO mice undergo accelerated extinction of this heightened aversive response. Taken together, these studies suggest that Narp modulates both acquisition and extinction of aversive responses to morphine withdrawal and, therefore, may regulate plasticity processes underlying drug addiction. PMID:18729628

  6. Effect of Bearing Cleaning on Long Term Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Timothy Raymond; Thom, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    For many years chlorofluorocarbon (CFC ) based solvents, such as Freon and 1,1,1, Trichloroethane (TCA), were used as bearing cleaning solvents for space mechanisms. The 1995 ban on the production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as CFCs caused a change to new ODC-free cleaners for the precision bearing cleaning. With this change the question arises what effect if any do these new cleaners have on long term bearing life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect. A one year test using 60 small electrical motors (two bearings per motor) was conducted in a high vacuum environment (2.0* 10(exp -6) torr) at a temperature of 90C. Prior to testing the bearings were cleaned with one of four cleaners. These cleaners included two aqueous based cleaners, a CFC based cleaner and supercritical carbon dioxide. Three space compatible greases were tested. After testing the mass of each lubricated bearing was measured both pre and post test. Along with mass loss measurements a profilometer trace of each bearing was taken to measure post test wear of the bearings. In addition the bearings were visually examined and analyzed using an optical microscope.

  7. Effect of Bearing Cleaning on Long Term Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Tim; Thom, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    For many years chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based solvents, such as CFC-113 and 1,1,1, trichloroethane (TCA), were used as bearing cleaning solvents for space mechanism bearings. The 1995 ban on the production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as CFCs caused a change requiring the use of ODC-free cleaners for precision bearing cleaning. With this change the question arises; what effect if any do these new cleaners have on long term bearing life? The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect. A one year test using 60 small electrical motors (two bearings per motor) was conducted in a high vacuum environment (2.0 x 10(exp -6) torr) at a temperature of 90 C. Prior to testing the bearings were cleaned with one of four cleaners. These cleaners included two aqueous based cleaners, a CFC based cleaner and supercritical carbon dioxide. Three space compatible greases were tested. After testing, the mass of each lubricated bearing was measured both pre and post test. Along with mass loss measurements a profilometer trace of each bearing was taken to measure post test wear of the bearings. In addition, the bearings were visually examined and analyzed using an optical microscope.

  8. Long-term effects of radiation exposure on health.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kenji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Akiba, Suminori; Niwa, Ohstura; Kodama, Kazunori; Takamura, Noboru; Zaharieva, Elena K; Kimura, Yuko; Wakeford, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Late-onset effects of exposure to ionising radiation on the human body have been identified by long-term, large-scale epidemiological studies. The cohort study of Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (the Life Span Study) is thought to be the most reliable source of information about these health effects because of the size of the cohort, the exposure of a general population of both sexes and all ages, and the wide range of individually assessed doses. For this reason, the Life Span Study has become fundamental to risk assessment in the radiation protection system of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and other authorities. Radiation exposure increases the risk of cancer throughout life, so continued follow-up of survivors is essential. Overall, survivors have a clear radiation-related excess risk of cancer, and people exposed as children have a higher risk of radiation-induced cancer than those exposed at older ages. At high doses, and possibly at low doses, radiation might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and some other non-cancer diseases. Hereditary effects in the children of atomic bomb survivors have not been detected. The dose-response relation for cancer at low doses is assumed, for purposes of radiological protection, to be linear without a threshold, but has not been shown definitively. This outstanding issue is not only a problem when dealing appropriately with potential health effects of nuclear accidents, such as at Fukushima and Chernobyl, but is of growing concern in occupational and medical exposure. Therefore, the appropriate dose-response relation for effects of low doses of radiation needs to be established.

  9. Long-term effects of radiation exposure on health.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kenji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Akiba, Suminori; Niwa, Ohstura; Kodama, Kazunori; Takamura, Noboru; Zaharieva, Elena K; Kimura, Yuko; Wakeford, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Late-onset effects of exposure to ionising radiation on the human body have been identified by long-term, large-scale epidemiological studies. The cohort study of Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (the Life Span Study) is thought to be the most reliable source of information about these health effects because of the size of the cohort, the exposure of a general population of both sexes and all ages, and the wide range of individually assessed doses. For this reason, the Life Span Study has become fundamental to risk assessment in the radiation protection system of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and other authorities. Radiation exposure increases the risk of cancer throughout life, so continued follow-up of survivors is essential. Overall, survivors have a clear radiation-related excess risk of cancer, and people exposed as children have a higher risk of radiation-induced cancer than those exposed at older ages. At high doses, and possibly at low doses, radiation might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and some other non-cancer diseases. Hereditary effects in the children of atomic bomb survivors have not been detected. The dose-response relation for cancer at low doses is assumed, for purposes of radiological protection, to be linear without a threshold, but has not been shown definitively. This outstanding issue is not only a problem when dealing appropriately with potential health effects of nuclear accidents, such as at Fukushima and Chernobyl, but is of growing concern in occupational and medical exposure. Therefore, the appropriate dose-response relation for effects of low doses of radiation needs to be established. PMID:26251392

  10. Protective effect of long-term angiotensin II inhibition.

    PubMed

    Basso, Nidia; Cini, Rosa; Pietrelli, Adriana; Ferder, León; Terragno, Norberto A; Inserra, Felipe

    2007-09-01

    Experimental studies indicate that angiotensin II (ANG II) through its type 1 receptor (AT(1)) promotes cardiovascular hypertrophy and fibrosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze whether chronic long-term inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) can prevent most of the deleterious effects due to aging in the cardiovascular system of the normal rat. The main objective was to compare two strategies of ANG II blockade: a converting enzyme inhibitor (CEI) and an AT(1) receptor blocker (AT(1)RB). A control group remained untreated; treatment was initiated 2 wk after weaning. A CEI, enalapril (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)), or an AT(1)RB, losartan (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)), was used to inhibit the RAS. Systolic blood pressure, body weight, and water and food intake were recorded over the whole experimental period. Heart, aorta, and mesenteric artery weight as well as histological analysis of cardiovascular structure were performed at 6 and 18 mo. Twenty animals in each of the three experimental groups were allowed to die spontaneously. The results demonstrated a significant protective effect on the function and structure of the cardiovascular system in all treated animals. Changes observed at 18 mo of age in the hearts and aortas were quite significant, but each treatment completely abolished this deterioration. The similarity between the results detected with either enalapril or losartan treatment clearly indicates that most of the effects are exerted through AT(1) receptors. An outstanding finding was the significant and similar prolongation of life span in both groups of treated animals compared with untreated control animals. PMID:17557916

  11. Long-term safety and effectiveness of tanezumab as treatment for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gimbel, Joseph S; Kivitz, Alan J; Bramson, Candace; Nemeth, Mary Anne; Keller, David S; Brown, Mark T; West, Christine R; Verburg, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    A noncontrolled, randomized, multicenter study (NCT00924664) evaluated long-term safety and effectiveness of tanezumab in patients with chronic low back pain following a randomized placebo- and active-controlled parent study that evaluated analgesic efficacy. Patients were randomized to tanezumab 10mg (n=321) or 20mg (n=527) administered at 8-week intervals via 3 intravenous injections followed by 4 subcutaneous injections. Effectiveness analyses included change from parent study baseline in Brief Pain Inventory Short Form, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, and Patient's Global Assessment of low back pain. Safety assessments included adverse event documentation, physical/neurological examinations, and laboratory tests. Mean treatment duration during the extension study was 194 and 202 days with tanezumab 10 and 20mg, respectively. Both tanezumab doses provided similar and sustained improvements in all effectiveness outcomes. The most frequently reported adverse events were arthralgia, paresthesia, and hypoesthesia. Adverse events initially described as osteonecrosis were reported in 6 patients (tanezumab 10mg, n=2; tanezumab 20mg, n=4); 9 additional patients (tanezumab 10mg, n=7; tanezumab 20mg, n=2) underwent total joint replacement (TJR). A blinded, independent adjudication committee reviewed all 6 patients with reported osteonecrosis and 4 of the 9 patients undergoing TJR. Adjudication outcomes were osteonecrosis (n=0), worsening osteoarthritis (n=5; 1 rapidly progressive), and another diagnosis or indeterminate (n=5). Tanezumab 10mg had better tolerability than tanezumab 20mg, and may represent an effective long-term treatment for chronic low back pain.

  12. Long-Term Psychosomatic Effects of Biofeedback vs. Relaxation Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowlis, David P.; Borzone, Ximena C.

    Differences were compared in the short-term and long-term responses of subjects with headache, insomnia, or hypertension to biofeedback training, relaxation, or a combination of both. Headache sufferers, insomniacs, and hypertensives were randomly assigned in equal numbers to biofeedback, relaxation training or a record-keeping control. Over 2…

  13. Long-Term Effects of Neurofeedback Treatment in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouijzer, Mirjam E. J.; de Moor, Jan M. H.; Gerrits, Berrie J. L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; van Schie, Hein T.

    2009-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated significant improvement of executive functions and social behavior in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) treated with 40 sessions of EEG neurofeedback in a nonrandomized waiting list control group design. In this paper we extend these findings by reporting the long-term results of neurofeedback treatment in…

  14. Long-term effects of the antibacterial agent triclosan on marine periphyton communities.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, K Martin; Johansson, C Henrik; Fihlman, Viktor; Grehn, Alexander; Sanli, Kemal; Andersson, Mats X; Blanck, Hans; Arrhenius, Åsa; Sircar, Triranta; Backhaus, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Triclosan is a widely used antibacterial agent that has become a ubiquitous contaminant in freshwater, estuary, and marine environments. Concerns about potential adverse effects of triclosan have been described in several recent risk assessments. Its effects on freshwater microbial communities have been well studied, but studies addressing effects on marine microbial communities are scarce. In the present study, the authors describe short- and long-term effects of triclosan on marine periphyton (microbial biofilm) communities. Short-term effects on photosynthesis were estimated after 60 min to 210 min of exposure. Long-term effects on photosynthesis, chlorophyll a fluorescence, pigment content, community tolerance, and bacterial carbon utilization were studied after exposing periphyton for 17 d in flow-through microcosms to 0.316 nM to 10,000 nM triclosan. Results from the short-term studies show that triclosan is toxic to periphyton photosynthesis. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 1080 nM and 3000 nM were estimated using (14)CO2-incorporation and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorescence measurements, respectively. After long-term triclosan exposure in flow-through microcosms, photosynthesis estimated using PAM fluorometry was not inhibited by triclosan concentrations up to 1000 nM but instead increased with increasing triclosan concentration. Similarly, at exposure concentrations of 31.6 nM and higher, triclosan caused an increase in photosynthetic pigments. At 316 nM triclosan, the pigment amounts were increased by a factor of 1.4 to 1.9 compared with the control level. Pollution-induced community tolerance was observed for algae and cyanobacteria at 100 nM triclosan and higher. Despite the widespread use of triclosan as an antibacterial agent, the compound did not have any effects on bacterial carbon utilization after long-term exposure.

  15. Long-term effects of the antibacterial agent triclosan on marine periphyton communities.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, K Martin; Johansson, C Henrik; Fihlman, Viktor; Grehn, Alexander; Sanli, Kemal; Andersson, Mats X; Blanck, Hans; Arrhenius, Åsa; Sircar, Triranta; Backhaus, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Triclosan is a widely used antibacterial agent that has become a ubiquitous contaminant in freshwater, estuary, and marine environments. Concerns about potential adverse effects of triclosan have been described in several recent risk assessments. Its effects on freshwater microbial communities have been well studied, but studies addressing effects on marine microbial communities are scarce. In the present study, the authors describe short- and long-term effects of triclosan on marine periphyton (microbial biofilm) communities. Short-term effects on photosynthesis were estimated after 60 min to 210 min of exposure. Long-term effects on photosynthesis, chlorophyll a fluorescence, pigment content, community tolerance, and bacterial carbon utilization were studied after exposing periphyton for 17 d in flow-through microcosms to 0.316 nM to 10,000 nM triclosan. Results from the short-term studies show that triclosan is toxic to periphyton photosynthesis. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 1080 nM and 3000 nM were estimated using (14)CO2-incorporation and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorescence measurements, respectively. After long-term triclosan exposure in flow-through microcosms, photosynthesis estimated using PAM fluorometry was not inhibited by triclosan concentrations up to 1000 nM but instead increased with increasing triclosan concentration. Similarly, at exposure concentrations of 31.6 nM and higher, triclosan caused an increase in photosynthetic pigments. At 316 nM triclosan, the pigment amounts were increased by a factor of 1.4 to 1.9 compared with the control level. Pollution-induced community tolerance was observed for algae and cyanobacteria at 100 nM triclosan and higher. Despite the widespread use of triclosan as an antibacterial agent, the compound did not have any effects on bacterial carbon utilization after long-term exposure. PMID:25904164

  16. Acute kidney injury: short-term and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Doyle, James F; Forni, Lui G

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most common cause of organ dysfunction in critically ill adults, with a single episode of AKI, regardless of stage, carrying a significant morbidity and mortality risk. Since the consensus on AKI nomenclature has been reached, data reflecting outcomes have become more apparent allowing investigation of both short- and long-term outcomes.Classically the short-term effects of AKI can be thought of as those reflecting an acute deterioration in renal function per se. However, the effects of AKI, especially with regard to distant organ function ("organ cross-talk"), are being elucidated as is the increased susceptibility to other conditions. With regards to the long-term effects, the consideration that outcome is a simple binary endpoint of dialysis or not, or survival or not, is overly simplistic, with the reality being much more complex.Also discussed are currently available treatment strategies to mitigate these adverse effects, as they have the potential to improve patient outcome and provide considerable economic health savings. Moving forward, an agreement for defining renal recovery is warranted if we are to assess and extrapolate the efficacy of novel therapies. Future research should focus on targeted therapies assessed by measure of long-term outcomes. PMID:27373891

  17. Long-term effects of synthetic fibers on concrete pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhi Gozarchi, Sasan

    The studies undertaken by this research were to evaluate the long-term performance and durability of synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete pipes. The target long-term performance is for 9000 hours. Two sets of pipes 8 ft. (2400 mm) long with inside diameters of 24 in. (600 mm) and 36 in. (1200 mm) were manufactured, with a wall thickness of 3 and 4 in., respectively. The pipes were produced based on ASTM C76, for a Class III type with a Wall B. The two set of pipes included RCP's (as control) and SYN-FRCP's. The SYN-FRCP's had several fiber dosages ranging from 6 lb/yd3 (3.5 kg/m 3) to 12 lb/yd3 (7.0 kg/m3) in order to evaluate the long-term performance of synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete pipes. The pipes were pre-cracked until the first visible crack was observed in the three-edge bearing test. As a result, the sustained load simulated, was calculated from the Peak D-load observed; and also the appropriate fiber dosages required for the 24. in (600 mm) and 36 in. (900 mm) pipes were obtained. Three of the 24 in. and three of the 36 in. pipes were installed in 7 ft. (2100 mm) and 8 ft. (2400 mm) wide trenches with 16 ft. (4800 mm) and 18 ft. (5500 mm) of cover respectively. The pipe was initially backfilled with native soil up to 2 ft. (600 mm) and 4 ft. (1200 mm) over the top of the pipe then backfilled again with pea-gravel weighing 100 lb/ft3, to a height of 14ft. to simulate the sustained loading. A type two installation was used during the development of the test setup. Once the long-term test set up was complete, the data was immediately recorded, and vertical deflections were observed from the time-dependent behavior of the pipes. It was observed from results obtained from the three-edge bearing test, that synthetic fibers improve the mechanical properties of concrete pipes, in dry-cast manufacturing. Also, it was observed from the time-dependent deformation, that there was no significant deformation of SYN-FRCP, while the shear capacity was enhanced. Based

  18. Long term effects of recreational SCUBA diving on higher cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Hemelryck, W; Germonpré, P; Papadopoulou, V; Rozloznik, M; Balestra, C

    2014-12-01

    We investigated long-term effects of SCUBA diving on cognitive function using a battery of neuropsychometric tests: the Simple Reaction Time (REA), Symbol Digit Substitution (SDS), Digit Span Backwards (DSB), and Hand-Eye Coordination tests (EYE). A group (n = 44) of experienced SCUBA divers with no history of decompression sickness was compared to non-diving control subjects (n = 37), as well as to professional boxers (n = 24), who are considered at higher risk of long term neurological damage. The REA was significantly shorter in SCUBA divers compared to the control subjects, and also more stable over the time course of the test. In contrast, the number of digits correctly memorized and reordered (DSB) was significantly lower for SCUBA divers compared to the control group. The results also showed that boxers performed significantly worse than the control group in three out of four tests (REA, DSB, EYE). While it may be concluded that accident-free SCUBA diving may have some long-term adverse effects on short-term memory, there is however, no evidence of general higher cognitive function deficiency.

  19. Long term effects of recreational SCUBA diving on higher cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Hemelryck, W; Germonpré, P; Papadopoulou, V; Rozloznik, M; Balestra, C

    2014-12-01

    We investigated long-term effects of SCUBA diving on cognitive function using a battery of neuropsychometric tests: the Simple Reaction Time (REA), Symbol Digit Substitution (SDS), Digit Span Backwards (DSB), and Hand-Eye Coordination tests (EYE). A group (n = 44) of experienced SCUBA divers with no history of decompression sickness was compared to non-diving control subjects (n = 37), as well as to professional boxers (n = 24), who are considered at higher risk of long term neurological damage. The REA was significantly shorter in SCUBA divers compared to the control subjects, and also more stable over the time course of the test. In contrast, the number of digits correctly memorized and reordered (DSB) was significantly lower for SCUBA divers compared to the control group. The results also showed that boxers performed significantly worse than the control group in three out of four tests (REA, DSB, EYE). While it may be concluded that accident-free SCUBA diving may have some long-term adverse effects on short-term memory, there is however, no evidence of general higher cognitive function deficiency. PMID:23902533

  20. Physical activity and late effects in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia long-term survivors.

    PubMed

    Bertorello, N; Manicone, R; Galletto, C; Barisone, E; Fagioli, F

    2011-08-01

    In the present study the authors evaluated therapy-related long-term adverse effects and physical activity in a cohort of long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), diagnosed in their center between March 1991 and August 2000, treated according to the AIEOP (Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica) ALL 91 or 95 study protocol and regularly seen in the authors' long-term follow-up unit. The authors analyzed the long-term sequelae of major body systems in this cohort of subjects and administered an "ad hoc" questionnaire concerning sport. The authors found that 70 patients out of 102 (68.5%) showed no late effects, 10% presented only instrumental or neuropsychological test abnormalities, and 21.5% had 1 or more clinical late sequelae. None of the evidenced late effects represented a contraindication to do physical activity. Sixty-one percent of survivors do physical activity, most of them regularly. Sixty-one percent of males and 18.5% of females (P < .005) do competitive sport (sports rates are similar to those of the general age-matched population). Nearly all subjects spontaneously choose to do sport and think physical exercise is an important and useful resource for their health. The authors conclude that the more recent therapy regimens for leukemia treatment, excluding bone marrow transplantation, do not seem to cause such late effects as to prevent survivors from doing sport. Therefore, in the care of ALL survivors, physical activity is not only not contraindicated, but should also be promoted as much as possible. The development of specific educational programs is warranted as part of the care of cancer survivors.

  1. Psychostimulants: Concerns over Long-Term Adverse Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Adams, James Gray

    2015-11-01

    The personal rewards are substantial for the healthcare provider who can make teachers and parents happy. There are evolving, alternative methods of dealing with ADHD, but PS are relatively cheap and quick when they work (roughly 70% of the time) and readily accessible. We have no social or educational structures currently to deal with the extreme ADHD cases. In cases of less dramatic, attention problems, poor grades, where PS boost attention, physicians are unlikely to abandon their patients willingly, unless compelled to sacrifice short-term goals over the unanswered questions about what is best in the long run. How can we know if it's the child and not the educational system that needs diagnosis and treatment? Psychiatric literature consistently suggests the prevalence of attention deficit in children is roughly 5% of the child population. Do 5% of our children need to take PS? This is where risks versus benefits enters the decision making process, and this is where this article aims to intentionally plant a healthy dose of scientific scrutiny. Ultimately, the doctor in charge makes a decision ... sometimes based on intangibles that cannot be legislated or defined by even the best scientific studies. It is not clear or scientifically established that the use of PS, especially in young, developing minds of children, is safe or meaningfully beneficial in the long run. There is much information in human and animal studies to question the wishful thinking that using mind altering drugs in children is the right thing to do. There are risks, and there are benefits. In this case, the risks are less obvious, cloaked in the inadequacy of our current state of knowledge, potentially threatening the quality of the lives we seek to enhance.

  2. Psychostimulants: Concerns over Long-Term Adverse Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Adams, James Gray

    2015-11-01

    The personal rewards are substantial for the healthcare provider who can make teachers and parents happy. There are evolving, alternative methods of dealing with ADHD, but PS are relatively cheap and quick when they work (roughly 70% of the time) and readily accessible. We have no social or educational structures currently to deal with the extreme ADHD cases. In cases of less dramatic, attention problems, poor grades, where PS boost attention, physicians are unlikely to abandon their patients willingly, unless compelled to sacrifice short-term goals over the unanswered questions about what is best in the long run. How can we know if it's the child and not the educational system that needs diagnosis and treatment? Psychiatric literature consistently suggests the prevalence of attention deficit in children is roughly 5% of the child population. Do 5% of our children need to take PS? This is where risks versus benefits enters the decision making process, and this is where this article aims to intentionally plant a healthy dose of scientific scrutiny. Ultimately, the doctor in charge makes a decision ... sometimes based on intangibles that cannot be legislated or defined by even the best scientific studies. It is not clear or scientifically established that the use of PS, especially in young, developing minds of children, is safe or meaningfully beneficial in the long run. There is much information in human and animal studies to question the wishful thinking that using mind altering drugs in children is the right thing to do. There are risks, and there are benefits. In this case, the risks are less obvious, cloaked in the inadequacy of our current state of knowledge, potentially threatening the quality of the lives we seek to enhance. PMID:26863827

  3. Effects of Long-term Diving Training on Cortical Gyrification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanchao; Zhao, Lu; Bi, Wenwei; Wang, Yue; Wei, Gaoxia; Evans, Alan; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-01-01

    During human brain development, cortical gyrification, which is believed to facilitate compact wiring of neural circuits, has been shown to follow an inverted U-shaped curve, coinciding with the two-stage neurodevelopmental process of initial synaptic overproduction with subsequent pruning. This trajectory allows postnatal experiences to refine the wiring, which may manifest as endophenotypic changes in cortical gyrification. Diving experts, typical elite athletes who commence intensive motor training at a very young age in their early childhood, serve ideal models for examining the gyrification changes related to long-term intensive diving training. Using local gyrification index (LGI), we compared the cortical gyrification between 12 diving experts and 12 controls. Compared with controls, diving experts showed widespread LGI reductions in regions relevant to diving performance. Negative correlations between LGIs and years of diving training were also observed in diving experts. Further exploratory network efficiency analysis of structural cortical networks, inferred from interregional correlation of LGIs, revealed comparable global and local efficiency in diving experts relative to controls. These findings suggest that gyrification reductions in diving experts may be the result of long-term diving training which could refine the neural circuitry (via synaptic pruning) and might be the anatomical substrate underlying their extraordinary diving performance. PMID:27320849

  4. Effects of Long-term Diving Training on Cortical Gyrification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanchao; Zhao, Lu; Bi, Wenwei; Wang, Yue; Wei, Gaoxia; Evans, Alan; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-01-01

    During human brain development, cortical gyrification, which is believed to facilitate compact wiring of neural circuits, has been shown to follow an inverted U-shaped curve, coinciding with the two-stage neurodevelopmental process of initial synaptic overproduction with subsequent pruning. This trajectory allows postnatal experiences to refine the wiring, which may manifest as endophenotypic changes in cortical gyrification. Diving experts, typical elite athletes who commence intensive motor training at a very young age in their early childhood, serve ideal models for examining the gyrification changes related to long-term intensive diving training. Using local gyrification index (LGI), we compared the cortical gyrification between 12 diving experts and 12 controls. Compared with controls, diving experts showed widespread LGI reductions in regions relevant to diving performance. Negative correlations between LGIs and years of diving training were also observed in diving experts. Further exploratory network efficiency analysis of structural cortical networks, inferred from interregional correlation of LGIs, revealed comparable global and local efficiency in diving experts relative to controls. These findings suggest that gyrification reductions in diving experts may be the result of long-term diving training which could refine the neural circuitry (via synaptic pruning) and might be the anatomical substrate underlying their extraordinary diving performance. PMID:27320849

  5. Long-term effects of flipper bands on penguins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier-Clerc, M.; Gendner, J.-P.; Ribic, C.A.; Fraser, William R.; Woehler, Eric J.; Descamps, S.; Gilly, C.; Le, Bohec C.; Le, Maho Y.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in seabird populations, and particularly of penguins, offer a unique opportunity for investigating the impact of fisheries and climatic variations on marine resources. Such investigations often require large-scale banding to identify individual birds, but the significance of the data relies on the assumption that no bias is introduced in this type of long-term monitoring. After 5 years of using an automated system of identification of king penguins implanted with electronic tags (100 adult king penguins were implanted with a transponder tag, 50 of which were also flipper banded), we can report that banding results in later arrival at the colony for courtship in some years, lower breeding probability and lower chick production. We also found that the survival rate of unbanded, electronically tagged king penguin chicks after 2-3 years is approximately twice as large as that reported in the literature for banded chicks. ?? 2004 The Royal Society.

  6. Long-term effects of microgravity and possible countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, James W.; Rummel, John D.

    It is well known that long-term exposure to microgravity causes a number of physiological and biochemical changes in humans; among the most significant are: 1) negative calcium balance resulting in the loss of bone; 2) atrophy of antigravity muscles; 3) fluid shifts and decreased plasma volume; and 4) cardiovascular deconditioning that leads to orthostatic intolerance. It is estimated that a mission to Mars may require up to 300 days in a microgravity environment; in the case of an aborted mission, the astronauts may have to remain in reduced gravity for up to three years. Although the Soviet Union has shown that exercise countermeasures appear to be adequate for exposures of up to on year in space, it is questionable whether astronauts could or should have to maintain such regimes for extremely prolonged missions. Therefore, the NASA Life Sciences Division has initiated a program designed to evaluate a number of methods for providing an artificial gravity environment.

  7. Long-term effects of microgravity and possible countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, J W; Rummel, J D

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that long-term exposure to microgravity causes a number of physiological and biochemical changes in humans; among the most significant are: 1) negative calcium balance resulting in the loss of bone; 2) atrophy of antigravity muscles; 3) fluid shifts and decreased plasma volume; and 4) cardiovascular deconditioning that leads to orthostatic intolerance. It is estimated that a mission to Mars may require up to 300 days in a microgravity environment; in the case of an aborted mission, the astronauts may have to remain in reduced gravity for up to three years. Although the Soviet Union has shown that exercise countermeasures appear to be adequate for exposures of up to one year in space, it is questionable whether astronauts could or should have to maintain such regimes for extremely prolonged missions. Therefore, the NASA Life Sciences Division has initiated a program designed to evaluate a number of methods for providing an artificial gravity environment. PMID:11536970

  8. Impaired Global Right Ventricular Longitudinal Strain Predicts Long-Term Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyeong; Park, Margaret M.; Farha, Samar; Sharp, Jacqueline; Lundgrin, Erika; Comhair, Suzy; Tang, Wai Hong; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Background New 2-dimensional strain echocardiography enables quantification of right ventricular (RV) mechanics by assessing global longitudinal strain of RV (GLSRV) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the prognostic significance of impaired GLSRV is unclear in these patients. Methods Comprehensive echocardiography was performed in 51 consecutive PAH patients without atrial fibrillation (40 females, 48 ± 14 years old) with long-term follow-up. GLSRV was measured with off-line with velocity vector imaging (VVI, Siemens Medical System, Mountain View, CA, USA). Results GLSRV showed significant correlation with RV fractional area change (r = -0.606, p < 0.001), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (r = -0.579, p < 0.001), and RV Tei index (r = 0.590, p < 0.001). It showed significant correlations with pulmonary vascular resistance (r = 0.469, p = 0.001) and B-natriuretic peptide concentration (r = 0.351, p = 0.012). During a clinical followup time (45 ± 15 months), 20 patients experienced one or more adverse events (12 death, 2 lung transplantation, and 15 heart failure hospitalization). After multivariate analysis, age [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.343, p = 0.040] and GLSRV (HR = 2.122, p = 0.040) were associated with adverse clinical events. Age (HR = 3.200, p = 0.016) and GLSRV (HR = 2.090, p = 0.042) were also significant predictors of death. Impaired GLSRV (≥ -15.5%) was associated with lower event-free survival (HR = 4.906, p = 0.001) and increased mortality (HR = 8.842, p = 0.005). Conclusion GLSRV by VVI showed significant correlations with conventional echocardiographic parameters indicating RV systolic function. Lower GLSRV (≥ -15.5%) was significantly associated with presence of adverse clinical events and deaths in PAH patients. PMID:26140151

  9. Long-Term Effects of Traffic Particles on Lung Function Decline in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Litonjua, Augusto A.; Coull, Brent; Koutrakis, Petros; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Few studies have been performed on air pollution effects on lung function in the elderly, a vulnerable population with low reserve capacity, and even fewer have looked at changes in the rate of lung function decline. Objectives: We evaluated the effect of long-term exposure to black carbon on levels and rates of decline in lung function in the elderly. Methods: FVC and FEV1 were measured one to six times during the period 1995–2011 in 858 men participating in the Normative Aging Study. Exposure to black carbon, a tracer of traffic emissions, was estimated by a spatiotemporal land use regression model. We investigated the effects of moving averages of black carbon of 1–5 years before the lung function measurement using linear mixed models. Measurements and Main Results: A 0.5 μg/m3 increase in long-term exposure to black carbon was associated with an additional rate of decline in FVC and FEV1 of between 0.5% and 0.9% per year, respectively, depending on the averaging time. In addition, black carbon exposure before the baseline visit was associated with lower levels of both FVC and FEV1, with effect estimates increasing up to 6–7% with a 5-year average exposure. Conclusions: Our results support adverse effects of long-term exposure to traffic particles on lung function level and rate of decline in the elderly and suggest that functionally significant differences in health and risk of disability occur below the annual Environmental Protection Agency National Air Quality Standards. PMID:25028775

  10. Effect of long term dexamethasone treatment on the glucocorticoid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, C.M.; DeLorenzo, T.M.; Cidlowski, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    The ability of dexamethasone(dex) to induce alkaline phosphatase activity was found to decrease with chronic hormone exposure. In order to better understand this adaptive resistance, the structure of the receptor from control cells and cells under long term dex (10/sup -6/M) treatment was analyzed. Native isoelectric focusing showed that receptor from dex treated cells focused at more basic pI than receptor from control cells. Denaturing two-dimensional gel analysis resulted in the characteristic 4-5 spots of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone mesylate (DM) binding of receptor from control cells, but no (/sup 3/H)DM binding could be seen for receptor from dex treated cells. In order to study DNA-binding characteristics, gels were renatured, transferred to nitrocellulose and probed with (/sup 32/P)MMTV-GRE. Receptor from control cells showed 5 spots of DNA-binding at 101 kDa molecular weight and a pI range of 7.42 to 7.32. However, receptor from dex treated cells showed less intense DNA-binding which occurred only at the more basic range of pIs (7.42 to 7.39). Furthermore, no nuclear receptor sites could be measured in the dex treated cells, whereas 20,000 sites were measured in control cells. Even after being taken off hormone treatment for 12 days, cells could regenerate only 50% of their receptors. In conclusion, this system is conducive to studying the mechanism of receptor regulation.

  11. Long-term effects of cannabis on brain structure.

    PubMed

    Battistella, Giovanni; Fornari, Eleonora; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Chtioui, Haithem; Dao, Kim; Fabritius, Marie; Favrat, Bernard; Mall, Jean-Frédéric; Maeder, Philippe; Giroud, Christian

    2014-08-01

    The dose-dependent toxicity of the main psychoactive component of cannabis in brain regions rich in cannabinoid CB1 receptors is well known in animal studies. However, research in humans does not show common findings across studies regarding the brain regions that are affected after long-term exposure to cannabis. In the present study, we investigate (using Voxel-based Morphometry) gray matter changes in a group of regular cannabis smokers in comparison with a group of occasional smokers matched by the years of cannabis use. We provide evidence that regular cannabis use is associated with gray matter volume reduction in the medial temporal cortex, temporal pole, parahippocampal gyrus, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex; these regions are rich in cannabinoid CB1 receptors and functionally associated with motivational, emotional, and affective processing. Furthermore, these changes correlate with the frequency of cannabis use in the 3 months before inclusion in the study. The age of onset of drug use also influences the magnitude of these changes. Significant gray matter volume reduction could result either from heavy consumption unrelated to the age of onset or instead from recreational cannabis use initiated at an adolescent age. In contrast, the larger gray matter volume detected in the cerebellum of regular smokers without any correlation with the monthly consumption of cannabis may be related to developmental (ontogenic) processes that occur in adolescence.

  12. Long-term effects of cannabis on brain structure.

    PubMed

    Battistella, Giovanni; Fornari, Eleonora; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Chtioui, Haithem; Dao, Kim; Fabritius, Marie; Favrat, Bernard; Mall, Jean-Frédéric; Maeder, Philippe; Giroud, Christian

    2014-08-01

    The dose-dependent toxicity of the main psychoactive component of cannabis in brain regions rich in cannabinoid CB1 receptors is well known in animal studies. However, research in humans does not show common findings across studies regarding the brain regions that are affected after long-term exposure to cannabis. In the present study, we investigate (using Voxel-based Morphometry) gray matter changes in a group of regular cannabis smokers in comparison with a group of occasional smokers matched by the years of cannabis use. We provide evidence that regular cannabis use is associated with gray matter volume reduction in the medial temporal cortex, temporal pole, parahippocampal gyrus, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex; these regions are rich in cannabinoid CB1 receptors and functionally associated with motivational, emotional, and affective processing. Furthermore, these changes correlate with the frequency of cannabis use in the 3 months before inclusion in the study. The age of onset of drug use also influences the magnitude of these changes. Significant gray matter volume reduction could result either from heavy consumption unrelated to the age of onset or instead from recreational cannabis use initiated at an adolescent age. In contrast, the larger gray matter volume detected in the cerebellum of regular smokers without any correlation with the monthly consumption of cannabis may be related to developmental (ontogenic) processes that occur in adolescence. PMID:24633558

  13. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  14. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  15. Psychophysiological effects of human-animal interaction: theoretical issues and long-term interaction effects.

    PubMed

    Virués-Ortega, Javier; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews literature published on the psychophysiological effects of long-term human-animal interaction (i.e., pet ownership, pet adoption). A literature search was conducted using PsycInfo and Medline databases. Although the available evidence is far from being consistent, it can be concluded that, in some cases, long-term relationships with animals may moderate baseline physiological variables, particularly blood pressure. Results proved more coherent in studies where animals were adopted by owners as part of the procedure. This paper examines existing hypotheses seeking to account for these effects and the supporting evidence. Two major hypotheses have been suggested to explain the psychophysiological effects of long-term interaction, namely (1) stress-buffering effects of noncritical social support provided by pets; and (2) classical conditioning of relaxation. These mechanisms may partially account for the long-term health outcomes observed in a number of human-animal interaction studies. PMID:16462556

  16. NASA Rodent Foodbar: Long Term Effects in Swiss Webster Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, D. L.; Yu, D. S.; Naficy, N. H.; Roghani, P. M.; Dalton, B. P.; Barrett, J. E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Swiss Webster male and female mice (150 of each) were fed NASA Rodent Foodbar for more than 110 days to test the diet's nutritional adequacy for use in future long-term studies aboard the International Space Station. Mice were grouped three to a cage (one cage = one sample) and cages were assigned to either Foodbar or Purina Chow #5001 (control) diet groups. Body weights, food intake, and water intake were obtained throughout the study. There were no significant differences in body weights between male Foodbar fed and Chow fed males (p=0.58), and at 15 weeks into the female mouse study there appear to be no significant body weight differences. Both male and female Foodbar fed groups consumed more food and less water than their Chow controls, both factors thought to be attributable to the high moisture content of the Foodbars (26% versus 10% for Chow). All differences in gross food and water consumption had p-values of less than 0.01. When food and water intake were adjusted for the moisture content in the food, both male and female Foodbar fed animals consumed less food, but still had a lower water intake rate than their controls. (p is less than 0.01). Preliminary analysis on blood samples from male and female halfway point dissections suggests differences in glucose and fat metabolism. In both male and female Foodbar fed animals, blood glucose values were significantly lower (p is less than 0.01) but there were no significant differences in cholesterol levels (p=0.51). In Foodbar fed females, triglycerides were significantly higher (p is less than 0.01). These data suggest that Foodbars allow for normal growth in Swiss Webster mice, but affect some blood chemistry parameters.

  17. Pathologic and physiologic effects associated with long-term intracoelomic transmitters in captive Siberian sturgeon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, S. Shaun; Divers, Stephen J.; Camus, Alvin C.; Peterson, Douglas C.; Jennings, Cecil A.; Shelton, James L.; Hernandez, Sonia M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracoelomic transmitters are commonly used to evaluate migratory patterns, distribution, and habitat use of many species of fish. Currently, transmitter implantation relies mostly on the assumption that transmitters do not cause any adverse physiological or pathological effects on the animal. To investigate these effects, we surgically implanted 60 Siberian Sturgeon Acipenser baeri with transmitters that weighed less than 2% of their body weight. Postoperative assessments were conducted at 1, 2, 8, 12, 26, and 55 weeks to evaluate surgical healing and transmitter retention. Blood samples were collected before and after the 55-week study for serum cortisol analysis. Overall transmitter loss was 32%. Minor to moderate adhesions were noted at necropsy but did not appear to affect organ function. One fish was noted to have an intraintestinal transmitter at necropsy, but the fish was in overall good health. Long-term transmitter presence does not appear to increase serum cortisol levels or affect overall growth more than nontransmitter fish. Although long-term telemetry studies can be undertaken with minimal concern for negative physiological or pathological effects from transmitters, researchers should be aware that transmitter loss rates may be higher than previously thought. Mechanisms for transmitter loss may include expulsion through the surgical incision, expulsion through the mucocutaneous junction between the large intestine and the vent, or intraintestinal capture and expulsion through the vent. Received February 10, 2013; accepted June 10, 2013

  18. The short and long term effects of conifer afforestation on a sensitive freshwater system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Nadeem; Nisbet, Thomas; Broadmeadow, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    Our study was driven by concerns that afforesting the headwater catchments of the Upper Halladale River in the Scottish Highlands would affect water quality and the local salmon fishery. The main uncertainty, on the sensitivity of the catchment to acid deposition, led to a preliminary study in 1993 by a consortium of research organisations; they concluded that the site was not significantly acidified and not at risk of acidification from the planned afforestation. The planting, therefore, went ahead and presented us with an opportunity to look at the short, medium and long-term effects of afforestation on the chemistry and biology of a sensitive freshwater system, to review the conclusions of the preliminary report and assess the efficacy of good management practices employed. Water samples were taken from six sites in the Upper Halladale Catchment and analysed for a wide range of chemical parameters to monitor changes in water quality due to cultivation (ploughing, drainage, road building and planting), fertiliser application and forest growth. The results demonstrate that water quality remained high during site preparation with little or no adverse chemical or biological impacts in the short-term (4 years) after planting. We do find significant changes in hydrochemistry in the long-term data (15+ years); some of these were expected, a decrease in non-marine sulphate and a general increasing trend for dissolved organic carbon, for example, but there are fluctuations within the long-term data for these and other parameters that warrant further explanation and discussion. We found that the most significant changes in hydrochemistry occur after marked meteorological events and that the effects are not always short-lived, sometimes lasting for years; the results indicate that climate, not land use, exerts the greatest control on chemistry within the Upper Halladale catchment.

  19. Effects of two long-term mowing regimes on vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.; Deller, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Wildlife managers have for many years been interested in the role of mowing as a management technique to benefit wildlife. Two long-term mowing regimes (60 years of similar management) were evaluated at Patuxent Research Refuge during the summer of 1997 to better understand the influence of mowing on vegetation communities. Mowing ceased in 1997 due to reduction in maintenance funds, which facilitated the identification of mature grasses. The previous mowing regimes included (1) lawn areas that had been mowed with rotary mowers approximately every 24 weeks and (2) meadow areas that had been mowed approximately once a year with a brushhog. Each regime had two replications. Vegetation was sampled in 20, 1 m2 plots per area (n=80) and percent cover visually estimated by species. The percent ground cover of the dominant vegetation on the lawn area was 40.0% red fescue (Festuca rubra), 26.5% white clover (Trifolium repens), and 18.0% Kentucky blue grass (Poa pratensis). The percent ground cover of the dominant vegetation in the meadow area was 33.2% meadow fescue (Festuca elatior), 9.9% sweet vernal grass (Anthoxanthum odoratum), 9.2% orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata), 6.3% Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), and 5.2% red fescue. The sites were sampled again in 1999 with the major difference being the absence of white clover in the lawn areas, believed to be a result of the drought conditions in recent years. All percent ground covers for the dominant vegetation were significantly different (P<0.01) between the two mowing regimes. Species richness was higher in both years in the meadow regime (74, 62) versus the lawn regime (33, 23). Frequently mowed lawn areas may provide better grazing forage for herbivores, such as geese, rabbits, and deer, however, meadow areas may provide greater plant biomass (232 vs. 63 g/m2) and greater diversity of plant species. The meadow regime also appeared to have greater seed production and cover, which is favored by a wider

  20. The Parable of the Sower and the Long-Term Effects of Early Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggate, Sebastian P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work on the long-term effects of early reading focuses on whether children can read early (i.e. capability) not on whether this is beneficial (i.e. optimality). The Luke Effect is introduced to predict long-term reading development as a function of when children learn to read. A review of correlational, intervention, and comparative…

  1. The effects of long-term dopaminergic treatment on locomotor behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira de Almeida, Welinton Alessandro; Maculano Esteves, Andrea; Leite de Almeida-Júnior, Canuto; Lee, Kil Sun; Kannebley Frank, Miriam; Oliveira Mariano, Melise; Frussa-Filho, Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; Tulio de Mello, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Long-term treatments with dopaminergic agents are associated with adverse effects, including augmentation. Augmentation consists of an exacerbation of restless legs syndrome (a sleep-related movement disorder) symptoms during treatment compared to those experienced during the period before therapy was initiated. The objective of this study was to examine locomotor activity in rats after long-term dopaminergic treatment and its relationship with expression of the D2 receptor, in addition to demonstrating possible evidence of augmentation. The rats were divided into control (CTRL) and drug (Pramipexole—PPX) groups that received daily saline vehicle and PPX treatments, respectively, for 71 days. The locomotor behavior of the animals was evaluated weekly in the Open Field test for 71 days. The expression of the dopamine D2 receptor was evaluated by Western Blot analysis. The animals that received the PPX demonstrated a significant reduction in locomotor activity from day 1 to day 57 and a significant increase in immobility time from day 1 to day 64 relative to baseline values, but these values had returned to baseline levels at 71 days. No changes in the expression of the D2 receptor were demonstrated after treatment with a dopaminergic agonist. This study suggests changes in locomotor activity in rats after long-term PPX treatment that include an immediate reduction of locomotion and an increase in immobilization, and after 64 days, these values returned to baseline levels without evidence of augmentation. In addition, it was not possible to demonstrate a relationship between locomotor activity and the expression of D2 receptors under these conditions. PMID:26483930

  2. Neonatal pain in very preterm infants: long-term effects on brain, neurodevelopment and pain reactivity.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Ruth Eckstein

    2013-01-01

    Effects of early life psychosocial adversity have received a great deal of attention, such as maternal separation in experimental animal models and abuse/neglect in young humans. More recently, long-term effects of the physical stress of repetitive procedural pain have begun to be addressed in infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care. Preterm infants are more sensitive to pain and stress, which cannot be distinguished in neonates. The focus of this review is clinical studies of long-term effects of repeated procedural pain-related stress in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in relation to brain development, neurodevelopment, programming of stress systems, and later pain sensitivity in infants born very preterm (24-32 weeks' gestational age). Neonatal pain exposure has been quantified as the number of invasive and/or skin-breaking procedures during hospitalization in the NICU. Emerging studies provide convincing clinical evidence for an adverse impact of neonatal pain/stress in infants at a time of physiological immaturity, rapidly developing brain microstructure and networks, as well as programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Currently it appears that early pain/stress may influence the developing brain and thereby neurodevelopment and stress-sensitive behaviors, particularly in the most immature neonates. However, there is no evidence for greater prevalence of pain syndromes compared to children and adults born healthy at full term. In addressing associations between pain/stress and outcomes, careful consideration of confounding clinical factors related to prematurity is essential. The need for pain management for humanitarian care is widely advocated. Non-pharmacological interventions to help parents reduce their infant's stress may be brain-protective. PMID:24228168

  3. Who Is at Greatest Risk of Adverse Long-Term Outcomes? The Finnish from a Boy to a Man Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sourander, Andre; Jensen, Peter; Davies, Mark; Niemela, Solja; Elonheimo, Henrik; Ristkari, Terja; Helenius, Hans; Sillanmaki, Lauri; Piha, Jorma; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Tamminen, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study associations between comorbid psychopathology and long-term outcomes in a large birth cohort sample from age 8 to early adulthood. Method: The sample included long-term outcome data on 2,556 Finnish boys born in 1981. The aim was to study the impact of early childhood psychopathology types (externalizing versus internalizing…

  4. The effects of short- and long-term air pollutants on plant phenology and leaf characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jochner, Susanne; Markevych, Iana; Beck, Isabelle; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Heinrich, Joachim; Menzel, Annette

    2015-11-01

    Pollution adversely affects vegetation; however, its impact on phenology and leaf morphology is not satisfactorily understood yet. We analyzed associations between pollutants and phenological data of birch, hazel and horse chestnut in Munich (2010) along with the suitability of leaf morphological parameters of birch for monitoring air pollution using two datasets: cumulated atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and ozone derived from passive sampling (short-term exposure) and pollutant information derived from Land Use Regression models (long-term exposure). Partial correlations and stepwise regressions revealed that increased ozone (birch, horse chestnut), NO2, NOx and PM levels (hazel) were significantly related to delays in phenology. Correlations were especially high when rural sites were excluded suggesting a better estimation of long-term within-city pollution. In situ measurements of foliar characteristics of birch were not suitable for bio-monitoring pollution. Inconsistencies between long- and short-term exposure effects suggest some caution when interpreting short-term data collected within field studies.

  5. The effects of short- and long-term air pollutants on plant phenology and leaf characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jochner, Susanne; Markevych, Iana; Beck, Isabelle; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Heinrich, Joachim; Menzel, Annette

    2015-11-01

    Pollution adversely affects vegetation; however, its impact on phenology and leaf morphology is not satisfactorily understood yet. We analyzed associations between pollutants and phenological data of birch, hazel and horse chestnut in Munich (2010) along with the suitability of leaf morphological parameters of birch for monitoring air pollution using two datasets: cumulated atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and ozone derived from passive sampling (short-term exposure) and pollutant information derived from Land Use Regression models (long-term exposure). Partial correlations and stepwise regressions revealed that increased ozone (birch, horse chestnut), NO2, NOx and PM levels (hazel) were significantly related to delays in phenology. Correlations were especially high when rural sites were excluded suggesting a better estimation of long-term within-city pollution. In situ measurements of foliar characteristics of birch were not suitable for bio-monitoring pollution. Inconsistencies between long- and short-term exposure effects suggest some caution when interpreting short-term data collected within field studies. PMID:26253312

  6. Factors Associated with the Effectiveness of Continuing Education in Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolee, Paul; Esbaugh, Jacquelin; Aylward, Sandra; Cathers, Tamzin; Harvey, David P.; Hillier, Loretta M.; Keat, Nancy; Feightner, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines factors within the long-term-care work environment that impact the effectiveness of continuing education. Design & Methods: In Study 1, focus group interviews were conducted with staff and management from urban and rural long-term-care facilities in southwestern Ontario to identify their perceptions of the workplace…

  7. Long-term impact of maternal substance use during pregnancy and extrauterine environmental adversity: stress hormone levels of preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Charles R; Lambert, Brittany L; Bann, Carla M; Lester, Barry M; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta S; Whitaker, Toni M; Lagasse, Linda L; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2011-08-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with blunted stress responsivity within the extrauterine environment. This study investigated the association between PCE and diurnal salivary cortisol levels in preadolescent children characterized by high biological and/or social risk (n = 725). Saliva samples were collected at their home. Analyses revealed no group differences in basal evening or morning cortisol levels; however, children with higher degrees of PCE exhibited blunted overnight increases in cortisol, controlling for additional risk factors. Race and caregiver depression were also associated with diurnal cortisol patterns. Although repeated PCE may contribute to alterations in the normal or expected stress response later in life, sociodemographic and environmental factors are likewise important in understanding hormone physiology, especially as more time elapses from the PCE. Anticipating the potential long-term medical, developmental, or behavioral effects of an altered ability to mount a normal protective cortisol stress response is essential in optimizing the outcomes of children with PCE.

  8. Word Length Effects in Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tehan, Gerald; Tolan, Georgina Anne

    2007-01-01

    The word length effect has been a central feature of theorising about immediate memory. The notion that short-term memory traces rapidly decay unless refreshed by rehearsal is based primarily upon the finding that serial recall for short words is better than that for long words. The decay account of the word length effect has come under pressure…

  9. Long-term effects of vaccination on attentional performance.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Roberto; Porro, Carlo Adolfo; Brighetti, Gianni; Monti, Daniela; Pagnoni, Giuseppe; Guido, Marcello; Rubichi, Sandro; Franceschi, Claudio

    2004-09-28

    To investigate the possible influence of stimulation of the immune system on cognitive tasks, healthy volunteers were vaccinated against hepatitis B and tested over a 6 month-period in a simple reaction times and the Stroop task. In general, the "Stroop effect" demonstrates that both the name and meaning of a word are automatically processed even when voluntary attention is trying hard not to process them. Unlike placebo group, vaccinated subjects showed a persistent lack of the classical Stroop effect. These findings may be explained by a constraint satisfaction model of the Stroop task, assuming a selective weakening of the connection matrix, and suggest that immune-cognitive effects may occur, besides the well known immune-cognitive influences like those elicited by emotional stress.

  10. Effects of TRIAD on Mathematics Achievement: Long-Term Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie; Layzer, Carolyn; Unlu, Fatih; Wolfe, Christopher B.; Spitler, Mary Elaine; Weiss, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Although some research-based educational practices have shown promise, many fail to be implemented at a scale that affects more than a small proportion of children. Further, research on interventions for young children includes mixed results, with most documenting "fadeout" of effects after several years, but some showing lasting…

  11. The Long-Term Effects of Inservice Training for Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Bruce G.; Mueller, Faye L.

    The literature provides scant evidence that training programs for teachers and administrators have lasting effects on job performance. The study summarized in this paper focuses on principals' perceptions of how their involvement in the Peer-Assisted Leadership (PAL) Program has affected their ongoing actions and attitudes. To determine if PAL's…

  12. Short- and long-term effects of unemployment on fertility

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Janet; Schwandt, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have been examining the relationship between fertility and unemployment for more than a century. Most studies find that fertility falls with unemployment in the short run, but it is not known whether these negative effects persist, because women simply may postpone childbearing to better economic times. Using more than 140 million US birth records for the period 1975–2010, we analyze both the short- and long-run effects of unemployment on fertility. We follow fixed cohorts of US-born women defined by their own state and year of birth, and relate their fertility to the unemployment rate experienced by each cohort at different ages. We focus on conceptions that result in a live birth. We find that women in their early 20s are most affected by high unemployment rates in the short run and that the negative effects on fertility grow over time. A one percentage point increase in the average unemployment rate experienced between the ages of 20 and 24 reduces the short-run fertility of women in this age range by six conceptions per 1,000 women. When we follow these women to age 40, we find that a one percentage point increase in the unemployment rate experienced at ages 20–24 leads to an overall loss of 14.2 conceptions. This long-run effect is driven largely by women who remain childless and thus do not have either first births or higher-order births. PMID:25267622

  13. Long-Term Effects of Psychological Trauma on Psychosocial Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Derek; Hill, Jonathan; O'Ryan, Dominic; Udwin, Orlee; Boyle, Stephanie; Yule, William

    2004-01-01

    Background: Most studies of the effects of trauma on mental health have generally not separately assessed psychosocial functioning, and in those that have key issues have received little attention, such as the relation between the time courses of the two kinds of outcome, and detailed assessment of social functioning in a range of domains. The…

  14. Short- and long-term effects of unemployment on fertility.

    PubMed

    Currie, Janet; Schwandt, Hannes

    2014-10-14

    Scholars have been examining the relationship between fertility and unemployment for more than a century. Most studies find that fertility falls with unemployment in the short run, but it is not known whether these negative effects persist, because women simply may postpone childbearing to better economic times. Using more than 140 million US birth records for the period 1975-2010, we analyze both the short- and long-run effects of unemployment on fertility. We follow fixed cohorts of US-born women defined by their own state and year of birth, and relate their fertility to the unemployment rate experienced by each cohort at different ages. We focus on conceptions that result in a live birth. We find that women in their early 20s are most affected by high unemployment rates in the short run and that the negative effects on fertility grow over time. A one percentage point increase in the average unemployment rate experienced between the ages of 20 and 24 reduces the short-run fertility of women in this age range by six conceptions per 1,000 women. When we follow these women to age 40, we find that a one percentage point increase in the unemployment rate experienced at ages 20-24 leads to an overall loss of 14.2 conceptions. This long-run effect is driven largely by women who remain childless and thus do not have either first births or higher-order births.

  15. Are There Long-Term Effects of Early Child Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Jay; Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Burchinal, Margaret; Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; McCartney, Kathleen; Owen, Margaret Tresch

    2007-01-01

    Effects of early child care on children's functioning from 4 1/2 years through the end of 6th grade (M age=12.0 years) were examined in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n=1,364). The results indicated that although parenting was a stronger and more consistent predictor of…

  16. Long-term effects of radiotherapy in childhood and adolescence

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.L.; Kroll, S.; Jaffe, N.; Serure, A.; Goepfert, H. )

    1990-10-01

    The records of 50 selected pediatric patients who were treated and followed at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center were reviewed to study the late effects of nonsurgical treatment of cancer in children. There were 26 girls and 24 boys ranging in age between 2 months and 16 years. Patients with head and neck cancer received chemotherapy and radiotherapy for rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 27), retinoblastoma (n = 8), or nasopharynx cancer (n = 2). Median follow-up was 13 years. The most severe side effects were noted in the fields of radiation and included hypoplasia of the jaw, orbit, or hemi-face with varying degrees of atrophy of the overlying soft tissues. A wide range of endocrine, dental, and psychologic abnormalities was also documented. Since 1 in every 1,000 adults older than 20 years today is likely to be a survivor of childhood cancer, recommendations are made for this new class of patients whom the head and neck surgeon will be seeing in the future.

  17. The effects of long-term captivity on the metabolic parameters of a small Afrotropical bird.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lindy J; Brown, Mark; Downs, Colleen T

    2015-04-01

    The few within-species studies on the effects of long-term captivity on avian physiological variables have small samples sizes and contradictory results. Nevertheless, many physiological studies make use of long-term captive birds, assuming the results will be applicable to wild populations. Here we investigated the effects of long-term captivity on a variety of physiological measurements in a relatively small (~12 g) southern African endemic bird, the Cape white-eye (Zosterops virens). Whole animal basal metabolic rate (BMR) and body mass (Mb) were influenced more by long-term captivity than by season, while mass-specific BMR, standard and basal whole animal and mass-specific evaporative water loss (EWL), and respiratory quotient (RQ), were all affected primarily by season, with long-term captivity having less of an effect. We therefore caution that whole animal BMR and Mb of long-term captive birds should not be used as representative of wild populations, and that the origin of study birds should be considered when comparing EWL and RQ of wild and long-term captive birds.

  18. Size effects in long-term quasistatic heat transport.

    PubMed

    Panasyuk, George Y; Yerkes, Kirk L

    2013-06-01

    We consider finite-size effects on heat transfer between thermal reservoirs mediated by a quantum system, where the number of modes in each reservoir is finite. Our approach is based on the generalized quantum Langevin equation and the thermal reservoirs are described as ensembles of oscillators within the Drude-Ullersma model. A general expression for the heat current between the thermal reservoirs in the long-time quasistatic regime, when an observation time is of the order of Δ(-1) and Δ is the mode spacing constant of a thermal reservoir, is obtained. The resulting equations that govern the long-time relaxation for the mode temperatures and the average temperatures of the reservoirs are derived and approximate analytical solutions are found. The obtained time dependencies of the temperatures and the resulting heat current reveal peculiarities at t=2πm/Δ with non-negative integers m and the heat current vanishes nonmonotonically when t→∞. The validity of Fourier's law for a chain of finite-size macroscopic subsystems is considered. As is shown, for characteristic times of the order of Δ(-1) the temperatures of subsystems' modes deviate from each other and the validity of Fourier's law cannot be established. In a case when deviations of initial temperatures of the subsystems from their average value are small, t→∞ asymptotic values for the mode temperatures do not depend on a mode's number and are the same as if Fourier's law were valid for all times.

  19. Propensity-Weighted Comparison of Long-Term Risk of Urinary Adverse Events in Elderly Women Treated For Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Sean P.; Fan, Yunhua; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Downs, Levi; Dusenbery, Kathryn; Geller, Melissa A.; Virnig, Beth A.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Cervical cancer treatment is associated with a risk of urinary adverse events (UAEs) such as ureteral stricture and vesicovaginal fistula. We sought to measure the long-term UAE risk after surgery and radiation therapy (RT), with confounding controlled through propensity-weighted models. Methods and Materials: From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, we identified women ≥66 years old with nonmetastatic cervical cancer treated with simple surgery (SS), radical hysterectomy (RH), external beam RT plus brachytherapy (EBRT+BT), or RT+surgery. We matched them to noncancer controls 1:3. Differences in demographic and cancer characteristics were balanced by propensity weighting. Grade 3 to 4 UAEs were identified by diagnosis codes plus treatment codes. Cumulative incidence was measured using Kaplan-Meier methods. The hazard associated with different cancer treatments was compared using Cox models. Results: UAEs occurred in 272 of 1808 cases (17%) and 222 of 5424 (4%) controls; most (62%) were ureteral strictures. The raw cumulative incidence of UAEs was highest in advanced cancers. UAEs occurred in 31% of patients after EBRT+BT, 25% of patients after RT+surgery, and 15% of patients after RH; however, after propensity weighting, the incidence was similar. In adjusted Cox models (reference = controls), the UAE risk was highest after RT+surgery (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.32-11.07), followed by EBRT+BT (HR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.45-7.65), RH (HR, 3.65; 95% CI, 1.41-9.46) and SS (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.32-3.01). The higher risk after RT+surgery versus EBRT+BT was statistically significant, whereas, EBRT+BT and RH were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions: UAEs are common after cervical cancer treatment, particularly in patients with advanced cancers. UAEs are more common after RT, but these women tend to have the advanced cancers. After propensity weighting, the risk after RT was similar

  20. Behavioral effects of acute and long-term administration of catnip (Nepeta cataria) in mice.

    PubMed

    Massoco, C O; Silva, M R; Gorniak, S L; Spinosa, M S; Bernardi, M M

    1995-12-01

    Catnip or catmint (Nepeta cataria) is a plant used extensively to treat human diseases and in toys for pets. We investigated the effects of acute and long-term administration of the plant on some behaviors of mice. The plant was fed as 10% of the normal diet for 2 h/d for 1 or 7 d. Acute and long-term dosing increased both rearing and locomotion frequencies observed in an open field. Acute exposure to catnip increased stereotyped behavior and susceptibility to seizures, did not interfere with haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and decreased sleeping time after sodium pentobarbital administration. Long-term exposure induced tolerance to stereotypic behavior, catalepsy and sleeping time, and increased the susceptibility to seizures induced by picrotoxin and strychnine. An amphetamine-like effect of catnip was suggested to explain the acute effects, while dispositional and functional adaptative changes were considered involved with the long-term effects.

