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Sample records for adverse pathologic features

  1. MUC1 Expression by Immunohistochemistry Is Associated with Adverse Pathologic Features in Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    Eminaga, Okyaz; Wei, Wei; Hawley, Sarah J.; Auman, Heidi; Newcomb, Lisa F.; Simko, Jeff; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Troyer, Dean A.; Carroll, Peter R.; Gleave, Martin E.; Lin, Daniel W.; Nelson, Peter S.; Thompson, Ian M.; True, Lawrence D.; McKenney, Jesse K.; Feng, Ziding; Fazli, Ladan; Brooks, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The uncertainties inherent in clinical measures of prostate cancer (CaP) aggressiveness endorse the investigation of clinically validated tissue biomarkers. MUC1 expression has been previously reported to independently predict aggressive localized prostate cancer. We used a large cohort to validate whether MUC1 protein levels measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC) predict aggressive cancer, recurrence and survival outcomes after radical prostatectomy independent of clinical and pathological parameters. Material and Methods MUC1 IHC was performed on a multi-institutional tissue microarray (TMA) resource including 1,326 men with a median follow-up of 5 years. Associations with clinical and pathological parameters were tested by the Chi-square test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Relationships with outcome were assessed with univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models and the Log-rank test. Results The presence of MUC1 expression was significantly associated with extracapsular extension and higher Gleason score, but not with seminal vesicle invasion, age, positive surgical margins or pre-operative serum PSA levels. In univariable analyses, positive MUC1 staining was significantly associated with a worse recurrence free survival (RFS) (HR: 1.24, CI 1.03–1.49, P = 0.02), although not with disease specific survival (DSS, P>0.5). On multivariable analyses, the presence of positive surgical margins, extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, as well as higher pre-operative PSA and increasing Gleason score were independently associated with RFS, while MUC1 expression was not. Positive MUC1 expression was not independently associated with disease specific survival (DSS), but was weakly associated with overall survival (OS). Conclusion In our large, rigorously designed validation cohort, MUC1 protein expression was associated with adverse pathological features, although it was not an independent predictor of outcome after radical

  2. In phyllodes tumour of the breast expression of c-kit but not of ALDH1A1 is associated with adverse clinico-pathological features.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Abhijit; Bal, Amanjit; Das, Ashim; Kohli, Pavneet Singh; Singh, Gurpreet

    2016-12-01

    Attempts at identification of an ideal prognostic/predictive biomarker in phyllodes tumour (PT) have not been fruitful so far. Studies evaluating c-kit expression in PT have shown contradictory results. Recently aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) was proposed as a stem cell marker for malignant PT but its expression has not been studied in benign and borderline tumours. We aimed to evaluate expression and prognostic significance of c-kit and ALDH1A1 in different grades of PT. Epithelial and stromal c-kit and ALDH1A1 expression were studied in 104 PT cases (86 primary and 18 recurrent tumours) and compared with different clinico-pathological features and recurrence rates. Stromal c-kit expression at 1 % cutoff correlated with increasing tumour grade, larger tumour size, hypercellularity, nuclear atypia, stromal overgrowth, infiltrative margins and mitotic count. These associations, however, were lost with higher (5 or 10 %) cutoffs. Conversely, decreased c-kit expression in the epithelial component correlated with increasing tumour grade, regardless of the cutoffs used. Stromal ALDH1A1 expression did not have significant associations with tumour grade or other adverse clinico-pathological features, regardless of different cutoffs. None of the cases showed significant epithelial ALDH1A1 expression. Expression of c-kit was associated with poorer overall survival (p = 0.011), while ALDH1A1 expression was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival (p = 0.036). In conclusion, c-kit expression was associated with higher tumour grade and adverse clinico-pathological features. However, these associations are cutoff dependent, partly explaining the variability in previously reported studies. ALDH1A1 expression did not have significant correlations with tumour grade and adverse clinico-pathological variables.

  3. Characterizing "Adversity" of Pathology Findings in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The identification of adverse health effects has a central role in the development and risk/safety assessment of chemical entities and pharmaceuticals. There is currently a need for better alignment in the toxicologic pathology community regarding how nonclinical adversity is determined and characterized. The European Society of Toxicologic Pathology (ESTP) therefore coordinated a workshop in June 2015 to review available definitions of adversity, weigh determining and qualifying factors of adversity based on case examples, and recommend a practical approach to define and characterize adversity in toxicology reports. The international group of expert pathologists and toxicologists emphasized that a holistic, weight-of-evidence, case-specific approach should be followed for each adversity assessment. It was recommended that nonclinical adversity should typically be determined at a morphological level (most often the organ) in the pathology report and should refer specifically to the test species. Final adversity calls, integration of target pharmacology/pathway information, and consideration of human translation should generally be made in toxicology overview reports. Differences in interpretation and implications of adversity calls between (agro)chemical and pharmaceutical industries and among world regions were highlighted. The results of this workshop should serve a valuable prerequisite for future organ- or lesion-specific workshops planned by the ESTP. This

  4. Associations Between Serum Vitamin D and Adverse Pathology in Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nyame, Yaw A.; Bowen, Diana K.; Jordan, Gregory; Batai, Ken; Dixon, Michael; Hollowell, Courtney M.P.; Kielb, Stephanie; Meeks, Joshua J.; Gann, Peter H.; Macias, Virgilia; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Catalona, William J.; Kittles, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lower serum vitamin D levels have been associated with an increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Among men with localized prostate cancer, especially with low- or intermediate-risk disease, vitamin D may serve as an important biomarker of disease aggression. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between adverse pathology at the time of radical prostatectomy and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) levels. Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out from 2009 to 2014, nested within a large epidemiologic study of 1,760 healthy controls and men undergoing prostate cancer screening. In total, 190 men underwent radical prostatectomy in the cohort. Adverse pathology was defined as the presence of primary Gleason 4 or any Gleason 5 disease, or extraprostatic extension. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the relationship between 25-OH D and adverse pathology at the time of prostatectomy. Results Eighty-seven men (45.8%) in this cohort demonstrated adverse pathology at radical prostatectomy. The median age in the cohort was 64.0 years (interquartile range, 59.0 to 67.0). On univariate analysis, men with adverse pathology at radical prostatectomy demonstrated lower median serum 25-OH D (22.7 v 27.0 ng/mL, P = .007) compared with their counterparts. On multivariate analysis, controlling for age, serum prostate specific antigen, and abnormal digital rectal examination, serum 25-OH D less than 30 ng/mL was associated with increased odds of adverse pathology (odds ratio, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.25 to 5.59; P = .01). Conclusion Insufficiency/deficiency of serum 25-OH D is associated with increased odds of adverse pathology in men with localized disease undergoing radical prostatectomy. Serum 25-OH D may serve as a useful biomarker in prostate cancer aggressiveness, which deserves continued study. PMID:26903577

  5. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy: pathologic features determine outcome

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Eric C.; Schlachta, Christopher M.; Burpee, Stephen E.; Pace, Kenneth T.; Mamazza, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    Introduction The differential outcomes of laparoscopic adrenalectomy are not well described. Therefore, we evaluated these outcomes in the 3 groups most often seen clinically: bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing's disease (group 1), pheochromocytoma (group 2) and unilateral adrenalectomy for non-pheochromocytoma (group 3). Methods We reviewed a longitudinal database of 72 consecutive cases of laparoscopic adrenalectomy carried out between 1997 and 2001 at the Centre for Minimally Invasive Surgery, University of Toronto. Results Patients in group 1 tended to be older (median 49 yr) and heavier (median 87 kg). They had a longer operating time (median 255 min), more postoperative complications (15%) and a longer median postoperative stay (4 d). Patients in group 2 had intermediate outcomes: a median operating time of 198 minutes, complication rate of 8.3% and a median postoperative hospital stay of 3 days. However, they had more intraoperative blood loss (median 150 mL). Group 3 patients had the best outcomes with the shortest median operating time (125 min), least blood loss (median 50 mL), fewer complications (6%) and shortest hospital stay (median 2 d). Conclusions Although the outcomes of laparoscopic adrenalectomy are uniformly good, on the basis of the underlying pathologic characteristics, patients can be divided into groups that have different expected outcomes. Patients requiring a unilateral adrenalectomy except for pheochromocytoma have the best recorded outcomes. Surgeons transferring to laparoscopic adrenalectomy would benefit from selecting patients in this group during their learning curve. PMID:14577705

  6. Meconium-Associated Umbilical Vascular Myonecrosis: Correlations with Adverse Outcome and Placental Pathology.

    PubMed

    Cimic, Adela; Baergen, Rebecca N

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine passage of meconium is common, occurring in approximately 10-15% of term births. Uncommonly, long-standing meconium exposure is associated with umbilical vascular myonecrosis, but few studies have evaluated specific clinical and pathologic features. This is a retrospective study of 481 term placentas: 139 with meconium-associated myonecrosis, 139 with meconium in fetal membranes, only 62 with meconium in the cord without myonecrosis, and 139 controls without meconium. We studied clinical factors, including clinical evidence of meconium discharge, fetal distress, APGAR scores, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and intrauterine fetal demise (IUFD), and histologic factors, including acute chorioamnionitis, umbilical cord complications, uteroplacental malperfusion, fetal thrombosis, chorangiosis, and fetal nucleated red blood cells. Meconium myonecrosis was significantly associated with clinical meconium, fetal distress, IUGR, IUFD, acute chorioamnionitis, cord complications, fetal thrombosis, chorangiosis, and nucleated red blood cells when compared to controls (P < 0.05). Compared to cases with meconium in the membranes only, clinical meconium, fetal distress, IUGR, chorioamnionitis, thrombosis, chorangiosis, and nucleated red blood cells remained significant. Compared to cases with meconium in the cord without myonecrosis, only chorioamnionitis retained significance. In conclusion, myonecrosis was associated with adverse clinical outcome and placental lesions associated with hypoxia. Chorioamnionitis was significantly more common in all meconium groups compared to controls. As myonecrosis is an important lesion, a clinical history of meconium should trigger a meticulous search for meconium and specifically myonecrosis.

  7. Feature Importance in Nonlinear Embeddings (FINE): Applications in Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Shoshana B; Lee, George; Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative histomorphometry (QH) refers to the process of computationally modeling disease appearance on digital pathology images by extracting hundreds of image features and using them to predict disease presence or outcome. Since constructing a robust and interpretable classifier is challenging in a high dimensional feature space, dimensionality reduction (DR) is often implemented prior to classifier construction. However, when DR is performed it can be challenging to quantify the contribution of each of the original features to the final classification result. We have previously presented a method for scoring features based on their importance for classification on an embedding derived via principal components analysis (PCA). However, nonlinear DR involves the eigen-decomposition of a kernel matrix rather than the data itself, compounding the issue of classifier interpretability. In this paper we present feature importance in nonlinear embeddings (FINE), an extension of our PCA-based feature scoring method to kernel PCA (KPCA), as well as several NLDR algorithms that can be cast as variants of KPCA. FINE is applied to four digital pathology datasets to identify key QH features for predicting the risk of breast and prostate cancer recurrence. Measures of nuclear and glandular architecture and clusteredness were found to play an important role in predicting the likelihood of recurrence of both breast and prostate cancers. Compared to the t-test, Fisher score, and Gini index, FINE was able to identify a stable set of features that provide good classification accuracy on four publicly available datasets from the NIPS 2003 Feature Selection Challenge.

  8. Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with nonuniform pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Luan, Xinghua; Zheng, Riliang; Chen, Bin; Yuan, Yun

    2010-08-01

    Nonuniform pathologic changes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy were previously reported only in adult humans. We analyzed the pathologic features of 12 children, aged 2-17 years, with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Six patients manifested a preceding illness. Five patients presented a chronic, monophasic course, and seven presented a relapsing-remitting course. Three patients exhibited multiple cranial-nerve involvement. Five of 12 (41.7%) patients presented nonuniform features. Two subtypes of nonuniform lesions were revealed. One exhibited varying myelinated fiber content between nerve fascicles, and one exhibited onion bulbs involving a variable number of fascicles. Macrophages were evident in 11 patients, and the number of CD3-positive T cells in the nonuniform group was greater compared with the uniform group (P = 0.045). Our results demonstrate that childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy exhibits pathologically nonuniform features, thus providing more evidence to assist in differential diagnoses of pediatric patients. However, clinical and electrophysiologic features, as well as responses to treatment, were similar in the nonuniform and uniform groups.

  9. A method for normalizing pathology images to improve feature extraction for quantitative pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Allison; Barker, Jocelyn; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: With the advent of digital slide scanning technologies and the potential proliferation of large repositories of digital pathology images, many research studies can leverage these data for biomedical discovery and to develop clinical applications. However, quantitative analysis of digital pathology images is impeded by batch effects generated by varied staining protocols and staining conditions of pathological slides. Methods: To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel, fully automated stain normalization method to reduce batch effects and thus aid research in digital pathology applications. Their method, intensity centering and histogram equalization (ICHE), normalizes a diverse set of pathology images by first scaling the centroids of the intensity histograms to a common point and then applying a modified version of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization. Normalization was performed on two datasets of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of different tissue slices from the same lung tumor, and one immunohistochemistry dataset of digitized slides created by restaining one of the H&E datasets. Results: The ICHE method was evaluated based on image intensity values, quantitative features, and the effect on downstream applications, such as a computer aided diagnosis. For comparison, three methods from the literature were reimplemented and evaluated using the same criteria. The authors found that ICHE not only improved performance compared with un-normalized images, but in most cases showed improvement compared with previous methods for correcting batch effects in the literature. Conclusions: ICHE may be a useful preprocessing step a digital pathology image processing pipeline.

  10. Cutaneous syncytial myoepithelioma:: Clinico-pathological features and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Marco; Facchin, Federico; Kohlscheen, Eva; Sartore, Leonardo; Salmaso, Roberto; Bassetto, Franco

    2016-10-01

    Cutaneous syncytial myoepithelioma (CSM) is a very rare tumor belonging to the spectrum of skin myoepithelial lesions. CSM usually affects the upper extremities of young to middle aged patients and is characterized by peculiar morphological and immunohistochemical features. Unlike classic myoepithelioma, CSM is composed by a densely packed proliferation of spindled to histiocytoid cells, which are variably positive for EMA, S100, SMA, and frequently negative for cytokeratins and GFAP. The peculiar histopathology and the extreme rarity of such lesion (less than 40 cases reported in the literature) can make the diagnosis of CSM a true challenge. In the present case, we report the clinico-pathological features of a primary CSM occurring in a 38 year-old Caucasian man. The differential diagnoses of such lesion are also briefly discussed.

  11. Characterizing "Adversity" of Pathology Findings in Nonclinical Toxicity Studies: Results from the 4th ESTP International Expert Workshop.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of adverse health effects has a central role in the development and risk/safety assessment of chemical entities and pharmaceuticals. There is currently a need for better alignment in the toxicologic pathology community regarding how nonclinical adversity is det...

  12. HPV vaccines: their pathology-based discovery, benefits, and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Alcina F; de Andrade, Cecilia V; Russomano, Fabio B; Rodrigues, Luana S L; Oliveira, Nathalia S; Provance, David William; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine illustrates the power of in situ-based pathologic analysis in better understanding and curing diseases. The 2 available HPV vaccines have markedly reduced the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, genital warts, and cervical cancer throughout the world. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, health care officials, and parents to refuse providing the recommended vaccination to the target population. The aims of the study were to discuss the discovery of HPV vaccine and review scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines. The strong type-specific immunity against HPV in humans has been known for more than 25 years. Multiple studies confirm the positive risk benefit of HPV vaccination with minimal documented adverse effects. The most common adverse effect, injection site pain, occurred in about 10% of girls and was less than the rate reported for other vaccines. Use of HPV vaccine should be expanded into more diverse populations, mainly in low-resource settings.

  13. Pathological Role of Serum- and Glucocorticoid-Regulated Kinase 1 in Adverse Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saumya; Aiba, Takeshi; Rosenberg, Michael; Hessler, Katherine; Xiao, Chunyang; Quintero, Pablo A.; Ottaviano, Filomena G.; Knight, Ashley C.; Graham, Evan L.; Boström, Pontus; Morissette, Michael R.; del Monte, Federica; Begley, Michael J.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality. Cardiac PI3-kinase signaling promotes cardiomyocyte survival and function but is paradoxically activated in heart failure, suggesting chronic activation of this pathway may become maladaptive. Here we investigated the downstream PI3-kinase effector, SGK1 (serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1), in heart failure and its complications. Methods and Results We found that cardiac SGK1 is activated in human and murine heart failure. We investigated the role of SGK1 in the heart using cardiac-specific expression of constitutively-active or dominant-negative SGK1. Cardiac-specific activation of SGK1 in mice increased mortality, cardiac dysfunction, and ventricular arrhythmias. The pro-arrhythmic effects of SGK1 were linked to biochemical and functional changes in the cardiac sodium channel and could be reversed by treatment with ranolazine, a blocker of the late sodium current. Conversely, cardiac-specific inhibition of SGK1 protected mice after hemodynamic stress from fibrosis, heart failure, and sodium channel alterations. Conclusions SGK1 appears both necessary and sufficient for key features of adverse ventricular remodeling and may provide a novel therapeutic target in cardiac disease. PMID:23019294

  14. TDP-43 and pathological subtype of Alzheimer’s disease impact clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Keith A.; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D.; Murray, Melissa E.; Serie, Amanda M.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Senjem, Matthew L.; Ivnik, Robert J.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the frequency of TDP-43 deposition in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) differs across pathologically defined AD subtypes (Hippocampal sparing [HpSp]; Typical and Limbic), and to further examine the relationship between TDP-43, pathological subtype, and clinical features in AD. Methods We identified all cases with pathologically-confirmed AD (NIA-Reagan intermediate-high probability, Braak stage IV–VI) independent of cognitive status (n=188). Neurofibrillary tangle counts were performed using thioflavin-S microscopy in hippocampus and three neocortical regions, and all cases were subtyped: HpSp AD Pathology (n=19); Typical AD Pathology (n=136); Limbic AD Pathology (n=33). TDP-43 immunoreactivity was performed in multiple brain regions to assess for the presence of TDP-43 and TDP-43 stage. All cases were clinically sub-classified at presentation as Amnestic AD Dementia versus Atypical AD Dementia. Statistical analysis was performed using linear and penalized logistic regression to assess associations with pathological subtype, and the effects of TDP-43, accounting for possible interactions between pathological subtype and TDP-43. Results TDP-43 deposition was frequent in Typical (59%) and Limbic AD pathologies (67%), but not HpSp AD Pathology (21%) (p=0.003). The observed associations of TDP-43 with greater memory loss, naming and functional decline, and smaller hippocampal volumes, closest to death, did not differ across AD pathological subtype. Clinical presentation was associated with pathological subtype (p=0.01), but not TDP-43 (p=0.69). Interpretation Although the frequency of TDP-43 deposition in AD varies by pathological subtype, the observed effects of TDP-43 on clinical/MRI features are consistent across pathological subtypes. Clinical presentation in AD is driven by pathological subtype, not by TDP-43. PMID:26224156

  15. Clinical and pathological features of alcohol-related brain damage.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Natalie M; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Harper, Clive G

    2011-05-01

    One of the sequelae of chronic alcohol abuse is malnutrition. Importantly, a deficiency in thiamine (vitamin B(1)) can result in the acute, potentially reversible neurological disorder Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). When WE is recognized, thiamine treatment can elicit a rapid clinical recovery. If WE is left untreated, however, patients can develop Korsakoff syndrome (KS), a severe neurological disorder characterized by anterograde amnesia. Alcohol-related brain damage (ARBD) describes the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on human brain structure and function in the absence of more discrete and well-characterized neurological concomitants of alcoholism such as WE and KS. Through knowledge of both the well-described changes in brain structure and function that are evident in alcohol-related disorders such as WE and KS and the clinical outcomes associated with these changes, researchers have begun to gain a better understanding of ARBD. This Review examines ARBD from the perspective of WE and KS, exploring the clinical presentations, postmortem brain pathology, in vivo MRI findings and potential molecular mechanisms associated with these conditions. An awareness of the consequences of chronic alcohol consumption on human behavior and brain structure can enable clinicians to improve detection and treatment of ARBD.

  16. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas: CT imaging features and radiologic-pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Gopinathan; Zhang, Junwei; Al-Hamar, Nawal Ebrahim; Nga, Min En

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the imaging features of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas with an emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation. METHODS Ten patients (all female; mean age, 32 years) with histologic or cytologic diagnosis of SPN encountered between January 2007 and December 2013 were included in this study. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) images were reviewed for location, attenuation, enhancement pattern, margin, shape, size, morphology, presence of capsule and calcification. CT appearances were correlated with histopathologic findings. RESULTS Tumors in the distal pancreatic body and tail had a tendency to be larger (mean size 12.6 cm vs. 4.0 cm). Six of the nine tumors that were resected had a fibrous pseudocapsule at histology, five of which could be identified on CT scan. Eight lesions had mixed hypoenhancing solid components and cystic areas corresponding to tumor necrosis and hemorrhage. The two smallest lesions were purely solid and nonencapsulated. Varied patterns of calcification were seen in four tumors. Three of the four pancreatic tail tumors invaded the spleen. At a median follow-up of 53 months, there was no evidence of recurrence in the nine patients who underwent surgical resection of the tumor. CONCLUSION A mixed solid and cystic pancreatic mass in a young woman is suggestive of SPN. However, smaller lesions may be completely solid. Splenic invasion can occur in pancreatic tail SPNs; however, in this series it did not adversely affect the long-term outcome. PMID:28089954

  17. B-cell lymphomas with features intermediate between distinct pathologic entities. From pathogenesis to pathology.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Antonino; Gloghini, Annunziata; Aiello, Antonella; Testi, Adele; Cabras, Antonello

    2010-05-01

    Published in September 2008, the updated World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues introduces provisional borderline categories for lymphoma cases that demonstrate overlapping clinical, morphological, and/or immunophenotypic features between well-established entities. These overlapping features pose real diagnostic challenges especially in identifying atypical cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and Burkitt lymphoma. Lymphoma cases showing borderline features between T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma are not included within the borderline categories provisionally recognized by the updated classification. Within the borderline categories, there are cases combining features of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Many of these cases resemble classical Hodgkin lymphoma but have a large number of tumor cells expressing CD20, CD45, and B-cell transcription factors. Alternatively, these cases may resemble primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma but contain tumor cells resembling Reed-Sternberg cells and displaying an aberrant phenotype such as CD20(-), CD15(-/+) CD45(+), CD30(+), Pax5(+), OCT2(+/-), and BOB1(+/-). Another new borderline category defining B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma, represents a biologically heterogeneous group. Cases with morphologic features intermediate and with CD10/BCL6 coexpression should be placed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma/Burkitt lymphoma category if tumor cells also show strong BCL2 staining and/or a Ki67 proliferation index of less than 90%. When MYC rearrangements are present in these cases, the lymphomas often have atypical features, including concurrent rearrangements of BCL2 and/or BCL6 genes (so-called double/triple-hit lymphomas) and more aggressive behavior. For the

  18. Acute Chorioamnionitis and Funisitis: Definition, Pathologic Features, and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiyasit, Noppadol; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Yeon Mee

    2015-01-01

    ; however, in fetuses, it is a risk factor for short- and long-term complications (i.e. neonatal sepsis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, and cerebral palsy). This article reviews the definition, pathogenesis, grading and staging, and clinical significance of the most common lesions in placental pathology. Illustrations of the lesions and diagrams of the mechanisms of disease are provided. PMID:26428501

  19. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary tract: imaging features with pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Muttarak, M; ChiangMai, W N; Lojanapiwat, B

    2005-10-01

    The prevalence of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has been increasing over the past decade, due to the rising number of people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the development of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The genitourinary tract is the most common site of extrapulmonary TB. Diagnosis is often difficult because TB has a variety of clinical and radiological findings. It can mimic numerous other disease entities. A high level of clinical suspicion and familiarity with various radiological manifestations of TB allow early diagnosis and timely initiation of proper management. This pictorial essay illustrates the spectrum of imaging features of TB affecting the kidney, ureter, bladder, and the female and male genital tracts.

  20. Pathological features of olfactory neuroblastoma in an axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Shioda, Chieko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2011-08-01

    A one-year-old, female Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) had a rough-surfaced, polypoid, pink tumor mass of approximately 10 mm in diameter in the oral cavity. Histologically, the tumor extended from the ethmoturbinate region and into the oral cavity and had replaced some of the maxillary bone tissue. The tumor mass was composed of a lobular architecture of small round-shaped tumor cells with occasional Flexner-Wintersteiner-like rosette formation. There were no metastatic lesions in the other organs. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were partly positive for several neural markers (class III beta-tubulin, S-100 protein, and doublecortin) and intensely positive for an epithelial marker (cytokeratin AE1/AE3). These results suggest that the present tumor originated from neuroectodermal tissue. Considering the location and histological and immunohistochemical features of the tumor, a diagnosis of olfactory neuroblastoma was made.

  1. Biologic features and prognosis of ductal carcinoma in situ are not adversely impacted by initial large body mass.

    PubMed

    Kuerer, Henry M; Lari, Sara A; Arun, Banu K; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Brewster, Abenaa; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Albarracin, Constance T; Babiera, Gildy V; Caudle, Abigail S; Wagner, Jamie L; Litton, Jennifer K; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Lucci, Anthony; Hunt, Kelly K

    2012-06-01

    Obesity is associated with adverse biologic features and poor outcome in patients with invasive breast cancer, yet this relationship has not been evaluated in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). From 1996 to 2009, body mass index (BMI) was recorded at initial diagnosis for 1,885 patients with DCIS treated at our institution. Patients were categorized as obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), overweight (BMI 25 to <30 kg/m(2)), or of normal weight or underweight (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)). Logistic regression was used to examine associations between BMI and patient, clinical, and pathologic features and treatment. Local-regional recurrence was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided. Of the 1,885 patients, 514 (27.7%) were obese, 510 (27.5%) were overweight, and 831 (44.8%) were normal/underweight. In multivariate analysis, overweight and obese patients were significantly more likely to be African American (odds ratio [OR], 3.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.66-5.80) or Hispanic (OR, 1.44; CI, 1.02-2.04), be postmenopausal (OR, 1.63; CI, 1.28-2.07), have diabetes (OR, 4.60; CI, 2.60-8.12), have estrogen-receptor-positive DCIS (OR, 1.39; CI, 1.00-192), and present with a radiologic abnormality rather than clinical symptoms (OR, 1.35; CI, 1.01-1.80). At a median follow-up time of 4.96 years (range, 1.0-14.34 years), no significant differences in local recurrence rates were detected based on patients' initial BMI category. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in risk of recurrence between diabetic patients receiving metformin or not. In conclusion, higher BMI is not associated with adverse biologic features or prognosis in patients with DCIS.

  2. Clinico-pathological feature of pilomyxoid astrocytomas: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Nagaishi, Masaya; Yokoo, Hideaki; Hirato, Junko; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Nakazato, Yoichi

    2011-04-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a newly identified variant of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). We report three cases of PMA with comparison to seven cases of PA in terms of their clinicopathological features. The three cases occurred at the ages of 2, 36 and 6 years, and their tumors were located in the left basal ganglia, the pineal gland, and the cerebellum, respectively. They were diagnosed PMA by surgical specimens that showed a characteristic monomorphous architecture with an angiocentric growth pattern and myxoid background. One patient developed localized relapse at 6 months after the surgery, but the other patients remained alive without tumor progression more than 5 years after treatment. In analysis of the immunohistochemical association in PMA and PA, no specific staining was found to be useful for differential diagnosis of PMA from PA. The expression of biomarkers including O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, p53, MIB-1, and EGF receptor neither distinguished PMA from PA nor correlated with outcome. But almost all PMA and PA that demonstrated prominent positivity for nestin showed a high MIB-1 labelling index (LI), and four of these five patients suffered a relapse in the early phase. These results suggest that immunohistochemical expression of nestin and MIB-1 LI may correlate with the aggressiveness of the tumor in PA and PMA.

  3. An improved retinal vessel segmentation method based on high level features for pathological images.

    PubMed

    Ganjee, Razieh; Azmi, Reza; Gholizadeh, Behrouz

    2014-09-01

    Most of the retinal blood vessel segmentation approaches use low level features, resulting in segmenting non-vessel structures together with vessel structures in pathological retinal images. In this paper, a new segmentation method based on high level features is proposed which can process the structure of vessel and non-vessel independently. In this method, segmentation is done in two steps. First, using low level features segmentation is accomplished. Second, using high level features, the non-vessel components are removed. For evaluation, STARE database is used which is publicly available in this field. The results show that the proposed method has 0.9536 accuracy and 0.0191 false positive average on all images of the database and 0.9542 accuracy and 0.0236 false positive average on pathological images. Therefore, the proposed approach shows acceptable accuracy on all images compared to other state of the art methods, and the least false positive average on pathological images.

  4. Text mining for the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System: medical text classification using informative feature selection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Michael D; Woo, Emily Jane; Markatou, Marianthi; Ball, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective The US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) collects spontaneous reports of adverse events following vaccination. Medical officers review the reports and often apply standardized case definitions, such as those developed by the Brighton Collaboration. Our objective was to demonstrate a multi-level text mining approach for automated text classification of VAERS reports that could potentially reduce human workload. Design We selected 6034 VAERS reports for H1N1 vaccine that were classified by medical officers as potentially positive (Npos=237) or negative for anaphylaxis. We created a categorized corpus of text files that included the class label and the symptom text field of each report. A validation set of 1100 labeled text files was also used. Text mining techniques were applied to extract three feature sets for important keywords, low- and high-level patterns. A rule-based classifier processed the high-level feature representation, while several machine learning classifiers were trained for the remaining two feature representations. Measurements Classifiers' performance was evaluated by macro-averaging recall, precision, and F-measure, and Friedman's test; misclassification error rate analysis was also performed. Results Rule-based classifier, boosted trees, and weighted support vector machines performed well in terms of macro-recall, however at the expense of a higher mean misclassification error rate. The rule-based classifier performed very well in terms of average sensitivity and specificity (79.05% and 94.80%, respectively). Conclusion Our validated results showed the possibility of developing effective medical text classifiers for VAERS reports by combining text mining with informative feature selection; this strategy has the potential to reduce reviewer workload considerably. PMID:21709163

  5. Intelligibility Evaluation of Pathological Speech through Multigranularity Feature Extraction and Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Zhang, Mancai

    2017-01-01

    Pathological speech usually refers to speech distortion resulting from illness or other biological insults. The assessment of pathological speech plays an important role in assisting the experts, while automatic evaluation of speech intelligibility is difficult because it is usually nonstationary and mutational. In this paper, we carry out an independent innovation of feature extraction and reduction, and we describe a multigranularity combined feature scheme which is optimized by the hierarchical visual method. A novel method of generating feature set based on S-transform and chaotic analysis is proposed. There are BAFS (430, basic acoustics feature), local spectral characteristics MSCC (84, Mel S-transform cepstrum coefficients), and chaotic features (12). Finally, radar chart and F-score are proposed to optimize the features by the hierarchical visual fusion. The feature set could be optimized from 526 to 96 dimensions based on NKI-CCRT corpus and 104 dimensions based on SVD corpus. The experimental results denote that new features by support vector machine (SVM) have the best performance, with a recognition rate of 84.4% on NKI-CCRT corpus and 78.7% on SVD corpus. The proposed method is thus approved to be effective and reliable for pathological speech intelligibility evaluation. PMID:28194222

  6. Intelligibility Evaluation of Pathological Speech through Multigranularity Feature Extraction and Optimization.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chunying; Li, Haifeng; Ma, Lin; Zhang, Mancai

    2017-01-01

    Pathological speech usually refers to speech distortion resulting from illness or other biological insults. The assessment of pathological speech plays an important role in assisting the experts, while automatic evaluation of speech intelligibility is difficult because it is usually nonstationary and mutational. In this paper, we carry out an independent innovation of feature extraction and reduction, and we describe a multigranularity combined feature scheme which is optimized by the hierarchical visual method. A novel method of generating feature set based on S-transform and chaotic analysis is proposed. There are BAFS (430, basic acoustics feature), local spectral characteristics MSCC (84, Mel S-transform cepstrum coefficients), and chaotic features (12). Finally, radar chart and F-score are proposed to optimize the features by the hierarchical visual fusion. The feature set could be optimized from 526 to 96 dimensions based on NKI-CCRT corpus and 104 dimensions based on SVD corpus. The experimental results denote that new features by support vector machine (SVM) have the best performance, with a recognition rate of 84.4% on NKI-CCRT corpus and 78.7% on SVD corpus. The proposed method is thus approved to be effective and reliable for pathological speech intelligibility evaluation.

  7. Feature analysis of pathological speech signals using local discriminant bases technique.

    PubMed

    Umapathy, K; Krishnan, S

    2005-07-01

    Speech is an integral part of the human communication system. Various pathological conditions affect the vocal functions, inducing speech disorders. Acoustic parameters of speech are commonly used for the assessment of speech disorders and for monitoring the progress of the patient over the course of therapy. In the last two decades, signal-processing techniques have been successfully applied in screening speech disorders. In the paper, a novel approach is proposed to classify pathological speech signals using a local discriminant bases (LDB) algorithm and wavelet packet decompositions. The focus of the paper was to demonstrate the significance of identifying the signal subspaces that contribute to the discriminatory characteristics of normal and pathological speech signals in a computationally efficient way. Features were extracted from target subspaces for classification, and time-frequency decomposition was used to eliminate the need for segmentation of the speech signals. The technique was tested with a database of 212 speech signals (51 normal and 161 pathological) using the Daubechies wavelet (db4). Classification accuracies up to 96% were achieved for a two-group classification as normal and pathological speech signals, and 74% was achieved for a four-group classification as male normal, female normal, male pathological and female pathological signals.

  8. Uncommon non-Hodgkin lymphomas of childhood: pathological diagnosis, clinical features and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Sandlund, John T; Perkins, Sherrie L

    2015-06-01

    We provide a review of the pathological and clinical features for uncommon B-cell and T-cell lymphomas of childhood with a specific focus on advances in treatment approaches and outcomes. There is clearly a need for prospective investigation of both the clinical and biological features of the uncommon non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes in childhood. These results should lead to more uniform and more effective treatment approaches.