  1. The effects of long-term sleep deprivation on the long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus and brain oxidation status in rats.

    PubMed

    Süer, Cem; Dolu, Nazan; Artis, A Seda; Sahin, Leyla; Yilmaz, Alpaslan; Cetin, Aysun

    2011-05-01

    Some evidence suggests that sleep deprivation might impair synaptic plasticity and produce oxidative stress in the hippocampus. However it is not clear whether impairment of long-term potentiation depends on the oxidative stress evoked by sleep deprivation protocol. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of a 21-day sleep deprivation period on long-term plasticity taking into account the stressful effect of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was carried out using the multiple platforms method on adult male Wistar rats. Long-term potentiation was studied in the medial perforant pathway-dentate gyrus synapses. Elevated T test was applied, and blood corticosterone levels were measured. Lipid peroxidation products in whole brain and hippocampus were determined. No significant difference was found between the sleep deprived, pedestal and cage control groups at the end of the 21-day period when corticosterone levels were compared. The results of the elevated T test indicated that sleep deprivation did not change the anxiety-like behavior of the animals. When compared with cage or pedestal control groups, sleep deprived rats displayed elevated malondialdehyde levels, and decreased superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities together with impaired long-term potentiation maintenance. It can be argued that 21-day SD may impair the maintenance of long-term potentiation evoked in the dentate gyrus, and the balance between oxidant and antioxidant defenses of the hippocampus. PMID:21256900

  2. Physical and psychological long-term and late effects of cancer.

    PubMed

    Stein, Kevin D; Syrjala, Karen L; Andrykowski, Michael A

    2008-06-01

    The number of long-term cancer survivors (> or =5 years after diagnosis) in the U.S. continues to rise, with more than 10 million Americans now living with a history of cancer. Along with such growth has come increasing attention to the continued health problems and needs of this population. Many cancer survivors return to normal functioning after the completion of treatment and are able to live relatively symptom-free lives. However, cancer and its treatment can also result in a wide range of physical and psychological problems that do not recede with time. Some of these problems emerge during or after cancer treatment and persist in a chronic, long-term manner. Other problems may not appear until months or even years later. Regardless of when they present, long-term and late effects of cancer can have a negative effect on cancer survivors' quality of life. This article describes the physical and psychological long-term and late effects among adult survivors of pediatric and adult cancers. The focus is on the prevalence and correlates of long-term and late effects as well as the associated deficits in physical and emotional functioning. In addition, the emergence of public health initiatives and large-scale research activities that address the issues of long-term cancer survivorship are discussed. Although additional research is needed to fully understand and document the long-term and late effects of cancer, important lessons can be learned from existing knowledge. Increased awareness of these issues is a key component in the development of follow-up care plans that may allow for adequate surveillance, prevention, and the management of long-term and late effects of cancer.

  3. Effects of long-term low atmospheric pressure on gas exchange and growth of lettuce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongkang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Dong, Wenping; Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Lin, Shan

    2010-09-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine photosynthesis, evapotranspiration and growth of lettuce at long-term low atmospheric pressure. Lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L . cv. Youmaicai) plants were grown at 40 kPa total pressure (8.4 kPa p) or 101 kPa total pressure (20.9 kPa p) from seed to harvest for 35 days. Germination rate of lettuce seeds decreased by 7.6% at low pressure, although this was not significant. There was no significant difference in crop photosynthetic rate between hypobaria and ambient pressure during the 35-day study. The crop evapotranspiration rate was significantly lower at low pressure than that at ambient pressure from 20 to 30 days after planting (DAP), but it had no significant difference before 20 DAP or after 30 DAP. The growth cycle of lettuce plants at low pressure was delayed. At low pressure, lettuce leaves were curly at the seedling stage and this disappeared gradually as the plants grew. Ambient lettuce plants were yellow and had an epinastic growth at harvest. The shoot height, leaf number, leaf length and shoot/root ratio were lower at low pressure than those at ambient pressure, while leaf area and root growth increased. Total biomass of lettuce plants grown at two pressures had no significant difference. Ethylene production at low pressure decreased significantly by 38.8% compared with ambient pressure. There was no significant difference in microelements, nutritional phytochemicals and nitrate concentrations at the two treatments. This research shows that lettuce can be grown at long-term low pressure (40 kPa) without significant adverse effects on seed germination, gas exchange and plant growth. Furthermore, ethylene release was reduced in hypobaria.

  4. Effects of physical aging on long-term creep of polymers and polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, L. Catherine; Gates, Thomas S.

    1994-01-01

    For many polymeric materials in use below the glass transition temperature, the long term viscoelastic behavior is greatly affected by physical aging. To use polymer matrix composites as critical structural components in existing and novel technological applications, this long term behavior of the material system must be understood. Towards that end, this study applied the concepts governing the mechanics of physical aging in a consistent manner to the study of laminated composite systems. Even in fiber-dominated lay-ups the effects of physical aging are found to be important in the long-term behavior of the composite. The basic concepts describing physical aging of polymers are discussed. Several aspects of physical aging which have not been previously documented are also explored in this study, namely the effects of aging into equilibrium and a relationship to the time-temperature shift factor. The physical aging theory is then extended to develop the long-term compliance/modulus of a single lamina with varying fiber orientation. The latter is then built into classical lamination theory to predict long-time response of general oriented lamina and laminates. It is illustrated that the long term response can be counterintuitive, stressing the need for consistent modeling efforts to make long term predictions of laminates to be used in structural situations.

  5. Short-term and long-term effects of osteoporosis therapies.

    PubMed

    Reid, Ian R

    2015-07-01

    Progress continues to be made in the development of therapeutics for fracture prevention. Bisphosphonates are now available orally and intravenously, often as inexpensive generics, and remain the most widely used interventions for osteoporosis. The major safety concern associated with the use of bisphosphonates is the development of femoral shaft stress fractures and, although rare, this adverse event affords the principal rationale for restricting bisphosphonate therapy to those individuals with femoral T-scores <-2.5, and for providing drug holidays in those individuals requiring therapy for >5 years. Newer antiresorptive therapies, in the form of denosumab and cathepsin K inhibitors, might increase efficacy and possibly circumvent some of the safety concerns associated with bisphosphonate use (for example, gastrointestinal and renal complications). The combination of teriparatide with antiresorptives markedly increases effects on BMD; new anabolic agents are also very promising in this regard. However, whether or not these changes in BMD translate into improved efficacy of fracture prevention remains to be determined. Vitamin D is important for the prevention of osteomalacia, but does not influence BMD or fracture risk in patients not deficient in vitamin D. The balance of risks and benefits of calcium supplementation is contentious, but patients should be encouraged to adhere to a balanced diet aimed at maintaining a healthy body weight. Consideration of a patient's risk of falling, and its mitigation, are also important. In this Review, I summarize the short-term and long-term effects of osteoporosis therapies. PMID:25963272

  6. Effects of ungulate disturbance and weather variation on Pediocactus winkleri: insights from long-term monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Deborah J.; Clark, Thomas O.; Duniway, Michael C.; Flagg, Cody B.

    2015-01-01

    Population dynamics and effects of large ungulate disturbances on Winkler cactus (Pediocactus winkleri K.D. Heil) were documented annually over a 20-year time span at one plot within Capitol Reef National Park, Utah. This cactus species was federally listed as threatened in 1998. The study began in 1995 to gain a better understanding of life history aspects and threats to this species. Data were collected annually in early spring and included diameter, condition, reproductive structures, mortality, recruitment, and disturbance by large ungulates. We used odds ratio and probability model analyses to determine effects of large ungulate trampling and weather on these cacti. During the study, plot population declined by 18%, with trampling of cactus, low precipitation, and cold spring temperatures implicated as causal factors. Precipitation and temperature affected flowering, mortality, and recruitment. Large ungulate disturbances increased mortality and reduced the probability of flowering. These results suggest that large ungulate disturbances and recent climate regimes have had an adverse impact on long-term persistence of this cactus.

  7. Effects of long-term electromagnetic field exposure on spatial learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Dongmei; Yang, Lei; Chen, Su; Tong, Jun; Tian, Yonghao; Su, Benhang; Wu, Shuicai; Zeng, Yanjun

    2013-02-01

    With the development of communications industry, mobile phone plays an important role in daily life. Whether or not the electromagnetic radiation emitted by mobile phone causes any adverse effects on brain function has become of a great concern. This paper investigated the effect of electromagnetic field on spatial learning and memory in rats. 32 trained Wistar rats were divided into two groups: exposure group and control group. The exposure group was exposed to 916 MHz, 10w/m2 mobile phone electromagnetic field (EMF) 6 h a day, 5 days a week, 10 weeks. The completion time, number of total errors and the neuron discharge signals were recorded while the rats were searching for food in an eight-arm radial maze at every weekend. The neuron signals of one exposed rat and one control rat in the maze were obtained by the implanted microelectrode arrays in their hippocampal regions. It can be seen that during the weeks 4-5 of the experiment, the average completion time and error rate of the exposure group were longer and larger than that of control group (p < 0.05). During the weeks 1-3 and 6-9, they were close to each other. The hippocampal neurons showed irregular firing patterns and more spikes with shorter interspike interval during the whole experiment period. It indicates that the 916 MHz EMF influence learning and memory in rats to some extent in a period during exposure, and the rats can adapt to long-term EMF exposure.

  8. Long-Term Effects of Neonatal Morphine Infusion on Pain Sensitivity: Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Abraham J; van den Bosch, Gerbrich E; de Graaf, Joke; van Lingen, Richard A; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; van Rosmalen, Joost; Groot Jebbink, Liesbeth J M; Tibboel, Dick; van Dijk, Monique

    2015-09-01

    Short-term and long-term effects of neonatal pain and its analgesic treatment have been topics of translational research over the years. This study aimed to identify the long-term effects of continuous morphine infusion in the neonatal period on thermal pain sensitivity, the incidence of chronic pain, and neurological functioning. Eighty-nine of the 150 participants of a neonatal randomized controlled trial on continuous morphine infusion versus placebo during mechanical ventilation underwent quantitative sensory testing and neurological examination at the age of 8 or 9 years. Forty-three children from the morphine group and 46 children from the placebo group participated in this follow-up study. Thermal detection and pain thresholds were compared with data from 28 healthy controls. Multivariate analyses revealed no statistically significant differences in thermal detection thresholds and pain thresholds between the morphine and placebo groups. The incidence of chronic pain was comparable between both groups. The neurological examination was normal in 29 (76%) of the children in the morphine group and 25 (61%) of the children in the control group (P = .14). We found that neonatal continuous morphine infusion (10 μg/kg/h) has no adverse effects on thermal detection and pain thresholds, the incidence of chronic pain, or overall neurological functioning 8 to 9 years later. Perspective: This unique long-term follow-up study shows that neonatal continuous morphine infusion (10 μg/kg/h) has no long-term adverse effects on thermal detection and pain thresholds or overall neurological functioning. These findings will help clinicians to find the most adequate and safe analgesic dosing regimens for neonates and infants.

  9. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Hickson, R C; Ball, K L; Falduto, M T

    1989-01-01

    Anabolic steroids are used therapeutically for various disorders and as ergogenic aids by athletes to augment strength, muscular development, and to enhance performance. There is a wide range of concomitant temporary and permanent adverse effects with steroid administration. Several well-documented adverse actions of these hormones may develop rapidly within several weeks or less (i.e. altered reproductive function) or require up to several years of steroid intake (i.e. liver carcinoma). More recent studies indicate that glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, increased cardiovascular disease risk profiles, cerebral dangers, musculoskeletal injuries, prostate cancer, psychosis and schizophrenic episodes, among others, accompany anabolic steroid intake. There is, at present, no evidence to support the claim that athletes are less susceptible to adverse effects than those individuals receiving hormone treatment in a clinical setting. Based on the available information which has accumulated primarily from cross-sectional, short term longitudinal, and case studies, there is a need: (a) to develop a comprehensive battery of specific and sensitive markers of adverse effects, particularly those that would be able to detect the onset of adverse actions; and (b) to conduct controlled long term longitudinal studies in order to fully understand the extensiveness and mechanisms involved in the occurrence of adverse effects.

  10. Effects of long-term drainage on microbial community composition vary between peatland types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanová, Zuzana; Barta, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands represent an important reservoir of carbon, but their functioning can be threatened by water level drawdown caused by climate or land use change. Knowledge of how microbial communities respond to long-term drainage in different peatland types could help improve predictions of the effect of climate change on these ecosystems. We investigated the effect of long-term drainage on microbial community composition in bog, fen and spruce swamp forests (SSF) in the Sumava Mountains (Czech Republic), using high-throughput barcoded sequencing, in relation to peat biochemical properties. Longterm drainage had substantial effects, which depended strongly on peatland type, on peat biochemical properties and microbial community composition. The effect of drainage was most apparent on fen, followed by SSF, and lowest on bog. Long-term drainage led to lower pH, reduced peat decomposability and increased bulk density, which was reflected by reduced microbial activity. Bacterial diversity decreased and Acidobacteria became the dominant phylum on drained sites, reflecting a convergence in bacterial community composition across peatlands after long-term drainage. The archaeal communities changed very strongly and became similar across drained peatlands. Overall, the characteristic differences between distinct peatland types under natural conditions were diminished by long-term drainage. Bog represented a relatively resilient system while fen seemed to be very sensitive to environmental changes.

  11. Long-term effects of maternal separation on chronic stress response suppressed by amitriptyline treatment.

    PubMed

    Cotella, E M; Mestres Lascano, I; Franchioni, L; Levin, G M; Suárez, M M

    2013-07-01

    Abstract The early-life environment has many long-term effects on mammals. Maternal interaction and early stressful events may affect regulation of the HPA axis during adulthood, leading to differential glucocorticoid secretion in response to stressful situations. These adverse experiences during postnatal development may even sensitize specific neurocircuits to subsequent stressors. Later in life, the overreaction of the HPA axis to stress can constitute a risk factor for metabolic and mental diseases. As tricyclic antidepressants are known to correct glucocorticoid hypersecretion during depression, we treated maternally separated animals with amitriptyline, at a lower dose than habitually used in depression models, to prevent the response to chronic stress during adulthood. Male Wistar rats were separated from the mother for 4.5 h every day for the first 3 weeks of life. From postnatal day 50, animals were subjected to chronic variable stress during 24 d (five types of stressors at different times of day). During the stress, protocol rats were orally administered amitriptyline (5 mg/kg) daily. We observed that maternal separation caused a reduction in plasma ACTH levels (p < 0.05), but evoked hypersecretion of corticosterone (p < 0.05) when it was combined with stress in adulthood. This rise was completely prevented by antidepressant treatment with amitriptyline.

  12. Long-term effects of sexual abuse which occurred in childhood: a review.

    PubMed

    Cahill, C; Llewelyn, S P; Pearson, C

    1991-05-01

    The psychological problems and difficulties experienced by adults who report having been sexually abused in childhood are reviewed. These long-term effects include damage to the victims' emotional reactions and self-perceptions, relationship problems, problems with sexuality and difficulties in social functioning. Common presenting problems of victims of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) are described. Also discussed are the characteristics of incestuous abuse in terms of the victim, the abusive relationship and its termination; the contributions of the various aspects of CSA to the psychological impact of such abuse; and psychodynamic explanations of the development of long-term effects. The bulk of the published material regarding the long-term effects of CSA refers to female victims only, and this 'bias' is reflected in the review. PMID:2059744

  13. The Long-Term Effects of Childhood Music Instruction on Intelligence and General Cognitive Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa-Giomi, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews research on the effects of music instruction on general cognitive abilities. The review of more than 75 reports shows (1) the consistency in results pertaining to the short-term effects of music instruction on cognitive abilities and the lack of clear evidence on the long-term effects on intelligence; (2) the complex nature of…

  14. Individual Differences in the Effects of Retrieval from Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Gene A.; Unsworth, Nash

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined individual differences in the effects of retrieval from long-term memory (i.e., the testing effect). The effects of retrieving from memory make tested information more accessible for future retrieval attempts. Despite the broad applied ramifications of such a potent memorization technique there is a paucity of research…

  15. Long-Term Effectiveness of the SpeechEasy Fluency-Enhancement Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallop, Ronald F.; Runyan, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    The SpeechEasy has been found to be an effective device for reduction of stuttering frequency for many people who stutter (PWS); published studies typically have compared stuttering reduction at initial fitting of the device to results achieved up to one year later. This study examines long-term effectiveness by examining whether effects of the…

  16. A Review of the Long-Term Effects of Child Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitchman, Joseph H.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Evidence suggests that sexual abuse has serious long-term effects; but specific effects, independent of force, threatened force, or family variables such as parental psychopathology, are not yet clarified. Effects among adults in terms of their relationship to sexual dysfunction, depression, anxiety, fear, multiple or borderline personality…

  17. The long-term effects of functional communication training in home settings.

    PubMed Central

    Derby, K M; Wacker, D P; Berg, W; DeRaad, A; Ulrich, S; Asmus, J; Harding, J; Prouty, A; Laffey, P; Stoner, E A

    1997-01-01

    A four-phase study was conducted in the homes of 4 young children who displayed aberrant behavior. Phases 1 and 2 consisted of a series of descriptive and experimental analyses to identify the environmental antecedents and consequences that controlled aberrant behavior. Phases 3 and 4 evaluated the short- and long-term effects of treatment on aberrant behavior, target mands, and collateral (social and toy play) behaviors. The effects of treatment were monitored for up to 27 months to assess long-term suppression of aberrant behavior. The assessment results successfully identified environmental events that occasioned and maintained aberrant behavior for all children. The short-term treatment resulted in immediate decreases in aberrant behavior for 3 of 4 children. Long-term treatment was successful for all children and was correlated with substantial response generalization. These results are interpreted in relation to functional equivalence, pivotal responding, and response generalization. PMID:9316262

  18. The science of cellulite treatment and its long-term effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Wassef, Cindy; Rao, Babar K

    2012-04-01

    Cellulite is a disorder in which adipose tissue extends through the dermis, producing a cosmetically displeasing dimpling in the affected areas. While many treatments claim to be able to improve the appearance of cellulite, the long-term effectiveness of these treatments and whether the logic behind these treatments can lead to a long-term improvement has not been extensively reviewed. In the following review, our goal is to assess the various cellulite treatments and evaluate the length of time results persist and whether the science behind the treatments warrants them as reliable and effective treatments for cellulite.

  19. Effectiveness of India ink as a long-term colonic mucosal marker.

    PubMed

    Fennerty, M B; Sampliner, R E; Hixson, L J; Garewal, H S

    1992-01-01

    We prospectively studied the use of India ink as a long-term or "permanent" mucosal marker as part of a study investigating the natural history of diminutive distal colorectal polyps. Twenty-six patients had 32 India ink tatoos implanted. The tatoo sites of the 19 patients who were followed at least 6 months continued to display intensely stained mucosa at the original sites. No side effects or complications were encountered. India ink appears to be a safe and effective long-term marker for colonic mucosal lesions. PMID:1370188

  20. Long-Term Effects of the Seattle Social Development Intervention on School Bonding Trajectories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, J. David; Guo, Jie; Hill, Karl G.; Battin-Pearson, Sara; Abbott, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the effects of intervention during the elementary grades on changes in school bonding from middle school through high school, using hierarchical linear modeling. Findings suggest that social development interventions through elementary school can have positive long-term effects on school bonding and demonstrate the importance…

  1. The Effects of Long Term Experiential Learning Programs on Their Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jernstedt, G. Christian; Johnson, Bradley T.

    Because previous research on long-term effects of Outward Bound programs has been contradictory, a study to analyze the impact of the Dartmouth College Outward Bound Center's Living/Learning Term program on undergraduate participants used a comprehensive battery of nine inventories to measure the effects of Outward Bound over time. The battery of…

  2. Long-Term Effects of a Home-Visiting Intervention for Depressed Mothers and Their Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersten-Alvarez, Laura E.; Hosman, Clemens M. H.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; Van Doesum, Karin T. M.; Hoefnagels, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Background: Whereas preventive interventions for depressed mothers and their infants have yielded positive short-term outcomes, few studies have examined their long-term effectiveness. The present follow-up of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) is one of the first to examine the longer-term effects of an intervention for mothers with postpartum…

  3. Long-Term Effects of Naltrexone on Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; Hetrick, William; Taylor, Derek V.; Marion, Sarah D.; Touchette, Paul; Barron, Jennifer L.; Martinezzi, Vernon; Steinberg, Russell M.; Crinella, Francis M.

    2000-01-01

    A study examined the effects of naltrexone after acute treatment and the long-term effects of naltrexone on the self-injurious behavior (SIB) of 15 individuals with mental retardation. Results found that a subgroup of patients decreased SIB for a year without treatment after acute exposure to naltrexone. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  4. Sustainability of Teacher Expectation Bias Effects on Long-Term Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Boer, Hester; Bosker, Roel J.; van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we address the relationship between teacher expectation bias and student characteristics, its effect on long-term student performance, and the development of this effect over time. Expectation bias was defined as the difference between observed and predicted teacher expectation. These predicted expectations were estimated from a…

  5. Legacy phosphorus in calcareous soils: effects of long-term poultry litter application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequential fractionation techniques, coupled with phosphatase hydrolysis, have allowed for greater understanding of manure/litter effects on soil P distribution. We evaluated the effect of long-term (greater than 10 years) poultry litter (broiler and turkey litter) application at annual rates of 4.5...

  6. Long-term semantic representations moderate the effect of attentional refreshing on episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Vanessa M; Duperreault, Kayla A; Rhodes, Matthew G; McCabe, David P

    2015-02-01

    The McCabe effect (McCabe, Journal of Memory and Language 58:480-494, 2008) refers to an advantage in episodic memory (EM) retrieval for memoranda studied in complex span versus simple span tasks, particularly for memoranda presented in earlier serial positions. This finding has been attributed to the necessity to refresh memoranda during complex span tasks that, in turn, promotes content-context binding in working memory (WM). Several frameworks have conceptualized WM as being embedded in long-term memory. Thus, refreshing may be less efficient when memoranda are not well-established in long-term semantic memory (SM). To investigate this, we presented words and nonwords in simple and complex span trials in order to manipulate the long-term semantic representations of the memoranda with the requirement to refresh the memoranda during WM. A recognition test was administered that required participants to make a remember-know decision for each memorandum recognized as old. The results replicated the McCabe effect, but only for words, and the beneficial effect of refreshing opportunities was exclusive to recollection. These results extend previous research by indicating that the predictive relationship between WM refreshing and long-term EM is specific to recollection and, furthermore, moderated by representations in long-term SM. This supports the predictions of WM frameworks that espouse the importance of refreshing in content-context binding, but also those that view WM as being an activated subset of and, therefore, constrained by the contents of long-term memory.

  7. Long-term effects of manipulated natal brood size on metabolic rate in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Verhulst, Simon; Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Riebel, Katharina

    2006-09-22

    Long-term effects of developmental conditions on health, longevity and other fitness components in humans are drawing increasing attention. In evolutionary ecology, such effects are of similar importance because of their role in the trade-off between quantity and quality of offspring. The central role of energy consumption is well documented for some long-term health effects in humans (e.g. obesity), but little is known of the long-term effects of rearing conditions on energy requirements later in life. We manipulated the rearing conditions in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) using brood size manipulation and cross-fostering. It has previously been shown in this species that being reared in a large brood has negative fitness consequences, and that such effects are stronger in daughters than in sons. We show that, independent of mass, standard metabolic rate of 1-year-old birds was higher when they had been reared in a large brood, and this is to our knowledge the first demonstration of such an effect. Furthermore, the brood size effect was stronger in daughters than in sons. This suggests that metabolic efficiency may play a role in mediating the long-term fitness consequences of rearing conditions. PMID:17148435

  8. Long-term effects of manipulated natal brood size on metabolic rate in zebra finches

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Simon; Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Riebel, Katharina

    2006-01-01

    Long-term effects of developmental conditions on health, longevity and other fitness components in humans are drawing increasing attention. In evolutionary ecology, such effects are of similar importance because of their role in the trade-off between quantity and quality of offspring. The central role of energy consumption is well documented for some long-term health effects in humans (e.g. obesity), but little is known of the long-term effects of rearing conditions on energy requirements later in life. We manipulated the rearing conditions in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) using brood size manipulation and cross-fostering. It has previously been shown in this species that being reared in a large brood has negative fitness consequences, and that such effects are stronger in daughters than in sons. We show that, independent of mass, standard metabolic rate of 1-year-old birds was higher when they had been reared in a large brood, and this is to our knowledge the first demonstration of such an effect. Furthermore, the brood size effect was stronger in daughters than in sons. This suggests that metabolic efficiency may play a role in mediating the long-term fitness consequences of rearing conditions. PMID:17148435

  9. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Roblin, Yves; Morozov, Vasiliy; Terzic, Balsa; Aturban, Mohamed A.; Ranjan, D.; Zubair, Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  10. Father-daughter incest: immediate and long-term effects of sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Brunngraber, L S

    1986-07-01

    The characteristics, immediate and long-term aftereffects, and methods of adapting to father-daughter incest were examined. Twenty-one women with a past history of childhood or adolescent paternal incest were interviewed. The findings suggest that the female victim of paternal incest may endure more emotional, social, physical, self-identity, familial, and interpersonal difficulties during and shortly after the incest has been terminated. Relationships with men and sexuality were more adversely affected with time. Positive coping mechanisms of incest and factors contributing to the victims' adjustment to the incest were documented. Implications of findings for nursing practice and research are discussed.

  11. An examination of the continuous distractor task and the "long-term recency effect".

    PubMed

    Koppenaal, L; Glanzer, M

    1990-03-01

    The continuous distractor task has yielded a so-called "long-term recency effect" that appears to call into question the dual-storage explanation of serial position effects in free recall. In this study, we show that the "long-term recency effect" is really a short-term storage effect, resulting from adaptation to the repeated presentation of a particular type of distractor throughout the list. This adaptation, a time-sharing process, permits short-term storage to carry out its normal functions. Experiment 1 shows that an appropriate postlist distractor task does in fact eliminate the "long-term recency effect." This finding supports the assertion that the effect is a product of short-term storage. Experiment 2 demonstrates the benefits and costs of the time-sharing process, relative to standard free recall, for both long-term and short-term storage. The findings support the time-sharing hypothesis. Experiment 3 replicates Experiment 2, with a change in procedure that rules out output interference as a mechanism responsible for the results of Experiment 2. Data are also presented on the development of the adaptation over trials. It is concluded that the adaptation and time-sharing processes need to be included in the dual-storage model of short-term storage.

  12. Long term effects of traffic noise on mortality in the city of Barcelona, 2004-2007.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Maria Antònia; Varga, Diego; Tobias, Aurelio; Diaz, Julio; Linares, Cristina; Saez, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Numerous studies showing statistically significant associations between environmental noise and adverse health effects already exist for short-term (over one day at most) and long-term (over a year or more) noise exposure, both for morbidity and (albeit to a lesser extent) mortality. Recently, several studies have shown this association to be independent from confounders, mainly those of air pollutants. However, what has not been addressed is the problem of misalignment (i.e. the exposure data locations and health outcomes have different spatial locations). Without any explicit control of such misalignment inference is seriously compromised. Our objective is to assess the long-term effects of traffic noise on mortality in the city of Barcelona (Spain) during 2004-2007. We take into account the control of confounding, for both air pollution and socioeconomic factors at a contextual level and, in particular, we explicitly address the problem of misalignment. We employed a case-control design with individual data. We used deaths resulting from myocardial infarction, hypertension, or Type II diabetes mellitus in Barcelona between 2004 and 2007 as cases for the study, while for controls we used deaths (likewise in Barcelona and over the same period of time) resulting from AIDS or external causes (e.g. accidental falls, accidental poisoning by psychotropic drugs, drugs of abuse, suicide and self-harm, or injuries resulting from motor vehicle accidents). The controls were matched with the cases by sex and age. We used the annual average equivalent A-weighted sound pressure levels for daytime (7-21h), evening-time (21-23h) and night-time (23-7h), and controlled for the following confounders: i) air pollutants (NO2, PM10 and benzene), ii) material deprivation (at a census tract level) and iii) land use and other spatial variables. We explicitly controlled for heterogeneity (uneven distribution of both response and environmental exposures within an area), spatial dependency

  13. Long term effects of traffic noise on mortality in the city of Barcelona, 2004-2007.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Maria Antònia; Varga, Diego; Tobias, Aurelio; Diaz, Julio; Linares, Cristina; Saez, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Numerous studies showing statistically significant associations between environmental noise and adverse health effects already exist for short-term (over one day at most) and long-term (over a year or more) noise exposure, both for morbidity and (albeit to a lesser extent) mortality. Recently, several studies have shown this association to be independent from confounders, mainly those of air pollutants. However, what has not been addressed is the problem of misalignment (i.e. the exposure data locations and health outcomes have different spatial locations). Without any explicit control of such misalignment inference is seriously compromised. Our objective is to assess the long-term effects of traffic noise on mortality in the city of Barcelona (Spain) during 2004-2007. We take into account the control of confounding, for both air pollution and socioeconomic factors at a contextual level and, in particular, we explicitly address the problem of misalignment. We employed a case-control design with individual data. We used deaths resulting from myocardial infarction, hypertension, or Type II diabetes mellitus in Barcelona between 2004 and 2007 as cases for the study, while for controls we used deaths (likewise in Barcelona and over the same period of time) resulting from AIDS or external causes (e.g. accidental falls, accidental poisoning by psychotropic drugs, drugs of abuse, suicide and self-harm, or injuries resulting from motor vehicle accidents). The controls were matched with the cases by sex and age. We used the annual average equivalent A-weighted sound pressure levels for daytime (7-21h), evening-time (21-23h) and night-time (23-7h), and controlled for the following confounders: i) air pollutants (NO2, PM10 and benzene), ii) material deprivation (at a census tract level) and iii) land use and other spatial variables. We explicitly controlled for heterogeneity (uneven distribution of both response and environmental exposures within an area), spatial dependency

  14. Association between hyperglycaemic crisis and long-term major adverse cardiovascular events: a nationwide population-based, propensity score-matched, cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Li-Hsin; Lin, Liang-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Tsun; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan; Hsieh, Ming-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycaemic crisis was associated with significant intrahospital morbidity and mortality. However, the association between hyperglycaemic crisis and long-term cardiovascular outcomes remained unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association between hyperglycaemic crisis and subsequent long-term major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs). Participants and methods This population-based cohort study was conducted using data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database for the period of 1996–2012. A total of 2171 diabetic patients with hyperglycaemic crisis fit the inclusion criteria. Propensity score matching was used to match the baseline characteristics of the study cohort to construct a comparison cohort which comprised 8684 diabetic patients without hyperglycaemic crisis. The risk of long-term MACEs was compared between the two cohorts. Results Six hundred and seventy-six MACEs occurred in the study cohort and the event rate was higher than that in the comparison cohort (31.1% vs 24.1%, p<0.001). Patients with hyperglycaemic crisis were associated with a higher risk of long-term MACEs even after adjusting for all baseline characteristics and medications (adjusted HR=1.76, 95% CI 1.62 to 1.92, p<0.001). Acute myocardial infarction had the highest adjusted HR (adjusted HR=2.19, 95% CI 1.75 to 2.75, p<0.001) in the four types of MACEs, followed by congestive heart failure (adjusted HR=1.97, 95% CI 1.70 to 2.28, p<0.001). Younger patients with hyperglycaemic crisis had a higher risk of MACEs than older patients (adjusted HR=2.69 for patients aged 20–39 years vs adjusted HR=1.58 for patients aged >65 years). Conclusions Hyperglycaemic crisis was significantly associated with long-term MACEs, especially in the young population. Further prospective longitudinal study should be conducted for validation. PMID:27554106

  15. Effect of water on long-term weakening preceding rupture of crustal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.; Arai, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Takahashi, M.; Shigematsu, N.

    2010-12-01

    Fault strength is a critical parameter in studies of crustal mechanics and for the prediction of earthquake hazards. The strengths of crustal faults inferred from borehole heat flow measurements and maximum stress orientations in the crust are less than those determined from laboratory measurements. Suggested causes of the weakening of faults include high fluid pressures, dynamic processes, or the presence of weak fault gouge. However, long-term changes of fault strength cannot be directly monitored using geophysical techniques, so an explanation for fault weakening remains an unsolved problem. We provide laboratory evidence that long-term weakening of the frictional strength of faults is caused by micro-fracturing at asperity contacts, which is a result of crack growth at subcritical stress levels. Our model suggests that long-term reductions of fault strength are related to chemical reactions that take place in the presence of water. For our measurements of friction on rupture surfaces in the presence of water, we increased temperatures to accelerate reaction processes so that they were observable at laboratory time-scales. In the presence of water, frictional strength decreased as temperature increased, whereas it changed little in the absence of water. The observed decreases in frictional strength were facilitated by chemical processes, rather than by physical processes governed by the effective pressure law. These observations suggest that chemical processes such as stress corrosion play an important role in long-term fault weakening. In addition to long-term monitoring of fault zones, we need to investigate long-term processes that cannot be observed during a human lifetime if we are to understand earthquake occurrences in the deep crust.

  16. Effects of Long-Term Ayahuasca Administration on Memory and Anxiety in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Favaro, Vanessa Manchim; Yonamine, Maurício; Soares, Juliana Carlota Kramer; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic beverage that combines the action of the 5-HT2A/2C agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) from Psychotria viridis with the monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) induced by beta-carbonyls from Banisteriopsis caapi. Previous investigations have highlighted the involvement of ayahuasca with the activation of brain regions known to be involved with episodic memory, contextual associations and emotional processing after ayahuasca ingestion. Moreover long term users show better performance in neuropsychological tests when tested in off-drug condition. This study evaluated the effects of long-term administration of ayahuasca on Morris water maze (MWM), fear conditioning and elevated plus maze (EPM) performance in rats. Behavior tests started 48h after the end of treatment. Freeze-dried ayahuasca doses of 120, 240 and 480 mg/kg were used, with water as the control. Long-term administration consisted of a daily oral dose for 30 days by gavage. The behavioral data indicated that long-term ayahuasca administration did not affect the performance of animals in MWM and EPM tasks. However the dose of 120 mg/kg increased the contextual conditioned fear response for both background and foreground fear conditioning. The tone conditioned response was not affected after long-term administration. In addition, the increase in the contextual fear response was maintained during the repeated sessions several weeks after training. Taken together, these data showed that long-term ayahuasca administration in rats can interfere with the contextual association of emotional events, which is in agreement with the fact that the beverage activates brain areas related to these processes. PMID:26716991

  17. Effects of Long-Term Ayahuasca Administration on Memory and Anxiety in Rats.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Vanessa Manchim; Yonamine, Maurício; Soares, Juliana Carlota Kramer; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic beverage that combines the action of the 5-HT2A/2C agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) from Psychotria viridis with the monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) induced by beta-carbonyls from Banisteriopsis caapi. Previous investigations have highlighted the involvement of ayahuasca with the activation of brain regions known to be involved with episodic memory, contextual associations and emotional processing after ayahuasca ingestion. Moreover long term users show better performance in neuropsychological tests when tested in off-drug condition. This study evaluated the effects of long-term administration of ayahuasca on Morris water maze (MWM), fear conditioning and elevated plus maze (EPM) performance in rats. Behavior tests started 48h after the end of treatment. Freeze-dried ayahuasca doses of 120, 240 and 480 mg/kg were used, with water as the control. Long-term administration consisted of a daily oral dose for 30 days by gavage. The behavioral data indicated that long-term ayahuasca administration did not affect the performance of animals in MWM and EPM tasks. However the dose of 120 mg/kg increased the contextual conditioned fear response for both background and foreground fear conditioning. The tone conditioned response was not affected after long-term administration. In addition, the increase in the contextual fear response was maintained during the repeated sessions several weeks after training. Taken together, these data showed that long-term ayahuasca administration in rats can interfere with the contextual association of emotional events, which is in agreement with the fact that the beverage activates brain areas related to these processes. PMID:26716991

  18. Unhappily Ever After: Effects of Long-Term, Low-Quality Marriages on Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Daniel N.; Booth, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The present study shows that long-term, low-quality marriages have significant negative effects on overall well-being. We utilize a nationally representative longitudinal study with a multi-item marital quality scale that allows us to track unhappy marriages over a 12-year period and to assess marital happiness along many dimensions. Remaining…

  19. Long-Term Effect of Prefrontal Lobotomy on Verbal Fluency in Patients with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stip, Emmanuel; Bigras, Marie-Josee.; Mancini-Marie, Adham; Cosset, Marie-Eve.; Black, Deborah; Lecours, Andre-Roch

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the long-term effects of bilateral prefrontal leukotomy on lexical abilities in schizophrenia subjects. Method: We compared performances of leukotomized (LSP), non-leukotomized schizophrenia patients (NLSP) and normal controls, using a test of verbal fluency. Multiple case and triple comparison design were…

  20. Peer Rejection during Adolescence: Psychological Long-Term Effects--A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Sternberg, Rotem

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the psychological long-term effects of social peer rejection (SPR) experienced during adolescence as retrospectively perceived by young adults. A convenient sample of 387 undergraduate university students were administered self-report questionnaires consisting of the following measures: demographic variables, traumatic…

  1. Effect of Long-Term Physical Activity Practice after Cardiac Rehabilitation on Some Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyssin, Celine, Jr.; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sebastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity…

  2. Effects of Long-Term Atomoxetine Treatment for Young Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Gao, Haitao; Baker, Kurt D.; Feldman, Peter D.; Gelowitz, Douglas L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this 13-study (seven double-blind/placebo-controlled, six open-label) meta-analysis is to determine the effectiveness and tolerability of long-term atomoxetine treatment among young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Data were pooled from 6- and 7-year-olds (N = 272) who met DSM-IV…

  3. Long-Term Effectiveness of the Response Restriction Method for Establishing Diurnal Bladder Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Duker, P. C.; Melein, L.; Averink, M.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term effectiveness of the response restriction method for establishing diurnal bladder control was assessed with 48 participants with intellectual disabilities. Intervals of assessment ranged from 28 to 66 months across the individuals following initial baseline. Difference scores in terms of the mean number of toileting accidents per…

  4. Editorial: Assessment Issues and Long-Term Effects of Childhood Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David P. H.

    1997-01-01

    This editorial reviews and comments on three recent studies: two on assessment issues or areas of diagnostic difficulty for pediatricians concerned with child abuse and neglect, and one on the long-term effects of childhood abuse and experiences of early attachment. (DB)

  5. Long-term effects of burn severity on non-native plant cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of burn severity on non-native plant invasion post-fire is of great concern to managers and researchers, especially given predicted increases in large, high severity fires. However, little else is known about long-term (>10 year) vegetation recovery and non-native plant persistence. We anal...

  6. The Long-Term Effects of Housing Assistance on Work and Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sandra; Holupka, C. Scott; Harkness, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the long-term effect of project-based housing assistance--public housing and private assisted housing--on work, earnings, and welfare receipt. We use the Panel Study of Income Dynamics-Assisted Housing Database to identify women ever living in project-based assisted housing and to create comparison groups using propensity…

  7. The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Quality Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Donald

    2005-01-01

    The short- and long-term effects of quality physical education programs have been a subject of considerable debate by educational administrators and state legislators during the past decade. While physical educators have repeatedly demonstrated the importance of daily moderate and vigorous physical activity on the immediate health and wellbeing of…

  8. Effects of Short- and Long-Term Changes in Auditory Feedback on Vowel and Sibilant Contrasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Harlan; Matthies, Melanie L.; Guenther, Frank H.; Denny, Margaret; Perkell, Joseph S.; Stockmann, Ellen; Tiede, Mark; Vick, Jennell; Zandipour, Majid

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effects of short- and long-term changes in auditory feedback on vowel and sibilant contrasts and to evaluate hypotheses arising from a model of speech motor planning. Method: The perception and production of vowel and sibilant contrasts were measured in 8 postlingually deafened adults prior to activation of their cochlear…

  9. Long-Term Effects of Methylphenidate Transdermal Delivery System Treatment of ADHD on Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Giefer, Eldred E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the long-term effects of the methylphenidate transdermal system (MTS) on the growth of children being treated for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Method: Height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were measured in 127 children ages 6 to 12 at longitudinal assessments for up to 36 months of treatment with MTS. These…

  10. Long-Term Effects of a Personality-Targeted Intervention to Reduce Alcohol Use in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrod, Patricia J.; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Mackie, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the long-term effects of a personality-targeted intervention on drinking quantity and frequency (QF), problem drinking, and personality-specific motivations for alcohol use in early adolescence. Method: A randomized control trial was carried out with 364 adolescents (median age 14) recruited from 13 secondary schools with…

  11. Short and Long Term Effects of Teacher-Training Workshop in Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Sophia; Benor, Dan E.

    A study measured both short- and long-term effects of an educational workshop designed for teachers in the Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion, Israel. Participants were 60 volunteer faculty members who were randomly assigned to one of eight multidisciplinary groups for the 4-day workshop, which aimed at improving teachers' instructional…

  12. Insights into Fluency Instruction: Short- and Long-Term Effects of Two Reading Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwanenflugel, Paula J.; Kuhn, Melanie R.; Morris, Robin D.; Morrow, Lesley Mandel; Meisinger, Elizabeth B.; Woo, Deborah Gee; Quirk, Matthew; Sevcik, Rose

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine short- and long-term effects of two instructional approaches designed to improve the reading fluency of second-grade children: Fluency-Oriented Reading Instruction (or FORI; Stahl & Heubach, 2005) and a wide reading approach (Kuhn et al., 2006). By the end of second grade, children in the wide reading…

  13. The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Secondary Schools upon Students' Academic Success and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoniou, Panayiotis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the short- and long-term effects of secondary schools upon student academic success and development. A questionnaire was administered to a randomly selected sample of 15% of Cypriot students who graduated in June 2004 and June 2005 from secondary schools. A good response rate (i.e., 66%) was…

  14. The Effect of Long-Term Outcome Studies on the Therapy of Schizophrenia: A Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Leonard I.

    1989-01-01

    Comments on Haley's paper "The Effect of Long-Term Outcome Studies on the Therapy of Schizophrenia." Criticizes Haley for making gratuitous, demeaning remarks about psychiatry; concluding that schizophrenia is a psychological and social problem; recommending ineffective treatments for the psychotic phase; and recommending psychotherapy without…

  15. Long-Term Effects of Postearthquake Distress on Brain Microstructural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Hanawa, Sugiko; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Sakuma, Atsushi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Stressful events can have both short- and long-term effects on the brain. Our recent investigation identified short-term white matter integrity (WMI) changes in 30 subjects soon after the Japanese earthquake. Our findings suggested that lower WMI in the right anterior cingulum (Cg) was a pre-existing vulnerability factor and increased WMI in the left anterior Cg and uncinate fasciculus (Uf) after the earthquake was an acquired sign of postearthquake distress. However, the long-term effects on WMI remained unclear. Here, we examined the 1-year WMI changes in 25 subjects to clarify long-term effects on the WMI. We found differential FAs in the right anterior Cg, bilateral Uf, left superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and left thalamus, suggesting that synaptic enhancement and shrinkage were long-term effects. Additionally, the correlation between psychological measures related to postearthquake distress and the degree of WMI alternation in the right anterior Cg and the left Uf led us to speculate that temporal WMI changes in some subjects with emotional distress occurred soon after the disaster. We hypothesized that dynamic WMI changes predict a better prognosis, whereas persistently lower WMI is a marker of cognitive dysfunction, implying the development of anxiety disorders. PMID:24551840

  16. Effects of Spaced Repetition on Long-Term Map Knowledge Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkle, David M.; Ellis, Arthur K.

    2010-01-01

    Sixth-grade students studying Latin America were placed in experimental and comparison groups to test the effects of map-study repetition on long-term memory. Mean scores on place-name repetition indicated that the experimental (repetition) group out-performed the comparison group at a statistically significant level with respect to both posttest…

  17. The Effects of Elaboration and Rehearsal on Long-Term Retention of Shape Names by Kindergarteners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallimore, Ronald; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Elaboration and overt rehearsal are compared as instructional paradigms for memory retention. Superior long-term retention was produced in the elaboration condition when the initial acquisition effects were statistically removed. Short-term data suggest acquisition was complexly affected by experimental condition, I.Q., and task. Elaboration…

  18. The Long-Term Effects of Bilingualism on Children of Immigration: Student Bilingualism and Future Earnings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agirdag, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examine the largely neglected long-term effects of bilingualism for students with roots in immigration. Our central research question is whether students' bilingual proficiencies have an impact on their future earnings in the USA. For this purpose, we used two different data-sets, i.e. the National Education Longitudinal…

  19. (Mis) Representations of the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Sexual Abuse in the Courts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Addresses representations made by pro-false memory attorneys and expert witnesses in court regarding the long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse. Examining the testimony revealed that such pro-false memory testimony was based on a partial understanding of retrospective data. Reviewing the totality of the scientific evidence demonstrates that…

  20. Effects of long-term use of HAART on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Talungchit, Sineepat; Jaruratanasirikul, Sutep; Silpapojakul, Kachornsakdi; Chayakul, Panthip; Nilmanat, Ampaipith; Pruphetkaew, Nannapat

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to determine the effects of long-term use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. METHODS Oral examination and measurement of saliva flow rate of both unstimulated and wax-stimulated whole saliva were performed in HIV-infected subjects with and without HAART, and in non-HIV individuals. The following data were recorded; duration and risk of HIV infection, type and duration of HAART, CD4 cell count, viral load, presence of orofacial pain, oral dryness, oral burning sensation, oral lesions, cervical caries, and periodontal pocket. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the effects of long-term use of HAART on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-seven HIV-infected subjects – 99 on HAART (age range 23–57 years, mean 39 years) and 58 not on HAART (age range 20–59 years, mean 34 years) – and 50 non-HIV controls (age range 19–59 years, mean 36 years) were enrolled. The most common HAART regimen was 2 NRTI + 2 NNRTI. HIV-infected subjects without HAART showed greater risks of having orofacial pain, oral dryness, oral lesions, and periodontal pockets than those with short-term HAART (P < 0.01). The subjects with long-term HAART were found to have a greater risk of having oral lesions than those with short-term HAART (P < 0.05). The unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates of the subjects with HAART were significantly lower than in those without HAART (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION We conclude that long-term HAART has adverse effects on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. PMID:20202089

  1. [Cutaneous adverse effects of TNFalpha antagonists].

    PubMed

    Failla, V; Sabatiello, M; Lebas, E; de Schaetzen, V; Dezfoulian, B; Nikkels, A F

    2012-01-01

    The TNFalpha antagonists, including adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab, represent a class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Although cutaneous adverse effects are uncommon, they are varied. There is no particular risk profile to develop cutaneous adverse effects. The principal acute side effects are injection site reactions and pruritus. The major long term cutaneous side effects are infectious and inflammatory conditions. Neoplastic skin diseases are exceptional. The association with other immunosuppressive agents can increase the risk of developing cutaneous adverse effects. Some adverse effects, such as lupus erythematosus, require immediate withdrawal of the biological treatment, while in other cases temporary withdrawal is sufficient. The majority of the other cutaneous adverse effects can be dealt without interrupting biologic treatment. Preclinical and clinical investigations revealed that the new biologics, aiming IL12/23, IL23 and IL17, present a similar profile of cutaneous adverse effects, although inflammatory skin reactions may be less often encountered compared to TNFalpha antagonists.

  2. Immunomodulatory effect of ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on long-term heavy-load exercising mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yali; Cai, Dehua; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Xinshen

    2012-12-01

    Long-term heavy-load exercise can lead to a decrease in the organism's immune response. In this study, we used 100 Kunming (KM) mice to investigate the immune-regulatory effects of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on long-term heavy-load exercising mice. Peripheral white blood cells (WBC), the absolute value of neutrophils (NEUT), the phagocytic function of macrophages, serum agglutination valence, and the number of plaque-forming cells (PFC) were evaluated 4 weeks after gavaging long-term heavy-load exercising mice with GLP. After exercise, the WBC count in peripheral blood, absolute neutrophil count, macrophage phagocytic index, serum agglutination valence, and the number of plaque-forming cells were significantly reduced in the mice not fed GLP. Both medium and high doses of GLP drastically increased peripheral WBC, absolute neutrophil count, macrophage phagocytic index, serum agglutination valence, and the number of plaque-forming cells in long-term heavy-load exercising mice. High doses of GLP increased peritoneal macrophage phagocytic rate considerably. With this study, we demonstrate that 4 weeks of heavy-load exercise can lead to exercise-induced immunosuppression in mice. A supplement of GLP fed to these mice improves both non-specific and specific immune responses among these mice. The effect for the high-dose GLP treatment is especially significant.

  3. Effects of trawl selectivity and genetic parameters on fish body length under long-term trawling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Peng; Cui, He; Sheng, Huaxiang; Zhao, Fenfang; Tang, Yanli; Chen, Zelin

    2015-10-01

    Long-term fishing pressure affects the biological characteristics of exploited fish stocks. The biological characteristics of hairtail ( Trichiurus lepturus) in the East China Sea are unable to recover because of long-term trawling. Fishing induces evolutionary effects on the fish's biological characteristics. Evidence of these changes includes small size at age, a shift to earlier age structure, and early maturation. Natural and artificial selection usually affect the fish's life history. Selection can induce different chances of reproduction, and individual fish can give a different genetic contribution to the next generation. In this study, analysis of time-dependent probability of significance and test of sensitivity were used to explore the effects of fish exploitation rate, mesh size, and heritability with long-term trawling. Results showed that fishing parameters were important drivers to exploited fish population. However, genetic traits altered by fishing were slow, and the changes in biological characteristics were weaker than those caused by fishing selection. Exploitation rate and mesh size exhibited similar evolutionary trend tendency under long-term fishing. The time-dependent probability of significance trend showed a gradual growth and tended to be stable. Therefore, the direction of fishing-induced evolution and successful management of fish species require considerable attention to contribute to sustainable fisheries in China.

  4. Long-term effects of methamphetamine exposure in adolescent mice on the future ovarian reserve in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Qu, Guoqiang; Dong, Xiyuan; Huang, Kai; Kumar, Molly; Ji, Licheng; Wang, Ya; Yao, Junning; Yang, Shulin; Wu, Ruxing; Zhang, Hanwang

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there is an increasing prevalence of adolescent exposure to methamphetamine (MA). However, there is a paucity of information concerning the long-term impact of early exposure to MA upon female fertility and ovarian reserve. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term MA exposure in adolescents on their ovarian reserve in adulthood. Adolescent mice received intraperitoneal injections of MA (5mg/kg, three times per week) or saline from the 21st postnatal day for an 8 week period. Morphological, histological, biochemical, hormonal and ethological parameters were evaluated. An impaired ovarian reserve and vitality was found in the group treated with MA, manifesting in morphological-apparent mitochondrial damage, an activated apoptosis pathway in the ovarian tissue, a downward expression of ovarian anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), a decreased number of primordial and growing follicles, an increased number of atretic follicles, and a depressed secretion of AMH, estradiol and progesterone from granulosa cells. However, no significant difference was noticed regarding the estrous cycle, the mating ability and the fertility outcome in the reproductive age of the mice after a period of non-medication. The present results confirmed that a long term exposure to methamphetamine in adolescent mice does have an adverse impact on their ovarian reserve, which indicates that such an early abuse of MA might influence the fertility lifespan of the female mouse.

  5. Long-term Cognitive and Functional Effects of Potentially Inappropriate Medications in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. The use of potentially inappropriate medications in older adults can lead to known adverse drug events, but long-term effects are less clear. We therefore conducted a prospective cohort study of older women to determine whether PIM use is associated with risk of functional impairment or low cognitive performance. Methods. We followed up 1,429 community-dwelling women (≥75 years) for a period of 5 years at four clinical sites in the United States. The primary predictor at baseline was PIM use based on 2003 Beers Criteria. We also assessed anticholinergic load using the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden scale. Outcomes included scores on a battery of six cognitive tests at follow-up and having one or more incident impairments in instrumental activities of daily living. Regression models were adjusted for baseline age, race, education, smoking, physical activity, a modified Charlson Comorbidity Index, and cognitive score. Results. The mean ± SD age of women at baseline was 83.2 ± 3.3. In multivariate models, baseline PIM use and higher ACB scores were significantly associated with poorer performance in category fluency (PIM: p = .01; ACB: p = .02) and immediate (PIM: p = .04; ACB: p = .03) and delayed recall (PIM: p = .04). Both PIM use (odds ratio [OR]: 1.36 [1.05–1.75]) and higher ACB scores (OR: 1.11 [1.04–1.19]) were also strongly associated with incident functional impairment. Conclusions. The results provide suggestive evidence that PIM use and increased anticholinergic load may be associated with risk of functional impairment and low cognitive performance. More cautious selection of medications in older adults may reduce these potential risks. PMID:24293516

  6. Long-term effects of red deer (Cervus elaphus) grazing on soil in a breeding area.

    PubMed

    Kumbasli, Meric; Makineci, Ender; Cakir, Meric

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of red deer grazing on some properties of soil (sand, silt, clay pH, electrical conductivity organic carbon, bulk density, fine soil weight, compaction and saturation capacity), and litter (unit weight-mass, organic matter content (%) and organic matter mass) properties on a red deer breeding area by comparing an undisturbed area in Istanbul Belgrad Forest-Turkey. According to the results obtained in this study the litter mass in the breeding area has been found considerably lower. There were some crucial changes in the characteristics of the soil which has been investigated in 0-5 cm depth. No important difference had been detected between the breeding area and the undisturbed area in terms of electrical conductivity. However, other investigated soil properties in 0-5 cm depth showed significant differences between the undisturbed area and the breeding area. Soil was significantly compacted by red deer grazing. The soil pH was 2.18 unit higher in undisturbed area. Moreover, organic carbon content (1.395%) in the breeding area was found quite lower. Depending on the compaction of the soil and lessen quantity of soil organic matter the value of saturation capacity (28.83%) on the breeding area is considerably lower, bulk density and fine soil weights were significantly higher. Mean silt and clay proportions (25.4 and 33.7%, respectively) are quite higher and the mean sand proportion (40.9%) was lower in the breeding area than in the undisturbed area. Results indicated that long-term red deer grazing in the breeding area adversely affected litter and soil properties.

  7. Torture and Long-Term Health Effects Among Lebanese Female Political Prisoners.

    PubMed

    Ghaddar, Ali; Elsouri, Ghadier; Abboud, Zeinab

    2016-02-01

    Lebanese prisoners during the Israeli occupation of Lebanon (1981-1999) were subject to regular torture. We examined the association between torture events and post-traumatic stress and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among former women political prisoners. We conducted a retrospective survey and performed health check-ups among 108 former women prisoners. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was measured through the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), and CVDs were assessed by physicians' diagnoses. The study was conducted between September 2008 and March 2010. All 67 participants in the study reported having been subjected to a variety of torture events. The prevalence of PTSD was 28.4% and that of CVD was 16.42%, respectively. PTSD and CVD were more likely to occur among women who had had longer imprisonment periods, and PTSD specifically was associated with exposure to torture (beating: OR = 1.49; 95% CI [0.48, 4.27] and threatening by rape: OR = 1.43; 95% CI [0.82, 9.30]). CVD was associated with asphyxia with water (OR = 3.86; 95% CI [0.03, 2.28]). Devoutness decreased the risk of PTSD (OR = 0.24; 95% CI [0.08, 1.41]). Torture had adverse long-term effects on prisoners' physiological and psychological health; devoutness played a significant protective role. This study highlights the importance of documenting torture events and identifying the indicators of associated morbidity among surviving political prisoners for the provision of additional resources to care.

  8. Long-term effects of health investments and parental favoritism: the case of breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jason M

    2011-11-01

    This paper re-examines the effects of breastfeeding on long-term educational outcomes using longitudinal data on siblings. While family-fixed effects allow controls for all shared family factors, these estimators are sensitive to compensating or reinforcing behaviors by parents. These biases may be particularly important for estimating the effects of parental investment such as breast feeding, where sibling discordance may be difficult to treat as a random outcome and may result in persistence in differential investments between siblings. This paper uses a unique question asked to adolescent siblings about parental favoritism to adjust for potential reinforcing behavior by parents. Standard fixed effects estimates suggest important long-term educational effects of breastfeeding; however, these effects are uniformly eliminated after focusing on families who treat siblings equally. These findings shed light on the mechanisms linking associations between breastfeeding and longer term outcomes. PMID:20960419

  9. Statin therapy and long-term adverse limb outcomes in patients with peripheral artery disease: insights from the REACH registry

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhani, Dharam J.; Steg, Ph. Gabriel; Cannon, Christopher P.; Eagle, Kim A.; Smith, Sidney C.; Goto, Shinya; Ohman, E. Magnus; Elbez, Yedid; Sritara, Piyamitr; Baumgartner, Iris; Banerjee, Subhash; Creager, Mark A.; Bhatt, Deepak L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Due to a high burden of systemic cardiovascular events, current guidelines recommend the use of statins in all patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). We sought to study the impact of statin use on limb prognosis in patients with symptomatic PAD enrolled in the international REACH registry. Methods Statin use was assessed at study enrolment, as well as a time-varying covariate. Rates of the primary adverse limb outcome (worsening claudication/new episode of critical limb ischaemia, new percutaneous/surgical revascularization, or amputation) at 4 years and the composite of cardiovascular death/myocardial infarction/stroke were compared among statin users vs. non-users. Results A total of 5861 patients with symptomatic PAD were included. Statin use at baseline was 62.2%. Patients who were on statins had a significantly lower risk of the primary adverse limb outcome at 4 years when compared with those who were not taking statins [22.0 vs. 26.2%; hazard ratio (HR), 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72–0.92; P = 0.0013]. Results were similar when statin use was considered as a time-dependent variable (P = 0.018) and on propensity analysis (P < 0.0001). The composite of cardiovascular death/myocardial infarction/stroke was similarly reduced (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.73–0.96; P = 0.01). Conclusion Among patients with PAD in the REACH registry, statin use was associated with an ∼18% lower rate of adverse limb outcomes, including worsening symptoms, peripheral revascularization, and ischaemic amputations. These findings suggest that statin therapy not only reduces the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, but also favourably affects limb prognosis in patients with PAD. PMID:24585266

  10. Long-term effectiveness of unboosted atazanavir plus abacavir/lamivudine in subjects with virological suppression

    PubMed Central

    Llibre, Josep M.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Pedersen, Court; Ristola, Matti; Losso, Marcelo; Mocroft, Amanda; Mitsura, Viktar; Falconer, Karolin; Maltez, Fernando; Beniowski, Marek; Vullo, Vincenzo; Hassoun, Gamal; Kuzovatova, Elena; Szlavik, János; Kuznetsova, Anastasiia; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Duvivier, Claudine; Edwards, Simon; Laut, Kamilla; Paredes, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Effectiveness data of an unboosted atazanavir (ATV) with abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) switch strategy in clinical routine are scant. We evaluated treatment outcomes of ATV + ABC/3TC in pretreated subjects in the EuroSIDA cohort when started with undetectable plasma HIV-1 viral load (pVL), performing a time to loss of virological response (TLOVR <50 copies/mL) and a snapshot analysis at 48, 96, and 144 weeks. Virological failure (VF) was defined as confirmed pVL >50 copies/mL. We included 285 subjects, 67% male, with median baseline CD4 530 cells, and 44 months with pVL ≤50 copies/mL. The third drug in the previous regimen was ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) in 79 (28%), and another ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r) in 29 (10%). Ninety (32%) had previously failed with a PI. Proportions of people with virological success at 48/96/144 weeks were 90%/87%/88% (TLOVR) and 74%/67%/59% (snapshot analysis), respectively. The rates of VF were 8%/8%/6%. Rates of adverse events leading to study discontinuation were 0.4%/1%/2%. The multivariable adjusted analysis showed an association between VF and nadir CD4+ (hazard ratio [HR] 0.63 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.42–0.93] per 100 cells higher), time with pVL ≤50 copies/mL (HR 0.87 [95% CI: 0.79–0.96] per 6 months longer), and previous failure with a PI (HR 2.78 [95% CI: 1.28–6.04]). Resistance selection at failure was uncommon. A switch to ATV + ABC/3TC in selected subjects with suppressed viremia was associated with low rates of VF and discontinuation due to adverse events, even in subjects not receiving ATV/r. The strategy might be considered in those with long-term suppression and no prior PI failure. PMID:27749561

  11. Acute, subacute and long-term subjective effects of psilocybin in healthy humans: a pooled analysis of experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Studerus, Erich; Kometer, Michael; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2011-11-01

    Psilocybin and related hallucinogenic compounds are increasingly used in human research. However, due to limited information about potential subjective side effects, the controlled medical use of these compounds has remained controversial. We therefore analysed acute, short- and long-term subjective effects of psilocybin in healthy humans by pooling raw data from eight double-blind placebo-controlled experimental studies conducted between 1999 and 2008. The analysis included 110 healthy subjects who had received 1-4 oral doses of psilocybin (45-315 µg/kg body weight). Although psilocybin dose-dependently induced profound changes in mood, perception, thought and self-experience, most subjects described the experience as pleasurable, enriching and non-threatening. Acute adverse drug reactions, characterized by strong dysphoria and/or anxiety/panic, occurred only in the two highest dose conditions in a relatively small proportion of subjects. All acute adverse drug reactions were successfully managed by providing interpersonal support and did not need psychopharmacological intervention. Follow-up questionnaires indicated no subsequent drug abuse, persisting perception disorders, prolonged psychosis or other long-term impairment of functioning in any of our subjects. The results suggest that the administration of moderate doses of psilocybin to healthy, high-functioning and well-prepared subjects in the context of a carefully monitored research environment is associated with an acceptable level of risk.