  9. Biologic features and prognosis of ductal carcinoma in situ are not adversely impacted by initial large body mass

    PubMed Central

    Lari, Sara A.; Arun, Banu K.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Brewster, Abenaa; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Albarracin, Constance T.; Babiera, Gildy V.; Caudle, Abigail S.; Wagner, Jamie L.; Litton, Jennifer K.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Lucci, Anthony; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with adverse biologic features and poor outcome in patients with invasive breast cancer, yet this relationship has not been evaluated in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). From 1996 to 2009, body mass index (BMI) was recorded at initial diagnosis for 1,885 patients with DCIS treated at our institution. Patients were categorized as obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25 to<30 kg/m2), or of normal weight or underweight (BMI <25 kg/m2). Logistic regression was used to examine associations between BMI and patient, clinical, and pathologic features and treatment. Local–regional recurrence was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided. Of the 1,885 patients, 514 (27.7%) were obese, 510 (27.5%) were overweight, and 831 (44.8%) were normal/underweight. In multivariate analysis, overweight and obese patients were significantly more likely to be African American (odds ratio [OR], 3.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.66–5.80) or Hispanic (OR, 1.44; CI, 1.02–2.04), be postmenopausal (OR, 1.63; CI, 1.28–2.07), have diabetes (OR, 4.60; CI, 2.60–8.12), have estrogen-receptor-positive DCIS (OR, 1.39; CI, 1.00–192), and present with a radiologic abnormality rather than clinical symptoms (OR, 1.35; CI, 1.01–1.80). At a median follow-up time of 4.96 years (range, 1.0–14.34 years), no significant differences in local recurrence rates were detected based on patients’ initial BMI category. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in risk of recurrence between diabetic patients receiving metformin or not. In conclusion, higher BMI is not associated with adverse biologic features or prognosis in patients with DCIS. PMID:22392043

  10. Review for carrageenan-based pharmaceutical biomaterials: favourable physical features versus adverse biological effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Zhan, Xiudan; Wan, Jianbo; Wang, Yitao; Wang, Chunming

    2015-05-05

    Carrageenan (CRG) is a family of natural polysaccharides derived from seaweeds and has widely been used as food additives. In the past decade, owing to its attractive physicochemical properties, CRG has been developed into versatile biomaterials vehicles for drug delivery. Nevertheless, studies also emerged to reveal its adverse effects on the biological system. In this review, we critically appraise the latest literature (two thirds since 2008) on the development of CRG-based pharmaceutical vehicles and the perspective of using CRG for broader biomedical applications. We focus on how current strategies exploit the unique gelling mechanisms, strong water absorption and abundant functional groups of the three major CRG varieties. Notably, CRG-based matrices are demonstrated to increase drug loading and drug solubility, enabling release of orally administrated drugs in zero-order or in a significantly prolonged period. Other amazing features, such as pH-sensitivity and adhesive property, of CRG-based formulations are also introduced. Finally, we discuss the adverse influence of CRG on the human body and then suggest some future directions for the development of CRG-based biomaterials for broader applications in biomedicine.

  11. [A comparative study of pathological voice based on traditional acoustic characteristics and nonlinear features].

    PubMed

    Gan, Deying; Hu, Weiping; Zhao, Bingxin

    2014-10-01

    By analyzing the mechanism of pronunciation, traditional acoustic parameters, including fundamental frequency, Mel frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC), linear prediction cepstrum coefficient (LPCC), frequency perturbation, amplitude perturbation, and nonlinear characteristic parameters, including entropy (sample entropy, fuzzy entropy, multi-scale entropy), box-counting dimension, intercept and Hurst, are extracted as feature vectors for identification of pathological voice. Seventy-eight normal voice samples and 73 pathological voice samples for /a/, and 78 normal samples and 80 pathological samples for /i/ are recognized based on support vector machine (SVM). The results showed that compared with traditional acoustic parameters, nonlinear characteristic parameters could be well used to distinguish between healthy and pathological voices, and the recognition rates for /a/ were all higher than those for /i/ except for multi-scale entropy. That is why the /a/ sound data is used widely in related research at home and abroad for obtaining better identification of pathological voices. Adopting multi-scale entropy for /i/ could obtain higher recognition rate than /a/ between healthy and pathological samples, which may provide some useful inspiration for evaluating vocal compensatory function.

  12. Clinical and Pathologic Features of a Suspected Selenium Deficiency in Captive Plains Zebras.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feilan; Gao, Jie; Wu, Denghu; Xu, Lei; Han, Wenli; Zhang, Denghua; Bi, Xiaoyun; He, Mingzhong; Pan, Yongquan

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that selenium (Se) deficiency is associated with nutritional myopathy, known as white muscle disease (WMD), in horses. However, correlations between Se deficiency and clinical findings, such as hematologic biochemical values and pathological features, have not been evaluated in captive plains zebras. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical and pathologic features that may be caused by a Se deficiency in the captive plains zebra. Clinical findings, feed analyses, hematologic biochemical analyses, response to treatment, and pathologic examination were assessed in six affected plains zebras. The dietary concentration of Se in feed was also tested. Sudden death occurred in two cases during the first day of the onset of symptoms. Two zebras died at 4 days and two zebras survived after treatment. The clinical signs in affected animals were characterized by general weakness, astasia, and abnormal postural positions. The Se concentration in hay from the breeding stable was low, based on the reference value. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was lower compared with the equine reference value. Multiple areas of subcutaneous steatitis and pale skeletal muscle and myocardium were revealed at gross necropsy. Degeneration and necrosis of myocardial and skeletal muscles, as well as congestion of the liver, lung, and kidney were found via histopathological examination. No suspected bacterial infections were found. Feed analyses, response to treatment, serum GSH-Px activity, and pathological features suggest that Se deficiency may have caused the disease in the six affected captive plains zebra.

  13. Pulmonary ground-glass opacity: computed tomography features, histopathology and molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Wei; Rizzo, Stefania; Ma, Li-Hong; Qiu, Xiang-Yu; Warth, Arne; Seki, Nobuhiko; Hasegawa, Mizue; Zou, Jia-Wei; Li, Qian; Femia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of pulmonary ground-glass opacity (GGO) lesions is increasing as a result of the widespread use of multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) and the low-dose CT screening for lung cancer detection. Besides benign lesions, GGOs can be a specific type of lung adenocarcinomas or their preinvasive lesions. Evaluation of pulmonary GGO and investigation of the correlation between CT imaging features and lung adenocarcinoma subtypes or driver genes can be helpful in confirming the diagnosis and in guiding the clinical management. Our review focuses on the pathologic characteristics of GGO detected at CT, involving histopathology and molecular pathology.

  14. Longitudinal Validation of General and Specific Structural Features of Personality Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aidan G.C.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Morey, Leslie C.

    2016-01-01

    Theorists have long argued that personality disorder (PD) is best understood in terms of general impairments shared across the disorders as well as more specific instantiations of pathology. A model based on this theoretical structure was proposed as part of the DSM-5 revision process. However, only recently has this structure been subjected to formal quantitative evaluation, with little in the way of validation efforts via external correlates or prospective longitudinal prediction. We used the Collaborative Longitudinal Study of Personality Disorders dataset to: (1) estimate structural models that parse general from specific variance in personality disorder features, (2) examine patterns of growth in general and specific features over the course of 10 years, and (3) establish concurrent and dynamic longitudinal associations in PD features and a host of external validators including basic personality traits and psychosocial functioning scales. We found that general PD exhibited much lower absolute stability and was most strongly related to broad markers of psychosocial functioning, concurrently and longitudinally, whereas specific features had much higher mean stability and exhibited more circumscribed associations with functioning. However, both general and specific factors showed recognizable associations with normative and pathological traits. These results can inform efforts to refine the conceptualization and diagnosis of personality pathology. PMID:27819472

  15. Glioma grading using cell nuclei morphologic features in digital pathology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, Syed M. S.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a computationally efficient cell nuclei morphologic feature analysis technique to characterize the brain gliomas in tissue slide images. In this work, our contributions are two-fold: 1) obtain an optimized cell nuclei segmentation method based on the pros and cons of the existing techniques in literature, 2) extract representative features by k-mean clustering of nuclei morphologic features to include area, perimeter, eccentricity, and major axis length. This clustering based representative feature extraction avoids shortcomings of extensive tile [1] [2] and nuclear score [3] based methods for brain glioma grading in pathology images. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) is used to classify extracted features into two tumor types: glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and low grade glioma (LGG). Quantitative scores such as precision, recall, and accuracy are obtained using 66 clinical patients' images from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) [4] dataset. On an average ~94% accuracy from 10 fold crossvalidation confirms the efficacy of the proposed method.

  16. Glioma Grading Using Cell Nuclei Morphologic Features in Digital Pathology Images

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Syed M. S.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a computationally efficient cell nuclei morphologic feature analysis technique to characterize the brain gliomas in tissue slide images. In this work, our contributions are two-fold: 1) obtain an optimized cell nuclei segmentation method based on the pros and cons of the existing techniques in literature, 2) extract representative features by k-mean clustering of nuclei morphologic features to include area, perimeter, eccentricity, and major axis length. This clustering based representative feature extraction avoids shortcomings of extensive tile [1] [2] and nuclear score [3] based methods for brain glioma grading in pathology images. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) is used to classify extracted features into two tumor types: glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and low grade glioma (LGG). Quantitative scores such as precision, recall, and accuracy are obtained using 66 clinical patients’ images from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) [4] dataset. On an average ~94% accuracy from 10 fold cross-validation confirms the efficacy of the proposed method. PMID:27942094

  17. Clinical features associated with adverse events in patients with post-pericardiotomy syndrome following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Alraies, M Chadi; Al Jaroudi, Wael; Shabrang, Cyrus; Yarmohammadi, Hirad; Klein, Allan L; Tamarappoo, Balaji K

    2014-11-01

    Postpericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) may be associated with tamponade and pericardial constriction that may require procedural intervention. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features associated with adverse events requiring procedural intervention in patients with PPS. A total of 239 patients who developed PPS after cardiac surgery were monitored for 12 months. PPS was diagnosed if 2 of the 5 following findings were present: fever without infection, pleuritic pain, friction rub, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion (<60 days after surgery). The primary end point was the development of pericardial effusion or pericardial constriction requiring procedural intervention. Among 239 patients with PPS, 75 (31%) required procedural intervention. In a univariate analysis, the odds of a procedural intervention were decreased with older age (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96 to 0.99) and with colchicine used in combination with anti-inflammatory agents (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.79). However, the odds were increased in patients with preoperative heart failure (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1 to 3.39) and early postoperative constrictive physiology (OR 5.77, 95% CI 2.62 to 12.7). After multivariate adjustment, treatment with colchicine along with anti-inflammatory agents was associated with lower odds of requiring intervention (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99). Independent positive predictors of procedural intervention included age (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99), time to PPS (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99), and early postoperative constrictive physiology (OR 6.23, 95% CI 2.04 to 19.07). In conclusion, younger age, early-onset PPS, and postoperative constrictive physiology were associated with the need for procedural intervention in patients with PPS, whereas colchicine was associated with reduced odds of adverse events and procedural intervention.

  18. Preventing Eating Disorder Pathology: Common and Unique Features of Successful Eating Disorders Prevention Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ciao, Anna C.; Loth, Katie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the field of eating disorders has made remarkable strides in identifying, evaluating, and disseminating successful prevention programs. The current review identifies and discusses nine distinct eating disorders prevention programs that reduce existing eating disorder pathology or prevent the onset of future pathology. Each program was evaluated in one or more controlled trial with a follow-up period of at least six months. We review the evidence base for these nine successful programs and discuss their common and unique features. Based on authors’ descriptions of their programs in published trials, we found that all programs were theory-driven, targeted one or more eating disorder risk factor (e.g., body dissatisfaction), were delivered across multiple group sessions, and included at least some interactive content. Most programs included content related to healthy eating/nutrition, media literacy/sociocultural pressures, and body acceptance/body satisfaction. Notably, there was wide variation in some participant features (e.g., participant age, sex, risk status) and intervention features (e.g., setting and format, length and dose, providers), suggesting that a variety of programs are beneficial in impacting eating disorder pathology. Implications and directions for future research are discussed, including an increased focus on universal and indicated prevention programs, expanding programs to a wider age range and a broader spectrum of weight-related problems, and rigorous evaluation of programs through efficacy, effectiveness, and implementation research. PMID:24821099

  19. Preventing eating disorder pathology: common and unique features of successful eating disorders prevention programs.

    PubMed

    Ciao, Anna C; Loth, Katie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-07-01

    Over the past two decades, the field of eating disorders has made remarkable strides in identifying, evaluating, and disseminating successful prevention programs. The current review identifies and discusses nine distinct eating disorders prevention programs that reduce existing eating disorder pathology or prevent the onset of future pathology. Each program was evaluated in one or more controlled trial with a follow-up period of at least six months. We review the evidence base for these nine successful programs and discuss their common and unique features. Based on authors' descriptions of their programs in published trials, we found that all programs were theory-driven, targeted one or more eating disorder risk factor (e.g., body dissatisfaction), were delivered across multiple group sessions, and included at least some interactive content. Most programs included content related to healthy eating/nutrition, media literacy/sociocultural pressures, and body acceptance/body satisfaction. Notably, there was wide variation in some participant features (e.g., participant age, sex, risk status) and intervention features (e.g., setting and format, length and dose, providers), suggesting that a variety of programs are beneficial in impacting eating disorder pathology. Implications and directions for future research are discussed, including an increased focus on universal and indicated prevention programs, expanding programs to a wider age range and a broader spectrum of weight-related problems, and rigorous evaluation of programs through efficacy, effectiveness, and implementation research.

  20. Glycogen storage diseases: a brief review and update on clinical features, genetic abnormalities, pathologic features, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hicks, John; Wartchow, Eric; Mierau, Gary

    2011-10-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) affect primarily the liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and sometimes the central nervous system and the kidneys. These unique diseases are quite varied in age of onset of symptoms, morbidity, and mortality. Glycogen storage diseases are classified according to their individual enzyme deficiency. Each of these enzymes regulates synthesis or degradation of glycogen. Interestingly, there is great phenotypic variation and variable clinical courses even when a specific enzyme is altered by mutation. Depending on the specific mutation in an enzyme, a GSD patient may have a favorable or unfavorable prognosis. With neonatal or infantile forms, some GSDs lead to death within the first year of life, whereas other glycogen storage diseases are relatively asymptomatic or may cause only exercise intolerance. The paper provides a brief review and update of glycogen storage diseases, with respect to clinical features, genetic abnormalities, pathologic features, and treatment.

  1. 6q deletion in Waldenström macroglobulinemia is associated with features of adverse prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ocio, E M; Schop, R F J; Gonzalez, B; Van Wier, S A; Hernandez-Rivas, J M; Gutierrez, N C; Garcia-Sanz, R; Moro, M J; Aguilera, C; Hernandez, J; Xu, R; Greipp, P R; Dispenzieri, A; Jalal, S M; Lacy, M Q; Gonzalez-Paz, N; Gertz, M A; San Miguel, J F; Fonseca, R

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is an effective technique for the cytogenetic analysis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), but the potential impact of molecular cytogenetics on disease evolution and as a prognostic marker is still unknown. Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 6 (6q-) is the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in WM. This study analysed the prevalence of this aberration in 102 WM patients, and correlated it with disease characteristics. The incidence of 6q21 deletion was 7% by conventional cytogenetics and 34% when analysed by FISH (54% when cytoplasmic immunoglobulin M-FISH was used). Patients with deletion of 6q displayed features of adverse prognosis, such as higher levels of beta2-microglobulin and monoclonal paraprotein and a greater tendency to display anaemia and hypoalbuminemia. Interestingly, there was a correlation between the presence of 6q deletion and the International Staging System prognostic index (incidence of 6q- among patients stratified in stages 1, 2 and 3 was 24%, 42% and 67% respectively). Those patients diagnosed with smouldering WM who displayed the abnormality showed a trend to an earlier requirement of treatment. Finally, the survival analysis did not show differences between the two groups of patients, probably due to the short follow up of our series.

  2. Ron tyrosine kinase receptor synergises with EGFR to confer adverse features in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Keller, J; Nimnual, A S; Shroyer, K R; Joy, C; Ischenko, I; Chandler, C S; Dong, L M; Hayman, M J; Chan, E L

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although EGFR inhibitors have shown some success in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), the results are not dramatic. Additional molecular targets are urgently needed. We previously showed that the loss of Ron receptor activity significantly slowed squamous tumour growth and progression in a murine model. Based on these data, we hypothesised that Ron expression confers an aggressive phenotype in HNSCCs. Methods: We prospectively collected and evaluated 154 snap-frozen, primary HNSCCs for Ron and EGFR expression/phosphorylation. Biomarker correlation with clinical, pathological and outcome data was performed. The biological responses of HNSCC cell lines to Ron knockdown, its activation and the biochemical interaction between Ron and EGFR were examined. Results: We discovered that 64.3% (99 out of 154) HNSCCs expressed Ron. The carcinomas expressed exclusively mature functional Ron, whereas the adjacent nonmalignant epithelium expressed predominantly nonfunctional Ron precursor. There was no significant association between Ron and sex, tumour differentiation, perineural/vascular invasion or staging. However, patients with Ron+HNSCC were significantly older and more likely to have oropharyngeal tumours. Ron+HNSCC also had significantly higher EGFR expression and correlated strongly with phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR). Newly diagnosed HNSCC with either Ron/pEGFR or both had lower disease-free survival than those without Ron and pEGFR. Knocking down Ron in SCC9 cells significantly blunted their migratory response to not only the Ron ligand, MSP, but also EGF. Stimulation of Ron in SCC9 cells significantly augmented the growth effect of EGF; the synergistic effect of both growth factors in SCC9 cells was dependent on Ron expression. Activated Ron also interacted with and transactivated EGFR. Conclusion: Ron synergises with EGFR to confer certain adverse features in HNSCCs. PMID:23799848

  3. Effect of Preoperative Risk Group Stratification on Oncologic Outcomes of Patients with Adverse Pathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won Sik; Kim, Lawrence H. C.; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Ham, Won Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy based only on adverse pathologic findings (APFs), irrespective of preoperative risk group. We assessed whether a model incorporating both the preoperative risk group and APFs could predict long-term oncologic outcomes better than a model based on APFs alone. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 4,404 men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at our institution between 1992 and 2014. After excluding patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy or with incomplete pathological or follow-up data, 3,092 men were included in the final analysis. APFs were defined as extraprostatic extension (EPE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), or a positive surgical margin (PSM). The adequacy of model fit to the data was compared using the likelihood-ratio test between the models with and without risk groups, and model discrimination was compared with the concordance index (c-index) for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). We performed multivariate Cox proportional hazard model and competing risk regression analyses to identify predictors of BCR and PCSM in the total patient group and each of the risk groups. Results Adding risk groups to the model containing only APFs significantly improved the fit to the data (likelihood-ratio test, p <0.001) and the c-index increased from 0.693 to 0.732 for BCR and from 0.707 to 0.747 for PCSM. A RP Gleason score (GS) ≥8 and a PSM were independently associated with BCR in the total patient group and also each risk group. However, only a GS ≥8 and SVI were associated with PCSM in the total patient group (GS ≥8: hazard ratio [HR] 5.39 and SVI: HR 3.36) and the high-risk group (GS ≥8: HR 6.31 and SVI: HR 4.05). Conclusion The postoperative estimation of oncologic outcomes in men with APFs at RP was improved by considering preoperative risk group stratification. Although a PSM was an

  4. A Joint Time-Frequency and Matrix Decomposition Feature Extraction Methodology for Pathological Voice Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoraani, Behnaz; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2009-12-01

    The number of people affected by speech problems is increasing as the modern world places increasing demands on the human voice via mobile telephones, voice recognition software, and interpersonal verbal communications. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology for automatic pattern classification of pathological voices. The main contribution of this paper is extraction of meaningful and unique features using Adaptive time-frequency distribution (TFD) and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). We construct Adaptive TFD as an effective signal analysis domain to dynamically track the nonstationarity in the speech and utilize NMF as a matrix decomposition (MD) technique to quantify the constructed TFD. The proposed method extracts meaningful and unique features from the joint TFD of the speech, and automatically identifies and measures the abnormality of the signal. Depending on the abnormality measure of each signal, we classify the signal into normal or pathological. The proposed method is applied on the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) voice disorders database which consists of 161 pathological and 51 normal speakers, and an overall classification accuracy of 98.6% was achieved.

  5. Paget disease of the vulva: a histologic study of 56 cases correlating pathologic features and disease course.

    PubMed

    Shaco-Levy, Ruthy; Bean, Sarah M; Vollmer, Robin T; Papalas, John A; Bentley, Rex C; Selim, Maria Angelica; Robboy, Stanley J

    2010-01-01

    The Duke experience with 56 vulvar Paget disease patients was analyzed emphasizing pathologic features and controversial issues. Nearly all patients were Caucasian, and their mean age was 69 years. The average length of follow-up was 5.6 years. For each case, the following histologic features were evaluated and their association with disease course was examined: pseudo-invasion, adnexal involvement, signet-ring cells, cytologic atypia, glands formation, epidermal acantholysis, parakeratosis, hyperkeratosis, and chronic inflammation. The recurrence rate after surgical management was 32%, with epidermal acantholysis being the only statistically significant risk factor. Stromal invasion occurred in 10 patients (18%), and was not a statistically significant adverse prognostic indicator, although the single patient who died of the disease had the deepest stromal invasion. Recurrence was more common after resections with positive surgical margins, but this correlation was not statistically significant. Intraoperative frozen section analysis of the margins did not reduce recurrence rate, nor was it useful in attaining permanent free margins. The Paget cells were consistently reactive with cytokeratin-7 and carcinoembryonic antigen and unreactive with S-100 protein, HMB-45, and Mart-1. In addition, the tumor cells were usually positive for mucin stains. This profile helps distinguish vulvar Paget disease from its mimics, Pagetoid squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma.

  6. A rare case of primary pulmonary artery myofibroblastic sarcoma--imaging and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ran; Tang, Hao; Shen, Kangjun; Luo, Junming; Zhou, Xinmin

    2014-02-01

    Primary myofibroblastic sarcomas of the pulmonary artery are very uncommon, but early detection is critical. Common clinical symptoms include shortness of breath, chest discomfort, and syncope. Patients diagnosed with a pulmonary tumor have a high risk of fatal pulmonary embolism. In this case study, we identified and diagnosed pulmonary artery myofibroblastic sarcoma in a young man by its imaging and pathologic characters. Surgery to excise the tumor was successfully performed and the operation was considered to have improved his prognosis. Postoperative examinations did not show any evidence of residual tumor, recurrence, or metastasis in the lungs or cardiac tissue. Based on the results of this case study, we concluded that the imaging and pathologic features of primary pulmonary artery myofibroblastic sarcoma can assist physicians in making a prompt diagnosis and an immediate surgical and treatment plan to greatly improve prognosis.

  7. CT Features and Pathological Correlation of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Dong, Junqiang; Xing, Jingjing; Limbu, Hangsha Hang; Yue, Songwei; Su, Lei; Zhang, Dandan; Gao, Jianbo

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the computed tomography (CT) findings of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of the kidney and correlate them pathologically. Ten cases of pathologically confirmed renal PNET were collected and retrospectively reviewed. The CT features that were analyzed include tumor size, shape, margins, density, nature of enhancement, presence of thrombosis, and metastasis, etc. These parameters were correlated with pathological findings and combined with literature review. The median age of the patients was 30 years. CT images showed solitary, large, ill-defined, irregular, or lobulated heterogeneous mass. Invasive growth toward the renal cortex and pelvis with renal cortical interruptions were seen in eight cases with one case exhibiting invasion that extended beyond the renal capsule with soft tissue seen in the perirenal fat pace. The tumors were confined to the kidney contour with enlargement of kidney in six of the cases. Cystic changes with mural nodules were detected in three cases. Eight cases showed persistent moderate enhancement during the nephrographic phase. Irregular septum-like structures were seen in four cases. Thrombosis was detected in eight cases. Lymph node metastasis was detected in eight cases with bilateral lung metastasis in two and bone metastasis in one. Renal PNET is a rare highly aggressive disease affecting younger people. It should be considered as a strong differential when well confined, yet large tumors that cause enlargement of the kidney are seen and also when tumors expressing cystic changes along with mural nodules are seen. Although renal PNET has certain other characteristic CT features, pathological and immunohistochemistry report must also be sought for definitive diagnosis.

  8. PREDICTING FIFTEEN-YEAR CANCER-SPECIFIC MORTALITY BASED ON THE PATHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Eggener, Scott E.; Scardino, Peter T.; Walsh, Patrick C.; Han, Misop; Partin, Alan W.; Trock, Bruce J.; Feng, Zhaoyong; Wood, David P.; Eastham, James A.; Yossepowitch, Ofer; Rabah, Danny M.; Kattan, Michael W.; Yu, Changhong; Klein, Eric A.; Stephenson, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Long-term prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) after radical prostatectomy is poorly defined in the era of widespread screening. An understanding of the treated natural history of screen-detected cancers and the pathological risk factors for PCSM are needed for treatment decision-making. Methods Using Fine and Gray competing risk regression analysis, the clinical and pathological data and follow-up information of 11,521 patients treated by radical prostatectomy at four academic centers from 1987 to 2005 were modeled to predict PCSM. The model was validated on 12,389 patients treated at a separate institution during the same period. Results The overall 15-year PCSM was 7%. Primary and secondary pathological Gleason grade 4–5 (P < 0.001 for both), seminal vesicle invasion (P < 0.001), and year of surgery (P = 0.002) were significant predictors of PCSM. A nomogram predicting 15-year PCSM based on standard pathological parameters was accurate and discriminating with an externally-validated concordance index of 0.92. Stratified by patient age, 15-year PCSM for Gleason score ≤ 6, 3+4, 4+3, and 8–10 ranged from 0.2–1.2%, 4.2–6.5%, 6.6–11%, and 26–37%, respectively. The 15-year PCSM risks ranged from 0.8–1.5%, 2.9–10%, 15–27%, and 22–30% for organ-confined cancer, extraprostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node metastasis, respectively. Only 3 of 9557 patients with organ-confined, Gleason score ≤ 6 cancers have died from prostate cancer. Conclusions The presence of poorly differentiated cancer and seminal vesicle invasion are the prime determinants of PCSM after radical prostatectomy. The risk of PCSM can be predicted with unprecedented accuracy once the pathological features of prostate cancer are known. PMID:21239008

  9. Distinguishing features of endometrial pathology after exposure to the progesterone receptor modulator mifepristone.

    PubMed

    Fiscella, Julietta; Bonfiglio, Thomas; Winters, Paul; Eisinger, Steven H; Fiscella, Kevin

    2011-07-01

    There is growing interest in the use of progesterone receptor modulators such as mifepristone for treatment of gynecologic and other conditions, but interest in progesterone receptor modulators is dampened by the effects of the agents on the endometrium. In this study, we examined the endometria of women exposed to mifepristone for treatment of leiomyomas in doses of 2.5 and 5 mg and compared them to unexposed endometria. We assessed the reliability of these features by comparing agreement in ratings between pathologists who were blinded to each other's readings. We assessed distinguishing features between exposed and unexposed groups by comparing frequency of features between groups. We found that key features could be reliably assessed by pathologists experienced in endometrial pathology. We observed several features (nonsynchronous endometrium, large fluid filled glands, and abnormal blood vessels) that distinguished endometrial samples that were and were not exposed to the drug. These findings suggest several features that can be tracked during studies involving mifepristone and, potentially, other progesterone receptor modulators.

  10. DISTINGUISHING FEATURES OF ENDOMETRIAL PATHOLOGY FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO THE PROGESTERONE RECEPTOR MODULATOR MIFEPRISTONE

    PubMed Central

    Fiscella, Julietta; Bonfiglio, Thomas; Winters, Paul; Eisinger, Steven H; Fiscella, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in use of progesterone receptor modulators (PRM) such as mifepristone for treatment of gynecological and other conditions, but interest in PRMs is dampened by effects of the agents on the endometrium. In this study, we examined the endometria of women exposed to mifepristone for treatment of leiomyomas in doses of 2.5 mg and 5 mg and compared them to unexposed endometria. We assessed the reliability of these features by comparing agreement in ratings between pathologists who were blinded to each other's readings. We assessed distinguishing features between exposed and unexposed groups by comparing frequency of features between groups. We found that key features could be reliably assessed by pathologists experienced in endometrial pathology. We observed several features (non synchronous endometrium, large fluid filled glands and abnormal blood vessels) that distinguished endometrial samples that were and were not exposed to the drug. These findings suggest several features that can be tracked during studies involving mifepristone and potentially other PRMs. PMID:21315422

  11. Unusual malignant tumors of the breast: MRI features and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Linda, Anna; Zuiani, Chiara; Girometti, Rossano; Londero, Viviana; Machin, Piernicola; Brondani, Giovanni; Bazzocchi, Massimo

    2010-08-01

    Unusual malignant breast tumors are well-differentiated subtypes of invasive ductal carcinoma, including mucinous, tubular, medullary and papillary carcinomas, and account for about 10% of malignant breast tumors. They are increasingly being encountered during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the breast. Therefore, breast radiologists should be aware of their appearance on MRI. This review provides an overview of MRI characteristics of a range of unusual tumors (mucinous carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, tubular carcinoma, intraductal papillary carcinoma, intracystic papillary carcinoma and invasive papillary carcinoma), highlighting specific clues for diagnosis and correlating MRI and pathologic features. Many unusual breast tumors exhibit MRI features similar to those of benign or low suspicious lesions (oval shape, well-defined margins, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, continuous increase kinetics, i.e. type I dynamic curve), leading to a possible misdiagnosis. Nevertheless, an understanding of pathologic features of these tumors, especially tissue content (mucinous, fibrous) and growth pattern, can help to define some specific clues for their diagnosis.

  12. Neoplastic diseases of the spermatic cord: an overview of pathological features, evaluation, and management.

    PubMed

    Dagur, Gautam; Gandhi, Jason; Kapadia, Kailash; Inam, Rafid; Smith, Noel L; Joshi, Gargi; Khan, Sardar Ali

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular tumors found with the spermatic cord, known as neoplasms, are usually identified to be benign. However, the accurate and timely diagnosis of spermatic cord masses is highly crucial, especially when most results are often overlooked or unclear. In this review, we discuss the anatomy and embryology of the spermatic cord. Upon rooting these fundamental concepts, we discuss an array of benign and malignant neoplastic tumors, including their origin, pathological features, clinical evaluation and management, as well as other case-specific characteristics of unique presentation. Many of these neoplasms are based on local neurological, vascular, muscular, bone, soft tissue, or lymphatic origin, while others have metastasized from particular areas of the body.

  13. Pathologic stratification of operable lung adenocarcinoma using radiomics features extracted from dual energy CT images

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Yun; Sohn, Insuk; Kim, Hye Seung; Son, Ji Ye; Kwon, O Jung; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shim, Young Mog

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of surrogate biomarkers as predictors of histopathologic tumor grade and aggressiveness using radiomics data from dual-energy computed tomography (DECT), with the ultimate goal of accomplishing stratification of early-stage lung adenocarcinoma for optimal treatment. Results Pathologic grade was divided into grades 1, 2, and 3. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed i-uniformity and 97.5th percentile CT attenuation value as independent significant factors to stratify grade 2 or 3 from grade 1. The AUC value calculated from leave-one-out cross-validation procedure for discriminating grades 1, 2, and 3 was 0.9307 (95% CI: 0.8514–1), 0.8610 (95% CI: 0.7547–0.9672), and 0.8394 (95% CI: 0.7045–0.9743), respectively. Materials and Methods A total of 80 patients with 91 clinically and radiologically suspected stage I or II lung adenocarcinoma were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent DECT and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, followed by surgery. Quantitative CT and PET imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for a tumor aggressiveness prediction model were extracted and used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting all pathologic grades. Conclusions Quantitative radiomics values from DECT imaging metrics can help predict pathologic aggressiveness of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27880938

  14. Early Controversies over Athetosis: I. Clinical Features, Differentiation from other Movement Disorders, Associated Conditions, and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lanska, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the description of athetosis in 1871 by American neurologist William Alexander Hammond (1828–1900) the disorder has been a source of controversy, as were many aspects of Hammond’s career. Methods Primary sources have been used to review controversies in the 50-year period since the initial description of athetosis, in particular those concerning clinical features, differentiation from other movement disorders, associated conditions, and pathology. Controversies concerning treatment will be addressed in a subsequent article. Results Hammond struggled to establish athetosis as a distinct clinical–pathological entity, and had successfully predicted the striatal pathology in his initial case (albeit somewhat serendipitously). Athetosis was, nevertheless, considered by many neurologists to be a form of post-hemiplegic chorea or part of a continuum between chorea and dystonia. European neurologists, and particularly the French, initially ignored or discounted the concept. Additional controversies arose over whether the movements persisted during sleep, whether athetosis was, or could be, associated with imbecility or insanity, and how it should be treated. Discussion Some controversies concerning athetosis served to identify areas where knowledge was insufficient to make accurate statements, despite prior self-assured or even dogmatic statements to the contrary. Other controversies illustrated established prejudices, even if these biases were often only apparent with the greater detachment of hindsight. PMID:23450262

  15. Image mining for investigative pathology using optimized feature extraction and data fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjin; Meer, Peter; Georgescu, Bogdan; He, Wei; Goodell, Lauri A; Foran, David J

    2005-07-01

    In many subspecialties of pathology, the intrinsic complexity of rendering accurate diagnostic decisions is compounded by a lack of definitive criteria for detecting and characterizing diseases and their corresponding histological features. In some cases, there exists a striking disparity between the diagnoses rendered by recognized authorities and those provided by non-experts. We previously reported the development of an Image Guided Decision Support (IGDS) system, which was shown to reliably discriminate among malignant lymphomas and leukemia that are sometimes confused with one another during routine microscopic evaluation. As an extension of those efforts, we report here a web-based intelligent archiving subsystem that can automatically detect, image, and index new cells into distributed ground-truth databases. Systematic experiments showed that through the use of robust texture descriptors and density estimation based fusion the reliability and performance of the governing classifications of the system were improved significantly while simultaneously reducing the dimensionality of the feature space.