  12. Long-term Impact of Prevention Programs to Promote Effective Parenting: Lasting Effects but Uncertain Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Irwin; Schoenfelder, Erin; Wolchik, Sharlene; MacKinnon, David

    2010-01-01

    This chapter reviews findings from 46 randomized experimental trials of preventive parenting interventions. The findings of these trials provide evidence of effects to prevent a wide range of problem outcomes and to promote competencies from one to twenty years later. However, there is a paucity of evidence concerning the processes that account for program effects. Three alternative pathways are proposed as a framework for future research on the long-term effects of preventive parenting programs; 1) through program effects on parenting skills, perceptions of parental efficacy and reduction in barriers to effective parenting; 2) through program-induced reductions in short-term problems of youth that persist over time, improvements in youth adaptation to stress, and improvements in youth belief systems concerning the self and their relationships with others; and 3) through effects on contexts in which youth become involved and on youth-environment transactions. PMID:20822438

  13. The causal effects of home care use on institutional long-term care utilization and expenditures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Konetzka, R Tamara; Manning, Willard G

    2015-03-01

    Limited evidence exists on whether expanding home care saves money overall or how much institutional long-term care can be reduced. This paper estimates the causal effect of Medicaid-financed home care services on the costs and utilization of institutional long-term care using Medicaid claims data. A unique instrumental variable was applied to address the potential bias caused by omitted variables or reverse effect of institutional care use. We find that the use of Medicaid-financed home care services significantly reduced but only partially offset utilization and Medicaid expenditures on nursing facility services. A $1000 increase in Medicaid home care expenditures avoided 2.75 days in nursing facilities and reduced annual Medicaid nursing facility costs by $351 among people over age 65 when selection bias is addressed. Failure to address selection biases would misestimate the substitution and offset effects.

  14. Long-term effective decrease of cesium concentration in foodstuffs after nuclear fallout.

    PubMed

    Mück, K

    1997-05-01

    The long-term decrease in activity concentrations in various foodstuffs relevant for the long-term ingestion dose after a nuclear fallout is reviewed. The effective decrease observed in various countries of Central Europe after the Chernobyl accident are compared to the effective decrease observed after the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. The presentation also includes the short-term decline immediately after fallout and the time course in the first year, which are relevant to the first year ingestion dose. The initial effective decrease is dominantly controlled by plant growth and follows an approximate half-life of 4.2 d in lettuce and spinach, and 10.5 d in grass during the growing season, resulting in an effective half-life of 33 d in milk. In order to avoid artifacts due to local fallout or plant variations or differences in the metabolism of single animals, the sampling of each foodstuff was spread over very large areas of production and a large number of samples including investigations in several individual provinces. The long-term decrease over the following years, which is vital for the long-term internal exposure, is slower but still follows an effective half-life for different foodstuffs: milk = 1.4-2.2 y, vegetables = 1.4-2.7 y, potatoes = 2.0-2.6 y, cereals = 3.0-3.4 y, and fruit = 1.2-1.6 y. Differences observed between the different products and areas are discussed. Half-lives in milk vary between three central-European countries from 708 d (Austria), to 663 d (Germany), to 538 d (Czechia). The observed effective half-life is much shorter than observed after nuclear weapons testing where a half-life of approximately 4.5-4.9 y was observed, which is explained by the weapons tests' fallout lasting for several years compared to the single short-term fallout after the Chernobyl accident. PMID:9106706

  15. Long-term versus short-term warming effects on microbial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Tom; Leblans, Niki; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Richter, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Rapid warming in high latitude ecosystems is predicted to drive massive losses of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils to the atmosphere, raising concerns that it will create a positive feedback to climate change. However, such predictions expect that temperature effects on soil microbes, as chief producers of CO2, will persist over time scales meaningful to the climate system (i.e. decades to centuries). There is increasing awareness that the soil microbial community can acclimate to temperature change over time scales from months to years, resulting in attenuating responses of CO2 release to the atmosphere. Despite this, nothing is currently known about long-term warming effects on the activity or physiology of high latitude soil microbes, and, through this, the longevity of CO2 losses from these ecosystems. We conducted a study at a unique research site that makes use of natural (geothermal) gradients in soil temperature that have been in place for over 35 years as a natural warming treatment. We determined long-term warming effects (+0.5 °C, +1.5 °C, +3 °C and +6 °C) on soil CO2 release through microbial respiration in a laboratory incubation experiment, and explored microbial carbon use efficiency and soil carbon and nitrogen pools as mechanisms. We also performed a companion experiment to compare long-term warming effects on microbial processes to those caused by six weeks of warming of ambient soil to +3 °C and +6 °C. We show that while six weeks of warming consistently increased microbial respiration by up to 30%, this effect did not persist in soils exposed to 35 years of warming. We present further data linking such long-term thermal acclimation to shifts in microbial carbon use efficiency and soil carbon and nitrogen availability, and discuss our findings in the context of warming-driven feedbacks from high latitude soils to future climate change.

  16. Comparative analysis of two community stressors' long-term mental health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Dew, M.A.; Bromet, E.J.; Schulberg, H.C.

    1987-04-01

    The investigation directly compared the long-term mental health consequences of two community-wide stressors, the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident and widespread unemployment due to layoff, in demographically comparable samples of women. Results showed a marked degree of similarity in the stressors' effects: Levels of subclinical symptomatology were elevated to similar degrees in each sample during the year following stressor onset, and symptom levels remained elevated in each sample 2 to 3 1/2 years later. Moreover, variables identified as predictors of enduring psychological distress were virtually identical for the two samples. Additional analyses revealed that the mental health status of unemployed husbands mediated the negative psychological effects of layoff on their wives. Implications of these results for understanding the long-term consequences of exposure to community-wide stress are discussed.

  17. A comparative analysis of two community stressors' long-term mental health effects.

    PubMed

    Dew, M A; Bromet, E J; Schulberg, H C

    1987-04-01

    The investigation directly compared the long-term mental health consequences of two community-wide stressors, the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident and widespread unemployment due to layoff, in demographically comparable samples of women. Results showed a marked degree of similarity in the stressors' effects: Levels of subclinical symptomatology were elevated to similar degrees in each sample during the year following stressor onset, and symptom levels remained elevated in each sample 2 to 3 1/2 years later. Moreover, variables identified as predictors of enduring psychological distress were virtually identical for the two samples. Additional analyses revealed that the mental health status of unemployed husbands mediated the negative psychological effects of layoff on their wives. Implications of these results for understanding the long-term consequences of exposure to community-wide stress are discussed. PMID:3604998

  18. Self-reported long-term effects of diving and decompression illness in recreational scuba divers.

    PubMed

    McQueen, D; Kent, G; Murrison, A

    1994-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the long-term effects of neurological decompression illness (NDCI) on recreational divers. Thirty-seven divers who had been treated for neurological decompression illness at least 2 years previously, and a control group of 50 divers with no history of decompression illness, responded to a postal questionnaire. Divers in the accident group reported more symptoms of neurological damage, were more likely to believe that diving had a deleterious effect on their health and were more likely to indicate symptoms of psychiatric morbidity. The quantity of diving in the year preceding the survey was associated with reports of neurological damage in both groups and with symptoms of psychiatric morbidity in the accident group. Although requiring confirmation from a longitudinal study, these results suggest that recreational diving can have negative long-term consequences for health, particularly after decompression illness.

  19. The effects, limitations, and long-term dentofacial adaptations to treatment with the Herbst appliance.

    PubMed

    Pancherz, H

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the existing scientific data with respect to the short- and long-term effects of the Herbst appliance on the occlusion and on the maxillo/mandibular complex. The article also discusses the treatment indications and possible treatment limitations. The Herbst method is most effective in the treatment of Class II malocclusions. Long-term stability seems to be dependent on a stable cuspal interdigitation. Marked mandibular morphological changes occur during therapy and sagittal condylar growth is increased. Posttreatment, most of the mandibular morphological changes revert and no long-term influence of Herbst treatment on mandibular growth can be verified. The appliance effect on the maxillary complex can be compared with that of a high-pull headgear. Without proper retention, however, this effect is of a temporary nature. Herbst treatment is especially indicated in the permanent dentition at or just after the pubertal peak of growth. Mixed dentition treatment is not recommended, as a stable cuspal interdigitation after therapy is difficult to achieve and relapses are prone to occur. In the nongrowing patient, the appliance should be used with great caution.

  20. Organotypic cultures as tool to test long-term effects of chemicals on the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Peña, F

    2010-01-01

    The study of neuroscience has vastly benefited from the use of brain slices. This preparation has been fundamental for the understanding of the cellular basis of nervous system function as well as for the study of the mechanisms involved in neuronal network dysfunction. This experimental model provides flexible access, and control of, specific neural circuits and maintains their basic properties, allowing them to reproduce most of their natural network activities. Brain slices permit the combination of sophisticated techniques such as electrophysiology, fluorescence imaging, pharmacology, molecular biology, etc. More recently, the development of organotypic brain slice cultures has expanded the use of modern technical approaches to the study neuronal networks, while increasing their possibilities of evaluating long-term effects of acute experimental conditions, as well as the effects of chronic treatments on neuronal network function in vitro. Here, I will provide an overview of the use of organotypic cultures to understand neuronal network function and dysfunction, as well as the pharmacological approaches used for these studies. As a final example, I will review the studies performed in organotypic cultures regarding the deleterious effects of long-term amyloid beta application on neuronal networks in vitro, as well as the use of drugs that may prevent or revert their deleterious effects on nervous system function. Overall, this review will provide elements to support the use of organotypic cultures as a very reliable model to explore long-term neuropharmacological studies in vitro. PMID:20156165

  1. Multicenter field trial on possible health effects of toluene. III. Evaluation of effects after long-term exposure.

    PubMed

    Gericke, C; Hanke, B; Beckmann, G; Baltes, M M; Kühl, K P; Neubert, D

    2001-11-15

    In rotogravure industry, contributing considerably to mass color printing of catalogues and magazines, toluene is still extensively used as paint solvent, and many printers have been exposed to this chemical for several decades. Information on adverse health effects associated with long-term toluene exposure is still controversial. In a multi-center study, adverse health effects possibly associated with long-term toluene exposure were evaluated. In 12 rotogravure factories, 1226 male volunteers were recruited, and sufficient information on exposure and on medical data was compiled for about 1077 of them. Evaluations included: physical examination, standard tests of psycho-physiological and psycho-motoric performances, self-report of subjective symptoms, and data on a variety of laboratory blood tests. The medical data were correlated with the length (months) of toluene exposure, and a rough estimate of the extent of exposure (i.e. highly exposed printers and their helpers versus employees working at locations with low or negligible toluene exposure). A small reference group (n=109) was selected from companies of the paper industry. When linear regression curves were calculated (test results versus duration of exposure), extremely low overall coefficients of determination (r(2) adj.) of a few percent were estimated within the data clouds, with sometimes statistically significant P-values. Closer analyses revealed a strong influence of the confounding factor age, no clustering of abnormal values of highly toluene-exposed volunteers, and the vast majority or all values of the highly and long-term toluene-exposed participants staying within the reference ranges. Thus, no medical relevance of P-values <0.05 could be recognized in this evaluation, and there may have been some border-line deviations or results largely occurring by chance in the large trial. In a small cluster of the many rotogravure printers toluene-exposed for more than 20 years, the highest systolic

  2. Working memory training shows immediate and long-term effects on cognitive performance in children.

    PubMed

    Pugin, Fiona; Metz, Andreas J; Stauffer, Madlaina; Wolf, Martin; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2014-01-01

    Working memory is important for mental reasoning and learning processes. Several studies in adults and school-age children have shown performance improvement in cognitive tests after working memory training. Our aim was to examine not only immediate but also long-term effects of intensive working memory training on cognitive performance tests in children. Fourteen healthy male subjects between 10 and 16 years trained a visuospatial n-back task over 3 weeks (30 min daily), while 15 individuals of the same age range served as a passive control group. Significant differences in immediate (after 3 weeks of training) and long-term effects (after 2-6 months) in an auditory n-back task were observed compared to controls (2.5 fold immediate and 4.7 fold long-term increase in the training group compared to the controls). The improvement was more pronounced in subjects who improved their performance during the training. Other cognitive functions (matrices test and Stroop task) did not change when comparing the training group to the control group. We conclude that visuospatial working memory training in children boosts performance in similar memory tasks such as the auditory n-back task. The sustained performance improvement several months after the training supports the effectiveness of the training. PMID:25671082

  3. Long term side effects of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jessica J; Visvanathan, Kala; Wolff, Antonio C

    2015-11-01

    Adjuvant systemic therapy along with screening has been key to the observed improvements in disease-free and overall survival (DFS/OS) in breast cancer. Improvements in overall survival already take into account therapy related toxicities that can result in death. However, this measure alone does not adequately capture the impact on health-related quality of life. Therefore, it is important to examine the prevalence, frequency and short/long-term impact of therapy-related toxicities, identify patients who might be at greatest risk. Ultimately decisions regarding expected therapy benefits (relative and absolute percentage improvements in DFS/OS) must be made against a background of known potential harms. For many patients with early breast cancer (EBC), their risk of recurrence is not zero but is small. At the same time, for many therapies for early stage breast cancer, the risk of serious side effects is small but is not zero. As we better understand the long-term side effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and targeted therapy, it becomes critical to integrate our growing understanding of breast cancer biology with standard high-quality histopathologic measures to better identify the patients most likely to benefit from the various options for combined multimodality therapy. Hence, we must strive against the notion of recommending adjuvant systemic chemotherapy "just in case." This article focuses on the long-term side effects of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with EBC.

  4. Effects of long-term hypergravity treatment on the development of inflorescence stems of arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahara, Ichirou; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Shinohara, Hironori; Kume, Atsushi; Inoue, Hiroshi

    Hypergravity experiments with plants have been mostly performed using a commercial centrifuge in the dark. In order to see longer-term effect of hypergravity on the development of plant shoots, however, it is necessary to carry out the experiments in the light. In the present study, we have set up a centrifuge equipped with lighting system, which supports long-term plant growth under hypergravity condition, in order to see long-term effects of hypergravity on the development of vascular tissues of inflorescence stems. Arabidopsis plants (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., Col-0), which were grown under 1 G conditions for 20-23 days and having the first visible flower bud, i.e., at Arabidopsis growth stage number 5 (according to Boys et al., 2001), were selected as the plant material. These plants were exposed to hypergravity stimulus at 10 G in a direction from the shoot to root for 10 days in the continuous light. Effects of hypergravity on growth of inflorescence stems, lignin content, and morphometrical parameters of the stem tissues were examined. As a result, the length of the inflorescence stem was decreased. Cross sectional area as well as cell number, and lignin content in the stem were increased under hypergravity. The length of basal internodes of the stem was decreased under hypergravity. In conclusion, the inflorescence stem was suggested to be strengthened through changes in its morphological characteristics as well as lignin deposition under long-term hypergravity conditions.

  5. Metabolomics Insights into the Modulatory Effects of Long-Term Low Calorie Intake in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junfang; Yang, Liu; Li, Shoufeng; Huang, Ping; Liu, Yong; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that calorie restriction without malnutrition can extend longevity and delay the onset of age-associated disorders. Identifying the biochemical perturbations associated with different dietary habits would provide valuable insights into associations between metabolism and longevity. To reveal the effects of long-term dietary interventions on metabolic perturbations, we investigated serum and urinary metabolic changes induced by interactive high/low fat diet in combination with/without reduced caloric intake over a life span in mice using NMR-based metabonomics. We found that the high calorie dietary regime disturbed lipid metabolism, suppressed glycolysis and TCA cycles, stimulated oxidative stress, promoted nucleotide metabolism and gluconeogenesis, and perturbed gut microbiota-host interactions. Such changes could be modified by long-term low calorie intake. Most importantly, we found that the calorie intake index exerts a dominant effect on metabolic perturbations irrespective of dietary regime. Our investigation provides a holistic view of the metabolic impact of long-term dietary interventions, which are important for detecting physiological changes and dietary effects on mammalian metabolism.

  6. The effect of gene interactions on the long-term response to selection

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Tiago; Barton, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of gene interactions in the evolutionary process has long been controversial. Although some argue that they are not of importance, because most variation is additive, others claim that their effect in the long term can be substantial. Here, we focus on the long-term effects of genetic interactions under directional selection assuming no mutation or dominance, and that epistasis is symmetrical overall. We ask by how much the mean of a complex trait can be increased by selection and analyze two extreme regimes, in which either drift or selection dominate the dynamics of allele frequencies. In both scenarios, epistatic interactions affect the long-term response to selection by modulating the additive genetic variance. When drift dominates, we extend Robertson’s [Robertson A (1960) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 153(951):234−249] argument to show that, for any form of epistasis, the total response of a haploid population is proportional to the initial total genotypic variance. In contrast, the total response of a diploid population is increased by epistasis, for a given initial genotypic variance. When selection dominates, we show that the total selection response can only be increased by epistasis when some initially deleterious alleles become favored as the genetic background changes. We find a simple approximation for this effect and show that, in this regime, it is the structure of the genotype−phenotype map that matters and not the variance components of the population. PMID:27044080

  7. Effects of long-term corset wearing on chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoto; Sekiguchi, Miho; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Shishido, Hiroaki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Konno, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    There are few studies of the therapeutic effects of long-term corset wearing in patients with chronic low back pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term corset wearing on chronic low back pain and to examine the myoelectrical activities of the paravertebral muscles. Forty subjects with chronic low back pain were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups: a group wearing corsets for 6 months (CW) group and a group not wearing corsets (NW). The treatment effects were measured using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Muscle endurance was evaluated during the Biering-Sorensen test (S-test), and the degree of muscle fatigue was evaluated by the change in percent mean power frequency (%MPF) of the paravertebral muscles. Corset treatment for chronic low back pain improved low back pain and increased muscle endurance for a short period of time. Paravertebral muscle fatigue was not increased by long-term corset wearing for chronic low back pain, and weakening of the paravertebral muscles was not observed up to 6 months after the start of corset wearing.

  8. Flood effects on an Alaskan stream restoration project: the value of long-term monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Roseann V.; Karle, Kenneth F.

    2009-01-01

    On a nationwide basis, few stream restoration projects have long-term programs in place to monitor the effects of floods on channel and floodplain configuration and floodplain vegetation, but long-term and event-based monitoring is required to measure the effects of these stochastic events and to use the knowledge for adaptive management and the design of future projects. This paper describes a long-term monitoring effort (15 years) on a stream restoration project in Glen Creek in Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska. The stream channel and floodplain of Glen Creek had been severely degraded over a period of 80 years by placer mining for gold, which left many reaches with unstable and incised streambeds without functioning vegetated floodplains. The objectives of the original project, initiated in 1991, were to develop and test methods for the hydraulic design of channel and floodplain morphology and for floodplain stabilization and riparian habitat recovery, and to conduct research and monitoring to provide information for future projects in similar degraded watersheds. Monitoring methods included surveyed stream cross-sections, vegetation plots, and aerial, ground, and satellite photos. In this paper we address the immediate and outlying effects of a 25-year flood on the stream and floodplain geometry and riparian vegetation. The long-term monitoring revealed that significant channel widening occurred following the flood, likely caused by excessive upstream sediment loading and the fairly slow development of floodplain vegetation in this climate. Our results illustrated design flaws, particularly in regard to identification and analysis of sediment sources and the dominant processes of channel adjustment.

  9. [Combined effects of benzene and chromium on navigation learning and long-term spatial memory in rats].

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, V V; Ermolina, E V; Miroshnichenko, I V

    2009-01-01

    The impact of long-term intake of drinking water containing the high level of chromium and benzene or their mixture on navigation learning and long-term spatial memory was studied in a Morris water maze. The chronic neurotoxic effect of benzene was characterized by worse long-term memory, which upon its exposure in combination with chromium remained unchanged and failed to block the realization of a positive effect of chromium on the mechanism of navigation learning.

  10. Impact of Antiphospholipid Syndrome and/or Systemic Lupus Erythematosus on the Long-term Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bundhun, Pravesh Kumar; Boodhoo, Kamini Devi; Long, Man-Yun; Chen, Meng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are 2 rare autoimmune disorders which commonly affect women. Several previous studies showed APS to have been evolved from SLE. Secondary APS often coexists with SLE. One common feature relating these 2 diseases are the antiphospholipid antibodies, which are found in most of the patients with APS and in approximately 30% to 40% of patients with SLE, among which, about 10% develop APS. The leading cause of death in these patients is from cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis, which often progresses more rapidly, compared with the general population. However, the impact of APS and/or SLE on the cardiovascular outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is controversial. Therefore, to solve this issue, we aim to compare the long-term (≥1 year) adverse cardiovascular outcomes after PCI, in patients with APS and/or SLE, and those without these disorders. Medline and EMBASE databases were searched for studies comparing the long-term adverse cardiovascular outcomes between SLE and non-SLE, APS and non-APS, or SLE + APS and non-SLE + non-APS after PCI. We calculated odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for these categorical variables, and the pooled analyses were performed with RevMan 5.3. Seven studies consisting of a total of 253,436 patients (568 patients in the experimental group and 252,868 patients in the control group) were included in this meta-analysis. During a follow-up period of ≥1 year, mortality and myocardial Infarction (MI) were significantly higher in the experimental group (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.63–2.49, P < 0.00001 and OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.23–2.05, P = 0.0004, respectively). Major adverse cardiac events and repeated revascularization were also significantly higher in the SLE/APS group (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.42–4.03, P = 0.001 and OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.26–5.31, P = 0.01, respectively). Antiphospholipid

  11. Cold Temperature Effects on Long-Term Nitrogen Transformation Pathway in a Tidal Flow Constructed Wetland.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yunmeng; Zhang, Yan; Yan, Xingjun; Ji, Guodong

    2015-11-17

    The present study investigated long-term treatment performance and nitrogen transformation mechanisms in tidal flow constructed wetlands (TFCWs) under 4, 8, and 12 °C temperature regimes. High and stable ammonium (NH4(+)-N) removal efficiency (93-96%) was achieved in our TFCWs, whereas nitrate (NO3(-)-N) was accumulated at different levels under different temperatures. Quantitative response relationships showed anammox/amoA, (narG+napA)/amoA, and (narG+napA)/bacteria were the respective key functional gene groups determining 4, 8, and 12 °C NO3(-)-N reduction. Pathway analysis revealed the contribution of these functional gene groups along a depth gradient. In addition, denitrification process increased, while anammox process decreased consistent with a rise in temperature from 4 to 12 °C. Furthermore, cold temperatures exhibited different effects on anammox and denitrification and their long-term acclimatization capacities changed with temperature.

  12. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention.

  13. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention.

  14. Assessment of the potential for long-term toxicological effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on birds and mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper assesses the potential for direct long-term toxicological effects of exposures to oils in birds and mammals by tracing exposures and effects form the initial cute phases through the sub-chronic to the eventual long-term exposures. The immediate effects of oil spills are physical, the oil acting on the plumage of birds or the fur of mammals. This causes a loss of entrained air and a concomitant reduction in buoyancy and thermal insulation. Animals that escape the immediate impacts may be isolated from their food supply and often ingest large amounts of oil while attempting to clean themselves. At the comparatively high dose levels involved, these exposures can result in toxicologically significant responses in many organ systems. In the course of an oil pollution incident, the amounts of biologically available oils decrease steadily, and simultaneously the composition of the oils shifts towards those components that have low volatility, and that resist photo- and bio-degradation. As this occurs, the primary pathways of exposure change from direct intakes to indirect routes involving the food supply. Although laboratory studies often report finding some adverse effects, the dose rates employed in many of these studies are extremely high when compared with those that are potentially available to animals in the wild, and very few actually use weathered oils. An assessment of the toxicological literature and of the available empirical data on the Exxon Valdez oil spill leads to the conclusion that long-term sub-lethal toxic effects of crude oils on wildlife in such marine spills appear to be very unlikely. 111 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Mutual long-term effects of school bullying, victimization, and justice sensitivity in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bondü, Rebecca; Rothmund, Tobias; Gollwitzer, Mario

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, we investigate long-term relations between experiences of aggression at school and the development of justice sensitivity as a personality disposition in adolescents. We assessed justice sensitivity (from the victim, observer, and perpetrator perspective), bullying, and victimization among 565 German 12- to 18-year-olds in a one-year longitudinal study with two measurement points. Latent path analyses revealed gender differences in long-term effects of bullying and victimization on observer sensitivity and victim sensitivity. Experiences of victimization at T1 predicted an increase in victim sensitivity among girls and a decrease in victim sensitivity among boys. Bullying behavior at T1 predicted an increase in victim sensitivity among boys and a decrease in observer sensitivity among girls. We did not find long-term effects of justice sensitivity on bullying and victimization. Our findings indicate that experiences of bullying and victimization have gender-specific influences on the development of moral personality dispositions in adolescents. PMID:26874784

  16. Protein aggregation in E. coli : short term and long term effects of nutrient density.

    PubMed

    Baig, Ulfat I; Bhadbhade, Bharati J; Mariyam, Dincy; Watve, Milind G

    2014-01-01

    During exponential growth some cells of E. coli undergo senescence mediated by asymmetric segregation of damaged components, particularly protein aggregates. We showed previously that functional cell division asymmetry in E. coli was responsive to the nutritional environment. Short term exposure as well as long term selection in low calorie environments led to greater cell division symmetry and decreased frequency of senescent cells as compared to high calorie environments. We show here that long term selection in low nutrient environment decreased protein aggregation as revealed by fluorescence microscopy and proportion of insoluble proteins. Across selection lines protein aggregation was correlated significantly positively with the RNA content, presumably indicating metabolic rate. This suggests that the effects of caloric restriction on cell division symmetry and aging in E. coli may work via altered protein handling mechanisms. The demonstrable effects of long term selection on protein aggregation suggest that protein aggregation is an evolvable phenomenon rather than being a passive inevitable process. The aggregated proteins progressively disappeared on facing starvation indicating degradation and recycling demonstrating that protein aggregation is a reversible process in E. coli. PMID:25210787

  17. Effect of long-term fertilization on total soil arsenic in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; He, Ji-Zheng

    2010-05-01

    To assess the effects of long-term fertilization on arsenic (As) accumulation in soils and crops with different agricultural practices, five experimental stations (Changshu, Taoyuan, Hailun, Fengqiu, and Qiyang) with long-term fertilization practices, representing five typical soils of China, were selected to investigate the soil As concentrations. Results indicated that the geological source, that is, parent materials, played a dominant role in determining the soil As concentrations. Long-term application of manure and phosphorus fertilizers led to a decrease of As concentration in the surface paddy soil at Taoyuan, while the effects of fertilization on As concentration in other samples were minimal. In addition, other agricultural practices, such as the removal of crop biomass, reduced the As concentrations in the surface soils with low levels of soil As (Fengqiu, Changshu, and Taoyuan). In the upland soils with higher As concentrations, wheat may have risk to human health through food-chain and maize can be considered as a favorable crop. PMID:20586774

  18. Long-term behavioral effects in a rat model of prolonged postnatal morphine exposure.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael M; Bajic, Dusica

    2015-10-01

    Prolonged morphine treatment in neonatal pediatric populations is associated with a high incidence of opioid tolerance and dependence. Despite the clinical relevance of this problem, our knowledge of long-term consequences is sparse. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether prolonged morphine administration in a neonatal rat is associated with long-term behavioral changes in adulthood. Newborn animals received either morphine (10 mg/kg) or equal volume of saline subcutaneously twice daily for the first 2 weeks of life. Morphine-treated animals underwent 10 days of morphine weaning to reduce the potential for observable physical signs of withdrawal. Animals were subjected to nonstressful testing (locomotor activity recording and a novel-object recognition test) at a young age (Postnatal Days [PDs] 27-31) or later in adulthood (PDs 55-56), as well as stressful testing (calibrated forceps test, hot plate test, and forced swim test) only in adulthood. Analysis revealed that prolonged neonatal morphine exposure resulted in decreased thermal but not mechanical threshold. Importantly, no differences were found for total locomotor activity (proxy of drug reward/reinforcement behavior), individual forced swim test behaviors (proxy of affective processing), or novel-object recognition test. Performance on the novel-object recognition test was compromised in the morphine-treated group at the young age, but the effect disappeared in adulthood. These novel results provide insight into the long-term consequences of opioid treatment during an early developmental period and suggest long-term neuroplastic differences in sensory processing related to thermal stimuli.

  19. LONG-TERM BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS IN A RAT MODEL OF PROLONGED POSTNATAL MORPHINE EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Michael M.; Bajic, Dusica

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged morphine treatment in neonatal pediatric populations is associated with a high incidence of opioid tolerance and dependence. Despite the clinical relevance of this problem, our knowledge of the long-term consequences is sparse. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether prolonged morphine administration in a neonatal rat is associated with long-term behavioral changes in adulthood. Newborn animals received either morphine (10mg/kg) or equal volume of saline subcutaneously twice daily for the first 2 weeks of life. Morphine treated animals underwent 10 days of morphine weaning to reduce the potential for observable physical signs of withdrawal. Animals were subjected to non-stressful testing (locomotor activity recording and a Novel-Object Recognition test) at a young age (PD27-31) or later in adulthood (PD55-56), as well as stressful testing (calibrated forceps test, Hot Plate test, and Forced Swim test) only in adulthood. Analysis revealed that prolonged neonatal morphine exposure resulted in decreased thermal, but not mechanical threshold. Importantly, no differences were found for total locomotor activity (proxy of drug reward/reinforcement behavior), individual Forced Swim test behaviors (proxy of affective processing), or Novel-Object Recognition test. Performance on the Novel-Object Recognition test was compromised in the morphine treated group at the young age, however the effect disappeared in adulthood. These novel results provide insight into the long-term consequences of opioid treatment during an early developmental period and suggest long-term neuroplastic differences in sensory processing related to thermal stimuli. PMID:26214209

  20. Testicular germ cell tumor: Short and long-term side effects of treatment among survivors

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Thierry; Sideris, Spyridon; Aoun, Fouad; van Velthoven, Roland; Sirtaine, Nicolas; Paesmans, Marianne; Ameye, Lieveke; Awada, Ahmad; Devriendt, Daniel; Peltier, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Long-term prognosis of germ cell tumor (GCT) types is excellent, however, treatment is associated with non-negligible complication rates and a negative impact on quality of life. The present study described treatment results in terms of survival, both short and long-term toxicity, and paternity rates in a cohort of patients treated at Jules Bordet Institute, University ULB of Brussels (Brussels, Belgium). The present study analyzed the data of a cohort of patients with GCT types. Pre-operative patient and tumor characteristics were described. Performance status, pulmonary function tests and renal clearance prior to chemotherapy were noted. Chemotherapeutic regimens and their associated toxicities were analyzed. The duration to event-free, cancer-specific and overall survivals were estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves. A total of 115 patients (median age, 31-years-old) were treated for a GCT at Jules Bordet Institute. At a median follow-up of 6-years, 11 (10%) patients had relapsed and 2 (2%) developed a second malignant neoplasm. At the final follow-up, 97 (89%) and 6 (5.5%) patients exhibited complete and partial remission, respectively. A total of 6% of patients exhibited a progressive disease. In terms of short-term toxicity, 11% of patients presented with febrile neutropenia. The 10-year overall survival rate and relapse-free survival rate were 93.4 and 89.8%, respectively. The paternity rate post-treatment was 27%. Testicular GCT survivors suffered from short- and long-term treatment-associated side effects on both a physical and psychological level. A long-term close follow-up is necessary in order to assist the patient with these treatment-induced complications. PMID:27588190

  1. Effect of long-term drainage of peatland on whole-profile microbial community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mpamah, Promise; Taipale, Sami; Rissanen, Antti; Biasi, Christina; Nykänen, Hannu

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands are crucial global carbon stores largely due to prevailing hydrological regime leading to higher rate of carbon input than loss. Like other changes in environmental conditions, alteration in peatland water table, which causes increased aeration in the upper layer, does not only cause a shift in this exchange rates, but leads to changes in plant species cover, litter quality as well as the niches of microbes, by affecting their functions and activities. Effects of changes in peatland hydrology are therefore complex, and play a key role in peat carbon cycles. Changed peat hydrology may especially affect the inter-play between methanogens and methanotrophs which are important members of the microbial community taking part in anaerobic/aerobic peatland carbon cycles. We provide more information on the effect of long-term (more than 33 years) changes in hydrology on the whole-peat-profile microbes, from top to bottom. We studied drained and adjacent non-drained peatlands in Lakkasuo mire complex and Lammi area of Finland, which differed in vegetation cover and management history. We focused majorly on the phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis as an indicator of the overall microbial community structure, but also used DNA analysis to mainly compare the methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) of the different peatland types with different vegetation. Our PLFA results showed that peat mire complexes are more similar in their microbial community, within location and profiles than between locations irrespective of hydrological changes and types or vegetation covers. PLFA and DNA analysis also showed that MOB species belonging to type II were more dominant than those of type I in both locations studied. Our study also showed that long-term draining of peatlands does not change the biomass of soil microbial communities, but alters their structural or relative composition. The effect of long-term peatland drainage is mostly located at the surface. Depth gradient effects

  2. Effect of Chronic Medical Conditions in Veterans with Multiple Sclerosis on Long-Term Disability

    PubMed Central

    Rabadi, Meheroz H.; Aston, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this observational study was to examine the effect of common chronic medical conditions (CMCs) on long-term disability (activity limitation) in veterans already diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Material/Methods We retrospectively reviewed the electronic charts of 124 veterans with MS who have been regularly followed in our MS clinic for 10 or more years. General linear model analysis examined whether MS-related severity as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the presence of CMCs affected long-term disability as measured by the total score on the Functional Independence Measure (TFIM). Results Commonly encountered CMCs were increased BMI (61%), hyperlipidemia (78%), hypertension (65%), current smokers (47%), and arthritis/arthralgia (24%). Results suggest that the number of CMCs was not predictive of final TFIM scores; of the variables examined, only initial EDSS score was predictive of final TFIM scores. Conclusions The presence of CMCs did not affect the long-term disability in veterans diagnosed with MS, this was due mainly to CMCs being closely monitored and co-treated with other medical specialties. PMID:27494787

  3. Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Orthopedic Biodegradable Implants

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ami R.; Wallace, James S.; Nukavarapu, Syam P.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, orthopedic and oral/maxillofacial implants represent a combined $2.8 billion market, a figure expected to experience significant and continued growth. Although traditional permanent implants have been proved clinically efficacious, they are also associated with several drawbacks, including secondary revision and removal surgeries. Non-permanent, biodegradable implants offer a promising alternative for patients, as they provide temporary support and degrade at a rate matching tissue formation, and thus, eliminate the need for secondary surgeries. These implants have been in clinical use for nearly 25 years, competing directly with, or maybe even exceeding, the performance of permanent implants. The initial implantation of biodegradable materials, as with permanent materials, mounts an acute host inflammatory response. Over time, the implant degradation profile and possible degradation product toxicity mediate long-term biodegradable implant-induced inflammation. However, unlike permanent implants, this inflammation is likely to cease once the material disappears. Implant-mediated inflammation is a critical determinant for implant success. Thus, for the development of a proactive biodegradable implant that has the ability to promote optimal bone regeneration and minimal detrimental inflammation, a thorough understanding of short- and long-term inflammatory events is required. Here, we discuss an array of biodegradable orthopedic implants, their associated short- and long- term inflammatory effects, and methods to mediate these inflammatory events. PMID:22043969

  4. Long-term effects of home rehabilitation on physical performance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wijkstra, P J; van der Mark, T W; Kraan, J; van Altena, R; Koëter, G H; Postma, D S

    1996-04-01

    A pilot study was set up to assess the long-term effects of once weekly versus once monthly follow-up of pulmonary rehabilitation after a comprehensive home rehabilitation program on physical performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) during an 18-mo period. Thirty-six patients with a mean FEV1 of 1.3 +/- 0.4 L (43% pred) were included in the study. Groups A and B (n = 23) visited the physical therapist twice weekly for 3 mo. Thereafter, 11 patients (Group A) had a follow-up of pulmonary rehabilitation once a week, and 12 patients (Group B) had a follow-up once a month. Thirteen patients received no rehabilitation at all (Group C). Long-term home rehabilitation does not appear to improve exercise tolerance; however, on the other hand, there is a deterioration in vital capacity (p < 0.01), walking distance (p < 0.01), and maximal work load (p < 0.05), as shown in the control group. A small improvement in exertional dyspnea (p < 0.01) after 18 mo and inspiratory muscle function (p < 0.05) after 12 mo was shown only in Group A. Because of the insufficient number of patients enrolled in this pilot study, no clear benefit on physical performance of long-term home rehabilitation with either weekly or monthly supervision could be demonstrated.

  5. Effect of urbanization on the long-term persistence of streamflow records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Tijana; Mejía, Alfonso; Gall, Heather; Gironás, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    We investigate here the effect of urbanization on the temporal behavior of streamflow records. To this end, we analyzed daily streamflow records from 22 urban basins using the scaling exponents for long-term correlated records and the multifractality strength. Additionally, we separated the streamflow into fast and slow components and performed the analysis separately on each of these time series. Overall, results indicate that in the most urbanized basins, with percent impervious cover greater than 25, the long-term correlation exponents for streamflow are generally lower than in the least urbanized basins (percent impervious cover less than 10), while the multifractality strength does not seem to be appreciably affected by the urbanization process. Based on the correlation exponents, we also found that in the most urbanized basins streamflow records tend to be more similar to quickflow and precipitation than in the least urbanized basins. Thus, the loss of long-term persistence in the most urbanized basins may be explained by their lesser ability, due to the combined presence of impervious surfaces and conventional stormwater infrastructure, to filter the precipitation forcing. We conclude that the correlation exponents can be useful for assessing the temporal alteration of streamflow in urban basins.

  6. Long-term Effects of Shrub Encroachment and Grazing on Soil Microbial Composition and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallery, R. E.; O'Shea, C.; Kwiecien, A.; Predick, K.; Archer, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Drylands account for ca. 35% of terrestrial net primary productivity and thus play a significant role in global water and biogeochemical cycles. Replacement of grasses by shrubs has been widespread in these systems and has altered rates of erosion and native plant biodiversity and productivity. The net effect of these changes on biogeochemical cycling is not well understood. Projected warmer and drier conditions may further alter the function and stability of these ecosystems and soil resources through direct effects on soil microbiota and plant-microbe interactions. We quantified microbial community responses to long-term livestock grazing and shrub encroachment in a Sonoran Desert grassland. We sought to characterize tipping points where biotic controls over ecosystem processes shift from being 'grass-driven' to 'shrub-driven.' We asked: How do livestock grazing (the predominant land use in dryland ecosystems) and shrub invasion (a predominant land cover change) interact to influence microbial biomass and the relative abundance of bacteria, archaea, and fungi and their extracellular enzyme activities? Surface soil from bare-ground patches, native and invasive grass rhizospheres, and bole and canopy dripline locations in patches of mature mesquite trees in long-term grazed and long-term (70+ y) protected pastures were collected and analyzed for microbial community composition, biomass, potential exoenzyme activities, and a suite of biogeochemical characteristics. We found no differences in microbial communities or the soils associated with native vs. exotic grasses. Overall, mesquite bole patches differed from other patches in all soil characteristics except potential enzyme activity: soil temperature was significantly lower, and total carbon (C) and soil moisture were significantly higher. Potential activities were lowest for bare ground and highest at shrub dripline patches for all seven exoenzymes tested. Mean potential activities for C and phosphorous (P

  7. Development of a cost-effective and flexible vibration DAQ system for long-term continuous structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Theanh; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Thambiratnam, David P.; King, Les

    2015-12-01

    In the structural health monitoring (SHM) field, long-term continuous vibration-based monitoring is becoming increasingly popular as this could keep track of the health status of structures during their service lives. However, implementing such a system is not always feasible due to on-going conflicts between budget constraints and the need of sophisticated systems to monitor real-world structures under their demanding in-service conditions. To address this problem, this paper presents a comprehensive development of a cost-effective and flexible vibration DAQ system for long-term continuous SHM of a newly constructed institutional complex with a special focus on the main building. First, selections of sensor type and sensor positions are scrutinized to overcome adversities such as low-frequency and low-level vibration measurements. In order to economically tackle the sparse measurement problem, a cost-optimized Ethernet-based peripheral DAQ model is first adopted to form the system skeleton. A combination of a high-resolution timing coordination method based on the TCP/IP command communication medium and a periodic system resynchronization strategy is then proposed to synchronize data from multiple distributed DAQ units. The results of both experimental evaluations and experimental-numerical verifications show that the proposed DAQ system in general and the data synchronization solution in particular work well and they can provide a promising cost-effective and flexible alternative for use in real-world SHM projects. Finally, the paper demonstrates simple but effective ways to make use of the developed monitoring system for long-term continuous structural health evaluation as well as to use the instrumented building herein as a multi-purpose benchmark structure for studying not only practical SHM problems but also synchronization related issues.

  8. The long-term effects of the herbicide atrazine on the dopaminergic system following exposure during pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanshu; Sun, Yan; Yang, Junwei; Wu, Yanping; Yu, Jia; Li, Baixiang

    2014-03-15

    Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) is used worldwide as a herbicide, and its presence in the environment has resulted in documented human exposure. Atrazine has been shown to cause dopaminergic neurotoxicity. The juvenile period is particularly vulnerable to environmental agents, but only few studies have investigated the long-term effects of atrazine following exposure during the pubertal development. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of a 41-day exposure to atrazine on the dopaminergic system in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally with atrazine at 25 or 50mg/kg bw, daily from postnatal day 22 to 62. The content of dopamine (DA) was examined in striatum samples by HPLC-FL, and the mRNA and protein expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), orphan nuclear hormone (Nurr1), dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoaminetransporter 2 (VMAT2) were examined in samples of the ventral mid-brain by use of fluorescence PCR and Western-blot analysis when the rats reached the age of one year. Exposure of juvenile rats to the high dose of atrazine led to reduced levels of DA and mRNA of Nurr1 in one-year-old animals. This study shows that the long-term adverse effects of atrazine on the dopaminergic system have a special relevance after juvenile exposure.

  9. The Long-Term Effects of Child Sexual Abuse by Female Perpetrators: A Qualitative Study of Male and Female Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denov, Myriam S.

    2004-01-01

    Although the long-term effects of sexual abuse by men have been studied extensively, minimal research has explored the effects of sexual abuse by women. This qualitative study explores the experience and long-term impact of sexual abuse by women. The data were derived from in-depth interviews with 14 adult victims (7 men, 7 women) of child sexual…

  10. Long-term priority effects among insects and fungi colonizing decaying wood

    PubMed Central

    Weslien, Jan; Djupström, Line B; Schroeder, Martin; Widenfalk, Olof

    2011-01-01

    1. Priority effects have been hypothesized to have long-lasting impact on community structure in natural ecosystems. Long-term studies of priority effects in natural ecosystems are however sparse, especially in terrestrial ecosystems. 2. Wood decay is a slow process involving a high diversity of insect and fungus species. Species interactions that drive change in communities of insects and fungi during wood decay are poorly understood because of a lack of sufficient long-term studies. 3. In this paper, we followed the colonization and succession of wood-living insects and fungi on cut trees during 15 years, from tree death and onwards, in a boreal forest landscape. We test the long-term priority effects hypothesis that the identity and abundance of species that colonize first affect the colonization success of later-arriving species. We also hypothesize that species interact in both facilitative and inhibitory ways, which ultimately affect habitat quality for a red-listed late-succession beetle species. 4. Possible causal associations between species were explored by path analysis. The results indicate that one bark beetle species, Hylurgops palliatus, and one wood-borer species, Monochamus sutor, which colonized the wood during the first year after cutting, influenced the occurrence of a rare, wood-living beetle, Peltis grossa, that started to emerge from the stumps about 10 years later. The positive effects of Hylurgops palliatus and negative effects of M. sutor were largely mediated through the wood-decaying fungus species Fomitopsis pinicola. 5. The study shows that variable priority effects may have long-lasting impact on community assembly in decaying wood. The study also exemplifies new possibilities for managing populations of threatened species by exploring links between early, well-understood species guilds and late, more poorly understood species guilds. PMID:21569031

  11. Long-term priority effects among insects and fungi colonizing decaying wood.

    PubMed

    Weslien, Jan; Djupström, Line B; Schroeder, Martin; Widenfalk, Olof

    2011-11-01

    1. Priority effects have been hypothesized to have long-lasting impact on community structure in natural ecosystems. Long-term studies of priority effects in natural ecosystems are however sparse, especially in terrestrial ecosystems. 2. Wood decay is a slow process involving a high diversity of insect and fungus species. Species interactions that drive change in communities of insects and fungi during wood decay are poorly understood because of a lack of sufficient long-term studies. 3. In this paper, we followed the colonization and succession of wood-living insects and fungi on cut trees during 15 years, from tree death and onwards, in a boreal forest landscape. We test the long-term priority effects hypothesis that the identity and abundance of species that colonize first affect the colonization success of later-arriving species. We also hypothesize that species interact in both facilitative and inhibitory ways, which ultimately affect habitat quality for a red-listed late-succession beetle species. 4. Possible causal associations between species were explored by path analysis. The results indicate that one bark beetle species, Hylurgops palliatus, and one wood-borer species, Monochamus sutor, which colonized the wood during the first year after cutting, influenced the occurrence of a rare, wood-living beetle, Peltis grossa, that started to emerge from the stumps about 10 years later. The positive effects of Hylurgops palliatus and negative effects of M. sutor were largely mediated through the wood-decaying fungus species Fomitopsis pinicola. 5. The study shows that variable priority effects may have long-lasting impact on community assembly in decaying wood. The study also exemplifies new possibilities for managing populations of threatened species by exploring links between early, well-understood species guilds and late, more poorly understood species guilds. PMID:21569031

  12. Hippocampal long term memory: effect of the cholinergic system on local protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lana, Daniele; Cerbai, Francesca; Di Russo, Jacopo; Boscaro, Francesca; Giannetti, Ambra; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2013-11-01

    The present study was aimed at establishing a link between the cholinergic system and the pathway of mTOR and its downstream effector p70S6K, likely actors in long term memory encoding. We performed in vivo behavioral experiments using the step down inhibitory avoidance test (IA) in adult Wistar rats to evaluate memory formation under different conditions, and immunohistochemistry on hippocampal slices to evaluate the level and the time-course of mTOR and p70S6K activation. We also examined the effect of RAPA, inhibitor of mTORC1 formation, and of the acetylcholine (ACh) muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine (SCOP) or ACh nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (MECA) on short and long term memory formation and on the functionality of the mTOR pathway. Acquisition test was performed 30 min after i.c.v. injection of RAPA, a time sufficient for the drug to diffuse to CA1 pyramidal neurons, as demonstrated by MALDI-TOF-TOF imaging. Recall test was performed 1 h, 4 h or 24 h after acquisition. To confirm our results we performed in vitro experiments on live hippocampal slices: we evaluated whether stimulation of the cholinergic system with the cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (CCh) activated the mTOR pathway and whether the administration of the above-mentioned antagonists together with CCh could revert this activation. We found that (1) mTOR and p70S6K activation in the hippocampus were involved in long term memory formation; (2) RAPA administration caused inhibition of mTOR activation at 1 h and 4 h and of p70S6K activation at 4 h, and long term memory impairment at 24 h after acquisition; (3) scopolamine treatment caused short but not long term memory impairment with an early increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1 h followed by stabilization at longer times; (4) mecamylamine plus scopolamine treatment caused short term memory impairment at 1 h and 4 h and reduced the scopolamine-induced increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1 h and 4 h; (5

  13. Long-term effect of September 11 on the political behavior of victims’ families and neighbors

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Eitan D.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the long-term effect of September 11, 2001 on the political behaviors of victims’ families and neighbors. Relative to comparable individuals, family members and residential neighbors of victims have become—and have stayed—significantly more active in politics in the last 12 years, and they have become more Republican on account of the terrorist attacks. The method used to demonstrate these findings leverages the random nature of the terrorist attack to estimate a causal effect and exploits new techniques to link multiple, individual-level, governmental databases to measure behavioral change without relying on surveys or aggregate analysis. PMID:24324145

  14. Long-term effect of September 11 on the political behavior of victims' families and neighbors.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Eitan D

    2013-12-24

    This article investigates the long-term effect of September 11, 2001 on the political behaviors of victims' families and neighbors. Relative to comparable individuals, family members and residential neighbors of victims have become--and have stayed--significantly more active in politics in the last 12 years, and they have become more Republican on account of the terrorist attacks. The method used to demonstrate these findings leverages the random nature of the terrorist attack to estimate a causal effect and exploits new techniques to link multiple, individual-level, governmental databases to measure behavioral change without relying on surveys or aggregate analysis.

  15. The long-term effect of 1550 nm erbium:glass fractional laser in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yale; Zeng, Weihui; Hu, Die; Jha, Smita; Ge, Qin; Geng, Songmei; Xiao, Shengxiang; Hu, Guanglei; Wang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the short-term and long-term effects of the 1550 nm erbium:glass (Er:glass) fractional laser in the treatment of facial acne vulgaris. Forty-five (9 male and 36 female) acne patients were treated 4 times at 4-week intervals with the following parameters: 169 spot density and 15-30 mJ/cm(2) fluence. There was no control group. The laser spots were adjustable (maximum overlap: 20%) according to the treatment area, and delivered in rows in order to cover all the face. Clinical photographs were taken. The IGA scores and lesion counts were performed for each treatment. Their current state was obtained by phone call follow-up to determine the long-term effect and photographs were offered by themselves or taken in hospital. After four treatments, all patients had an obvious reduction of lesion counts and IGA score and the peak lesion counts decreased to 67.7% after the initial four treatment sessions. For long-term effect, 8 patients lost follow-up, hence 37 patients were followed-up. 8 patients were 2-year follow up, 27 at the 1-year follow-up, and all patients at the half-year follow-up. The mean percent reduction was 72% at the half-year follow-up, 79 at the 1-year follow-up and 75% at the 2-year follow-up. Side effects and complications were limited to transient erythema and edema, and few patients suffered from transient acne flare-ups and sensitivity. All patients responded that their skin was less prone to oiliness. In conclusion, acne can be successfully treated by 1550 nm Er:glass fractional laser, with few side effects and prolonged acne clearing.

  16. Effects of physical aging on long-term behavior of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, L. Catherine

    1993-01-01

    The HSCT plane, envisioned to have a lifetime of over 60,000 flight hours and to travel at speeds in excess of Mach 2, is the source of intensive study at NASA. In particular, polymer matrix composites are being strongly considered for use in primary and secondary structures due to their high strength to weight ratio and the options of property tailoring. However, an added difficulty in the use of polymer based materials is that their properties change significantly over time, especially at the elevated temperatures that will be experienced during flight, and prediction of properties based on irregular thermal and mechanical loading is extremely difficult. This study focused on one aspect of long-term polymer composite behavior: physical aging. When a polymer is cooled to below its glass transition temperature, the material is not in thermodynamic equilibrium and the free volume and enthalpy evolve over time to approach their equilibrium values. During this time, the mechanical properties change significantly and this change is termed physical aging. This work begins with a review of the concepts of physical aging on a pure polymer system. The effective time theory, which can be used to predict long term behavior based on short term data, is mathematically formalized. The effects of aging to equilibrium are proven and discussed. The theory developed for polymers is then applied first to a unidirectional composite, then to a general laminate. Comparison to experimental data is excellent. It is shown that the effects of aging on the long-term properties of composites can be counter-intuitive, stressing the importance of the development and use of a predictive theory to analyze structures.

  17. Keep going in adversity – using a resilience perspective to understand the narratives of long-term social assistance recipients in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In Sweden, means-tested social assistance serves as a temporary, last resort safety net. However, increasing numbers of people are receiving it for longer periods and about a third has assistance for more than a year. The aim of this study was to explore the ways social assistance recipients manage long lasting adversity and their roles as active, rather than passive, agents in this process, using a resilience perspective. Method The study is based on thirteen in-depth interviews with long-term social assistance recipients from diverse areas in Stockholm County. The interviews were guided by narrative inquiry to interpret and construct stories of experiences and are part of a larger qualitative study exploring experiences of living on social assistance in Sweden. Results Experiences of cumulative adversity during many years compounded recipients’ difficulties in finding ways out of hardship. They had different strategies to deal with adversities, and many had underlying “core problems”, including mental health problems, which had not been properly resolved. Recipients’ showed resistance in adverse situations. Some made attempts to find ways out of hardship, whereas others struggled mainly to achieve a sense of mastering life. They received important support from individual professionals in different authorities, but mostly the help from the welfare system was fragmented. Conclusions Social assistance recipients in this study demonstrated agency in ways of managing long lasting difficulties, sometimes caused by “core problems”, which were often accumulated into complex difficulties. Resilience was about keeping going and resisting these difficulties. To find ways out of social assistance required help from different welfare agencies and professionals and was hindered by the fragmentation of services. This study shows that there is a need for more long-term personalised, comprehensive support, including interventions both to increase

  18. Effects of long term storage on aerospace nickel cadmium cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Thomas Y.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of the long term effects on aerospace nickel cadmium cells is described. A number of 6Ah and 12Ah capacity cells which were stored in shorted condition for 9 to 11 years at the Goddard Space Flight Center were selected for the study. Of the three tests which were initiated (initial and final destruction analyses of the test cells, electrical characterization tests, and life cycling tests) only the electrical characterization tests are completed; the other tests are scheduled to be completed by February 1987. The preliminary electrial performance data from the life cycling test and chemical composition data from the destructive testing indicate no anomalous behavior.

  19. Effect of long-term drought on carbon allocation and nitrogen uptake of Pinus sylvestris seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumpanen, Jukka; Aaltonen, Heidi; Lindén, Aki; Köster, Kajar; Biasi, Christina; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    Weather extremes such as drought events are expected to increase in the future as a result of climate change. The drought affects the allocation of carbon assimilated by plants e.g. by modifying the root to shoot ratio, amount of fine roots and the amount of mycorrhizal fungal hyphae. We studied the effect of long term drought on the allocation of carbon in a common garden experiment with 4-year-old Pinus sylvestris seedlings. Half of the seedlings were exposed to long-term drought by setting the soil water content close to wilting point for over two growing seasons whereas the other half was grown in soil close to field capacity. We conducted a pulse labelling with 13CO2 in the end of the study by injecting a known amount of 13C enriched CO2 to the seedlings and measuring the CO2 uptake and distribution of 13C to the biomass of the seedlings and to the root and rhizosphere respiration. In addition, we studied the effect of drought on the decomposition of needle litter and uptake of nitrogen by 15N labelled needles buried in the soil in litter bags. The litterbags were collected and harvested in the end of the experiment and the changes in microbial community in the litterbags were studied from the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition. We also determined the 15N isotope concentrations from the needles of the seedlings to study the effect of drought on the nitrogen uptake of the seedlings. Our results indicate that the drought had a significant effect both on the biomass allocation of the seedlings and on the microbial species composition. The amount of carbon allocated belowground was much higher in the seedlings exposed to drought compared to the control seedlings. The seedlings seemed to adapt their carbon allocation to long-term drought to sustain adequate needle biomass and water uptake. The seedlings also adapted their osmotic potential and photosynthesis capacity to sustain the long-term drought as was indicated by the measurements of osmotic potential

  20. An examination of the woodwork effect using national medicaid long-term services and supports data.

    PubMed

    Eiken, Steve; Burwell, Brian; Sredl, Kate

    2013-01-01

    A common concern in long-term services and supports (LTSS) policy is the "woodwork effect," which has two components: (1) more people will use publicly funded services if access to home- and community-based services (HCBS) is expanded; and (2) the additional beneficiaries will increase the growth rate of LTSS expenditures. Medicaid LTSS beneficiary and utilization data starting in 1999 indicate modest growth in beneficiaries and expenditures, after adjusting for inflation and the number of people with functional impairments. The data do not provide strong evidence that the shift in Medicaid funding toward HCBS significantly increased or decreased overall Medicaid LTSS spending.

  1. Long-term temperature effects on GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Hong, K. H.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal degradation of AlGaAs solar cells resulting from a long-term operation in a space environment is investigated. The solar cell degradation effects caused by zinc and aluminum diffusion as well as deterioration by arsenic evaporation are presented. Also, the results are presented of experimental testing and measurements of various GaAs solar cell properties while the solar cell was operating in the temperature range of 27 C to 350 C. In particular, the properties of light current voltage curves, dark current voltage curves, and spectral response characteristics are given. Finally, some theoretical models for the annealing of radiation damage over various times and temperatures are included.

  2. [Effect of Long-Term Application of Agrotechnical Techniques and Crops on Soil Microbial Communities].

    PubMed

    Korvigo, I O; Pershina, E V; Ivanova, E A; Matyuk, N S; Savos'kina, O A; Chirak, E L; Provorov, N A; Andronov, E E

    2016-01-01

    Effects of long-term application ofvarious fertilizers and crops on soil microbiomes an a long-term field experiment were investigated using the library of the 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained by high-throughput sequencing of the total DNA. The communities exhibited high diversity, with 655 microbial genera belonging to 34 phyla detected (31 bacterial and 3 archaeal ones). For analysis of the effect of the studied factors on community structure, a linear model was developed in order to simplify interpretation of the data of high-throughput sequencing and to obtain biologically important information. Liming was shown to modulate the effect of mineral fertilizers on the structure of microbial populations. The differences in the structure and alpha-diversity of microbial communities were shown to depend more on the crops and liming, rather than on the fertilizers applied. Interaction between the crop factor and liming expressed as an ambiguous effect of liming on the microbiome in the presence of different plants was reliably demonstrated. Thus, in the case of barley and clover, liming resulted in increased taxonomic diversity of the community, while in the case of potato and flax it had an opposite effect. PMID:27476208

  3. A Comparison of the Long-Term Learning Effects of Comprehensive and Topic-Specific Practice Set Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, Darius; Marley, Robert; Marquis, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the long-term learning effects of two different practice set assignment approaches on business students' long-term learning: a comprehensive, multiple-period practice set and a topic-specific practice set. Student learning was measured longitudinally across semesters. The authors found evidence that students using a…

  4. Effect of Clickers "versus" Online Homework on Students' Long-Term Retention of General Chemistry Course Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebru, Misganaw T.; Phelps, Amy J.; Wulfsberg, Gary

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the effects of student response systems (clickers) "versus" online homework on students' long-term retention of General Chemistry I course material. Long-term content retention was measured by a comprehensive yearlong American Chemical Society (ACS) GC97 exam administered seven months after students had completed the General…

  5. Long-Term Effects of Caffeine Therapy for Apnea of Prematurity on Sleep at School Age

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Lisa J.; Roberts, Robin S.; Traylor, Joel; Dix, Joanne; D’ilario, Judy; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Opie, Gillian; Doyle, Lex W.; Biggs, Sarah N.; Nixon, Gillian M.; Narang, Indra; Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Davey, Margot; Horne, Rosemary S. C.; Cheshire, Maureen; Gibbons, Jeremy; Costantini, Lorrie; Bradford, Ruth; Schmidt, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Apnea of prematurity is a common condition that is usually treated with caffeine, an adenosine receptor blocker that has powerful influences on the central nervous system. However, little is known about the long-term effects of caffeine on sleep in the developing brain. Objectives: We hypothesized that neonatal caffeine use resulted in long-term abnormalities in sleep architecture and breathing during sleep. Methods: A total of 201 ex-preterm children aged 5–12 years who participated as neonates in a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial of caffeine versus placebo underwent actigraphy, polysomnography, and parental sleep questionnaires. Coprimary outcomes were total sleep time on actigraphy and apnea–hypopnea index on polysomnography. Measurements and Main Results: There were no significant differences in primary outcomes between the caffeine group and the placebo (adjusted mean difference of −6.7 [95% confidence interval (CI) = −15.3 to 2.0 min]; P = 0.13 for actigraphic total sleep time; and adjusted rate ratio [caffeine/placebo] for apnea–hypopnea index of 0.89 [95% CI = 0.55–1.43]; P = 0.63). Polysomnographic total recording time and total sleep time were longer in the caffeine group, but there was no difference in sleep efficiency between groups. The percentage of children with obstructive sleep apnea (8.2% of caffeine group versus 11.0% of placebo; P = 0.22) or elevated periodic limb movements of sleep (17.5% in caffeine group versus 11% in placebo group) was high, but did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusions: Therapeutic neonatal caffeine administration has no long-term effects on sleep duration or sleep apnea during childhood. Ex-preterm infants, regardless of caffeine status, are at risk for obstructive sleep apnea and periodic limb movements in later childhood. PMID:25171195

  6. Intervention to increase physical activity in irritable bowel syndrome shows long-term positive effects

    PubMed Central

    Johannesson, Elisabet; Ringström, Gisela; Abrahamsson, Hasse; Sadik, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the long-term effects of physical activity on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and on quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. METHODS: Seventy-six patients from a previous randomized controlled interventional study on increased physical activity in IBS were asked to participate in this long-term follow-up study. The included patients attended one visit in which they filled out questionnaires and they underwent a submaximal cycle ergometer test. The primary end point was the change in the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) at baseline, i.e., before the intervention and at follow-up. The secondary endpoints were changes in quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. RESULTS: A total of 39 [32 women, median age 45 (28-61) years] patients were included in this follow-up. Median follow-up time was 5.2 (range: 3.8-6.2) years. The IBS symptoms were improved compared with baseline [IBS-SSS: 276 (169-360) vs 218 (82-328), P = 0.001]. This was also true for the majority of the dimensions of psychological symptoms such as disease specific quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. The reported time of physical activity during the week before the visit had increased from 3.2 (0.0-10.0) h at baseline to 5.2 (0.0-15.0) h at follow-up, P = 0.019. The most common activities reported were walking, aerobics and cycling. There was no significant difference in the oxygen uptake 31.8 (19.7-45.8) mL per min per kg at baseline vs 34.6 (19.0-54.6) mL/min per kg at follow-up. CONCLUSION: An intervention to increase physical activity has positive long-term effects on IBS symptoms and psychological symptoms. PMID:25593485

  7. Hurricanes vs. Humans: Their Comparative Long-Term Effects on Tropical Landscapes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, A. E.

    2002-12-01

    Puerto Rico experiences about 50 hurricanes per century. These large-scale events last for hours, but have significant short, medium, and long-term effects on vegetation and landscape processes as shown in studies in the Long-Term Ecological Research program. Forest canopy characteristics, tree mortality rates, life history characteristics of both plants and animals, successional rates, landslide occurrence, and sediment erosion and transport are examples of ecological and landscape attributes that exhibit strong responses to hurricane frequency and intensity. However, Puerto Rico has also undergone dramatic land cover change due to human activity. The island as a whole has experienced a cycle of deforestation, agricultural use, land abandonment, forest recovery, and urbanization. These anthropogenic events leave a long-term legacy on both individual ecosystems and the landscape as a whole. Species composition, structure, and age of forests are significantly influenced by human activity, as are rates of sediment erosion and transport, and frequency and size of landslides. I will present comparative data on the effects of hurricanes and human activity on Puerto Rico's forests and landscape. I address the following questions: which of these two forces that jointly shape the island's biota and landscape has a greater influence on functioning at the ecosystem level and what are the management implications? It appears that human impact on sediment erosion and transport events is greater than that of hurricanes and that humans change species composition of forests more than do hurricanes. However, regardless of the nature of the new ecosystems formed due to human activity, these systems must cope with the forces (rain and winds) of hurricanes in order to persist on the landscape. Regardless of the power of hurricanes, they don't appear to reset the human legacy on the island's landscape.

  8. Effects of short and long term exercise on intracellular glycogen and fat in pigeon pectoralis.

    PubMed

    Parker, G H; George, J C

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the functional role of the component broad white and narrow red fibre types during activity, the pectroalis muscle of the adult pigeon (Columba livia) was electrically stimulated in situ after anaesthetizing the birds with sodium pentobarbital. For examination of the effect of short term exercise, the pectoral muscle of one side was stimulated through the innervating brachial plexus, using an electronic stimulator for 1 hr, and a biopsy sample was taken from the stimulated muscle. The stimulation was resumed for 17 hr more with additional doses of anaesthesia, and a muscle sample was taken after the decapitation of the birds in the long term experiment. Muscle samples from non-stimulated pigeons under identical conditions served as control. Fixed and frozen sections were made from the samples and were stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff's reagent for the demonstration of glycogen, while additional frozen muscle sections were stained with Fettrot 7B according to Pearse, A.G.E. (1960) for the demonstration of neutral lipids in the specimen. Thus histochemical examinations were made to study effects of short and long term exercises on energy stores in skeletal muscles. Short-term stimulation resulted in a selective depletion of intracellular glycogen stores from white fibre populations whereas prolonged long term stimulation resulted in the resynthesis of glycogen within these fibres and a concomitant reduction in the intracellular fat and glycogen reserves in most red fibres. It is postulated that during flight the white fibres indulge only in brief bursts of intense phasic activity such as in quick take-off, rapid accelerations or sudden manoeuvres and utilize glycogen as fuel whereas the red fibres perform sustained activity as in cruising flight and metabolize chiefly fat.

  9. Long-term effects of prevention and treatment on youth antisocial behavior: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Aaron M; Borduin, Charles M; Dopp, Alex R

    2015-12-01

    Youth antisocial behavior exacts a tremendous toll on society and often persists into adulthood. Although researchers have identified a number of psychosocial interventions that prevent or reduce youth antisocial behavior in the short term, evidence of long-term intervention benefits has only recently become available. In addition, research on such interventions spans two substantial but largely separate bodies of literature: prevention and therapy. The present study used meta-analysis to integrate research on the long-term effects of preventive and therapeutic interventions for youth antisocial behavior and examined potential moderators of these effects. Results from 66 intervention trials (i.e., 34 prevention, 32 therapy) indicated that a broad range of youth psychosocial interventions demonstrated modest effects on antisocial behavior (mean d=0.31, 95% confidence interval=0.23-0.39) for at least one year beyond the end of interventions relative to control conditions. Among other findings, moderator analyses revealed that inclusion of a peer group intervention component was associated with reduced intervention effects for samples consisting predominantly of boys or older youths. The results of this study have important implications for service providers, administrators, and policymakers involved in the implementation of preventive and therapeutic interventions targeting youth antisocial behavior.

  10. Training with anxiety: short- and long-term effects on police officers' shooting behavior under pressure.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuys, Arne; Oudejans, Raôul R D

    2011-08-01

    We investigated short- and long-term effects of training with anxiety on police officers' shooting behavior under pressure. Using a pretest, posttest, and retention test design, 27 police officers executed a shooting exercise against an opponent that did (high anxiety) or did not (low anxiety) shoot back using colored soap cartridges. During the training sessions, the experimental group practiced with anxiety and the control group practiced without anxiety. At the pretest, anxiety had a negative effect on shot accuracy for both groups. At the posttest, shot accuracy of the experimental group no longer deteriorated under anxiety, while shot accuracy of the control group was still equally affected. At the retention test, 4 months after training, positive results for the experimental group remained present, indicating that training with anxiety may have positive short- and long-term effects on police officers' shot accuracy under pressure. Additional analyses showed that these effects are potentially related to changes in visual attention on task-relevant information. PMID:21431863

  11. NEREC, an effective brain mapping protocol for combined language and long-term memory functions.

    PubMed

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Girard, Cléa; Cousin, Emilie; Vidal, Juan Ricardo; Pichat, Cédric; Kahane, Philippe; Baciu, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy can induce functional plasticity in temporoparietal networks involved in language and long-term memory processing. Previous studies in healthy subjects have revealed the relative difficulty for this network to respond effectively across different experimental designs, as compared to more reactive regions such as frontal lobes. For a protocol to be optimal for clinical use, it has to first show robust effects in a healthy cohort. In this study, we developed a novel experimental paradigm entitled NEREC, which is able to reveal the robust participation of temporoparietal networks in a uniquely combined language and memory task, validated in an fMRI study with healthy subjects. Concretely, NEREC is composed of two runs: (a) an intermixed language-memory task (confrontation naming associated with encoding in nonverbal items, NE) to map language (i.e., word retrieval and lexico-semantic processes) combined with simultaneous long-term verbal memory encoding (NE items named but also explicitly memorized) and (b) a memory retrieval task of items encoded during NE (word recognition, REC) intermixed with new items. Word recognition is based on both perceptual-semantic familiarity (feeling of 'know') and accessing stored memory representations (remembering). In order to maximize the remembering and recruitment of medial temporal lobe structures, we increased REC difficulty by changing the modality of stimulus presentation (from nonverbal during NE to verbal during REC). We report that (a) temporoparietal activation during NE was attributable to both lexico-semantic (language) and memory (episodic encoding and semantic retrieval) processes; that (b) encoding activated the left hippocampus, bilateral fusiform, and bilateral inferior temporal gyri; and that (c) task recognition (recollection) activated the right hippocampus and bilateral but predominant left fusiform gyrus. The novelty of this protocol consists of (a) combining two tasks in one (language

  12. NEREC, an effective brain mapping protocol for combined language and long-term memory functions.

    PubMed

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Girard, Cléa; Cousin, Emilie; Vidal, Juan Ricardo; Pichat, Cédric; Kahane, Philippe; Baciu, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy can induce functional plasticity in temporoparietal networks involved in language and long-term memory processing. Previous studies in healthy subjects have revealed the relative difficulty for this network to respond effectively across different experimental designs, as compared to more reactive regions such as frontal lobes. For a protocol to be optimal for clinical use, it has to first show robust effects in a healthy cohort. In this study, we developed a novel experimental paradigm entitled NEREC, which is able to reveal the robust participation of temporoparietal networks in a uniquely combined language and memory task, validated in an fMRI study with healthy subjects. Concretely, NEREC is composed of two runs: (a) an intermixed language-memory task (confrontation naming associated with encoding in nonverbal items, NE) to map language (i.e., word retrieval and lexico-semantic processes) combined with simultaneous long-term verbal memory encoding (NE items named but also explicitly memorized) and (b) a memory retrieval task of items encoded during NE (word recognition, REC) intermixed with new items. Word recognition is based on both perceptual-semantic familiarity (feeling of 'know') and accessing stored memory representations (remembering). In order to maximize the remembering and recruitment of medial temporal lobe structures, we increased REC difficulty by changing the modality of stimulus presentation (from nonverbal during NE to verbal during REC). We report that (a) temporoparietal activation during NE was attributable to both lexico-semantic (language) and memory (episodic encoding and semantic retrieval) processes; that (b) encoding activated the left hippocampus, bilateral fusiform, and bilateral inferior temporal gyri; and that (c) task recognition (recollection) activated the right hippocampus and bilateral but predominant left fusiform gyrus. The novelty of this protocol consists of (a) combining two tasks in one (language

  13. The effect of long-term amiodarone administration on myocardial fibrosis and evolution of left ventricular remodeling in a porcine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zagorianou, Anastasia; Marougkas, Meletios; Drakos, Stavros G; Diakos, Nikolaos; Konstantopoulos, Panagiotis; Perrea, Despina N; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria; Malliaras, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is effective in suppressing arrhythmias in heart failure patients. We investigated the effect of long-term amiodarone administration on myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular (LV) remodeling in a porcine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy. Eighteen infarcted farm pigs were randomized to receive long-term amiodarone administration for 3 months (n = 9) or conventional follow-up (n = 9). Evolution of LV remodeling over 3 months post-myocardial infarction was examined at tissue level (myocyte size, myocardial fibrosis and vascular density assessed by whole-field digital histopathology), organ level (LV structure and function assessed by echocardiography), and systemic level (BNP and MMP-9 levels). Long-term administration of the standard anti-arrhythmic doses of amiodarone was not associated with adverse effects on myocardial fibrosis and other features of adverse cardiac remodeling. This favorable safety profile suggests that long-term anti-arrhythmic therapy with amiodarone warrants further clinical investigation in the subpopulation of heart failure patients with significantly increased burden of arrhythmias. PMID:27652141

  14. Effect of long-term mechanical perturbation on intertidal soft-bottom meiofaunal community spatial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldina, Inna; Beninger, Peter G.; Le Coz, Maïwen

    2014-01-01

    Situated at the interface of the microbial and macrofaunal compartments, soft-bottom meiofauna accomplish important ecological functions. However, little is known of their spatial distribution in the benthic environment. To assess the effects of long-term mechanical disturbance on soft-bottom meiofaunal spatial distribution, we compared a site subjected to long-term clam digging to a nearby site untouched by such activities, in Bourgneuf Bay, on the Atlantic coast of France. Six patterned replicate samples were taken at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 cm lags, all sampling stations being separated by 5 m. A combined correlogram-variogram approach was used to enhance interpretation of the meiofaunal spatial distribution; in particular, the definition of autocorrelation strength and its statistical significance, as well as the detailed characteristics of the periodic spatial structure of nematode assemblages, and the determination of the maximum distance of their spatial autocorrelation. At both sites, nematodes and copepods clearly exhibited aggregated spatial structure at the meso scale; this structure was attenuated at the impacted site. The nematode spatial distribution showed periodicity at the non-impacted site, but not at the impacted site. This is the first explicit report of a periodic process in meiofaunal spatial distribution. No such cyclic spatial process was observed for the more motile copepods at either site. This first study to indicate the impacts of long-term anthropogenic mechanical perturbation on meiofaunal spatial structure opens the door to a new dimension of mudflat ecology. Since macrofaunal predator search behaviour is known to be strongly influenced by prey spatial structure, the alteration of this structure may have important consequences for ecosystem functioning.

  15. Association of Long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy with Bone Fractures and effects on Absorption of Calcium, Vitamin B12, Iron, and Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are now one of the most widely used classes of drugs. PPIs have proven to have a very favorable safety profile and it is unusual for a patient to stop these drugs because of side effects. However, increasing numbers of patients are chronically taking PPIs for gastroesophageal reflux disease and a number of other common persistent conditions, therefore the long-term potential adverse effects are receiving increasing attention. One area that is receiving much attention and generally has been poorly studied, is the long-term effects of chronic acid suppression on the absorption of vitamins and nutrients. This area has received increased attention because of the reported potential adverse effect of chronic PPI treatment leading to an increased occurrence of bone fractures. This has led to an increased examination of the effects of PPIs on calcium absorption/metabolism as well as numerous cohort, case control and prospective studies of their ability to affect bone density and cause bone fractures. In this article these studies are systematically examined, as well as the studies of the effects of chronic PPI usage on VB12, iron and magnesium absorption. In general the studies in each of thee areas have led to differing conclusions, but when examined systematically, a number of the studies are showing consistent results that support the conclusion that long-term adverse effects on these processes can have important clinical implications. PMID:20882439

  16. Long-term effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Daecke, W; Kusnierczak, D; Loew, M

    2002-01-01

    Various short-term studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in the treatment of calcific tendinitis. To evaluate the long-term effects and any complications, the 4-year outcome was determined in a prospective study of 115 patients. One session (group A, n = 56) or two sessions (group B, n = 59) of high-energy shockwave therapy were administered to each patient. The 6-month results showed that the level of success achieved in pain relief and the Constant score was energy-dependent and that there were significant differences in radiologic changes between the groups. By 4 years after shockwave therapy, 20% of the entire patient population had undergone surgery on the involved shoulder. The effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy not followed by any other therapy within the first 6 months were evaluated in 59% (n = 68) of the original 115 patients. Subjectively, 78% of patients in group A and 87% in group B thought the shockwave treatment had been successful. The Constant score increased from a mean of 45 before treatment to 88 in group A and 85 in group B after treatment. Radiologic changes were found in 93% of patients in each group. In conclusion, the failure rate after ESWT is high, but for 70% of the patients in this study, the treatment was successful and no long-term complications were seen.

  17. Long-term neurobehavioural impact of the postnatal environment in rats: manipulations, effects and mediating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Christopher R; Feldon, Joram

    2003-01-01

    The major characteristics of the postnatal environment of the rat pup are its mother and littermates. The pup, which is poorly developed at birth, matures rapidly in this environment, and regulates the behaviour and physiology of the dam and littermates, as well as vice versa. The study of the impact of the rat's postnatal environment on its long-term neurobehavioural development is of fundamental importance. In fact, it is one of the major examples--at the interface of the biological, social and medical sciences--of animal models for the study of the interaction between the environment and the genome in both the acute and chronic regulation of the phenotype. Specific experimental manipulations of the rat postnatal environment have been demonstrated to exert robust and marked effects on neurobiological, physiological and behavioural phenotypes in adulthood. In the present review we present some of the major findings, including some original data, and discuss what these existing data can tell us about the long-term neurobehavioural effects of the postnatal environment in rats, the external and internal mechanisms that mediate these effects, and the most appropriate directions for future basic and applied research in this area. PMID:12732223

  18. Effects of long-term grazing on sediment deposition and salt-marsh accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elschot, Kelly; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Temmerman, Stijn; Bakker, Jan P.

    2013-11-01

    Many studies have attempted to predict whether coastal marshes will be able to keep up with future acceleration of sea-level rise by estimating marsh accretion rates. However, there are few studies focussing on the long-term effects of herbivores on vegetation structure and subsequent effects on marsh accretion. Deposition of fine-grained, mineral sediment during tidal inundations, together with organic matter accumulation from the local vegetation, positively affects accretion rates of marsh surfaces. Tall vegetation can enhance sediment deposition by reducing current flow and wave action. Herbivores shorten vegetation height and this could potentially reduce sediment deposition. This study estimated the effects of herbivores on 1) vegetation height, 2) sediment deposition and 3) resulting marsh accretion after long-term (at least 16 years) herbivore exclusion of both small (i.e. hare and goose) and large grazers (i.e. cattle) for marshes of different ages. Our results firstly showed that both small and large herbivores can have a major impact on vegetation height. Secondly, grazing processes did not affect sediment deposition. Finally, trampling by large grazers affected marsh accretion rates by compacting the soil. In many European marshes, grazing is used as a tool in nature management as well as for agricultural purposes. Thus, we propose that soil compaction by large grazers should be taken in account when estimating the ability of coastal systems to cope with an accelerating sea-level rise.

  19. Long-term effective population size dynamics of an intensively monitored vertebrate population.

    PubMed

    Mueller, A-K; Chakarov, N; Krüger, O; Hoffman, J I

    2016-10-01

    Long-term genetic data from intensively monitored natural populations are important for understanding how effective population sizes (Ne) can vary over time. We therefore genotyped 1622 common buzzard (Buteo buteo) chicks sampled over 12 consecutive years (2002-2013 inclusive) at 15 microsatellite loci. This data set allowed us to both compare single-sample with temporal approaches and explore temporal patterns in the effective number of parents that produced each cohort in relation to the observed population dynamics. We found reasonable consistency between linkage disequilibrium-based single-sample and temporal estimators, particularly during the latter half of the study, but no clear relationship between annual Ne estimates () and census sizes. We also documented a 14-fold increase in between 2008 and 2011, a period during which the census size doubled, probably reflecting a combination of higher adult survival and immigration from further afield. Our study thus reveals appreciable temporal heterogeneity in the effective population size of a natural vertebrate population, confirms the need for long-term studies and cautions against drawing conclusions from a single sample. PMID:27553455

  20. [Hemodynamic long-term effects of a beta-receptor blockader (Pindolol) in primary essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Klein, W W; Brandt, D; Fluch, N; Goebel, R; Holzer, H; Pöch, G

    1976-01-01

    1. Pindolol lowers blood pressure both, immediately after administration by a reduction of cardiac output and heart rate and after long-term administration by reducing peripheral resistance. Cardiac index, initially decreased, reached the control value after 8 weeks of treatment. 2. The persistent reduction in heart rate and increase of the cardiac index during exercise after prolonged treatment together with the increase of right and left heart filling pressures seems to be due to augmentation of the Starling mechanism. The increase of the stroke volume at rest and during exercise diminished the blood-pressure lowering effect of the drug. 4. The exercise-induced increase of noradrenalin was abolished by acute administration of pindolol. After long-term treatment, however, we found a consistent and significant elevation of the plasma-catecholamines. This may reflect the development of heart failure [1], a tyramin- or cocain-like action of pindolol [2] or an indirect sympathicomimetic effect of this drug at low doses (10--15 mg/day orally ) [3]. 5. The elevation of plasma-noradrenalin reflects increased sympathetic tone and may be responsible for the increase in stroke volume and plasma renin activity observed by several authors. 6. Since there was no evidence for a hemodynamic mode of action, the lowering of blood rpessure by pindolol may be a central effect.

  1. Long-term effect of flunarizine on patients with alternating hemiplegia of childhood in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, M; Sakuragawa, N; Osawa, M

    2001-08-01

    To determine the effect of flunarizine therapy on patients with alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), we sent a questionnaire by mail to council members of the Japanese Society of Child Neurology. We collected 28 AHC patients, and studied their clinical courses and the effects of drug therapy. All of the patients had received flunarizine. In 18 of the 28 patients, flunarizine reduced the severity, duration, or frequency of the hemiplegic attacks. No other drug was more effective than flunarizine. Some flunarizine non-effective patients were severely deteriorated, for example, they had dementia or were ventilator-assisted. Flunarizine had not only a short-term effect, i.e. it reduced the hemiplegic attacks, but also a long-term effect on the motor and intellectual development in some patients with AHC. Flunarizine is still an essential drug for treating AHC. PMID:11504600

  2. Short and long-term effects of an historic blizzard in Asturias (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Hernandez, Cristina; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Gallinar, David

    2016-04-01

    This research has combined the consult of several historical sources (historic newspapers, church records, meteorological records) with fieldwork (geographical checking and interviews) and the application of statistical techniques for data processing in order to define, locate and analyze the causes and physical, social, economic and demographic effects (both short- and long-term) of an historic natural disaster that concerned the territory of Asturias (Northern Spain). The storm that hit the Spanish northwest in the winter of 1888 consisted of a four snowstorms concatenation occurred between 14th February 1888 and 8th April 1888. It was a phenomenon that, by its magnitude and rarity, was especially harmful because of the triggering of avalanches of snow and landslides; the generation of large snow deposits (up to 9 meters depth), and the floods related with the effects of the snow thawing. The first results of this research point to 36 people dead and 23 injured, more than 1,000 buildings ruined and more than 19,000 head of cattle lost as a result of all these events. However, the personal and material losses increase if we investigate the long-term consequences and, in this aspect, we have identified several singularities in the 1888 mortality patterns (ie an increase in neonatal mortality rate), and a clear increase in overall mortality in the two years following this episode, affecting to women more than to men.

  3. Effect of wettability alteration on long-term behavior of fluids in subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, Uditha C.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-04-01

    Wettability is an important factor affecting fluid behavior in the subsurface, including oil, gas, and supercritical hbox {CO}_2 in deep geological reservoirs. For example, hbox {CO}_2 is generally assumed to behave as a non-wetting fluid, which favors safe storage. However, because of chemical heterogeneity of the reservoirs, mixed wettability conditions can exist. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that with time, the wettability of super-critical hbox {CO}_2 may change from non-wetting to partially wetting due to changes in electrostatic interactions. These changes are caused by chemical reactions between dissolved hbox {CO}_2 and its environment. To date, the effect of wettability alteration and mixed wettability on the long-term fate of injected hbox {CO}_2 has not well been studied. Here, we use the multiphase pairwise force smoothed particle hydrodynamics model to study complex pore-scale processes involved in geological hbox {CO}_2 sequestration, including the effect of spatial and temporal wettability variations on long-term distribution of hbox {CO}_2 in porous media. Results reveal that in the absence of dissolution of supercritical hbox {CO}_2 and precipitation of carbonate minerals (mineral trapping), the amount of trapped supercritical hbox {CO}_2 significantly decreases as the wettability of the porous media changes from brine-wet to partial-wet or hbox {CO}_2-wet.

  4. Long-term effect of yolk carotenoid levels on testis size in a precocial bird.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Mathieu; Ziegler, Ann-Kathrin; Tschirren, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Conditions experienced during prenatal development can have long-lasting organizational effects on offspring. Maternal carotenoids deposited in the eggs of birds and other oviparous species play an important role during fast embryonic growth and chick development through their antioxidant properties. However, the long-term consequences of variation in maternal carotenoid transfer for the offspring have seldom been considered. Since plasma carotenoid levels at adulthood are known to influence testis size and yolk carotenoid levels influence the ability to extract carotenoids later in life, we hypothesized that maternally transmitted carotenoids might influence gonad size at adulthood. Here, we showed that male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) originating from a carotenoid-enriched egg had smaller testes than control individuals at adulthood. This result shows that yolk carotenoids have long-term organizational effects. In addition, given that carotenoid intake at sexual maturity increases sperm quality and that a decreased testis size is associated with a lower sperm production, we propose that carotenoid exposure during embryo development might influence a trade-off between ejaculate size and sperm quality. PMID:27122006

  5. Long-Term Effects from Bacterial Meningitis in Childhood and Adolescence on Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Hannes; Patel, Mitesh; Ingason, Einar F.; Einarsson, Einar J.; Haraldsson, Ásgeir; Fransson, Per-Anders

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis in childhood is associated with cognitive deficiencies, sensorimotor impairments and motor dysfunction later in life. However, the long-term effects on postural control is largely unknown, e.g., whether meningitis subjects as adults fully can utilize visual information and adaptation to enhance stability. Thirty-six subjects (20 women, mean age 19.3 years) treated in childhood or adolescence for bacterial meningitis, and 25 controls (13 women, mean age 25.1 years) performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing. The meningitis subjects were screened for subjective vertigo symptoms using a questionnaire, clinically tested with headshake and head thrust test, as well as their hearing was evaluated. Meningitis subjects were significantly more unstable than controls during unperturbed (p≤0.014) and perturbed standing, though while perturbed only with eyes open in anteroposterior direction (p = 0.034) whereas in lateral direction both with eyes open and closed (p<0.001). Meningitis subjects had poorer adaption ability to balance perturbations especially with eyes open, and they frequently reported symptoms of unsteadiness (88% of the subjects) and dizziness (81%), which was found significantly correlated to objectively decreased stability. Out of the 36 subjects only 3 had unilateral hearing impairment. Hence, survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis may suffer long-term disorders affecting postural control, and would greatly benefit if these common late effects became generally known so treatments can be developed and applied. PMID:25405756

  6. Short- and long-term effects of probiotics administered early in life.

    PubMed

    Szajewska, Hania

    2011-01-01

    The concept of manipulating the gut microbiota through the administration of probiotics during early life in order to reduce the risk of and prevent or treat diseases, including those that manifest in later life, is appealing. However, a cautious approach is needed, and the long-term consequences of such administration should be carefully evaluated. Concerns related to the early administration of probiotics include timing, i.e. the administration often begins in early infancy, sometimes at birth, when gut microbiota is not fully established, and duration, i.e. the daily administration of such products is prolonged (several weeks or months). In the case of non-breastfed infants, delivery may be in the form of a specific matrix (infant formula) that could be the only source of feeding of an infant over a prolonged period. Finally, the fact that beneficial as well as some detrimental effects are seen years after administration of probiotics during the first months of life raises concern that other long-term effects such as immunosuppression in later life may also occur. Currently, while some promising data exist, there are still more questions than answers. However, rapid progress in this area of research is expected and no doubt will bring about a number of exciting findings. PMID:22044892

  7. Long-Term Effects of Metformin and Lifestyle Modification on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tock, Lian; Dâmaso, Ana R.; de Piano, Aline; Carnier, June; Sanches, Priscila L.; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Ernandes, Regina M. Y.; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Tufik, Sérgio

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To assess the long-term effects of metformin in combination with lifestyle intervention and its association between insulin levels and the degree of steatosis at ultrasonography (US) in obese adolescents. Methods. Thirty-five postpubertal obese boys were randomized into two groups: one receiving metformin in combination with a multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention versus a placebo group, which also received the same intervention. The visceral, subcutaneous fat and degree of steatosis were measured by ultrasonography. Fasting blood samples were collected to analyze glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, and aminotransferases. Repeated ANOVA measures were used to compare changes over time and between groups, and Spearman's correlations were used to identify an association between insulin and the degree of steatosis at US. Results. There was a positive correlation between the degree of steatosis at US with insulin concentrations and HOMA-IR. Long-term therapy plus metformin significantly reduced body weight, body mass index, insulin, HOMA-IR, and visceral fat. Conclusions. Metformin was more effective than the placebo in improving clinical parameters associated with obesity and steatosis. PMID:20798858

  8. (Mis) representations of the long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse in the courts.

    PubMed

    Brown, D

    2000-01-01

    This study addresses the (mis) representations made by pro-false memory attorneys and expert witnesses in court regarding the long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). Five pro-false memory positions were identified: (1) there is no causal connection between CSA and adult psychopathology; (2) the evidence is insufficient; (3) CSA does not cause specific trauma-related outcomes like borderline and dissociative identity disorder; (4) other variables than CSA explain the variance of adult psychopathology; and (5) the long-term effects of CSA are general and non-specific. Examining the testimony revealed that such pro-false memory testimony was based solely on a partial understanding of retrospective data and that pro-false memory experts do not cite the more recent prospective data. Reviewing the totality of the scientific evidence demonstrates that such pro-false memory testimony is inaccurate and has the potential of misleading the jury. Prospective studies provide sufficient evidence to causally link CSA to a number of areas of adult psychopathology including multiple, co-morbid psychiatric conditions, and possibly to link early parent-infant attachment pathology to the development of borderline and dissociative identity disorder.

  9. Short-term and long-term effects of reinforcers on choice.

    PubMed

    Buckner, R L; Green, L; Myerson, J

    1993-03-01

    The relation between molar and molecular aspects of time allocation was studied in pigeons on concurrent variable-time variable-time schedules of reinforcement. Fifteen-minute reinforcer-free periods were inserted in the middle of every third session. Generalized molar matching of time ratios to reinforcer ratios was observed during concurrent reinforcement. Contrary to melioration theory, preference was unchanged during the reinforcer-free periods as well as in extinction. In addition to this long-term effect of reinforcement, short-term effects were observed: Reinforcers increased the duration of the stays during which they were delivered but had little consistent effect either on the immediately following stay in the same schedule or on the immediately following stay in the alternative schedule. Thus, an orderly effect of reinforcer delivery on molecular aspects of time allocation was observed, but because of its short-term nature, this effect cannot account for the matching observed at the molar level.

  10. Short-term and long-term effects of reinforcers on choice

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Randy L.; Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    1993-01-01

    The relation between molar and molecular aspects of time allocation was studied in pigeons on concurrent variable-time variable-time schedules of reinforcement. Fifteen-minute reinforcer-free periods were inserted in the middle of every third session. Generalized molar matching of time ratios to reinforcer ratios was observed during concurrent reinforcement. Contrary to melioration theory, preference was unchanged during the reinforcer-free periods as well as in extinction. In addition to this long-term effect of reinforcement, short-term effects were observed: Reinforcers increased the duration of the stays during which they were delivered but had little consistent effect either on the immediately following stay in the same schedule or on the immediately following stay in the alternative schedule. Thus, an orderly effect of reinforcer delivery on molecular aspects of time allocation was observed, but because of its short-term nature, this effect cannot account for the matching observed at the molar level. PMID:16812687

  11. Long-term effects of early life exposure to environmental estrogens on ovarian function: Role of epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Gonzalo; Foster, Warren; Paredes, Alfonso; Yi, Kun Don; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play an important role in development and function of the brain and reproductive tract. Accordingly, it is thought that developmental exposure to environmental estrogens can disrupt neural and reproductive tract development potentially resulting in long-term alterations in neurobehavior and reproductive function. Many chemicals have been shown to have estrogenic activity whereas others affect estrogen production and turnover resulting in disruption of estrogen signaling pathways. However, these mechanisms and the concentrations required to induce these effects cannot account for the myriad adverse effects of environmental toxicants on estrogen sensitive target tissues. Hence, alternative mechanisms are thought to underlie the adverse effects documented in experimental animal models and thus could be important to human health. In this review, the epigenetic regulation of gene expression is explored as a potential target of environmental toxicants including estrogenic chemicals. We suggest that toxicant-induced changes in epigenetic signatures are important mechanisms underlying disruption of ovarian follicular development. In addition, we discuss how exposure to environmental estrogens during early life can alter gene expression through effects on epigenetic control potentially leading to permanent changes in ovarian physiology. PMID:25040227

  12. The Long-Term Effects of Participant Direction of Supports and Services for People With Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Harry, Melissa L; Kong, Jooyoung; MacDonald, Lynn M; McLuckie, Althea; Battista, Christina; Mahoney, Ellen K; Jeon, Haesang; Mahoney, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the short-term effectiveness of the Cash and Counseling model option of participant-directed home and community-based personal care service programs for Medicaideligible recipients with disabilities requiring long-term care. However, long-term experiences with participant-directed services have yet to be examined for these individuals. We addressed this gap in the literature through participatory action research and qualitative content analysis. Working together as coresearchers with members of the National Participant Network, a peer organization for people interested in or enrolled in participant-directed services, we interviewed 17 adults enrolled in one state's Cash and Counseling-based program. Participants' ages ranged from 40 to 83 years, had been enrolled for at least 5 years, and acted as their own representative within the program. Our major findings show (a) the program's flexibility allowed for adaptation to meet participants' changing needs over time and (b) that program attendants helped connect participants with community in multiple ways. In this article, we provide important policy and practice implications for participant-directed programs for people with disabilities.

  13. Effectiveness of a social robot, "Paro," in a VA long-term care setting.

    PubMed

    Lane, Geoffrey W; Noronha, Delilah; Rivera, Alexandra; Craig, Kathy; Yee, Christina; Mills, Brent; Villanueva, Eimee

    2016-08-01

    Interest in animal assisted interventions (AAI) has grown over the years, but acceptance of AAI by the clinical and research community has been hampered by safety, hygiene, and logistical concerns. Advances in the field of social robotics have provided a promising route to deliver AAI while avoiding these aforementioned obstacles. Although there has been promising initial research on social robotics in older adults, to date there has been no such research conducted with a veteran population. The present pilot study followed 23 veteran residents of a Veterans Affairs (VA) geropsychiatric long-term care facility over the span of approximately a year and a half. It was found that use of Paro, a social robot, resulted in increased observed positive affective and behavioral indicators, with concomitant decreases observed in negative affective and behavioral indicators. The authors concluded that Paro is likely an effective nonpharmacological approach for managing dementia-related mood and behavior problems with veterans in VA long term care facilities. They additionally observed that Paro is best presented to residents who are relatively calm and approachable, as opposed to actively exhibiting behavior or mood problems. Future research directions are discussed in light of both the positive results noted and the inherent limitations of our pilot study. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27195530

  14. Effect of long term intake of aspartame on antioxidant defense status in liver.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, M; Paul, M V Sauganth; Varghese, Mathews V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2011-06-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of long term intake of aspartame, the artificial sweetener, on liver antioxidant system and hepatocellular injury in animal model. Eighteen adult male Wistar rats, weighing 150-175 g, were randomly divided into three groups as follows: first group was given aspartame dissolved in water in a dose of 500 mg/kg b.wt.; the second group was given a dose of 1000 mg/kg b.wt.; and controls were given water freely. Rats that had received aspartame (1000 mg/kg b.wt.) in the drinking water for 180 days showed a significant increase in activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT). The concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) were significantly reduced in the liver of rats that had received aspartame (1000 mg/kg b.wt.). Glutathione was significantly decreased in both the experimental groups. Histopathological examination revealed leukocyte infiltration in aspartame-treated rats (1000 mg/kg b.wt.). It can be concluded from these observations that long term consumption of aspartame leads to hepatocellular injury and alterations in liver antioxidant status mainly through glutathione dependent system.

  15. Long-term Blue Light Effects on the Histology of Lettuce and Soybean Leaves and Stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougher, Tracy A. O.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Blue light (320 to 496 nm) alters hypocotyl and stem elongation and leaf expansion in short-term, cell-level experiments, but histological effects of blue light in long-term studies of whole plants have not been described. We measured cell size and number in stems of soybean (Glycine max L.) and leaves of soybean and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), at two blue light fractions. Short-term studies have shown that cell expansion in stems is rapidly inhibited when etiolated tissue is exposed to blue light. However, under long-term light exposure, an increase in the blue light fraction from less than 0.1% to 26% decreased internode length, specifically by inhibiting soybean cell division in stems. In contrast, an increase in blue light fraction from 6% to 26% reduced soybean leaf area by decreasing cell expansion. Surprisingly, lettuce leaf area increased with increasing blue light fraction (0% to 6%), which was attributed to a 3.1-fold increase in cell expansion and a 1.6-fold increase in cell division.

  16. The long-term effects of invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) on instream macroinvertebrate communities.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Kate L; Chadd, Richard P; Dunbar, Michael J; Extence, Chris A; Reeds, Jake; Rice, Stephen P; Wood, Paul J

    2016-06-15

    Non-native species represent a significant threat to indigenous biodiversity and ecosystem functioning worldwide. It is widely acknowledged that invasive crayfish species may be instrumental in modifying benthic invertebrate community structure, but there is limited knowledge regarding the temporal and spatial extent of these effects within lotic ecosystems. This study investigates the long term changes to benthic macroinvertebrate community composition following the invasion of signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, into English rivers. Data from long-term monitoring sites on 7 rivers invaded by crayfish and 7 rivers where signal crayfish were absent throughout the record (control sites) were used to examine how invertebrate community composition and populations of individual taxa changed as a result of invasion. Following the detection of non-native crayfish, significant shifts in invertebrate community composition were observed at invaded sites compared to control sites. This pattern was strongest during autumn months but was also evident during spring surveys. The observed shifts in community composition following invasion were associated with reductions in the occurrence of ubiquitous Hirudinea species (Glossiphonia complanata and Erpobdella octoculata), Gastropoda (Radix spp.), Ephemeroptera (Caenis spp.), and Trichoptera (Hydropsyche spp.); although variations in specific taxa affected were evident between regions and seasons. Changes in community structure were persistent over time with no evidence of recovery, suggesting that crayfish invasions represent significant perturbations leading to permanent changes in benthic communities. The results provide fundamental knowledge regarding non-native crayfish invasions of lotic ecosystems required for the development of future management strategies.

  17. Effectiveness of a social robot, "Paro," in a VA long-term care setting.

    PubMed

    Lane, Geoffrey W; Noronha, Delilah; Rivera, Alexandra; Craig, Kathy; Yee, Christina; Mills, Brent; Villanueva, Eimee

    2016-08-01

    Interest in animal assisted interventions (AAI) has grown over the years, but acceptance of AAI by the clinical and research community has been hampered by safety, hygiene, and logistical concerns. Advances in the field of social robotics have provided a promising route to deliver AAI while avoiding these aforementioned obstacles. Although there has been promising initial research on social robotics in older adults, to date there has been no such research conducted with a veteran population. The present pilot study followed 23 veteran residents of a Veterans Affairs (VA) geropsychiatric long-term care facility over the span of approximately a year and a half. It was found that use of Paro, a social robot, resulted in increased observed positive affective and behavioral indicators, with concomitant decreases observed in negative affective and behavioral indicators. The authors concluded that Paro is likely an effective nonpharmacological approach for managing dementia-related mood and behavior problems with veterans in VA long term care facilities. They additionally observed that Paro is best presented to residents who are relatively calm and approachable, as opposed to actively exhibiting behavior or mood problems. Future research directions are discussed in light of both the positive results noted and the inherent limitations of our pilot study. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. The long-term effects of invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) on instream macroinvertebrate communities.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Kate L; Chadd, Richard P; Dunbar, Michael J; Extence, Chris A; Reeds, Jake; Rice, Stephen P; Wood, Paul J

    2016-06-15

    Non-native species represent a significant threat to indigenous biodiversity and ecosystem functioning worldwide. It is widely acknowledged that invasive crayfish species may be instrumental in modifying benthic invertebrate community structure, but there is limited knowledge regarding the temporal and spatial extent of these effects within lotic ecosystems. This study investigates the long term changes to benthic macroinvertebrate community composition following the invasion of signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, into English rivers. Data from long-term monitoring sites on 7 rivers invaded by crayfish and 7 rivers where signal crayfish were absent throughout the record (control sites) were used to examine how invertebrate community composition and populations of individual taxa changed as a result of invasion. Following the detection of non-native crayfish, significant shifts in invertebrate community composition were observed at invaded sites compared to control sites. This pattern was strongest during autumn months but was also evident during spring surveys. The observed shifts in community composition following invasion were associated with reductions in the occurrence of ubiquitous Hirudinea species (Glossiphonia complanata and Erpobdella octoculata), Gastropoda (Radix spp.), Ephemeroptera (Caenis spp.), and Trichoptera (Hydropsyche spp.); although variations in specific taxa affected were evident between regions and seasons. Changes in community structure were persistent over time with no evidence of recovery, suggesting that crayfish invasions represent significant perturbations leading to permanent changes in benthic communities. The results provide fundamental knowledge regarding non-native crayfish invasions of lotic ecosystems required for the development of future management strategies. PMID:26974569

  19. Effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on Pinus ponderosa

    SciTech Connect

    Surano, K.A.; Kercher, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    This report details the results from an experiment of the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) saplings and seedlings. The study began in 1983 as a pilot study designed to explore the feasibility of using open-top chambers for continuous multi-year exposures on sapling-sized trees and to examine possible CO{sub 2} responses so that future research could be adequately designed. however, following the first year of exposure, preliminary results from the study indicated that measurements of CO{sub 2} responses should be intensified. Open-top chambers proved suitable for use in multiyear exposures of mature trees. With respect to the preliminary examination of CO{sub 2} responses, many interesting observations were made. The nature of the preliminary results suggests that future long-term field CO{sub 2} exposures on perennial species may be critical to the understanding and preparation for future environments. Other research reported here attempted to adapt an existing western coniferous forest growth and succession model for use in elevated CO{sub 2} scenarios using differential species responses, and assessed the usefulness of the model in that regard. Seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  20. Defining Molecular Sensors to Assess Long-Term Effects of Pesticides on Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    L’Héritier, Fanny; Marques, Maud; Fauteux, Myriam; Gaudreau, Luc

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of dioxins and dioxin-like pollutants has massively increased in the environment due to human activity. These chemicals are particularly persistent and accumulate in the food chain, which raises major concerns regarding long-term exposure to human health. Most dioxin-like pollutants activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcription factor, which regulates xenobiotic metabolism enzymes that belong to the cytochrome P450 1A family (that includes CYP1A1 and CYP1B1). Importantly, a crosstalk exists between estrogen receptor α (ERα) and AhR. More specifically, ERα represses the expression of the CYP1A1 gene, which encodes an enzyme that converts 17β-estradiol into 2-hydroxyestradiol. However, (ERα) does not repress the CYP1B1 gene, which encodes an enzyme that converts 17β-estradiol into 4-hydroxyestradiol, one of the most genotoxic estrogen metabolites. In this review, we discuss how chronic exposure to xenobiotic chemicals, such as pesticides, might affect the expression of genes regulated by the AhR–ERα crosstalk. Here, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of molecular mechanisms that mediate this crosstalk repression, and particularly on how ERα represses the AhR target gene CYP1A1, and could subsequently promote breast cancer. Finally, we propose that genes implicated in this crosstalk could constitute important biomarkers to assess long-term effects of pesticides on human health. PMID:25257533

  1. Long-term effects of radiotherapy on taste and salivary function in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.; Shatzman, A.; Chencharick, J.

    1982-06-01

    The long-term effects of radiotherapy on taste and salivary function were studied in 13 patients treated by radiation 1-7 years previously for tumors of the head and neck. Taste function was studied quantitatively using a standard forced choice, three-stimulus-drop technique for the determination of detection and recognition thresholds and a forced-scaling technique for the determination of taste intensity reponsiveness. Parotid salivary function was quantitatively evaluated by determination of flow rate and protein secretion rate. Nine of the 13 patients studied (69%) had measurable taste loss; every patient who had radiotherapy including the parotid glands had measurable salivary dysfunction. Our results demonstrate that curative courses of radiotherapy for tumors of the head and neck may result in long-term changes in taste and salivary function. From the present study, the maximum tolerance doses resulting in a 50% complication rate 5 years after treatment (TD 50/5) are estimated to be 40-65 Gy for xerostomia and 50-65 Gy for taste loss. Therefore, in a standard treatment regimen for tumors of the head and neck, with curative intent, gustatory and salivary gland tissues frequently sustain maximum tolerance injury.

  2. Effects of long-term anabolic androgenic steroid administration on respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Gething, Alex D; Grace, Fergal M; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance training and long-term anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) administration on respiratory function. Subject groups consisted of AAS users (n = 9) who were still using AAS at time of testing (SU); AAS users (n = 6) who had been abstinent for > 3 months (SA), bodybuilding controls (n = 8) (BC), and (n = 8) sedentary male controls (SC). FEV(1), FVC, and PEF were measured. The results found that all subjects were within normal range, and there were no differences between groups. Maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and grip strength were both significantly greater in SU (P < 0.05) compared with SC; no significant difference was found between the other groups. Their MIP and grip strength was significantly correlated (r = 0.57; P < 0.05). The data from this study suggest that the combination of resistance training and AAS administration produce a significant increase in MIP in a cohort of long-term AAS users.

  3. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention. PMID:27630396

  4. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention. PMID:27630396

  5. Effects of long-term benzene pollution on bacterial diversity and community structure in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Anne; Lethbridge, Gordon; Earle, Richard; Ball, Andrew S; Timmis, Kenneth N; McGenity, Terry J

    2005-08-01

    In this study we analysed the relationship between bacterial community structures and geochemistry of groundwater in a sandstone aquifer (SIReN site) impacted mainly by BTEX hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes), of which benzene is most abundant. The long-term presence of benzene reduced bacterial diversity: in groundwaters contaminated with more than 1.8 x 10(4) microg l(-1) of benzene, bacterial diversity was half of that in clean groundwaters. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rDNA revealed that the community structures were very similar in uncontaminated groundwaters, whereas communities subjected to long-term benzene contamination were different, not only from uncontaminated groundwater communities, but also from each other. Canonical correspondence analysis of the community profiles and the geochemical data showed that this divergence in community structure was not primarily caused by the direct toxic or stressful effects of benzene, but by the environmental changes brought about by benzene metabolism, in particular a decrease in redox potential.

  6. Long term effect and safety of Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells on type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianxia; Wang, Yangang; Gong, Huimin; Yu, Chundong; Guo, Caihong; Wang, Fang; Yan, Shengli; Xu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies offer novel opportunities for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study evaluated the long-term efficacy and safety of infusion of Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSC) on T2DM. A total of 61 patients with T2DM were randomly divided into two groups on the basis of basal therapy; patients in group I were administered WJ-MSC intravenous infusion twice, with a four-week interval, and patients in group II were treated with normal saline as control. During the 36-month follow-up period, the occurrence of any adverse effects and the results of clinical and laboratory examinations were recorded and evaluated. The lack of acute or chronic adverse effects in group I was consistent with group II.. Blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, C-peptide, homeostasis model assessment of pancreatic islet β-cell function and incidence of diabetic complications in group I were significantly improved, as compared with group II during the 36-month follow-up. The results of the present study demonstrated that infusion of WJ-MSC improved the function of islet β-cells and reduced the incidence of diabetic complications, although the precise mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. The infusion of WJ-MSC may be an effective option for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27588104

  7. Possible long-term effects of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) due to neurotoxicity and overdose.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan G C; Brunt, Tibor M; McMaster, Minni T B; Niesink, Raymond J M

    2012-04-01

    In several countries, including the Netherlands, the use of GHB seems to be rising. GHB is regarded by recreational users as an innocent drug without any side effects. Recently, the number of patients in treatment due to GHB addiction sharply increased. In addition, various studies report incidents following risky GHB use or GHB overdosing. Other sedative drugs, like ketamine and alcohol have been shown to result in unintended neurotoxic harm at the level of memory and cognitive function. As outlined in the present review, GHB and ketamine have a common mode of action, which suggests that GHB may also lead to similar neurotoxicity as ketamine. GHB overdosing, as well as binge drinking (and high ketamine doses), induce profound coma which is probably neurotoxic for the brain especially in the maturing brain of young adults. It is therefore advocated to investigate possible long-term neurotoxic effects in recreational GHB users e.g. by studying the residual effects on cognition and memory.

  8. Topological effects of network structure on long-term social network dynamics in a wild mammal.

    PubMed

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Booms, Andrew S; Holekamp, Kay E

    2015-07-01

    Social structure influences ecological processes such as dispersal and invasion, and affects survival and reproductive success. Recent studies have used static snapshots of social networks, thus neglecting their temporal dynamics, and focused primarily on a limited number of variables that might be affecting social structure. Here, instead we modelled effects of multiple predictors of social network dynamics in the spotted hyena, using observational data collected during 20 years of continuous field research in Kenya. We tested the hypothesis that the current state of the social network affects its long-term dynamics. We employed stochastic agent-based models that allowed us to estimate the contribution of multiple factors to network changes. After controlling for environmental and individual effects, we found that network density and individual centrality affected network dynamics, but that social bond transitivity consistently had the strongest effects. Our results emphasise the significance of structural properties of networks in shaping social dynamics. PMID:25975663

  9. Topological effects of network structure on long-term social network dynamics in a wild mammal.

    PubMed

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Booms, Andrew S; Holekamp, Kay E

    2015-07-01

    Social structure influences ecological processes such as dispersal and invasion, and affects survival and reproductive success. Recent studies have used static snapshots of social networks, thus neglecting their temporal dynamics, and focused primarily on a limited number of variables that might be affecting social structure. Here, instead we modelled effects of multiple predictors of social network dynamics in the spotted hyena, using observational data collected during 20 years of continuous field research in Kenya. We tested the hypothesis that the current state of the social network affects its long-term dynamics. We employed stochastic agent-based models that allowed us to estimate the contribution of multiple factors to network changes. After controlling for environmental and individual effects, we found that network density and individual centrality affected network dynamics, but that social bond transitivity consistently had the strongest effects. Our results emphasise the significance of structural properties of networks in shaping social dynamics.

  10. Topological effects of network structure on long-term social network dynamics in a wild mammal

    PubMed Central

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Booms, Andrew S.; Holekamp, Kay E.

    2015-01-01

    Social structure influences ecological processes such as dispersal and invasion, and affects survival and reproductive success. Recent studies have used static snapshots of social networks, thus neglecting their temporal dynamics, and focused primarily on a limited number of variables that might be affecting social structure. Here, instead we modelled effects of multiple predictors of social network dynamics in the spotted hyena, using observational data collected during 20 years of continuous field research in Kenya. We tested the hypothesis that the current state of the social network affects its long-term dynamics. We employed stochastic agent-based models that allowed us to estimate the contribution of multiple factors to network changes. After controlling for environmental and individual effects, we found that network density and individual centrality affected network dynamics, but that social bond transitivity consistently had the strongest effects. Our results emphasise the significance of structural properties of networks in shaping social dynamics. PMID:25975663

  11. Effects of long-term hypergravity on growth of Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahara, Ichirou; Ando, Naoko; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    Effects of altered gravity on growth of plant root are not yet well understood compared to that of shoot organ such as stem, epicotyl or hypocotyl. And besides, its effect on growth is not yet examined at cellular level either in the root or the shoot. In the present study, we examined effects of long-term hypergravity on growth not only of the root but also the shoot at cellular level. Seeds of Arabidopsis were sown on gelrite containing Murashige-Skoog medium and were started to be exposed to hypergravity before germination. Growth of the hypocotyl had been inhibited since 3 d after the onset of hypergravity treatment at both 100 and 300 G while that of the root was not at either gravity. Longitudinal length of epidermal cells in one cell file decreased in response to hypergravity at 300 G in 3 d old hypocotyls while the number of the epidermal cells did not.

  12. Long term sex-dependent psychoneuroendocrine effects of maternal deprivation and juvenile unpredictable stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Llorente, R; Miguel-Blanco, C; Aisa, B; Lachize, S; Borcel, E; Meijer, O C; Ramirez, M J; De Kloet, E R; Viveros, M P

    2011-04-01

    We have analysed the long-term psychoneuroendocrine effects of maternal deprivation (MD) [24 h at postnatal day (PND) 9] and/or exposure to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) during the periadolescent period (PND 28 to PND 43) in male and female Wistar rats. Animals were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM, anxiety) at PND 44 and in two memory tests, spontaneous alternation and novel object recognition (NOT) in adulthood. The expression of hippocampal glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors, as well as of synaptophysin, neural cell adhesion molecule and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, was analysed by in situ hybridisation in selected hippocampal regions. Endocrine determinations of leptin, testosterone and oestradiol plasma levels were carried out by radioimmunoassay. Young CUS animals showed decreased anxiety behaviour in the EPM (increased percentage of time and entries in the open arms) irrespective of neonatal treatment. Memory impairments were induced by the two stressful treatments as was revealed by the NOT, with males being most clearly affected. Although each stressful procedure, when considered separately, induced different (always decrements) effects on the three synaptic molecules analysed and affected males and females differently, the combination of MD and CUS induced an unique disruptive effect on the three synaptic plasticity players. MD induced a long-term significant decrease in hippocampal GR only in males, whereas CUS tended to increase MR in males and decrease MR in females. Both neonatal MD and periadolescent CUS induced marked reductions in testosterone and oestradiol in males, whereas MD male animals also showed significantly decreased leptin levels. By contrast, in females, none of the hormones analysed was altered by any of the stressful procedures. Taking our data together in support of the 'two-hit' hypothesis, MD during neonatal life and/or exposure to CUS during the periadolescent period induced a permanent

  13. Understanding long-term variations in an elephant piosphere effect to manage impacts.

    PubMed

    Landman, Marietjie; Schoeman, David S; Hall-Martin, Anthony J; Kerley, Graham I H

    2012-01-01

    Surface water availability is a key driver of elephant impacts on biological diversity. Thus, understanding the spatio-temporal variations of these impacts in relation to water is critical to their management. However, elephant piosphere effects (i.e. the radial pattern of attenuating impact) are poorly described, with few long-term quantitative studies. Our understanding is further confounded by the complexity of systems with elephant (i.e. fenced, multiple water points, seasonal water availability, varying population densities) that likely limit the use of conceptual models to predict these impacts. Using 31 years of data on shrub structure in the succulent thickets of the Addo Elephant National Park, South Africa, we tested elephant effects at a single water point. Shrub structure showed a clear sigmoid response with distance from water, declining at both the upper and lower limits of sampling. Adjacent to water, this decline caused a roughly 300-m radial expansion of the grass-dominated habitats that replace shrub communities. Despite the clear relationship between shrub structure and ecological functioning in thicket, the extent of elephant effects varied between these features with distance from water. Moreover, these patterns co-varied with other confounding variables (e.g. the location of neighboring water points), which limits our ability to predict such effects in the absence of long-term data. We predict that elephant have the ability to cause severe transformation in succulent thicket habitats with abundant water supply and elevated elephant numbers. However, these piosphere effects are complex, suggesting that a more integrated understanding of elephant impacts on ecological heterogeneity may be required before water availability is used as a tool to manage impacts. We caution against the establishment of water points in novel succulent thicket habitats, and advocate a significant reduction in water provisioning at our study site, albeit with greater

  14. Thermoregulatory effects of chlorpyrifos in the rat: long-term changes in cholinergic and noradrenergic sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    1994-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of a sublethal dose of chlorpyrifos (CHLP), an organophosphate (OP) pesticide, causes long-term inhibition in cholinesterase activity (ChE) of brain, blood, and other tissues. Such prolonged inhibition in ChE should lead to marked behavioral and autonomic thermoregulatory patterns, especially in terms of altered noradrenergic and cholinergic sensitivity. To evaluate the behavioral and autonomic effects of long-term ChE inhibition, Long-Evans rats were implanted with radiotelemetry transmitters that continuously monitored core temperature (Tc), heart rate (HR), and motor activity (MA). These parameters were monitored for 7 days following a single injection of peanut oil (vehicle control) or 280 mg/kg CHLP. CHLP led to a significant reduction in Tc during the first night after treatment but had no other effects on Tc. CHLP also resulted in a significant elevation in HR which lasted for approximately 72 h. Motor activity was unaffected by CHLP. Cholinergic and noradrenergic drug sensitivity was assessed between 7 and 25 days after CHLP. CHLP-treated rats were more sensitive to norepinephrine as based on a greater hyperthermic response. MA of CHLP-treated rats was more sensitive to scopolamine. On the other hand, the hypothermic effects of oxotremorine (0.4 mg/kg) were nearly abolished by CHLP treatment, indicating tolerance to cholinergic stimulation. The tachycardic effects of methyscopolamine were also greater in the CHLP group. Overall, the acute effects of CHLP are unusual compared to other OP's in that there is no hypothermic response, an attenuated nocturnal elevation in Tc and a prolonged elevation in HR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7514260

  15. Immediate and long-term effects of electron beam irradiation on nitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopitaux, Garance; Coqueret, Xavier; Boursereau, Frédéric; Larnac, Guy

    2003-08-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation in a formulated nitrile butadiene rubber elastomer, vulcanized thermally prior to irradiation, were investigated. The immediate effects of radiation predominantly result in cross-linking of polymer chains. Upon thermal aging, the amplitude of the relative stiffening due to cross-linking was shown to decrease with increasing absorbed dose of ionizing radiation. The ultimate tensile elongation has been analyzed as a function of aging time by means of a first order kinetic model, and as a function of temperature by an Arrhenius equation. The influence of the radiation dose has been introduced in the model. This set of parameters makes it possible to accurately predict the long-term evolution of mechanical properties for elastomers treated under various conditions.