  16. Clinical, Pathological, and Molecular Features of Lung Adenocarcinomas with AXL Expression

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kenichi; Shimizu, Shigeki; Sakai, Kazuko; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL is a member of the Tyro3-Axl-Mer receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily. AXL affects several cellular functions, including growth and migration. AXL aberration is reportedly a marker for poor prognosis and treatment resistance in various cancers. In this study, we analyzed clinical, pathological, and molecular features of AXL expression in lung adenocarcinomas (LADs). We examined 161 LAD specimens from patients who underwent pulmonary resections. When AXL protein expression was quantified (0, 1+, 2+, 3+) according to immunohistochemical staining intensity, results were 0: 35%; 1+: 20%; 2+: 37%; and 3+: 7% for the 161 samples. AXL expression status did not correlate with clinical features, including smoking status and pathological stage. However, patients whose specimens showed strong AXL expression (3+) had markedly poorer prognoses than other groups (P = 0.0033). Strong AXL expression was also significantly associated with downregulation of E-cadherin (P = 0.025) and CD44 (P = 0.0010). In addition, 9 of 12 specimens with strong AXL expression had driver gene mutations (6 with EGFR, 2 with KRAS, 1 with ALK). In conclusion, we found that strong AXL expression in surgically resected LADs was a predictor of poor prognosis. LADs with strong AXL expression were characterized by mesenchymal status, higher expression of stem-cell-like markers, and frequent driver gene mutations. PMID:27100677

  17. Clinical, Pathologic, and Genetic Features of Wilms Tumors With WTX Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Sanda; Akhavanfard, Sara; Harris, Marian H; Vargas, Sara O

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and pathologic features of patients with WTX-mutated Wilms tumor (WT) have not been studied in detail. We characterize the clinical and pathologic findings in WT with WTX abnormalities and provide comparison with WT without WTX mutation. Clinical, gross, and microscopic features in 35 patients with WT were examined. Karyotype was examined in a subset of cases. All cases had been previously analyzed for WTX, WT1, and CTNNB1 aberrations via array comparative genomic hybridization; OncoMap 4 high throughput genotyping was performed on 18 cases. Eleven tumors had WTX abnormality. No significant differences were identified between patients with mutated versus nonmutated WTX with respect to gender (45% versus 33% male), age (mean 3.9 versus 4.1 years), tumor size (mean 12.7 cm versus 12.8 cm), anaplasia (9% versus 12%), rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (18% versus 8%), cartilage differentiation (9% versus 4%), mucinous epithelial differentiation (9% versus 4%), nephrogenic rests (28% versus 21%), or relapse rate (11% versus 25%). Mutations in KRAS, MYC, and PIK3R1 were restricted to WTX-mutated WT, mutations in AKT, CKDN2A, EFGR, HRAS, MET, and RET were restricted to WT without WTX mutation, and mutations in BRAF, CTTNB1, NRAS, PDGFRA, and STK11 were seen in both groups. Our study revealed no clinical or pathologic distinctions between WT with and without WTX abnormality. This similarity lends support to the concept of a common tumorigenic pathway between WT with aberrant WTX and those without.

  18. MRL/MpJ mice show unique pathological features after experimental kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Shiozuru, Daichi; Ichii, Osamu; Kimura, Junpei; Nakamura, Teppei; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Otsuka-Kanazawa, Saori; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Clarification of the renal repair process is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies for kidney injury. MRL/MpJ mice have a unique repair process characterized by low scar formation. The pathological features of experimentally injured MRL/MpJ and C57BL/6 mouse kidneys were compared to examine the renal repair process. The dilation and atrophy of renal tubules were observed in folic acid (FA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in both strains, and the histopathological injury scores and number of interleukin (IL)-1F6-positive damaged distal tubules and kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1)-positive damaged proximal tubules drastically increased 1 day after AKI induction. However, KIM-1-positive tubules and the elevation of serum renal function markers were significantly fewer and lower, respectively, in MRL/MpJ mice at days 2 and 7 after AKI. After traumatic kidney injury (TKI) via needle puncture, severe tubular necrotic lesions in the punctured area and fibrosis progressed in both strains. Indices for fibrosis such as aniline blue-positive area, number of alpha smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts, and messenger RNA expression levels of Tgfb1 and Mmp2 indicated lower fibrotic activity in MRL/MpJ kidneys. Characteristically, only MRL/MpJ kidneys manifested remarkable calcification around the punctured area beginning 7 days after TKI. The pathological features of injured MRL/MpJ and C57BL/6 kidneys differed, especially those of kidneys with mild proximal tubular injuries after FA-induced AKI. Lower fibrotic activity and increased calcification after TKI were observed in MRL/MpJ kidneys. These findings clarified the unique pathological characteristics of MRL/MpJ mouse kidneys and contribute to understanding of the renal repair process after kidney injury.

  19. Clinical, pathologic, and molecular features of early-onset colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yantiss, Rhonda K; Goodarzi, Mahmoud; Zhou, Xi K; Rennert, Hanna; Pirog, Edyta C; Banner, Barbara F; Chen, Yao-Tseng

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of colorectal carcinoma has increased among patients <40 years of age for unclear reasons. In this study, we describe the clinical, pathologic, and molecular features of colorectal carcinomas that developed in young patients. We compiled a study group of 24 patients <40 years of age with colorectal carcinoma, and 45 patients > or =40 years of age served as controls. Cases were evaluated for clinical risk factors of malignancy and pathologic features predictive of outcome. The tumors were immunohistochemically stained for O6-methylguanine methyltransferase, MLH-1, MSH-2, MSH-6, beta-catenin, chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4, epidermal growth factor receptor, TP53, p16, survivin, and alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase; assessed for microsatellite instability and mutations in beta-catenin, APC, EGFR, PIK3CA, KRAS, and BRAF; evaluated for micro-RNA expression (miR-21, miR-20a, miR-183, miR-192, miR-145, miR-106a, miR-181b, and miR-203); and examined for evidence of human papillomavirus infection. One study patient each had ulcerative colitis and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Ninety-two percent of tumors from young patients occurred in the distal colon (P=0.006), particularly the rectum (58%, P=0.02), and 75% were stage III or IV. Tumors from young patients showed more frequent lymphovascular (81%, P=0.03) and/or venous (48%, P=0.003) invasion, an infiltrative growth pattern (81%, P=0.03), and alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase expression (83%, P=0.02) compared with controls. Carcinomas in this group showed significantly increased expression of miR-21, miR-20a, miR-145, miR-181b, and miR-203 (P< or =0.005 for all comparisons with controls). These results indicate that early-onset carcinomas commonly show pathologic features associated with aggressive behavior. Posttranslational regulation of mRNA and subsequent protein expression may be particularly important to the development of colorectal carcinomas in young patients.

  20. The Research of Feature Extraction Method of Liver Pathological Image Based on Multispatial Mapping and Statistical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiling; Xia, Bingbing; Yi, Dehui

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new feature extraction method of liver pathological image based on multispatial mapping and statistical properties. For liver pathological images of Hematein Eosin staining, the image of R and B channels can reflect the sensitivity of liver pathological images better, while the entropy space and Local Binary Pattern (LBP) space can reflect the texture features of the image better. To obtain the more comprehensive information, we map liver pathological images to the entropy space, LBP space, R space, and B space. The traditional Higher Order Local Autocorrelation Coefficients (HLAC) cannot reflect the overall information of the image, so we propose an average correction HLAC feature. We calculate the statistical properties and the average gray value of pathological images and then update the current pixel value as the absolute value of the difference between the current pixel gray value and the average gray value, which can be more sensitive to the gray value changes of pathological images. Lastly the HLAC template is used to calculate the features of the updated image. The experiment results show that the improved features of the multispatial mapping have the better classification performance for the liver cancer. PMID:27022407

  1. The Research of Feature Extraction Method of Liver Pathological Image Based on Multispatial Mapping and Statistical Properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiling; Jiang, Huiyan; Xia, Bingbing; Yi, Dehui

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new feature extraction method of liver pathological image based on multispatial mapping and statistical properties. For liver pathological images of Hematein Eosin staining, the image of R and B channels can reflect the sensitivity of liver pathological images better, while the entropy space and Local Binary Pattern (LBP) space can reflect the texture features of the image better. To obtain the more comprehensive information, we map liver pathological images to the entropy space, LBP space, R space, and B space. The traditional Higher Order Local Autocorrelation Coefficients (HLAC) cannot reflect the overall information of the image, so we propose an average correction HLAC feature. We calculate the statistical properties and the average gray value of pathological images and then update the current pixel value as the absolute value of the difference between the current pixel gray value and the average gray value, which can be more sensitive to the gray value changes of pathological images. Lastly the HLAC template is used to calculate the features of the updated image. The experiment results show that the improved features of the multispatial mapping have the better classification performance for the liver cancer.

  2. The York platelet syndrome: a fourth case with unusual pathologic features.

    PubMed

    White, James G; Pakzad, Kourosh; Meister, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The present report describes a fourth patient with platelet pathological features identical to those found in the first three cases with the York platelet syndrome (YPS), as well as other findings that suggest he may be a variant. His platelets contain the same giant opaque and target organelles found earlier, as well as enlarged organelles with a gray appearing matrix. It is possible that the giant structures have the same source, but are at different stages of development. The fourth patient has platelet pathology suggestive of other thrombocyte disorders. He has many large platelets and normal sized thrombocytes nearly devoid of alpha granules. As a result, he was originally thought to have the gray platelet syndrome. He also has significant numbers of platelets attached to platelets and platelets in platelets as seen in patients with the X-linked GATA-1 mutation. Some of the fourth YPS patient's platelets contained massive alpha granules suggesting the possibility of the Paris Trousseau Jacobson Syndrome. Yet, none of these other platelet disorders had giant dense organelles like those found in YPS thrombocytes. As a result, it is reasonable to include this child with the other three, and diagnose him as a patient with the YPS.

  3. Diprosopia/dicephalia in calves in northern Italy: clinical and aetio-pathological features.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, E; D'Angelo, A; Bellino, C; Gay, L; Gianella, P; Capucchio, M T

    2011-12-01

    Cephalic parapagia, a rare congenital anomaly caused by the fusion of two monozygotic embryos, is characterized by a single body and a spectrum of duplication of craniofacial structures. The authors describe the clinical and pathological aspects of the parapagus conjoined twin defect in nine calves referred to the Department of Animal Pathology, Turin, between 1999 and 2009. The majority of the calves (eight cases) presented two snouts that shared three or four eyes (diprosopia); one calf presented two separate skulls fused at the foramen magnum (dicephalia). Bilateral inferior brachygnathia was observed in four calves. Post-mortem examination of the skull revealed complete brain duplication with fusion at the caudal portion of the brainstem in all calves. Histological features of the cerebral hemispheres and brainstem were normal; moderate disorganization of the cerebellar cortex was noted in two cases. Cardiac malformations were observed in three calves. No aetiologic cause was determined. This article underscores the importance of diprosopia in cattle species and suggests the need for more detailed investigations to better understand its pathogenesis.

  4. Chlamydia trachomatis pneumonitis in the C57BL/KsJ mouse: pathologic and immunologic features.

    PubMed

    Harrison, H R; Lee, S M; Lucas, D O

    1982-12-01

    Pneumonitis occurred in both normal and diabetic C57BL/KsJ mice, inoculated with a Chlamydia trachomatis strain isolated from a human infant . Animals were inoculated intranasally under light ether anesthesia. Control animals receiving carrier medium did not develop pulmonary disease. The pneumonitis was focal and involved interstitial and peribronchial structures. Pathological changes were most pronounced at 10 to 14 days after inoculation, but no animals died of their disease. The early cellular response was polymorphonuclear (4 to 6 days); this was followed by a predominantly mononuclear cell infiltrate. Immunopathological examination revealed immunoglobulin- and complement-bearing cells in a peribronchial distribution, corresponding to the mononuclear infiltrates seen by light microscopy. Infected animals seroconverted to C. trachomatis. Specific antichlamydial IgM antibody was detected at days 6 through 21 and higher titer IgG at days 10 through 28. Splenic lymphocyte stimulation responses to chlamydial antigen were observed at 10 and 21 days. C. trachomatis was cultured only from 6-day lung tissue. The histopathological and immunopathological features of the pneumonitis were similar in normal and diabetic mice. In addition, humoral and cellular immunoresponsiveness to chlamydial infection were not compromised in the diabetics. This animal model resembles human infant chlamydial pneumonitis in its pathological manifestations and may increase our understanding of the human disease.

  5. Segmental necrotising enterocolitis: pathological and clinical features of 22 cases in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, T; Dahms, B; Lindpaintner, K; Islam, M; Azad, M A; Anton, P

    1987-01-01

    To describe the pathology and clinical features of segmental necrotising enterocolitis (SNE) in children and adults, 22 diarrhoeal patients (median age two years, range two months to 50 years) in Bangladesh with this lesion detected at autopsy were examined and compared with two groups of diarrhoeal control patients. Gross pathology consisted of purplish or black mucosal or transmural discoloration with erosions or ulcerations in segments of the jejunum or ileum of 18 cases and of the colon alone in four cases. Two patients had intestinal perforations. Microscopically all specimens showed coagulation necrosis or haemorrhagic necrosis indicative of mucosal ischaemia. In 20 cases there was submucosal oedema and nine showed pneumatosis of the bowel. From 11, one or more of the invasive diarrhoeal pathogens Shigella, Campylobacter and Entamoeba histolytica were detected. From the comparison with controls significant associations were found for a long duration of diarrhoea, blood and mucus in stool, abdominal distension or tenderness, shock not attributable to hypovolaemia, septicaemia, and low concentration of serum protein (p less than 0.05). These findings indicated that segmental necrotising enterocolitis develops sometimes as a fatal complication of prolonged diarrhoeal illnesses associated with shock and hypoproteinaemia and is caused by ischaemic injury to the intestinal mucosa. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3428668

  6. Dysfunctional tubular endoplasmic reticulum constitutes a pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sharoar, M G; Shi, Q; Ge, Y; He, W; Hu, X; Perry, G; Zhu, X; Yan, R

    2016-09-01

    Pathological features in Alzheimer's brains include mitochondrial dysfunction and dystrophic neurites (DNs) in areas surrounding amyloid plaques. Using a mouse model that overexpresses reticulon 3 (RTN3) and spontaneously develops age-dependent hippocampal DNs, here we report that DNs contain both RTN3 and REEPs, topologically similar proteins that can shape tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Importantly, ultrastructural examinations of such DNs revealed gradual accumulation of tubular ER in axonal termini, and such abnormal tubular ER inclusion is found in areas surrounding amyloid plaques in biopsy samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Functionally, abnormally clustered tubular ER induces enhanced mitochondrial fission in the early stages of DN formation and eventual mitochondrial degeneration at later stages. Furthermore, such DNs are abrogated when RTN3 is ablated in aging and AD mouse models. Hence, abnormally clustered tubular ER can be pathogenic in brain regions: disrupting mitochondrial integrity, inducing DNs formation and impairing cognitive function in AD and aging brains.

  7. Neoplastic diseases of the spermatic cord: an overview of pathological features, evaluation, and management

    PubMed Central

    Dagur, Gautam; Gandhi, Jason; Kapadia, Kailash; Inam, Rafid; Smith, Noel L.; Joshi, Gargi

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular tumors found with the spermatic cord, known as neoplasms, are usually identified to be benign. However, the accurate and timely diagnosis of spermatic cord masses is highly crucial, especially when most results are often overlooked or unclear. In this review, we discuss the anatomy and embryology of the spermatic cord. Upon rooting these fundamental concepts, we discuss an array of benign and malignant neoplastic tumors, including their origin, pathological features, clinical evaluation and management, as well as other case-specific characteristics of unique presentation. Many of these neoplasms are based on local neurological, vascular, muscular, bone, soft tissue, or lymphatic origin, while others have metastasized from particular areas of the body. PMID:28217455

  8. Estimation of T2* Relaxation Time of Breast Cancer: Correlation with Clinical, Imaging and Pathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mirinae; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Sohn, Yu-Mee; Rhee, Sun Jung; Oh, Jang-Hoon; Won, Kyu-Yeoun

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to estimate the T2* relaxation time in breast cancer, and to evaluate the association between the T2* value with clinical-imaging-pathological features of breast cancer. Materials and Methods Between January 2011 and July 2013, 107 consecutive women with 107 breast cancers underwent multi-echo T2*-weighted imaging on a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging system. The Student's t test and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare the T2* values of cancer for different groups, based on the clinical-imaging-pathological features. In addition, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to find independent predictive factors associated with the T2* values. Results Of the 107 breast cancers, 92 were invasive and 15 were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The mean T2* value of invasive cancers was significantly longer than that of DCIS (p = 0.029). Signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and histologic grade of invasive breast cancers showed significant correlation with T2* relaxation time in univariate and multivariate analysis. Breast cancer groups with higher signal intensity on T2WI showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.005). Cancer groups with higher histologic grade showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.017). Conclusion The T2* value is significantly longer in invasive cancer than in DCIS. In invasive cancers, T2* relaxation time is significantly longer in higher histologic grades and high signal intensity on T2WI. Based on these preliminary data, quantitative T2* mapping has the potential to be useful in the characterization of breast cancer. PMID:28096732

  9. The Hybrid Feature Selection Algorithm Based on Maximum Minimum Backward Selection Search Strategy for Liver Tissue Pathological Image Classification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel feature selection algorithm for liver tissue pathological image classification. To improve the efficiency of feature selection, the same feature values of positive and negative samples are removed in rough selection. To obtain the optimal feature subset, a new heuristic search algorithm, which is called Maximum Minimum Backward Selection (MMBS), is proposed in precise selection. MMBS search strategy has the following advantages. (1) For the deficiency of Discernibility of Feature Subsets (DFS) evaluation criteria, which makes the class of small samples invalid for unbalanced samples, the Weighted Discernibility of Feature Subsets (WDFS) evaluation criteria are proposed as the evaluation strategy of MMBS, which is also available for unbalanced samples. (2) For the deficiency of Sequential Forward Selection (SFS) and Sequential Backward Selection (SBS), which can only add or only delete feature, MMBS decides whether to add the feature to feature subset according to WDFS criteria for each feature firstly; then it decides whether to remove the feature from feature subset according to SBS algorithm. In this way, the better feature subset can be obtained. The experiment results show that the proposed hybrid feature selection algorithm has good classification performance for liver tissue pathological image. PMID:27563344

  10. The Hybrid Feature Selection Algorithm Based on Maximum Minimum Backward Selection Search Strategy for Liver Tissue Pathological Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiling; Jiang, Huiyan; Zheng, Ruiping

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel feature selection algorithm for liver tissue pathological image classification. To improve the efficiency of feature selection, the same feature values of positive and negative samples are removed in rough selection. To obtain the optimal feature subset, a new heuristic search algorithm, which is called Maximum Minimum Backward Selection (MMBS), is proposed in precise selection. MMBS search strategy has the following advantages. (1) For the deficiency of Discernibility of Feature Subsets (DFS) evaluation criteria, which makes the class of small samples invalid for unbalanced samples, the Weighted Discernibility of Feature Subsets (WDFS) evaluation criteria are proposed as the evaluation strategy of MMBS, which is also available for unbalanced samples. (2) For the deficiency of Sequential Forward Selection (SFS) and Sequential Backward Selection (SBS), which can only add or only delete feature, MMBS decides whether to add the feature to feature subset according to WDFS criteria for each feature firstly; then it decides whether to remove the feature from feature subset according to SBS algorithm. In this way, the better feature subset can be obtained. The experiment results show that the proposed hybrid feature selection algorithm has good classification performance for liver tissue pathological image.

  11. Does the choice of display system influence perception and visibility of clinically relevant features in digital pathology images?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpe, Tom; Rostang, Johan; Avanaki, Ali; Espig, Kathryn; Xthona, Albert; Cocuranu, Ioan; Parwani, Anil V.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-03-01

    Digital pathology systems typically consist of a slide scanner, processing software, visualization software, and finally a workstation with display for visualization of the digital slide images. This paper studies whether digital pathology images can look different when presenting them on different display systems, and whether these visual differences can result in different perceived contrast of clinically relevant features. By analyzing a set of four digital pathology images of different subspecialties on three different display systems, it was concluded that pathology images look different when visualized on different display systems. The importance of these visual differences is elucidated when they are located in areas of the digital slide that contain clinically relevant features. Based on a calculation of dE2000 differences between background and clinically relevant features, it was clear that perceived contrast of clinically relevant features is influenced by the choice of display system. Furthermore, it seems that the specific calibration target chosen for the display system has an important effect on the perceived contrast of clinically relevant features. Preliminary results suggest that calibrating to DICOM GSDF calibration performed slightly worse than sRGB, while a new experimental calibration target CSDF performed better than both DICOM GSDF and sRGB. This result is promising as it suggests that further research work could lead to better definition of an optimized calibration target for digital pathology images resulting in a positive effect on clinical performance.

  12. The comparison of pathology in ferrets infected by H9N2 avian influenza viruses with different genomic features.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rongbao; Bai, Tian; Li, Xiaodan; Xiong, Ying; Huang, Yiwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Ye; Bo, Hong; Zou, Shumei; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-01-15

    H9N2 avian influenza virus circulates widely in poultry and has been responsible for sporadic human infections in several regions. Few studies have been conducted on the pathogenicity of H9N2 AIV isolates that have different genomic features. We compared the pathology induced by a novel reassortant H9N2 virus and two currently circulating H9N2 viruses that have different genomic features in ferrets. The results showed that the three viruses can induce infections with various amounts of viral shedding in ferrets. The novel H9N2 induced respiratory infection, but no pathological lesions were observed in lung tissues. The other two viruses induced mild to intermediate pathological lesions in lung tissues, although the clinical signs presented mildly in ferrets. The pathological lesions presented a diversity consistent with viral replication in ferrets.

  13. Improved biochemical outcome with adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer with poor pathologic features

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Weed, Dan W.; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The indications for adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) are poorly defined. We performed a retrospective comparison of our institution's experience treating prostate cancer with RP vs. RP followed by adjuvant EBRT. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 1998, 617 patients with clinical Stage T1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer underwent RP. Patients who underwent preoperative androgen deprivation and those with positive lymph nodes were excluded. Of the 617 patients, 34 (5.5%) with an undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level underwent adjuvant prostatic fossa RT at a median of 0.25 year (range, 0.1-0.6) postoperatively because of poor pathologic features. The median total dose was 59.4 Gy (range, 50.4-66.6 Gy) in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. These 34 RP+RT patients were compared with the remaining 583 RP patients. Biochemical failure was defined as any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.1 ng/mL and any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.3 ng/mL (at least 30 days after surgery). Administration of androgen deprivation was also scored as biochemical failure when applying either definition. The median clinical follow-up was 8.2 years (range, 0.1-11.2 years) for RP and 8.4 years (range, 0.3-13.8 years) for RP+RT. Results: Radical prostatectomy + radiation therapy patients had a greater pathologic Gleason score (mean, 7.3 vs. 6.5; p < 0.01) and pathologic T stage (median, T3a vs. T2c; p < 0.01). Age (median, 65.7 years) and pretreatment PSA level (median, 7.9 ng/mL) were similar between the treatment groups. Extracapsular extension was present in 72% of RP+RT patients vs. 27% of RP patients (p < 0.01). The RP+RT patients were more likely to have seminal vesicle invasion (29% vs. 9%, p < 0.01) and positive margins (73% vs. 36%, p < 0.01). Despite these poor pathologic features, the 5-year biochemical control (BC) rate (PSA < 0.1 ng/mL) was 57% for RP+RT and 47% for RP (p = 0.28). For patients with extracapsular extension, the

  14. The behavioural/dysexecutive variant of Alzheimer’s disease: clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features

    PubMed Central

    Pijnenburg, Yolande A. L.; Perry, David C.; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I.; Scheltens, Nienke M. E.; Vogel, Jacob W.; Kramer, Joel H.; van der Vlies, Annelies E.; Joie, Renaud La; Rosen, Howard J.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Grinberg, Lea T.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J.; Huang, Eric J.; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Miller, Bruce L.; Barkhof, Frederik; Jagust, William J.; Scheltens, Philip; Seeley, William W.; Rabinovici, Gil D.

    2015-01-01

    A ‘frontal variant of Alzheimer’s disease’ has been described in patients with predominant behavioural or dysexecutive deficits caused by Alzheimer’s disease pathology. The description of this rare Alzheimer’s disease phenotype has been limited to case reports and small series, and many clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological characteristics are not well understood. In this retrospective study, we included 55 patients with Alzheimer’s disease with a behavioural-predominant presentation (behavioural Alzheimer’s disease) and a neuropathological diagnosis of high-likelihood Alzheimer’s disease (n = 17) and/or biomarker evidence of Alzheimer’s disease pathology (n = 44). In addition, we included 29 patients with autopsy/biomarker-defined Alzheimer’s disease with a dysexecutive-predominant syndrome (dysexecutive Alzheimer’s disease). We performed structured chart reviews to ascertain clinical features. First symptoms were more often cognitive (behavioural Alzheimer’s disease: 53%; dysexecutive Alzheimer’s disease: 83%) than behavioural (behavioural Alzheimer’s disease: 25%; dysexecutive Alzheimer’s disease: 3%). Apathy was the most common behavioural feature, while hyperorality and perseverative/compulsive behaviours were less prevalent. Fifty-two per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer’s disease met diagnostic criteria for possible behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia. Overlap between behavioural and dysexecutive Alzheimer’s disease was modest (9/75 patients). Sixty per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer’s disease and 40% of those with the dysexecutive syndrome carried at least one APOE ε4 allele. We also compared neuropsychological test performance and brain atrophy (applying voxel-based morphometry) with matched autopsy/biomarker-defined typical (amnestic-predominant) Alzheimer’s disease (typical Alzheimer’s disease, n = 58), autopsy-confirmed/Alzheimer’s disease biomarker-negative behavioural

  15. The behavioural/dysexecutive variant of Alzheimer's disease: clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Perry, David C; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; Scheltens, Nienke M E; Vogel, Jacob W; Kramer, Joel H; van der Vlies, Annelies E; La Joie, Renaud; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Grinberg, Lea T; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; Huang, Eric J; van Berckel, Bart N M; Miller, Bruce L; Barkhof, Frederik; Jagust, William J; Scheltens, Philip; Seeley, William W; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-09-01

    A 'frontal variant of Alzheimer's disease' has been described in patients with predominant behavioural or dysexecutive deficits caused by Alzheimer's disease pathology. The description of this rare Alzheimer's disease phenotype has been limited to case reports and small series, and many clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological characteristics are not well understood. In this retrospective study, we included 55 patients with Alzheimer's disease with a behavioural-predominant presentation (behavioural Alzheimer's disease) and a neuropathological diagnosis of high-likelihood Alzheimer's disease (n = 17) and/or biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's disease pathology (n = 44). In addition, we included 29 patients with autopsy/biomarker-defined Alzheimer's disease with a dysexecutive-predominant syndrome (dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease). We performed structured chart reviews to ascertain clinical features. First symptoms were more often cognitive (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 53%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 83%) than behavioural (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 25%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 3%). Apathy was the most common behavioural feature, while hyperorality and perseverative/compulsive behaviours were less prevalent. Fifty-two per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease met diagnostic criteria for possible behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia. Overlap between behavioural and dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease was modest (9/75 patients). Sixty per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease and 40% of those with the dysexecutive syndrome carried at least one APOE ε4 allele. We also compared neuropsychological test performance and brain atrophy (applying voxel-based morphometry) with matched autopsy/biomarker-defined typical (amnestic-predominant) Alzheimer's disease (typical Alzheimer's disease, n = 58), autopsy-confirmed/Alzheimer's disease biomarker-negative behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 59

  16. Somatic molecular changes and histo-pathological features of colorectal cancer in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Aissi, Sana; Buisine, Marie Pierre; Zerimech, Farid; Kourda, Nadia; Moussa, Amel; Manai, Mohamed; Porchet, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine correlations between family history, clinical features and mutational status of genes involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: Histo-pathological features and molecular changes [KRAS, BRAF and CTNNB1 genes mutations, microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype, expression of mismatch repair (MMR) and mucin (MUC) 5AC proteins, mutation and expression analysis of TP53, MLH1 promoter hypermethylation analysis] were examined in a series of 51 unselected Tunisian CRC patients, 10 of them had a proven or probable hereditary disease, on the track of new tumoral markers for CRC susceptibility in Tunisian patients. RESULTS: As expected, MSI and MMR expression loss were associated to the presence of familial CRC (75% vs 9%, P < 0.001). However, no significant associations have been detected between personal or familial cancer history and KRAS (codons 12 and 13) or TP53 (exons 4-9) alterations. A significant inverse relationship has been observed between the presence of MSI and TP53 accumulation (10.0% vs 48.8%, P = 0.0335) in CRC tumors, suggesting different molecular pathways to CRC that in turn may reflect different environmental exposures. Interestingly, MUC5AC expression was significantly associated to the presence of MSI (46.7% vs 8.3%, P = 0.0039), MMR expression loss (46.7% vs 8.3%, P = 0.0039) and the presence of familial CRC (63% vs 23%, P = 0.039). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that MUC5AC expression analysis may be useful in the screening of Tunisian patients with high risk of CRC. PMID:23983431

  17. C9orf72 BAC transgenic mice display typical pathologic features of ALS/FTD

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Jacqueline G.; Bogdanik, Laurent; Muhammad, A.K.M.G.; Gendron, Tania F.; Kim, Kevin J.; Austin, Andrew; Cady, Janet; Liu, Elaine; Zarrow, Jonah; Grant, Sharday; Ho, Ritchie; Bell, Shaughn; Carmona, Sharon; Simpkinson, Megan; Lall, Deepti; Wu, Kathryn; Daughrity, Lillian; Dickson, Dennis W.; Harms, Matthew B.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Lee, Edward B.; Lutz, Cathleen M.; Baloh, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Noncoding expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the C9orf72 gene are the most common cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Here we report transgenic mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) containing the full human C9orf72 gene with either a normal allele (15 repeats) or disease-associated expansion (~100-1000 repeats; C9-BACexp). C9-BACexp mice displayed pathologic features seen in C9orf72 expansion patients, including widespread RNA foci and repeat associated non-ATG (RAN) translated dipeptides, which were suppressed by antisense oligonucleotides targeting human C9orf72. Nucleolin distribution was altered supporting that either C9orf72 transcripts or RAN dipeptides promote nucleolar dysfunction. Despite early and widespread production of RNA foci and RAN dipeptides in C9-BACexp mice, behavioral abnormalities and neurodegeneration were not observed even at advanced ages, supporting the hypothesis that RNA foci and RAN dipeptides occur presymptomatically, and are not sufficient to drive neurodegeneration in mice at levels seen in patients. PMID:26637796

  18. C9orf72 BAC Transgenic Mice Display Typical Pathologic Features of ALS/FTD.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Jacqueline G; Bogdanik, Laurent; Muhammad, A K M G; Gendron, Tania F; Kim, Kevin J; Austin, Andrew; Cady, Janet; Liu, Elaine Y; Zarrow, Jonah; Grant, Sharday; Ho, Ritchie; Bell, Shaughn; Carmona, Sharon; Simpkinson, Megan; Lall, Deepti; Wu, Kathryn; Daughrity, Lillian; Dickson, Dennis W; Harms, Matthew B; Petrucelli, Leonard; Lee, Edward B; Lutz, Cathleen M; Baloh, Robert H

    2015-12-02

    Noncoding expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the C9orf72 gene are the most common cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Here we report transgenic mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) containing the full human C9orf72 gene with either a normal allele (15 repeats) or disease-associated expansion (∼100-1,000 repeats; C9-BACexp). C9-BACexp mice displayed pathologic features seen in C9orf72 expansion patients, including widespread RNA foci and repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translated dipeptides, which were suppressed by antisense oligonucleotides targeting human C9orf72. Nucleolin distribution was altered, supporting that either C9orf72 transcripts or RAN dipeptides promote nucleolar dysfunction. Despite early and widespread production of RNA foci and RAN dipeptides in C9-BACexp mice, behavioral abnormalities and neurodegeneration were not observed even at advanced ages, supporting the hypothesis that RNA foci and RAN dipeptides occur presymptomatically and are not sufficient to drive neurodegeneration in mice at levels seen in patients.

  19. DNA methylation Profiles in Primary Cutaneous Melanomas are Associated with Clinically Significant Pathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Nancy E.; Slater, Nathaniel A.; Edmiston, Sharon N.; Zhou, Xin; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Groben, Pamela A.; Carson, Craig C.; Hao, Honglin; Parrish, Eloise; Moschos, Stergios J.; Berwick, Marianne; Ollila, David W.; Conway, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation studies have elucidated a methylation signature distinguishing primary melanomas from benign nevi and provided new insights about genes that may be important in melanoma development. However, it is unclear whether methylation differences among primary melanomas are related to tumor pathologic features with known clinical significance. We utilized the Illumina Golden Gate Cancer Panel array to investigate the methylation profiles of 47 primary cutaneous melanomas. Array-wide methylation patterns revealed a positive association of methylation with Breslow thickness and mutated BRAF, a negative association with mitotic rate, and a weak association with ulceration. Hierarchical clustering on CpG sites exhibiting the most variable methylation (n=235) divided the melanoma samples into three clusters, including a highly-methylated cluster that was positively associated with Breslow thickness and an intermediately-methylated cluster associated with Breslow thickness and mitotic rate. Our findings provide support for the existence of methylation-defined subsets in melanomas, with increased methylation associated with Breslow thickness. PMID:24986547

  20. A retrospective cohort study identifying the principal pathological features useful in the diagnosis of inclusion body myositis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Stefen; Squier, Waney; Sewry, Caroline; Hanna, Michael; Hilton-Jones, David; Holton, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    Objective The current pathological diagnostic criteria for sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) lack sensitivity. Using immunohistochemical techniques abnormal protein aggregates have been identified in IBM, including some associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Our objective was to investigate the diagnostic utility of a number of markers of protein aggregates together with mitochondrial and inflammatory changes in IBM. Design Retrospective cohort study. The sensitivity of pathological features was evaluated in cases of Griggs definite IBM. The diagnostic potential of the most reliable features was then assessed in clinically typical IBM with rimmed vacuoles (n=15), clinically typical IBM without rimmed vacuoles (n=9) and IBM mimics—protein accumulation myopathies containing rimmed vacuoles (n=7) and steroid-responsive inflammatory myopathies (n=11). Setting Specialist muscle services at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London. Results Individual pathological features, in isolation, lacked sensitivity and specificity. However, the morphology and distribution of p62 aggregates in IBM were characteristic and in a myopathy with rimmed vacuoles, the combination of characteristic p62 aggregates and increased sarcolemmal and internal major histocompatibility complex class I expression or endomysial T cells were diagnostic for IBM with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 100%. In an inflammatory myopathy lacking rimmed vacuoles, the presence of mitochondrial changes was 100% sensitive and 73% specific for IBM; characteristic p62 aggregates were specific (91%), but lacked sensitivity (44%). Conclusions We propose an easily applied diagnostic algorithm for the pathological diagnosis of IBM. Additionally our findings support the hypothesis that many of the pathological features considered typical of IBM develop later in the disease, explaining their poor sensitivity at disease presentation and

  1. An improved high order texture features extraction method with application to pathological diagnosis of colon lesions for CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bowen; Zhang, Guopeng; Lu, Hongbing; Wang, Huafeng; Han, Fangfang; Zhu, Wei; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Differentiation of colon lesions according to underlying pathology, e.g., neoplastic and non-neoplastic, is of fundamental importance for patient management. Image intensity based textural features have been recognized as a useful biomarker for the differentiation task. In this paper, we introduce high order texture features, beyond the intensity, such as gradient and curvature, for that task. Based on the Haralick texture analysis method, we introduce a virtual pathological method to explore the utility of texture features from high order differentiations, i.e., gradient and curvature, of the image intensity distribution. The texture features were validated on database consisting of 148 colon lesions, of which 35 are non-neoplastic lesions, using the random forest classifier and the merit of area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics. The results show that after applying the high order features, the AUC was improved from 0.8069 to 0.8544 in differentiating non-neoplastic lesion from neoplastic ones, e.g., hyperplastic polyps from tubular adenomas, tubulovillous adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The experimental results demonstrated that texture features from the higher order images can significantly improve the classification accuracy in pathological differentiation of colorectal lesions. The gain in differentiation capability shall increase the potential of computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal cancer screening by not only detecting polyps but also classifying them from optimal polyp management for the best outcome in personalized medicine.