  16. Long-term environmental effects and flight service evaluation of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, H.B.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a NASA-Langley sponsored research program to establish the long term effects of realistic flight environments and ground based exposure on advanced composite materials are presented. The effects of moisture, ultraviolet radiation, aircraft fuels and fluids, sustained stress, and fatigue loading are reported. Residual strength and stiffness as a function of exposure time and exposure location are reported for seven different material systems after 10 years of worldwide outdoor exposure. Flight service results of over 300 composite components installed on rotorcraft and transport aircraft are included. Over 4 million total component flight hours were accumulated on various aircraft since initiation of flight service in 1973. Service performance, maintenance characteristics, and residual strength of numerous composite components installed on commercial and military aircraft are reported as a function of flight hours and years in service. Residual strength test results of graphite/epoxy spoilers with 10 years of worldwide service and over 28,000 flight hours are reported.

  17. The possible long-term effects of early-life circadian rhythm disturbance on social behavior.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Sleep loss impairs brain function. As late sleep onset can reduce sleep, this sleep/circadian rhythm disturbance may cause brain impairment. Specific data on the long-term effects of sleep/circadian rhythm disturbance on subsequent brain function are lacking. Japan, a sleep-deprived society from infancy to adulthood, provides an ideal platform to investigate the association of these disturbances in early life with subsequent functioning. In this article, several current problematic behaviors among youth in Japan (dropping out from high school, school absenteeism, early resignation from employment, and suicide) are discussed in relation to early life sleep/circadian rhythm patterns. We hypothesize that daily habits of modern society during early stages of life produce unfavorable effects on brain function resulting in problematic behaviors in subsequent years.

  18. Long-term effects of the transient COD concentration on the performance of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Mateo, S; Gonzalez Del Campo, A; Lobato, J; Rodrigo, M; Cañizares, P; Fernandez-Morales, F J

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the long-term effects of transient chemical oxygen demands (COD) concentrations over the performance of a microbial fuel cell were studied. From the obtained results, it was observed that the repetitive change in the COD loading rate during 12 h conditioned the behavior of the system during periods of up to 7 days. The main modifications were the enhancement of the COD consumption rate and the exerted current. These enhancements yielded increasing Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) when working with COD concentrations of 300 mg/L, but constant CEs when working with COD concentrations from 900 to 1800 mg/L. This effect could be explained by the higher affinity for the substrate of Geobacter than that of the nonelectrogenic organisms such as Clostridia. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:883-890, 2016.

  19. Long-term effects of the transient COD concentration on the performance of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Mateo, S; Gonzalez Del Campo, A; Lobato, J; Rodrigo, M; Cañizares, P; Fernandez-Morales, F J

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the long-term effects of transient chemical oxygen demands (COD) concentrations over the performance of a microbial fuel cell were studied. From the obtained results, it was observed that the repetitive change in the COD loading rate during 12 h conditioned the behavior of the system during periods of up to 7 days. The main modifications were the enhancement of the COD consumption rate and the exerted current. These enhancements yielded increasing Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) when working with COD concentrations of 300 mg/L, but constant CEs when working with COD concentrations from 900 to 1800 mg/L. This effect could be explained by the higher affinity for the substrate of Geobacter than that of the nonelectrogenic organisms such as Clostridia. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:883-890, 2016. PMID:27072066

  20. [Short-and long-term effects of cannabinoids on memory, cognition and mental illness].

    PubMed

    Sagie, Shira; Eliasi, Yehuda; Livneh, Ido; Bart, Yosi; Monovich, Einat

    2013-12-01

    Marijuana is considered the most commonly used drug in the world, with estimated millions of users. There is dissent in the medical world about the positive and negative effects of marijuana, and recently, a large research effort has been directed to that domain. The main influencing drug ingredient is THC, which acts on the cannabinoid system and binds to the CB1 receptor. The discovery of the receptor led to the finding of an endogenous ligand, anandamide, and another receptor-CB2. The researchers also discovered that cannabinoids have extensive biological activity, and its short and long-term effects may cause cognitive and emotional deficiencies. Findings show that the short-term effects, such as shortterm memory and verbal Learning, are reversible. However, despite the accumulation of evidence about long-term cognitive damage due to cannabis use, it is difficult to find unequivocal results, arising from the existence of many variables such as large differences between cannabis users, frequency of use, dosage and endogenous brain compensation. Apart from cognitive damage, current studies investigate how marijuana affects mental illness: a high correlation between cannabis use and schizophrenia was found and a high risk to undergo a psychotic attack. Furthermore, patients with schizophrenia who used cannabis showed a selective neuro-psychological disruption, and similar cognitive deficiencies and brain morphological changes were found among healthy cannabis users and schizophrenia patients. In contrast to the negative effects of marijuana including addiction, there are the medical uses: reducing pain, anxiety and nausea, increasing appetite and an anti-inflammatory activity. Medicalization of marijuana encourages frequent use, which may elevate depression. PMID:24483000

  1. Long-Term Effects of Prenatal Hypoxia on Schizophrenia-Like Phenotype in Heterozygous Reeler Mice.

    PubMed

    Howell, Kristy R; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal hypoxia (PHX) is a well-known environmental factor implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the long-term effects of PHX on schizophrenia-related neuroplasticity are poorly understood. Using behavioral tasks, MRI imaging, and biochemical studies, we examined the long-term effects of PHX in heterozygous reeler mice (HRM; mice deficient for reelin, a candidate gene for schizophrenia). PHX at E17 failed to induce any significant deficits in prepulse inhibition, spatial memory, anxiety-like behavior, or blood flow in wild type (WT) and HRM at 6 months of age. However, PHX induced a significant increase in frontal cortex volume in WT whereas the higher frontal cortical volume found in HRM was significantly reduced by PHX. A significant decrease in reelin levels was observed in frontal cortex of WT and HRM and hippocampus of HRM following PHX. In addition, PHX induced significant reductions in hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) levels in frontal cortex and hippocampus of HRM. Although no significant effect of PHX was observed in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein levels in frontal cortex and hippocampus of WT and HRM, serum VEGF levels were found higher in HRM following PHX. Moreover, glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels were significantly lower in frontal cortex of WT and HRM and hippocampus of HRM following PHX. We found a significant reduction in serum corticosterone levels of PHX-treated WT mice. These findings suggest that future experiments addressing gene-environment interaction in schizophrenia should consider age-dependent effects of the environmental factor, in addition to the specificity of the gene of interest. PMID:26059812

  2. [Short-and long-term effects of cannabinoids on memory, cognition and mental illness].

    PubMed

    Sagie, Shira; Eliasi, Yehuda; Livneh, Ido; Bart, Yosi; Monovich, Einat

    2013-12-01

    Marijuana is considered the most commonly used drug in the world, with estimated millions of users. There is dissent in the medical world about the positive and negative effects of marijuana, and recently, a large research effort has been directed to that domain. The main influencing drug ingredient is THC, which acts on the cannabinoid system and binds to the CB1 receptor. The discovery of the receptor led to the finding of an endogenous ligand, anandamide, and another receptor-CB2. The researchers also discovered that cannabinoids have extensive biological activity, and its short and long-term effects may cause cognitive and emotional deficiencies. Findings show that the short-term effects, such as shortterm memory and verbal Learning, are reversible. However, despite the accumulation of evidence about long-term cognitive damage due to cannabis use, it is difficult to find unequivocal results, arising from the existence of many variables such as large differences between cannabis users, frequency of use, dosage and endogenous brain compensation. Apart from cognitive damage, current studies investigate how marijuana affects mental illness: a high correlation between cannabis use and schizophrenia was found and a high risk to undergo a psychotic attack. Furthermore, patients with schizophrenia who used cannabis showed a selective neuro-psychological disruption, and similar cognitive deficiencies and brain morphological changes were found among healthy cannabis users and schizophrenia patients. In contrast to the negative effects of marijuana including addiction, there are the medical uses: reducing pain, anxiety and nausea, increasing appetite and an anti-inflammatory activity. Medicalization of marijuana encourages frequent use, which may elevate depression.

  3. Calcium Induces Long-Term Legacy Effects in a Subalpine Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Urs; Alewell, Christine; Eschen, René; Matthies, Diethart; Spiegelberger, Thomas; Hegg, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Human activities have transformed a significant proportion of the world’s land surface, with profound effects on ecosystem processes. Soil applications of macronutrients such as nitrate, phosphorus, potassium or calcium are routinely used in the management of croplands, grasslands and forests to improve plant health or increase productivity. However, while the effects of continuous fertilization and liming on terrestrial ecosystems are well documented, remarkably little is known about the legacy effect of historical fertilization and liming events in terrestrial ecosystems and of the mechanisms involved. Here, we show that more than 70 years after the last application of lime on a subalpine grassland, all major soil and plant calcium pools were still significantly larger in limed than in unlimed plots, and that the resulting shift in the soil calcium/aluminium ratio continues to affect ecosystem services such as primary production. The difference in the calcium content of the vegetation and the topmost 10 cm of the soil in limed vs. unlimed plots amounts to approximately 19.5 g m−2, equivalent to 16.3% of the amount that was added to the plots some 70 years ago. In contrast, plots that were treated with nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium fertilizer in the 1930s did not differ from unfertilized plots in any of the soil and vegetation characteristics measured. Our findings suggest that the long-term legacy effect of historical liming is due to long-term storage of added calcium in stable soil pools, rather than a general increase in nutrient availability. Our results demonstrate that single applications of calcium in its carbonated form can profoundly and persistently alter ecosystem processes and services in mountain ecosystems. PMID:23284779

  4. Effects of Long-Term Pioglitazone Treatment on Peripheral and Central Markers of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pancani, Tristano; Searcy, James L.; Anderson, Katie L.; Gant, John C.; Popovic, Jelena; Avdiushko, Margarita G.; Cohen, Don A.; Chen, Kuey-Chu; Porter, Nada M.; Thibault, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Background Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and are used clinically to help restore peripheral insulin sensitivity in Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Interestingly, long-term treatment of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with TZDs also has been shown to reduce several well-established brain biomarkers of AD including inflammation, oxidative stress and Aβ accumulation. While TZD's actions in AD models help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their potentially beneficial effects in AD patients, little is known about the functional consequences of TZDs in animal models of normal aging. Because aging is a common risk factor for both AD and T2DM, we investigated whether the TZD, pioglitazone could alter brain aging under non-pathological conditions. Methods and Findings We used the F344 rat model of aging, and monitored behavioral, electrophysiological, and molecular variables to assess the effects of pioglitazone (PIO-Actos® a TZD) on several peripheral (blood and liver) and central (hippocampal) biomarkers of aging. Starting at 3 months or 17 months of age, male rats were treated for 4–5 months with either a control or a PIO-containing diet (final dose approximately 2.3 mg/kg body weight/day). A significant reduction in the Ca2+-dependent afterhyperpolarization was seen in the aged animals, with no significant change in long-term potentiation maintenance or learning and memory performance. Blood insulin levels were unchanged with age, but significantly reduced by PIO. Finally, a combination of microarray analyses on hippocampal tissue and serum-based multiplex cytokine assays revealed that age-dependent inflammatory increases were not reversed by PIO. Conclusions While current research efforts continue to identify the underlying processes responsible for the progressive decline in cognitive function seen during normal aging, available medical treatments are still very limited. Because TZDs have been

  5. The effects of Creatine Long-Term Supplementation on Muscle Morphology and Swimming Performance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ahmet; Ozdemir, Ercan; Gulturk, Sefa; Erdal, Sena

    2009-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) has been shown to increase the total muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Cr supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance, using an animal model. Each rat was subjected to exercise 15-minute period daily for the 12 weeks. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: no Cr supplementation (CON), no Cr supplementation and incomplete food intake (lacking lysine and methionine in diet for rats) (INCO), Cr supplementation 1 g·kg-1·day-1 (CREAT-I) and Cr supplementation 2 g·kg-1·day-1 (CREAT-II). Three months later, all groups adult rats exercised in swimming pool chambers. Swimming time was recorded as minute for each rat. Following swimming performance period, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation and the gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles were dissected. Serial slices of 5-7 μm were allocated paraffin wax and histochemical staining procedure of cross-sections was carried out with heamatoxylin-eosin technics. All groups gained body weight at the end of 12 weeks but there was no statistical difference among them. Swimming time values were statistical difference between CREAT-II and CON group as well as between CREAT-I and CON group (p < 0.05). In the INCO group was determined increased connective tissue cell of the muscle sample. In contrast, in the CREAT-I and CREAT-II group, the basic histological changes were large-scale muscle fibers and hypertrophic muscle cells. These results suggest that long-term creatine supplementation increased the number of muscle fibers and enhanced endurance swimming performance in rats. Key points There is no study about the effects of creatine long-term supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance in rats. Long-term creatine supplementation increase muscle hypertrophy (but not body weight) and enhance endurance swimming performance in rats. The quantitative analysis indicated that the number of muscle fibers per defined area increased

  6. Long-Term Safety and Effectiveness of the 'OptEase' Vena Cava Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Kalva, Sanjeeva P.; Marentis, Theodore C.; Yeddula, Kalpana; Somarouthu, Bhanusupriya; Wicky, Stephan; Stecker, Michael S.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the long-term safety and effectiveness of the OptEase inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Materials and Methods: In this Institutional Review Board-approved, retrospective study, we reviewed data of 71 patients who received an OptEase filter at our institution from 2002 to 2007. Thirty-nine (55%) patients had symptoms of venous thromboembolism before filter placement. The indications for filter included contraindication to anticoagulation in 31 (44%) patients, prophylaxis against pulmonary embolism (PE) in 29 (41%) patients, and failure of anticoagulation in 11 (15%) patients. Procedure-related complications, such as symptomatic post-filter PE, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), IVC occlusion, and incidental imaging-evident filter-related complications, were recorded. Safety was assessed by the occurrence of filter-related complications during placement and follow-up. Effectiveness was assessed by the occurrence of post-filter PE. Results: Sixty-five (92%) filters were placed under fluoroscopy, and 6 (8%) were placed using intravascular ultrasound guidance. Seventy (99%) filters were placed successfully. Seven (10%) filters were placed in the suprarenal cava. Retrieval was attempted in 14 (20%) patients, and 12 filters were successfully retrieved. Clinical follow-up was available for 20 {+-} 21 months. Symptoms of postfilter PE and DVT occurred in 15% (n = 11) and 10% (n = 7) patients, respectively. None of these patients had computed tomography (CT)-proven PE, and only one had ultrasound-proven new DVT. One patient had symptomatic IVC occlusion. Follow-up abdominal CT in 20 patients showed thrombus in the filter in two of them. There were no instances of filter migration, filter tilt, or caval wall penetration. Conclusion: The OptEase filter appears to have an acceptable long-term safety profile. The filter was effective against PE.

  7. Effects of long-term treatment on brain volume in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hosung; Joo, EunYeon; Suh, Sooyeon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Sung Tae; Hong, Seung Bong

    2016-01-01

    We assessed structural brain damage in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) patients (21 males) and the effects of long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment (18.2 ± 12.4 months; 8-44 months) on brain structures and investigated the relationship between severity of OSA and effects of treatment. Using deformation-based morphometry to measure local volume changes, we identified widespread neocortical and cerebellar atrophy in untreated patients compared to controls (59 males; Cohen's D = 0.6; FDR < 0.05). Analysis of longitudinally scanned magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans both before and after treatment showed increased brain volume following treatment (FDR < 0.05). Volume increase was correlated with longer treatment in the cortical areas that largely overlapped with the initial atrophy. The areas overlying the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the cerebellar dentate nucleus displayed a volume increase after treatment. Patients with very severe OSA (AHI > 64) presented with prefrontal atrophy and displayed an additional volume increase in this area following treatment. Higher impairment of working memory in patients prior to treatment correlated with prefrontal volume increase after treatment. The large overlap between the initial brain damage and the extent of recovery after treatment suggests partial recovery of nonpermanent structural damage. Volume increases in the dentate gyrus and the dentate nucleus possibly likely indicate compensatory neurogenesis in response to diminishing oxidative stress. Such changes in other brain structures may explain gliosis, dendritic volume increase, or inflammation. This study provides neuroimaging evidence that revealed the positive effects of long-term CPAP treatment in patients with OSA.

  8. Effects of surface preparation on the long-term durability of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardis, Jason Dante

    The long-term durability of adhesively bonded composite joints is critical to modern aircraft structures, which are increasingly adopting bonding as an alternative option to mechanical fastening. The effects of the surface preparation of the adherends are critical, affecting initial strength, long-term durability, fracture toughness, and failure modes of bonded joints. In this study, several potential factors are evaluated, with focus on the following: (1) Effects of possible chemical contamination from release fabrics, release films, and peel plies during adherend cure. (2) Chemical and mechanical effects of abrasion on the fracture toughness and failure mode. (3) Characterization of paste and film adhesives. There are several standard test methods used to evaluate specimen fracture, but the majority concentrate on bonded metals and interlaminar composite fracture. Testing concentrated on mode I tests; a custom double cantilever beam specimen was devised and utilized, and two forms of a wedge crack test (traveling and static) were also used. Additionally, single lap shear tests were run to contrast the mode I tests. Non-destructive testing included X-ray photography of crack fronts, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface chemistry analyses, and scanning electron microscope imaging of prepared surfaces. All mode I test methods tended to be in agreement in the ranking of different surface preparation methods. Test results revealed that release agents deposited on adherend surfaces during their cure cycle prevented proper adhesion. While mechanical abrasion did improve their fracture toughness and lower their contamination greatly, the test values did not reach the levels of samples that were not contaminated before bonding, and the interfacial modes of failure did not always change to desirable modes.

  9. Short and long-term effects of high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy on thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomei; Wang, Shu; Qin, Li; Qiang, Wei; Dahal, Mahesh; Fan, Ping; Gao, Shan; Shi, Bingyin

    2016-01-01

    The majority of previous studies on high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone pulse (IVMP) therapy have observed the clinical conditions of patients prior to and following treatment without any long-term follow-up, and these studies have predominantly focused on combined treatment. The present prospective clinical study aimed to assess the long-term effects and safety of high-dose IVMP therapy in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), as well as the significance of thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-l (sICAM-1) during IVMP therapy. A total of 58 patients with TAO were treated with high-dose IVMP therapy, and their clinical characteristics and indices were recorded before, during and after therapy, with a 12–57 month (mean, 28.4 months) follow-up. Before treatment and on the second day after each IVMP therapy, serum TRAb and sICAM-1 levels were evaluated in 23 patients with TAO via a competitive radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The results of the present study demonstrated that the symptoms of eyelid swelling, ophthalmodynia, photophobia, lacrimation and diplopia, and visual acuity, ocular motility, proptosis and clinical activity score (CAS) indices were all significantly improved after IVMP therapy. In addition, analysis of covariance demonstrated that alterations in the levels of serum TRAb during the course of treatment were associated with CAS of TAO, whereas the change in serum sICAM-1 was not. In conclusion, high-dose IVMP therapy is an effective, safe, stable and well-tolerated treatment for TAO, which is associated with rare, minor adverse effects. Furthermore, serum TRAb levels are correlated with the CAS of TAO and may serve as a predictor of the response to methylprednisolone therapy. PMID:27446294

  10. Long-term effects of PZP immunization on reproduction in white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Miller, L A; Johns, B E; Killian, G J

    1999-10-14

    A 6-year study was conducted to determine the long-term effects of porcine zona pellucida (PZP) vaccine on the immune and hormonal responses, and reproduction of the white-tailed deer. The first 2 years of active immunization resulted in an 89% reduction in fawning. Vaccination with PZP produced reversible infertility lasting 1-4 years. Infertility was directly related to immune titers to PZP. Doe fertility was restored when the antibody titer dropped to minimal levels, but following re-immunization, infertility was reestablished. Reduction in fawning throughout the 6-year study was 76%. It was also observed that immune responses among deer were variable, especially in the first year of treatment. Variability was also observed among deer for the duration of infertility following the initial vaccination.

  11. The Effects of Long Term Cure on Offgassed Products of Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, Ginger; Whitfield, Steve

    1997-01-01

    The Environmental Chemistry and Compatability Team at The Marshall Space Flight Center conducts toxic offgassing analysis on materials and flight hardware for use in habitable environments aboard the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. As part of Research and Development, the Toxic Offgassing Laboratory conducted a long term cure study on four polyurethane coatings which are slated for potential use on Space Station. This study demonstrates the effects of cure time and temperature on the total tox value (sum T) and the maximum usage weight for each coating. All analysis was conducted according to test procedures outlined specifically for Space Station environments. Therefore, the ratings and weight limits generated for these materials are most applicable to space environments. However, this test does give some indication of time frames for solvent removal and is therefore of interest to, the environmental community as a whole.

  12. Long-term effects of preterm birth on language and literacy at eight years.

    PubMed

    Guarini, Annalisa; Sansavini, Alessandra; Fabbri, Cristina; Savini, Silvia; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether specific linguistic difficulties in preterm children persist at eight years and to examine the interrelationships between language and literacy in this population, compared with a control group of full-term children. Sixty-eight monolingual Italian preterms and 26 chronologically matched controls were recruited. Language (grammar comprehension, lexical production and phonological awareness), literacy (reading comprehension, reading and writing) and general cognitive development were investigated. Results showed no general delay in preterms, but slight difficulties in specific linguistic abilities (grammar, lexicon, phoneme synthesis and deletion of the first syllable), more difficulties in literacy (speed in reading and accuracy in writing) and certain correlations among competencies turning out to be different from the control group. In conclusion, our study established that a partially atypical trajectory emerged in preterms, showing specific long-term effects of preterm birth on language and literacy development. PMID:19698208

  13. [Possible long-term effects on the respiratory system of exposure to yperite of fishermen].

    PubMed

    Assennato, G; Ambrosi, F; Sivo, D

    1997-01-01

    Yperite or mustard gas is a well known vesicant agent that was widely used in World War I, and so far it has been the cause of several accidental exposures from sulfur mustard bombs in the marine environment. In Apulia from 1946 to 1996, 236 exposures were identified when sulfur mustard shells were caught up in fishing nets. The long term effects on the respiratory tract due to the occupational exposure to sulfur mustard are well known. Sulfur mustard has been demonstrated to be causally related to COLD and respiratory tract cancer in many epidemiological studies conducted on workers exposed in manufacturing plants. This study describes chronic pulmonary diseases in fishermen acutely exposed to mustard gas. PMID:9312665

  14. The effects of CON repeal on Medicaid nursing home and long-term care expenditures.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, David C; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Morrisey, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    Certificate-of-need (CON) and construction moratorium laws are used widely by states as a potential mechanism for constraining Medicaid nursing home expenditures. However, there is only limited empirical work examining whether these policies are effective at lowering Medicaid spending. Using aggregate state-level data from 1981 through 1998, this study found that states that repealed their CON and moratorium laws had no significant growth in either nursing home or long-term care Medicaid expenditures. In the context of declining occupancy rates within the nursing home market, this study provides strong evidence that states have little to fear in terms of increased expenditures with the repeal of CON and moratorium laws.

  15. Jupiter's decameter and kilometer emissions: satellite effects and long term periodicities

    SciTech Connect

    St. Cyr, O.C.

    1985-01-01

    Results of observational studies of Jupiter's decameter (DAM) and kilometer (KOM) radio emissions are presented. The initial goal was to investigate the role of Jupiter's major satellites in modulating these sporadic emissions. Concepts of electromagnetic induction in planet-sized bodies are reviewed and the Jovian magnetosphere environment and the physical characteristics of the Galilean satellites and Amalthea are described. Since the phase of Io is known to modulate the DAM emissions, the author addresses the problem of orbital resonance among the Galilean satellites. When IO's influence in the emissions is eliminated from more than two decades of ground-based observation, no significant enhancements or deficiencies in the detection probability were found for the phases of Europa, Ganymede, or Callisto. A secondary goal was to search for long term periodicities and other effects in the ground-based DAM data. As expected, a strong tendency toward an increase or decrease, respectively, in D/sub E/ was found.

  16. Effect of long-term physical activity practice after cardiac rehabilitation on some risk factors.

    PubMed

    Freyssin, Céline; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sébastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity indice were measured at the beginning, at the end of the rehabilitation program and at 18.3 ± 5.3 months after. After the cardiac rehabilitation, sedentary patients showed a significant increase in weight and a significant reduction in distance on the 6-min walk test and in the arterial compliance. Active patients did not show any alteration in these parameters. We concluded that, after a cardiac rehabilitation program, the sedentary lifestyle has a negative influence on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance, which are major markers of risk factors. In contrast, the practice of physical activity preserves these parameters.

  17. Long-term Effects of Fathers’ Depressed Mood on Youth Internalizing Symptoms in Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Ben T.; Wu, Ed Y.; Martin, Monica J.; Gelardi, Kristina L.; Shirley Chan, Sut Yee; Conger, Katherine J.

    2014-01-01

    While an accumulating body of research has documented increased risk for psychopathology among children of depressed fathers, most studies have used cross-sectional design and little is known about offspring outcomes beyond childhood. Using prospective data from a community sample (N = 395), we found that paternal depressive symptoms when children were in early adolescence (age 13) predicted offspring depressive and anxiety symptoms at age 21, controlling for baseline youth symptoms, maternal depressive symptoms, and other known correlates of internalizing problems in early adulthood. Associations were not moderated by maternal depressive symptoms or child gender. These results suggest that the unique and long-term effects of paternal depression on children's risk for mood disorders may persist into adulthood. PMID:25750495

  18. Long-term effectiveness of the response restriction method for establishing diurnal bladder control.

    PubMed

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Duker, P C; Melein, L; Averink, M

    2009-01-01

    The long-term effectiveness of the response restriction method for establishing diurnal bladder control was assessed with 48 participants with intellectual disabilities. Intervals of assessment ranged from 28 to 66 months across the individuals following initial baseline. Difference scores in terms of the mean number of toileting accidents per hour were related to participants' stereotypic behaviour and their housing conditions, as these were hypothesized to differentially influence the maintenance of diurnal bladder control. It was found that (a) across all participants there was a statistically significant decrease of the mean number of toileting accidents during follow-up as compared to initial baseline (b) stereotypic behaviour failed to be related to maintenance of bladder control, and (c) housing condition was significantly related to the above dependent variable, in that those living in a residential facility were more likely to wear a diaper again as compared to those living with their family. Implications for the clinical practice are discussed. PMID:19643573

  19. Long-term effects of preterm birth on language and literacy at eight years.

    PubMed

    Guarini, Annalisa; Sansavini, Alessandra; Fabbri, Cristina; Savini, Silvia; Alessandroni, Rosina; Faldella, Giacomo; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether specific linguistic difficulties in preterm children persist at eight years and to examine the interrelationships between language and literacy in this population, compared with a control group of full-term children. Sixty-eight monolingual Italian preterms and 26 chronologically matched controls were recruited. Language (grammar comprehension, lexical production and phonological awareness), literacy (reading comprehension, reading and writing) and general cognitive development were investigated. Results showed no general delay in preterms, but slight difficulties in specific linguistic abilities (grammar, lexicon, phoneme synthesis and deletion of the first syllable), more difficulties in literacy (speed in reading and accuracy in writing) and certain correlations among competencies turning out to be different from the control group. In conclusion, our study established that a partially atypical trajectory emerged in preterms, showing specific long-term effects of preterm birth on language and literacy development.

  20. The effect of long-term use of intranasal steroids on intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Şimşek, Ali; Bayraktar, Cem; Doğan, Sedat; Karataş, Mehmet; Sarıkaya, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Long-term use of topical nasal steroids (especially older generation steroids) has been shown to elevate intraocular pressure (IOP), but newer intranasal steroids are thought to have a minimal effect on IOP because of their low bioavailability. This study aimed to investigate alterations in IOP with two commonly used intranasal steroids for a 6-month period of time. One-hundred allergic rhinitis patients, divided equally into two groups, used mometasone furoate and fluticasone furoate intranasal steroids for 6 months. IOPs were measured before treatment and repeated at the 3rd, 6th, 12th, and 24th weeks of treatment. The IOPs of the groups were then compared. No statistically significant alteration was observed between the groups during the treatment time period. It was found that new generation intranasal steroids can be used safely, and there may not be an increased risk of IOP elevation in prolonged use in normal healthy people. PMID:27354761

  1. The effect of earthworms on copper fractionation of freshly and long-term polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshikazu; Kaneko, Nobuhiro

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the effects of earthworm activity on the bioavailability of Cu in soil. The bioavailable fraction was estimated using sequential extraction, and the results of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) extraction were analyzed for comparison. Changes in the Cu fraction were compared in Cu-spiked soil (high bioavailability) and long-term polluted field soil (low bioavailability) with approximately equivalent total Cu concentrations. Earthworm activity decreased the bioavailable fraction in the Cu-spiked soil, where earthworm body Cu concentrations did not affect the bioavailable fraction. Soil pH was not a factor in the bioavailability differences between soils with and without earthworms in this study. The bioavailable fraction appears to be more heavily affected by biological and physical mechanisms than by soil pH. The two extraction methods showed different trends; the bioavailable fraction method was better than DTPA extraction, because the former gives clear insight into the aging process of Cu in soil. PMID:19477521

  2. Long term outcome and cost-effectiveness of stenting versus balloon angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Suryapranata, H; Ottervanger, J; Nibbering, E; van't, H; Hoorntje, J; de Boer, M J; Al, M; Zijlstra, F

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the long term clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness of stenting compared with balloon angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction.
METHODS—Patients with acute myocardial infarction were randomly allocated to primary stenting (112) or balloon angioplasty (115). The primary end point was the cumulative first event rate of death, non-fatal reinfarction, or target vessel revascularisation. Secondary end points were restenosis at six months and the cost-effectiveness at follow up.
RESULTS—After 24 months, the combined clinical end point of death/reinfarction was 4% after stenting and 11% after balloon angioplasty (p = 0.04). Subsequent target vessel revascularisation was necessary in 15 patients (13%) after stenting and in 39 (34%) after balloon angioplasty (p < 0.001). The cumulative cardiac event-free survival rate was also higher after stenting (84% v 62%, p < 0.001). The angiographic restenosis rate after stenting was less than after balloon angioplasty (12% v 34%, p < 0.001). Despite the higher initial costs of stenting (Dfl 21 484 v Dfl 18 625, p < 0.001), the cumulative costs at 24 months were comparable with those of balloon angioplasty (Dfl 31 423 v Dfl 32 933, p = 0.83).
CONCLUSIONS—Compared with balloon angioplasty, primary stenting for acute myocardial infarction results in a better long term clinical outcome without increased cost.


Keywords: stenting; angioplasty; myocardial infarction; cost-benefit analysis PMID:11359749

  3. [Effect of long-term fertilization on lignin accumulation in typical subtropical upland soil].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu-zhen; Chen, Xiang-bi; He, Xun-yang; Dong, Ming-zhe; Qiu, Hu-sen; Su, Yi-rong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of long-term fertilization on lignin accumulation and clarify its influencing factors in subtropical agricultural upland soils, alkaline CuO oxidation and gas chromatography was performed to quantify the amount of lignin and its monomers components (V, S and C). The soil samples were collected from the fertilization treatments of NPK and NPKS (NPK combined with straw) in Huanjiang County, Guangxi Province (limestone soil) and Taoyuan County, Hunan Province (red soil). The results showed that NPK had no significant effect on the lignin content (Sumvsc) of limestone soil, whereas the content in red soil significantly increased by (55 ± 1)%. For the NPKS treatment, the lignin content in limestone and red soil increased by (328 ± 4)% and (456 ± 9)%, respectively. After the same fertilization treatment, the proportion of cinnamyl (C)-type significantly increased in red soil, while a significant increase of vanillyl (V)-type monomers occurred in limestone soil, indicating that lignin degradation in agricultural soils was monomer specific. Furthermore, the acid-to-aldehyde ratios of syringyl-type [(Ac/Al)] or vanillyl-type [(Ac/Al)v] monomers tended to decrease after long-term fertilization with the higher value for limestone soil, suggesting the degree of lignin degradation in limestone was higher than that in red soil. Soil organic matter and total nitrogen were not correlated with lignin content, but were significantly correlated with the composition of VSC monomers. Meanwhile, the available nutrient content in the soil (available nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) was closely related to the contents and components of V, S, and C-type monomers (P<0.05). It indicated that the availability of soil nutrition should be considered as a key factor for the accumulation of lignin. PMID:25985658

  4. Long-term effectiveness of a prefabricated oral appliance for myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Doepel, M; Nilner, M; Ekberg, E; LE Bell, Y

    2012-04-01

    The long-term effectiveness of a prefabricated oral appliance (R) was compared with a stabilisation appliance (S) in patients with myofascial pain. Sixty-five patients diagnosed with myofascial pain at two centres for Stomatognathic Physiology in Sweden and Finland were included in a randomised controlled trial using Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, with history questionnaires and clinical examinations performed by blinded examiners at baseline and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Patients were randomly assigned either to the R or the S group. Treatment outcome was measured according to IMMPACT for four chronic pain outcome domains: pain intensity, overall improvement, physical functioning and emotional functioning. Physical functioning was classified for Graded Chronic Pain severities and assessed by the Jaw Functional Limitation scale. Emotional functioning composed of scores of non-specific physical symptoms and depression. There were no differences between groups at baseline. At both follow-ups, all outcome domains showed significant within-group improvement, without significant differences between groups. At 12 months, 72% of all patients reported a 30% reduction in worst pain and 63% of the patients a 50% reduction in worst pain. Overall improvement 'better' to 'symptom-free' was observed in 81% in the R and 64% in the S group at the 12-month follow-up. Graded Chronic Pain, Functional Limitation of the Jaw, non-specific physical symptoms and depression showed statistically significant reduction at 12-month follow-up. Results support the hypothesis that the effectiveness of the prefabricated appliance is similar to that of the stabilisation appliance in the long-term when treating patients with myofascial pain.

  5. The effects of freezing on long-term storage of canine erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Aktaran Bala, D; Özcan, M

    2016-01-01

    Human medicine studies have so far demonstrated that erythrocytes may be preserved and stored at low temperatures for decades retaining their metabolic and biochemical properties. However, detailed studies regarding this problem are not yet available in veterinary medicine. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to investigate time-dependent effects of long-term frozen storage of canine red blood cells. Twelve healthy adult dogs meeting the criteria for blood transfusion were used in the study. Whole blood samples (450 ± 45 ml) collected from each dog were centrifuged by a cryogenic microcentrifuge and packed RBC suspensions were obtained. The samples were prewashed three times in 0.9% NaCl solution and were allocated into three groups to be evaluated at three different time points (day 0 and month 4 and 6). The samples to be frozen were subjected to glycerolization and then stored at -80°C for 4 and 6-month periods. At the end of this period the packed RBC samples were thawed, centrifuged and then washed in a consecutive series of dextrose solutions. 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), Adenosin triphosphate (ATP), supernatant hemoglobin (SupHb), sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+) levels, residual glycerol concentrations and hemograms were evaluated and compared. Sterility tests were performed on all samples for bacterial contamination. A statistically significant decrease was noted in potassium levels, which was the natural outcome of deglycerolization process. No significant change was observed in terms of other parameters due based on different time points. In conclusion, long-term frozen storage had no negative effect on the quality parameters of canine erythrocytes. PMID:27487516

  6. Long term effects of high intensity laser therapy in lateral epicondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Akkurt, Ekrem; Kucuksen, Sami; Yılmaz, Halim; Parlak, Selman; Sallı, Ali; Karaca, Gülten

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate short- and long-term effects of high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) in lateral epicondylitis (LE) patients. Thirty patients with LE diagnosis (23 unilateral and 7 bilateral in total 37 elbows) were treated using HILT. LE patients were evaluated before, right after, and 6 months following HILT intervention post-treatment using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) during activity and resting. Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score and hand grip strength test (HGST) were used. The participants of the present study were also evaluated using Short-Form 36 (SF-36) before and 6 months after the treatment. Out of the 30 patients, 8 were male and 22 female with a mean age of 47.2 ± 9.7. The activity and resting VAS, DASH, and HGST scores revealed statistically significant improvement (p = 0.001) following treatment. Whereas VAS activity, DASH, and HGST scores increased after treatment until post-treatment 6 months significantly (p = 0.001), VAS resting scores remained stable (p = 0.476). A statistically significant improvement was also evident in the physical and mental components of SF-36 scores following treatment until post-treatment 6 months compared to pre-treatment scores (p = 0.001). In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that HILT is a reliable, safe, and effective treatment option in LE patients in the short and long term considering pain, functional status, and quality of life. PMID:26714978

  7. Simulating long-term effectiveness and efficiency of management scenarios for an invasive grass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Holcombe, Tracy R.; Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Frid, Leonardo; Olsson, Aaryn D.

    2015-01-01

    Resource managers are often faced with trade-offs in allocating limited resources to manage plant invasions. These decisions must often be made with uncertainty about the location of infestations, their rate of spread and effectiveness of management actions. Landscape level simulation tools such as state-and-transition simulation models (STSMs) can be used to evaluate the potential long term consequences of alternative management strategies and help identify those strategies that make efficient use of resources. We analyzed alternative management scenarios for African buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare syn. Cenchrus ciliaris) at Ironwood Forest National Monument, Arizona using a spatially explicit STSM implemented in the Tool for Exploratory Landscape Scenario Analyses (TELSA). Buffelgrass is an invasive grass that is spreading rapidly in the Sonoran Desert, affecting multiple habitats and jurisdictions. This invasion is creating a novel fire risk and transforming natural ecosystems. The model used in this application incorporates buffelgrass dispersal and establishment and management actions and effectiveness including inventory, treatment and post-treatment maintenance. We simulated 11 alternative scenarios developed in consultation with buffelgrass managers and other stakeholders. The scenarios vary according to the total budget allocated for management and the allocation of that budget between different kinds of management actions. Scenario results suggest that to achieve an actual reduction and stabilization of buffelgrass populations, management unconstrained by fiscal restrictions and across all jurisdictions and private lands is required; without broad and aggressive management, buffelgrass populations are expected to increase over time. However, results also suggest that large upfront investments can achieve control results that require relatively minimal spending in the future. Investing the necessary funds upfront to control the invasion results in the most

  8. [Effect of long-term fertilization on lignin accumulation in typical subtropical upland soil].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu-zhen; Chen, Xiang-bi; He, Xun-yang; Dong, Ming-zhe; Qiu, Hu-sen; Su, Yi-rong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of long-term fertilization on lignin accumulation and clarify its influencing factors in subtropical agricultural upland soils, alkaline CuO oxidation and gas chromatography was performed to quantify the amount of lignin and its monomers components (V, S and C). The soil samples were collected from the fertilization treatments of NPK and NPKS (NPK combined with straw) in Huanjiang County, Guangxi Province (limestone soil) and Taoyuan County, Hunan Province (red soil). The results showed that NPK had no significant effect on the lignin content (Sumvsc) of limestone soil, whereas the content in red soil significantly increased by (55 ± 1)%. For the NPKS treatment, the lignin content in limestone and red soil increased by (328 ± 4)% and (456 ± 9)%, respectively. After the same fertilization treatment, the proportion of cinnamyl (C)-type significantly increased in red soil, while a significant increase of vanillyl (V)-type monomers occurred in limestone soil, indicating that lignin degradation in agricultural soils was monomer specific. Furthermore, the acid-to-aldehyde ratios of syringyl-type [(Ac/Al)] or vanillyl-type [(Ac/Al)v] monomers tended to decrease after long-term fertilization with the higher value for limestone soil, suggesting the degree of lignin degradation in limestone was higher than that in red soil. Soil organic matter and total nitrogen were not correlated with lignin content, but were significantly correlated with the composition of VSC monomers. Meanwhile, the available nutrient content in the soil (available nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) was closely related to the contents and components of V, S, and C-type monomers (P<0.05). It indicated that the availability of soil nutrition should be considered as a key factor for the accumulation of lignin.

  9. The Effects of Long Term Nitrogen Fertilization on Soil Respiration in Rocky Mountain National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J.; Denning, S.; Baron, J.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities contribute to increased levels of nitrogen deposition and elevated CO2 concentrations in terrestrial ecosystems. The role that soils play in biogeochemical cycles is an important area of uncertainty in ecosystem ecology. One of the main reasons for this uncertainty is that we have limited understanding of belowground microbial activity and how this activity is linked to soil processes. In particular, elevated CO2 may influence soil nitrogen processes that regulate nitrogen availability to plants. Warming and nitrogen fertilization may both contribute to loss of stored carbon from mountain ecosystems, because they contribute to microbial decomposition of organic matter. To study the effects of long-term nitrogen fertilization on soil respiration, we analyzed results from a 25-year field experiment in Rocky Mountain National Park. Field treatments are in old growth Engelmann spruce forests. Soil respiration responses to the effects of nitrogen fertilization on soil carbon cycling, via respiration, were investigated during the 2013 growing season. Soil moisture, temperature, and respiration rates were measured in six 30 x 30 m plots, of the six plots three are fertilized with 25 kg N ha-1 yr-1 as ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) pellets and three receives ambient atmospheric nitrogen deposition (1-6 kg N/ha/yr) in Rocky Mountain National Park. We found that respirations rates in the fertilized plots were not significantly higher than respiration rates in the unfertilized plots. We speculate that acclimation to long-term fertilization and relatively high levels of nitrogen deposition in the control plots both contribute to the insensitivity of soil respiration to fertilization at this site.

  10. Long-Term Effects of Simulated Childbirth Injury on Function and Innervation of the Urethra

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qi-Xiang; Balog, Brian M.; Kerns, James; Lin, Dan Li; Sun, Yinghao; Damaser, Margot S.; Jiang, Hai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Aims Pudendal nerve and external urethral sphincter (EUS) injury during vaginal delivery are risk factors for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Although most patients with short-term postpartum SUI regain continence within 1 year, they have a higher predisposition to develop recurrent SUI years later, suggesting a possible mechanistic relationship. In contrast, animal models generally recover spontaneously and have not been studied much in the long term. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of simulated childbirth injury in rats. Methods Thirty-four Sprague–Dawley female rats underwent sham injury or pudendal nerve crush and vaginal distension (PNC + VD), a simulated childbirth injury. Nine weeks later, leak point pressure (LPP) and EUS electromyography (EMG) were recorded simultaneously. The pudendal nerve was harvested for histological analysis. EUS neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and their innervation were qualitatively assessed using immunofluorescence. A t-test was used to compare quantitative outcomes between groups, with P <0.05 indicating a significant difference. Results There was no significant difference in LPP or EUS EMG amplitude or firing rate between the two groups. Nonetheless after PNC + VD, NMJs in the EUS were diffuse and were innervated by tortuous and multiple axons, demonstrating that reinnervation of the EUS was still in progress. Conclusions Although continence function recovered 9 weeks after simulated childbirth injury, innervation of EUS was not complete at this time point, suggestive of persistent neurogenic deficiency which when compounded by the effects of aging may lead to a delayed recurrence of SUI in this animal model with increased age. PMID:24501018

  11. Long-term effects of chronic light pollution on seasonal functions of European blackbirds (Turdus merula).

    PubMed

    Dominoni, Davide M; Quetting, Michael; Partecke, Jesko

    2013-01-01

    Light pollution is known to affect important biological functions of wild animals, including daily and annual cycles. However, knowledge about long-term effects of chronic exposure to artificial light at night is still very limited. Here we present data on reproductive physiology, molt and locomotor activity during two-year cycles of European blackbirds (Turdus merula) exposed to either dark nights or 0.3 lux at night. As expected, control birds kept under dark nights exhibited two regular testicular and testosterone cycles during the two-year experiment. Control urban birds developed testes faster than their control rural conspecifics. Conversely, while in the first year blackbirds exposed to light at night showed a normal but earlier gonadal cycle compared to control birds, during the second year the reproductive system did not develop at all: both testicular size and testosterone concentration were at baseline levels in all birds. In addition, molt sequence in light-treated birds was more irregular than in control birds in both years. Analysis of locomotor activity showed that birds were still synchronized to the underlying light-dark cycle. We suggest that the lack of reproductive activity and irregular molt progression were possibly the results of i) birds being stuck in a photorefractory state and/or ii) chronic stress. Our data show that chronic low intensities of light at night can dramatically affect the reproductive system. Future studies are needed in order to investigate if and how urban animals avoid such negative impact and to elucidate the physiological mechanisms behind these profound long-term effects of artificial light at night. Finally we call for collaboration between scientists and policy makers to limit the impact of light pollution on animals and ecosystems.

  12. [Determination of geroprotective potential of sodium butyrate in Drosophila melanogaster: long-term effects].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown (Vaiserman A. M. et al., 2012) that the dietary supplementation with histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate (SB) throughout adult stage or both pre-adult and adult stages results in increase of life span (LS) in Drosophila melanogaster. It was suggested that because of the impact of SB on epigenetic control of gene function and therefore possibility of long-term effects, SB supplementation during the larval stage of development only may also increase adult LS. The present study was carried out to verify that assumption. The nutritional supplementation with SB during the larval stage at the concentration of 20 mmol/l resulted in a significant increase in the male mean LS; maximum LS was significantly increased in males treated with SB at concentrations of 10, 20 and 40 mmol/l. Female mean LS was unchanged following the SB administration; maximum LS was significantly increased in female group treated with SB at concentration of 10 mmol/l only. Female reproductive activity was the same in all groups. To test the hypothesis that the observed long-term effect of SB exposure on the flies' longevity could be caused by the induction of persistent epigenetic changes, the levels of expression of the longevity-associated genes (hsp70, sir2 and InR) were determined. The expression level of sir2 gene, known to mediate longevity in the fly through a pathway related to calorie restriction, in the group treated at the larval stage with 20 mmol/l SB was significantly higher after the stress (starvation) than in the control group.

  13. Long-term effects of chronic light pollution on seasonal functions of European blackbirds (Turdus merula).

    PubMed

    Dominoni, Davide M; Quetting, Michael; Partecke, Jesko

    2013-01-01

    Light pollution is known to affect important biological functions of wild animals, including daily and annual cycles. However, knowledge about long-term effects of chronic exposure to artificial light at night is still very limited. Here we present data on reproductive physiology, molt and locomotor activity during two-year cycles of European blackbirds (Turdus merula) exposed to either dark nights or 0.3 lux at night. As expected, control birds kept under dark nights exhibited two regular testicular and testosterone cycles during the two-year experiment. Control urban birds developed testes faster than their control rural conspecifics. Conversely, while in the first year blackbirds exposed to light at night showed a normal but earlier gonadal cycle compared to control birds, during the second year the reproductive system did not develop at all: both testicular size and testosterone concentration were at baseline levels in all birds. In addition, molt sequence in light-treated birds was more irregular than in control birds in both years. Analysis of locomotor activity showed that birds were still synchronized to the underlying light-dark cycle. We suggest that the lack of reproductive activity and irregular molt progression were possibly the results of i) birds being stuck in a photorefractory state and/or ii) chronic stress. Our data show that chronic low intensities of light at night can dramatically affect the reproductive system. Future studies are needed in order to investigate if and how urban animals avoid such negative impact and to elucidate the physiological mechanisms behind these profound long-term effects of artificial light at night. Finally we call for collaboration between scientists and policy makers to limit the impact of light pollution on animals and ecosystems. PMID:24376865

  14. Effects of maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy on long-term physical and cognitive parameters of child development.

    PubMed

    Lassen, K; Oei, T P

    1998-01-01

    The negative impact of maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy on the growth and development of the foetus has been well documented. However, the long-term effects of the subsequent cognitive and physical development of the child are less clearly understood. This article presents a critical review of the literature on this topic. The review shows that the effects of prenatal exposure to smoking on children's physical development are mediated by a dose-response relationship. Although the observed effects are long term, they are small and may have no major functional importance. The evidence on the long-term consequences of intellectual function is still unclear. One reason is that very few studies have looked at the long-term consequences of maternal smoking on both physical and cognitive development. More effort is needed to investigate this important issue.

  15. PROUD: Effects of preoperative long-term immunonutrition in patients listed for liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nickkholgh, Arash; Schneider, Heinz; Encke, Jens; Büchler, Markus W; Schmidt, Jan; Schemmer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients with end stage liver disease are characteristically malnourished which is associated with poor outcome. Formulas enriched with arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and nucleotides, "immunonutrients", potentially improve their nutritional status. This study is designed to evaluate the clinical outcome of long-term "immunonutrition" of patients with end-stage liver disease while on the waiting list for liver transplantation. Methods/design A randomized controlled double blind multi-center clinical trial with two parallel groups comprising a total of 142 newly registered patients for primary liver transplantation has been designed to assess the safety and efficacy of the long-term administration of ORAL IMPACT®, an "immunonutrient" formula, while waiting for a graft. Patients will be enrolled the day of registration on the waiting list for liver transplantation. Study ends on the day of transplantation. Primary endpoints include improved patients' nutritional and physiological status, as measured by mid-arm muscle area, triceps skin fold thickness, grip strength, and fatigue score, as well as patients' health related quality of life. Furthermore, patients will be followed for 12 postoperative weeks to evaluate anabolic recovery after transplantation as shown by reduced post-transplant mechanical ventilation, hospital stay, wound healing, infectious morbidities (pneumonia, intraabdominal abscess, sepsis, line sepsis, wound infection, and urinary tract infection), acute and chronic rejection, and mortality. Discussion Formulas enriched with arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and nucleotides have been proven to be beneficial in reducing postoperative infectious complications and length of hospital stay among the patients undergoing elective gastrointestinal surgery. Possible mechanisms include downregulation of the inflammatory responses to surgery and immune modulation rather than a sole nutritional effect. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00495859 PMID

  16. [Effect of long-term fertilization on microbial community functional diversity in black soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-xin; Chi, Feng-qin; Xu, Xiu-hong; Kuang, En-jun; Zhang, Jiu-ming; Su, Qing-rui; Zhou, Bao-ku

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the effects of long-term different fertilization on microbial community functional diversity in arable black. soil, we examined microbial metabolic activities in two soil la- yers (0-20 cm, 20-40 cm) under four treatments (CK, NPK, M, MNPK) from a 35-year continuous fertilization field at the Ministry of Agriculture Key Field Observation Station of Harbin Black Soil Ecology Environment using Biolog-ECO method. The results showed that: in the 0-20 cm soil layer, combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizer(MNPK) increased the rate of soil microbial carbon source utilization and community metabolism richness, diversity and dominance; In the 20-40 cm layer, these indices of the MNPK treatment was lower than that of the NPK treat- ment; while NPK treatment decreased soil microbial community metabolism evenness in both layers. Six groups of carbon sources used by soil microbes of all the treatments were different between the two soil layers, and the difference was significant among all treatments in each soil layer (P < 0.05) , while the variations among treatments were different in the two soil layers. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that soil microbial community metabolic function of all the treatments was different between the two soil layers, and there was difference among all treatments in each soil layer, while the influences of soil nutrients on soil microbial community metabolic function of all treatments were similar in each soil layer. It was concluded that long-term different fertilization affected soil microbial community functional diversity in both tillage soil layer and down soil layers, and chemical fertilization alone had a larger influence on the microbial community functional diversity in the 20-40 cm layer. PMID:26995915

  17. Short- and long-term temperature effects on aerobic polyhydroxybutyrate producing mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katja; van Geest, Jorien; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-03-01

    Short- and long-term temperature effects on polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) producing mixed cultures enriched in feast-famine sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were investigated in a temperature range of 15-35 degrees C and 15-30 degrees C, respectively. After short-term temperature changes (i.e. 1 cycle) from the steady state temperature of 20 degrees C, reaction rate changes in the famine phase could be described over the whole temperature range with the Arrhenius equation with one temperature coefficient. For the feast phase different temperature coefficients were identified for acetate uptake, PHB production and growth. These were only valid for temperatures 5 degrees C higher or lower than the steady state temperature. Long-term temperature changes (i.e. new steady states) influenced not only the reaction rates but also the selective pressure in the SBR. At higher temperatures (30 degrees C) the SBR feast phase was short and the rates of acetate uptake and PHB storage were very high. This culture was characterized by a storage strategy with high yields of PHB and low yields of biomass in the feast phase. The PHB storage capacity of this culture was 84 wt% as evaluated in fed-batch experiments. At lower temperatures (15 degrees C) the feast phase was longer due to a lower rate of acetate uptake and the culture followed a strategy of direct growth on acetate rather than on PHB. This culture had a low maximal PHB storage capacity (about 35 wt%). The SBR culture enriched at 20 degrees C was able to store up to about 70 wt% PHB. The temperature at which fed-batch experiments were conducted did not influence the maximal PHB storage capacity. The SBR temperature was found to be an important factor to consider when designing a mixed culture PHB production process.

  18. Long-term effectiveness of four pulpotomy techniques: 3-year randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Huth, Karin Christine; Hajek-Al-Khatar, Niran; Wolf, Petra; Ilie, Nicoleta; Hickel, Reinhard; Paschos, Ekaterini

    2012-08-01

    A pulpotomy is the therapy for management of pulp exposures due to caries in symptom-free primary molars. The aim was to longitudinally compare the relative effectiveness of the Er:YAG laser, calcium hydroxide and ferric sulphate techniques with dilute formocresol in retaining symptom-free molars. Two hundred primary molars in 107 healthy children were included and randomly allocated to one technique. The treated teeth were blindly reevaluated after 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months. Descriptive data analysis and logistic regression analysis accounting for multiple observations per patient by generalised estimating equation were used. Additionally, various influences including tooth type, upper and lower jaws, type of anaesthesia, operator and the final restoration on treatment success were evaluated (Wald chi-square test). After 36 months, the following total (considering clinical and clinically symptom-free radiographic failures) and clinical success rates were determined (in percent): Formocresol 72 (92), laser 73 (89), calcium hydroxide 46 (75), ferric sulphate 76 (97). No significant differences were detected between formocresol and any other technique after 36 months. However, the odds ratio of failure appeared to be three times higher for calcium hydroxide than for formocresol. No significant differences in total success rates were seen regarding the aforementioned influencing clinical parameters. The correct diagnosis of the pulpal status, bleeding control and the specific technique are highly important for long-term success of pulpotomies in primary molars. According to the presented long-term data, pulpotomies using ferric sulphate revealed the best treatment outcome among the used techniques, while calcium hydroxide resulted in the lowest success rates after 3 years. Therefore, we can recommend ferric sulphate for easy and successful treatment of primary molars with caries-exposed pulps. PMID:21842145

  19. [Effect of long-term fertilization on microbial community functional diversity in black soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-xin; Chi, Feng-qin; Xu, Xiu-hong; Kuang, En-jun; Zhang, Jiu-ming; Su, Qing-rui; Zhou, Bao-ku

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the effects of long-term different fertilization on microbial community functional diversity in arable black. soil, we examined microbial metabolic activities in two soil la- yers (0-20 cm, 20-40 cm) under four treatments (CK, NPK, M, MNPK) from a 35-year continuous fertilization field at the Ministry of Agriculture Key Field Observation Station of Harbin Black Soil Ecology Environment using Biolog-ECO method. The results showed that: in the 0-20 cm soil layer, combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizer(MNPK) increased the rate of soil microbial carbon source utilization and community metabolism richness, diversity and dominance; In the 20-40 cm layer, these indices of the MNPK treatment was lower than that of the NPK treat- ment; while NPK treatment decreased soil microbial community metabolism evenness in both layers. Six groups of carbon sources used by soil microbes of all the treatments were different between the two soil layers, and the difference was significant among all treatments in each soil layer (P < 0.05) , while the variations among treatments were different in the two soil layers. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that soil microbial community metabolic function of all the treatments was different between the two soil layers, and there was difference among all treatments in each soil layer, while the influences of soil nutrients on soil microbial community metabolic function of all treatments were similar in each soil layer. It was concluded that long-term different fertilization affected soil microbial community functional diversity in both tillage soil layer and down soil layers, and chemical fertilization alone had a larger influence on the microbial community functional diversity in the 20-40 cm layer.

  20. Effects of treatment on fertility in long-term survivors of childhood or adolescent cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, J.; Mulvihill, J.J.; Myers, M.H.; Connelly, R.R.; Naughton, M.D.; Krauss, M.R.; Steinhorn, S.C.; Hassinger, D.D.; Austin, D.F.; Bragg, K.

    1987-11-19

    In a retrospective cohort study of survivors of cancer and of controls, we estimated the risk of infertility after treatment for cancer during childhood or adolescence. We interviewed 2283 long-term survivors of childhood or adolescent cancer diagnosed in the period from 1945 through 1975, who were identified at five cancer centers in the United States. Requirements for admission to the study were diagnosis before the age of 20, survival for at least five years, and attainment of the age of 21. In addition, 3270 controls selected from among the survivors' siblings were interviewed. Cox regression analysis showed that cancer survivors who married and were presumed to be at risk of pregnancy were less likely than their sibling controls to have ever begun a pregnancy (relative fertility, 0.85; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.78 to 0.92). Radiation therapy directed below the diaphragm depressed fertility in both sexes by about 25 percent. Chemotherapy with alkylating agents, with or without radiation to sites below the diaphragm, was associated with a fertility deficit of about 60 percent in the men. Among the women, there was no apparent effect of alkylating-agent therapy administered alone (relative fertility, 1.02) and only a moderate fertility deficit when alkylating-agent therapy was combined with radiation below the diaphragm (relative fertility, 0.81). Relative fertility in the survivors varied considerably according to sex, site of cancer, and type of treatment; these factors should be taken into consideration in counseling survivors about the long-term consequences of disease.

  1. Long-Term Effects of Intracerebroventricular Streptozotocin Treatment on Adult Neurogenesis in the Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Knezovic, Ana; Parlak, Milena; Cuber, Jacqueline; Karabeg, Margherita M; Deckert, Jürgen; Riederer, Peter; Hua, Qian; Salkovic-Petrisic, Melita; Schmitt, Angelika G

    2015-01-01

    Altered adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AN) plays a role in the etiopathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a disorder characterized by a progressive loss of memory and spatial orientation impairment. Diabetes is shown to be one risk factor for the development of the sporadic form of AD (sAD), which affects >95% of AD patients. Streptozotocin intracerebroventricularily (STZ icv) treated rats, which develop an insulin-resistant brain state and learning and memory deficits preceding amyloid beta and tau pathology, may act as an appropriate animal model for sAD. The goal of our quantitative immunohistochemistry study was to compare short-term (1 month) and long-term (3 months) effects of STZ icv treatment on different AN stages. Applying MCM2 antibodies we quantified cell (e.g. stem cell) proliferation, by the use of NeuroD and DCX antibodies we analyzed immature neurons. BrdU incorporation with approximately 27 days of survival before sacrifice allowed us to quantify and identify surviving newborn cells. Performing co-localization studies with antibodies detecting BrdU and cell-type specific markers we could confirm that STZ treatment does not affect the differentiation fate of newly generated cells. Whereas STZ icv treatment does not seem to considerably influence cell proliferation over a shortterm period (1 month), in the long-term (3 months) it significantly decreased generation of immature and mature neurons. This reduction seen after 3 months was specific for the septal hippocampus, discussed to be important for spatial learning. Moreover, AN changes display the same timeline as the development of amyloid beta pathology in this animal model of sAD.

  2. The effects of long-term leptin administration on morphometrical changes of mice testicular tissue

    PubMed Central

    Esmaili-Nejad, Mohammad-Reza; Babaei, Homayoon; Kheirandish, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Leptin is a novel and interesting hormone for anyone trying to lose weight, but its effects on male gonad structure in longitudinal study is unknown. The present study was designed to explore morphometrical changes of mouse testicular tissue after long-term administration of leptin. Materials and Methods: Thirty healthy mature male mice were randomly assigned to either control (n=15) or treatment (n=15) groups. Leptin was intraperitoneally injected to the treatment group (0.1 µg/100 µl of physiological saline) once a day for 30 consecutive days, and control animals received normal saline with the same volume and route. Five mice from each experimental group were sacrificed at 15, 30 and 60 days after the beginning of treatments. Left testes were removed, weighted and then fixed in 10% buffered formalin, and stained with hematoxylin and eosine for morphometrical assays. Results: Except for sertoli cell nucleus diameter, which was affected from 30th day, evaluation of other morphometrical parameters such as Johnsen’s score, meiotic index, spermatogenesis, epithelial height, seminiferous tubules diameter and spermatogonial nucleus diameter revealed significant decrease from 15th day after leptin administration compare to those of the control group (P<0.05). Thus, meiotic index and spermatogonial cell nucleus diameter were two parameters that were further disturbed on 30th day compare to the day 15 (3.09±0.03 vs. 3.23±0.03, P=0.006 and 5.50±0.09 vs. 6.08±0.14, P=0.007, respectively). Conclusion: Our results showed that long-term administration of leptin could disturb testicular tissue structure and delay spermatogenesis process. PMID:26877846

  3. Effects of Long Term Supplementation of Anabolic Androgen Steroids on Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji-Guo; Bonnerud, Patrik; Eriksson, Anders; Stål, Per S.; Tegner, Yelverton; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    The effects of long-term (over several years) anabolic androgen steroids (AAS) administration on human skeletal muscle are still unclear. In this study, seventeen strength training athletes were recruited and individually interviewed regarding self-administration of banned substances. Ten subjects admitted having taken AAS or AAS derivatives for the past 5 to 15 years (Doped) and the dosage and type of banned substances were recorded. The remaining seven subjects testified to having never used any banned substances (Clean). For all subjects, maximal muscle strength and body composition were tested, and biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were obtained. Using histochemistry and immunohistochemistry (IHC), muscle biopsies were evaluated for morphology including fiber type composition, fiber size, capillary variables and myonuclei. Compared with the Clean athletes, the Doped athletes had significantly higher lean leg mass, capillary per fibre and myonuclei per fiber. In contrast, the Doped athletes had significantly lower absolute value in maximal squat force and relative values in maximal squat force (relative to lean body mass, to lean leg mass and to muscle fiber area). Using multivariate statistics, an orthogonal projection of latent structure discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) model was established, in which the maximal squat force relative to muscle mass and the maximal squat force relative to fiber area, together with capillary density and nuclei density were the most important variables for separating Doped from the Clean athletes (regression  =  0.93 and prediction  =  0.92, p<0.0001). In Doped athletes, AAS dose-dependent increases were observed in lean body mass, muscle fiber area, capillary density and myonuclei density. In conclusion, long term AAS supplementation led to increases in lean leg mass, muscle fiber size and a parallel improvement in muscle strength, and all were dose-dependent. Administration of AAS may induce sustained

  4. Effect of long-term weightlessness on retina and optic nerve in tail-suspension rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Wei; Zhao, Jun; Hu, Lian-Na; Liang, Jing-Nan; Shi, Yuan-Yuan; Nie, Chuang; Qiu, Chang-Yu; Nan, Xin-Shuai; Li, Yu-Xin; Gao, Fu-Lin; Liu, Yi; Dong, Yu; Luo, Ling

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of long-term weightlessness on retina and optic nerve in tail-suspension (TS) rats. METHODS A stimulated weightlessness model was established by suspending rats' tail. After 12wk, the ultrastructure and the number of optic nerve axons were observed by transmission electron microscope. The number of survival retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was calculated by fluorescent gold retrograde labeling. Retina cells apoptosis was detected by TUNEL staining. The function of optic nerve and retina was evaluated by the visual evoked potential (VEP) and oscillatory potentials (Ops). RESULTS The optic nerve axons were swollen and sparsely aligned, and the lamellar separation and myelin disintegration occurred after 12wk in TS rats. The density of optic nerve axons was 32.23±3.92 (vs 37.43±4.13, P=0.0145), the RGCs density was 1645±46 cells/mm2 (vs 1867±54 cells/mm2 P=0.0000), the incidence rate of retinal cells apoptosis was 5.38%±0.53% (vs 4.75%±0.54%, P=0.0238), the amplitude of VEP-P100 was 15.43±2.14 µV (vs 17.67±2.17 µV, P=0.0424), the latency of VEP-P100 was 69.05±5.34ms (vs 62.43±4.87ms P=0.0143) and the sum amplitude of Ops was 81.05±8.34 µV (vs 91.67±10.21 µV, P=0.0280) in TS group and the control group, respectively. CONCLUSION Long-term weightlessness can induce the ultrastructural changes and functional depress of the optic nerve, as well as retinal cell damages in TS rats. PMID:27366682

  5. Effects of long term supplementation of anabolic androgen steroids on human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Guo; Bonnerud, Patrik; Eriksson, Anders; Stål, Per S; Tegner, Yelverton; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    The effects of long-term (over several years) anabolic androgen steroids (AAS) administration on human skeletal muscle are still unclear. In this study, seventeen strength training athletes were recruited and individually interviewed regarding self-administration of banned substances. Ten subjects admitted having taken AAS or AAS derivatives for the past 5 to 15 years (Doped) and the dosage and type of banned substances were recorded. The remaining seven subjects testified to having never used any banned substances (Clean). For all subjects, maximal muscle strength and body composition were tested, and biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were obtained. Using histochemistry and immunohistochemistry (IHC), muscle biopsies were evaluated for morphology including fiber type composition, fiber size, capillary variables and myonuclei. Compared with the Clean athletes, the Doped athletes had significantly higher lean leg mass, capillary per fibre and myonuclei per fiber. In contrast, the Doped athletes had significantly lower absolute value in maximal squat force and relative values in maximal squat force (relative to lean body mass, to lean leg mass and to muscle fiber area). Using multivariate statistics, an orthogonal projection of latent structure discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) model was established, in which the maximal squat force relative to muscle mass and the maximal squat force relative to fiber area, together with capillary density and nuclei density were the most important variables for separating Doped from the Clean athletes (regression  =  0.93 and prediction  =  0.92, p<0.0001). In Doped athletes, AAS dose-dependent increases were observed in lean body mass, muscle fiber area, capillary density and myonuclei density. In conclusion, long term AAS supplementation led to increases in lean leg mass, muscle fiber size and a parallel improvement in muscle strength, and all were dose-dependent. Administration of AAS may induce sustained

  6. Long-Term Effects of Induced Hypothermia on Local and Systemic Inflammation - Results from a Porcine Long-Term Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Horst, K.; Eschbach, D.; Pfeifer, R.; Relja, B.; Sassen, M.; Steinfeldt, T.; Wulf, H.; Vogt, N.; Frink, M.; Ruchholtz, S.; Pape, H. C.; Hildebrand, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothermia has been discussed as playing a role in improving the early phase of systemic inflammation. However, information on the impact of hypothermia on the local inflammatory response is sparse. We therefore investigated the kinetics of local and systemic inflammation in the late posttraumatic phase after induction of hypothermia in an established porcine long-term model of combined trauma. Materials & Methods Male pigs (35 ± 5kg) were mechanically ventilated and monitored over the study period of 48 h. Combined trauma included tibia fracture, lung contusion, liver laceration and pressure-controlled hemorrhagic shock (MAP < 30 ± 5 mmHg for 90 min). After resuscitation, hypothermia (33°C) was induced for a period of 12 h (HT-T group) with subsequent re-warming over a period of 10 h. The NT-T group was kept normothermic. Systemic and local (fracture hematoma) cytokine levels (IL-6, -8, -10) and alarmins (HMGB1, HSP70) were measured via ELISA. Results Severe signs of shock as well as systemic and local increases of pro-inflammatory mediators were observed in both trauma groups. In general the local increase of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediator levels was significantly higher and prolonged compared to systemic concentrations. Induction of hypothermia resulted in a significantly prolonged elevation of both systemic and local HMGB1 levels at 48 h compared to the NT-T group. Correspondingly, local IL-6 levels demonstrated a significantly prolonged increase in the HT-T group at 48 h. Conclusion A prolonged inflammatory response might reduce the well-described protective effects on organ and immune function observed in the early phase after hypothermia induction. Furthermore, local immune response also seems to be affected. Future studies should aim to investigate the use of therapeutic hypothermia at different degrees and duration of application. PMID:27144532

  7. Association between childhood adversities and long-term suicidality among South Africans from the results of the South African Stress and Health study: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bruwer, Belinda; Govender, Ravi; Bishop, Melanie; Williams, David R; Stein, Dan J; Seedat, Soraya

    2014-01-01

    Objective Suicide and suicidal behaviours are significant public health problems and a leading cause of death worldwide and in South Africa. We examined the association between childhood adversities and suicidal behaviour over the life course. Methods A national probability sample of 4351 South African adult participants (aged 18 years and older) in the South African Stress and Health (SASH) study was interviewed as part of the World Mental Health Surveys initiative. Respondents provided sociodemographic and diagnostic information, as well as an account of suicide-related thoughts and behaviours. Suicidality or suicidal behaviour were defined as were defined as suicide attempts and suicidal ideation in the total sample, and suicide plans and attempts among ideators. Childhood adversities included physical abuse, sexual abuse, parental death, parental divorce, other parental loss, family violence, physical illness and financial adversity. The association between suicidality and childhood adversities was examined using discrete-time survival models. Results More than a third of the respondents with suicidal behaviour experienced at least one childhood adversity, with physical abuse, parental death and parental divorce being the most prevalent adversities. Physical abuse, sexual abuse and parental divorce were identified as significant risk markers for lifetime suicide attempts, while physical abuse and parental divorce were significantly correlated with suicidal ideation. Two or more childhood adversities were associated with a twofold higher risk of lifetime suicide attempts. Sexual abuse (OR 9.3), parental divorce (OR 3.1) and childhood physical abuse (OR 2.2) had the strongest associations with lifetime suicide attempts. The effect of childhood adversities on suicidal tendencies varied over the life course. For example, sexual abuse was significantly associated with suicide attempts during childhood and teen years, but not during young and later adulthood

  8. Long-term effects of air pollutants: in canine species. Series No. 8

    SciTech Connect

    Stara, J.F.; Dungworth, D.L.; Orthoefer, J.G.; Tyler, W.S.

    1980-07-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1970 as amended in 1977 requires that a comprehensive data base be established to assess human health effects caused by air pollution from mobile sources. The spectrum of potential toxic effects can be viewed from two perspectives: The first is the identification of toxic effects from combined low-level effects of the individual major ambient air pollutants, which are combustion by-products of automotive exhaust. Ideally, the major components of a data base used to develop health risk assessments are well-designed epidemiological studies and long-term, low-level animal studies. The 9-year study presented in this monograph reviews the effects following exposure of dogs for 68 months to automotive exhaust, simulated smog, oxides of nitrogen, oxides of sulfur, and their combinations. Studies using canine species over extended periods of time have proven useful in the evaluation of risk to humans, especially when combined with epidemiological studies and human clinical investigations. All of the data were reviewed at a conference held at Asilomr, California by invited expert scientists. Their evaluations and judgments form a significant segment of this monograph.

  9. Effect of long term administration of ovine prolactin on hypothalamic-pituitary testicular axis in rat.

    PubMed

    D'Urso, R; Falaschi, P; Rocco, A; Iellamo, R; Manente, L; Motta, M; Frajese, G

    1983-05-01

    The effect of hyperprolactinaemia on testicular morphology and on hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis was studied in adult male Wistar rats. Animals received ovine prolactin (oPRL) 200 micrograms twice daily s.c.) for 24 and 36 days and were killed by exanguination. Blood was collected for hormonal determinations and sex accessory glands were removed for histological studies. Circulating testosterone (T) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels showed a significant reduction after 36 days of treatment whereas plasma follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were unchanged in all animals. No macroscopic or light microscopic histological modifications were observed in the testes. The present results, while excluding a direct effect of hyperprolactinaemia on seminiferous tubules, suggest that LH suppression is the consequence of a central effect of the ovine PRL long-term administration. The increased DA turnover in the hypothalamus suggested as inhibitory on GnRH neurons could account for this effect. The reduction of T levels seems to be mediated by the LH suppression, even though a direct effect of oPRL on Leydig cell receptors could be hypothesized.

  10. A long-term assessment of pesticide mixture effects on aquatic invertebrate communities.

    PubMed

    Hasenbein, Simone; Lawler, Sharon P; Geist, Juergen; Connon, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    To understand the potential effects of pesticide mixtures on aquatic ecosystems, studies that incorporate increased ecological relevance are crucial. Using outdoor mesocosms, the authors examined long-term effects on aquatic invertebrate communities of tertiary mixtures of commonly used pesticides: 2 pyrethroids (permethrin, λ-cyhalothrin) and an organophosphate (chlorpyrifos). Application scenarios were based on environmentally relevant concentrations and stepwise increases of lethal concentrations from 10% (LC10) to 50% (LC50) based on laboratory tests on Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dilutus; repeated applications were meant to generally reflect runoff events in a multiple-grower or homeowner watershed. Pyrethroids rapidly dissipated from the water column, whereas chlorpyrifos was detectable even 6 wk after application. Twelve of 15 macroinvertebrate and 10 of 16 zooplankton taxa responded to contaminant exposures. The most sensitive taxa were the snail Radix sp., the amphipod H. azteca, the water flea Daphnia magna, and copepods. Environmentally relevant concentrations had acute effects on D. magna and H. azteca (occurring 24 h after application), whereas lag times were more pronounced in Radix sp. snails and copepods, indicating chronic sublethal responses. Greatest effects on zooplankton communities were observed in environmentally relevant concentration treatments. The results indicate that insecticide mixtures continue to impact natural systems over multiple weeks, even when no longer detectable in water and bound to particles. Combinations of indirect and direct effects caused consequences across multiple trophic levels. PMID:26565581

  11. Short- and long-term functional effects of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in hemodialysis vascular access.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Joke; Smits, Johannes H M; Assink, Jan H; Wolterbeek, Derk W; Zijlstra, Jan J; de Jong, Gijs H T; van den Dorpel, Marinus A; Blankestijn, Peter J

    2002-03-01

    The efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) is usually expressed as the angiographic result. Access flow (Qa) measurements offer a means to quantify the functional effects. This study was performed to evaluate the short-term functional and angiographic effects of PTA and to determine the longevity of the functional effects during the follow-up period. Patients with an arteriovenous graft (AVG) or an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) who were eligible for PTA (Qa values of <600 ml/min) were included. Ultrasound-dilution Qa measurements were obtained shortly before PTA and periodically after PTA, beginning 1 wk after the procedure. The short-term effects were expressed as the increase in Qa and the reduction of stenosis. The long-term effects were expressed as patency and the decrease in Qa after PTA. Ninety-eight PTA procedures for 60 patients (65 AVG and 33 AVF) were analyzed. Qa improved from 371 +/- 17 to 674 +/- 30 ml/min for AVG and from 304 +/- 24 to 638 +/- 51 ml/min for AVF (both P < 0.0001). In 66% (AVG) and 50% (AVF) of cases, Qa increased to levels of >600 ml/min. The degree of stenosis decreased from 65 +/- 3 to 17 +/- 2% for AVG and from 72 +/- 5 to 23 +/- 7% for AVF (both P < 0.005). The reduction of stenosis was not correlated with DeltaQa (r(2) = 0.066). Six-month unassisted patency rates after PTA were 25% for AVG and 50% for AVF. The decreases in Qa were 3.7 +/- 0.8 ml/min per d for AVG and 1.8 +/- 0.9 ml/min per d for AVF. Qa values before PTA and DeltaQa were correlated with the subsequent decrease in Qa (P < 0.005). In conclusion, Qa increases after PTA but, in a substantial percentage of cases, not to levels of >600 ml/min. Qa values before PTA and the increase in Qa were correlated with long-term outcomes, whereas angiographic results were not. These data, combined with literature data, suggest that there is optimal timing for PTA.

  12. The effect of long-term pulsing electromagnetic field stimulation on experimental osteoporosis of rats.

    PubMed

    Mishima, S

    1988-03-01

    The author performed experiments in order to investigate what biological effect on the bone would be produced by long-term pulsing electromagnetic field (PEMF) systemic stimulation. In some of the mature female rats used as experimental animals, bilateral ovariectomy and right sciatic neurectomy were performed in order to make a model osteoporosis. PEMF stimulation was produced by repetitive pulse burst (RPB) waves at a positive amplitude of 25 mV, negative amplitude of 62.5 mV, burst width of 4.2 ms, pulse width of 230 microseconds and 12 Hz, with the magnetic field strength within a cage being set at 3-10 Gauss. PEMF stimulation over 6 months did not produce any effects on the physiologically aged bones. PEMF stimulation also did not produce any effects on losed cortical bone in osteoporotic hindlegs. On the other hand, an increase of bone volume and bone formation activity was observed in the cancellous bone of osteoporotic hindlegs. These findings suggested that PEMF stimulation exerted a preventive effect against bone loss of osteoporotic hindlegs. Furthermore, an observed increase in bone marrow blood flow seemed to be related with this increase of bone volume and bone formation activity.

  13. Effects of long-term chronic exposure to radionuclides in plant populations.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, S; Evseeva, T; Oudalova, A

    2013-07-01

    The results of field studies carried out on different plant species (winter rye and wheat, spring barley, oats, Scots pine, wild vetch, crested hairgrass) in various radioecological situations (nuclear weapon testing, the Chernobyl accident, uranium and radium processing) to investigate the effects of long-term chronic exposure to radionuclides are discussed. Plant populations growing in areas with relatively low levels of pollution are characterized by an increased level of both cytogenetic disturbances and genetic diversity. Although ionizing radiation causes primary damage at the molecular level, there are emergent effects at the level of populations, non-predictable from the knowledge of elementary mechanisms of cellular effects formation. Accumulation of cellular alterations may afterward influence biological parameters important for populations such as health and reproduction. Presented data provide evidence that in plant populations inhabiting heavily contaminated territories cytogenetic damage could be accompanied by a decrease in reproductive capacity. However, in less contaminated sites, because of the scarcity of data available, a steady relationship between cytogenetic effects and reproductive capacity was not revealed. Under radioactive contamination of the plant's environment, a population's resistance to exposure may increase. However, there are radioecological situations where an enhanced radioresistance has not evolved or has not persisted. PMID:22483340

  14. Long-Term Effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene on Microbial Communities in Dry Soil.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yuan; Priester, John H; Mortimer, Monika; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Schimel, Joshua P; Holden, Patricia A

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the long-term effects of engineered carbonaceous nanomaterials (ECNMs) on soil microbial communities, especially when compared to possible effects of natural or industrial carbonaceous materials. To address these issues, we exposed dry grassland soil for 1 year to 1 mg g(-1) of either natural nanostructured material (biochar), industrial carbon black, three types of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), or graphene. Soil microbial biomass was assessed by substrate induced respiration and by extractable DNA. Bacterial and fungal communities were examined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Microbial activity was assessed by soil basal respiration. At day 0, there was no treatment effect on soil DNA or T-RFLP profiles, indicating negligible interference between the amended materials and the methods for DNA extraction, quantification, and community analysis. After a 1-year exposure, compared to the no amendment control, some treatments reduced soil DNA (e.g., biochar, all three MWCNT types, and graphene; P < 0.05) and altered bacterial communities (e.g., biochar, carbon black, narrow MWCNTs, and graphene); however, there were no significant differences across the amended treatments. These findings suggest that ECNMs may moderately affect dry soil microbial communities but that the effects are similar to those from natural and industrial carbonaceous materials, even after 1-year exposure. PMID:26962674

  15. Long-Term Effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene on Microbial Communities in Dry Soil.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yuan; Priester, John H; Mortimer, Monika; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Schimel, Joshua P; Holden, Patricia A

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the long-term effects of engineered carbonaceous nanomaterials (ECNMs) on soil microbial communities, especially when compared to possible effects of natural or industrial carbonaceous materials. To address these issues, we exposed dry grassland soil for 1 year to 1 mg g(-1) of either natural nanostructured material (biochar), industrial carbon black, three types of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), or graphene. Soil microbial biomass was assessed by substrate induced respiration and by extractable DNA. Bacterial and fungal communities were examined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Microbial activity was assessed by soil basal respiration. At day 0, there was no treatment effect on soil DNA or T-RFLP profiles, indicating negligible interference between the amended materials and the methods for DNA extraction, quantification, and community analysis. After a 1-year exposure, compared to the no amendment control, some treatments reduced soil DNA (e.g., biochar, all three MWCNT types, and graphene; P < 0.05) and altered bacterial communities (e.g., biochar, carbon black, narrow MWCNTs, and graphene); however, there were no significant differences across the amended treatments. These findings suggest that ECNMs may moderately affect dry soil microbial communities but that the effects are similar to those from natural and industrial carbonaceous materials, even after 1-year exposure.

  16. Dynamic analysis of long-term seismicity effects on the Piz Dora DSGSD (E Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Federico; Agliardi, Federico; Battista Crosta, Giovanni; Zanchi, Andrea; Scotti, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    Deep seated gravitational slope deformations (DSGSD) evolve over several thousands of years in changing environmental conditions, under the influence of multiple triggering processes. Although glacial and fluvial erosion, deglaciation processes and slope hydrology perturbations are recognized to be common drivers of these phenomena in alpine environment, there is evidence of possible effects of seismicity on their initiation and development. A major difficulty in quantifying such effects is related to the involved timescales. In fact, while earthquake-induced, instantaneous slope instabilities can be studied with reference to specific earthquake scenarios, a considerably large number of seismic events of different magnitude and recurrence may contribute to slope instability and displacements on the typical DSGSD timescale, possibly leading to catastrophic rock slope instabilities over the long-term. In this work, we used numerical modelling to investigate the effects of long-term seismicity on a DSGSD, affecting the Piz Dora (Val Müstair, E Switzerland) over an area of 12 Km2 and with a 1500 m local relief. The slope is made of a sequence of Austroalpine conglomerates, meta-conglomerates and phyllites, folded into a kilometre-scale anticline setting geometrical and geomechanical constraints on the large slope instability. The area has been experiencing tectonic uplift and fault activity since the Pliocene, and is characterized by frequent present-day shallow seismicity with maximum magnitude Mw>5 and dominant dip-slip mechanisms. After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the slope experienced the removal of about 1000 m of ice. Morpho-structural characterization of DSGSD features and their relationships with glacial deposits and different generations of periglacial features (rock glaciers and protalus ramparts) allowed reconstructing a complex relative chronology of slope displacements and establishing local constraints on deglaciation. We used these constraints to

  17. Climate effects and feedback structure determining weed population dynamics in a long-term experiment.

    PubMed

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements.

  18. An evaluation of persistence of treatment effects during long-term treatment of destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David P; Harding, Jay W; Berg, Wendy K; Lee, John F; Schieltz, Kelly M; Padilla, Yaniz C; Nevin, John A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2011-09-01

    Eight young children who displayed destructive behavior maintained, at least in part, by negative reinforcement received long-term functional communication training (FCT). During FCT, the children completed a portion of a task and then touched a communication card attached to a microswitch to obtain brief breaks. Prior to and intermittently throughout FCT, extinction probes were conducted within a withdrawal design in which task completion, manding, and destructive behavior were placed on extinction to evaluate the relative persistence of appropriate and destructive behavior over the course of treatment. FCT continued until appropriate behavior persisted and destructive behavior failed to recur at baseline levels during extinction probes. The completion of FCT was followed by four challenges to the persistence of treatment effects conducted within mixed- or multiple-schedule designs: (a) extended extinction sessions (from 5 to 15 min), (b) introduction of a novel task, (c) removal of the microswitch and communication card, and (d) a mixed schedule of reinforcement in which both appropriate and destructive behavior produced reinforcement. The results showed that although FCT often resulted in quick reductions in destructive behavior and increases in appropriate behavior, destructive behavior often recurred during the extinction probes conducted during the initial treatment. When the effects of treatment persisted during the extinction probes, the remaining challenges to treatment effects resulted in only mild to moderate disruptions in behavior. These results are consistent with the quantitative predictions of behavioral momentum theory and may provide an alternative definition of maintenance as constituting behavioral persistence.

  19. Countermeasure of the negative effects of weightlessness on physical systems in long-term space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Grigoriev, A. I.; Stepantzov, V. I.

    The system of countermcasure of microgravity effects has been developed in Russia that allowed to perform safely long-term space flights. This system that includes different means and methods such as special regimens of physical exercises, axial loading ("Pingiun") and antigravity suits, low body negative pressure device (LBNP, "Chibis") and "cuffs" and others has been used with certain variations at certain stages of flight in 27 successfully accomplished space flights that lasted from 60 to 439 days. The pre-, in- and postflight studies performed in 57 crew members of these flights have shown that the system of countermeasure is effective in preventing or diminishing to a great extent almost all the negative effects of weightlessness in flights of a year and more duration and that the intensity and duration of changes recorded in different body systems after flights do not correlate significantly to flight durations, correlating strongly to the volume and intensity of physical exercises used during flight and especially during concluding stage of it.

  20. An evaluation of persistence of treatment effects during long-term treatment of destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David P; Harding, Jay W; Berg, Wendy K; Lee, John F; Schieltz, Kelly M; Padilla, Yaniz C; Nevin, John A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2011-09-01

    Eight young children who displayed destructive behavior maintained, at least in part, by negative reinforcement received long-term functional communication training (FCT). During FCT, the children completed a portion of a task and then touched a communication card attached to a microswitch to obtain brief breaks. Prior to and intermittently throughout FCT, extinction probes were conducted within a withdrawal design in which task completion, manding, and destructive behavior were placed on extinction to evaluate the relative persistence of appropriate and destructive behavior over the course of treatment. FCT continued until appropriate behavior persisted and destructive behavior failed to recur at baseline levels during extinction probes. The completion of FCT was followed by four challenges to the persistence of treatment effects conducted within mixed- or multiple-schedule designs: (a) extended extinction sessions (from 5 to 15 min), (b) introduction of a novel task, (c) removal of the microswitch and communication card, and (d) a mixed schedule of reinforcement in which both appropriate and destructive behavior produced reinforcement. The results showed that although FCT often resulted in quick reductions in destructive behavior and increases in appropriate behavior, destructive behavior often recurred during the extinction probes conducted during the initial treatment. When the effects of treatment persisted during the extinction probes, the remaining challenges to treatment effects resulted in only mild to moderate disruptions in behavior. These results are consistent with the quantitative predictions of behavioral momentum theory and may provide an alternative definition of maintenance as constituting behavioral persistence. PMID:21909168

  1. Long-term effects of music therapy on elderly with moderate/severe dementia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takiko; Matsushita, Hiroko

    2006-01-01

    Over a period of 2 years we assessed the long-term effects of group music therapy carried out once weekly on the elderly (mean age: 83 years) suffering from moderate or severe dementia by observing changes in the cortisol level in saliva and in blood pressure and by an intelligence assessment. Systolic blood pressure determined 1 and 2 years after the start of therapy increased significantly in the nonmusic therapy group compared with that in music therapy group (p < .05). Systolic blood pressure increases with aging; the systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in participants who received music therapy. No significant differences in cortisol level in saliva or intelligence assessment score were observed, but the music therapy group maintained their physical and mental states during the 2-year period better than the nonmusic therapy group. This result indicates the lasting effect of once-a-week continuous music therapy. Even the elderly with moderate or severe dementia were able to participate in the group music therapy, and results suggest that enjoying singing and playing musical instruments in a concert was effective in preventing cardiac and cerebral diseases.

  2. The headgear effect of the Herbst appliance: a cephalometric long-term study.

    PubMed

    Pancherz, H; Anehus-Pancherz, M

    1993-06-01

    The short- and long-term effects of the Herbst appliance on the maxillary complex were evaluated in 45 patients who had Class II malocclusions. The patients were followed for 6.4 years (5 to 10 years) after treatment. Lateral cephalograms from before and after 7 months of treatment, 6 months, and 6.4 years after treatment were analyzed. During Herbst treatment the upper molars were distalized in 96% of the subjects (maximum 4.5 mm), and the upper molars were intruded in 69% of the subjects (maximum 3.5 mm). The maxillary occlusal plane was opened in 82% of the subjects (maximum 7.5 degrees). Sagittal maxillary jaw base position seemed unaffected by therapy. A downward tipping of the palatal plane was noted in 47% of the subjects (maximum 2 degrees). During the first 6 months after therapy most of the treatment changes reverted. During the following 5.9 years after treatment, normal growth developmental changes prevailed: the upper molars moved mesially, and the teeth extruded, the occlusal plane closed, the maxilla grew anteriorly, and the palatal plane tipped downward. In conclusion the Herbst appliance exhibited a pronounced high-pull headgear effect on the maxillary complex. Without proper retention, however, the effect seemed to be of a temporary nature.

  3. [Pay for performance (P4P). Long-term effects and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Schrappe, M; Gültekin, N

    2011-02-01

    After 10 years of experience and research, a wide array of results on evaluation and long-term effects of pay for performance (P4P) programs have been published. These data do not only give insight into most of the problems of implementation, but also into aspects which, in part, may attenuate the high expectations at the beginning of the discussion. P4P programs exhibit a ceiling effect, some improvements are reversed after incentives are cancelled, and improvements show opportunity costs as absent improvements for indicators, which are not object to financial incentives (in some cases for the same disease). These observations can be explained by the hypothesis that P4P programs have characteristics of fee-for-service reimbursement, if symmetric information is available for insurance and provider. P4P programs are local instruments. While integration of healthcare is considered as an important issue, they should be combined with programs and incentives which foster further vertical and horizontal integration. For Germany, further research in the implementation and effects of P4P programs is necessary.

  4. Long term effects of alumina on components of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tornling, G; Blaschke, E; Eklund, A

    1993-01-01

    Significant differences in several components of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL fluid) have previously been reported in aluminium potroom workers compared with controls. The present paper describes the long term effects in rats of one time exposure to potroom aluminium oxide without fluorides (primary alumina (PA)) or with adsorbed fluorides (secondary alumina (SA)) on components of BAL fluid. Alumina dust (40 mg) suspended in saline was instilled intratracheally; controls received saline. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed one, four, and 12 months after exposure. The number of cells in BAL fluid was increased significantly (p < 0.05) by SA but not PA. The increase was mainly macrophages, but the concentrations of neutrophils also increased about 10-fold one and 12 months after exposure. Although albumin and hyaluronan concentrations did not differ from those of controls, fibronectin concentrations were significantly (p < 0.001) increased one year after exposure both in PA exposed and SA exposed rats. The results indicate that SA, possibly because of adhered fluorides, induces early changes in alveolar cell populations including persistent neutrophilia. These cellular changes may have a destructive effect. The late pronounced increase of fibronectin in both PA and SA exposed rats indicates a delayed effect of alumina on the extracellular matrix. PMID:8435350

  5. Climate Effects and Feedback Structure Determining Weed Population Dynamics in a Long-Term Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements. PMID:22272362

  6. Long-term effects of lead poisoning on bone mineralization in vultures exposed to ammunition sources.

    PubMed

    Gangoso, Laura; Alvarez-Lloret, Pedro; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro A B; Mateo, Rafael; Hiraldo, Fernando; Donázar, José Antonio

    2009-02-01

    Long-lived species are particularly susceptible to bioaccumulation of lead in bone tissues. In this paper we gain insights into the sublethal effects of lead contamination on Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus). Our approach was done on the comparison of two populations (Canary Islands and Iberian Peninsula) differing in exposures to the ingestion of lead ammunition. Blood lead levels were higher in the island population (Canary Islands range: 5.10-1780 microg L(-1) n=137; Iberian Peninsula range: 5.60-217.30 microg L(-1) n=32) showing clear seasonal trends, peaking during the hunting season. Moreover, males were more susceptible to lead accumulation than females. Bone lead concentration increased with age, reflecting a bioaccumulation effect. The bone composition was significatively altered by this contaminant: the mineralization degree decreased as lead concentration levels increased. These results demonstrate the existence of long-term effects of lead poisoning, which may be of importance in the declines of threatened populations of long-lived species exposed to this contaminant. PMID:18995938

  7. Effects of long-term etanercept treatment on anxiety- and depression-like neurobehaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Bayramgürler, Dilek; Karson, Ayşe; Ozer, Cüneyt; Utkan, Tijen

    2013-07-01

    Growing evidence indicates that there is a correlation between depression and inflammation. Administration of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis, was associated with decreased depressive symptoms and increased quality of life in some clinical studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of chronic etanercept, a TNF-α inhibitor, on anxiety- and depression-like neurobehaviors in rats. Male rats were treated for 8 weeks with either saline or etanercept (0.8 mg/kg/week, subcutaneously). The anxiety levels of rats were evaluated using the elevated plus maze, a classical rodent model of anxiety and depression was measured using the force swimming test, a behavioral despair task. The anxiety-like neurobehaviors of the animals were found significantly decreased after the etanercept treatment. Etanercept significantly decreased immobility time in rat model of despair test, seemed to have an antidepressive effect in rats. Compared to saline treatment, long-term etanercept treatment had no effect on the total number and pattern of locomotor activities. Findings of the study supported the hypothesis that TNF-α has a role in the modulation of emotional processes and its inhibition may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of affective disorders.

  8. Long-term effects of a universal family intervention: mediation through parent-adolescent conflict.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Michaeline R; Wong, Jessie J; Gonzales, Nancy A; Dumka, Larry E; Millsap, Roger; Coxe, Stefany

    2014-01-01

    This randomized trial of a family-focused preventive intervention for Mexican American middle schoolers examined internalizing, externalizing, and substance use outcomes in late adolescence, 5 years after completing the intervention. Parent-adolescent conflict was tested as a mediator of these effects. The role of parent and adolescent acculturation in these pathways was also examined. There were 494 seventh-grade adolescents and their primary female caregivers randomized to receive either a 9-week multicomponent intervention or a brief workshop control group. Assessments were conducted at pretest, 2-year follow-up (9th grade), and 5-year follow-up (when most participants were in the 12th grade). The Bridges program significantly reduced mother-adolescent conflict measured in the 9th grade, with conflict mediating program effects on internalizing and externalizing symptoms, adolescent substance use, and diagnosed internalizing disorder in late adolescence. Mother and child acculturation were both significantly predictive of late adolescence outcomes. Contrary to hypotheses, neither mother nor child acculturation emerged as a significant predictor of mother-adolescent conflict, and the interaction of mother and adolescent acculturation was similarly not related to mother-adolescent conflict. Intervention effects were largely consistent across different levels of acculturation. These findings provide support for the efficacy of family-focused intervention during early adolescence, both in reducing mental health problems and substance use in the long term and in impacting parent-adolescent conflict processes that appear to play an important role in the development of later adjustment problems. PMID:24730357

  9. Long-term effect of the antibiotic cefalexin on methane production during waste activated sludge anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xueqin; Zhen, Guangyin; Liu, Yuan; Hojo, Toshimasa; Estrada, Adriana Ledezma; Li, Yu-You

    2014-10-01

    Long-term experiments herein were conducted to investigate the effect of cefalexin (CLX) on methane production during waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic digestion. CLX exhibited a considerable inhibition in methane production during the initial 25 days while the negative effect attenuated subsequently and methane production recovered depending on CLX doses used (600 and 1000 mg/L). The highest methane yield reached 450 mL at 1000 mg-CLX/L after 157 days of digestion, 63.8% higher than CLX-free one. Stimulated excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by CLX served as microbial protecting layers, creating a suitable environment for microbes' growth and fermentation. Further examination via ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectra also verified the elevated slime EPS, LB-EPS and TB-EPS indicated by UV-254 in the presence of CLX. Unlike the commonly accepted adverse effect, this study demonstrated the beneficial role of CLX in methane production, providing new insights into its true environmental impacts.

  10. Long-term effect of specific treatment of primary aldosteronism on carotid intima–media thickness

    PubMed Central

    Holaj, Robert; Rosa, Ján; Zelinka, Tomáš; Štrauch, Branislav; Petrák, Ondřej; Indra, Tomáš; Šomlóová, Zuzana; Michalský, David; Novák, Květoslav; Wichterle, Dan; Widimský, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aldosterone has been shown to substantially contribute to the accumulation of different types of collagen fibres and growth factors in the arterial wall, thus increasing wall thickness. A previous study showed reduction of increased common carotid intima–media thickness (IMT) in patients with primary aldosteronism 1 year after adrenalectomy. Our study in patients with primary aldosteronism was aimed at comparing the long-term effect of adrenalectomy vs. spironolactone therapy on common carotid IMT regression. Method: Forty-two patients with confirmed primary aldosteronism (21 with aldosterone-producing adenoma treated by unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy, 21 treated with spironolactone) were investigated by carotid ultrasound at baseline and 1 and 6 years after the specific treatment. Results: There was a decrease in common carotid IMT from 0.956 ± 0.140 to 0.900 ± 0.127 mm (−5.9%; P < 0.05) at 1 year and to 0.866 ± 0.130 mm (−9.4%; P < 0.01) at 6 years after adrenalectomy; in the spironolactone group, common carotid IMT decreased from 0.917 ± 0.151 to 0.900 ± 0.165 mm (−1.8%; NS) at 1 year and to 0.854 ± 0.176 mm (−6.8%; P < 0.01) at 6 years of treatment. The magnitude of improvement at 1 year was significantly higher (by 70%; P < 0.05) in the adrenalectomy group; however, the difference (by 27%) became nonsignificant at 6 years. Comparing the adrenalectomy and spironolactone groups, there was no significant difference in blood pressure decrease after treatment. Conclusion: In the long term, spironolactone therapy in patients with primary aldosteronism had significant effect on regression of IMT, which was comparable to surgical treatment in patients with unilateral forms of primary aldosteronism. PMID:25490707

  11. Long-term effects of seeding after wildfire on vegetation in Great Basin shrubland ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutson, Kevin C.; Pyke, David A.; Wirth, Troy A.; Arkle, Robert S.; Pilliod, David S.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Grace, James B.

    2014-01-01

    1. Invasive annual grasses alter fire regimes in shrubland ecosystems of the western USA, threatening ecosystem function and fragmenting habitats necessary for shrub-obligate species such as greater sage-grouse. Post-fire stabilization and rehabilitation treatments have been administered to stabilize soils, reduce invasive species spread and restore or establish sustainable ecosystems in which native species are well represented. Long-term effectiveness of these treatments has rarely been evaluated. 2. We studied vegetation at 88 sites where aerial or drill seeding was implemented following fires between 1990 and 2003 in Great Basin (USA) shrublands. We examined sites on loamy soils that burned only once since 1970 to eliminate confounding effects of recurrent fire and to assess soils most conducive to establishment of seeded species. We evaluated whether seeding provided greater cover of perennial seeded species than burned–unseeded and unburned–unseeded sites, while also accounting for environmental variation. 3. Post-fire seeding of native perennial grasses generally did not increase cover relative to burned–unseeded areas. Native perennial grass cover did, however, increase after drill seeding when competitive non-natives were not included in mixes. Seeding non-native perennial grasses and the shrub Bassia prostrata resulted in more vegetative cover in aerial and drill seeding, with non-native perennial grass cover increasing with annual precipitation. Seeding native shrubs, particularly Artemisia tridentata, did not increase shrub cover or density in burned areas. Cover of undesirable, non-native annual grasses was lower in drill seeded relative to unseeded areas, but only at higher elevations. 4. Synthesis and applications. Management objectives are more likely to be met in high-elevation or precipitation locations where establishment of perennial grasses occurred. On lower and drier sites, management objectives are unlikely to be met with seeding alone

  12. Long-term effect of temperature on N2O emission from the denitrifying activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, Xiaoru; Zhang, Zhaoji; Ye, Xin; Kao, Chih Ming; Chen, Shaohua

    2014-03-01

    The long-term effect of various temperature (4°C, 12°C, 20°C, 25°C and 34°C) on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from lab-scale denitrifying activated sludge was studied in terms of activation energy, abundance of functional gene nosZ and its transcription. Results showed that temperature had a positive effect on N2O emissions as well as the maximum biomass-specific reduction rates of N2O and NO3(-), ranging from 0.006% to 0.681% of (N2O + N2), 17.3-116.2 and 5.2-66.2 mg N g(-1) VSS h(-1), respectively. The activation energies (Ea) for N2O and NO3(-) reduction of 44.1 kJ mol(-1) and 54.9 kJ mol(-1), shed light on differences in denitrifying rate variation. The maximum NO3(-) reduction rates were more sensitive to temperature variation than the corresponding N2O reduction rates under long-term acclimation. As a result, the ratio between N2O and NO3(-) reduction rates declined to 1.87 at 34°C from 3.31 at 4°C, suggesting great potential capacity for N2O losses at high temperature. The copy numbers of denitrifiers as nosZ gene (×10(8) copies mL(-1)) and total bacteria as 16S rRNA gene (×10(10) copies mL(-1)) did not show obvious relationship with temperature, having relative abundance of 0.42% on average. The transcriptional regulation of nosZ gene, in the range of 10(8)-10(5) copies mL(-1), was affected by reductase activity, substrate concentration as well as its duration. The active nosZ gene expression was accompanied with low reductase capacity, high dissolved N2O and the duration of N2O accumulation. These results provide insights into activation energy and gene expression responsible for N2O emission.

  13. Emulsified halothane produces long-term epidural anesthetic effect: a study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengshan; Liao, Daqing; Liu, Jin; Xiao, Lin; Guo, Jiao; Yi, Mingliang; Zhou, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that volatile anesthetics could produce local anesthesia. Emulsified isoflurane at 8% has been reported to produce epidural anesthetic effect in rabbits. This study was designed to investigate the long-term epidural anesthetic effect of emulsified halothane in rabbits. In this study, 40 healthy adult rabbits (weighting 2.0-2.5 kg) with an epidural catheter were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10/group), receiving epidural administration of 1% lidocaine (lido group), 8% emulsified isoflurane 1ml (8% E-iso group), 8% emulsified halothane (8% E-Halo group) and 12% emulsified halothane (12% E-Halo group). After administration, sensory and motor functions as well as consciousness state were assessed until 60 minutes after sensory and motor function returned to its baseline or at least for 180 min. After epidural anesthesia, all the rabbits were continuously observed for 7 days and sacrificed for pathological evaluations. As a result, all the four study solutions produced typical epidural anesthesia. Onset times of sensory and motor function blockade were similar among the four groups (P>0.05). Duration of sensory blockade in 12% E-Halo group (83±13 min) was significantly longer than other groups: 51±12 min in 8% E-Halo group (P<0.01), 57±8 min in 8% E-iso group (P<0.01) and 47±9 min in lido group (P<0.01). Duration of sensory blockade in 8% E-iso group is longer than lido group (P<0.05). Duration of motor blockade in 12% E-Halo group (81±12 min) was also significantly longer than other groups: 40±8 min in 8% E-Halo group (P<0.01), 37±3 min in 8% E-iso group (P<0.01), 37±6 min in lido group (P<0.01). Normal consciousness was found in the rabbits from 8% E-Halo, 8% E-iso and lido groups while there were four rabbits in 12% E-Halo group (4/10) showed a light sedation. For all the rabbits, no pathological injury was found. The present study demonstrates that emulsified halothane produces reversible concentration

  14. Effect of Long-Term Osmotic Loading Culture on Matrix Synthesis from Intervertebral Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Isabella B.; Carapezza, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a highly hydrated tissue that acts to absorb and distribute large complex loads placed on the spine. Diurnal loading and disc degeneration causes significant changes in water volume and proteoglycan content, which alters the internal osmotic environment. Short-term osmotic loading alters disc cell gene expression; however, the long-term effect of osmotic loading on disc cell matrix synthesis is not well understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of long-term osmotic loading on matrix turnover and proliferation by juvenile and adult cells from the nucleus pulposus (NP) and the cartilaginous endplate (EP). Matrix synthesis was evaluated using pellets and a 3D agarose system, which has been used for developing engineered tissues. Intervertebral discs were acquired from juvenile and adult cows. Cells were acquired through enzymatic digestion and expanded in culture. Pellets were formed through centrifugation, and constructs were created by encapsulating cells within 2% w/v agarose hydrogel. Pellets and constructs were cultured up to 42 days in chemically defined medium with the osmolality adjusted to 300, 400, or 500 mOsm/kg. EP cells were evaluated as a chondrocyte comparison to chondrocyte-like NP cells. Pellet and agarose cultures of juvenile NP and EP cells demonstrated similarities with respect to cell proliferation and functional mechanical properties. Cell proliferation decreased significantly with increased osmotic loading. The final compressive Young's modulus of juvenile NP cells was 10–40× greater than initial properties (i.e., day 0) and was greater than the final Young's modulus of adult NP and juvenile EP constructs. In juvenile NP constructs, there were no significant differences in GAG content with respect to osmotic loading. However, GAG synthesis and mechanical properties were greatest for the 400 mOsm/kg group in adult NP constructs. Taken together, the results presented here suggest a

  15. Effect of CTLA-4 gene polymorphisms on long-term kidney allograft function in Han Chinese recipients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 gene (CTLA-4) have been associated with graft rejection and long-term clinical outcome after organ transplantation. Our aim was to examine the association between CTLA-4 SNPs (rs733618, rs4553808, rs5742909, rs231775, rs3087243) and long-term allograft function in Chinese renal transplant recipients. Genotyping of CTLA-4 SNPs was performed in 292 renal transplantation recipients. To assess long-term allograft function, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after renal transplantation. CTLA-4 rs733618 and rs3087243 alleles and genotypes as well as the rs5742909 and rs231775 genotypes were significantly associated with long-term allograft function after transplantation (P<0.05). Patients with favorable genotypes had higher allograft function during the 60 months after transplantation. The TACGG, CACAG and CGTAA haplotypes were also associated with long-term kidney function after renal transplantation (P<0.05 or P<0.01). In sum, the favorable CTLA-4 rs5742909TT genotype, CTLA-4 rs733618C and rs3087243A alleles, and CACAG and CGTAA haplotypes, as well as the unfavorable rs733618TT, rs3087243GG and rs231775GG genotypes and TACGG haplotype could potentially serve as effective indicators of long-term allograft function in Chinese renal transplantation recipients. PMID:27081086

  16. Animal model of methylphenidate's long-term memory-enhancing effects.

    PubMed

    Carmack, Stephanie A; Howell, Kristin K; Rasaei, Kleou; Reas, Emilie T; Anagnostaras, Stephan G

    2014-01-16

    Methylphenidate (MPH), introduced more than 60 years ago, accounts for two-thirds of current prescriptions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although many studies have modeled MPH's effect on executive function, almost none have directly modeled its effect on long-term memory (LTM), even though improvement in LTM is a critical target of therapeutic intervention in ADHD. We examined the effects of a wide range of doses of MPH (0.01-10 mg/kg, i.p.) on Pavlovian fear learning, a leading model of memory. MPH's effects were then compared to those of atomoxetine (0.1-10 mg/kg, i.p.), bupropion (0.5-20 mg/kg, i.p.), and citalopram (0.01-10 mg/kg, i.p.). At low, clinically relevant doses, MPH enhanced fear memory; at high doses it impaired memory. MPH's memory-enhancing effects were not confounded by its effects on locomotion or anxiety. Further, MPH-induced memory enhancement seemed to require both dopamine and norepinephrine transporter inhibition. Finally, the addictive potential of MPH (1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg) was compared to those of two other psychostimulants, amphetamine (0.005 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg) and cocaine (0.15 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg), using a conditioned place preference and behavioral sensitization paradigm. We found that memory-enhancing effects of psychostimulants observed at low doses are readily dissociable from their reinforcing and locomotor activating effects at high doses. Together, our data suggest that fear conditioning will be an especially fruitful platform for modeling the effects of psychostimulants on LTM in drug development.

  17. Animal model of methylphenidate's long-term memory-enhancing effects

    PubMed Central

    Carmack, Stephanie A.; Howell, Kristin K.; Rasaei, Kleou; Reas, Emilie T.; Anagnostaras, Stephan G.

    2014-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH), introduced more than 60 years ago, accounts for two-thirds of current prescriptions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although many studies have modeled MPH's effect on executive function, almost none have directly modeled its effect on long-term memory (LTM), even though improvement in LTM is a critical target of therapeutic intervention in ADHD. We examined the effects of a wide range of doses of MPH (0.01–10 mg/kg, i.p.) on Pavlovian fear learning, a leading model of memory. MPH's effects were then compared to those of atomoxetine (0.1–10 mg/kg, i.p.), bupropion (0.5–20 mg/kg, i.p.), and citalopram (0.01–10 mg/kg, i.p.). At low, clinically relevant doses, MPH enhanced fear memory; at high doses it impaired memory. MPH's memory-enhancing effects were not confounded by its effects on locomotion or anxiety. Further, MPH-induced memory enhancement seemed to require both dopamine and norepinephrine transporter inhibition. Finally, the addictive potential of MPH (1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg) was compared to those of two other psychostimulants, amphetamine (0.005 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg) and cocaine (0.15 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg), using a conditioned place preference and behavioral sensitization paradigm. We found that memory-enhancing effects of psychostimulants observed at low doses are readily dissociable from their reinforcing and locomotor activating effects at high doses. Together, our data suggest that fear conditioning will be an especially fruitful platform for modeling the effects of psychostimulants on LTM in drug development. PMID:24434869

  18. Long-term effects of electrotactile sensory substitution therapy on balance disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Sawai, Yachiyo; Murai, Takayuki; Nishimura, Tadashi; Kitahara, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    This clinical research investigated whether a new type of rehabilitation therapy involving the use of a vestibular substitution tongue device (VSTD) is effective for severe balance disorders caused by unilateral vestibular loss. Sixteen patients with postural imbalances because of unilateral vestibular loss underwent training with VSTD. The VSTD transmits information on the head position to the brain through the tongue as substitutes for the lost vestibular information. The device's electrode array was placed on the tongue and participants were trained to maintain a centered body position by ensuring the electrical signals in the center of their tongue. All participants completed 10 min training sessions 2-3 times per day for 8 weeks. Functional gait assessments and the dizziness handicap inventory were, respectively, used to the evaluate participants' dynamic gait function and their severity of balance problems before and after the training period. All examined parameters improved after the 8-week training period. These changes were maintained for up to 2 years after the termination of the training program. Short-term training with VSTD had beneficial carry-over effects. VSTD training might represent a useful rehabilitation therapy in individuals with persistent balance disorders and might lead to long-term improvements in their balance performance and ability to perform daily and social activities.

  19. Long-term effects of prenatal x-ray of human females: mortality and morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.B.; Tonascia, J.

    1981-09-01

    Experimental studies and long-term studies of humans exposed to ionizing radiation in utero and after birth show that these exposures increase the risk of cancer in childhood and in later life. A possible life-shortening effect has also been reported. This study followed to their mid-twenties 1458 women exposed in utero to diagnostic x-rays and 1458 matched, unexposed controls in Baltimore, Maryland, and obtained responses from over 100 women in each group. Information about general health and specific diseases was obtained from questionnaires. Deaths were ascertained through family members and death certificates. Mortality rates were slightly higher among exposure. Exposed women reported poor general health significantly more often than controls. Specific diseases occurred similarly in the two groups, although exposed women reported more epilepsy or fits, more ovarian tumors, and more high blood pressure. These strong correlation between weight and high blood pressure and the heavier weights of exposed women seemed to account for this difference. In summary, these matched exposed and control women, followed to their mid-twenties, experienced similar rates of morbidity and mortality. Radiation-induced cancers and life-shortening effects, if any, might not become evident until older ages.

  20. Long-term effects of electrotactile sensory substitution therapy on balance disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Sawai, Yachiyo; Murai, Takayuki; Nishimura, Tadashi; Kitahara, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    This clinical research investigated whether a new type of rehabilitation therapy involving the use of a vestibular substitution tongue device (VSTD) is effective for severe balance disorders caused by unilateral vestibular loss. Sixteen patients with postural imbalances because of unilateral vestibular loss underwent training with VSTD. The VSTD transmits information on the head position to the brain through the tongue as substitutes for the lost vestibular information. The device's electrode array was placed on the tongue and participants were trained to maintain a centered body position by ensuring the electrical signals in the center of their tongue. All participants completed 10 min training sessions 2-3 times per day for 8 weeks. Functional gait assessments and the dizziness handicap inventory were, respectively, used to the evaluate participants' dynamic gait function and their severity of balance problems before and after the training period. All examined parameters improved after the 8-week training period. These changes were maintained for up to 2 years after the termination of the training program. Short-term training with VSTD had beneficial carry-over effects. VSTD training might represent a useful rehabilitation therapy in individuals with persistent balance disorders and might lead to long-term improvements in their balance performance and ability to perform daily and social activities. PMID:27213931

  1. Long-term effects of fire severity on oak-conifer dynamics in the southern Cascades.

    PubMed

    Cocking, Matthew I; Varner, J Morgan; Knapp, Eric E

    2014-01-01

    We studied vegetation composition and structure in a mixed conifer-oak ecosystem across a range of fire severity 10 years following wildfire. Sample plots centered on focal California black oaks (Quercus kelloggii) were established to evaluate oak and neighboring tree and shrub recovery across a gradient of fire severity in the southern Cascade Range, USA. Shrub and oak resprouting was strongest around focal oaks where conifer mortality was greatest. Linear modeling revealed negative relationships between California black oak sprout height or basal area and residual overstory tree survival, primarily white fir (Abies concolor). The two dominant competing species, California black oak and white fir, showed opposite responses to fire severity. Sprouting California black oak and associated shrubs dominated in severely burned areas, while surviving, non-sprouting white fir maintained dominance by its height advantage and shading effects in areas that burned with low fire severity. Our results indicate that high-severity fire promotes persistence and restoration of ecosystems containing resprouting species, such as California black oak, that are increasingly rare due to widespread fire exclusion in landscapes that historically experienced more frequent fire. We present a conceptual model based on our results and supported by a synthesis of postfire resprouting dynamics literature. Our results and conceptual model help illuminate long-term postfire vegetation responses and the potential ability of fire to catalyze formation of alternate vegetation community structures that may not be apparent in studies that evaluate postfire effects at shorter time-since-fire intervals or at coarser scales.

  2. Integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective biosolids management at a large Canadian wastewater treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, R J; Allain, C J; Laughton, P J; Henry, J G

    2004-01-01

    The Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission's 115,000 m3/d advanced, chemically assisted primary wastewater treatment facility located in New Brunswick, Canada, has developed an integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective programme for the management and beneficial utilization of biosolids from lime stabilized raw sludge. The paper overviews biosolids production, lime stabilization, conveyance, and odour control followed by an indepth discussion of the wastewater sludge as a resource programme, namely: composting, mine site reclamation, landfill cover, land application for agricultural use, tree farming, sod farm base as a soil enrichment, topsoil manufacturing. The paper also addresses the issues of metals, pathogens, organic compounds, the quality control program along with the regulatory requirements. Biosolids capital and operating costs are presented. Research results on removal of metals from primary sludge using a unique biological process known as BIOSOL as developed by the University of Toronto, Canada to remove metals and destroy pathogens are presented. The paper also discusses an ongoing cooperative research project with the Université de Moncton where various mixtures of plant biosolids are composted with low quality soil. Integration, approach to sustainability and "cumulative effects" as part of the overall biosolids management strategy are also discussed.

  3. Long-term effects of soldering fumes upon respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, S K; Gupta, B N; Husain, T; Pangtey, B S; Srivastava, S; Garg, N

    1991-06-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of soldering gases and fumes, and of cigarette smoke on lung function, and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, a comparative study of spirometric measurements in 57 solderers engaged in acetylene gas soldering of brassware joints in the brass industry (mean exposure: 12.4 +/- 1.1 years) and in 131 controls was performed. The two groups were similar in age, height, smoking habits and social class. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms in the solderers did not differ significantly from that in the unexposed controls (59.6 vs 56.4%). However, solderers who smoked showed higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms than those who did not smoke; a similar trend was observed in the controls. The study failed to demonstrate any association between the respiratory symptoms and length of exposure. The respiratory status of the solderers was unaffected as the results of spirometric measurements of lung function did not show any significant differences between the exposed and the control groups, indicating the absence of an additive effect of cigarette smoking and exposure to soldering fumes.

  4. Long-term changes in Jovian synchrotron radio emission - Intrinsic variations or effects of viewing geometry?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Lon L.

    1993-01-01

    Possible causes of the observed long-term variation of Jovian synchrotron radio emission, including both intrinsic changes in the Jovian radiation belts and apparent changes due to variations in the Jovigraphic declination of the earth, D sub E, are investigated. An increase in diffusion rate with other parameters held constant results in an inward displacement of the peak emission radial distance that is not observed. Effects of viewing geometry changes are examined. The possible importance of such effects is suggested by a correlation between the total decimetric radio flux and D sub E, which varies between -3.3 and +3.3 deg during one Jovian orbital period. Because the Jovian central meridian longitudes where the magnetic latitude passes through zero during a given Jovian rotation change substantially with D sub E and since significant longitudinal asymmetries exist in both the volume emissivity and the latitudinal profile of the beam, the total intensity should be at least a partial function of D sub E.

  5. Sea surface height evidence for long-term warming effects of tropical cyclones on the ocean.

    PubMed

    Mei, Wei; Primeau, François; McWilliams, James C; Pasquero, Claudia

    2013-09-17

    Tropical cyclones have been hypothesized to influence climate by pumping heat into the ocean, but a direct measure of this warming effect is still lacking. We quantified cyclone-induced ocean warming by directly monitoring the thermal expansion of water in the wake of cyclones, using satellite-based sea surface height data that provide a unique way of tracking the changes in ocean heat content on seasonal and longer timescales. We find that the long-term effect of cyclones is to warm the ocean at a rate of 0.32 ± 0.15 PW between 1993 and 2009, i.e., ∼23 times more efficiently per unit area than the background equatorial warming, making cyclones potentially important modulators of the climate by affecting heat transport in the ocean-atmosphere system. Furthermore, our analysis reveals that the rate of warming increases with cyclone intensity. This, together with a predicted shift in the distribution of cyclones toward higher intensities as climate warms, suggests the ocean will get even warmer, possibly leading to a positive feedback.

  6. Integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective biosolids management at a large Canadian wastewater treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, R J; Allain, C J; Laughton, P J; Henry, J G

    2004-01-01

    The Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission's 115,000 m3/d advanced, chemically assisted primary wastewater treatment facility located in New Brunswick, Canada, has developed an integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective programme for the management and beneficial utilization of biosolids from lime stabilized raw sludge. The paper overviews biosolids production, lime stabilization, conveyance, and odour control followed by an indepth discussion of the wastewater sludge as a resource programme, namely: composting, mine site reclamation, landfill cover, land application for agricultural use, tree farming, sod farm base as a soil enrichment, topsoil manufacturing. The paper also addresses the issues of metals, pathogens, organic compounds, the quality control program along with the regulatory requirements. Biosolids capital and operating costs are presented. Research results on removal of metals from primary sludge using a unique biological process known as BIOSOL as developed by the University of Toronto, Canada to remove metals and destroy pathogens are presented. The paper also discusses an ongoing cooperative research project with the Université de Moncton where various mixtures of plant biosolids are composted with low quality soil. Integration, approach to sustainability and "cumulative effects" as part of the overall biosolids management strategy are also discussed. PMID:15259950

  7. Assessing airborne pollution effects on bryophytes: lessons learned through long-term integrated monitoring in Austria.

    PubMed

    Zechmeister, H G; Dirnböck, T; Hülber, K; Mirtl, M

    2007-06-01

    The study uses measured and calculated data on airborne pollutants, particularly nitrogen (ranges between 28 to 43kgN*ha(-1)*yr(-1)) and sulphur (10 to 18kgSO(4)-S*ha(-1)*yr(-1)), in order to assess their long-term (1992 to 2005) effects on bryophytes at the UN-ECE Integrated Monitoring site 'Zöbelboden' in Austria. Bryophytes were used as reaction indicators on 20 epiphytic plots using the IM monitoring method and on 14 terrestrial plots using standardised photography. The plots were recorded in the years 1992, 1993, 1998, and 2004/2005. Most species remained stable in terms of their overall population size during the observed period, even though there were rapid turnover rates of a large percentage of species on all investigated plots. Only a few bryophytes (Hypnum cupressiforme, Leucodon sciuroides) responded unambiguously to N and S deposition. Nitrogen deposition had a weak but significant effect on the distribution of bryophyte communities. However, the time shifts in bryophyte communities did not depend on total deposition of N and S.