  2. Pharmacovigilance from social media: mining adverse drug reaction mentions using sequence labeling with word embedding cluster features

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Abeed; O’Connor, Karen; Ginn, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Social media is becoming increasingly popular as a platform for sharing personal health-related information. This information can be utilized for public health monitoring tasks, particularly for pharmacovigilance, via the use of natural language processing (NLP) techniques. However, the language in social media is highly informal, and user-expressed medical concepts are often nontechnical, descriptive, and challenging to extract. There has been limited progress in addressing these challenges, and thus far, advanced machine learning-based NLP techniques have been underutilized. Our objective is to design a machine learning-based approach to extract mentions of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) from highly informal text in social media. Methods We introduce ADRMine, a machine learning-based concept extraction system that uses conditional random fields (CRFs). ADRMine utilizes a variety of features, including a novel feature for modeling words’ semantic similarities. The similarities are modeled by clustering words based on unsupervised, pretrained word representation vectors (embeddings) generated from unlabeled user posts in social media using a deep learning technique. Results ADRMine outperforms several strong baseline systems in the ADR extraction task by achieving an F-measure of 0.82. Feature analysis demonstrates that the proposed word cluster features significantly improve extraction performance. Conclusion It is possible to extract complex medical concepts, with relatively high performance, from informal, user-generated content. Our approach is particularly scalable, suitable for social media mining, as it relies on large volumes of unlabeled data, thus diminishing the need for large, annotated training data sets. PMID:25755127

  3. Nanotheranostics of Circulating Tumor Cells, Infections and Other Pathological Features In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zaharoff, David A.; Griffin, Robert J.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Many life-threatening diseases are disseminated through biological fluids, such as blood, lymph and cerebrospinal fluid. The migration of tumor cells through the vascular circulation is a mandatory step in metastasis, which is responsible for ∼90% of cancer-associated mortality. Circulating pathogenic bacteria, viruses, or blood clots lead to other serious conditions including bacteremia, sepsis, viremia and infarction. Therefore, technologies capable of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating bacterial cells (CBCs), circulating endothelial cells (CECs), cancer biomarkers such as microparticles and exosomes, which contain important microRNA signatures, and other abnormal features in biological fluids may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cancers, infections and adverse cardiovascular events. Unfortunately, even in a disease setting, circulating abnormal cells are rare events that are easily obscured by the overwhelming background material in whole blood. Existing detection methods mostly rely on ex vivo analyses of limited volumes (a few mL) of whole blood. These small volumes limit the probability of detecting CTCs, CECs, CBCs and other rare phenomena. In vivo detection platforms capable of continuously monitoring the entire circulation may substantially increase the probability of detecting circulating abnormal cells and, in particular, increase the opportunity to identify exceedingly rare and potentially dangerous subsets of these cells, such as circulating cancer stem cells (CCSCs). In addition, in vivo detection technologies capable of destroying and/or capturing circulating abnormal cells may inhibit disease progression. This article reviews novel therapeutic and diagnostic (theranostic) platforms integrating in vivo realtime early diagnosis of CTCs, CECs, CBCs and other abnormal objects in circulation. This critical review particularly focuses on nanotechnology-based theranostic (nanotheranostic) approaches, especially in

  4. The Characteristics of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Rhesus Macaques and the Associated Pathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shengtao; Cai, Hongzhi; Xu, Xingli; Feng, Min; Wang, Lichun; Liao, Yun; Zhang, Ying; He, Zhanlong; Yang, Fengmei; Yu, Wenhai; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Jumin; Li, Qihan

    2017-01-01

    As one of the major pathogens for human herpetic diseases, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) causes herpes labialis, genital herpes and herpetic encephalitis. Our aim here was to investigate the infectious process of HSV1 in rhesus macaques and the pathological features induced during this infection. Clinical symptoms that manifested in the rhesus macaque during HSV1 infection included vesicular lesions and their pathological features. Viral distribution in the nervous tissues and associated pathologic changes indicated the typical systematic pathological processes associated with viral distribution of HSV1. Interestingly, vesicular lesions recurred in oral skin or in mucosa associated with virus shedding in macaques within four to five months post-infection, and viral latency-associated transcript (LAT) mRNA was found in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) on day 365 post-infection. Neutralization testing and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) detection of specific T cell responses confirmed the specific immunity induced by HSV1 infection. Thus, rhesus macaques could serve as an infectious model for HSV1 due to their typical clinical symptoms and the pathological recurrence associated with viral latency in nervous tissues. PMID:28146109

  5. A comparison of the clinico-pathological features with stool pathogens in patients hospitalised with the symptom of diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Watson, B; Ellis, M; Mandal, B; Dunbar, E; Whale, K; Brennand, J

    1986-01-01

    The clinico-pathological features of 515 adult patients admitted to a major Regional Infectious Diseases Unit in United Kingdom with the symptom complex of diarrhoea were compared to the pathogens detected in their stool specimens. Routine clinical examination supported by basic pathological and laboratory investigations identified 138 (28%) in whom the cause of diarrhoea was extragastrointestinal or non-infectious gastrointestinal. Of the 351 patients (72%) with infectious gastroenteritis 72 (21%) had campylobacter, 59 (17%) had salmonella (22% bacteraemic) and 16 (5%) shigella. Clostridium difficile toxin accounted for a further 15 (4%)--antibiotics had been the antecedent cause in only one half of these. Routine microscopical examination of the faeces for red and white cells distinguished many with "culture positive" diarrhoea from those with "culture negative" infectious diarrhoea. Although there are no clinico-pathological features which are unique to a particular pathogen and unequivocally suggest a particular pathogen, certain features did tend to present more often in association with particular microorganisms, and this knowledge may suggest a bacterial diagnosis whilst awaiting the definitive results of stool microbiology. These features include prior antimicrobial therapy with positive sigmoidoscopical/histological features: Cl. difficile; protracted diarrhoea in elderly severely dehydrated patients: salmonellosis; foreign travel in males with bloody diarrhoea: shigellosis; abdominal pain in younger patients with a small degree of vomiting: campylobacteriosis. Early diagnosis may then prove useful in rationalizing initial therapy, particularly the appropriate use of antimicrobials.

  6. Immunohistochemical angiogenic biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis: correlation with pathological features

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Osmar Damasceno; Canedo, Nathalie Henriques Silva; Pannain, Vera Lucia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis and their association with pathological prognostic features in hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhotic liver. METHODS: Vascular endothelial growth factor, CD105, and cyclooxygenase-2 were immunohistochemically detected in 52 hepatocellular carcinoma tissue samples and 48 cirrhotic liver tissue samples. Semiquantitative measurements of vascular endothelial growth factor and cyclooxygenase-2 were evaluated considering the degree and intensity of immunostaining based on a 7-point final scoring scale. CD105 microvascular density (MVD-CD105) was measured using automated analysis. Morphological aspects evaluated in the hepatocellular carcinoma samples included size (≤2 and >2 cm), differentiation grade, and microvascular invasion. RESULTS: The mean vascular endothelial growth factor immunoreactivity score was slightly higher in the hepatocellular carcinoma samples (4.83±1.35) than the cirrhotic liver (4.38±1.28) samples. There was a significant and direct correlation between these mean scores (rs=0.645, p=0.0001). Cyclooxygenase-2 was expressed in all the cirrhotic liver samples but was only found in 78% of the hepatocellular carcinoma samples. The mean cyclooxygenase-2 score was higher in the cirrhotic liver samples (4.85±1.38) than the hepatocellular carcinoma samples (2.58±1.68), but there was no correlation between the scores (rs=0.177, p=0.23). The mean CD105 percentage in the hepatocellular carcinoma samples (11.2%) was lower than that in the cirrhotic samples (16.9%). There was an inverse relationship in MVD-CD105 expression between the hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhotic samples (rs=-0.78, p=0.67). There were no significant associations between vascular endothelial growth factor expression and morphological characteristics. Cyclooxygenase-2 and CD105 were associated with hepatocellular carcinoma differentiation grade (p=0.003 and p=0.05, respectively). CONCLUSION: Vascular endothelial

  7. Pathological Features in the LmnaDhe/+ Mutant Mouse Provide a Novel Model of Human Otitis Media and Laminopathies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Heping; Xu, Min; Han, Fengchan; Tian, Cong; Kim, Suejin; Fredman, Elisha; Zhang, Jin; Benedict-Alderfer, Cindy; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2013-01-01

    Genetic predisposition is recognized as an important pathogenetic factor in otitis media (OM) and associated diseases. Mutant Lmna mice heterozygous for the disheveled hair and ears allele (LmnaDhe/+) exhibit early-onset, profound hearing deficits and other pathological features mimicking human laminopathy associated with the LMNA mutation. We assessed the effects of the LmnaDhe/+ mutation on development of OM and pathological abnormalities characteristic of laminopathy. Malformation and abnormal positioning of the eustachian tube, accompanied by OM, were observed in all of the LmnaDhe/+ mice (100% penetrance) as early as postnatal day P12. Scanning electronic microscopy revealed ultrastructural damage to the cilia in middle ears that exhibited OM. Hearing assessment revealed significant hearing loss, paralleling that in human OM. Expression of NF-κB, TNF-α, and TGF-β, which correlated with inflammation and/or bony development, was up-regulated in the ears or in the peritoneal macrophages of LmnaDhe/+ mice. Rugous, disintegrative, and enlarged nuclear morphology of peritoneal macrophages and hyperphosphatemia were found in LmnaDhe/+ mutant mice. Taken together, these features resemble the pathology of human laminopathies, possibly revealing some profound pathology, beyond OM, associated with the mutation. The LmnaDhe/+ mutant mouse provides a novel model of human OM and laminopathy. PMID:22819531

  8. Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Abdomen and Pelvis: Radiologic-Pathologic Features, Part 1-Common Sarcomas: From the Radiologic Pathology Archives.

    PubMed

    Levy, Angela D; Manning, Maria A; Al-Refaie, Waddah B; Miettinen, Markku M

    2017-01-01

    Soft-tissue sarcomas are a diverse group of rare mesenchymal malignancies that can arise at any location in the body and affect all age groups. These sarcomas are most common in the extremities, trunk wall, retroperitoneum, and head and neck. In the adult population, soft-tissue sarcomas arising in the abdomen and pelvis are often large masses at the time of diagnosis because they are usually clinically silent or cause vague or mild symptoms until they invade or compress vital organs. In contrast, soft-tissue sarcomas arising from the abdominal wall come to clinical attention earlier in the course of disease because they cause a palpable mass, abdominal wall deformity, or pain that is more clinically apparent. The imaging features of abdominal and pelvic sarcomas and abdominal wall sarcomas can be nonspecific and overlap with more common pathologic conditions, making diagnosis difficult or, in some cases, delaying diagnosis. Liposarcoma (well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcomas), leiomyosarcoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) are the most common intra-abdominal primary sarcomas. Any soft-tissue sarcoma can arise in the abdominal wall. Knowledge of the classification and pathologic features of soft-tissue sarcomas, the anatomic locations where they occur, and their cross-sectional imaging features helps the radiologist establish the diagnosis or differential diagnosis so that patients with soft-tissue sarcomas can receive optimal treatment and management. In part 1 of this article, the most common soft-tissue sarcomas (liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, and GIST) are reviewed, with a discussion on anatomic locations, classification, clinical considerations, and differential diagnosis. Part 2 will focus on the remainder of the soft-tissue sarcomas occurring in the abdomen and pelvis.

  9. Motor neurons derived from ALS-related mouse iPS cells recapitulate pathological features of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Hwang; Park, Hang-Soo; Hong, Sunghoi; Kang, Seongman

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are known to induce ALS. Although many research models have been developed, the exact pathological mechanism of ALS remains unknown. The recently developed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology is expected to illuminate the pathological mechanisms and new means of treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. To determine the pathological mechanism of ALS, we generated mouse iPS (miPS) cells from experimental ALS transgenic mice and control mice and characterized the cells using molecular biological methods. The generated miPS cells expressed many pluripotent genes and differentiated into three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Motor neurons derived from ALS-related miPS cells recapitulated the pathological features of ALS. The ALS-model motor neurons showed SOD1 aggregates, as well as decreased cell survival rate and neurite length compared with wild-type motor neurons. Our study will be helpful in revealing the mechanism of motor neuronal cell death in ALS. PMID:27932790

  10. Motor neurons derived from ALS-related mouse iPS cells recapitulate pathological features of ALS.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Hwang; Park, Hang-Soo; Hong, Sunghoi; Kang, Seongman

    2016-12-09

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are known to induce ALS. Although many research models have been developed, the exact pathological mechanism of ALS remains unknown. The recently developed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology is expected to illuminate the pathological mechanisms and new means of treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. To determine the pathological mechanism of ALS, we generated mouse iPS (miPS) cells from experimental ALS transgenic mice and control mice and characterized the cells using molecular biological methods. The generated miPS cells expressed many pluripotent genes and differentiated into three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Motor neurons derived from ALS-related miPS cells recapitulated the pathological features of ALS. The ALS-model motor neurons showed SOD1 aggregates, as well as decreased cell survival rate and neurite length compared with wild-type motor neurons. Our study will be helpful in revealing the mechanism of motor neuronal cell death in ALS.

  11. A case of aggressive solid pseudopapillary neoplasm: Comparison of clinical and pathologic features with non-aggressive cases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yukihiro; Okamoto, Kojun; Okada, Katsuya; Aikawa, Masayasu; Koyama, Isamu; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) may have an aggressive clinical course, but clinical predictors of this condition have not been thoroughly evaluated. We performed a retrospective study of 11 cases of SPN managed in our hospital between January 2007 and April 2015. Of these 11 cases, we encountered a single case with an aggressive clinical course. Histological, immunohistochemical, and clinical features were compared to identify predictors of poor prognosis. The 11 patients comprised four women and seven men with a median age of 41 years (range, 26-58 years). Clinical symptoms were nonspecific and the median tumor size was 4.6 cm (range, 1.4-18 cm). The patient with an aggressive clinical course developed multiple liver metastases within three months and died seven months after surgery. Pathological features of the tumor in this case included lymph node metastases, a diffuse growth pattern, extensive tumor necrosis, high mitotic rate, and immunohistochemistry. These features were not observed in patients who survived without recurrence at a median follow-up of 25 months (range, 6-82 months). Characteristic pathological features and a high proliferative index, as assessed by Ki-67 staining, may predict poor outcome in cases of SPN.

  12. Predicting and replacing the pathological Gleason grade with automated gland ring morphometric features from immunofluorescent prostate cancer images.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faisal M; Scott, Richard; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2017-04-01

    The Gleason grade is the most common architectural and morphological assessment of prostate cancer severity and prognosis. There have been numerous algorithms developed to approximate and duplicate the Gleason scoring system, mostly developed in standard H&E brightfield microscopy. Immunofluorescence (IF) image analysis of tissue pathology has recently been proven to be robust in developing prognostic assessments of disease, particularly in prostate cancer. We leverage a method of segmenting gland rings in IF images for predicting the pathological Gleason, both the clinical and the image specific grades, which may not necessarily be the same. We combine these measures with nuclear specific characteristics. In 324 images from 324 patients, our individual features correlate well univariately with the Gleason grades and in a multivariate setting have an accuracy of 85% in predicting the Gleason grade. Additionally, these features correlate strongly with clinical progression outcomes [concordance index (CI) of 0.89], significantly outperforming the clinical Gleason grades (CI of 0.78). Finally, in multivariate models for multiple prostate cancer progression endpoints, replacing the Gleason with these features results in equivalent or improved performances. This work presents the first assessment of morphological gland unit features from IF images for predicting the Gleason grade, and even replacing it in prostate cancer prognostics.

  13. Allele frequency net 2015 update: new features for HLA epitopes, KIR and disease and HLA adverse drug reaction associations.

    PubMed

    González-Galarza, Faviel F; Takeshita, Louise Y C; Santos, Eduardo J M; Kempson, Felicity; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; da Silva, Andrea Luciana Soares; Teles e Silva, André Luiz; Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Alfirevic, Ana; Jones, Andrew R; Middleton, Derek

    2015-01-01

    It has been 12 years since the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND; http://www.allelefrequencies.net) was first launched, providing the scientific community with an online repository for the storage of immune gene frequencies in different populations across the world. There have been a significant number of improvements from the first version, making AFND a primary resource for many clinical and scientific areas including histocompatibility, immunogenetics, pharmacogenetics and anthropology studies, among many others. The most widely used part of AFND stores population frequency data (alleles, genes or haplotypes) related to human leukocyte antigens (HLA), killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes (MIC) and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. AFND now contains >1400 populations from more than 10 million healthy individuals. Here, we report how the main features of AFND have been updated to include a new section on 'HLA epitope' frequencies in populations, a new section capturing the results of studies identifying HLA associations with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and one for the examination of infectious and autoimmune diseases associated with KIR polymorphisms-thus extending AFND to serve a new user base in these growing areas of research. New criteria on data quality have also been included.

  14. Overexpression of Ku80 correlates with aggressive clinicopathological features and adverse prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHUAI; WANG, ZHOU; YANG, YU; SHI, MO; SUN, ZHENGUO

    2015-01-01

    Ku80, a subunit of the heterodymeric Ku protein, is clearly implicated in nonhomologous end joining DNA repair, chemoresistance and radioresistance in malignant tumors. In the present study, the clinicopathological significance of Ku80 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was investigated. The expression levels of Ku80 were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in ESCC specimens and normal esophageal mucosa. The mRNA and protein levels of Ku80 were significantly higher in ESCC tissues than in normal esophageal mucosa, and were significantly associated with tumor differentiation, local invasion, lymph node metastasis and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage. However, overexpression of Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were not significantly correlated with age, gender, tumor site or tumor size. Cox proportional hazards regression model demonstrated that tumor local invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage and Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were independent risk factors indicating the overall survival of patients with ESCC. The present study demonstrated that aberrant Ku80 overexpression is observed in ESCC. In addition, high expression levels of Ku80 are associated with adverse clinicopathological features and unfavorable prognosis in ESCC patients. PMID:26722230

  15. Extramural venous invasion detected by MDCT as an adverse imaging feature for predicting synchronous metastases in T4 gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Wu, Jing; Ye, Yingjiang; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhang, Yinli; Wang, Yi

    2017-04-01

    Background Extramural venous invasion (EMVI) is defined histologically as the active invasion of tumor cells to the lumens of mesenteric vessels beyond the muscularis propria in advanced gastrointestinal cancer, resulting in distant metastases. Purpose To determine the association between synchronous metastatic disease in patients with T4 gastric cancer and EMVI detected on contrast-enhanced multiple-row detector computed tomography (MDCT). Material and Methods A total of 152 patients with T4 gastric carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed and divided into EMVI-positive and EMVI-negative groups where EMVI, as detected on MDCT, was defined as a tubular or nodular soft tissue thickening extending from the tumor along the vessels of the mesentery. Synchronous metastases were detected by MDCT and/or confirmed by postoperative diagnosis. Logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze the predictive factors of synchronous metastases in gastric cancer. Results Synchronous metastases were found in 47 of 152 (30.9%) patients with T4 gastric cancer. Thirty-one of 77 (40.3%) patients in the EMVI-positive group had evidence of metastases compared to 16 (21.3%) of 75 patients in the EMVI-negative group ( P = 0.019). Synchronous metastases were significantly associated with EMVI with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.250 (95% CI, 1.072-4.724). Conclusion EMVI-positive tumors, as an adverse imaging feature, were significantly associated with synchronous metastases in patients with T4 gastric cancer.

  16. Mitosis detection in breast cancer pathology images by combining handcrafted and convolutional neural network features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is the mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e., undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently, mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields (HPFs) on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical, or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Although handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely supervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal in attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. We present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color, and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing the

  17. CT features and pathologic characteristics of IgG4-related systemic disease of submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Feng, Ruie; Chen, Yu; Duan, Miao; Wang, Man; Jin, Zhengyu; Rumboldt, Zoran; Zhang, Zhuhua

    2015-01-01

    The submandibular gland is one of the most frequently affected salivary gland in IgG4-related systemic disease, usually demonstrate homogeneous attenuation on CT imaging as reported, but without much pathological comparison of many cases. This article is to investigate and analyze the typical CT findings and pathologic characteristics of IgG4-related systemic disease (IgG4-RSD) of submandibular gland. A retrospective analysis of the preoperative CT findings in patients with IgG4-RSD of submandibular glands who underwent surgical resection between January 2010 and February 2014 was performed. Twenty patients (16 women) were identified, with a mean age of 58.1±10.2 years. All patients presented with painless submandibular gland swelling. Diffuse gland enlargement, with clear margins and homogeneous density, was found on non-enhanced CT scans in all cases. There were no calcifications or stones within the involved glands. Based on contrast-enhanced CT appearance the patients could be divided into two groups: 11 cases showed homogeneous gland enhancement; and multiple hyperenhancing foci, with a crazy-paving pattern, were detected in 9 cases, which were in consistent with the pathologic findings. The maximum submandibular gland diameter on transverse images was significantly larger (P=0.008) in patients with crazy-paving appearance (32±4 mm) compared to patients with homogeneous enhancement (28±3 mm). It is concluded that the submandibular glands with IgG4-RSD can be characterized by either homogenous appearance or crazy-paving pattern on contrast-enhanced CT imaging.

  18. Length-adaptive graph search for automatic segmentation of pathological features in optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brenton; Cunefare, David; Grewal, Dilraj S.; Mahmoud, Tamer H.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a metric in graph search and demonstrate its application for segmenting retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of macular pathology. Our proposed "adjusted mean arc length" (AMAL) metric is an adaptation of the lowest mean arc length search technique for automated OCT segmentation. We compare this method to Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, which we utilized previously in our popular graph theory and dynamic programming segmentation technique. As an illustrative example, we show that AMAL-based length-adaptive segmentation outperforms the shortest path in delineating the retina/vitreous boundary of patients with full-thickness macular holes when compared with expert manual grading.

  19. Intra- and Inter-database Study for Arabic, English, and German Databases: Do Conventional Speech Features Detect Voice Pathology?

    PubMed

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Alsulaiman, Mansour; Muhammad, Ghulam; Elamvazuthi, Irraivan; Al-Nasheri, Ahmed; Mesallam, Tamer A; Farahat, Mohamed; Malki, Khalid H

    2016-10-10

    A large population around the world has voice complications. Various approaches for subjective and objective evaluations have been suggested in the literature. The subjective approach strongly depends on the experience and area of expertise of a clinician, and human error cannot be neglected. On the other hand, the objective or automatic approach is noninvasive. Automatic developed systems can provide complementary information that may be helpful for a clinician in the early screening of a voice disorder. At the same time, automatic systems can be deployed in remote areas where a general practitioner can use them and may refer the patient to a specialist to avoid complications that may be life threatening. Many automatic systems for disorder detection have been developed by applying different types of conventional speech features such as the linear prediction coefficients, linear prediction cepstral coefficients, and Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs). This study aims to ascertain whether conventional speech features detect voice pathology reliably, and whether they can be correlated with voice quality. To investigate this, an automatic detection system based on MFCC was developed, and three different voice disorder databases were used in this study. The experimental results suggest that the accuracy of the MFCC-based system varies from database to database. The detection rate for the intra-database ranges from 72% to 95%, and that for the inter-database is from 47% to 82%. The results conclude that conventional speech features are not correlated with voice, and hence are not reliable in pathology detection.

  20. Pathological features in marine birds affected by the prestige's oil spill in the north of Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, A; Espí, A; Márquez, I; Pérez, V; Ferreras, M C; Marín, J F García; Prieto, J M

    2005-04-01

    A total of 2,465 seabirds, mainly common murres (Uria aalge), razorbills (Alca torda), and puffins (Fratercula arctica) that beached in the northwestern part of Spain after the "Prestige" oil spill on 19 November 2002 were examined by pathological methods. Birds were divided into three groups: dead birds with the body covered (group 1) or uncovered (group 2) by oil and birds recovered alive but which died after being treated at a rescue center (group 3). The main gross lesions were severe dehydration and emaciation. Microscopically, hemosiderin deposits, related to cachexia and/or hemolytic anemia, were observed in those birds harboring oil in the intestine. Severe aspergillosis and ulcers in the ventriculus were found only in group 3 birds, probably because of stress associated with attempted rehabilitation at the rescue center. The mild character of the pathological changes suggests that petroleum oil toxicosis causes multiple sublethal changes that have an effect on the ability of the birds to survive at sea, especially weak and young, inexperienced animals. Dehydration and exhaustion seem to be the most likely cause of death.

  1. Comparative pathologic features and development of Sphaeridiotrema globulus (Trematoda) infections in the mute swan and domestic chicken and chicken chorioallantois.

    PubMed

    Huffman, J E; Fried, B; Roscoe, D E; Cali, A

    1984-02-01

    The natural infection of Sphaeridiotrema globulus in the mute swan and the experimental infection in the chicken resulted in an ulcerative hemorrhagic enteritis. Swans and chickens died from the resultant blood loss. Culturing of the parasite on the chorioallantoic membrane of the chicken egg resulted in hemorrhage and a cellular response of the chorioallantois to the trematode. Experimental infections in the domestic chicken and chicken embryo can be of use for the study of ulcerative hemorrhagic enteritis produced by the trematode, pathologic features, identification of the metacercaria to the adult, and developmental aspects of the parasite.

  2. Graph theory for feature extraction and classification: a migraine pathology case study.

    PubMed

    Jorge-Hernandez, Fernando; Garcia Chimeno, Yolanda; Garcia-Zapirain, Begonya; Cabrera Zubizarreta, Alberto; Gomez Beldarrain, Maria Angeles; Fernandez-Ruanova, Begonya

    2014-01-01

    Graph theory is also widely used as a representational form and characterization of brain connectivity network, as is machine learning for classifying groups depending on the features extracted from images. Many of these studies use different techniques, such as preprocessing, correlations, features or algorithms. This paper proposes an automatic tool to perform a standard process using images of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine. The process includes pre-processing, building the graph per subject with different correlations, atlas, relevant feature extraction according to the literature, and finally providing a set of machine learning algorithms which can produce analyzable results for physicians or specialists. In order to verify the process, a set of images from prescription drug abusers and patients with migraine have been used. In this way, the proper functioning of the tool has been proved, providing results of 87% and 92% of success depending on the classifier used.

  3. The Imaging and Pathological Features of Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma in the Gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yi; Chen, Eleanor; Davidson, Darin J.; Pillarisetty, Venu G.; Jones, Robin L.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyosarcoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy with poor overall prognosis. There have been few reports of metastatic leiomyosarcoma in the gallbladder. We report a case of a 41-year-old female who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy due to presumed uterine fibroids. The postoperative pathology revealed high-grade pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma, with involvement of the uterine serosal surface. She subsequently underwent exploratory laparotomy, followed by pelvic radiation and chemotherapy. Since initial management she has developed metastatic disease and has been under treatment and surveillance for 11 years. She has undergone multiple surgical procedures and numerous lines of systemic therapy for metastatic leiomyosarcoma, including cholecystectomy for a metastatic lesion in the gallbladder. There have been no previous reports of metastatic leiomyosarcoma in the gallbladder. Despite extensive metastatic disease this patient has had prolonged survival with multi-modality management. PMID:28191293

  4. Hematological and pathological features of massive hepatic necrosis in two radiated tortoises (Astrochelys radiata)

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, Nobuhide; ITAGAKI, Iori; KIRYU, Daisuke; OMIYA, Tomoko; ONO, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Two radiated tortoises (Astrochelys radiata) exhibited anorexia and hypokinesia. In both cases, hematological and serum biochemical examinations revealed high alkaline phosphatase levels, moderately high aspartate aminotransferase levels and white blood cell counts approximately within the normal range. Despite being treated, the tortoises died 9 and 43 days after the first clinical examination. Gross pathological examinations revealed that the livers of both animals were extremely swollen and contained pale yellow necrotic tissue. Histopathological assessment revealed that the livers contained a massive area of hepatic necrosis surrounded by migration of macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. In one of the cases, severe fibrosis was observed. The present study provides reference information for similar cases in the future. PMID:27746414

  5. Clinical and Anatomical Features as well as Pathological Conditions of Surgically Treated Adult Patients with Occipitalization of the Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takachika; Fueki, Keisuke; Ino, Masatake; Toda, Naofumi; Tanouchi, Tetsu; Manabe, Nodoka

    2016-01-01

    Background This paper intends to clarify clinical and anatomical features as well as pathological conditions of surgically treated adult patients with occipitalization of the atlas. Methods The authors reviewed 12 consecutive adult patients with occipitalization of the atlas who underwent surgery for myleopathy in our hospital. Mainly using preoperative computed tomography and three-dimensional computed tomography angiography, we investigated their anomalies of the osseous structures and vertebral artery at the cervical spine including the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). We also developed a new classification system for occipitalization of the atlas. Results Atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) was detected in 9 patients (75%). The condition of AAS was irreducible in 7 patients. Among these 7 patients, deformity at the lateral atlantoaxial joints was detected in 2 patients. C2-3 fusion was detected in 6 patients (67%) among 9 patients with AAS. Anomalies of the VA were detected in 11 patients (92%). Occipitalization of the atlas was classified into three types according to their pathological conditions. In type 1 (2 patients) the medial atlantoaxial joint is semi-dislocated and the lateral atlantoaxial joints are severely deformed. Type 2 (7 patients) exhibits AAS but the lateral atlantoaxial joints are not deformed. Type 3 (3 patients) is not associated with AAS and therefore does not exhibit osseous stenosis at the CVJ. In type 3 the myelopathy was caused by another coexisting condition. Conclusions Occipitalization of the atlas is classified into three types. The main pathological condition in both types 1 and 2 is AAS. Reduction of AAS is essential in both; however, reduction of AAS in type 1 is more technically demanding than in type 2. The pathological conditions of type 3 are completely different from those of the others, so an accurate diagnosis must be made. The new classification system is a useful guide for surgeons when planning surgical strategies. PMID

  6. Pathologic features of metastatic lymph nodes identified from prophylactic central neck dissection in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Shin; Park, Chanwoo; Kim, Sung Won; Noh, Woong Jae; Lim, Soo Jin; Chun, Bong Kwon; Kim, Beom Su; Hong, Jong Chul; Lee, Kang Dae

    2016-10-01

    The importance of pathologic features of metastatic lymph nodes (LNs), such as size, number, and extranodal extension, has been recently emphasized in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We evaluated the characteristics of metastatic LNs identified after prophylactic central neck dissection (CND) in patients with PTC. We performed a retrospective review of 1,046 patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral thyroidectomy with ipsilateral prophylactic CND. We reviewed the characteristics of the metastatic LNs and analyzed their correlation to the clinicopathologic characteristics of the primary tumor. Cervical LN metastasis after prophylactic CND was identified in 280 out of 1046 patients (26.8 %). The size of metastatic foci (≥2 mm) was independently correlated with primary tumor size (≥1 cm) (p = 0.016, OR = 1.88). Primary tumor size (≥1 cm) was also correlated to the number of metastatic LNs (≥5) (p = 0.004, OR = 3.14) and extranodal extension (p = 0.021, OR = 2.41) in univariate analysis. The size of the primary tumor affects pathologic features of subclinical LN metastasis in patients with PTC. Patients with primary tumors ≥1 cm have an increased risk of larger LN metastases (≥2 mm), an increased number of LN metastases (≥5), and a higher incidence of ENE, which should be considered in decision for prophylactic CND.

  7. Clinicopathologic and molecular features of sporadic early-onset colorectal adenocarcinoma: an adenocarcinoma with frequent signet ring cell differentiation, rectal and sigmoid involvement, and adverse morphologic features.