  8. Protein synthesis and antioxidant capacity in aging mice: effects of long-term voluntary exercise.

    PubMed

    Vaanholt, Lobke M; Speakman, John R; Garland, Theodore; Lobley, Gerald E; Visser, G Henk

    2008-01-01

    Exercise increases metabolic rate and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but also elevates protein turnover. ROS cause damage to macromolecules (e.g., proteins) and thereby contribute to aging. Protein turnover removes and replaces damaged proteins. The balance between these two responses may underlie beneficial effects of physical activity on aging. Effects of lifelong exercise on antioxidant enzyme activities and fractional synthesis rate of protein (FSRP) were examined at various ages (2-26 mo) in heart, liver, and muscle of mice that had been selectively bred for high wheel-running activity, housed with (S+) or without (S-) a running wheel, and their random-bred controls (C+) housed with running wheels. FSRP decreased with age and increased in muscle of young, but not old, activity-selected mice. Enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase decreased with age and showed a peak at 10 mo of age in liver. Selection for wheel-running activity did not affect antioxidant enzyme activity. Daily energy expenditure correlated positively with antioxidant levels in liver. This might indicate that oxidative stress (ROS production) increases with metabolic rate, driving upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. Alternatively, the elevated energy expenditure may reflect the energetic cost of elevated protection, consistent with the disposable-soma hypothesis and with other studies showing positive links between energy expenditure and life span. Long-term elevations in voluntary exercise did not result in elevations in antioxidant enzyme activities or protein synthesis rates.

  9. Long-term physiological effects of enhanced O2 release by inositol hexaphosphate-loaded erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Teisseire, B; Ropars, C; Villeréal, M C; Nicolau, C

    1987-01-01

    A continuous lysing and resealing procedure with erythrocytes permitted incorporation in these cells of inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6), a strong allosteric effector of Hb. This leads to significant rightward shifts of the HbO2 dissociation curves with in vitro P50 (partial pressure of O2 at 50% Hb saturation), values increasing from 32.2 +/- 1.8 torr for control erythrocytes to 86 +/- 60 torr (pH 7.40; PCO2 40 torr at 37 degrees C; 1 torr = 1.333 X 10(2) Pa). The shape of the dissociation curve was still sigmoidal, although the Hill coefficient was decreased. The life span of InsP6-loaded erythrocytes equaled that of control erythrocytes. The long-term physiological effects of the InsP6-loaded erythrocytes on piglets were increased O2 release and reduced cardiac output. The reduced O2 affinity of the InsP6-loaded erythrocytes was still effective 20 days after transfusion in awake piglets. The electrolyte concentration appeared stable over the 5-day observation period except for a transient, but significant, hyperkalemia immediately after transfusion. The reductions in the O2 affinity of Hb reported here are large compared with previously reported values. Introduction of InsP6 into viable erythrocytes improves tissue oxygenation when, for any reason, normal blood flow is impaired. PMID:3116545

  10. Long-term effect of tobacco on unstimulated salivary pH

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Neeraj; Sharma, Jyoti; Sengupta, Shamindra; Singh, Sanjeet; Singh, Nishant; Kaur, Harjeet

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the effects of tobacco on salivary pH between tobacco chewers, smokers and controls. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 subjects (males and females) aged 25–40 years, were divided equally into three groups: Tobacco smokers (Group A), chewers (Group B) and controls (Group C). Saliva of each subject was collected under resting condition. Salivary pH was determined using the specific salivary pH meter. Results: The mean (±standard deviation) pH for Group A was 6.75 (±0.11), Group B was 6.5 (±0.29) and Group C was 7.00 (±0.28) after comparison. The significant results showed lower salivary pH in Groups A and B as compared to controls. Salivary pH was lowest in Group B compared to Group A and Group C. Conclusion: This study indicates that a lower (acidic) salivary pH was observed in tobacco users as compared with control. These alterations in pH due to the long-term effect of tobacco use can render oral mucosa vulnerable to various oral and dental diseases. PMID:27194856

  11. Long-Term Effectiveness of Accelerated Hepatitis B Vaccination Schedule in Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dimpy P.; Grimes, Carolyn Z.; Nguyen, Anh T.; Lai, Dejian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We demonstrated the effectiveness of an accelerated hepatitis B vaccination schedule in drug users. Methods. We compared the long-term effectiveness of accelerated (0–1–2 months) and standard (0–1–6 months) hepatitis B vaccination schedules in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and anti-hepatitis B (anti-HBs) antibody loss during 2-year follow-up in 707 drug users (HIV and HBV negative at enrollment and completed 3 vaccine doses) from February 2004 to October 2009. Results. Drug users in the accelerated schedule group had significantly lower HBV infection rates, but had a similar rate of anti-HBs antibody loss compared with the standard schedule group over 2 years of follow-up. No chronic HBV infections were observed. Hepatitis C positivity at enrollment and age younger than 40 years were independent risk factors for HBV infection and antibody loss, respectively. Conclusions. An accelerated vaccination schedule was more preferable than a standard vaccination schedule in preventing HBV infections in drug users. To overcome the disadvantages of a standard vaccination schedule, an accelerated vaccination schedule should be considered in drug users with low adherence. Our study should be repeated in different cohorts to validate our findings and establish the role of an accelerated schedule in hepatitis B vaccination guidelines for drug users. PMID:25880946

  12. ORTHODONTIC RETENTION. Studies of retention capacity, cost-effectiveness and long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Tynelius, Gudrun Edman

    2014-01-01

    Retention strategies, cost-effectiveness and long-term stability of treatment outcome are essential aspects of orthodontic treatment planning. The overall aim of this thesis was to compare and evaluate three different retention strategies, with special reference to short- and long-term clinical stability and cost-effectiveness. The approach was evidence-based, hence randomized controlled methodology was used in order to generate high levels of evidence. This thesis is based on four studies: Papers I and II are based on randomized controlled trials, evaluating the stability of treatment outcome after one and two years of retention, using three different retention strategies: a maxillary vacuum-formed retainer combined with a mandibular canine-to-canine retainer; a maxillary vacuum-formed retainer combined with stripping of the mandibular anterior teeth and a prefabricated positioner. Paper III presents a cost-minimization analysis of two years of retention treatment. Paper IV is based on a randomized controlled trial documenting the results five years post-retention. The following conclusions were drawn: Papers I and II. From a clinical perspective, asssessment after one year of retention disclosed that the three retention methods were successful in retaining the orthodontic treatment results. After two years of retention, all three retention methods were equally effective in controlling relapse at a clinically acceptable level. Most of the relapse occurred during the first year of retention; only minor or negligible changes were found during the second year. The subjects were grouped according to the level of compliance (excellent or good). After two years of retention there was a negative correlation between growth in body height and relapse of mandibular LII in the group of subjects with excellent compliance. The group with good compliance showed a positive correlation (Paper II, Figure 3). After two years of retention, growth in body height, initial crowding and

  13. Long term enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease: effectiveness on kidney, heart and brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency leading to renal, cardiac, cerebrovascular disease and premature death. Treatment with α-galactosidase A (enzyme replacement therapy, ERT) stabilises disease in some patients, but long term effectiveness is unclear. Methods Renal, cardiac, and cerebral outcomes were prospectively studied in males and females with Fabry disease treated with ERT. Additionally, the occurrence of major cardiac events, stroke, end-stage renal disease and death was compared to a natural history (NH) cohort meeting treatment criteria. Results Of 75 patients on ERT (median treatment duration 5.2 years, range 0.05-11.0), prospective follow-up was available for 57 adult patients (30 males) and 6 adolescents. Renal function declined in males (-3.4 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year, SE 0.2; p < 0.001) despite ERT, but followed the normal course in females (-0.8 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year, SE 0.3; p = 0.001). Cardiac mass increased during ERT in males (+ 1.2 gram/m2.7, SE 0.3; p < 0.001), but remained stable in females (-0.3 gram/m2.7 per year, SE 0.4; p = 0.52). ERT did not prevent the occurrence of cerebral white matter lesions. Comparison of ERT treated to untreated patients revealed that the odds to develop a first complication increased with age (OR 1.05 (95% CI: 1.0-1.1) per year, p = 0.012). For development of a first or second complication the odds declined with longer treatment duration (OR 0.81 (95% CI: 0.68-0.96) per year of ERT, p = 0.015;OR 0.52 (0.31-0.88), p = 0.014 respectively). Conclusions Long term ERT does not prevent disease progression, but the risk of developing a first or second complication declines with increasing treatment duration. ERT in advanced Fabry disease seems of doubtful benefit. PMID:23531228

  14. Short and long term health effects of parental tobacco smoking during pregnancy and lactation: a descriptive review.

    PubMed

    Banderali, G; Martelli, A; Landi, M; Moretti, F; Betti, F; Radaelli, G; Lassandro, C; Verduci, E

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of attention has been focused on adverse effects of tobacco smoking on conception, pregnancy, fetal, and child health. The aim of this paper is to discuss the current evidence regarding short and long-term health effects on child health of parental smoking during pregnancy and lactation and the potential underlying mechanisms. Studies were searched on MEDLINE(®) and Cochrane database inserting, individually and using the Boolean ANDs and ORs, 'pregnancy', 'human lactation', 'fetal growth', 'metabolic outcomes', 'obesity', 'cardiovascular outcomes', 'blood pressure', 'brain development', 'respiratory outcomes', 'maternal or paternal or parental tobacco smoking', 'nicotine'. Publications coming from the reference list of studies were also considered from MEDLINE. All sources were retrieved between 2015-01-03 and 2015-31-05. There is overall consistency in literature about negative effects of fetal and postnatal exposure to parental tobacco smoking on several outcomes: preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, low birth weight, sudden infant death syndrome, neurodevelopmental and behavioral problems, obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, impaired lung function, asthma and wheezing. While maternal smoking during pregnancy plays a major role on adverse postnatal outcomes, it may also cumulate negatively with smoking during lactation and with second-hand smoking exposure. Although this review was not strictly designed as a systematic review and the PRISMA Statement was not fully applied it may benefit the reader with a promptly and friendly readable update of the matter. This review strengthens the need to plan population health policies aimed to implement educational programs to hopefully minimize tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:26472248

  15. Short and long term health effects of parental tobacco smoking during pregnancy and lactation: a descriptive review.

    PubMed

    Banderali, G; Martelli, A; Landi, M; Moretti, F; Betti, F; Radaelli, G; Lassandro, C; Verduci, E

    2015-10-15

    A great deal of attention has been focused on adverse effects of tobacco smoking on conception, pregnancy, fetal, and child health. The aim of this paper is to discuss the current evidence regarding short and long-term health effects on child health of parental smoking during pregnancy and lactation and the potential underlying mechanisms. Studies were searched on MEDLINE(®) and Cochrane database inserting, individually and using the Boolean ANDs and ORs, 'pregnancy', 'human lactation', 'fetal growth', 'metabolic outcomes', 'obesity', 'cardiovascular outcomes', 'blood pressure', 'brain development', 'respiratory outcomes', 'maternal or paternal or parental tobacco smoking', 'nicotine'. Publications coming from the reference list of studies were also considered from MEDLINE. All sources were retrieved between 2015-01-03 and 2015-31-05. There is overall consistency in literature about negative effects of fetal and postnatal exposure to parental tobacco smoking on several outcomes: preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, low birth weight, sudden infant death syndrome, neurodevelopmental and behavioral problems, obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, impaired lung function, asthma and wheezing. While maternal smoking during pregnancy plays a major role on adverse postnatal outcomes, it may also cumulate negatively with smoking during lactation and with second-hand smoking exposure. Although this review was not strictly designed as a systematic review and the PRISMA Statement was not fully applied it may benefit the reader with a promptly and friendly readable update of the matter. This review strengthens the need to plan population health policies aimed to implement educational programs to hopefully minimize tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy and lactation.

  16. Is natural experiment a cure? Re-examining the long-term health effects of China's 1959-1961 famine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongwei; Li, Lydia; Zhang, Zhenmei; Liu, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    The fetal origins hypothesis posits that adverse prenatal exposures, particularly malnutrition, increase the risk of poor adult health. Studies using famine as a natural experiment to test the fetal origins hypothesis present conflicting findings, partly because of data limitations and modeling flaws. Capitalizing on the biomarker data and prefecture-level geographic information from the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, this study estimates the effects of prenatal exposure to China's 1959-61 famine on later-life risks of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Our analysis addresses the problems of measurement error and intrinsic cohort differences that challenge prior studies. We use provincial and prefecture-level geographic variations in famine severity, a proxy for prenatal malnutrition, for model identification. We construct instrumental variables from geocoded newspaper archive data to adjust for measurement error in famine exposure. We find that estimates of the famine effects are highly sensitive to the choices of health indicators, measures of famine severity, and regression model specifications. Overall, we find little evidence supporting the fetal origins hypothesis. In fact, it appears that prenatal exposure to famine reduces later-life disease risks in certain cases. We interpret this finding as evidence of mortality selection among the famine survivors at work. We conclude that using famine as a natural experiment in itself does not guarantee correct statistical inference about the long-term health impacts of prenatal malnutrition when other analytical challenges remain unresolved.

  17. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m/sup 3/) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time.

  18. Effects of discontinuation of long-term anticholinergic treatment in elderly schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Drimer, T; Shahal, B; Barak, Y

    2004-01-01

    Anticholinergic medication (ACM) is frequently used in psychiatry to treat the side-effects of D2 blocking agents. However, ACM is not without adverse effects and, in the elderly, cognitive and memory impairments have been emphasized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of discontinuation of ACM on cognitive functions in a group of elderly chronic schizophrenia patients. Twenty-seven elderly patients (age 60 years or older), who were diagnosed as suffering from schizophrenia (DSM-IV) and receiving ACM in addition to antipsychotic treatment, were enrolled. Before and after ACM was discontinued, the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) subscale was administered. Twenty-one patients completed the study. All were receiving Akineton (biperiden), 2-6 mg daily before the study. Significant improvement in the ADAS-Cog total score was demonstrated (P < 0.03), as well as in the ideational praxia and orientation subscales. Improvement was correlated with the previous dose of biperidin. No adverse events or emergent extrapyramidal symptoms were noted. Discontinuation of ACM may be warranted in chronic schizophrenia patients since it may improve cognitive functioning with no adverse effects.

  19. Effects of forest management on soil carbon: results of some long-term resampling studies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D W; Knoepp, J D; Swank, W T; Shan, J; Morris, L A; Van Lear, D H; Kapeluck, P R

    2002-01-01

    The effects of harvest intensity (sawlog, SAW; whole tree, WTH; and complete tree, CTH) on biomass and soil C were studied in four forested sites in the southeastern US (mixed deciduous forests at Oak Ridge, TN and Coweeta, NC; Pinus taeda at Clemson, SC: and P. eliottii at Bradford, FL). In general, harvesting had no lasting effects on soil C. However, intensive temporal sampling at the NC and SC sites revealed short-term changes in soil C during the first few years after harvesting, and large, long-term increases in soil C were noted at the TN site in all treatments. Thus, changes in soil C were found even though lasting effects of harvest treatment were not. There were substantial differences in growth and biomass C responses to harvest treatments among sites. At the TN site, there were no differences in biomass at 15 years after harvest. At the SC site, greater biomass was found in the SAW than in the WTH treatment 16 years after harvest, and this effect is attributed to be due to both the N left on site in foliar residues and to the enhancement of soil physical and chemical properties by residues. At the FL site, greater biomass was found in the CTH than in the WTH treatment 15 years after harvest, and this effect is attributed to be due to differences in understory competition. Biomass data were not reported for NC. The effects of harvest treatment on ecosystem C are expected to magnify over time at the SC and FL sites as live biomass increases, whereas the current differences in ecosystem C at the TN site (which are due to the presence of undecomposed residues) are expected to lessen with time.

  20. Adverse Events in the Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Treated With Samarium Sm 153 Lexidronam for Osseous Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Paravati, Anthony J.; Russo, Andrea L.; Aitken, Candice

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate adverse events after samarium Sm 153 lexidronam and the effect of pre- and post-samarium Sm 153 lexidronam external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and/or chemotherapy on myelosuppression in patients who received samarium Sm 153 lexidronam for osseous metastases. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-institution retrospective review of 139 patients treated with samarium Sm 153 lexidronam between November 1997 and February 2008. New-onset adverse events after samarium Sm 153 lexidronam were reported. The effect of samarium Sm 153 lexidronam on platelet and peripheral white blood cell counts and the duration of myelosuppression after samarium Sm 153 lexidronam plus EBRT and/or chemotherapy were calculated. Differences in the prevalence of adverse events among patients with varying treatment histories were evaluated with the Pearson chi-square test. Results: Hematologic follow-up was available for 103 patients. Chemotherapy and/or EBRT had no effect on the magnitude or duration of myelosuppression. The most common nonhematologic adverse events were acute lower extremity edema (n = 27) and acute and transient neuropathy (n = 29). Patients treated with chemotherapy after samarium Sm 153 lexidronam had a higher prevalence of lower extremity edema (9 of 18 [50%]) than those who were not treated with chemotherapy after samarium Sm 153 lexidronam (18 of 85 [21.2%]) (p = 0.01, chi-square test). No adverse events were correlated with EBRT. Conclusions: Our observation of new-onset, acute and transient edema and neuropathy after samarium Sm 153 lexidronam and of a relationship between edema and post-samarium Sm 153 lexidronam chemotherapy suggests the need for re-examination of patients in past series or for a prospective investigation with nonhematologic adverse events as a primary endpoint.

  1. Long Term Positive Effect of Grassland Restoration on Plant Diversity - Success or Not?

    PubMed

    Waldén, Emelie; Lindborg, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Restoration is important for biodiversity conservation worldwide, but surprisingly little is known about its efficiency in a long-term perspective. In this study, we re-examined Swedish semi-natural grasslands 12-20 years after the restoration, by comparing field inventories of vascular plant species diversity made in 2001 with follow-up inventories in 2012. We also analysed restoration effect in relation to six environmental factors and used continuously managed semi-natural grasslands as references of desired state after restoration. We found that total species richness increased over time but not to reference levels, while there were no significant changes in species density or number of grassland specialists. However, the overall species composition in the restored sites, as well as grassland specialist composition, now largely resembled reference conditions. Fertilisation and time between abandonment and restoration were the only environmental variables that affected total species composition change, while site area affected change in grassland specialist composition. Our results show that restoration of semi-natural grasslands can contribute to conservation of semi-natural habitats and their associated biodiversity. Yet, due to the vague restoration goals for these sites, it is difficult to evaluate the restoration success, which emphasise the general need for clear and measurable goals. PMID:27196748

  2. Effect of Long-term Smoking on Whole-mouth Salivary Flow Rate and Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Maryam; Kakoie, Shahla; Niliye Brojeni, Fateme; Pourdamghan, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Change in the resting whole-mouth salivary flow rate (SFR) plays a significant role in patho-genesis of various oral conditions. Factors such as smoking may affect SFR as well as the oral and dental health. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of smoking on SFR, and oral and dental health. Materials and methods One-hundred smokers and 100 non-tobacco users were selected as case and control groups, respectively. A questionnaire was used to collect the demographic data and smoking habits. A previously used questionnaire about dry mouth was also employed. Then, after a careful oral examination, subjects’ whole saliva was collected in the resting condition. Data was analyzed by chi-square test using SPSS 15. Results The mean (±SD) salivary flow rate were 0.38 (± 0.13) ml/min in smokers and 0.56 (± 0.16) ml/min in non-smokers. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.00001). Also, 39% of smokers and 12% of non-smokers reported experiencing at least one xerostomia symptom, with statistically significant difference between groups (p=0.0001). Oral lesions including cervical caries, gingivitis, tooth mobility, calculus and halitosis were significantly higher in smokers. Conclusion Our findings indicated that long-term smoking would significantly reduce SFR and increase oral and dental disorders associated with dry mouth, especially cervical caries, gingivitis, tooth mobility, calculus, and halitosis. PMID:23346336

  3. Neighborhood effects on the long-term well-being of low-income adults.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Jens; Duncan, Greg J; Gennetian, Lisa A; Katz, Lawrence F; Kessler, Ronald C; Kling, Jeffrey R; Sanbonmatsu, Lisa

    2012-09-21

    Nearly 9 million Americans live in extreme-poverty neighborhoods, places that also tend to be racially segregated and dangerous. Yet, the effects on the well-being of residents of moving out of such communities into less distressed areas remain uncertain. Using data from Moving to Opportunity, a unique randomized housing mobility experiment, we found that moving from a high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhood leads to long-term (10- to 15-year) improvements in adult physical and mental health and subjective well-being, despite not affecting economic self-sufficiency. A 1-standard deviation decline in neighborhood poverty (13 percentage points) increases subjective well-being by an amount equal to the gap in subjective well-being between people whose annual incomes differ by $13,000--a large amount given that the average control group income is $20,000. Subjective well-being is more strongly affected by changes in neighborhood economic disadvantage than racial segregation, which is important because racial segregation has been declining since 1970, but income segregation has been increasing.

  4. Effect of Genetic Polymorphisms and Long-Term Tobacco Exposure on the Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verde, Zoraida; Santiago, Catalina; Chicharro, Luis Miguel; Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Tejerina, Alejandro; Bandrés, Fernando; Gómez-Gallego, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco smoke contains many potentially harmful compounds that may act differently and at different stages in breast cancer development. The focus of this work was to assess the possible role of cigarette smoking (status, dose, duration or age at initiation) and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in tobacco carcinogen metabolism (CYP1A1, CYP2A6) or in DNA repair (XRCC1, APEX1, XRCC3 and XPD) in breast cancer development. Methods: We designed a case control study with 297 patients, 217 histologically verified breast cancers (141 smokers and 76 non-smokers) and 80 healthy smokers in a cohort of Spanish women. Results: We found an association between smoking status and early age at diagnosis of breast cancer. Among smokers, invasive carcinoma subtype incidence increased with intensity and duration of smoking (all Ptrend < 0.05). When smokers were stratified by smoking duration, we only observed differences in long-term smokers, and the CYP1A1 Ile462Ile genotype was associated with increased risk of breast cancer (OR = 7.12 (1.98–25.59)). Conclusions: Our results support the main effect of CYP1A1 in estrogenic metabolism rather than in tobacco carcinogen activation in breast cancer patients and also confirmed the hypothesis that CYP1A1 Ile462Val, in association with long periods of active smoking, could be a breast cancer risk factor. PMID:27754415

  5. Long term effects of crude oil on common murres (Uria aalge) following rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, R.A.; Ryan, P. )

    1991-02-01

    Oil spilled or discharged at sea is known to contaminate and cause mortality in seabirds and in some instances, these losses can be substantial as reported recently following an oil spill from the Exxon Valdez in Alaskan waters. Crude petroleum alters the arrangement of the feather barbules causing a loss of buoyancy and hypothermia. Attempts to rehabilitate birds with light to moderate amounts of oil exposure have met with modest success. Following cleaning and release, many of these birds never recovered and little is known of their survival rate in nature subsequently. A number of oiled sea birds, primarily common murres (Uria aalge), were retrieved recently by the Canadian Coast Guard and attempts to rehabilitate them were conducted. Since the majority of birds were retained longer than the usual 4 to 5 days recommended by the Bird Rescue International Centre after retrieval, it soon became apparent that many were suffering from problems other than diet or thermoregulation. Following autopsy/necropsy, extensive organ damage was observed in all of the birds. The purpose of this communication is to report the long term effects of crude oil on common murres.

  6. Effects of small particle numbers on long-term behaviour in discrete biochemical systems

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Bashar; Dittrich, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The functioning of many biological processes depends on the appearance of only a small number of a single molecular species. Additionally, the observation of molecular crowding leads to the insight that even a high number of copies of species do not guarantee their interaction. How single particles contribute to stabilizing biological systems is not well understood yet. Hence, we aim at determining the influence of single molecules on the long-term behaviour of biological systems, i.e. whether they can reach a steady state. Results: We provide theoretical considerations and a tool to analyse Systems Biology Markup Language models for the possibility to stabilize because of the described effects. The theory is an extension of chemical organization theory, which we called discrete chemical organization theory. Furthermore we scanned the BioModels Database for the occurrence of discrete chemical organizations. To exemplify our method, we describe an application to the Template model of the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint mechanism. Availability and implementation: http://www.biosys.uni-jena.de/Services.html. Contact: bashar.ibrahim@uni-jena.de or dittrich@minet.uni-jena.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161236

  7. Circulating endothelial and progenitor cells: Evidence from acute and long-term exercise effects

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumpi, Matina; Dimopoulos, Stavros; Psarra, Katherini; Kyprianou, Theodoros; Nanas, Serafim

    2012-01-01

    Circulating bone-marrow-derived cells, named endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), are capable of maintaining, generating, and replacing terminally differentiated cells within their own specific tissue as a consequence of physiological cell turnover or tissue damage due to injury. Endothelium maintenance and restoration of normal endothelial cell function is guaranteed by a complex physiological procedure in which EPCs play a significant role. Decreased number of peripheral blood EPCs has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and high cardiovascular risk. In this review, we initially report current knowledge with regard to the role of EPCs in healthy subjects and the clinical value of EPCs in different disease populations such as arterial hypertension, obstructive sleep-apnea syndrome, obesity, diabetes mellitus, peripheral arterial disease, coronary artery disease, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure. Recent studies have introduced the novel concept that physical activity, either performed as a single exercise session or performed as part of an exercise training program, results in a significant increase of circulating EPCs. In the second part of this review we provide preliminary evidence from recent studies investigating the effects of acute and long-term exercise in healthy subjects and athletes as well as in disease populations. PMID:23272272

  8. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Deprivation on the Neuronal Soma Area in the Rat Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Aksić, Milan; Radonjić, Nevena V.; Aleksić, Dubravka; Jevtić, Gordana; Marković, Branka; Petronijević, Nataša; Radonjić, Vidosava; Filipović, Branislav

    2014-01-01

    Early separation of rat pups from their mothers (separatio a matrem) is considered and accepted as an animal model of perinatal stress. Adult rats, separated early postnatally from their mothers, are developing long-lasting changes in the brain and neuroendocrine system, corresponding to the findings observed in schizophrenia and affective disorders. With the aim to investigate the morphological changes in this animal model we exposed 9-day-old (P9) Wistar rats to a 24 h maternal deprivation (MD). At young adult age rats were sacrificed for morphometric analysis and their brains were compared with the control group bred under the same conditions, but without MD. Rats exposed to MD had a 28% smaller cell soma area in the prefrontal cortex (PFCX), 30% in retrosplenial cortex (RSCX), and 15% in motor cortex (MCX) compared to the controls. No difference was observed in the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the neocortex of MD rats compared to the control group. The results of this study demonstrate that stress in early life has a long-term effect on neuronal soma size in cingulate and retrosplenial cortex and is potentially interesting as these structures play an important role in cognition. PMID:24895554

  9. Long Term Positive Effect of Grassland Restoration on Plant Diversity - Success or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Lindborg, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Restoration is important for biodiversity conservation worldwide, but surprisingly little is known about its efficiency in a long-term perspective. In this study, we re-examined Swedish semi-natural grasslands 12–20 years after the restoration, by comparing field inventories of vascular plant species diversity made in 2001 with follow-up inventories in 2012. We also analysed restoration effect in relation to six environmental factors and used continuously managed semi-natural grasslands as references of desired state after restoration. We found that total species richness increased over time but not to reference levels, while there were no significant changes in species density or number of grassland specialists. However, the overall species composition in the restored sites, as well as grassland specialist composition, now largely resembled reference conditions. Fertilisation and time between abandonment and restoration were the only environmental variables that affected total species composition change, while site area affected change in grassland specialist composition. Our results show that restoration of semi-natural grasslands can contribute to conservation of semi-natural habitats and their associated biodiversity. Yet, due to the vague restoration goals for these sites, it is difficult to evaluate the restoration success, which emphasise the general need for clear and measurable goals. PMID:27196748

  10. Does beach nourishment have long-term effects on intertidal macroinvertebrate species abundance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leewis, Lies; van Bodegom, Peter M.; Rozema, Jelte; Janssen, Gerard M.

    2012-11-01

    Coastal squeeze is the largest threat for sandy coastal areas. To mitigate seaward threats, erosion and sea level rise, sand nourishment is commonly applied. However, its long-term consequences for macroinvertebrate fauna, critical to most ecosystem services of sandy coasts, are still unknown. Seventeen sandy beaches - nourished and controls - were sampled along a chronosequence to investigate the abundance of four dominant macrofauna species and their relations with nourishment year and relevant coastal environmental variables. Dean's parameter and latitude significantly explained the abundance of the spionid polychaete Scolelepis squamata, Beach Index (BI), sand skewness, beach slope and latitude explained the abundance of the amphipod Haustorius arenarius and Relative Tide Range (RTR), recreation and sand sorting explained the abundance of Bathyporeia sarsi. For Eurydice pulchra, no environmental variable explained its abundance. For H. arenarius, E. pulchra and B. sarsi, there was no relation with nourishment year, indicating that recovery took place within a year after nourishment. Scolelepis squamata initially profited from the nourishment with "over-recolonisation". This confirms its role as an opportunistic species, thereby altering the initial community structure on a beach after nourishment. We conclude that the responses of the four dominant invertebrates studied in the years following beach nourishment are species specific. This shows the importance of knowing the autecology of the sandy beach macroinvertebrate fauna in order to be able to mitigate the effects of beach nourishment and other environmental impacts.

  11. Effect of fertilization on the weediness of maize in a long-term field experiment.

    PubMed

    Kismányoky, A; Lehoczky, E; Kismányoky, T

    2006-01-01

    We carried our examination in a long-term fertilization field experiment in 2005. In the experiment we had opportunity to compare the weediness in NPK and NPK + FYM1 treatments, and we could study the effect of increasing N dosis on the weeds and maize. The bi-factorial trial was arranged in split plot design with three replications. The weed survey was made 25 days after seeding in the 27th of may. For the weed survey the Balázs-Ujvárosi method was applied. After the weed survey we collected all the weed species from the plots per 1-1 m2. We counted, mesured the fresh and dry matter weight of aerial shoots. We collected maize too, five pieces per plots. In the experiment were found 12 weed species, 9 annual: Abutilon theophrasti, Amaranthus chlorostachys, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Chenopodium album, Chenopodium hybridum, Echinochloa crus-galli, Polygonum lapathifolium, Xantium strumarium, Veronica hederi-folia, and 3 perennial: Cirsium arvense, Convolvulus arvensis, Lathyrus tuberosus. On the NPK plots the Ch. album, on NPK + FYM treatments the A. theophrasti was the first in order of the dominance. The biomass production of weeds in the NPK + FYM treatments were 3 times higher than in the only NPK treatments. PMID:17390821

  12. Long term care financing in four OECD countries: fiscal burden and distributive effects.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Martin; Mayhew, Les; Rickayzen, Ben

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares long term care (LTC) systems in four OECD countries (UK, Japan, Sweden and Germany). In the UK, provision is means tested, so that out of pocket payments depend on levels of income, savings and assets. In Sweden, where the system is wholly tax-financed, provision is essentially free at the point of use. In Germany and Japan, provision is financed from recently introduced compulsory insurance schemes, although the details of how each scheme operates and the distributive consequences differ somewhat. The paper analyses the effects of importing the other three countries' systems for financing LTC into the UK, focussing on both the distributive consequences and the tax burden. It finds that the German system would not be an improvement on the current UK system, because it uses a regressive method of financing. Therefore, the discussion of possible alternatives to the present UK system could be restricted to a general tax-based system as used in Sweden or the compulsory insurance system as used in Japan. The results suggest that all three systems would imply increased taxes in the UK. PMID:16564108

  13. Effects of long-term variability on projections of twenty-first century dynamic sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordbar, Mohammad H.; Martin, Thomas; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2015-04-01

    Sea-level rise is one of the most pressing aspects of anthropogenic global warming with far-reaching consequences for coastal societies. However, sea-level rise did and will strongly vary from coast to coast. Here we investigate the long-term internal variability effects on centennial projections of dynamic sea level (DSL), the local departure from the globally averaged sea level. A large ensemble of global warming integrations has been conducted with a climate model, where each realization was forced by identical CO2 increase but started from different atmospheric and oceanic initial conditions. In large parts of the mid- and high latitudes, the ensemble spread of the projected centennial DSL trends is of the same order of magnitude as the globally averaged steric sea-level rise, suggesting that internal variability cannot be ignored when assessing twenty-first-century DSL trends. The ensemble spread is considerably reduced in the mid- to high latitudes when only the atmospheric initial conditions differ while keeping the oceanic initial state identical; indicating that centennial DSL projections are strongly dependent on ocean initial conditions.

  14. Long-Term Internal Variability Effects on Centennial Dynamic Sea Level Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi Bordbar, Mohammad; Martin, Thomas; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2015-04-01

    The Earth's surface is warming in response to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). Sea level rise is one of the most pressing aspects of global warming with far-reaching consequences for coastal societies. However, sea level rise did and will strongly vary from coast to coast. Here we investigate the long-term internal variability effects on centennial projections of dynamic sea level (DSL), the local departure from the globally averaged sea level. A large ensemble of global warming integrations was conducted with a climate model, where each ensemble member was forced by identical CO2-increase but started from different atmospheric and oceanic initial conditions taken from an unforced millennial control run. In large parts of the mid- and high latitudes, the ensemble spread of the projected centennial DSL trends is of the same order of magnitude as the globally averaged steric sea level rise, suggesting internal variability cannot be ignored when assessing 21st century DSL changes. This conclusion is also supported by analyzing projections with other climate models. The ensemble spread is strongly reduced in the mid- to high latitudes if only the atmospheric initial conditions are perturbed; suggesting uncertainty in the projected centennial DSL trends there is largely due to the lack of ocean information. Thus climate model projections of regional sea level would benefit from ocean initialization.

  15. The effects of acute social isolation on long-term social recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Leser, Noam; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-10-01

    The abilities to recognize individual animals of the same species and to distinguish them from other individuals are the basis for all mammalian social organizations and relationships. These abilities, termed social recognition memory, can be explored in mice and rats using their innate tendency to investigate novel social stimuli more persistently than familiar ones. Using this methodology it was found that social recognition memory is mediated by a specific neural network in the brain, the activity of which is modulated by several molecules, such the neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin. During the last 15 years several independent studies have revealed that social recognition memory of mice and rats depends upon their housing conditions. Specifically, long-term social recognition memory cannot be formed as shortly as few days following social isolation of the animal. This rapid and reversible impairment caused by acute social isolation seems to be specific to social memory and has not been observed in other types of memory. Here we review these studies and suggest that this unique system may serve for exploring of the mechanisms underlying the well-known negative effects of partial or perceived social isolation on human mental health.

  16. Long-term effects of prenatal x-ray of human females. II. Growth and development.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M B; Tonascia, J

    1981-09-01

    Experimental studies and studies of survivors of in-utero exposure to atomic bomb blasts have shown significant stunting of growth and mental retardation following these exposures. Central nervous system damage following very low doses of x-ray at around the time of birth has also been observed in experimental animals. This long term follow-up studies of 1458 human females exposed in utero to diagnostic x-rays and of 1458 matched unexposed controls studied in Baltimore, Maryland, included measurements of height, weight and school achievement. Women who had been exposed to x-rays in utero were significantly shorter in their mid-twenties than were their matched, unexposed controls, even after adjustment for other social and economic factors. However, additional follow-up revealed that mothers of exposed women were also shorter than the control mothers. Short stature appeared to be a selective factor for x-ray during pregnancy (mostly pelvimetry, 1947-1952). Mothers' and daughters' heights were similarly correctly among exposed and control mother-daughter pairs, suggesting that the height differences between exposed daughters and their controls were due to these selective factor rather than to any direct effect of radiation on growth. Exposed women reported poorer school achievement than control women. However, except for a higher proportion of exposed women leaving school because of pregnancy, these measurements were no longer significantly different when rates were simultaneously adjusted for socioeconomic differences between exposed and control women.

  17. The effects of open throat technique on long term average spectra (LTAS) of female classical voices.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Helen F; Kenny, Dianna T

    2004-01-01

    In the third of a series of studies on open throat technique, we compared long term average spectra (LTAS) of six advanced singing students under three conditions: 'optimal' (O), representing maximal open throat, 'sub-optimal' (SO), using reduced open throat, and loud sub-optimal (LSO) to control for the effect of loudness. Using a series of univariate repeated measures ANOVAs with planned orthogonal contrasts, we tested the hypotheses that sound pressure level (SPL) and the ratio of spectral energy in peaks and areas between 0-2 kHz and 2-4 kHz would be reduced in SO and LSO compared to O. There were significant differences between SO and LSO but hypotheses were not confirmed for O. These findings do not accord with differences in vibrato extent and onset between O and SO/LSO (Mitchell and Kenny, in press). These results suggest that while LTAS provides information on energy distribution, measuring spectral energy areas appears to be the most sensitive measure of energy distribution between conditions. Plotting the differences between O and SO/LSO pairs of LTAS clearly indicates the areas of spectral change. The findings from this study also indicate that LTAS are not sufficiently sensitive to measure vocal timbre as they were not consistent with perceptual or other acoustic studies of the same samples. PMID:15370642

  18. Long-Term Isothermal Aging Effects on Carbon Fabric-Reinforced PMR-15 Composites: Compression Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Roberts, Gary D.; Kamvouris, John E.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of long-term isothermal thermo-oxidative aging on the compressive properties of T-650-35 fabric reinforced PMR-15 composites. The temperatures that were studied were 204, 260, 288, 316, and 343 C. Specimens of different geometries were evaluated. Cut edge-to-surface ratios of 0.03 to 0.89 were fabricated and aged. Aging times extended to a period in excess of 15,000 hours for the lower temperature runs. The unaged and aged specimens were tested in compression in accordance with ASTM D-695. Both thin and thick (plasma) specimens were tested. Three specimens were tested at each time/temperature/geometry condition. The failure modes appeared to be initiated by fiber kinking with longitudinal, interlaminar splitting. In general, it appears that the thermo-oxidative degradation of the compression strength of the composite material may occur by both thermal (time-dependent) and oxidative (weight-loss) mechanisms. Both mechanisms appear to be specimen-thickness dependent.

  19. Neural Stimulation Has a Long-Term Effect on Foreign Vocabulary Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualotto, Achille; Kobanbay, Begüm; Proulx, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of a foreign language is a challenging task that is becoming increasingly more important in the world nowadays. There is evidence suggesting that the frontal and temporal cortices are involved in language processing and comprehension, but it is still unknown whether foreign language acquisition recruits additional cortical areas in a causal manner. For the first time, we used transcranial random noise stimulation on the frontal and parietal brain areas, in order to compare its effect on the acquisition of unknown foreign words and a sham, or placebo, condition was also included. This type of noninvasive neural stimulation enhances cortical activity by boosting the spontaneous activity of neurons. Foreign vocabulary acquisition was tested both immediately and seven days after the stimulation. We found that stimulation on the posterior parietal, but not the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or sham stimulation, significantly improved the memory performance in the long term. These results suggest that the posterior parietal cortex is directly involved in acquisition of foreign vocabulary, thus extending the “linguistic network” to this area. PMID:26075102

  20. Long term beneficial effects of weak electromagnetic fields in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1995-11-01

    A 39 year-old severely disabled woman with a 19 year history of chronic relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) began to experience improvement in symptoms within 24 hours after she received experimental treatment with picotesla electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Pattern reversal visual evoked potential (VEP) study obtained three weeks after the initiation of the first magnetic treatment showed a return to normal of the P100 latencies in each eye. The patient continued to receive 1-2 EMFs treatments per week and during the following 32 months she made a dramatic recovery with resolution of diplopia, blurring of vision, dysarthria, ataxia of gait, and bladder dysfunction as well as improvement in fatigue, heat tolerance, mood, sleep, libido, and cognitive functions. VEP studies, which were repeated in April of 1995 more than 2 1/2 years after the initiation of magnetic treatment, showed that P100 latencies remained normal in each eye providing objective documentation that continued application of these EMFs may sustain normal conduction in the damaged optic pathways over a long period of time. This is the first case report documenting the dramatic long term beneficial effects of treatment with picotesla range EMFs in a patient with MS.

  1. Toward an effective long-term strategy for preventing motor vehicle crashes and injuries.

    PubMed

    Mawson, Anthony R; Walley, E Kenneth

    2014-08-01

    Casualties due to motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) include some 40,000 deaths each year in the United States and one million deaths worldwide. One strategy that has been recommended for improving automobile safety is to lower speed limits and enforce them with speed cameras. However, motor vehicles can be hazardous even at low speeds whereas properly protected human beings can survive high-speed crashes without injury. Emphasis on changing driver behavior as the focus for road safety improvements has been largely unsuccessful; moreover, drivers today are increasingly distracted by secondary tasks such as cell phone use and texting. Indeed, the true limiting factor in vehicular safety is the capacity of human beings to sense and process information and to make rapid decisions. Given that dramatic reductions in injuries and deaths from MVCs have occurred over the past century due to improvements in safety technology, despite increases in the number of vehicles on the road and miles driven per vehicle, we propose that an effective long-term strategy for reducing MVC-related injury would be continued technological innovation in vehicle design, aimed at progressively removing the driver from routine operational decision-making. Once this is achieved, high rates of speed could be achieved on open highways, with minimal risk of crashes and injury to occupants and pedestrians. PMID:25116634

  2. Neural Stimulation Has a Long-Term Effect on Foreign Vocabulary Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Pasqualotto, Achille; Kobanbay, Begüm; Proulx, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of a foreign language is a challenging task that is becoming increasingly more important in the world nowadays. There is evidence suggesting that the frontal and temporal cortices are involved in language processing and comprehension, but it is still unknown whether foreign language acquisition recruits additional cortical areas in a causal manner. For the first time, we used transcranial random noise stimulation on the frontal and parietal brain areas, in order to compare its effect on the acquisition of unknown foreign words and a sham, or placebo, condition was also included. This type of noninvasive neural stimulation enhances cortical activity by boosting the spontaneous activity of neurons. Foreign vocabulary acquisition was tested both immediately and seven days after the stimulation. We found that stimulation on the posterior parietal, but not the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or sham stimulation, significantly improved the memory performance in the long term. These results suggest that the posterior parietal cortex is directly involved in acquisition of foreign vocabulary, thus extending the "linguistic network" to this area.

  3. Long-term effects of prenatal x-ray of human females: growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.B.; Tonascia, J.

    1981-09-01

    Experimental studies and studies of survivors of in-utero exposure to atomic bomb blasts have shown significant stunting of growth and mental retardation following these exposures. Central nervous system damage following very low dosage of x-ray at around the time of birth has also been observed in experimental animals. This long term followup study of 1458 human females exposed in-utero to diagnostic x-rays and of 1458 matched unexposed controls studied in Baltimore, Maryland, included measurements of height, weight, and school achievement. Women who had been exposed to x-rays in-utero were significantly shorter in their mid-twenties than were their matched, unexposed controls, even after adjustment for other social and economic factors. However, additional followup revealed that mothers of exposed women were also shorter than the control mothers. Short stature appeared to be a selective factor for x-ray during pregnancy (mostly pelvimetry, 1947 to 1952). Mothers' and daughters' heights were similarly correlated among exposed and controlled mother-daughter pairs, suggesting that the height differences between exposed daughters and their controls were due to these selective factors rather than to any direct effect of radiation on growth. Exposed women reported poorer school achievement than control women. However, except for a higher proportion of exposed women leaving school because of pregnancy, these measurements were no longer significantly different when rates were simultaneously adjusted for socioeconomic differences between exposed and control women.

  4. Toward an Effective Long-Term Strategy for Preventing Motor Vehicle Crashes and Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mawson, Anthony R.; Walley, E. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Casualties due to motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) include some 40,000 deaths each year in the United States and one million deaths worldwide. One strategy that has been recommended for improving automobile safety is to lower speed limits and enforce them with speed cameras. However, motor vehicles can be hazardous even at low speeds whereas properly protected human beings can survive high-speed crashes without injury. Emphasis on changing driver behavior as the focus for road safety improvements has been largely unsuccessful; moreover, drivers today are increasingly distracted by secondary tasks such as cell phone use and texting. Indeed, the true limiting factor in vehicular safety is the capacity of human beings to sense and process information and to make rapid decisions. Given that dramatic reductions in injuries and deaths from MVCs have occurred over the past century due to improvements in safety technology, despite increases in the number of vehicles on the road and miles driven per vehicle, we propose that an effective long-term strategy for reducing MVC-related injury would be continued technological innovation in vehicle design, aimed at progressively removing the driver from routine operational decision-making. Once this is achieved, high rates of speed could be achieved on open highways, with minimal risk of crashes and injury to occupants and pedestrians. PMID:25116634

  5. The long-term effects of undertaking a research course on clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Hazel, Rangeley; Joyce, Arthurs

    2004-03-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study was to examine the students perceptions of the long-term effectiveness of the English National Board (ENB) 870 course (Understanding and Application of Research). Method. Both quantitative and qualitative strategies examined four objectives focusing on: research utilisation, usefulness of the course in the "real world", factors affecting research use and student support. A total sample comprised all 315 students from 1995 to 1998. Data were collected by postal questionnaires and by two focus group interviews. The responding sample of nurses, midwives and health visitors, all with a minimum of one years practice since completing the course totaled 145, achieving a response rate of 45%. Results. Evidence identified that practitioners were using research at a variety of levels to inform everyday practice. The skills developed in the course had transferred well to real life practice and a critical, confident, proactive approach within and across professional boundaries was demonstrated. A generally supportive culture was identified in the workplace but a lack of time and staff had prevented optimum utilisation of the new skills. A much more positive approach to research-based care was reported and many respondents stated that they had become more autonomous, accountable and better practitioners. PMID:19038132

  6. Effects of Long-Term Dust Exposure on Human Respiratory System Health in Minqin County, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyu; Li, Sheng; Wang, Shigong; Shang, Kezheng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of long-term sand dust exposure on human respiratory health. Dust events break out frequently in Minqin County, northwest China, whereas Pingliang City, northwest China, is rarely influenced by dust events. Therefore, Minqin and Pingliang were selected as sand dust exposure region and control area, respectively. The incidence of respiratory system diseases and symptoms was determined through a structured respiratory health questionnaire (ATS-DLD-78-A) and personal interviews. The subjects comprised 728 farmers (Minqin, 424; Pingliang, 304) aged 40 years or older, who had nondocumented occupational history to industrial dust exposure. Prevalences (odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI]) of chronic rhinitis, chronic bronchitis, and chronic cough increased 9.6% (3.141, 1.776-5.555), 7.5% (2.468, 1.421-4.286), and 10.2% (1.787, 1.246-2.563) in Minqin comparison with Pingliang, respectively, and the differences were significant (p <.01).

  7. Effect of fertilization on the weediness of maize in a long-term field experiment.

    PubMed

    Kismányoky, A; Lehoczky, E; Kismányoky, T

    2006-01-01

    We carried our examination in a long-term fertilization field experiment in 2005. In the experiment we had opportunity to compare the weediness in NPK and NPK + FYM1 treatments, and we could study the effect of increasing N dosis on the weeds and maize. The bi-factorial trial was arranged in split plot design with three replications. The weed survey was made 25 days after seeding in the 27th of may. For the weed survey the Balázs-Ujvárosi method was applied. After the weed survey we collected all the weed species from the plots per 1-1 m2. We counted, mesured the fresh and dry matter weight of aerial shoots. We collected maize too, five pieces per plots. In the experiment were found 12 weed species, 9 annual: Abutilon theophrasti, Amaranthus chlorostachys, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Chenopodium album, Chenopodium hybridum, Echinochloa crus-galli, Polygonum lapathifolium, Xantium strumarium, Veronica hederi-folia, and 3 perennial: Cirsium arvense, Convolvulus arvensis, Lathyrus tuberosus. On the NPK plots the Ch. album, on NPK + FYM treatments the A. theophrasti was the first in order of the dominance. The biomass production of weeds in the NPK + FYM treatments were 3 times higher than in the only NPK treatments.

  8. Long term care financing in four OECD countries: fiscal burden and distributive effects.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Martin; Mayhew, Les; Rickayzen, Ben

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares long term care (LTC) systems in four OECD countries (UK, Japan, Sweden and Germany). In the UK, provision is means tested, so that out of pocket payments depend on levels of income, savings and assets. In Sweden, where the system is wholly tax-financed, provision is essentially free at the point of use. In Germany and Japan, provision is financed from recently introduced compulsory insurance schemes, although the details of how each scheme operates and the distributive consequences differ somewhat. The paper analyses the effects of importing the other three countries' systems for financing LTC into the UK, focussing on both the distributive consequences and the tax burden. It finds that the German system would not be an improvement on the current UK system, because it uses a regressive method of financing. Therefore, the discussion of possible alternatives to the present UK system could be restricted to a general tax-based system as used in Sweden or the compulsory insurance system as used in Japan. The results suggest that all three systems would imply increased taxes in the UK.

  9. Neighborhood effects on the long-term well-being of low-income adults.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Jens; Duncan, Greg J; Gennetian, Lisa A; Katz, Lawrence F; Kessler, Ronald C; Kling, Jeffrey R; Sanbonmatsu, Lisa

    2012-09-21

    Nearly 9 million Americans live in extreme-poverty neighborhoods, places that also tend to be racially segregated and dangerous. Yet, the effects on the well-being of residents of moving out of such communities into less distressed areas remain uncertain. Using data from Moving to Opportunity, a unique randomized housing mobility experiment, we found that moving from a high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhood leads to long-term (10- to 15-year) improvements in adult physical and mental health and subjective well-being, despite not affecting economic self-sufficiency. A 1-standard deviation decline in neighborhood poverty (13 percentage points) increases subjective well-being by an amount equal to the gap in subjective well-being between people whose annual incomes differ by $13,000--a large amount given that the average control group income is $20,000. Subjective well-being is more strongly affected by changes in neighborhood economic disadvantage than racial segregation, which is important because racial segregation has been declining since 1970, but income segregation has been increasing. PMID:22997331

  10. The effect of long-term working memory through personalization applied to free recall: uncurbing the primacy-effect enthusiasm.

    PubMed

    Guida, Alessandro; Gras, Doriane; Noel, Yvonnick; Le Bohec, Olivier; Quaireau, Christophe; Nicolas, Serge

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a personalization method (Guida, Tardieu, & Nicolas, European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 21: 862-896 2009) was applied to a free-recall task. Fifteen pairs of words, composed of an object and a location, were presented to 93 participants, who had to mentally associate each pair and subsequently recall the objects. A 30-s delay was introduced on half of the trials, the presentation rate was manipulated (5 or 10 s per item), and verbal and visuospatial working memory tests were administered to test for their effects on the serial curve. Two groups were constituted: a personalized group, for whom the locations were well-known places on their university campus, and a nonpersonalized group, for whom the locations did not refer to known places. Since personalization putatively operationalizes long-term working memory (Ericsson & Kintsch, Psychological Review, 102: 211-245 1995)-namely, the capacity to store information reliably and rapidly in long-term memory-and if we take a dual-store approach to memory, the personalization advantage would be expected to be greater for pre-recency than for recency items. Overall, the results were compatible with long-term working memory theory. They contribute to validating the personalization method as a methodology to characterize the contribution of long-term memory storage to performance in working memory tasks.

  11. Effects of high power microwave pulses on synaptic transmission and long term potentiation in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Doyle, Joanne; Stuck, Bruce E; Murphy, Michael R

    2003-04-01

    Effects of short, extremely high power microwave pulses (EHPP) on neuronal network function were explored by electrophysiological techniques in the isolated rat hippocampal slice model. Population spikes (PS) in the CA1 area were evoked by repeated stimulation (1 per 30 s) of the Schaffer collateral pathway. A brief tetanus (2 s at 50 Hz) was used to induce long term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. In three different series of experiments with a total of 160 brain slices, the EHPP irradiation was performed before, during, or after the tetanus. The EHPP carrier frequency was 9.3 GHz, the pulse width and repetition rate were from 0.5 to 2 micros and from 0.5 to 10 Hz, respectively, and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) in brain slices reached up to 500 MW/kg. Microwave heating of the preparation ranged from 0.5 degrees C (at 0.3 kW/kg time average SAR) to 6 degrees C (at 3.6 kW/kg). The experiments established that the only effect caused by EHPP exposure within the studied range of parameters was a transient and fully reversible decrease in the PS amplitude. Recovery took no more than a few minutes after the cessation of exposure and return to the initial temperature. This effect's features were characteristic of an ordinary thermal response: it was proportional to the temperature rise but not to any specific parameter of EHPP, and it could also be induced by a continuous wave (CW) irradiation or conventional heating. Irradiation did not affect the ability of neurons to develop LTP in response to tetanus or to retain the potentiated state that was induced before irradiation. No lasting or delayed effects of EHPP were observed. The results are consistent with the thermal mechanism of EHPP action and thus far provided no indication of EHPP-specific effects on neuronal function.

  12. A long-term stable equilibrium for synchronous binaries including tides and the byorp effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2011-04-01

    We present theoretical evidence for the existence of a long-term stable equilibrium solution for synchronous binary asteroids accounting for mutual body tides, the binary YORP (BYORP) effect and dynamics. Synchronous binary asteroid systems consist of a rapidly spinning primary and a tidally-locked secondary, analogous to the Earth-Moon system. Tidal evolution of these systems leads to growth in the semi-major axis. Evolution from the BYORP effect can lead to both contraction and growth of the semi-major axis. There are two scenarios for joint evolution of a synchronous binary when both effects are considered: expansive and opposing evolution. During joint expansive evolution, both effects grow the semi-major axis. The system will either grow to the Hill sphere and disrupt if tidally dominated, or the mutual orbit will be de-stabilized due to runaway eccentricity growth if BYORP dominated. During joint opposing evolution, tidal and BYORP evolution act to evolve the system to a stable equilibrium. The location of this equilibrium to first order depends on just the tidal parameters, specific tidal dissipation number Q and the tidal Love number k, as well as the BYORP shape coefficient. If the observed population of small (0.1 - 10 km diameter), synchronous binaries are assumed to be in this static configuration, then our analysis shows that a monolithic geophysical model is not satisfactory, whereas the ``rubble pile'' model proposed by Goldreich & Sari (2009) is sufficient to prevent runaway eccentricity growth. The existence of this equilibrium and a secondary shape model built from observations enables direct study of asteroid geophysics through tidal theory. The existence of this equilibrium would be confirmed by a lack of migration in observational tests for the BYORP effect. Goldreich, P. & R. Sari, ApJ, 691:54-60 (2009)

  13. Sarin experiences in Japan: acute toxicity and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, N; Morita, H; Nakajima, T

    2006-11-01

    Two terrorist attacks with the nerve agent Sarin affected citizens in Matsumoto and Tokyo, Japan in 1994 and 1995, killing 19 and injuring more the 6000. Sarin, a very potent organophosphate nerve agent, inhibits acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity within the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems. Acute and long-term Sarin effects upon humans were well documented in these two events. Sarin gas inhalation caused instantaneous death by respiratory arrest in 4 victims in Matsumoto. In Tokyo, two died in station yards and another ten victims died in hospitals within a few hours to 3 months after poisoning. Six victims with serum ChE below 20% of the lowest normal were resuscitated from cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) or coma with generalized convulsion. Five recovered completely and one remained in vegetative state due to anoxic brain damage. EEG abnormalities persisted for up to 5 years. Miosis and copious secretions from the respiratory and GI tracts (muscarinic effects) were common in severely to slightly affected victims. Weakness and twitches of muscles (nicotinic effects) appeared in severely affected victims. Neuropathy and ataxia were observed in small number (less than 10%) of victims, which findings disappeared between 3 days and 3 months. Leukocytosis and high serum CK levels were common. Hyperglycemia, ketonuria, low serum triglyceride, hypopotassemia were observed in severely affected victims, which abnormalities were attributed to damage of the adrenal medulla. Oximes, atropine sulphate, diazepam and ample intravenous infusion were effective treatments. Pralidoxime iodide IV reversed cholinesterase and symptoms quickly even if administered 6 h after exposure. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was less than 8% after 5 years. However, psychological symptoms continue in victims of both incidents. In summary, both potent toxicity and quick recovery from critical ill conditions were prominent features. Conventional therapies proved effective in

  14. Early and later adoptions have different long-term effects on male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Barbazanges, A; Vallée, M; Mayo, W; Day, J; Simon, H; Le Moal, M; Maccari, S

    1996-12-01

    Both prenatal and postnatal environmental factors exert complex influences on the development of an organism. Previous studies have demonstrated that intervening events during the prenatal period can have different and even opposite effects than similar intervening events occurring in the postnatal period. We have reported previously that early postnatal adoption prevents prenatal stress-induced long-term impairments in glucocorticoid feedback. To characterize further the effects of adoptions during the postnatal period, adoptions have been performed at different times, and the effect on the postnatal ontogeny of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis has been investigated. Adoptions were performed during the first hour after birth (A1) and on the fifth (A5) and twelfth (A12) days after birth. At each of these times, other litters (S1, S5, S12) underwent a "separation" controlling for the 1 min maternal separation necessary for the adoptions. Locomotor behavior, cognition, and stress-induced corticosterone secretion in the adult male offspring have been examined, along with maternal behavior. Early adoption (A1) was found to prevent the prolonged stress-induced secretion of corticosterone evident in early separated (S1) offspring. Similarly, A1 rats demonstrated lower novelty-induced locomotion and improved recognition performance in a Y-maze compared to S1 offspring. However, later adoption (A5, A12) prolonged stress-induced corticosterone secretion, increased the locomotor response to novelty, and disrupted cognitive performance in the offspring. Only the early adoption increased maternal licking behavior, a factor that may have a protective effect on the pups. Taken together, these results suggest that the same postnatal manipulation realized at different times can induce different, or even opposite, effects on the behavioral and neuroendocrine characteristics of the adult offspring. PMID:8922434

  15. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors.