    PubMed

    Chang, Daniel T; Pai, Rish K; Rybicki, Lisa A; Dimaio, Michael A; Limaye, Maneesha; Jayachandran, Priya; Koong, Albert C; Kunz, Pamela A; Fisher, George A; Ford, James M; Welton, Mark; Shelton, Andrew; Ma, Lisa; Arber, Daniel A; Pai, Reetesh K

    2012-08-01

    Recent literature suggests an increasing incidence of colorectal carcinoma in young patients. We performed a histologic, molecular, and immunophenotypic analysis of patients with sporadic early-onset (≤40 years of age) colorectal carcinoma seen at our institution from the years 2000-2010 and compared these tumors to a cohort of consecutively resected colorectal carcinomas seen in patients >40 years of age. A total of 1160 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas were surgically resected for the years 2000 through 2010. Of these, 75 (6%) were diagnoses in patients ≤40 years of age of which 13 (17%) demonstrated abnormalities in DNA mismatch repair, 4 (5%) were in patients with known germline genetic disorders (two patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, one patient with juvenile polyposis, and one patient with Li-Fraumeni syndrome), and three patients (4%) had long-standing chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The sporadic early-onset colorectal carcinoma group comprised a total of 55 patients (55/1160, 5%) and were compared with a control group comprising 73 consecutively resected colorectal carcinomas with proficient DNA mismatch repair in patients >40 years of age. For the early-onset colorectal carcinoma group, most cases (33/55, 60%) were diagnosed between the age of 35 and 40 years of age. Compared with the control group, the early-onset colorectal carcinoma group was significantly different with respect to tumor location (P<0.007) with 80% (44/55 cases) identified in either the sigmoid colon (24/55, 44%) or rectum (20/55, 36%). Morphologically, early-onset colorectal carcinomas more frequently displayed adverse histologic features compared with the control colorectal carcinoma group such as signet ring cell differentiation (7/55, 13% vs 1/73, 1%, P=0.021), perineural invasion (16/55, 29% vs 8/73, 11%, P=0.009) and venous invasion (12/55, 22% vs 4/73, 6%, P=0.006). A precursor adenomatous lesion was less frequently identified in the early-onset colorectal

  8. Long-term pathological and immunohistochemical features in the liver after intraoperative whole-liver irradiation in rats.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Masumi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Yukari; Takahashi, Takeo; Ohkubo, Yu; Musha, Atsushi; Komachi, Mayumi; Nakazato, Yoichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) has become particularly important recently for treatment of liver tumors, but there are few experimental investigations pertaining to radiation-induced liver injuries over long-term follow-up periods. Thus, the present study examined pathological liver features over a 10-month period using an intraoperative whole-liver irradiation model. Liver function tests were performed in blood samples, whereas cell death, cell proliferation, and fibrotic changes were evaluated pathologically in liver tissues, which were collected from irradiated rats 24 h, 1, 2, 4 and 40 weeks following administration of single irradiation doses of 0 (control), 15 or 30 Gy. The impaired liver function, increased hepatocyte number, and decreased apoptotic cell proportion observed in the 15 Gy group, but not the 30 Gy group, returned to control group levels after 40 weeks; however, the Ki-67 indexes in the 15 Gy group were still higher than those in the control group after 40 weeks. Azan staining showed a fibrotic pattern in the irradiated liver in the 30 Gy group only, but the expression levels of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) in both the 15 and 30 Gy groups were significantly higher than those in the control group (P < 0.05). There were differences in the pathological features of the irradiated livers between the 15 Gy and 30 Gy groups, but TGF-β1 and α-SMA expression patterns supported the gradual progression of radiation-induced liver fibrosis in both groups. These findings will be useful in the future development of protective drugs for radiation-induced liver injury.

  9. Congenital hereditary corneal oedema of Maumenee: its clinical features, management, and pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkness, C M; McCartney, A; Rice, N S; Garner, A; Steele, A D

    1987-01-01

    The clinical and histological features of congenital hereditary corneal oedema in 23 patients are presented. The series includes cases of both recessive and dominant inheritance. Although the condition is present at birth or in early childhood, visual development appears to be little impaired, if at all. Penetrating keratoplasty carries a relatively good surgical prognosis and can produce a substantial visual gain even when carried out late in life. Images PMID:3548808

  10. Characterization of the Pathological and Biochemical Markers that Correlate to the Clinical Features of Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    or autistic features, and frequently with seizures. The parent -of-origin effect is not evident in the reported cases of int trp(15), with both maternal ...and paternal triplications associated with poor outcome. Clinical studies indicate that most individuals diag- nosed with dup(15) of maternal origin...EH Jr, Lindgren V, Leventhal BL, et al. Autism or atypical autism in maternally but not paternally derived proximal 15q duplication. Am J Hum Genet

  11. Pathological features in dead on arrival broilers with special reference to heart disorders.

    PubMed

    Nijdam, E; Zailan, A R M; van Eck, J H H; Decuypere, E; Stegeman, J A

    2006-07-01

    A gross postmortem investigation was done on 302 broilers that died between catching and slaughter to establish predisposing factors for dying in this period. Special attention was paid to heart disorders, which were established by determining the ratio of the right ventricle mass to the total ventricle mass (RV:TV) and to postmortem changes in hearts and lungs of broilers that were dead on arrival (DOA). Macroscopic pathologic lesions were found in 89.4% of DOA broilers. Signs of infectious diseases appeared to be most frequent (64.9%), followed by heart and circulation disorders (42.4%), and trauma (29.5%). The RV:TV was significantly higher for DOA broilers in comparison with slaughtered broilers. The prevalence of hearts with an abnormal RV:TV in DOA broilers was 34.4 vs. 4.1% in slaughtered broilers. The DOA broilers with an abnormal heart ratio more frequently showed ascites and hydropericardium. Postmortem changes in lungs depend on the position of the carcass the first several hours after death. Broilers, which remain in dorsal recumbency for several hours after death, develop engorged lungs. A good health status as well as more attention for the catching and crating process is crucial in decreasing the percentage of DOA broilers. Prevention of an increased heart ratio and of ascites will improve the livability in the broiler house and also decrease the DOA rate enormously.

  12. Leukoencephalopathy with cerebral calcifications and cysts: clinical and pathological features in two adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Zheng, Xueping; Sui, Qinglan; Xu, Wenjian; Zee, Chi-Shing

    2016-03-01

    Two adult patients diagnosed with Leukoencephalopathy with cerebral calcifications and cysts (LCC) were presented. Both patients had a long-term (8-10 years) following-up. Radiological findings of both patients revealed the characteristic signs of LCC: cerebral white matter abnormalities, calcifications, and cysts. In case 1, the initial CT scan showed a low-density area in the right frontal lobe and it had developed into a large cystic lesion after 8 years. Histopathological determination revealed that the cyst wall was associated with hemorrhage, angiomatous formation, and some Rosenthal fibers. In case 2, a major cystic lesion was located at the left parietal lobe which was resected and an old hematoma was found inside the cyst. Nine years later, the follow-up neuroimaging of case 2 showed a remarkable improvement of white matter abnormalities and cystic lesions. Hemorrhagic fluid was observed inside the cysts. Additionally, follow-up CT and MR scans showed a rapid enlargement of cystic lesions accompanied with hemorrhagic fluid levels after a year. Then, a major cyst was surgically removed to relieve pressure symptoms. Pathology of the resected cyst exhibited an organized hemorrhage inside the cyst and a large amount of hemosiderin surrounding the cyst wall. In conclusion, our two cases demonstrated that angiomatous changes subsequent with hemorrhage may be the major mechanism of cyst formation and development.

  13. Clinico-pathological features of breast myxoma: report of a case with histogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Magro, Gaetano; Cavanaugh, Barbara; Palazzo, Juan

    2010-05-01

    We herein report the clinical, radiological, and pathological findings of a rare case of myxoma occurring in the breast parenchyma of a 75-year-old female. The tumor was incidentally detected at a mammographic screening and, ultrasonographically, presented as an ovoid mass. Histologically, an encapsulated hypocellular, myxoid tumor with low vascularization was evident. Neoplastic cells were round- to spindle/stellate-shaped and stained with vimentin and focally with calponin. We emphasize that morphology remains preeminent in the diagnosis of a breast myxoma, while immunohistochemistry may assist in ruling out other tumor entities. Differential diagnosis with all benign and malignant myxoid lesions, primarily occurring in the breast, is provided. The histogenesis of breast myxoma is unknown. The lack of expression of desmin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD34, CD99, CD10, bcl-2 protein, and estrogen/progesterone/androgen receptors, all markers characteristically expressed by "the benign spindle cell tumors of the mammary stroma," would suggest that breast myxoma does not fall into this tumor category and that its putative precursor mesenchymal cell resides in the interlobular stroma.

  14. Polyp detection rate and pathological features in patients undergoing a comprehensive colonoscopy screening

    PubMed Central

    Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Ashtari, Sara; Pourhoseingholi, Mohmad Amin; Chaleshi, Vahid; Anaraki, Fakhrosadat; Haghazali, Mehrdad; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify the prevalence, and clinical and pathologic characteristic of colonic polyps among Iranian patients undergoing a comprehensive colonoscopy, and determine the polyp detection rate (PDR) and adenoma detection rate (ADR). METHODS In this cross-sectional study, demographics and epidemiologic characteristics of 531 persons who underwent colonoscopies between 2014 and 2015 at Mehrad gastrointestinal clinic were determined. Demographics, indication for colonoscopy, colonoscopy findings, number of polyps, and histopathological characteristics of the polyps were examined for each person. RESULTS Our sample included 295 (55.6%) women and 236 (44.4%) men, with a mean age of 50.25 ± 14.89 years. Overall PDR was 23.5% (125/531). ADR and colorectal cancer detection rate in this study were 12.8% and 1.5%, respectively. Polyps were detected more significantly frequently in men than in women (52.8% vs 47.2%, P < 0.05). Polyps can be seen in most patients after the age of 50. The average age of patients with cancer was significantly higher than that of patients with polyps (61.3 years vs 56.4 years, P < 0.05). The majority of the polyps were adenomatous. More than 50% of the polyps were found in the rectosigmoid part of the colon. CONCLUSION The prevalence of polyps and adenomas in this study is less than that reported in the Western populations. In our patients, distal colon is more susceptible to developing polyps and cancer than proximal colon. PMID:28251034

  15. Clinical and pathological features of fat embolism with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang Jyh; Yeh, Diana Yu-Wung; Chen, Hsing I

    2007-09-01

    FES (fat embolism syndrome) is a clinical problem, and, although ARDS (acute respiratory distress syndrome) has been considered as a serious complication of FES, the pathogenesis of ARDS associated with FES remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the clinical manifestations, and biochemical and pathophysiological changes, in subjects associated with FES and ARDS, to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved in this disorder. A total of eight patients with FES were studied, and arterial blood pH, PaO(2) (arterial partial pressure of O(2)), PaCO(2) (arterial partial pressure of CO(2)), biochemical and pathophysiological data were obtained. These subjects suffered from crash injuries and developed FES associated with ARDS, and each died within 2 h after admission. In the subjects, chest radiography revealed that the lungs were clear on admission, and pulmonary infiltration was observed within 2 h of admission. Arterial blood pH and PaO(2) declined, whereas PaCO(2) increased. Plasma PLA(2) (phospholipase A(2)), nitrate/nitrite, methylguanidine, TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha), IL-1beta (interleukin-1beta) and IL-10 (interleukin-10) were significantly elevated. Pathological examinations revealed alveolar oedema and haemorrhage with multiple fat droplet depositions and fibrin thrombi. Fat droplets were also found in the arterioles and/or capillaries in the lung, kidney and brain. Immunohistochemical staining identified iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) in alveolar macrophages. In conclusion, our clinical analysis suggests that PLA(2), NO, free radicals and pro-inflammatory cytokines are involved in the pathogenesis of ARDS associated with FES. The major source of NO is the alveolar macrophages.

  16. A note on the stability and discriminability of graph-based features for classification problems in digital pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Xu, Jun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear architecture or the spatial arrangement of individual cancer nuclei on histopathology images has been shown to be associated with different grades and differential risk for a number of solid tumors such as breast, prostate, and oropharyngeal. Graph-based representations of individual nuclei (nuclei representing the graph nodes) allows for mining of quantitative metrics to describe tumor morphology. These graph features can be broadly categorized into global and local depending on the type of graph construction method. While a number of local graph (e.g. Cell Cluster Graphs) and global graph (e.g. Voronoi, Delaunay Triangulation, Minimum Spanning Tree) features have been shown to associated with cancer grade, risk, and outcome for different cancer types, the sensitivity of the preceding segmentation algorithms in identifying individual nuclei can have a significant bearing on the discriminability of the resultant features. This therefore begs the question as to which features while being discriminative of cancer grade and aggressiveness are also the most resilient to the segmentation errors. These properties are particularly desirable in the context of digital pathology images, where the method of slide preparation, staining, and type of nuclear segmentation algorithm employed can all dramatically affect the quality of the nuclear graphs and corresponding features. In this paper we evaluated the trade off between discriminability and stability of both global and local graph-based features in conjunction with a few different segmentation algorithms and in the context of two different histopathology image datasets of breast cancer from whole-slide images (WSI) and tissue microarrays (TMA). Specifically in this paper we investigate a few different performance measures including stability, discriminability and stability vs discriminability trade off, all of which are based on p-values from the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance for local and global

  17. Correlating DWI MRI with pathological and other features of Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Potter, Christopher A.; Sattavat, Mamta; Garcia, Paul A.; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI is a highly sensitive and specific test for diagnosis of sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease (sCJD); however, the neuropathological origin of DWI signal abnormalities including other clinical features have not been well-defined. We describe a case of sCJD with brain MRI taken 15 days prior to death, which provided an opportunity to correlate clinical, EEG, MRI and neuropathological findings in order to better understand which sCJD-specific neuropathological changes underlie the DWI abnormalities. Clinical findings correlated well with both EEG and MRI changes. Neuropathological analysis showed that hyperintensities on DWI MRI correlated best with the vacuolation score (r=0.78, p=0.0005) and PrPSc load (r=0.77; p=0.0006), followed by reactive astrocytic gliosis (r=0.63, p=0.008). This case provides further evidence that DWI abnormalities correlate well with the clinical features and with PrPSc accumulation and vacuolation. PMID:19266702

  18. Perturbations of the endocannabinoid system in mantle cell lymphoma: correlations to clinical and pathological features

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Agata M.; Nygren, Lina; Almestrand, Stefan; Zong, Fang; Flygare, Jenny; Wennerholm, Stefanie Baumgartner; Saft, Leonie; Andersson, Patrik; Kimby, Eva; Wahlin, Björn E.; Christensson, Birger; Sander, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptors are upregulated in many types of cancers, including mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and have been suggested to constitute novel therapeutic targets. The expression pattern of the key members of the endocannabinoid system was analyzed in a well-characterized MCL patient cohort and correlated to biological features. 107 tumor tissues were analyzed for the mRNA levels of cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CNR1 and CNR2) and the two main enzymes regulating the endocannabinoid anandamide levels in tissue: NAPEPLD and FAAH (participating in synthesis and degradation, respectively). NAPEPLD, CNR1 and CNR2 were overexpressed while FAAH expression was reduced in MCL compared to non-malignant B-cells. Both low CNR1 and high FAAH levels correlated with lymphocytosis (p=0.016 and p=0.022, respectively) and with leukocytosis (p=0.0018 and p=0.047). Weak to moderate CNR1 levels were a feature of SOX11 negative MCL (p=0.006). Both high CNR2 and high FAAH levels correlated to anemia (p=0.0006 and p=0.038, respectively). In conclusion, the relative expression of the anandamide synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes in MCL is heavily perturbed. This finding, together with high expression of cannabinoid receptors, could favor enhanced anandamide signaling and suggest that targeting the endocannabinoid system might be considered as part of lymphoma therapy. PMID:25594062

  19. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer's disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may be

  20. Examining the relation of osteochondral lesions of the talus to ligamentous and lateral ankle tendinous pathologic features: a comprehensive MRI review in an asymptomatic lateral ankle population.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; Protzman, Nicole M; Mandelker, Eiran M; Malhotra, Amit D; Schwartz, Edward; Brigido, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Given the frequency and burden of ankle sprains, the pathologic features identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are widely known in the symptomatic population. Ankle MRI pathologic features in the asymptomatic population, however, are poorly understood. Such examinations are rarely undertaken unless an ankle has been injured or is painful. We report the systematic MRI findings from the reports of 108 consecutive asymptomatic lateral ankles (104 patients). Our purpose was to (1) report the prevalence of osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) and pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR); (2) correlate the presence of OLTs with the pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and SPR; and (3) correlate ligamentous discontinuity with the peroneal pathologic features, OLTs, and SPR pathologic features. A total of 16 OLTs (14.81%) were present (13 medial and 3 lateral). Of the 16 patients with OLTs, 8 (50.00%) had concomitant peroneal pathologic findings. Healthy medial and lateral ligaments were noted in 41 patients (37.96%), and ligamentous discontinuity was grade I in 25 (23.15%), II in 32 (29.63%), III in 5 (4.63%), and grade IV in 5 patients (4.63%). A weak positive correlation was found between attenuation or tears of the superficial deltoid and medial OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.23, p = .0191) and a moderate positive correlation between tears of the posterior talofibular ligament and lateral OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.30, p = .0017). Additionally, a moderate positive correlation between ligamentous discontinuity and tendinopathy of the peroneus brevis was noted [Spearman's coefficient(106) = 0.29, p = .0024]. These findings add to the evidence of concomitant pathologic features in the asymptomatic population. To definitively assess causation and evaluate the clinical evolution of radiologic findings, future, prospective, longitudinal

  1. RET/PTC Translocations and Clinico-Pathological Features in Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Romei, Cristina; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most frequent endocrine cancer accounting for 5–10% of thyroid nodules. Papillary histotype (PTC) is the most prevalent form accounting for 80% of all thyroid carcinoma. Although much is known about its epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical, and biological behavior, the only documented risk factor for PTC is the ionizing radiation exposure. Rearrangements of the Rearranged during Transfection (RET) proto-oncogene are found in PTC and have been shown to play a pathogenic role. The first RET rearrangement, named RET/PTC, was discovered in 1987. This rearrangement constitutively activates the transcription of the RET tyrosine-kinase domain in follicular cell, thus triggering the signaling along the MAPK pathway and an uncontrolled proliferation. Up to now, 13 different types of RET/PTC rearrangements have been reported but the two most common are RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3. Ionizing radiations are responsible for the generation of RET/PTC rearrangements, as supported by in vitro studies and by the evidence that RET/PTC, and particularly RET/PTC3, are highly prevalent in radiation induced PTC. However, many thyroid tumors without any history of radiation exposure harbor similar RET rearrangements. The overall prevalence of RET/PTC rearrangements varies from 20 to 70% of PTCs and they are more frequent in childhood than in adulthood thyroid cancer. Controversial data have been reported on the relationship between RET/PTC rearrangements and the PTC prognosis. RET/PTC3 is usually associated with a more aggressive phenotype and in particular with a greater tumor size, the solid variant, and a more advanced stage at diagnosis which are all poor prognostic factors. In contrast, RET/PTC1 rearrangement does not correlate with any clinical–pathological characteristics of PTC. Moreover, the RET protein and mRNA expression level did not show any correlation with the outcome of patients with PTC and no correlation between RET/PTC rearrangements and the

  2. Parkinson disease: insights in clinical, genetic and pathological features of monogenic disease subtypes.

    PubMed

    Crosiers, David; Theuns, Jessie; Cras, Patrick; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2011-10-01

    In the past 15 years, insights in clinical and genetic characteristics of Parkinson disease (PD) have increased substantially. Sequence or copy number variants in at least six genes (SNCA, LRRK2, PARK2, PINK1, DJ-1 and ATP13A2) have been identified to cause monogenic forms of PD. Routine clinical testing for mutations in these genes is feasible and available, but overlapping phenotypes in monogenic and sporadic PD complicate straightforward diagnostic screening. Primarily, a positive familial history and an early onset age should prompt clinicians to consider genetic testing. Based on a literature review on clinical and neuropathological features of PD patients carrying a pathogenic mutation we propose guidelines for genetic diagnostic testing in clinical practice. However, the absence of disease-modifying therapies and the variable penetrance of most known mutations currently limit the usefulness of genetic diagnostic testing for PD in clinical practice.

  3. Pathological features of Cryptosporidium andersoni-induced lesions in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Masuno, Koichi; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki; Satoh, Masaaki; Kai, Chieko; Nakai, Yutaka

    2013-07-01

    To assess the infectivity and the istopathological features of Cryptosporidium andersoni (C. andersoni) in laboratory animals, SCID mice were orally inoculated with oocysts of C. andersoni. Starting one week after inoculation, the SCID mice began shedding oocysts, and this continued for ten weeks. Histopathologically, myriads of C. andersoni were observed on the apical surface of the epithelium in the gastric pit of the glandular stomach. There were few lesions in the gastric epithelium except C. andersoni adhesion. In the lamina propria of the affected mucosa, minimum infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed. Immunohistochemically, C. andersoni demonstrated a positive reaction to a number of primary antibodies of Cryptosporidium parvum. In the experiment described here, few increases were seen in apoptotic epithelial cells in the affected mucosas of the SCID mice, and the nuclear augmentation was not enhanced. It was hypothesized that the absence of apoptosis and cell division were due to a lack of inflammatory cell reaction in the lamina propria.

  4. Ameloblastomas: Clinicopathological features from 70 cases diagnosed in a single Oral Pathology service in an 8-year period

    PubMed Central

    Filizzola, Andressa-Incerte; Bartholomeu-dos-Santos, Teresa-Cristina-Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Ameloblastomas are odontogenic tumors that can present some distinct clinicopathological profiles when comparing different populations and studies. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to analyze the clinicopathological features from a series of ameloblastomas diagnosed in a single Oral Pathology service in Brazil in an 8-year period. Study Design: The files were revised and all cases diagnosed as ameloblastomas in the period were retrieved. All hematoxylin and eosin stained histological slides were reviewed and all clinical and radiological information were obtained through a review of the laboratory forms. Data were descriptively analyzed and a comparison was performed with the different ameloblastomas subtypes. Results: Seventy ameloblastomas composed the final sample, including 57 (81%) solid/multicystic, 9 (13%) unicystic, 2 (3%) desmoplastic and 2 (3%) peripheral ameloblastomas. Mean age of the affected patients was in the forth decade of life and there was a slight male predominance. Most tumors presented as multilocular radiolucencies, were located in the posterior mandible and showed the follicular and plexiform histological patterns. There was no difference on the mean age of the patients affected by solid and unicystic ameloblastomas. Conclusions: The present results showed that the clinicopathological features of the ameloblastomas included in this Brazilian sample were similar to the features described in most other worldwide populations. Key words:Ameloblastoma, solid, unicystic, review, epidemiology, histology. PMID:25129244

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 infection: overview on relevant clinico-pathological features.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Paolo G; Porter, Stephen R

    2008-02-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) is a nuclear replicating enveloped virus, usually acquired through direct contact with infected lesions or body fluids (typically saliva). The prevalence of HSV-1 infection increases progressively from childhood, the seroprevalence being inversely related to socioeconomic background. Primary HSV-1 infections in children are either asymptomatic or following an incubation period of about 1 week gives rise to mucocutaneous vesicular eruptions. Herpetic gingivostomatitis typically affects the tongue, lips, gingival, buccal mucosa and the hard and soft palate. Most primary oro-facial HSV infection is caused by HSV-1, infection by HSV-2 is increasingly common. Recurrent infections, which occur at variable intervals, typically give rise to vesiculo-ulcerative lesions at mucocutaneous junctions particularly the lips (herpes labialis). Recurrent HSV-1 infection within the mouth is uncommon in otherwise healthy patients, although in immunocompromised patients, recurrent infection can be more extensive and/or aggressive. The diagnosis of common herpetic infection can usually be based upon the clinical history and presenting features. Confirmatory laboratory diagnosis is, however, required when patients are, or may be, immunocompromised.

  6. S-phase fractions of colorectal carcinomas related to pathologic and clinical features

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Prioleau, P.G.

    1981-09-01

    The S-phase fractions (SPFs) of epithelial cells in 100 resected colorectal carcinomas were measured by in vitro exposure to tritiated thymidine and autoradiography. The frequency distribution of SPFs was gaussian with a median of 17.8 per hundred in 90 unirradiated carcinomas, whereas in ten carcinomas given radiation therapy preoperatively, it was positively skewed with a median of 6.9. Analysis of the unirradiated carcinomas showed no relationship between SPF and various clinical and morphologic features that included age, race, sex, site, size, Dukes' stage, histologic grade of the tumor, number of metastasis-bearing regional lymph nodes, presence of adenomas of the large bowel, survival or relapse-free survival of the patient, or SPF or adjacent normal colorectal crypts. The results show no evidence that colorectal carcinomas can be divided into kinetic subsets. The spatial orientation of labeled cells in autoradiographs indicated presence of a nonproliferative fraction of cells in many tumors that may modulate response to radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  7. A solitary uterine relapse in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: CT features and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, M A; Bettini, G; Pozzessere, C; Guerrini, S; Defina, M; Ambrosio, M R; Aprile, L; Bocchia, M; Volterrani, L

    2016-01-01

    T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-cell ALL) is a rare haematological neoplasia, that affects children and less commonly adults. Female genital tract and particularly uterus involvement in acute ALL is rare. This report presents the CT features of a 64-year-old woman with uterine relapse of T-cell ALL, occurring 11 months after the diagnosis, as a second, unique relapse of disease. The patient was asymptomatic when a CT examination showed a homogenous thickness of the uterine wall in comparison with the previous CT examination. Histology from biopsy specimens, obtained through hysteroscopy, confirmed T-cell ALL localisation (TdT+, CD10+, CD3c+ and CD2+). The uterus could be a site of relapse in patients suffering from ALL. Even though an MRI examination could better demonstrate the disease in cases of suspected female genital tract involvement by ALL, the comparison of differences between a present and a previous CT examination is sufficient to suspect the diagnosis.

  8. Extramedullary plasmacytoma-like posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders: clinical and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Richendollar, Bill G; Hsi, Eric D; Cook, James R

    2009-10-01

    Most monomorphic posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma. Rare cases of PTLD resembling extramedullary plasmacytomas have also been described. This report describes the clinical, histologic, phenotypic, and genotypic findings in 4 cases of plasmacytoma-like PTLD (2 nodal, 1 adenoidal, and 1 cutaneous) and compares the findings with extramedullary involvement by plasma cell neoplasms arising in immunocompetent patients. Plasmacytoma-like PTLDs characteristically arise late after transplantation (mean, 7.0 years), show a variable association with Epstein-Barr virus (2/4 cases positive), and demonstrate histologic and phenotypic findings that overlap with immunocompetent extramedullary plasma cell neoplasms. None of the patients with plasmacytoma-like PTLD developed lytic bone lesions, and 3 of 4 patients had complete responses (>2 years) to reduction of immunosuppression, confirming the role of immunosuppression in the pathogenesis of these lesions. This report, which represents the first case series of plasmacytoma-like PTLD, clarifies the features of this rare subtype of PTLD.

  9. Pathological features and diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Castellano-Megías, Víctor M; Andrés, Carolina Ibarrola-de; López-Alonso, Guadalupe; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas is a noninvasive epithelial neoplasm of mucin-producing cells arising in the main duct (MD) and/or branch ducts (BD) of the pancreas. Involved ducts are dilated and filled with neoplastic papillae and mucus in variable intensity. IPMN lacks ovarian-type stroma, unlike mucinous cystic neoplasm, and is defined as a grossly visible entity (≥ 5 mm), unlike pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm. With the use of high-resolution imaging techniques, very small IPMNs are increasingly being identified. Most IPMNs are solitary and located in the pancreatic head, although 20%-40% are multifocal. Macroscopic classification in MD type, BD type and mixed or combined type reflects biological differences with important prognostic and preoperative clinical management implications. Based on cytoarchitectural atypia, IPMN is classified into low-grade, intermediate-grade and high-grade dysplasia. Based on histological features and mucin (MUC) immunophenotype, IPMNs are classified into gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary and oncocytic types. These different phenotypes can be observed together, with the IPMN classified according to the predominant type. Two pathways have been suggested: gastric phenotype corresponds to less aggressive uncommitted cells (MUC1 -, MUC2 -, MUC5AC +, MUC6 +) with the capacity to evolve to intestinal phenotype (intestinal pathway) (MUC1 -, MUC2 +, MUC5AC +, MUC6 - or weak +) or pancreatobiliary /oncocytic phenotypes (pyloropancreatic pathway) (MUC1 +, MUC 2-, MUC5AC +, MUC 6 +) becoming more aggressive. Prognosis of IPMN is excellent but critically worsens when invasive carcinoma arises (about 40% of IPMNs), except in some cases of minimal invasion. The clinical challenge is to establish which IPMNs should be removed because of their higher risk of developing invasive cancer. Once resected, they must be extensively sampled or, much better, submitted in its entirety for microscopic study to

  10. Effects of clinical, laboratuary and pathological features on successful sperm retrieval in non-obstructive azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Güneri, Çağrı; Alkibay, Turgut; Tunç, Lütfi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study aims to evaluate the correlation of testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and histopathology with various features of non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) cases who consulted to our university-based infertility clinic, and the probability of prompting couples about TESE success and to investigate the cost reduction chance through cost-beneficial aspects. Material and methods One hundred and twenty-five patients were enrolled in this study. Age, unprotected intercourse period, age of puberty, and concomittant diseases were noted. Testicular volumes were measured. The correlations between genetic test results and serum levels of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Luteinizing Hormone (LH), free testosterone, prolactine were investigated. Results The incidence of NOA among infertile men was found to be 15.1%. Median age of the cases was 33.1 years. Decrease in TESE success rate was seen in the group aged >30, and those who practiced unprotected intercourse for more than 10 years. TESE success rate was 40 percent. The required negative correlation between FSH levels, and testicular volume was not observed when the patient had additional diseases and/or genitourinary surgery. FSH and LH levels were significantly different between TESE- positive and negative groups (p=0.006, and p=0.001 respectively). Success rate in bilateral TESE group was 14.2%, and 96% of TESE- negative patients had bilateral TESE. Fifteen of 118 patients had Y chromosome microdeletions. These results were similar in both TESE- positive and negative group. Conclusion None of the parameters investigated herein predicted succesful TESE outcomes. However, in cases with increased FSH and AZFa/AZFb deletion before application of bilateral TESE, in cases of increased FSH and AZFa/AZFb deletion, detailed information should be given to these patients about low success rates and risk of disease inheritance which may reduce procedural costs. Knowing groups with poor prognosis, may help

  11. Usual interstitial pneumonia end-stage features from explants with radiologic and pathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Rabeyrin, Maud; Thivolet, Françoise; Ferretti, Gilbert R; Chalabreysse, Lara; Jankowski, Adrien; Cottin, Vincent; Pison, Christophe; Cordier, Jean-François; Lantuejoul, Sylvie

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most frequent and severe idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, with typical high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features and histologic pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP); its main differential diagnosis is fibrotic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (F-NSIP). Usual interstitial pneumonia was mainly described from lung biopsies, and little is known on explants. Twenty-two UIP/IPF explants were analyzed histologically and compared with previous open lung biopsies (OLBs; n = 11) and HRCT (n = 19), when available. Temporospatial heterogeneity and subpleural and paraseptal fibrosis were similarly found in UIP/IPF explants and OLB (91%-95%). Fibroblastic foci were found in 82% of OLBs and 100% of explants, with a higher mean score in explants (P = .023). Honeycombing was present in 64% of OLBs and 95% of explants, with a higher mean score in explants (P = .005). Almost 60% of UIP/IPF explants showed NSIP areas and 41% peribronchiolar fibrosis; inflammation, bronchiolar metaplasia, and vascular changes were more frequent in UIP/IPF explants; and Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia (DIP)-like areas were not common (18%-27%). Numerous large airspace enlargements with fibrosis were frequent in UIP/IPF explants (59%). On HRCT, honeycombing was observed in 95% of the cases and ground-glass opacities in 53%, correlating with NSIP areas or acute exacerbation at histology. Six patients had combined IPF and emphysema. Lesions were more severe in UIP/IPF explants, reflecting the worsening of the disease. Usual interstitial pneumonia/IPF explants more frequently presented with confounding lesions such as NSIP areas, peribronchiolar fibrosis, and airspace enlargements with fibrosis sometimes associated with emphysema.

  12. Pathological features and diagnosis of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Castellano-Megías, Víctor M; Andrés, Carolina Ibarrola-de; López-Alonso, Guadalupe; Colina-Ruizdelgado, Francisco

    2014-09-15

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas is a noninvasive epithelial neoplasm of mucin-producing cells arising in the main duct (MD) and/or branch ducts (BD) of the pancreas. Involved ducts are dilated and filled with neoplastic papillae and mucus in variable intensity. IPMN lacks ovarian-type stroma, unlike mucinous cystic neoplasm, and is defined as a grossly visible entity (≥ 5 mm), unlike pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm. With the use of high-resolution imaging techniques, very small IPMNs are increasingly being identified. Most IPMNs are solitary and located in the pancreatic head, although 20%-40% are multifocal. Macroscopic classification in MD type, BD type and mixed or combined type reflects biological differences with important prognostic and preoperative clinical management implications. Based on cytoarchitectural atypia, IPMN is classified into low-grade, intermediate-grade and high-grade dysplasia. Based on histological features and mucin (MUC) immunophenotype, IPMNs are classified into gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary and oncocytic types. These different phenotypes can be observed together, with the IPMN classified according to the predominant type. Two pathways have been suggested: gastric phenotype corresponds to less aggressive uncommitted cells (MUC1 -, MUC2 -, MUC5AC +, MUC6 +) with the capacity to evolve to intestinal phenotype (intestinal pathway) (MUC1 -, MUC2 +, MUC5AC +, MUC6 - or weak +) or pancreatobiliary /oncocytic phenotypes (pyloropancreatic pathway) (MUC1 +, MUC 2-, MUC5AC +, MUC 6 +) becoming more aggressive. Prognosis of IPMN is excellent but critically worsens when invasive carcinoma arises (about 40% of IPMNs), except in some cases of minimal invasion. The clinical challenge is to establish which IPMNs should be removed because of their higher risk of developing invasive cancer. Once resected, they must be extensively sampled or, much better, submitted in its entirety for microscopic study to

  13. Programmed death ligand 1 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma: Relationship With clinical and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Julien; Rousseau, Benoît; Amaddeo, Giuliana; Mercey, Marion; Charpy, Cécile; Costentin, Charlotte; Luciani, Alain; Zafrani, Elie-Serge; Laurent, Alexis; Azoulay, Daniel; Lafdil, Fouad; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2016-12-01

    The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains poor, with only one third of patients eligible for curative treatments and very limited survival benefits with the use of sorafenib, the current standard of care for advanced disease. Recently, agents targeting the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)/programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint were shown to display impressive antitumor activity in various solid or hematological malignancies, including HCC. PD-L1 immunohistochemical expression is thought to represent a biomarker predictive of drug sensitivity. Here, we investigated PD-L1 expression in a series of 217 HCCs and correlated our results with clinical and histological features and immunohistochemical markers (PD-1, cytokeratin 19, glutamine synthetase, and β-catenin expression). PD-L1 expression by neoplastic cells was significantly associated with common markers of tumor aggressiveness (high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels, P = 0.038; satellite nodules, P < 0.001; macrovascular invasion, P < 0.001; microvascular invasion, P < 0.001; poor differentiation, P < 0.001) and with the progenitor subtype of HCC (cytokeratin 19 expression, P = 0.031). High PD-L1 expression by inflammatory cells from the tumor microenvironment also correlated with high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels (P < 0.001), macrovascular invasion (P = 0.001), poor differentiation (P = 0.001), high PD-1 expression (P < 0.001), and the so-called lymphoepithelioma-like histological subtype of HCC (P = 0.003).

  14. Oral squamous cell carcinoma: clinicopathological features from 346 cases from a single Oral Pathology service during an 8-year period

    PubMed Central

    PIRES, Fábio Ramôa; RAMOS, Amanda Barreto; de OLIVEIRA, Jade Bittencourt Coutinho; TAVARES, Amanda Serra; da LUZ, Priscilla Silva Ribeiro; dos SANTOS, Teresa Cristina Ribeiro Bartholomeu

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is mostly derived from North American, European and East Asian populations. Objective The aim of this study was to report the demographic and clinicopathological features from OSCC diagnosed in an Oral Pathology service in southeastern Brazil in an 8-year period. Material and Methods All OSCC diagnosed from 2005 to 2012 were reviewed, including histological analysis of all hematoxylin and eosin stained slides and review of all demographic and clinical information from the laboratory records. Results A total of 346 OSCC was retrieved and males represented 67% of the sample. Mean age of the patients was 62.3 years-old and females were affected a decade older than males (p<0.001). Mean time of complaint with the tumors was 10 months and site distribution showed that the border of the tongue (37%), alveolar mucosa/gingiva (20%) and floor of mouth/ventral tongue (19%) were the most common affected sites. Mean size of the tumors was 3.4 cm, with no differences for males and females (p=0.091) and males reported both tobacco and alcohol consumption more frequently than females. Histological grade of the tumors revealed that 27%, 40% and 21% of the tumors were, respectively, classified as well-, moderately- and poorly-differentiated OSCC, 26 cases (7.5%) were microinvasive OSCC and 17 cases were OSCC variants. OSCC in males mostly affected the border of tongue, floor of mouth/ventral tongue and alveolar mucosa/gingival, while they were more frequent on the border of tongue, alveolar mucosa/gingival and buccal mucosa/buccal sulcus in females (p=0.004). Conclusions The present data reflect the epidemiological characteristics of OSCC diagnosed in a public Oral Pathology laboratory in southeastern Brazil and have highlighted several differences in clinicopathological features when comparing male and female OSCC-affected patients. PMID:24212993

  15. Experimentally induced orchitis associated with Arcanobacterium pyogenes: clinical, ultrasonographic, seminological and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Gouletsou, P G; Fthenakis, G C; Cripps, P J; Papaioannou, N; Lainas, T; Psalla, D; Amiridis, G S

    2004-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the features of experimentally induced orchitis associated with Arcanobacterium pyogenes and confirm the pathogenicity of the organism for the ovine testicle. One testicle of each of nine rams was inoculated with 1.3 +/- 10(4) colony-forming-units of an A. pyogenes isolate and regular clinical, ultrasonographic, bacteriological and seminological examinations were carried out up to 204 days after challenge. The rams were sequentially euthanatized 3, 6, 9, 18, 30, 50, 71, 113 and 204 days after challenge and a gross- and histopathological examination of their testicles was performed. All rams developed clinical orchitis and general signs. The initial ultrasonographic findings were changes of size and echogenicity of the genitalia, whilst in the long-standing phase they were wider appearance of the mediastinum testis, presence of hyperechogenic foci, changes of echogenicity of the genitalia and increased echogenicity of the scrotum and tunics. The following changes in semen evaluation parametres were recorded: the pH, the percentage of dead sperms, the percentage of abnormal sperms and the number of nonsperm round cells increased, whilst the mass motility, the individual motility and the sperm concentration decreased; the following sperm defects were observed: misshapen or piriform heads, sperms with coiled tails, sperms without tail and sperms with proximal cytoplasmic droplet; at the early stages neutrophils were the prevailing nonsperm round cell type, later the proportion of immature germ cells increased and in the long-standing phase there were enlogated spermatids and leucocytes; it is noteworthy that semen evaluation parametres were restored to normal at the late stages of the disease. A. pyogenes was consistently isolated from the semen samples after challenge, as well as from the dissected genitalia. The salient post-mortem findings were: initially, subcutaneous oedema, fluid into the vaginal cavity, congested and

  16. Differences in Clinical and Pathological Features of Renal Cell Carcinoma Between Japanese Patients After Kidney Transplantation and Those on Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Okumi, Masayoshi; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-04-01

    We compared the clinical features, pathological features, and prognoses of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) arising in the native kidney after kidney transplantation (RCC-transplant) or on hemodialysis (RCC-HD), and analyzed predictive factors for survival at a Japanese single institution. This cohort included 42 patients in the RCC-transplant group and 467 patients in the RCC-HD group. RCC-transplant patients were younger (53 years vs. 56 years, P = 0.0358) and had less frequent symptoms (12% vs. 27%, P = 0.0344) than RCC-HD patients. Although tumor size, tumor stage, and histological subtype were not significantly different, the RCC-transplant group had less frequent multifocal occurrences and ACDK. Overall 5-year survival (RCC-transplant, 80%; RCC-hemodialysis, 76%; P = 0.3217) and 5-year cancer-specific survival (CSS; RCC-transplant, 84%; RCC-hemodialysis, 89%; P = 0.8916) were not significantly different between the two groups. Tumor stage and grade were significant predictors for CSS. Although kidney transplantation and hemodialysis were not associated with CSS, tumor stage was an independent predictor of CSS.

  17. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer’s disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may

  18. BRAF V600E mutation in metastatic colorectal cancer: Methods of detection and correlation with clinical and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Roma, Cristin; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Pasquale, Raffaella; Fenizia, Francesca; Iannaccone, Alessia; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Antinolfi, Giuseppe; Parrella, Paola; Graziano, Paolo; Sabatino, Lina; Colantuoni, Vittorio; Botti, Gerardo; Maiello, Evaristo; Normanno, Nicola

    2016-08-02

    The screening for BRAF V600E mutation is employed in clinical practice for its prognostic and potentially predictive role in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC). Little information is available on the sensitivity and specificity of the testing methods to detect this mutation in CRC. By using serial dilution of BRAF mutant DNA with wild type DNA, we found that the sensitivity of allelic discrimination-Real Time PCR was higher than PCR-Sequencing (10% vs 20%). In agreement, the Real Time PCR assay displayed increased analytical sensitivity in detecting the BRAF V600E mutation as compared with PCR-Sequencing in a cohort of 510 consecutive CRCs (21 vs 16 cases). Targeted resequencing demonstrated that all cases negative by PCR-Sequencing had an allelic frequency of the BRAF mutation <20%, thus suggesting tumor heterogeneity. The association of BRAF mutations with clinical and pathological features was assessed next in a cohort of 840 KRAS exon 2 wild type CRC patients screened with the Real Time PCR assay. The BRAF V600E mutation frequency in this cohort was 7.8% that increased to 33.4% in females over 70 y of age with right-sided tumor location. BRAF mutations were also detected in 4.4% of male patients with left-sided tumors and aged <70 y. Fourteen of 61 (22.9%) BRAF V600E mutation bearing patients exhibited microsatellite instability (MSI) as assessed by T17 mononucleotide sequence within intron 8 of HSP110. Our study indicates that Real Time PCR-based assays are more sensitive than PCR-Sequencing to detect the BRAF V600E mutation in CRC and that BRAF mutations screening should not be restricted to selected patients on the basis of the clinical-pathological characteristics.

  19. Expression profile of SIX family members correlates with clinic-pathological features and prognosis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Han-Xiao; Wu, Kong-Ju; Tian, Yi-Jun; Liu, Qian; Han, Na; He, Xue-Lian; Yuan, Xun; Wu, Gen Sheng; Wu, Kong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sineoculis homeobox homolog (SIX) family proteins, including SIX1, SIX2, SIX3, SIX4, SIX5, and SIX6, have been implicated in the initiation and progression of breast cancer, but the role of each member in breast tumor is not fully understood. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the association between the mRNA levels of all 6 members and clinic-pathological characteristics and clinical outcome of breast cancer patients based on the PRISMA statement criteria. ArrayExpress and Oncomine were searched for eligible databases published up to December 10, 2015. The association between the mRNA expression of SIX family members and clinic-pathological features and prognosis was measured by the odds ratio (OR), hazard ratio (HR), and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI), respectively. All statistical analyses were performed using STATA software. In total, 20 published Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) databases with 3555 patients were analyzed. Our analysis revealed that patients with SIX1 overexpression had worse overall survival (OS) (HR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.03–1.58) and shorter relapse-free survival (RFS) (HR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.05–1.56), and much worse prognosis for luminal breast cancer patients with SIX1 overexpression (OS: HR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.13–2.39; RFS: HR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.06–1.93). We found that patients with higher SIX2 level had shorter time to both relapse and metastasis. However, high SIX3 mRNA level was a protective factor for OS and RFS of basal-like breast cancer patients. Our study suggested that members of SIX family played distinct roles in breast cancer. Detailed analysis of the expression of the SIX family members might provide useful information to predict breast cancer progression and prognosis. PMID:27399099

  20. Clinical and pathological features of familial frontotemporal dementia caused by C9ORF72 mutation on chromosome 9p.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Feldman, Howard H; Sengdy, Pheth; Bouchard-Kerr, Phoenix; Dwosh, Emily; Butler, Rachel; Leung, Bonnie; Fok, Alice; Rutherford, Nicola J; Baker, Matt; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2012-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are closely related clinical syndromes with overlapping molecular pathogenesis. Several families have been reported with members affected by frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or both, which show genetic linkage to a region on chromosome 9p21. Recently, two studies identified the FTD/ALS gene defect on chromosome 9p as an expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72). In the present study, we provide detailed analysis of the clinical features and neuropathology for 16 unrelated families with frontotemporal dementia caused by the C9ORF72 mutation. All had an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Eight families had a combination of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis while the other eight had a pure frontotemporal dementia phenotype. Clinical information was available for 30 affected members of the 16 families. There was wide variation in age of onset (mean = 54.3, range = 34-74 years) and disease duration (mean = 5.3, range = 1-16 years). Early diagnoses included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (n = 5), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 9) and progressive non-fluent aphasia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 1). Heterogeneity in clinical presentation was also common within families. However, there was a tendency for the phenotypes to converge with disease progression; seven subjects had final clinical diagnoses of both frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and all of those with an initial progressive non-fluent aphasia diagnosis subsequently developed significant behavioural abnormalities. Twenty-one affected family members came to autopsy and all were found to have transactive response DNA binding protein with M(r) 43 kD (TDP-43) pathology in a wide neuroanatomical distribution. All had involvement of the extramotor

  1. Correlation of pathologic features with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) by quantitative DNA methylation analysis in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shuji; Odze, Robert D; Kawasaki, Takako; Brahmandam, Mohan; Kirkner, Gregory J; Laird, Peter W; Loda, Massimo; Fuchs, Charles S

    2006-09-01

    Extensive gene promoter methylation in colorectal carcinoma has been termed the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Previous studies on CIMP used primarily methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which, unfortunately, may detect low levels of methylation that has little or no biological significance. Utilizing quantitative real-time PCR (MethyLight), we measured DNA methylation in a panel of 5 CIMP-specific gene promoters (CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16), CRABP1, MLH1, and NEUROG1) in 459 colorectal carcinomas obtained from 2 large prospective cohort studies. CIMP was defined as tumors that showed methylation in >or=4/5 promoters. CIMP was significantly associated with the presence of mucinous or signet ring cell morphology, marked Crohn's-like lymphoid reaction, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, marked peritumoral lymphocytic reaction, tumor necrosis, tumor cell sheeting, and poor differentiation. All these features have previously been associated with microsatellite instability (MSI). Therefore, we divided the 459 colorectal carcinomas into 6 subtypes, namely, MSI-high (MSI-H)/CIMP, MSI-H/non-CIMP, MSI-low (MSI-L)/CIMP, MSI-L/non-CIMP, microsatellite stable/CIMP, and micro satellite sstable/non-CIMP. Compared with MSI-H/non-CIMP, MSI-H/CIMP was associated with marked tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, tumor necrosis, sheeting, and poor differentiation (all Ppathologic features that have previously been shown to be associated with MSI are also significantly associated with CIMP. Both MSI and CIMP appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of specific morphologic patterns of colorectal carcinoma.

  2. Targeted disruption of the Hexa gene results in mice with biochemical and pathologic features of Tay-Sachs disease

    SciTech Connect

    Proia, R.L.; Yamanaka, S.; Johnson, M.D.

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease, the prototype of the G{sub M2} gangliosidoses, is a catastrophic neurodegenerative disorder of infancy. The disease is caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in an absence of the lysosomal enzyme, {beta}-hexosaminidase A. As consequence of the enzyme deficiency, G{sub M2} ganglioside accumulates progressively, beginning early in fetal life, to excessive amounts in the central nervous system (CNS). Rapid mental and motor deterioration starting in the first year of life leads to death by 2 to 4 years of age. Through the targeted disruption of the Hexa gene in embryonic stem cells, we have produced mice with biochemical and neuropathologic features of Tay-Sachs disease. The mutant mice exhibited less than 1% of normal {beta}-hexosaminidase A activity and accumulated G{sub M2} ganglioside in their CNS in an age-dependent manner. The accumulated ganglioside was stored in neurons as membranous cytoplasmic bodies characteristically found in the neurons of Tay-Sachs disease patients. At three to five months of age the mutant mice showed no apparent defects in motor or memory function. These {beta}-hexosaminidase A deficient mice should be useful for devising strategies to introduce functional enzymes and genes into the CNS. This model may also be valuable for studying the biochemical and pathologic changes occurring during the course of the disease.

  3. Molecular profiles of BRCA1-mutated and matched sporadic breast tumours: relation with clinico-pathological features

    PubMed Central

    Berns, E M J J; Staveren, I L van; Verhoog, L; Ouweland, A M W van de; Gelder, M Meijer-van; Meijers-Heijboer, H; Portengen, H; Foekens, J A; Dorssers, L C J; Klijn, J G M

    2001-01-01

    About 5–10% of breast cancers are hereditary; a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease in which several susceptibility genes, including BRCA1, have been identified. While distinct tumour features can be used to estimate the likelihood that a breast tumour is caused by a BRCA1 germline mutation it is not yet possible to categorize a BRCA1 mutated tumour. The aim of the present study is to molecularly classify BRCA1 mutated breast cancers by resolving gene expression patterns of BRCA1 and matched sporadic surgical breast tumour specimens. The expression profiles of 6 frozen breast tumour tissues with a proven BRCA1 gene mutation were weighed against those from 12 patients without a known family history but who had similar clinico-pathological characteristics. In addition two fibroblast cultures, the breast cancer cell-line HCC1937 and its corresponding B-lymphoblastoid cell line (heterozygous for mutation BRCA1 5382insC) and an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line (A2780) were studied. Using a high density membrane based array for screening of RNA isolated from these samples and standard algorithms and software, we were able to distinguish subgroups of sporadic cases and a group consisting mainly of BRCA1-mutated breast tumours. Furthermore this pilot analysis revealed a gene cluster that differentially expressed genes related to cell substrate formation, adhesion, migration and cell organization in BRCA1-mutated tumours compared to sporadic breast tumours. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506493

  4. Pathological and Clinical Features and Management of Central Nervous System Hemangioblastomas in von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Natsuki; Nakanowatari, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) hemangioblastoma is the most common manifestation of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. It is found in 70–80% of VHL patients. Hemangioblastoma is a rare form of benign vascular tumor of the CNS, accounting for 2.0% of CNS tumors. It can occur sporadically or as a familial syndrome. CNS hemangioblastomas are typically located in the posterior fossa and the spinal cord. VHL patients usually develop a CNS hemangioblastoma at an early age. Therefore, they require a special routine for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. The surgical management of symptomatic tumors depend on many factors such as symptom, location, multiplicity, and progression of the tumor. The management of asymptomatic tumors in VHL patients are controversial since CNS hemangioblastomas grow with intermittent quiescent and rapid-growth phases. Preoperative embolization of large solid hemangioblastomas prevents perioperative hemorrhage but is not necessary in every case. Radiotherapy should be reserved for inoperable tumors. Because of complexities of VHL, a better understanding of the pathological and clinical features of hemangioblastoma in VHL is essential for its proper management. PMID:28326249

  5. Spatial-Temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Features for Predicting Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Shan; Kligerman, Seth; Chen, Wengen; Lu, Minh; Kim, Grace; Feigenberg, Steven; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To extract and study comprehensive spatial-temporal {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) features for the prediction of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with esophageal cancer were treated with trimodal therapy (CRT plus surgery) and underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT scans both before (pre-CRT) and after (post-CRT) CRT. The 2 scans were rigidly registered. A tumor volume was semiautomatically delineated using a threshold standardized uptake value (SUV) of ≥2.5, followed by manual editing. Comprehensive features were extracted to characterize SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns (texture), tumor geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT. The usefulness of each feature in predicting pathologic tumor response to CRT was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value. Results: The best traditional response measure was decline in maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}; AUC, 0.76). Two new intensity features, decline in mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) and skewness, and 3 texture features (inertia, correlation, and cluster prominence) were found to be significant predictors with AUC values ≥0.76. According to these features, a tumor was more likely to be a responder when the SUV{sub mean} decline was larger, when there were relatively fewer voxels with higher SUV values pre-CRT, or when [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake post-CRT was relatively homogeneous. All of the most accurate predictive features were extracted from the entire tumor rather than from the most active part of the tumor. For SUV intensity features and tumor size features, changes were more predictive than pre- or post-CRT assessment alone. Conclusion: Spatial-temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET features were found to be useful predictors of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant CRT in esophageal cancer.

  6. Pathologic features of dilated cardiomyopathy with localized noncompaction in a child with deletion 1p36 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pearce, F Bennett; Litovsky, Silvio H; Dabal, Robert J; Robin, Nathaniel; Dure, Leon J; George, James F; Kirklin, James K

    2012-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular noncompaction have been reported in association with deletion 1p36 syndrome. Previous descriptions include echocardiographic and/or gross pathologic descriptions. There are no previous reports of microscopic findings. We report a case with descriptions of echocardiographic, gross pathologic, and microscopic findings.

  7. Adrenal oncocytic phaeochromocytoma with putative adverse histologic features: a unique case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kasem, Kais; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2014-12-01

    Oncocytic phaeochromocytomas are exceedingly rare tumours. To date, there are three reported cases in the literature. This report describes a case of adrenal oncocytic phaeochromocytoma with unique features and malignant potential in a 68-year-old man. The patient presented with an incidental non-functional mass discovered on routine radiological investigation, which was subsequently excised. Histologically, the tumour cells showed oncocytic features with high-grade nuclear abnormalities and foci of extension to the peri-adrenal fat. Immunohistochemistry performed was positive for chromogranin, CD56, S-100 and p53 and negative for inhibin, HMB-45, EMA, AE1/AE3, Cam 5.2 and calretinin. Electron microscopy showed electron dense granules of neurosecretory type, which confirmed the diagnosis. The malignant potential of the tumour was assessed on available histologic scoring systems, which demonstrated a high malignant potential. However, no recurrence was detected after 5 years of follow-up. Compared to all the previously reported cases of oncocytic phaeochromocytoma, this patient was the oldest on presentation, was the only case with identified high malignant potential and has the longest follow-up. A review of the literature showed that all the oncocytic phaeochromocytomas reported were non-functional, non-metastasizing and were described in women. To conclude, oncocytic phaeochromocytoma should be in the differential diagnoses of oncocytic tumours of the adrenal gland. Additional studies are needed to predict the behaviour of this entity.

  8. Combining radiomic features with a miRNA classifier may improve prediction of malignant pathology for pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Permuth, Jennifer B.; Choi, Jung; Balarunathan, Yoganand; Kim, Jongphil; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, Lu; Orcutt, Sonia; Doepker, Matthew P.; Gage, Kenneth; Zhang, Geoffrey; Latifi, Kujtim; Hoffe, Sarah; Jiang, Kun; Coppola, Domenico; Centeno, Barbara A.; Magliocco, Anthony; Li, Qian; Trevino, Jose; Merchant, Nipun; Gillies, Robert; Malafa, Mokenge

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are pancreatic cancer precursors incidentally discovered by cross-sectional imaging. Consensus guidelines for IPMN management rely on standard radiologic features to predict pathology, but they lack accuracy. Using a retrospective cohort of 38 surgically-resected, pathologically-confirmed IPMNs (20 benign; 18 malignant) with preoperative computed tomography (CT) images and matched plasma-based ‘miRNA genomic classifier (MGC)’ data, we determined whether quantitative ‘radiomic’ CT features (+/- the MGC) can more accurately predict IPMN pathology than standard radiologic features ‘high-risk’ or ‘worrisome’ for malignancy. Logistic regression, principal component analyses, and cross-validation were used to examine associations. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) were estimated. The MGC, ‘high-risk,’ and ‘worrisome’ radiologic features had area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.83, 0.84, and 0.54, respectively. Fourteen radiomic features differentiated malignant from benign IPMNs (p<0.05) and collectively had an AUC=0.77. Combining radiomic features with the MGC revealed an AUC=0.92 and superior sensitivity (83%), specificity (89%), PPV (88%), and NPV (85%) than other models. Evaluation of uncertainty by 10-fold cross-validation retained an AUC>0.80 (0.87 (95% CI:0.84-0.89)). This proof-of-concept study suggests a noninvasive radiogenomic approach may more accurately predict IPMN pathology than ‘worrisome’ radiologic features considered in consensus guidelines. PMID:27589689

  9. Chromosome region maintenance 1 expression and its association with clinical pathological features in primary carcinoma of the liver

    PubMed Central

    XIE, QIAO-LING; LIU, YUE; ZHU, YING

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Recurrence and metastasis are the major factors affecting the prognosis; thus, investigation of the underlying molecular mechanisms of invasion and metastasis, and detection of novel drug target may improve the mortality rate of liver cancer patients. Chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) recognizes specific leucine-rich nuclear export signal sequences, and its overexpression is associated with tumor-suppressor gene inactivation, proliferation, invasion and resistance to chemotherapy. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of CRM1 expression with the clinical and pathological features of primary liver cancer. In total, 152 cases diagnosed with liver cancer were included. CRM1 expression was detected in cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical assay. No statistically significant difference was found between the CRM1 expression levels in tumor and adjacent normal tissues (P=0.106). However, CRM1 expression in adjacent normal tissues was higher compared with that in tumor tissues in the negative hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg; P=0.029) and low differentiation (P=0.004) groups. In tumor tissues, CRM1 expression was significantly correlated with differentiation (P=0.045), whereas in adjacent normal tissues, CRM1 expression was significantly correlated with the tumor diameter (P=0.004). Therefore, it can be concluded that CRM1 is highly expressed in both tumor and adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, CRM1 expression is associated with the tumor differentiation degree and diameter. Lower differentiation and larger tumor diameter resulted in higher CRM1 expression in adjacent normal tissues, and higher tendency for invasion and metastasis. In addition, the risk of invasion and metastasis remains in chronic hepatitis B patients with negative HBeAg. PMID:27347018

  10. Chromosome region maintenance 1 expression and its association with clinical pathological features in primary carcinoma of the liver.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiao-Ling; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Recurrence and metastasis are the major factors affecting the prognosis; thus, investigation of the underlying molecular mechanisms of invasion and metastasis, and detection of novel drug target may improve the mortality rate of liver cancer patients. Chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) recognizes specific leucine-rich nuclear export signal sequences, and its overexpression is associated with tumor-suppressor gene inactivation, proliferation, invasion and resistance to chemotherapy. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of CRM1 expression with the clinical and pathological features of primary liver cancer. In total, 152 cases diagnosed with liver cancer were included. CRM1 expression was detected in cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical assay. No statistically significant difference was found between the CRM1 expression levels in tumor and adjacent normal tissues (P=0.106). However, CRM1 expression in adjacent normal tissues was higher compared with that in tumor tissues in the negative hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg; P=0.029) and low differentiation (P=0.004) groups. In tumor tissues, CRM1 expression was significantly correlated with differentiation (P=0.045), whereas in adjacent normal tissues, CRM1 expression was significantly correlated with the tumor diameter (P=0.004). Therefore, it can be concluded that CRM1 is highly expressed in both tumor and adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, CRM1 expression is associated with the tumor differentiation degree and diameter. Lower differentiation and larger tumor diameter resulted in higher CRM1 expression in adjacent normal tissues, and higher tendency for invasion and metastasis. In addition, the risk of invasion and metastasis remains in chronic hepatitis B patients with negative HBeAg.

  11. Clinical features and pathological joint changes in dogs with erosive immune-mediated polyarthritis: 13 cases (2004–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Shaughnessy, Magen L.; Sample, Susannah J.; Abicht, Carter; Heaton, Caitlin; Muir, Peter

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical features and pathological joint changes in dogs with erosive immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA). DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 13 dogs with erosive IMPA and 66 dogs with nonerosive IMPA. PROCEDURES The medical record database of a veterinary teaching hospital was reviewed to identify dogs with IMPA that were examined between October 2004 and December 2012. For each IMPA-affected dog, information extracted from the medical record included signalment, diagnostic test results, radiographic findings, and treatments administered. Dogs were classified as having erosive IMPA if review of radiographs revealed the presence of bone lysis in multiple joints, and descriptive data were generated for those dogs. All available direct smears of synovial fluid samples underwent cytologic evaluation. The synovial fluid total nucleated cell count and WBC differential were estimated and compared between dogs with erosive IMPA and dogs with nonerosive IMPA. RESULTS 13 of 79 (16%) dogs had erosive IMPA. Dogs with erosive IMPA had a mean ± SD age of 7.1 ± 2.4 years and bodyweight of 8.3 ± 3.4 kg (18.3 ± 7.5 lb). All 13 dogs had erosive lesions in their carpal joints. The estimated median synovial fluid lymphocyte count for dogs with erosive IMPA was significantly greater than that for dogs with nonerosive IMPA. All dogs received immunosuppressive therapy with leflunomide (n = 9), prednisone (3), or prednisone-azathioprine (1). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated erosive IMPA most commonly affected the carpal joints of middle-aged small-breed dogs. Further genetic analyses and analysis of lymphocyte-subsets is warranted for dogs with erosive IMPA. Word count = 256 PMID:27823373

  12. Features and machine learning classification of connected speech samples from patients with autopsy proven Alzheimer's disease with and without additional vascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Rentoumi, Vassiliki; Raoufian, Ladan; Ahmed, Samrah; de Jager, Celeste A; Garrard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mixed vascular and Alzheimer-type dementia and pure Alzheimer's disease are both associated with changes in spoken language. These changes have, however, seldom been subjected to systematic comparison. In the present study, we analyzed language samples obtained during the course of a longitudinal clinical study from patients in whom one or other pathology was verified at post mortem. The aims of the study were twofold: first, to confirm the presence of differences in language produced by members of the two groups using quantitative methods of evaluation; and secondly to ascertain the most informative sources of variation between the groups. We adopted a computational approach to evaluate digitized transcripts of connected speech along a range of language-related dimensions. We then used machine learning text classification to assign the samples to one of the two pathological groups on the basis of these features. The classifiers' accuracies were tested using simple lexical features, syntactic features, and more complex statistical and information theory characteristics. Maximum accuracy was achieved when word occurrences and frequencies alone were used. Features based on syntactic and lexical complexity yielded lower discrimination scores, but all combinations of features showed significantly better performance than a baseline condition in which every transcript was assigned randomly to one of the two classes. The classification results illustrate the word content specific differences in the spoken language of the two groups. In addition, those with mixed pathology were found to exhibit a marked reduction in lexical variation and complexity compared to their pure AD counterparts.

  13. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  14. TU-C-12A-09: Modeling Pathologic Response of Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer to Chemo-Radiotherapy Using Quantitative PET/CT Features, Clinical Parameters and Demographics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Chen, W; Kligerman, S; D’Souza, W; Suntharalingam, M; Lu, W; Tan, S; Kim, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop predictive models using quantitative PET/CT features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Methods: This study included 20 patients who underwent tri-modality therapy (CRT + surgery) and had {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans before initiation of CRT and 4-6 weeks after completion of CRT but prior to surgery. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (SUVmax, tumor diameter, etc.); (2) clinical parameters (TNM stage, histology, etc.) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, using cross-validations to avoid model over-fitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed via area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated via confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). Using spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications), significantly better than using conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone. For groups with a large number of tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher accuracy than the LR model. Conclusion: The SVM model using all features

  15. Modeling Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Chemoradiation Therapy Using Spatial-Temporal {sup 18}F-FDG PET Features, Clinical Parameters, and Demographics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hao; Tan, Shan; Chen, Wengen; Kligerman, Seth; Kim, Grace; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct predictive models using comprehensive tumor features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This study included 20 patients who underwent trimodality therapy (CRT + surgery) and underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) both before and after CRT. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (eg, standardized uptake value [SUV]{sub max}, tumor diameter); (2) clinical parameters (eg, TNM stage, histology) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, cross-validations being used to avoid model overfitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated by confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). With the use of spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications)—results that were significantly better than when conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone were used. For groups with many tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher

  16. Clinical, pathological, and genetic features of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A with new calpain 3 gene mutations in seven patients from three Japanese families.

    PubMed

    Kawai, H; Akaike, M; Kunishige, M; Inui, T; Adachi, K; Kimura, C; Kawajiri, M; Nishida, Y; Endo, I; Kashiwagi, S; Nishino, H; Fujiwara, T; Okuno, S; Roudaut, C; Richard, I; Beckmann, J S; Miyoshi, K; Matsumoto, T

    1998-11-01

    We report on the clinical, pathological, and genetic features of 7 patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) from three Japanese families. The mean age of onset was 9.7+/-3.1 years (mean+/-SD), and loss of ambulance occurred at 38.5+/-2.1 years. Muscle atrophy was predominant in the pelvic and shoulder girdles, and proximal limb muscles. Muscle pathology revealed dystrophic changes. In two families, an identical G to C mutation at position 1080 the in calpain 3 gene was identified, and a frameshift mutation (1796insA) was found in the third family. The former mutation results in a W360R substitution in the proteolytic site of calpain 3, and the latter in a deletion of the Ca2+-binding domain.

  17. Clinical and pathological features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutation in the C9ORF72 gene on chromosome 9p.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Heather; Rutherford, Nicola J; Briemberg, Hannah; Krieger, Charles; Cashman, Neil; Fabros, Marife; Baker, Matt; Fok, Alice; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Eisen, Andrew; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2012-03-01

    Two studies recently identified a GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open-reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72) as the cause of chromosome 9p-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). In a cohort of 231 probands with ALS, we identified the C9ORF72 mutation in 17 familial (27.4%) and six sporadic (3.6%) cases. Patients with the mutation presented with typical motor features of ALS, although subjects with the C9ORF72 mutation had more frequent bulbar onset, compared to those without this mutation. Dementia was significantly more common in ALS patients and families with the C9ORF72 mutation and was usually early-onset FTD. There was striking clinical heterogeneity among the members of individual families with the mutation. The associated neuropathology was a combination of ALS with TDP-ir inclusions and FTLD-TDP. In addition to TDP-43-immunoreactive pathology, a consistent and specific feature of cases with the C9ORF72 mutation was the presence of ubiquitin-positive, TDP-43-negative inclusions in a variety of neuroanatomical regions, such as the cerebellar cortex. These findings support the C9ORF72 mutation as an important newly recognized cause of ALS, provide a more detailed characterization of the associated clinical and pathological features and further demonstrate the clinical and molecular overlap between ALS and FTD.

  18. A mouse model for fucosidosis recapitulates storage pathology and neurological features of the milder form of the human disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Heike; Stroobants, Stijn; D'Hooge, Rudi; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Dierks, Thomas; Lübke, Torben

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-L-fucosidase, which leads to an impaired degradation of fucosylated glycoconjugates. Here, we report the generation of a fucosidosis mouse model, in which the gene for lysosomal α-L-fucosidase (Fuca1) was disrupted by gene targeting. Homozygous knockout mice completely lack α-L-fucosidase activity in all tested organs leading to highly elevated amounts of the core-fucosylated glycoasparagine Fuc(α1,6)-GlcNAc(β1-N)-Asn and, to a lesser extent, other fucosylated glycoasparagines, which all were also partially excreted in urine. Lysosomal storage pathology was observed in many visceral organs, such as in the liver, kidney, spleen and bladder, as well as in the central nervous system (CNS). On the cellular level, storage was characterized by membrane-limited cytoplasmic vacuoles primarily containing water-soluble storage material. In the CNS, cellular alterations included enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in various cell types, accumulation of secondary storage material and neuroinflammation, as well as a progressive loss of Purkinje cells combined with astrogliosis leading to psychomotor and memory deficits. Our results demonstrate that this new fucosidosis mouse model resembles the human disease and thus will help to unravel underlying pathological processes. Moreover, this model could be utilized to establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for fucosidosis. PMID:27491075

  19. Assessment of the degree of asymmetry of pathological features in neurodegenerative diseases. What is the significance for brain banks?

    PubMed

    King, Andrew; Bodi, Istvan; Nolan, Matthew; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa

    2015-10-01

    Brain banks allow researchers access to tissue from well-characterised neurodegenerative disease cases. Fixed tissue employed for diagnosis is often not appropriate for research and frozen tissue is therefore made available. Many brain banks use a protocol where half the brain is fixed and half frozen. Recently a study has shown that there can be asymmetry in protein deposition between the hemispheres especially with tau and TDP-43. We aimed to test this hypothesis by prospectively taking bilateral cortical blocks from 30 brains on arrival, and immunostaining to assess the degree of asymmetry. In 6 out 14 cases of AD (Alzheimer's Disease) (Modified Braak Stage V-VI), there was some asymmetrical staining for tau. In 2 cases, there was moderate discrepancy for tau staining between left and right calcarine cortices. However, careful analysis in both these cases revealed discrepancies in tau staining in adjacent regions even on the same side. The α-synuclein staining showed asymmetry in one case only, the Aβ showed only mild asymmetry in 3 cases of AD. The TDP-43 pathology appeared symmetrical in the 2 cases of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with motor neurone disease, but there was asymmetry noted when seen in conjunction with AD. In conclusion, there is the potential for asymmetrical pathology in neurodegenerative diseases and caution should be maintained when freezing half and fixing half of the brain in neurodegenerative diseases. Nevertheless, marked variability in staining can also be identified in adjacent cortical areas so there is no guarantee that an alternative strategy would be superior.