  16. Long-term effects of timber harvesting on hemicellulolytic microbial populations in coniferous forest soils.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hilary T C; Maas, Kendra R; Wilhelm, Roland C; Mohn, William W

    2016-02-01

    Forest ecosystems need to be sustainably managed, as they are major reservoirs of biodiversity, provide important economic resources and modulate global climate. We have a poor knowledge of populations responsible for key biomass degradation processes in forest soils and the effects of forest harvesting on these populations. Here, we investigated the effects of three timber-harvesting methods, varying in the degree of organic matter removal, on putatively hemicellulolytic bacterial and fungal populations 10 or more years after harvesting and replanting. We used stable-isotope probing to identify populations that incorporated (13)C from labeled hemicellulose, analyzing (13)C-enriched phospholipid fatty acids, bacterial 16 S rRNA genes and fungal ITS regions. In soil microcosms, we identified 104 bacterial and 52 fungal hemicellulolytic operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Several of these OTUs are affiliated with taxa not previously reported to degrade hemicellulose, including the bacterial genera Methylibium, Pelomonas and Rhodoferax, and the fungal genera Cladosporium, Pseudeurotiaceae, Capronia, Xenopolyscytalum and Venturia. The effect of harvesting on hemicellulolytic populations was evaluated based on in situ bacterial and fungal OTUs. Harvesting treatments had significant but modest long-term effects on relative abundances of hemicellulolytic populations, which differed in strength between two ecozones and between soil layers. For soils incubated in microcosms, prior harvesting treatments did not affect the rate of incorporation of hemicellulose carbon into microbial biomass. In six ecozones across North America, distributions of the bacterial hemicellulolytic OTUs were similar, whereas distributions of fungal ones differed. Our work demonstrates that diverse taxa in soil are hemicellulolytic, many of which are differentially affected by the impact of harvesting on environmental conditions. However, the hemicellulolytic capacity of soil communities appears

  17. Long-term effects of timber harvesting on hemicellulolytic microbial populations in coniferous forest soils.

    PubMed

    Leung, Hilary T C; Maas, Kendra R; Wilhelm, Roland C; Mohn, William W

    2016-02-01

    Forest ecosystems need to be sustainably managed, as they are major reservoirs of biodiversity, provide important economic resources and modulate global climate. We have a poor knowledge of populations responsible for key biomass degradation processes in forest soils and the effects of forest harvesting on these populations. Here, we investigated the effects of three timber-harvesting methods, varying in the degree of organic matter removal, on putatively hemicellulolytic bacterial and fungal populations 10 or more years after harvesting and replanting. We used stable-isotope probing to identify populations that incorporated (13)C from labeled hemicellulose, analyzing (13)C-enriched phospholipid fatty acids, bacterial 16 S rRNA genes and fungal ITS regions. In soil microcosms, we identified 104 bacterial and 52 fungal hemicellulolytic operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Several of these OTUs are affiliated with taxa not previously reported to degrade hemicellulose, including the bacterial genera Methylibium, Pelomonas and Rhodoferax, and the fungal genera Cladosporium, Pseudeurotiaceae, Capronia, Xenopolyscytalum and Venturia. The effect of harvesting on hemicellulolytic populations was evaluated based on in situ bacterial and fungal OTUs. Harvesting treatments had significant but modest long-term effects on relative abundances of hemicellulolytic populations, which differed in strength between two ecozones and between soil layers. For soils incubated in microcosms, prior harvesting treatments did not affect the rate of incorporation of hemicellulose carbon into microbial biomass. In six ecozones across North America, distributions of the bacterial hemicellulolytic OTUs were similar, whereas distributions of fungal ones differed. Our work demonstrates that diverse taxa in soil are hemicellulolytic, many of which are differentially affected by the impact of harvesting on environmental conditions. However, the hemicellulolytic capacity of soil communities appears

  18. Effects of long-term feeding of the polyphenols resveratrol and kaempferol in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Montero, Mayte; de la Fuente, Sergio; Fonteriz, Rosalba I; Moreno, Alfredo; Alvarez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the intake of antioxidant polyphenols such as resveratrol and others on survival and different parameters of life quality has been a matter of debate in the last years. We have studied here the effects of the polyphenols resveratrol and kaempferol added to the diet in a murine model undergoing long-term hypercaloric diet. Using 50 mice for each condition, we have monitored weight, survival, biochemical parameters such as blood glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and aspartate aminotransferase, neuromuscular coordination measured with the rotarod test and morphological aspect of stained sections of liver and heart histological samples. Our data show that mice fed since they are 3-months-old with hypercaloric diet supplemented with any of these polyphenols reduced their weight by about 5-7% with respect to the controls fed only with hypercaloric diet. We also observed that mice fed with any of the polyphenols had reduced levels of glucose, insulin and cholesterol, and better marks in the rotarod test, but only after 1 year of treatment, that is, during senescence. No effect was observed in the rest of the parameters studied. Furthermore, although treatment with hypercaloric diets induced large changes in the pattern of gene expression in liver, we found no significant changes in gene expression induced by the presence of any of the polyphenols. Thus, our data indicate that addition of resveratrol or kaempferol to mice food produces an initial decrease in weight in mice subjected to hypercaloric diet, but beneficial effects in other parameters such as blood glucose, insulin and cholesterol, and neuromuscular coordination, only appear after prolonged treatments. PMID:25386805

  19. The effect of the Earth's oblateness on the long-term dispersion of debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenberg, J.; Broucke, R. A.

    1993-08-01

    A model for an analytical prediction of the space debris long-term dispersion, is suggested. The main idea is to compute the variation of the secular orbital elements, assuming a weak explosion as the initial conditions. The instantaneous changes in the orbital elements due to an explosion are evaluated by the Poisson's method for small impulses. Then, the sensitivity of the secular precessing ellipse to these small impulses, is computed. These are combined to form a sensitivity matrix which formulates the long-term dispersion as a linear mapping of the initially perturbed state vector.

  20. Long-term effects of differential early rearing in rhesus macaques: behavioral reactivity in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Christopher A; Pierre, Peter J; Haddad, Tyler; Bice, Christina; Suomi, Stephen J; Grant, Kathleen A; Friedman, David P; Bennett, Allyson J

    2012-07-01

    Adverse early experiences are associated with a range of deleterious health outcomes in humans, including higher risk for affective disorders. Studies using a long-standing model of nonhuman primate model of early adversity have demonstrated that nursery-reared (NR) monkeys exhibit alterations in multiple aspects of biobehavioral development; however, few studies have evaluated the persistence of socioaffective behavioral changes through adulthood. We evaluated the effects of early rearing experience on adult animals' response to a well-validated assessment of anxiety-like behavior, the human intruder paradigm (HIP). We tested 22 rhesus monkeys who were either nursery-reared (NR) or reared with their mothers (mother-reared; MR). NR monkeys were inhibited in their behavior compared to MR monkeys, with reduced locomotion and exploratory behaviors. NR animals showed a marginal increase in freezing. Together these findings demonstrate that the consequences of differential infant rearing experience on socioaffective behavior persist into adulthood, with evidence of greater inhibition in NR monkeys.

  1. Long-term effects on nitrogen and benthic fauna of extreme weather events: Examples from two Swedish headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, Stefan; Grandin, Ulf; Stendera, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is expected to cause an increased frequency of extreme events such as heavy floods and major storms. Such stochastic events have an immediate impact on surface water quality, but the long-term effects are largely unknown. In this study, we assess long-term monitoring data from two Swedish headwater catchments affected by extreme weather events. At one site, where nitrogen effects in soil water, groundwater, and stream water were studied after storm-felling and subsequent forest dieback from bark beetle attack, long-term (> 5 years) but relatively modest (generally <1 mg L⁻¹) increases in ammonium (NH(4)-N) and nitrate (NO(3)-N) concentrations were observed in the various aqueous media. At the other site, where effects on benthic fauna were studied in a stream impacted by extreme geophysical disturbances caused by rainstorm-induced flashflood, only short-term (1 year) effects were revealed both regarding diversity and composition of species.

  2. Long-term effects on nitrogen and benthic fauna of extreme weather events: Examples from two Swedish headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, Stefan; Grandin, Ulf; Stendera, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is expected to cause an increased frequency of extreme events such as heavy floods and major storms. Such stochastic events have an immediate impact on surface water quality, but the long-term effects are largely unknown. In this study, we assess long-term monitoring data from two Swedish headwater catchments affected by extreme weather events. At one site, where nitrogen effects in soil water, groundwater, and stream water were studied after storm-felling and subsequent forest dieback from bark beetle attack, long-term (> 5 years) but relatively modest (generally <1 mg L⁻¹) increases in ammonium (NH(4)-N) and nitrate (NO(3)-N) concentrations were observed in the various aqueous media. At the other site, where effects on benthic fauna were studied in a stream impacted by extreme geophysical disturbances caused by rainstorm-induced flashflood, only short-term (1 year) effects were revealed both regarding diversity and composition of species. PMID:25403970

  3. Long-Term Effects of a Universal Family Intervention: Mediation Through Parent-Adolescent Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M.; Wong, J.J.; Gonzales, N.A.; Dumka, L.E.; Millsap, R.; Coxe, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This randomized trial of a family-focused preventive intervention for Mexican American middle schoolers examined internalizing, externalizing, and substance use outcomes in late adolescence, five years after completing the intervention. Parent-adolescent conflict was tested as a mediator of these effects. The role of parent and adolescent acculturation in these pathways was also examined. Method 498 7th grade adolescents and their primary female caregivers were randomized to receive either a 9-week, multi-component intervention or a brief workshop control group. Assessments were conducted at pre-test, two year follow-up (9th grade), and five year follow-up (when most participants were in the 12th grade). Results The Bridges program significantly reduced mother-adolescent conflict measured in the 9th grade, with conflict mediating program effects on internalizing and externalizing symptoms, adolescent substance use, and diagnosed internalizing disorder in late adolescence. Mother and child acculturation were both significantly predictive of late adolescence outcomes. Contrary to hypotheses, neither mother nor child acculturation emerged as a significant predictor of mother-adolescent conflict, and the interaction of mother and adolescent acculturation was similarly not related to mother-adolescent conflict. Intervention effects were largely consistent across different levels of acculturation. Conclusions These findings provide support for the efficacy of family-focused intervention during early adolescence, both in reducing mental health problems and substance use in the long term, as well as in impacting parent-adolescent conflict processes that appear to play an important role in the development of later adjustment problems. PMID:24730357

  4. Hematopoietic effects of benzene inhalation assessed by long-term bone marrow culture.

    PubMed

    Abraham, N G

    1996-12-01

    The strong and long-lasting hematotoxic effect after benzene exposure in vivo (300 ppm, 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 2 weeks) was assessed in mice with bone marrow cells grown in long-term bone marrow culture (LTBMC). Bone marrow cultures initiated 1 day after the last benzene exposure did not produce adequate numbers of hematopoietic cells over 3 weeks, and, in most cases, no erythroid or myeloid clonogenic cells could be recovered. The adherent cell layer of these cultures had a lowered capacity for supporting in vitro hematopoiesis after the second seeding with normal bone marrow cells compared with control cultures. Two weeks after the last benzene exposure, body weight, hematocrit, bone marrow cellularity, and committed hematopoietic progenitor content (BFU-E and CFU-GM) were regenerated to normal or subnormal values, whereas hematopoiesis in LTBMC was very poor. Over 8 weeks, little or no significant committed progenitor production was observed. Treatment of mice exposed to benzene with hemin (three doses of 3 micrograms/g bw i.v. over 2 weeks for a total dose of 9 micrograms/g) partially overcame the toxic effect of benzene on the hematopoietic system as measured by the LTBMC method. Cultures from mice treated with hemin had a modest recovery of BFU-E and CFU-GM clonogenic potential after 5 to 6 weeks in LTBMC. In contrast, little or no recovery was obtained for the adherent cell layer clonogenic capacity, even after hemin treatment. These results clearly indicate a strong, long-lasting toxic effect on the bone marrow stroma and a limited recovery of hematopoietic potential by clonogenic cells of the nonadherent population after in vivo hemin treatment.

  5. Long-term effects of castration on the skeleton of male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Kessler, Matthew J; Wang, Qian; Cerroni, Antonietta M; Grynpas, Marc D; Gonzalez Velez, Olga D; Rawlins, Richard G; Ethun, Kelly F; Wimsatt, Jeffrey H; Kensler, Terry B; Pritzker, Kenneth P H

    2016-01-01

    While osteopenia (OPE) and osteoporosis (OPO) have been studied in various species of aging nonhuman primates and extensively in ovariectomized rhesus and cynomolgus macaques, there is virtually no information on the effects of castration on the skeleton of male nonhuman primates. Most information on castrated male primates comes from a few studies on the skeletons of eunuchs. This report used a subset of the Caribbean Primate Research Center's (CPRC) Cayo Santiago (CS) rhesus macaque skeletal collection to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the bone mineral density (BMD) of castrated and age-matched intact males and, thereby, determine the long-term effects of castration (orchidectomy) on bone. Lumbar vertebrae, femora, and crania were evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA or DXA) and digital radiography augmented, when fresh tissues were available, with autoradiography and histology. Results confirmed physical examinations of long bones that castration causes changes in the skeleton of male rhesus macaques similar to those found in eunuchs, including OPE and OPO of the vertebrae and femora, thinning of the skull, and vertebral fractures and kyphosis of the spine more severe than that caused by normal aging alone. Also like eunuchs, some castrated CS male rhesus monkeys had a longer life span than intact males or females. Based on these results and the effects of castration on other tissues and organs of eunuchs, on behavior, hormone profiles and possibly on cognition and visual perception of human and nonhuman primates, and other mammals, castrated male rhesus macaques should be used with caution for laboratory studies and should be considered a separate category from intact males. Despite these caveats, the castrated male rhesus macaque should make an excellent animal model in which to test hormone replacement therapies for boys and men orchidectomized for testicular and prostate cancer.

  6. Effects of myelotoxic agents on cytokine production in murine long-term bone marrow cultures.

    PubMed

    Hauser, S P; Allewelt, M C; Lipschitz, D A

    1998-01-01

    In long-term bone marrow cultures we studied the effect of the addition of the myelotoxic agents methotrexate (MTX) and ceftazidime (CEF) on the kinetics of cytokine production in the supernatant (SN) and on mRNA expression in the adherent stromal layer. In response to a medium change, a prompt and significant increase in colony-stimulating activity (CSA) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) concentrations in the SN occurred, peaking 12 h later. Two macrophage colony-stimulating factors (M-CSF) mRNA of 23 kb and 4 kb were identified. In response to the medium change, the 4.0-kb transcript increased significantly six h later. The 2.3-kb transcript expression was stronger than the 4-kb mRNA but did not cycle with medium change. At medium change, IL-6 mRNA was only minimally expressed; then a prompt increase occurred, which peaked six h later. The addition of 500 mg/ml (=915 microM) CEF to the culture caused a dose-dependent suppression of CSA and IL-6 supernatant concentrations and IL-6 and M-CSF mRNA expression. By contrast, 1 microM MTX had minimal effect on cytokine concentrations in the SN following medium change. mRNA expression was, however, suppressed. These results provide insights into the possible mechanisms whereby cytokines lead to increased myeloid cell proliferation following medium change. We also demonstrate that two myelotoxic agents have different effects on cytokine production. This information could be of value in developing rational approaches to the therapeutic use of cytokines in drug-induced neutropenia.

  7. Cascading effects of long-term land-use changes on plant traits and ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Laliberté, Etienne; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2012-01-01

    There is much concern that the functioning of ecosystems will be affected by human-induced changes in biodiversity, of which land-use change is the most important driver. However, changes in biodiversity may be only one of many pathways through which land use alters ecosystem functioning, and its importance relative to other pathways remains unclear. In particular, although biodiversity-ecosystem function research has focused primarily on grasslands, the increases in agricultural inputs (e.g., fertilization, irrigation) and grazing pressure that drive change in grasslands worldwide have been largely ignored. Here we show that long-term (27-year) manipulations of soil resource availability and sheep grazing intensity caused marked, consistent shifts in grassland plant functional composition and diversity, with cascading (i.e., causal chains of) direct, indirect, and interactive effects on multiple ecosystem functions. Resource availability exerted dominant control over above-ground net primary production (ANPP), both directly and indirectly via shifts in plant functional composition. Importantly, the effects of plant functional diversity and grazing intensity on ANPP shifted from negative to positive as agricultural inputs increased, providing strong evidence that soil resource availability modulates the impacts of plant diversity and herbivory on primary production. These changes in turn altered litter decomposition and, ultimately, soil carbon sequestration, highlighting the relevance of ANPP as a key integrator of ecosystem functioning. Our study reveals how human alterations of bottom-up (resources) and top-down (herbivory) forces together interact to control the functioning of grazing systems, the most extensive land use on Earth.

  8. Long-term antihypertensive effect of a soluble cocoa fiber product in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Vallinas, Sandra; Miguel, Marta; Aleixandre, Amaya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Methods This study evaluates the antihypertensive effect of long-term intake of a soluble cocoa fiber product (SCFP). Different doses of SCFP were evaluated (200, 400, and 800 mg/kg/day) and a dose of 800 mg/kg/day of beta-glucan 0.75 (BETA-G) was used as a standard fiber. Water, a neutral vehicle, was used as negative control, and 50 mg/kg/day captopril was used as positive control. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured weekly by the tail cuff method. Body weight, food, and liquid intake were also registered weekly in the rats from 10 to 24 weeks of life. Glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels; redox status; and the angiotensin-converting enzyme activity were also studied in the plasma samples of these animals. Results Throughout the 10 weeks of treatment, captopril and SCFP (400 mg/kg/day) demonstrated blood pressure lowering effects in the spontaneously hypertensive rats (p<0.05; n=8). Paradoxically, neither the highest dose (800 mg/kg/day) of SCFP decreased SBP nor 800 mg/kg/day BETA-G (p>0.05; n=8). When the corresponding antihypertensive treatment, was disrupted the SBP values of the 400 mg/kg/day SCFP treated animals returned to control values (p>0.05; n=8). In addition, the SCFP significantly decreased (p<0.05; n=4) the glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels and also the liver and plasma malondaldehyde levels. Moreover, the SCFP slightly increased the reduced glutathione levels in the liver. Conclusion The SCFP could be used to control the blood pressure of hypertensive subjects for a long period of time and could improve metabolic complications associated to cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27211316

  9. Prior contest experience exerts a long-term influence on subsequent winner and loser effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Animals are capable of using information from recent experiences to modify subsequent behavioral responses. Animals' ability or propensity to modify their behavior in the light of new information has repeatedly been shown to correlate with, or be influenced by, either their intrinsic competitive ability or their dominance experience - an influence which can be long-lasting. Using a mangrove killifish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, as the study organism, we investigated whether and if so how the effect of a winning or a losing experience one day prior to a dyadic contest was modulated by both competitive ability measured two months previously and a winning or losing experience forced on the contestants one month previously. Results Winning/losing experience forced on the fish one month previously affected how they utilized information from their winning/losing experience one day before Test Day: Individuals that were randomly assigned a losing experience one month previously were more susceptible to the influence of their 1-day winning/losing experience than those assigned a winning experience. Competitive ability measured two months previously, winning/losing experience from one month previously and the winning/losing experience received one day previously all significantly influenced the fish's contest behaviors on Test Day, although only 2-month competitive ability significantly influenced escalation duration, indicating that it was still a good index for the fish's competitive ability two months later. Conclusions These results suggest that the value to the fish of information from a recent win or loss depends on the outcome of their past contests and show that contest experience has a long-term effect on contest behavior. PMID:22051441

  10. Linking flood frequency to long-term water balance: Incorporating effects of seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, M.; Blöschl, G.; Merz, R.; Gutknecht, D.

    2005-06-01

    Derived flood frequency models can be used to study climate and land use change effects on the flood frequency curve. Intra-annual (i.e., within year) climate variability strongly impacts upon the flood frequency characteristics in two ways: in a direct way through the seasonal variability of storm characteristics and indirectly through the seasonality of rainfall and evapotranspiration which then affect the antecedent catchment conditions for individual storm events. In this paper we propose a quasi-analytical derived flood frequency model that is able to account for both types of seasonalities. The model treats individual events separately. It consists of a rainfall model with seasonally varying parameters. Increased flood peaks, as compared to block rainfall, due to random within-storm rainfall time patterns are represented by a factor that is a function of the ratio of storm duration and catchment response time. Event runoff coefficients are allowed to vary seasonally and include a random component. Their statistical characteristics are derived from long-term water balance simulations. The components of the derived flood frequency model are integrated in probability space to derive monthly flood frequency curves. These are then combined into annual flood frequency curves. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations using parameters that are typical of Austrian catchments indicate that the approximations used here are appropriate. We perform sensitivity analyses to explore the effects of the interaction of rainfall and antecedent soil moisture seasonalities on the flood frequency curve. When the two seasonalities are in phase, there is resonance, which increases the flood frequency curve dramatically. We are also able to isolate the contributions of individual months to the annual flood frequency curve. Monthly flood frequency curves cross over for the parameters chosen here, as extreme floods tend to mainly occur in summer while less extreme floods may occur

  11. Effects of voluntary exercise on hippocampal long-term potentiation in morphine-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Miladi-Gorji, H; Rashidy-Pour, A; Fathollahi, Y; Semnanian, S; Jadidi, M

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of voluntary exercise on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in morphine-dependent rats. The rats were randomly distributed into the saline-sedentary (Sal/Sed), the dependent-sedentary, the saline-exercise (Sal/Exc), and the dependent-exercise (D/Exc) groups. The Sal/Exc and the D/Exc groups were allowed to freely exercise in a running wheel for 10 days. The Sal/Sed and the morphine-sedentary groups were kept sedentary for the same extent of time. Morphine (10 mg/kg) was injected bi-daily (12 h interval) during 10 days of voluntary exercise. On day 11, 2h after the morphine injection, the in vivo LTP in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus was examined. The theta frequency primed bursts were delivered to the perforant path for induction of LTP. Population spike (PS) amplitude and the field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSP) slope were measured as indices of increase in synaptic efficacy. Chronic morphine increased the mean basal EPSP, and augmented PS-LTP. Exercise significantly increased the mean baseline EPSP and PS responses, and augmented PS-LTP in both saline and morphine-treated groups. Moreover, the increase of PS-LTP in the morphine-exercise group was greater (22.5%), but not statistically significant, than that of the Sal/Exc group. These results may imply an additive effect between exercise and morphine on mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Such an interaction between exercise and chronic morphine may influence cognitive functions in opiate addicts.

  12. Long-term effects of organized violence on young Middle Eastern refugees' mental health.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Edith

    2008-11-01

    The pre- and post-displacement factors associated with psychological problems among young refugees are not clear. From the existing research it appears that refugee children and adolescents are vulnerable to the effects of pre-migration exposure to trauma, but the long-term effects of such exposure are mediated by certain risk and protective factors at the individual, family and community level. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of traumatic experiences before emigration, as well as social life after immigration, on the mental health of young Middle Eastern refugees 8-9 years after immigration into Denmark. The study group comprises 131 young refugees (76 girls and 55 boys; mean age 15.3 years) from 67 families. They were assessed in 2000-2001 as part of a follow-up study of 311 children, who in 1992-1993 were consecutively registered in Denmark as asylum seekers with at least one parent. Predictors of more externalizing behaviour were: witnessing attack on others after arrival, more schools attended, less attending school or work, lower mother's education in the home country and lower age. Predictors of more internalizing behaviour were: numbers of types of traumatic events before arrival, numbers of types of stressful events after arrival, and numbers of types of experiences of discrimination, lower mother's education in the home country, fewer Danish friends, not Muslim or Christian religion, less Danish proficiency and female gender. It is concluded that aspects of social life in Denmark, including mother's education and indicators of adaptation, as well as a stressful life context in exile, including discrimination, predicted psychological problems 8-9 years after arrival, more than traumatic experiences before arrival. Thus, the prevention of psychopathology in young refugees depends to a large extent on the political will to make provision for the necessary changes regarding reception and treatment of refugees. PMID:18755530

  13. Does repetitive Ritalin injection produce long-term effects on SD female adolescent rats?

    PubMed

    Lee, Min J; Yang, Pamela B; Wilcox, Victor T; Burau, Keith D; Swann, Alan C; Dafny, Nachum

    2009-09-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD), or Ritalin, is a psychostimulant that is prescribed for an extended period of time to children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Adolescence is a time of critical brain maturation and development, and the drug exposure during this time could lead to lasting changes in the brain that endure into the adulthood. Circadian rhythms are 24 h rhythms of physiological processes that are synchronized by the master-clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, to keep the body stable in a changing environment. The aim of present study is to observe the effect of repeated MPD exposure on the locomotor diurnal rhythm activity patterns of female adolescent Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats using the open field assay. 31 female adolescent SD rats were divided into four groups: control, 0.6 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, and 10 mg/kg MPD group. On experimental day 1, all groups were given an injection of saline. On experimental days 2-7, animals were injected once a day with either saline, 0.6 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, or 10 mg/kg MPD, and experimental days 8-10 were the washout period. A re-challenge injection was given to each animal on experimental day 11 with the similar dose as the experimental days 2-7. The locomotor movements were counted by the computerized animal activity monitoring system. The data were analyzed statistically to find out whether the diurnal rhythm activity patterns were altered. The obtained data showed that repeated administrations of 2.5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg MPD were able to change the locomotor diurnal rhythm patterns, which suggests that these MPD doses exerts long-term effects.

  14. Long-term effects of organized violence on young Middle Eastern refugees' mental health.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Edith

    2008-11-01

    The pre- and post-displacement factors associated with psychological problems among young refugees are not clear. From the existing research it appears that refugee children and adolescents are vulnerable to the effects of pre-migration exposure to trauma, but the long-term effects of such exposure are mediated by certain risk and protective factors at the individual, family and community level. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of traumatic experiences before emigration, as well as social life after immigration, on the mental health of young Middle Eastern refugees 8-9 years after immigration into Denmark. The study group comprises 131 young refugees (76 girls and 55 boys; mean age 15.3 years) from 67 families. They were assessed in 2000-2001 as part of a follow-up study of 311 children, who in 1992-1993 were consecutively registered in Denmark as asylum seekers with at least one parent. Predictors of more externalizing behaviour were: witnessing attack on others after arrival, more schools attended, less attending school or work, lower mother's education in the home country and lower age. Predictors of more internalizing behaviour were: numbers of types of traumatic events before arrival, numbers of types of stressful events after arrival, and numbers of types of experiences of discrimination, lower mother's education in the home country, fewer Danish friends, not Muslim or Christian religion, less Danish proficiency and female gender. It is concluded that aspects of social life in Denmark, including mother's education and indicators of adaptation, as well as a stressful life context in exile, including discrimination, predicted psychological problems 8-9 years after arrival, more than traumatic experiences before arrival. Thus, the prevention of psychopathology in young refugees depends to a large extent on the political will to make provision for the necessary changes regarding reception and treatment of refugees.

  15. Long-term effects of tetanus toxoid inoculation on the demography and life expectancy of the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Matthew J; Hernández Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G; Ruiz-Lambrides, Angelina; Delgado, Diana L; Sabat, Alberto M

    2015-02-01

    Tetanus was a major cause of mortality in the free-ranging population of rhesus monkeys on Cayo Santiago prior to 1985 when the entire colony was given its first dose of tetanus toxoid. The immediate reduction in mortality that followed tetanus toxoid inoculation (TTI) has been documented, but the long-term demographic effects of eliminating tetanus infections have not. This study uses the Cayo Santiago demographic database to construct comparative life tables 12 years before, and 12 years after, TTI. Life tables and matrix projection models are used to test for differences in: (i) survival among all individuals as well as among social groups, (ii) long-term fitness of the population, (iii) age distribution, (iv) reproductive value, and (v) life expectancy. A retrospective life table response experiment (LTRE) was performed to determine which life cycle transition contributed most to observed changes in long-term fitness of the population post-TTI. Elimination of clinical tetanus infections through mass inoculation improved the health and well-being of the monkeys. It also profoundly affected the population by increasing survivorship and long-term fitness, decreasing the differences in survival rates among social groups, shifting the population's age distribution towards older individuals, and increasing reproductive value and life expectancy. These findings are significant because they demonstrate the long-term effects of eradicating a major cause of mortality at a single point in time on survival, reproduction, and overall demography of a naturalistic population of primates.

  16. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Cumulative Finals on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanna, Maya M.; Brack, Amy S. Badura; Finken, Laura L.

    2013-01-01

    In two experiments, we examined the benefits of cumulative and noncumulative finals on students' short- and long-term course material retention. In Experiment 1, we examined results from course content exams administered immediately after course finals. Course sections including cumulative finals had higher content exam scores than sections…

  17. The Effect of Long-Term Outcome Studies on the Therapy of Schizophrenia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Jay

    1989-01-01

    Claims since schizophrenia is reversible, professions involved in social control and those doing therapy face new responsibilities. Notes therapists can approach psychotic symptoms expecting the person to become normal. Describes goal as being to help people past periods of acute disturbance without doing them long-term harm. (Author/ABL)

  18. An Evaluation of the Long-Term Effectiveness of a Women's Leadership Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericksen, Kirsten S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the Women's Institute for Leadership Development (W.I.L.D.) program to determine the immediate and long-term impact as defined by the alumni program participants from three cohorts (2008, 2005, 2003). A secondary focus of the career transition decision-making of recent W.I.L.D. participants was also…

  19. Bullying: Effective Strategies for Long-Term Improvement. School Concerns Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, David; Arora, Tiny; Sharp, Sonia

    This book focuses on issues related to bullying in school, offering guidance on how to deal successfully with the problem long-term. Based on 10 years of research on bullying, the book examines how bullying begins, the impact of bullying on the victimized child, and how the extent of bullying in schools can be reliably measured and assessed. It…

  20. Long-Term Effects of Risperidone in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Placebo Discontinuation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troost, Pieter W.; Lahuis, Bertine E.; Steenhuis, Mark-Peter; Ketelaars, Cees E. J.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; van Engeland, Herman; Scahill, Lawrence; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The short-term benefit of risperidone in ameliorating severe disruptive behavior in pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders is well established; however, only one placebo-controlled, long-term study of efficacy is available. Method: Thirty-six children with an autism spectrum disorder (5-17 years old) accompanied by severe…

  1. LONG-TERM HEALTH EFFECTS FOLLOWING GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO PFOA IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is used in many commercial products as a surfactant. It has been shown to induce mammary tumors in lifetime fed adult female rats and to delay mammary gland development in mouse pups exposed to the compound prenatally. To evaluate the long-term healt...

  2. Long-Term Effect of College Quality on the Occupational Status of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey, Eric L.; Wimsatt, Leslie A.; Rhee, Byung-Shik; Meader, Ellen Waterson.

    This study examined whether, and to what extent, college quality has a longitudinal impact on the occupational status of students after controlling for students' background characteristics, ability, and years of schooling. The study also explored whether college quality differentially affects the long-term occupational status of students. Data for…

  3. Effects of Long-Term Representations on Free Recall of Unrelated Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katkov, Mikhail; Romani, Sandro; Tsodyks, Misha

    2015-01-01

    Human memory stores vast amounts of information. Yet recalling this information is often challenging when specific cues are lacking. Here we consider an associative model of retrieval where each recalled item triggers the recall of the next item based on the similarity between their long-term neuronal representations. The model predicts that…

  4. The Long Term Effectiveness of Intensive Stuttering Therapy: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irani, Farzan; Gabel, Rodney; Daniels, Derek; Hughes, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of client perceptions of an intensive stuttering therapy program that utilizes a multi-faceted approach to therapy. The study also proposed to gain a deeper understanding about the process involved in long-term maintenance of meaningful changes made in therapy. Methods: The…

  5. Analyzing the Effects of Horizontal Resolution on Long-Term Coupled WRF-CMAQ Simulations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study is to determine the adequacy of using a relatively coarse horizontal resolution (i.e. 36 km) to simulate long-term trends of pollutant concentrations and radiation variables with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model. To this end, WRF-CMAQ simulations over the co...

  6. Long-term rotation history and previous crop effects on corn seedling health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse rotations provide benefits to agroecosystems through changes in the soil environment. A long term experiment was established to study four different four-year rotation sequences in which the crop phase prior to corn was sampled. Soils from rotations ending with soybean, sunflower, corn and p...

  7. Insights into the effects of long-term artificial selection on seed size in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain produced from cereal crops is a major source of human and animal feed worldwide. To understand the genetic basis of seed size variation, a component trait of grain yield, we conducted a genome-wide scan to detect evidence of selection in the Krug Yellow Dent long-term selection experiment for ...

  8. An Evaluation of Persistence of Treatment Effects during Long-Term Treatment of Destructive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, David P.; Harding, Jay W.; Berg, Wendy K.; Lee, John F.; Schieltz, Kelly M.; Padilla, Yaniz C.; Nevin, John A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    Eight young children who displayed destructive behavior maintained, at least in part, by negative reinforcement received long-term functional communication training (FCT). During FCT, the children completed a portion of a task and then touched a communication card attached to a microswitch to obtain brief breaks. Prior to and intermittently…

  9. Teacher Experience, Learning, and Change: An Investigation of the Effects of Long-Term Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffino, Kara Lee

    2012-01-01

    As US public schools become increasingly diverse and teachers are expected to teach across cultural differences, teacher educators must consider how different professional development models shape teacher learning and practice. This study explores how a cohort of 55 P-12 teachers experienced and perceived long-term professional development focused…

  10. Assessing the Long-Term Effects of an Environmental Education Program: A Pragmatic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, Joanne M.; Halverson, Wesley F.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the nature and extent of behavioral changes exhibited by participants of an action oriented environmental program which focused on Lake Michigan's water quality. Outlines the program's objectives and assesses long-term behavioral modifications resulting from involvement in the decision-making process. (ML)

  11. Effects of a Long-Term Participatory Action Research Project on Science Teachers' Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilks, Ingo; Markic, Silvija

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the potential of long-term co-operation between science educators and science teachers concerning the teachers' continuous professional development, based on Participatory Action Research in science education. The discussion is based on a six-year case study observing a group of about ten German chemistry teachers by chemistry…

  12. Long-term effects of ammonia on the behavioral activity of the aquatic snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae, Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Alvaro; Camargo, Julio A

    2009-05-01

    An appropriate approach to assess the effect of toxicants on aquatic animals is to monitor behavioral endpoints, as they are a link between physiological and ecological processes. A group that can be exposed long-term to low toxic concentrations is benthic macroinvertebrates, as their mobility in aquatic ecosystems is relatively limited. Therefore, the study of behavioral long-term effects in this group is suitable from an ecological point of view, as behavioral effects can appear before mortality. During the last decades there has been an increase in ammonia concentrations in freshwater ecosystems, threatening aquatic animals. The present study focuses on the long-term effects (40 days) of nonionized ammonia on the behavioral activity of the aquatic snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum. One control and three ammonia concentrations (0.02, 0.07, and 0.13 mg N-NH(3)/L) were used in triplicate, and the activity of snails (as mean time to start normal movement) and immobility were recorded for each treatment after 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 days of continuous exposure to nonionized ammonia. The results show that P. antipodarum presented a high tolerance to lethal long-term effects of nonionized ammonia, as no animal died during the bioassay. However, the behavioral activity of snails was a very sensitivity endpoint, as a mean nonionized ammonia concentration of 0.07 mg N-NH(3)/L affected P. antipodarum. The results are discussed and compared with the available literature on long-term effects of ammonia on freshwater macroinvertebrates. Additionally, the ammonia water quality criteria, NOECs, LOECs, and long-term LCs are discussed on the basis of the current available data for freshwater macroinvertebrates.

  13. Long-Term Evolution Studies of E. Coli under Combined Effects of Simulated Microgravity and Antibiotic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouia, Fathi; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Ott, Mark C.; Pierson, Duane L.; Fox, George E.; Tran, Quyen

    2016-07-01

    Multiple spaceflight and simulated microgravity experiments have shown changes in phenotypic microbial characteristics such as microbial growth, morphology, metabolism, genetic transfer, antibiotic and stress susceptibility, and an increase in virulence factors. However, while these studies have contributed to expand our understanding of the short-term effects of spaceflight or simulated microgravity on biological systems, it remains unclear the type of responses subsequent to long-term exposure to space environment and microgravity in particular. As such, organisms exposed to the space environment for extended periods of time may evolve in unanticipated ways thereby negatively impacting long duration space missions. We report here for the first time, an experimental study of microbial evolution in which the effect of long-term exposure to Low Shear Modeled MicroGravity (LSMMG) on microbial gene expression and physiology in Escherichia coli (E. coli) MG1655 was examined using functional genomics, and molecular techniques with and without simultaneous exposure to broad spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol. E. coli cells were grown under simulated microgravity for 1000 generations in High Aspect Ratio Vessels (HARVs) that were either heat-sterilized (115 deg C, 15 min) or by using/rinsing the HARVs with a saturated solution of the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol. In the case of the cells evolved using the antibiotic sterilized HARVs, the expression levels of 357 genes were significantly changed. In particular, fimbriae encoding genes were significantly up-regulated whereas genes encoding the flagellar motor complex were down-regulated. Re-sequencing of the genome revealed that a number of the flagellar genes were actually deleted. The antibiotic resistance levels of the evolved strains were analyzed using VITEK analyzer. The evolved strain was consistently resistant to the antibiotics used (viz., Ampicillin, Cefalotin, Cefurox-ime, Cefuroxime Axetil

  14. Active Motor Training Has Long-term Effects on Infants’ Object Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Wiesen, Sarah E.; Watkins, Rachel M.; Needham, Amy Work

    2016-01-01

    Long-term changes in infants’ behavior as a result of active motor training were studied. Thirty-two infants completed three visits to the laboratory. At the first visit, infants were 3 months old and completed an object exploration assessment. Then the experimenter demonstrated the motor training procedures appropriate for the infant’s experimental condition, and parents took home custom infant mittens (either sticky or non-sticky) and a bag of lightweight toys to practice with their infants. Over the course of the following 2 weeks, infants participated in 10 sessions of either active (sticky) or passive (non-sticky) mittens training at home with their parents. Infants who participated in active mittens training wore mittens with the palms covered in Velcro, allowing them to pick up and move around small toys. Infants who participated in passive mittens training wore non-sticky mittens, and their parents moved the toys through their visual fields on their behalf. After completing the training, infants returned to the lab for the second visit. At visit two, infants participated in another object exploration assessment as well as a reaching assessment. Parents returned the training materials to the lab at the second visit, and were told not to continue any specific training regimen from this point forward. Two months later, when infants were about 5.5 months of age, they returned to the lab for a third visit. At the third visit, infants completed the same two assessments as during the second visit. The results of this study indicate that infants who participated in active motor training engaged in more sophisticated object exploration when compared to infants who received passive training. These findings are consistent with others in the literature showing that active motor training at 3 months of age facilitates the processes of object exploration and engagement. The current results and others reveal that the effects of early experience can last long after

  15. Long-term effect of rice-based farming systems on soil health.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Priyanka; Nayak, A K; Gautam, Priyanka; Lal, B; Shahid, M; Raja, R; Tripathi, R; Bhattacharyya, P; Panda, B B; Mohanty, S; Rao, K S

    2015-05-01

    Integrated rice-fish culture, an age-old farming system, is a technology which could produce rice and fish sustainably at a time by optimizing scarce resource use through complementary use of land and water. An understanding of microbial processes is important for the management of farming systems as soil microbes are the living part of soil organic matter and play critical roles in soil C and N cycling and ecosystem functioning of farming system. Rice-based integrated farming system model for small and marginal farmers was established in 2001 at Central Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, Odisha. The different enterprises of farming system were rice-fish, fish-fingerlings, fruits, vegetables, rice-fish refuge, and agroforestry. This study was conducted with the objective to assess the soil physicochemical properties, microbial population, carbon and nitrogen fractions, soil enzymatic activity, and productivity of different enterprises. The effect of enterprises induced significant changes in the chemical composition and organic matter which in turn influenced the activities of enzymes (urease, acid, and alkaline phosphatase) involved in the C, N, and P cycles. The different enterprises of long-term rice-based farming system caused significant variations in nutrient content of soil, which was higher in rice-fish refuge followed by rice-fish enterprise. Highest microbial populations and enzymatic properties were recorded in rice-fish refuge system because of waterlogging and reduced condition prolonged in this system leading to less decomposition of organic matter. The maximum alkaline phosphatase, urease, and FDA were observed in rice-fish enterprise. However, highest acid phosphatase and dehydrogenase activity were obtained in vegetable enterprise and fish-fingerlings enterprise, respectively.

  16. Long-term effects of methadone maintenance treatment with different psychosocial intervention models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lirong; Wei, Xiaoli; Wang, Xueliang; Li, Jinsong; Li, Hengxin; Jia, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term effects of different psychosocial intervention models in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in Xi'an China. Patients from five MMT clinics were divided into three groups receiving MMT only, MMT with counseling psychology (CP) or MMT with contingency management (CM). A five-year follow-up was carried out with daily records of medication, monthly random urine morphine tests, and tests for anti-HIV and anti-HCV every six months. Drug use behavior was recorded six months after initial recruitment using a survey. Adjusted RRs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using an unconditional logistic regression model or a Cox proportional hazard model. A total of 2662 patients were recruited with 797 in MMT, 985 in MMT with CP, and 880 in MMT with CM. Following six months of treatment, the injection rates of MMT with CP and MMT with CM groups were significantly lower than that of MMT (5.1% and 6.9% vs. 16.3%, x²  =  47.093 and 29.908, respectively; P<0.05). HIV incidences for MMT, MMT with CP and MMT with CM at the five year follow-up were 20.09, 0.00 and 10.02 per ten thousand person-years, respectively. HCV incidences were 18.35, 4.42 and 6.61 per hundred person-years, respectively, demonstrating that CP and CM were protective factors for HCV incidence (RR  =  0.209 and 0.414, with range of 0.146-0.300 and 0.298-0.574, respectively). MMT supplemented with CP or CM can reduce heroin use and related risk behaviors, thereby reducing the incidence of HIV and HCV. PMID:24498406

  17. Long-term effects of early life deprivation on brain glia in Fischer rats.

    PubMed

    Leventopoulos, Michail; Rüedi-Bettschen, Daniela; Knuesel, Irene; Feldon, Joram; Pryce, Christopher R; Opacka-Juffry, Jolanta

    2007-04-20

    Both clinical and experimental studies have indicated that depression and depression-like animal conditions are associated with disruption of the intrinsic plasticity of the brain, resulting in neuronal atrophy. However, little is known about the brain glia in these conditions. Early life stress in the form of infant abuse or neglect constitutes a risk factor in the aetiology of major depressive disorder in later life. It is possible to model this relation between early life stress and depression in the rat through maternal deprivation; in adulthood, this postnatal manipulation is known to lead to depression-like behaviour. In the stress-hyperresponsive Fischer strain, P1-14 pups were isolated for 4 h/day (early deprivation, ED, n=6) or were nonhandled (NH, n=6); they were left undisturbed until adulthood. Postmortem quantitative analysis of regional astroglial distribution and morphology based on glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry indicated a significant effect of ED on the density of GFAP-reactive astrocytes in brain areas implicated in stress-related behaviour. A moderate (10-22%) but consistent reduction in GFAP-reactive astrocyte density was seen in dorsal dentate gyrus, prefrontal cortex, ventral hippocampal CA1, cingulate cortex, dorsal hippocampal CA1 and basolateral amygdala. The ED-related reduction in GFAP-immunoreactive astrocyte density was more marked than the reduction in total cell density, which suggests that GFAP immunoreactivity, rather than the number of astrocytes, was reduced. This study provides evidence that early life stress leads to long-term changes in the density of astroglia in the brain regions involved in stress responses in the rat. PMID:17306230

  18. Organic Amendment Effects on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Long-Term Stockpiled Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvomuya, F.; Laskosky, J.

    2014-12-01

    In oil sands projects in Alberta, Canada, salvaged soils are often placed in large stockpiles where they are stored for the duration of the project, typically 20-30 years. Alberta regulations require that topsoil and subsoil are salvaged in two distinct operations - a process known as two-lifting. Reclamation using long-term stockpiled soils often gives poor results, characterized by lower soil organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations compared with equivalent natural, undisturbed soils. It is thought that the change from an aerobic to an anaerobic environment during soil stockpiling and back again to aerobic during placement are largely responsible for the low carbon and nitrogen due to microbial activity transforming C and N in the soil into CO2, CH4 and N2O and releasing them to the atmosphere. Evidence from recent studies indicates that biochar improves soil physical, chemical and biological properties, and hence could mitigate C and N losses due to greenhouse gas emissions from the soil indirectly. We postulate that documented improvements in soil physical, chemical, and biological properties in soils treated with amendments such as biochar may help mitigate C and N losses due to greenhouse gas emissions from the soil indirectly. This laboratory incubation experiment tested the effects of differential rates (0, 10, 20, and 40 g biochar carbon equivalents kg-1 dry soil) of biochar, peat, and humalite on greenhouse gas emissions from a 25-year old two-lift stockpiled soil. The soils were fertilized according to standard practice, placed in 120-mL plastic containers, and incubated at 25°C for 45 days. Gas samples were taken at 1- to 7-day intervals and analyzed for CO2, CH4, and N2O. Data on treatment differences in emissions will be presented. Results from this experiment will provide an insight into the potential for organic amendments to mitigate greenhouse gas emission during reclamation using degraded soils.

  19. Long term effectiveness of a team-taught, constructivist, experiential secondary science methods course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Jeffery Scott

    The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effects of a secondary science methods course that was moved to an on-site setting in a local high school. The methods course was team taught by the university science methods instructor and two teachers---one biology and one chemistry---from the school in which the class was located. During the sequence of the course, the instructors often traded classes based on topic expertise. As a result of the experiential situation, the preservice teachers were able to participate in constructivist-based lessons, observe the teacher---administered lessons and ultimately have day-to-day interactions with high school students while teaching their own lessons. The theoretical background of this research is based on a constructivist teaching and learning model. In order for the preservice science teachers to build knowledge of popular pedagogical practices, they had to be given the opportunity to experience the ideas and try them out for themselves. They had to experience and judge for themselves the methods for which current reform documents in science education propose. This study utilized an exploratory mixed-methods approach with observations, semi-structured interviews, surveys and Rasch analysis techniques to investigate the practices and beliefs of several former students---now practicing teachers---that participated in the teacher preparation program both before and after the major changes were made. Findings suggest that participants from the experiential methods course were more likely to both identify elaborate upon the methods course as being a major philosophical and pedagogical influence than those who had the university-based methods course. The findings did not, however, find a difference between the groups regarding pedagogical practices or teacher and student beliefs about the learning environment.

  20. Electrolyte management for effective long-term electro-osmotic transport in low-permeability soils.

    PubMed

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2003-07-01

    Electro-osmosis, a coupled-flow phenomenon in which an applied electrical potential gradient drives water flow, may be used to induce water flow through fine-grained sediments. Test cell measurements of electro-osmotic transport in clayey cores extracted from the 27-31 m depth range of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site indicate the importance of pH control within the anode and cathode reservoirs. In our first experiment, pH was not controlled. As a result, carbonate precipitation and metals precipitation occurred near the cathode end of the core, with acidification near the anode. The combination of these acid and base reactions led to the decline of electro-osmotic flow by a factor of 2 in less than one pore volume. In a second experiment, long-term water transport (>21 pore volumes) at stable electro-osmotic conductivity (k(eo) approximately 1 x 10(-9) m2/s-V) was effected with anode reservoir pH > 8, and cathode reservoir pH < 6. Hydraulic conductivity (k(h)) of the same core was 4 x 10(-10) m/s under a 0.07 MPa hydraulic gradient without electro-osmosis. Stable electro-osmotic flow was measured at a velocity of 4 x 10(-7) m/s under a 4 V/cm voltage gradient, and no hydraulic gradient-3 orders of magnitude greater than the hydraulic flow. We also observed chloroform production in the anode reservoir, resulting from electrochemical production of chlorine gas reacting with trace organics. The chloroform was transported electro-osmotically to the cathode, without measurable loss to adsorption, volatilization, or degradation. PMID:12875410

  1. Long-term effect of rice-based farming systems on soil health.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Priyanka; Nayak, A K; Gautam, Priyanka; Lal, B; Shahid, M; Raja, R; Tripathi, R; Bhattacharyya, P; Panda, B B; Mohanty, S; Rao, K S

    2015-05-01

    Integrated rice-fish culture, an age-old farming system, is a technology which could produce rice and fish sustainably at a time by optimizing scarce resource use through complementary use of land and water. An understanding of microbial processes is important for the management of farming systems as soil microbes are the living part of soil organic matter and play critical roles in soil C and N cycling and ecosystem functioning of farming system. Rice-based integrated farming system model for small and marginal farmers was established in 2001 at Central Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, Odisha. The different enterprises of farming system were rice-fish, fish-fingerlings, fruits, vegetables, rice-fish refuge, and agroforestry. This study was conducted with the objective to assess the soil physicochemical properties, microbial population, carbon and nitrogen fractions, soil enzymatic activity, and productivity of different enterprises. The effect of enterprises induced significant changes in the chemical composition and organic matter which in turn influenced the activities of enzymes (urease, acid, and alkaline phosphatase) involved in the C, N, and P cycles. The different enterprises of long-term rice-based farming system caused significant variations in nutrient content of soil, which was higher in rice-fish refuge followed by rice-fish enterprise. Highest microbial populations and enzymatic properties were recorded in rice-fish refuge system because of waterlogging and reduced condition prolonged in this system leading to less decomposition of organic matter. The maximum alkaline phosphatase, urease, and FDA were observed in rice-fish enterprise. However, highest acid phosphatase and dehydrogenase activity were obtained in vegetable enterprise and fish-fingerlings enterprise, respectively. PMID:25913623

  2. Active Motor Training Has Long-term Effects on Infants' Object Exploration.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Sarah E; Watkins, Rachel M; Needham, Amy Work

    2016-01-01

    Long-term changes in infants' behavior as a result of active motor training were studied. Thirty-two infants completed three visits to the laboratory. At the first visit, infants were 3 months old and completed an object exploration assessment. Then the experimenter demonstrated the motor training procedures appropriate for the infant's experimental condition, and parents took home custom infant mittens (either sticky or non-sticky) and a bag of lightweight toys to practice with their infants. Over the course of the following 2 weeks, infants participated in 10 sessions of either active (sticky) or passive (non-sticky) mittens training at home with their parents. Infants who participated in active mittens training wore mittens with the palms covered in Velcro, allowing them to pick up and move around small toys. Infants who participated in passive mittens training wore non-sticky mittens, and their parents moved the toys through their visual fields on their behalf. After completing the training, infants returned to the lab for the second visit. At visit two, infants participated in another object exploration assessment as well as a reaching assessment. Parents returned the training materials to the lab at the second visit, and were told not to continue any specific training regimen from this point forward. Two months later, when infants were about 5.5 months of age, they returned to the lab for a third visit. At the third visit, infants completed the same two assessments as during the second visit. The results of this study indicate that infants who participated in active motor training engaged in more sophisticated object exploration when compared to infants who received passive training. These findings are consistent with others in the literature showing that active motor training at 3 months of age facilitates the processes of object exploration and engagement. The current results and others reveal that the effects of early experience can last long after

  3. The long-term side effects of radiation therapy for benign brain tumors in adults.

    PubMed

    al-Mefty, O; Kersh, J E; Routh, A; Smith, R R

    1990-10-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral part in managing intracranial tumors. While the risk:benefit ratio is considered acceptable for treating malignant tumors, risks of long-term complications of radiotherapy need thorough assessment in adults treated for benign tumors. Many previously reported delayed complications of radiotherapy can be attributed to inappropriate treatment or to the sensitivity of a developing child's brain to radiation. Medical records, radiological studies, autopsy findings, and follow-up information were reviewed for 58 adult patients (31 men and 27 women) treated between 1958 and 1987 with radiotherapy for benign intracranial tumors. Patient ages at the time of irradiation ranged from 21 to 87 years (mean 47.7 years). The pathology included 46 pituitary adenomas, five meningiomas, four glomus jugulare tumors, two pineal area tumors, and one craniopharyngioma. Average radiation dosage was 4984 cGy (range 3100 to 7012 cGy), given in an average of 27.2 fractions (range 15 to 45 fractions), over a period averaging 46.6 days. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 31 years (mean 8.1 years). Findings related to tumor recurrence or surgery were excluded. Twenty-two patients had complications considered to be delayed side effects of radiotherapy. Two patients had visual deterioration developing 3 and 6 years after treatment; six had pituitary dysfunction; and 17 had varying degrees of parenchymal changes of the brain, occurring mostly in the temporal lobes and relating to the frequent presentation of pituitary tumors (two of these also had pituitary dysfunction). One clival tumor with the radiographic appearance of a meningioma, developed 30 years post-irradiation for acromegaly. This study unveils considerable delayed sequelae of radiotherapy in a series of adult patients receiving what is considered "safe" treatment for benign brain tumors.

  4. Skin alterations induced by long-term exposure to uranium and their effect on permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ubios, A.M.; Marzorati, M.; Cabrini, R.L.

    1997-05-01

    The skin is a probable route of incorporation of uranium by percutaneous absorption. The changes in epidermal thickness and their effect on skin permeability after uranium exposure are reported herein. Two experiments (A and B) were performed in Wistar rats weighing 60 g. In experiment A the animals were exposed to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (0.012 g d{sup - 1}) in 30 daily topical applications. In experiment B the animals were treated as in experiment A, followed by a period of non-exposure of 60 d. Samples of the treated area of skin were taken for histologic studies and for the study of the skin permeability. The epidermal thickness was measured on the histological sections. Epidermis was thinner in experimental than in control animals in both experiments. The values in the control groups were 41.05 {+-} 14.03 {mu}m (A) and 38.92 {+-} 16.50 {mu}m (B) and 21.35 {+-} 10.29 {mu}m (A) and 24.06 {+-} 16.50 {mu}m (B) in the experimental groups, the differences being statistically significant. Skin permeability was measured placing skin samples in a diffusion cell, in which the upper compartment was filled with a staining solution. The determinations were made with a spectrophotometer. The results revealed that the skin permeability in both experimental groups was higher than in the respective controls, 65% in experiment A and 77% in experiment B. The results revealed that a long term uranium exposure leads to an epidermal atrophy which in turn results in an increased permeability of the skin. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Effects of long-term administration of Senna occidentalis seeds on the hematopoietic tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Teles, A V F F; Fock, R A; Górniak, S L

    2015-12-15

    Senna occidentalis (S. occidentalis) is a toxic leguminous plant that contaminates crops and has been shown to be toxic to several animal species. All parts of the plant are toxic, but most of the plant's toxicity is due to its seeds. Despite its toxicity, S. occidentalis is widely used for therapeutic purposes in humans. The aim of the present work was to investigate, for the first time, the effects of the chronic administration of S. occidentalis seeds on hematopoietic organs, including the bone marrow and spleen. Fifty male Wistar rats were divided into five groups of 10 animals. Rats were treated with diets containing 0% (control), 0.5% (So0.5), 1% (So1), or 2% (So2) S. occidentalis seeds for a period of 90 days. Food and water were provided ad libitum, except to pair-fed (PF) group which received the same amount of ration to those of So2 group, however free of S. occidentalis seeds. It was verified that rats treated with 2% S. occidentalis seeds presented changes in hematological parameters. The blood evaluation also showed a significant decrease of the Myeloid/Erythroid (M/E) ratio. Chronic treatment with S. occidentalis promoted a reduction in the cellularity of both the bone marrow and spleen. Additionally, we observed changes in bone marrow smears, iron stores and spleen hemosiderin accumulation. Histological analyses of bone marrow revealed erythroid hyperplasia which was consistent with the increased reticulocyte count. These findings suggest that the long-term administration of S. occidentalis seeds can promote blood toxicity.

  6. Effect of long-term therapy with oral steroids on respiratory muscle function and ventilatory drive.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, E; Corsico, R; Rampulla, C; Ambrosino, N; Fracchia, C; Crotti, P; Rubini, F; Nava, S

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown that chronic oral steroid therapy (ST) does not induce respiratory muscle dysfunction in normal and asthmatic subjects. As corticosteroids are sometimes chronically used in the treatment of the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the aim of our study was to verify whether ST could cause respiratory muscle impairment and, since ST also affects the central nervous system, whether ST could influence the ventilatory pattern. We retrospectively studied 12 COPD patients (group A), on long-term therapy (for at least 4 consecutive months, range 4-18 months) with an oral steroid, deflazacort, 15 mg.d-1. The subjects were strictly matched, with regard to age, sex, height, weight, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), residual volume (RV), arterial oxygen tension (PaCO2), arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) and pH, with 12 COPD patients (Group B) who had never taken oral steroids. To assess respiratory muscle strength, we measured maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressures, while mouth occlusion pressure (P0.1) was employed to assess neuromuscular drive; ventilatory pattern and airway impedence were also evaluated. Effectiveness of ST was confirmed by the plasmatic levels of endogenous cortisol. No significant differences were observed between the two groups with regard to MIP (A 72.2 +/- 9.7 vs B: 70 +/- 7.2 cmH2O) and MEP (A 91.6 +/- 10.5 vs B 94.4 +/- 7.6 cmH2O) whilst P0.1 was significantly higher in group A (2.6 +/- 0.3 cmH2O) than in group B (1.8 +/- 0.1 cmH2O). No significant differences were found among all the ventilatory parameters, but the impedence was significantly higher in group A.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8472057

  7. Effects of long-term space flight on erythrocytes and oxidative stress of rodents.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Montorfano, Gigliola; Milani, Simona; Zava, Stefania; Tavella, Sara; Cancedda, Ranieri; Berra, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Erythrocyte and hemoglobin losses have been frequently observed in humans during space missions; these observations have been designated as "space anemia". Erythrocytes exposed to microgravity have a modified rheology and undergo hemolysis to a greater extent. Cell membrane composition plays an important role in determining erythrocyte resistance to mechanical stress and it is well known that membrane composition might be influenced by external events, such as hypothermia, hypoxia or gravitational strength variations. Moreover, an altered cell membrane composition, in particular in fatty acids, can cause a greater sensitivity to peroxidative stress, with increase in membrane fragility. Solar radiation or low wavelength electromagnetic radiations (such as gamma rays) from the Earth or the space environment can split water to generate the hydroxyl radical, very reactive at the site of its formation, which can initiate chain reactions leading to lipid peroxidation. These reactive free radicals can react with the non-radical molecules, leading to oxidative damage of lipids, proteins and DNA, etiologically associated with various diseases and morbidities such as cancer, cell degeneration, and inflammation. Indeed, radiation constitutes on of the most important hazard for humans during long-term space flights. With this background, we participated to the MDS tissue-sharing program performing analyses on mice erythrocytes flown on the ISS from August to November 2009. Our results indicate that space flight induced modifications in cell membrane composition and increase of lipid peroxidation products, in mouse erythrocytes. Moreover, antioxidant defenses in the flight erythrocytes were induced, with a significant increase of glutathione content as compared to both vivarium and ground control erythrocytes. Nonetheless, this induction was not sufficient to prevent damages caused by oxidative stress. Future experiments should provide information helpful to reduce the effects

  8. The long-term side effects of radiation therapy for benign brain tumors in adults

    SciTech Connect

    al-Mefty, O.; Kersh, J.E.; Routh, A.; Smith, R.R. )

    1990-10-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral part in managing intracranial tumors. While the risk:benefit ratio is considered acceptable for treating malignant tumors, risks of long-term complications of radiotherapy need thorough assessment in adults treated for benign tumors. Many previously reported delayed complications of radiotherapy can be attributed to inappropriate treatment or to the sensitivity of a developing child's brain to radiation. Medical records, radiological studies, autopsy findings, and follow-up information were reviewed for 58 adult patients (31 men and 27 women) treated between 1958 and 1987 with radiotherapy for benign intracranial tumors. Patient ages at the time of irradiation ranged from 21 to 87 years (mean 47.7 years). The pathology included 46 pituitary adenomas, five meningiomas, four glomus jugulare tumors, two pineal area tumors, and one craniopharyngioma. Average radiation dosage was 4984 cGy (range 3100 to 7012 cGy), given in an average of 27.2 fractions (range 15 to 45 fractions), over a period averaging 46.6 days. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 31 years (mean 8.1 years). Findings related to tumor recurrence or surgery were excluded. Twenty-two patients had complications considered to be delayed side effects of radiotherapy. Two patients had visual deterioration developing 3 and 6 years after treatment; six had pituitary dysfunction; and 17 had varying degrees of parenchymal changes of the brain, occurring mostly in the temporal lobes and relating to the frequent presentation of pituitary tumors. One clival tumor with the radiographic appearance of a meningioma, developed 30 years post-irradiation for acromegaly. This study unveils considerable delayed sequelae of radiotherapy in a series of adult patients receiving what is considered safe treatment for benign brain tumors. 163 refs.

  9. Effects of long-term voluntary exercise on the mouse hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis.

    PubMed

    Droste, Susanne K; Gesing, Angela; Ulbricht, Sabine; Müller, Marianne B; Linthorst, Astrid C E; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2003-07-01

    We studied the effects of long-term (i.e. 4 wk) voluntary exercise on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis in male mice. Voluntary exercise was provided by giving mice access to a running wheel, in which they indeed ran for about 4 km/d. Exercising mice showed similar body weights as control animals but presented less abdominal fat, lighter thymuses, and heavier adrenal glands. Exercise resulted in asymmetric structural changes in the adrenal glands. Whereas control mice had larger left than right adrenals, this condition was abolished in exercising animals, mainly because of enlargement of the right adrenal cortex. Tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA expression in the adrenal medullas of exercising mice was increased. In exercising mice, early-morning baseline plasma ACTH levels were decreased, whereas plasma corticosterone levels at the start of the dark phase were twice as high as those in control animals. To forced swimming and restraint stress, exercising mice responded with higher corticosterone levels than those of the control animals but with similar ACTH levels. However, if exposed to a novel environment, then exercising mice presented decreased ACTH responses. Interestingly, exercising mice showed a decreased corticosterone response to novelty only when the novel environment contained a functioning running wheel. Glucocorticoid receptor levels were unchanged, whereas mineralocorticoid receptor levels were decreased, in hippocampus of exercising animals. Cort