  20. Significant differences in demographic, clinical, and pathological features in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption among 1,633 head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Moyses, Raquel Ajub; López, Rossana Verónica Mendoza; Cury, Patrícia Maluf; Siqueira, Sheila Aparecida Coelho; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; de Gois Filho, José Francisco; Figueiredo, David Livingstone Alves; Head; GENCAPO, Neck Genome Project; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Michaluart, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As a lifestyle-related disease, social and cultural disparities may influence the features of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in different geographic regions. We describe demographic, clinical, and pathological aspects of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck according to the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of patients in a Brazilian cohort. METHODS: We prospectively analyzed the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of 1,633 patients enrolled in five São Paulo hospitals that participated in the Brazilian Head and Neck Genome Project – Gencapo. RESULTS: The patients who smoked and drank were younger, and those who smoked were leaner than the other patients, regardless of alcohol consumption. The non-smokers/non-drinkers were typically elderly white females who had more differentiated oral cavity cancers and fewer first-degree relatives who smoked. The patients who drank presented significantly more frequent nodal metastasis, and those who smoked presented less-differentiated tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck demonstrated demographic, clinical, and pathological features that were markedly different according to their smoking and drinking habits. A subset of elderly females who had oral cavity cancer and had never smoked or consumed alcohol was notable. Alcohol consumption seemed to be related to nodal metastasis, whereas smoking correlated with the degree of differentiation. PMID:23778492

  1. Expression of Estrogen Receptor Beta Predicts Oncologic Outcome of pT3 Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Carcinoma Better Than Aggressive Pathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hao Lun; Sung, Ming Tse; Tsai, Eing Mei; Lin, Chang Shen; Lee, Nai Lun; Chung, Yueh-Hua; Chiang, Po Hui

    2016-01-01

    Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UT-UC) is rare and treatment options or prognostic markers are limited. There is increasing evidence indicating that urothelial carcinoma may be an endocrine-related cancer. The aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic effect of estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) on the outcome of UT-UC. From 2005 to 2012, this study included 105 patients with pT3 UT-UC. Perioperative factors, pathological features, and ERβ immunostaining were reviewed and prognostic effects were examined by multivariate analysis. This study divided patients into either the ERβ-high (n = 52) or ERβ-low (n = 53) group and analyzed their oncologic outcomes. All pathological features except infiltrating tumor architecture (significantly higher incidence in ERβ-low group, p = 0.004) are symmetric in both groups. Low ERβ expression was significantly correlated with local recurrence and distant metastasis in univariate analysis (p = 0.035 and 0.004, respectively) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.05 and 0.008, respectively). Cell line study also proved that knock down of ERβ cause less UTUC proliferation and migration. In addition, ERβ agonist also enhanced the cytotoxic and migration inhibition effect of cisplatin and ERβ antagonist cause the UTUC cell more resistant to cisplatin. This result may help identify patients in need of adjuvant therapy or develop potential targeted therapy. PMID:27052470

  2. High Pretreatment D-Dimer Levels Correlate with Adverse Clinical Features and Predict Poor Survival in Patients with Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xi-wen; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Wen-wen; Sun, Peng; Yan, Shu-mei; Liu, Pan-pan; Li, Zhi-ming; Jiang, Wen-qi

    2016-01-01

    Pretreatment plasma D-dimer levels have been reported to predict survival in several types of malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of D-dimer levels in patients with newly diagnosed natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL). The cut-off value of D-dimer to predict survival was set as 1.2 μg/mL based on the receiver operating curve analysis. Patients with a D-dimer level ≥ 1.2 μg/mL had significantly more adverse clinical features, including poor performance status, advanced stage diseases, B symptoms, elevated serum lactic dehydrogenase levels, involvement of regional lymph nodes, more extranodal diseases, and higher International Prognostic Index and natural killer/T-cell lymphoma prognostic index scores. A D-dimer level ≥ 1.2 μg/mL was significantly associated with inferior 3-year overall survival (OS, 13.0 vs. 68.5%, P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, a D-dimer level ≥ 1.2 μg/mL remained an independent predictor for worse OS (HR: 3.13, 95% CI: 1.47-6.68, P = 0.003) after adjusting for other confounding prognostic factors. Among patients with Ann Arbor stage I-II diseases, those with a D-dimer level ≥ 1.2 μg/mL had a significantly worse survival than those with a D-dimer level < 1.2 μg/mL (3 year-OS: 76.2 vs. 22.2%, P < 0.001). Survival of early-stage patients with a high D-dimer level was similar to that of the advanced-stage patients. In conclusion, pretreatment plasma D-dimer level may serve as a simple but effective predictor of prognosis in patients with NKTCL.

  3. Clinical, biologic, and pathologic features in 157 patients with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma treated within the Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA) trials.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Nathalie; Mounier, Nicolas; Brière, Josette; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Delmer, Alain; Feller, Alfred; Meijer, Chris J L M; Emile, Jean-François; Bouabdallah, Réda; Bosly, André; Diebold, Jacques; Haioun, Corinne; Coiffier, Bertrand; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinicobiologic and pathological features in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), 157 AITL patients were retrieved from the GELA LNH87-LNH93 randomized clinical trials. One hundred forty-seven patients received a cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP)-like regimen with intensified courses in half of them. Histologically, 41 cases were classified as "rich in large cells" and 116 as "classic" (including 19 rich in epithelioid cells, 14 rich in clear cells, and 4 with hyperplastic germinal centers). Sixty-two cases were scored for CD10 and CXCL13 expression according to the abundance of positive lymphoid cells. Median age was 62 years, with 81% advanced stage, 72% B symptoms, 65% anemia, 50% hypergammaglobulinemia, and 66% elevated LDH. Overall 7-year survival was 30%. In multivariate analysis, only male sex (P = .004), mediastinal lymphadenopathy (P = .041), and anemia (P = .042) adversely affected overall survival. Increase in large cells and high level of CD10 and CXCL13 did not affect survival. Intensive regimen did not improve survival. In conclusion, AITL is a morphologically heterogeneous T-cell lymphoma commonly expressing CXCL13 and CD10 and carrying few prognostic factors. It portends a poor prognosis even when treated intensively. However, AITL is not always lethal with 30% of patients alive at 7 years.

  4. A Model Based on Pathologic Features of Superficial Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Complements Clinical Node Staging in Determining Risk of Metastasis to Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Jon M.; Landau, Michael S.; Luketich, James D.; McGrath, Kevin M.; Foxwell, Tyler J.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Gibson, Michael K.; Nason, Katie S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims It is important to identify superficial (T1) gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) that are most or least likely to metastasize to lymph nodes, to select appropriate therapy. We aimed to develop a risk stratification model for metastasis of superficial EAC to lymph nodes using pathologic features of the primary tumor. Methods We collected pathology data from 210 patients with T1 EAC who underwent esophagectomy from1996 through 2012 on factors associated with metastatsis to lymph nodes (tumor size, grade, angio-lymphatic invasion, and submucosal invasion). Using these variables, we developed a multivariable logistic model to generate 4 categories for estimated risk of metastasis (<5% risk, 5%–10% risk, 15%–20% risk, or >20% risk). The model was validated in a separate cohort of 39 patients who underwent endoscopic resection of superficial EAC and subsequent esophagectomy, with node stage analysis. Results We developed a model based on 4 pathologic factors that determined risk of metastasis to range from 2.9% to 60% for patients in the first cohort. In the endoscopic resection validation cohort, higher risk scores were associated with increased detection of lymph node metastases at esophagectomy (P=.025). Among patients in the first cohort who did not have lymph node metastases detected before surgery (cN0), those with high risk scores (>20% risk) had 11-fold greater odds for having lymph node metastases at esophagectomy compared to patients with low risk scores (95% confidence interval, 2.3–52 fold). Increasing risk scores were associated with reduced patient survival time (P<.001) and shorter time to tumor recurrence (P<.001). Patients without lymph node metastases (pT1N0) but high risk scores had reduced times of survival (P<.001) and time to tumor recurrence (P=.001) after esophagectomy than patients with pT1N0 tumors and lower risk scores. Conclusions Pathologic features of primary superficial EACs can be used, along with the

  5. Clinico-Pathologic Features of Fatal Disease Attributed to New Variants of Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses in Two Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Garner, M. M.; Helmick, K.; Ochsenreiter, J.; Richman, L. K.; Latimer, E.; Wise, A. G.; Maes, R. K.; Kiupel, M.; Nordhausen, R. W.; Zong, J. C.; Hayward, G. S.

    2013-01-01

    The first herpesviruses described in association with serious elephant disease were referred to as endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHV) because of their ability to infect capillary endothelial cells and cause potentially fatal disease. Two related viruses, EEHV1 and EEHV2, have been described based on genetic composition. This report describes the similarities and differences in clinicopathologic features of 2 cases of fatal endotheliotropic herpesvirus infections in Asian elephants caused by a previously unrecognized virus within the betaherpesvirus subfamily that is markedly divergent from the 2 previously studied fatal probosciviruses, based on polymerase chain reaction sequence analysis of 2 segments of the viral genome. In addition to ascites, widespread visceral edema, petechiae, and capillary damage previously reported, important additional findings with EEHV3 infection were the presence of grossly visible renal medullary hemorrhage, a tropism for larger veins and arteries in various tissues, relatively high density of renal herpetic inclusions, and involvement of the retinal vessels. These findings indicate a less selective organ tropism, and this may confer a higher degree of virulence for EEHV3. PMID:19112123

  6. Isolated IgG4-related interstitial lung disease: unusual histological and radiological features of a pathologically proven case.

    PubMed

    Wibmer, Thomas; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Rüdiger, Stefan; Blanta, Ioanna; Stoiber, Kathrin M; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Schumann, Christian

    2013-03-19

    IgG4-related lung disease is commonly associated with autoimmune pancreatitis. Recently, isolated IgG4-related interstitial lung disease (ILD) without other organ involvement has newly been reported in two cases with clinical features of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP).We report the first case of an isolated IgG4-related ILD in a 78-year-old man with dry cough and dyspnea, whose clinical findings proved to be different from NSIP. Serum IgG4 levels were increased. Chest CT scan revealed bilateral consolidations especially in the lower lobes, enlarged mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes and pleural effusions. Video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lung biopsy revealed a pattern similar to usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and an abundant IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration. He was effectively treated by steroid therapy.Increasing recognition of IgG4 related diseases has led to a growing number of new entities. The novel concept of isolated IgG4-related ILD as a pulmonary manifestation of a systemic IgG4-related disorder should be taken into account as a possible differential diagnosis of ILD and mass-forming lesions, even when no other organ manifestation is clinically apparent at the time of diagnosis. Lung specific diagnostic criteria and algorithms are required to enhance diagnostic accuracy in cases of possible IgG4-related ILD.

  7. Isolated IgG4-related interstitial lung disease: unusual histological and radiological features of a pathologically proven case

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    IgG4-related lung disease is commonly associated with autoimmune pancreatitis. Recently, isolated IgG4-related interstitial lung disease (ILD) without other organ involvement has newly been reported in two cases with clinical features of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP). We report the first case of an isolated IgG4-related ILD in a 78-year-old man with dry cough and dyspnea, whose clinical findings proved to be different from NSIP. Serum IgG4 levels were increased. Chest CT scan revealed bilateral consolidations especially in the lower lobes, enlarged mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes and pleural effusions. Video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lung biopsy revealed a pattern similar to usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and an abundant IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration. He was effectively treated by steroid therapy. Increasing recognition of IgG4 related diseases has led to a growing number of new entities. The novel concept of isolated IgG4-related ILD as a pulmonary manifestation of a systemic IgG4-related disorder should be taken into account as a possible differential diagnosis of ILD and mass-forming lesions, even when no other organ manifestation is clinically apparent at the time of diagnosis. Lung specific diagnostic criteria and algorithms are required to enhance diagnostic accuracy in cases of possible IgG4-related ILD. PMID:23509921

  8. [Amyloid beta-related angiitis: brain lesions showing leptomeningeal gadolinium enhancement on MRI and characteristic surgical pathologic features].

    PubMed

    Koike, Yuka; Ouchi, Haruka; Sato, Tomoe; Shimbo, Junsuke; Sato, Aki; Sasaki, Osamu; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Igarashi, Shuichi

    2013-06-01

    Amyloid-β-related angiitis (ABRA) of the CNS occurs in association with vasculitis of small-and medium-sized leptomeningeal arteries. Here, we describe the clinicopathological features of a 76-year-old man with ABRA. The patient suffered progressive truncal oscillation, aphasia, and recent memory disturbance with a subacute disease onset. His cerebrospinal fluid showed a mild increase in protein levels (101 mg/dL) and pleocytosis (8/mm(3)). High-intensity brain lesion were detected on T(2)-weighted and FLAIR MRI scans, and prominent spread of gadolinium enhancement spreading was observed through the sulci of the left occipital and temporal lobes and left cerebellar hemisphere. A biopsy of the left temporal lesion showed a granulomatous and angiodestructive inflammation with infiltration of many CD4(+) T-lymphocytes and multinucleated giant cells and with fibrinoid necrosis of the arterial walls in the subarachnoid space. Immunolabeling for Aβ(1-40) revealed the abundant deposition of this protein in the affected arteries. On the basic of the diagnosis of ABRA, immunosuppressive therapy was conducted, and it ameliorated the clinical course.

  9. Primary and Secondary T-cell Lymphomas of the Breast: Clinico-pathologic Features of 11 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J.; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Breast involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphomas is rare, and exceptional for T-cell lymphomas; we studied the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features of 11 patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas involving the breast. Four cases fulfilled the definition criteria for primary breast lymphomas, 3 females and 1 male, with a median age of 51 years. One primary breast lymphomas was T-cell lymphoma unspecified, other was subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and 2 cases were anaplastic large cell lymphomas. One of the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases was found surrounding a silicone breast implant and presented as clinically as mastitis; whereas the other case occurred in a man. T-cell lymphoma secondarily involved the breast in 7 patients, all women and 1 bilateral, with a median age of 29 years. These secondary breast lymphomas occurred as part of widespread nodal or leukemic disease. Three patients had adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, including the patient with bilateral lesions, 3 others had precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia, and the other presented with a peripheral-T-cell lymphoma nonotherwise specified type. Breast T-cell lymphomas are very infrequent and are morphologically and clinically heterogeneous. PMID:19318917

  10. Adverse drug reactions in neonates: could we be documenting more?

    PubMed

    Hawcutt, Daniel B; O'Connor, Olya; Turner, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    Neonates are vulnerable to adverse drug reactions but reports of these events are relatively infrequent. Reporting can be increased by adapting a number of standard techniques to the unique features of neonatal care and pathology. However, clinicians and parents will be reluctant to report information about harms in the absence of mechanisms to ensure that reports affect clinical practice. Improved reporting will depend on education and cultural change that are informed by research about pharmacovigilance in neonatal settings. The efficient use of neonatal adverse drug reaction reports will require harmonization of terminology and interoperable databases.

  11. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into Development of Chemical Tools to Control Individual and Inter-Related Pathological Features in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyuck Jin; Korshavn, Kyle J; Nam, Younwoo; Kang, Juhye; Paul, Thomas J; Kerr, Richard A; Youn, Il Seung; Ozbil, Mehmet; Kim, Kwang S; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Lim, Mi Hee

    2017-02-21

    To elucidate the involvement of individual and inter-related pathological factors [i.e., amyloid-β (Aβ), metals, and oxidative stress] in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), chemical tools have been developed. Characteristics required for such tool construction, however, have not been clearly identified; thus, the optimization of available tools or new design has been limited. Here, key structural properties and mechanisms that can determine tools' regulatory reactivities with multiple pathogenic features found in AD are reported. A series of small molecules was built up through rational structural selection and variations onto the framework of a tool useful for in vitro and in vivo metal-Aβ investigation. Variations include: (i) location and number of an Aβ interacting moiety; (ii) metal binding site; and (iii) denticity and structural flexibility. Detailed biochemical, biophysical, and computational studies were able to provide a foundation of how to originate molecular formulas to devise chemical tools capable of controlling the reactivities of various pathological components through distinct mechanisms. Overall, this multidisciplinary investigation illustrates a structure-mechanism-based strategy of tool invention for such a complicated brain disease.

  12. Clinical and pathologic features of H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy associated with E211K prion protein polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Smith, Jodi D; West Greenlee, M Heather; Nicholson, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    The majority of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) cases have been ascribed to the classical form of the disease. H-type and L-type BSE cases have atypical molecular profiles compared to classical BSE and are thought to arise spontaneously. However, one case of H-type BSE was associated with a heritable E211K mutation in the prion protein gene. The purpose of this study was to describe transmission of this unique isolate of H-type BSE when inoculated into a calf of the same genotype by the intracranial route. Electroretinograms were used to demonstrate preclinical deficits in retinal function, and optical coherence tomography was used to demonstrate an antemortem decrease in retinal thickness. The calf rapidly progressed to clinical disease (9.4 months) and was necropsied. Widespread distribution of abnormal prion protein was demonstrated within neural tissues by western blot and immunohistochemistry. While this isolate is categorized as BSE-H due to a higher molecular mass of the unglycosylated PrP(Sc) isoform, a strong labeling of all 3 PrP(Sc) bands with monoclonal antibodies 6H4 and P4, and a second unglycosylated band at approximately 14 kDa when developed with antibodies that bind in the C-terminal region, it is unique from other described cases of BSE-H because of an additional band 23 kDa demonstrated on western blots of the cerebellum. This work demonstrates that this isolate is transmissible, has a BSE-H phenotype when transmitted to cattle with the K211 polymorphism, and has molecular features that distinguish it from other cases of BSE-H described in the literature.

  13. A TNFRSF14-FcɛRI-mast cell pathway contributes to development of multiple features of asthma pathology in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Gaudenzio, Nicolas; DeGorter, Marianne K.; Reber, Laurent L.; Hernandez, Joseph D.; Starkl, Philipp M.; Zurek, Oliwia W.; Tsai, Mindy; Zahner, Sonja; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Roers, Axel; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Yu, Mang; Galli, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma has multiple features, including airway hyperreactivity, inflammation and remodelling. The TNF superfamily member TNFSF14 (LIGHT), via interactions with the receptor TNFRSF14 (HVEM), can support TH2 cell generation and longevity and promote airway remodelling in mouse models of asthma, but the mechanisms by which TNFSF14 functions in this setting are incompletely understood. Here we find that mouse and human mast cells (MCs) express TNFRSF14 and that TNFSF14:TNFRSF14 interactions can enhance IgE-mediated MC signalling and mediator production. In mouse models of asthma, TNFRSF14 blockade with a neutralizing antibody administered after antigen sensitization, or genetic deletion of Tnfrsf14, diminishes plasma levels of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgE antibodies, airway hyperreactivity, airway inflammation and airway remodelling. Finally, by analysing two types of genetically MC-deficient mice after engrafting MCs that either do or do not express TNFRSF14, we show that TNFRSF14 expression on MCs significantly contributes to the development of multiple features of asthma pathology. PMID:27982078

  14. Clinical-pathological features and treatment modalities associated with recurrence in DCIS and micro-invasive carcinoma: Who to treat more and who to treat less.

    PubMed

    Toss, Angela; Palazzo, Juan; Berger, Adam; Guiles, Frances; Sendecki, Jocelyn Andrel; Simone, Nicole; Anne, Rani; Avery, Tiffany; Jaslow, Rebecca; Lazar, Melissa; Tsangaris, Theodore; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    The primary aim in the management of DCIS is the prevention of recurrence and contralateral tumor. Risk factors for DCIS recurrence and appropriate treatments are still widely debated. Adjuvant therapies after surgical resection reduce recurrences and contralateral disease, but these treatments have significant financial costs, side effects and there is a group of low-risk patients who would not gain additional benefit. The aim of our analysis was to identify clinical-pathological features and treatment modalities associated with recurrence in DCIS and microinvasive carcinoma. In the Thomas Jefferson University Cancer Registry of Philadelphia, we identified 865 patients with DCIS or micro-invasive carcinoma treated between 2003 and 2013. Associations between recurrence and demographic factors (age at diagnosis, ethnicity), biological features (ER, PR and HER2) and treatment modalities (surgery, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment) were assessed. Our single institution register-based study showed that distribution of age at diagnosis and biological features did not significantly differ among ethnic groups. Younger women and micro-invasive carcinoma patients were more likely to undergo mastectomy, while African Americans were more likely to take endocrine therapy and undergo radiotherapy. In our sample only ER/PR negative DCIS were associated with significantly higher recurrence rate. Moreover, we reported a high rate of HER2 positive recurrences, suggesting that expression of this oncogene may represent a potential biomarker for DCIS at high risk of recurrence. To better define the molecular profile of the subgroup at worse prognosis might help to identify biomarkers predictive of recurrence or second tumors, identifying patients candidates for more appropriate treatments.

  15. Consideration of the Pathological Features of Pediatric Congenital Heart Diseases Which Are Ideally Suitable for Diagnosing With Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Watanabe, Noriko; Sakata, Miho; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Kagami, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Background A lots of articles published regarding the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) mostly describe that it can be an alternative to the invasive catheterization and angiography. The unique diagnostic features of this imaging modality have been largely ignored or disregarded. We described the pathological conditions that cannot be diagnosed by conventional angiography with cardiac catheterization but can be accurately diagnosed by MDCT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed non-ECG-gated MDCT images acquired from 452 children and young adults with CHD between 2005 and 2010 in our institute. In this article, we focused on the diagnostic advantages of MDCT, and indicated five pathological conditions. (1) When Blalock-Taussig shunt total occlusion prevents catheter insertion into the artificial vessel and angiography is ruled out, the peripheral pulmonary artery during the peripheral pulmonary artery can be imaged and diagnosed using MDCT based on blood flow supplied from many small collateral vessels originating from the aorta. (2) The location and protrusion of the device in the vessel after coil embolization to treat patent ductus arteriosus can be accurately visualized by virtual endoscopy using MDCT. (3) Calcification of patches, synthetic blood vessels, and other prostheses that is indistinct on conventional angiograms is clear on MDCT. (4) Simultaneous MDCT observations of the anatomical relationships between arterial and venous systems on the same image can clarify the detail diagnosis for surgical treatment. (5) Compression of the airways by the great vessels and pulmonary segmental emphysematous change can be diagnosed by MDCT. Results and Conclusions Among patients with CHD, MDCT is useful not only as a non-invasive alternative to conventional angiography, but also as a tool for specific morphological diagnoses. In the future, it will be necessary to accumulate experience in the

  16. Syndromic versus non-syndromic sporadic gastrin-producing neuroendocrine tumors of the duodenum: comparison of pathological features and biological behavior.

    PubMed

    Rosentraeger, M Johannes; Garbrecht, Nele; Anlauf, Martin; Raffel, Andreas; Knoefel, Wolfram T; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klöppel, Günter

    2016-03-01

    Sporadic gastrin-producing neuroendocrine tumors of the duodenum present either with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) or with unspecific symptoms. While syndromic gastrin-producing neuroendocrine tumors often show metastases at the time of diagnosis, those without a syndrome do not. The aim of the study was to search for clinicopathological features that may distinguish the two categories of gastrin-producing duodenal tumors. In a retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical and pathological data in a series of 41 patients with syndromic (i.e., gastrinomas) or non-syndromic duodenal gastrin-producing neuroendocrine tumors (ns-gas-NETs). Twenty-four (59 %) of the 41 patients had tumors that were associated with a ZES and were classified as gastrinomas. These tumors showed a higher Ki-67 index than that of the ns-gas-NETs (1.74 vs. 0.85 %, p = 0.012). In addition, they had more lymph node metastases (75 vs. 6 %, p < 0.001) and showed liver metastases and thus presented much more frequently in TNM stage ≥III (75 vs. 6 %; p < 0.001) than their non-syndromic counterparts. Gastrinomas were removed surgically, ns-gas-NETs endoscopically. We did not observe any significant differences in overall survival or recurrence of disease. Duodenal gastrinomas show no clear morphological features that distinguish them from their non-syndromic counterparts. However, the patients with gastrinomas present in a more advanced stage of disease and need surgical treatment, while non-syndromic gastrin-producing duodenal NETs may be cured by complete endoscopical removal.

  17. Eco-epidemiological and pathological features of wildlife mortality events related to cyanobacterial bio-intoxication in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bengis, Roy; Govender, Danny; Lane, Emily; Myburgh, Jan; Oberholster, Paul; Buss, Peter; Prozesky, Leon; Keet, Dewald

    2016-10-31

    Over the past decade, several clustered, multispecies, wildlife mortality events occurred in the vicinity of two man-made earthen dams in the southern and south central regions of the Kruger National Park, South Africa. On field investigation, heavy cyanobacterial blooms were visible in these impoundments and analysis of water samples showed the dominance of Microcystis spp. (probably Microcystis aeruginosa). Macroscopic lesions seen at necropsy and histopathological lesions were compatible with a diagnosis of cyanobacterial intoxication. Laboratory toxicity tests and assays also confirmed the presence of significant levels of microcystins in water from the two dams. These outbreaks occurred during the dry autumn and early winter seasons when water levels in these dams were dropping, and a common feature was that all the affected dams were supporting a large number of hippopotamuses (Hippopotamus amphibius). It is hypothesised that hippopotamus' urine and faeces, together with agitation of the sediments, significantly contributed to internal loading of phosphates and nitrogen - leading to eutrophication of the water in these impoundments and subsequent cyanobacterial blooms. A major cause for concern was that a number of white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) were amongst the victims of these bio-intoxication events. This publication discusses the eco-epidemiology and pathology of these clustered mortalities, as well as the management options considered and eventually used to address the problem.

  18. [Specific features of the development of pathology of the upper respiratory tracts in the workers employed in the ore mining industry in the subarctic regions].

    PubMed

    Fedina, I N; Sineva, E L

    2009-01-01

    Criteria for the risk of development of occupational pathology of the upper respiratory tracts in the workers employed in the ore mining industry have been proposed based on the results of evaluation of the occurrence of pathological changes, morpho-functional characteristics of upper respiratory tract mucosa, and immunological properties. These criteria provide a basis for the development of differential approach to the choice of priority hygienic and medical preventive measures designed to a lower the risk of respiratory organ pathology.

  19. Clinical and pathological features of toxoplasmosis in free-ranging common wombats (Vombatus ursinus) with multilocus genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii type II-like strains.

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Shannon L; Šlapeta, Jan; Knowles, Graeme; Obendorf, David; Peck, Sarah; Phalen, David N

    2015-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a cosmopolitan zoonotic protozoan parasite with the capacity to infect virtually any warm blooded vertebrate species. Australian native marsupials are thought to be highly susceptible to toxoplasmosis; however, most reports are in captive animals and little is known about T. gondii associated disease in free-ranging marsupials, including wombats (Vombatus ursinus). This study describes the clinical and pathological features of eight cases of toxoplasmosis in free-ranging common wombats in Tasmania and New South Wales (NSW) from 1992 to 2013, including a morbidity and mortality event investigated in the Southern Highlands NSW in the autumn of 2010. The diagnosis of T. gondii infection was confirmed using either immunohistochemistry, molecular diagnostics or both. Utilizing the combination of direct DNA sequencing of B1, SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico DNA markers and virtual RFLP to genetically characterize two of the T. gondii strains, we found a nonarchetypal type II-like strain (ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #1) and an atypical type II-like strain (ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #3) to be the causal agents of toxoplasmosis in wombats from the 2010 morbidity and mortality event. This study suggests that T. gondii may act as a significant disease threat to free-ranging common wombats. Our findings indicate neurologic signs are a very common clinical presentation in common wombats with toxoplasmosis and T. gondii infection should be considered as a likely differential diagnosis for any common wombat exhibiting signs of blindness, head tilt, circling and changes in mentation.

  20. The Characteristics of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Rhesus Macaques and the Associated Pathological Features.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shengtao; Cai, Hongzhi; Xu, Xingli; Feng, Min; Wang, Lichun; Liao, Yun; Zhang, Ying; He, Zhanlong; Yang, Fengmei; Yu, Wenhai; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Jumin; Li, Qihan

    2017-01-30

    As one of the major pathogens for human herpetic diseases, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) causes herpes labialis, genital herpes and herpetic encephalitis. Our aim here was to investigate the infectious process of HSV1 in rhesus macaques and the pathological features induced during this infection. Clinical symptoms that manifested in the rhesus macaque during HSV1 infection included vesicular lesions and their pathological features. Viral distribution in the nervous tissues and associated pathologic changes indicated the typical systematic pathological processes associated with viral distribution of HSV1.Interestingly, vesicular lesions recurred in oral skin or in mucosa associated with virus shedding in macaques within four to five months post-infection,and viral latency-associated transcript (LAT) mRNA was found in the trigeminal ganglia (TG)on day 365 post-infection. Neutralization testing and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) detection of specific T cell responses confirmed the specific immunity induced by HSV1 infection. Thus, rhesus macaques could serve as an infectious model for HSV1 due to their typical clinical symptoms and the pathological recurrence associated with viral latency in nervous tissues.

  1. Toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by acetaminophen featuring almost 100% skin detachment: Acetaminophen is associated with a risk of severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Kamiyama, Taisuke; Sasaki, Shun; Kobayashi, Kae; Fukuda, Kenichiro; Miyake, Yasufumi; Aruga, Tohru; Sueki, Hirohiko

    2016-03-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an adverse reaction that can be induced by various drugs; the associated mortality rate is 20-25%. A previous report showed a weak association between TEN and acetaminophen. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration declared that acetaminophen is associated with a risk of serious skin reactions, including TEN. Here, we describe the case of a 43-year-old Japanese woman with TEN caused by acetaminophen. She had poorly controlled ulcerative colitis and was treated with high doses of prednisolone, infliximab, acetaminophen and lansoprazole. Nine days after administrating acetaminophen, targetoid erythematous and bullous lesions appeared on the patient's trunk, palms and the soles of her feet. The skin lesions expanded rapidly; within 3 weeks, skin detachment was detected across nearly 100% of the patient's body. However, no mucosal involvement of the eyes, oral cavity or genitalia was found. We performed lymphocyte transformation tests using various drugs; however, a high stimulation index was obtained only with acetaminophen. The patient recovered following treatment with plasmapheresis, i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, topical medication and supportive therapy. Acetaminophen is included in many prescription and over-the-counter products; thus, clinicians should monitor their patients for severe drug reactions, including TEN.

  2. Computational Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  3. Pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Hollander, E; Buchalter, A J; DeCaria, C M

    2000-09-01

    With increasing access to gambling facilities through casinos, the Internet, and other venues, PG is a rapidly emerging mental health concern. This impulse-control disorder tends to be comorbid with a wide range of other disorders and is reportedly associated with a high rate of suicide. For most gamblers, gambling is a form of entertainment, but for many individuals, the activity leads to far-reaching disruption of family and work. The personal and societal financial ramifications are severe, and many individuals with PG end up in the criminal justice system. An understanding of the neurobiology of PG is beginning to surface. 5-HT is linked to behavioral initiation and disinhibition, which are important in the onset of the gambling cycle and the difficulty in ceasing the behavior. Norepinephrine is associated with the arousal and risk taking in patients with PG. Dopamine is linked to positive and negative reward, the addictive component of this disorder. Effective treatment strategies for pathological gamblers are emerging. Potentially useful pharmacologic agents include SRIs (clomipramine and fluvoxamine), mood stabilizers for pathological gamblers with comorbid bipolar disorders (lithium), and naltrexone. Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies offer promising results in the treatment of patients with this disorder. To devise prevention and early-intervention programs, research is needed to identify specific features of the individuals at risk for gambling problems. Education targeting vulnerable youth that show early signs of gambling behavior may be worthwhile and should be investigated further. Funding is necessary to support these endeavors, so perhaps a portion of tax revenues generated from the gambling industry should go toward specialized treatment facilities, educational efforts, and research into the neurobiology and treatment of PG.

  4. Relationship between Quantitative Adverse Plaque Features from Coronary CT Angiography and Downstream Impaired Myocardial Flow Reserve by 13N-Ammonia Positron Emission Tomography: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Damini; Zamudio, Mariana Diaz; Schuhbaeck, Annika; Orozco, Luis Eduardo Juarez; Otaki, Yuka; Gransar, Heidi; Li, Debiao; Germano, Guido; Achenbach, Stephan; Berman, Daniel S.; Meave, Aloha; Alexanderson, Erick; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the relationship of quantitative plaque features from coronary CT Angiography (CTA) and coronary vascular dysfunction by impaired myocardial flow reserve (MFR) by 13N-Ammonia Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Methods and Results Fifty-one patients (32 men, 62.4±9.5 years) underwent combined rest-stress 13N-ammonia PET and CTA scans by hybrid PET/CT. Regional MFR was measured from PET. From CTA, 153 arteries were evaluated by semi-automated software, computing arterial non-calcified plaque (NCP), low-density NCP (NCP<30 HU), calcified and total plaque volumes, and corresponding plaque burden (plaque volumex100%/vessel volume), stenosis, remodeling index, contrast density difference (maximum difference in luminal attenuation per unit area in the lesion), and plaque length. Quantitative stenosis, plaque burden and myocardial mass were combined by boosted ensemble machine-learning algorithm into a composite risk score to predict impaired MFR (MFR≤2.0) by PET, in each artery. Nineteen patients (37%) had impaired regional MFR in at least one territory, (41/153 vessels). Patients with impaired regional MFR had higher arterial NCP (32.4 vs.17.2 %), low-density NCP (7 vs 4 %) and total plaque burden (37 vs 19.3 %, p<0.02). In multivariable analysis with 10-fold cross-validation, NCP burden was the most significant predictor of impaired MFR (Odds Ratio 1.35, p=0.021). For prediction of impaired MFR with 10-fold cross-validation, receiver-operating-characteristics-area-under-the-curve for the composite score was 0.83 (95%CI:0.79–0.91), greater than for quantitative stenosis (0.66, 95%CI:0.57–0.76, p = 0.005). Conclusions Compared to stenosis, arterial NCP burden and a composite score combining quantitative stenosis and plaque burden from CTA significantly improves identification of downstream regional vascular dysfunction. PMID:26467104

  5. Pathology of extramedullary mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Leona A; Hornick, Jason L

    2014-05-01

    Mastocytosis encompasses a group of clinically and pathologically heterogeneous disorders most commonly involving the skin, which typically takes the form of urticaria pigmentosa. Mastocytosis may also involve other organs, most often bone marrow, followed by gastrointestinal tract, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. The presence of extracutaneous involvement by mastocytosis is a major diagnostic criterion for systemic disease. However, mast cell infiltrates are often subtle in skin and extracutaneous organs, and the histologic features of mastocytosis at different anatomic sites may be variable. This article reviews the pathologic features and clinical correlates of mastocytosis involving skin and other extramedullary sites.

  6. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2015-06-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale.

  7. Bio-pathologic characteristics related to chromosome 11 aneusomy and cyclin D1 gene status in surgically resected stage I and II breast cancer: Identification of an adverse prognostic profile.

    PubMed

    Mottolese, Marcella; Orlandi, Giulia; Sperduti, Isabella; Merola, Roberta; Buglioni, Simonetta; Di Benedetto, Anna; Pinnarò, Paola; Perracchio, Letizia; Venturo, Irene; Cognetti, Francesco; Cianciulli, AnnaMaria

    2007-02-01

    We aimed at developing a more detailed understanding of cyclin D1 in early stage human breast cancer and defining the biologic profiles with different prognostic value correlating cyclin D1 gene amplification and chromosome 11 aneusomy with bio-pathologic variables of known clinical importance. Cyclin D1 gene amplification and chromosome 11 aneusomy were investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization whereas cyclin D1, PgR, HER-2, Bcl2, p53, and Ki-67 expressions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 121 stage I or II breast cancer patients uniformly treated with cyclophosphamide/metotrexate/5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Cyclin D1 was amplified in 6.6% and overexpressed in 32.2% of cases. Amplification was not associated with any selected bio-pathologic variables, whereas the chromosome 11 aneusomy level significantly increased in tumors with higher histologic grade (P < 0.01), higher tumor size (P < 0.003), p53 nuclear accumulation (P < 0.04), and ERalpha negativity (P < 0.049). Multiple correspondence analysis showed 4 different biologic tumor profiles. The first, characterized by high Ki-67 score, p53+, cyclin D1+, HER-2+, aneusomy level > 30%, ratio (cyclin D1 gene/CEP11) > 2, was associated with tumor relapse defining the most unfavorable biologic profile. Kaplan-Meier's method showed significantly shorter disease-free survival in patients with at least 3 variables positive out of the 6 detected by multiple correspondence analysis. In multivariate analysis, the identified biologic profile emerged as the only significant prognostic indicator. Our findings are of particular clinical interest for early stage breast cancer patients, because the assessment of biologic factors predictive of tumor aggressiveness may influence postoperative therapeutic strategies.

  8. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  9. Therapeutic Approach of a High Functioning Individual With Traumatic Brain Injury and Subsequent Emotional Volatility With Features of Pathological Laughter and Crying With Dextromethorphan/Quinidine

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Baran, Dynela; Johnson, Thomas M.; Wagner, Joyce; Shen, Joann; Geers, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pathological laughing and crying, or pseudobulbar affect (PBA), has been described in patients with neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury (TBI) since the 19th century (Schiffer 2005). The syndrome is characterized by inappropriate episodes of laughing or crying after minor stimuli. It was first coined a disinhibition of cortical control by Kinnier Wilson in 1924. It was observed in brain disease and seen with mild TBI. It can impair social and occupational function and is largely underrecognized in clinical settings. PBA is usually treated with antidepressants and dopaminergic agents. In this case we treated a military recruit with TBI with Nuedexta—a dextromethorphan/Quinidine derivative with a subsequent decrease in his episodes. PMID:27015166

  10. Therapeutic Approach of a High Functioning Individual With Traumatic Brain Injury and Subsequent Emotional Volatility With Features of Pathological Laughter and Crying With Dextromethorphan/Quinidine.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Baran, Dynela; Johnson, Thomas M; Wagner, Joyce; Shen, Joann; Geers, Michelle

    2016-03-01

    Pathological laughing and crying, or pseudobulbar affect (PBA), has been described in patients with neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury (TBI) since the 19th century (Schiffer 2005). The syndrome is characterized by inappropriate episodes of laughing or crying after minor stimuli. It was first coined a disinhibition of cortical control by Kinnier Wilson in 1924. It was observed in brain disease and seen with mild TBI. It can impair social and occupational function and is largely underrecognized in clinical settings. PBA is usually treated with antidepressants and dopaminergic agents. In this case we treated a military recruit with TBI with Nuedexta-a dextromethorphan/Quinidine derivative with a subsequent decrease in his episodes.

  11. Profiles of extracellular miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases correlate with disease status and features of pathology.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Kasandra; Malenica, Ivana; Metpally, Raghu; Courtright, Amanda; Rakela, Benjamin; Beach, Thomas; Shill, Holly; Adler, Charles; Sabbagh, Marwan; Villa, Stephen; Tembe, Waibhav; Craig, David; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall

    2014-01-01

    The discovery and reliable detection of markers for neurodegenerative diseases have been complicated by the inaccessibility of the diseased tissue--such as the inability to biopsy or test tissue from the central nervous system directly. RNAs originating from hard to access tissues, such as neurons within the brain and spinal cord, have the potential to get to the periphery where they can be detected non-invasively. The formation and extracellular release of microvesicles and RNA binding proteins have been found to carry RNA from cells of the central nervous system to the periphery and protect the RNA from degradation. Extracellular miRNAs detectable in peripheral circulation can provide information about cellular changes associated with human health and disease. In order to associate miRNA signals present in cell-free peripheral biofluids with neurodegenerative disease status of patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, we assessed the miRNA content in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from postmortem subjects with full neuropathology evaluations. We profiled the miRNA content from 69 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 67 with Parkinson's disease and 78 neurologically normal controls using next generation small RNA sequencing (NGS). We report the average abundance of each detected miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and in serum and describe 13 novel miRNAs that were identified. We correlated changes in miRNA expression with aspects of disease severity such as Braak stage, dementia status, plaque and tangle densities, and the presence and severity of Lewy body pathology. Many of the differentially expressed miRNAs detected in peripheral cell-free cerebrospinal fluid and serum were previously reported in the literature to be deregulated in brain tissue from patients with neurodegenerative disease. These data indicate that extracellular miRNAs detectable in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum are reflective of cell-based changes in pathology and can be used to assess

  12. Pathology of hereditary nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, V. V.

    1968-01-01

    This report describes the renal pathology in three siblings with hereditary nephritis. All three cases showed combined features of chronic glomerulonephritis, pyelonephritis, and interstitial nephritis. Foam cells were seen in only one case. These findings support the contention of Krickstein, Gloor, and Balogh (1966) that the renal changes in hereditary nephritis are those of a mixed nephritis. Images PMID:5717545

  13. Industry-contract research organization pathology interactions: a perspective of contract research organizations in producing the best quality pathology report.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Sylvie J; Palate, Bernard; Parker, George A; Engelhardt, Jeffery A; Hardisty, Jerry F; McDorman, Kevin S; Tellier, Pierre A; Silverman, Lee R

    2011-02-01

    This article provides observations on the features of sponsor-contract research organization communication that will achieve the best quality pathology report based on our collective experience. Information on the test article and any anticipated findings should be provided, and initial slide examination should be done with knowledge of treatment group (but may be followed by blinded review of target tissues to determine no-effect levels). Only a pathologist should write or revise the pathology report or the pathology section of the overall study report. To address concerns related to undue sponsor influence, comments by sponsors should be presented as suggestions rather than directives. Adversity should be defined for each finding by the study pathologist, but the no-observed adverse effect level should not be discussed in the pathology report. Board-certified pathologists are recommended, but are not essential. Sponsors that have a particular format or report preferences should make them known well in advance. Histologic processing "to glass" of protocol-specified tissues from all dosage groups is recommended for rapid evaluation of target tissues. Telepathology is beneficial in certain situations, but it is usually more efficient for the study pathologist and reviewing pathologist to be in the same physical location to review differences of opinion and reach a consensus.

  14. OAE: The Ontology of Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A medical intervention is a medical procedure or application intended to relieve or prevent illness or injury. Examples of medical interventions include vaccination and drug administration. After a medical intervention, adverse events (AEs) may occur which lie outside the intended consequences of the intervention. The representation and analysis of AEs are critical to the improvement of public health. Description The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), previously named Adverse Event Ontology (AEO), is a community-driven ontology developed to standardize and integrate data relating to AEs arising subsequent to medical interventions, as well as to support computer-assisted reasoning. OAE has over 3,000 terms with unique identifiers, including terms imported from existing ontologies and more than 1,800 OAE-specific terms. In OAE, the term ‘adverse event’ denotes a pathological bodily process in a patient that occurs after a medical intervention. Causal adverse events are defined by OAE as those events that are causal consequences of a medical intervention. OAE represents various adverse events based on patient anatomic regions and clinical outcomes, including symptoms, signs, and abnormal processes. OAE has been used in the analysis of several different sorts of vaccine and drug adverse event data. For example, using the data extracted from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), OAE was used to analyse vaccine adverse events associated with the administrations of different types of influenza vaccines. OAE has also been used to represent and classify the vaccine adverse events cited in package inserts of FDA-licensed human vaccines in the USA. Conclusion OAE is a biomedical ontology that logically defines and classifies various adverse events occurring after medical interventions. OAE has successfully been applied in several adverse event studies. The OAE ontological framework provides a platform for systematic representation and analysis of

  15. Inguinoscrotal pathology

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Luis; Leonard, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Infants, children, and adolescents with inguinoscrotal pathology comprise a significant proportion of emergency department and outpatient visits. Visits to the emergency department primarily comprise individuals presenting with scrotal pain due to testicular torsion or torsion of the testicular appendages. At such time, immediate urological consultation is sought. Outpatient visits comprise those individuals with undescended testes, hydroceles, and varicoceles. Rare, but important problems, such as pediatric testicular tumours, may also present in the office setting. Many of these outpatient visits are to primary care physicians, who should have an appreciation of the timing and need for referral. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the general urologist and primary care physician with these varied pathologies and give insight into their assessment and management. Some of these same conditions are seen in adult patients, but there are some significant differences in their management in the pediatric group. In addition, the utility of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, are discussed within each pathological entity. It is hoped that this overview will assist our general urology and primary care colleagues in patient management for diverse inguinoscrotal pathologies. PMID:28265317

  16. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  17. Pathology of radiation myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Burns, R. J.; Jones, A. N.; Robertson, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    After nothing the rarity of papers describing the pathology of delayed radiation necrosis of the spinal cord, the clinical and pathological findings from four cases are presented. The main pathological features are asymmetric demyelination of the lateral columns and to a lesser degree the posterior and anterior columns of white matter, with coagulative necrosis at the level of irradiation which affected the grey matter to a lesser degree. There is ascending and descending secondary tract degeneration, and poor glial response in the lesions themselves. Vascular changes, mainly hyalilne thickening of arteriolar walls, are present, but not in degree sufficient to explain the primary lesion. The discussion of the pathogenesis of the myelopathy weighs the merits of a primary vascular lesion against those of a primary effect of the radiation on neural tissue. The latter is favoured. Images PMID:4647860

  18. Is It Adverse, Nonadverse, Adaptive, or Artifact?

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Arun R; Kerlin, Roy L; Mann, Peter C; Everds, Nancy E; Sharma, Alok K; Myers, L Peyton; Steinbach, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    One of the principal challenges facing a toxicologic pathologist is to determine and differentiate a true adverse effect from a nonadverse or an adaptive response. Recent publications from the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and the European STP provide guidance for determining and communicating adversity in nonclinical toxicology studies. In order to provide a forum to inform and engage in a discussion on this important topic, a continuing education (CE) course was held during the 2016 STP Annual meeting in San Diego, CA. The lectures at this course provided guidance on determining and communicating adversity using case studies involving both clinical pathology and anatomic pathology. In addition, one talk also focused on data quality, study design, and interpretation of artifacts that could hinder the determination of adversity. The CE course ended with a talk on understanding adversity in preclinical studies and engaging the regulatory agencies in the decision-making process. This manuscript is designed to provide brief summaries of all the talks in this well-received CE course.

  19. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  20. A Murine Niemann-Pick C1 I1061T Knock-In Model Recapitulates the Pathological Features of the Most Prevalent Human Disease Allele

    PubMed Central

    Praggastis, Maria; Tortelli, Brett; Zhang, Jessie; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sidhu, Rohini; Chacko, Anita; Chen, Zhouji; Chung, Chan; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Sikora, Jakub; Davidson, Cristin; Walkley, Steven U.; Pipalia, Nina H.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Schaffer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C1 (NPC1) disease is a rare neurovisceral, cholesterol–sphingolipid lysosomal storage disorder characterized by ataxia, motor impairment, progressive intellectual decline, and dementia. The most prevalent mutation, NPC1I1061T, encodes a misfolded protein with a reduced half-life caused by ER-associated degradation. Therapies directed at stabilization of the mutant NPC1 protein reduce cholesterol storage in fibroblasts but have not been tested in vivo because of lack of a suitable animal model. Whereas the prominent features of human NPC1 disease are replicated in the null Npc1−/− mouse, this model is not amenable to examining proteostatic therapies. The objective of the present study was to develop an NPC1 I1061T knock-in mouse in which to test proteostatic therapies. Compared with the Npc1−/− mouse, this Npc1tm(I1061T)Dso model displays a less severe, delayed form of NPC1 disease with respect to weight loss, decreased motor coordination, Purkinje cell death, lipid storage, and premature death. The murine NPC1I1061T protein has a reduced half-life in vivo, consistent with protein misfolding and rapid ER-associated degradation, and can be stabilized by histone deacetylase inhibition. This novel mouse model faithfully recapitulates human NPC1 disease and provides a powerful tool for preclinical evaluation of therapies targeting NPC1 protein variants with compromised stability. PMID:26019327

  1. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities

    PubMed Central

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-01-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents’ lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2+/−) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2+/− mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2+/− mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15Ink4b, p16Ink4a and p19Arf or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2+/− mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation. PMID:17272307

  2. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities.

    PubMed

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-07-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents' lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2(+/-)) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2(+/-) mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2(+/-) mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15(Ink4b), p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf) or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2(+/-) mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation.

  3. African American Men With Very Low–Risk Prostate Cancer Exhibit Adverse Oncologic Outcomes After Radical Prostatectomy: Should Active Surveillance Still Be an Option for Them?

    PubMed Central

    Sundi, Debasish; Ross, Ashley E.; Humphreys, Elizabeth B.; Han, Misop; Partin, Alan W.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Active surveillance (AS) is a treatment option for men with very low–risk prostate cancer (PCa); however, favorable outcomes achieved for men in AS are based on cohorts that under-represent African American (AA) men. To explore whether race-based health disparities exist among men with very low–risk PCa, we evaluated oncologic outcomes of AA men with very low–risk PCa who were candidates for AS but elected to undergo radical prostatectomy (RP). Patients and Methods We studied 1,801 men (256 AA, 1,473 white men, and 72 others) who met National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria for very low–risk PCa and underwent RP. Presenting characteristics, pathologic data, and cancer recurrence were compared among the groups. Multivariable modeling was performed to assess the association of race with upgrading and adverse pathologic features. Results AA men with very low–risk PCa had more adverse pathologic features at RP and poorer oncologic outcomes. AA men were more likely to experience disease upgrading at prostatectomy (27.3% v 14.4%; P < .001), positive surgical margins (9.8% v 5.9%; P = .02), and higher Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment Post-Surgical scoring system (CAPRA-S) scores. On multivariable analysis, AA race was an independent predictor of adverse pathologic features (odds ratio, [OR], 3.23; P = .03) and pathologic upgrading (OR, 2.26; P = .03). Conclusion AA men with very low–risk PCa who meet criteria for AS but undergo immediate surgery experience significantly higher rates of upgrading and adverse pathology than do white men and men of other races. AA men with very low–risk PCa should be counseled about increased oncologic risk when deciding among their disease management options. PMID:23775960

  4. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  5. Nanotechnology: Toxicologic Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hubbs, Ann F.; Sargent, Linda M.; Porter, Dale W.; Sager, Tina M.; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David G.; Castranova, Vincent; Sriram, Krishnan; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Reynolds, Steven H.; Battelli, Lori A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Fluharty, Kara L.; Mercer, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies. PMID:23389777

  6. Distinguishing hazards and harms, adverse drug effects and adverse drug reactions : implications for drug development, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance, biomarkers, and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2013-03-01

    The terms 'adverse drug effects' and 'adverse drug reactions' are commonly used interchangeably, but they have different implications. Adverse drug reactions arise when a compound (e.g. a drug or metabolite, a contaminant or adulterant) is distributed in the same place as a body tissue (e.g. a receptor, enzyme, or ion channel), and the encounter results in an adverse effect (a physiological or pathological change), which results in a clinically appreciable adverse reaction. Both the adverse effect and the adverse reaction have manifestations by which they can be recognized: adverse effects are usually detected by laboratory tests (e.g. biochemical, haematological, immunological, radiological, pathological) or by clinical investigations (e.g. endoscopy, cardiac catheterization), and adverse reactions by their clinical manifestations (symptoms and/or signs). This distinction suggests five scenarios: (i) adverse reactions can result directly from adverse effects; (ii) adverse effects may not lead to appreciable adverse reactions; (iii) adverse reactions can occur without preceding adverse effects; (iv) adverse effects and reactions may be dissociated; and (v) adverse effects and reactions can together constitute syndromes. Defining an adverse drug reaction as "an appreciably harmful or unpleasant reaction, resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product" suggests a definition of an adverse drug effect: "a potentially harmful effect resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product, which constitutes a hazard and may or may not be associated with a clinically appreciable adverse reaction and/or an abnormal laboratory test or clinical investigation, as a marker of an adverse reaction."

  7. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  8. Axis II comorbidity and developmental adversity in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Steiger, H; Jabalpurwala, S; Champagne, J

    1996-09-01

    Using data from 61 bulimic patients, we evaluated associations among axis II disturbances, psychopathological traits, eating symptoms, and adverse developmental experiences (e.g., childhood sexual and physical abuse). Findings showed likelihood of childhood abuse to increase markedly in function of comorbid personality pathology. In addition, comorbid borderline personality disorder was found to be a better predictor of object-relations disturbances, primitive defenses, and hostility than developmental adversity was. Although marked trait disturbances were strongly associated with borderline personality disorder (more than with severity of childhood adversity), the converse seemed true of severity of bulimic symptoms (i.e., comorbid personality disorder had no predictive effects, whereas developmental variables had inconsistent effects). Bulimic and general psychopathological symptoms, thus, seemed to have intriguingly independent determinants. We interpret these findings as showing that the observed association between developmental adversity and bulimic syndromes may, in large part, be attributable to comorbid personality pathology.

  9. Pathology of the parathyroid glands in hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Zubair W; LiVolsi, Virginia A

    2013-08-01

    This paper reviews the embryology, histology and pathology of the human parathyroid glands. It emphasizes those pathologic lesions which are found in the setting of clinical hyperparathyroidism. Also discussed are certain molecular features of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands. The difficulties encountered in parathyroid FNA are reviewed and illustrated.

  10. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  11. Pathology of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vijgen, Sandrine; Terris, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCC) is a primary carcinoma of the liver with increasing significance and major pathogenic, clinical and therapeutic challenges. Classically, it arises from malignant transformation of cholangiocytes bordering small portal bile duct (BD) to second-order segmental large BDs. It has three major macroscopic growth pattern [mass-forming (MF), periductal infiltrative (PI), and intraductal growth (IG)] and histologically is a desmoplastic stroma-rich adenocarcinoma with cholangiocyte differentiation. Recent data pointed out noteworthy degree of heterogeneity in regards of their epidemiology and risk factors, pathological and molecular features, pathogenesis, clinical behaviors and treatment. Notably, several histological variants are described and can coexist within the same tumor. Several different cells of origin have also been depicted in a fraction of iCCs, amongst which malignant transformation of ductules, of hepatic stem/progenitor cells, of periductal glands or through oncogenic reprogramming of adult hepatocytes. A degree of pathological overlap with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may be observed in a portion of iCC. A series of precursor lesions are today characterized and emphasize the existence of a multistep carcinogenesis process. Overall, these new data have brought up in proposal of new histological or molecular classifications, which could soon replace current anatomic-based classification and could have major impact on establishment of prognosis and on development of novel target treatment approaches. PMID:28261592

  12. Pathological findings in homocystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J. B.; Carson, Nina A. J.; Neill, D. W.

    1964-01-01

    Pathological findings are described in four cases of a new aminoaciduria in which homocystine is excreted in the urine. All the patients were mentally retarded children. Three of them presented diagnostic features of Marfan's syndrome. Necropsy on one case and biopsy findings in the others are described. Fatty change occurs in the liver. The most striking lesions are vascular. Metachromatic medial degeneration of the aorta and of the elastic arteries in the necropsied case are considered in relation to Marfan's syndrome. Other changes, particularly thrombosis which is prevalent in homocystinuria, suggest the possibility of a platelet defect. The findings are discussed in respect of an upset in the metabolism of sulphur-containing amino-acids and with particular reference to Marfan's syndrome. Images PMID:14195630

  13. Shame regulation in personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Schoenleber, Michelle; Berenbaum, Howard

    2012-05-01

    Drawing on extant work on shame and emotion regulation, this article proposes that three broad forms of maladaptive shame regulation strategies are fundamental in much of personality pathology: Prevention (e.g., dependence, fantasy), used preemptively, lessens potential for shame; Escape (e.g., social withdrawal, misdirection) reduces current or imminent shame; Aggression, used after shame begins, refocuses shame into anger directed at the self (e.g., physical self-harm) or others (e.g., verbal aggression). This article focuses on the contributions of shame regulation to the development and maintenance of personality pathology, highlighting how various maladaptive shame regulation strategies may lead to personality pathology symptoms, associated features, and dimensions. Consideration is also given to the possible shame-related constructs necessitating emotion regulation (e.g., shame aversion and proneness) and the points in the emotion process when regulation can occur.

  14. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  15. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  16. Adverse events related to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

  17. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Violence Data LGB Suicidal Thoughts & Experiences Data LGB Youth Report School Violence Featured Topic: Opportunities for Action Featured Topic: Bullying Research Featured Topic: Prevent Gang Membership Featured Topic: ...

  18. Environmental adversity and uncertainty favour cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Andras, Peter; Lazarus, John; Roberts, Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    Background A major cornerstone of evolutionary biology theory is the explanation of the emergence of cooperation in communities of selfish individuals. There is an unexplained tendency in the plant and animal world – with examples from alpine plants, worms, fish, mole-rats, monkeys and humans – for cooperation to flourish where the environment is more adverse (harsher) or more unpredictable. Results Using mathematical arguments and computer simulations we show that in more adverse environments individuals perceive their resources to be more unpredictable, and that this unpredictability favours cooperation. First we show analytically that in a more adverse environment the individual experiences greater perceived uncertainty. Second we show through a simulation study that more perceived uncertainty implies higher level of cooperation in communities of selfish individuals. Conclusion This study captures the essential features of the natural examples: the positive impact of resource adversity or uncertainty on cooperation. These newly discovered connections between environmental adversity, uncertainty and cooperation help to explain the emergence and evolution of cooperation in animal and human societies. PMID:18053138

  19. [Once again: theoretical pathology].

    PubMed

    Bleyl, U

    2010-07-01

    Theoretical pathology refers to the attempt to reintroduce methodical approaches from the humanities, philosophical logic and "gestalt philosophy" into medical research and pathology. Diseases, in particular disease entities and more complex polypathogenetic mechanisms of disease, have a "gestalt quality" due to the significance of their pathophysiologic coherence: they have a "gestalt". The Research group Theoretical Pathology at the Academy of Science in Heidelberg are credited with having revitalized the philosophical notion of "gestalt" for morphological and pathological diagnostics. Gestalt means interrelated schemes of pathophysiological significance in the mind of the diagnostician. In pathology, additive and associative diagnostic are simply not possible without considering the notion of synthetic entities in Kant's logic.

  20. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  1. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  2. Digital imaging in pathology.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil Vasdev

    2012-12-01

    Advances in computing speed and power have made a pure digital work flow for pathology. New technologies such as whole slide imaging (WSI), multispectral image analysis, and algorithmic image searching seem poised to fundamentally change the way in which pathology is practiced. This article provides the practicing pathologist with a primer on digital imaging. Building on this primer, the current state of the art concerning digital imaging in pathology is described. Emphasis is placed on WSI and its ramifications, showing how it is useful in both anatomic (histology, cytopathology) and clinical (hematopathology) pathology. Future trends are also extrapolated.

  3. Handheld computing in pathology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; Satyanarayanan, Mahadev; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Handheld computing has had many applications in medicine, but relatively few in pathology. Most reported uses of handhelds in pathology have been limited to experimental endeavors in telemedicine or education. With recent advances in handheld hardware and software, along with concurrent advances in whole-slide imaging (WSI), new opportunities and challenges have presented themselves. This review addresses the current state of handheld hardware and software, provides a history of handheld devices in medicine focusing on pathology, and presents future use cases for such handhelds in pathology. PMID:22616027

  4. Pathology in Greece.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, S; Patsouris, E

    2015-11-01

    Pathology is the field of medicine that studies diseases. Ancient Greece hosted some of the earliest societies that laid the structural foundations of pathology. Initially, knowledge was based on observations but later on the key elements of pathology were established based on the dissection of animals and the autopsy of human cadavers. Christianized Greece under Ottoman rule (1453-1821) was not conducive to the development of pathology. After liberation, however, a series of events took place that paved the way for the establishment and further development of the specialty. The appointment in 1849 of two Professors of Pathology at the Medical School of Athens for didactical purposes proved to be the most important step in fostering the field of pathology in modern Greece. Presently in Greece there are seven university departments and 74 pathology laboratories in public hospitals, employing 415 specialized pathologists and 90 residents. The First Department of Pathology at the Medical School of Athens University is the oldest (1849) and largest in Greece, encompassing most pathology subspecialties.

  5. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  6. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation.

    PubMed

    Calafate, Sara; Buist, Arjan; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Vijayan, Vinoy; Daneels, Guy; de Strooper, Bart; de Wit, Joris; Verstreken, Patrik; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-05-26

    Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close distance between the cells, enhance the propagation of Tau pathology between acceptor hippocampal neurons and Tau donor cells. Similarly, in an artificial neuronal network using microfluidic devices, synapses and synaptic activity are promoting neuronal Tau pathology propagation in parallel to the non-synaptic mechanisms. Our work indicates that the physical presence of synaptic contacts between neurons facilitate Tau pathology propagation. These findings can have implications for synaptic repair therapies, which may turn out to have adverse effects by promoting propagation of Tau pathology.

  7. Voice data mining for laryngeal pathology assessment.

    PubMed

    Hemmerling, Daria; Skalski, Andrzej; Gajda, Janusz

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of different methods of speech signal analysis in the detection of voice pathologies. Firstly, an initial vector was created consisting of 28 parameters extracted from time, frequency and cepstral domain describing the human voice signal based on the analysis of sustained vowels /a/, /i/ and /u/ all at high, low and normal pitch. Afterwards we used a linear feature extraction technique (principal component analysis), which enabled a reduction in the number of parameters and choose the most effective acoustic features describing the speech signal. We have also performed non-linear data transformation which was calculated using kernel principal components. The results of the presented methods for normal and pathological cases will be revealed and discussed in this paper. The initial and extracted feature vectors were classified using the k-means clustering and the random forest classifier. We found that reasonably good classification accuracies could be achieved by selecting appropriate features. We obtained accuracies of up to 100% for classification of healthy versus pathology voice using random forest classification for female and male recordings. These results may assist in the feature development of automated detection systems for diagnosis of patients with symptoms of pathological voice.

  8. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) development ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is increasingly being adopted as a tool for organizing and summarizing the mechanistic information connecting molecular perturbations by environmental stressors with adverse outcomes relevant for ecological and human health outcomes. However, the conventional process for assembly of these AOPs is time and resource intensive, and has been a rate limiting step for AOP use and development. Therefore computational approaches to accelerate the process need to be developed. We previously developed a method for generating computationally predicted AOPs (cpAOPs) by association mining and integration of data from publicly available databases. In this work, a cpAOP network of ~21,000 associations was established between 105 phenotypes from TG-GATEs rat liver data from different time points (including microarray, pathological effects and clinical chemistry data), 994 REACTOME pathways, 688 High-throughput assays from ToxCast and 194 chemicals. A second network of 128,536 associations was generated by connecting 255 biological target genes from ToxCast to 4,980 diseases from CTD using either HT screening activity from ToxCast for 286 chemicals or CTD gene expression changes in response to 2,330 chemicals. Both networks were separately evaluated through manual extraction of disease-specific cpAOPs and comparison with expert curation of the relevant literature. By employing data integration strategies that involve the weighting of n

  9. [Pathology- a new revival].

    PubMed

    Barshack, Iris

    2013-06-01

    The field of pathology has undergone considerable change in recent years. The editor and editorial board of this journal are to be commended for their decision to devote a special issue to the field of pathology. Pathology deals with the characterization, investigation, and diagnosis of disease and disease processes and as such, has Long been considered one of the foundations of medicine. It is a rich and multi-faceted field which has retained its breadth of scope in the face of ever-increasing specialization and sub-specialization in medicine. In addition to its classic roles in autopsy, case description, and the diagnosis of pathoLogic processes, new and innovative spheres of activity are becoming integral to the field, especially in the realm of molecular pathology. Pathology is a Leading player in the new age of "personalized cancer therapy", where pathologists are responsible not only for diagnosing disease in the tissue, but also for conducting additional tests which may predict its response to specific drug therapies. In this context, moLecular pathology has become essential to the field both in the provision of cLinical service and research. To fully implement this trend, we are witness to the rise of tissue collection and tissue banking initiatives for both diagnostic and research purposes. A national tissue banking project in Israel has recently received considerable attention.

  10. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy.

  11. [Pathological gambling: literature revue].

    PubMed

    Filteau, M J; Baruch, P; Vincent, P

    1992-03-01

    This paper summarizes the current literature on pathological gambling. Interest in gambling has been present in every society but treated as an object of sociopolitical or literary interest. It is only from the beginning of this century that psychiatry began to look at pathological gambling, first with Freud and his writing on Dostoïevsky then with other theories like the learning theory, studies on substance dependence, the links with affective syndromes and the psychobiological studies. These studies are presented and discussed. Finally, the authors offer some guidelines for an approach to a pathological gambler.

  12. Meeting report: Urinary Pathology; sixth Research Triangle Park Rodent Pathology Course.

    PubMed

    Boyle, M C; Boyle, M H

    2013-05-01

    Urinary system toxicity is a significant concern to pathologists in the hazard identification, drug and chemical safety evaluation, and diagnostic service industries worldwide. There are myriad known human and animal urinary system toxicants, and investigatory renal toxicology and pathology is continually evolving. The system-specific Research Triangle Park (RTP) Rodent Pathology Course biennially serves to update scientists on the latest research, laboratory techniques, and debates. The Sixth RTP Rodent Pathology Course, Urinary Pathology, featured experts from the government, pharmaceutical, academic, and diagnostic arenas sharing the state of the science in urinary pathology. Speakers presented on a wide range of topics including background lesions, treatment-related non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions, transgenic rodent models of human disease, diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and molecular analyses. These seminars were accompanied by case presentation sessions focused on usual and unusual lesions, grading schemes, and tumors.

  13. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  14. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  15. Renal pathology in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Peernel

    2006-01-01

    The class of Reptilia varies widely. Both the gross morphology and microscopic anatomy of the kidneys are specific for each species. In each species of reptile, the physiology of the renal system has adapted to the specific conditions of life, including, among other factors, the type of food, environmental temperature, and the availability of water. The pathology of the kidneys in reptiles has been poorly studied, but in recent years a number of investigators have specifically studied reptilian renal pathology.

  16. Isolated Sphenoid Sinus Lesions: Experience with a Few Rare Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Sadashiva, Nishanth; Nandeesh, B. N.; Shukla, Dhaval; Bhat, Dhananjaya; Somanna, Sampath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The sphenoid sinus is often neglected because of its difficult access. The deep position of the sphenoid sinus hinders early diagnosis of pathologies in that location. Delayed diagnosis can cause serious complications due to proximity to many important structures. Objectives: The aim of this study is to demonstrate different pathologies which can affect the sphenoid sinus and elucidate the findings. Methods: Cases of isolated sphenoid sinus lesions encountered in the neurosurgical setting which had rare pathologies are discussed. Pathologies such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis, solitary plasmacytoma, chordoma, pituitary adenoma, leiomyosarcoma, fungal infection, and mucocele which appeared primarily in sphenoid sinus are discussed along with their imaging features and pathological findings. Conclusion: Multitude of different pathologies can occur in sphenoid sinus. Detailed preoperative imaging is very helpful, but transnasal biopsy and histological study are required often for definitive diagnosis. The possible advantages of early diagnosis before spread of pathology for prognosis cannot be overemphasized. PMID:28149092

  17. Eponyms in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Nečas, Pavel; Hejna, Petr

    2012-12-01

    The phenomenon of eponymous terms in forensic pathology is described in this paper. The authors analyzed representative textbooks (monographs) dealing with forensic pathology in both English and German and identified several eponymous terms. The paper aims to present to the reader the most important eponymous terms in forensic pathology. Included in the paper are the following terms: Beckwith's Sign, Casper's Rule, Krönlein's Shot, Lichtenberg's Figures, Nysten's Law, Paltauf's Spots, Puppe's Rule, Sehrt's Sign, Simon's Sign, Sveshnikov's Sign, Tardieu's Spots, Wischnewski Spots, Wydler's Sign. The spread of eponymous terms throughout various languages is mentioned. The linguistic basis of such terms as well as their advantages and disadvantages in specialist fields, and indeed in even wider circles, is discussed. The authors state that the main function of these terms is to facilitate the open flow of unambiguous information among scholars. Eponymous terms in forensic pathology are characteristic for the German speaking countries and for all countries influenced by the German school of forensic pathology. Their usage in the Anglo-Saxon world is much less widespread, meaning they do not occur very often in English monographs and textbooks.

  18. Differential diagnosis of cerebral hemispheric pathology: multimodal approach.

    PubMed

    Moritani, T; Smoker, W R K; Lee, H K; Sato, Y

    2011-06-01

    This article gives a comprehensive review and illustrations of the imaging features of various pathological conditions and clinical syndromes associated with cerebral hemispheric involvement. The various conditions are described and defined to provide a basis for the differential diagnostics. The hypotheses relating to the pathology of the various syndromes are discussed with special emphasis on excitotoxic mechanisms for explaining the subsequent cerebral hemiatrophy.

  19. Vasoregression: A Shared Vascular Pathology Underlying Macrovascular And Microvascular Pathologies?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akanksha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vasoregression is a common phenomenon underlying physiological vessel development as well as pathological microvascular diseases leading to peripheral neuropathy, nephropathy, and vascular oculopathies. In this review, we describe the hallmarks and pathways of vasoregression. We argue here that there is a parallel between characteristic features of vasoregression in the ocular microvessels and atherosclerosis in the larger vessels. Shared molecular pathways and molecular effectors in the two conditions are outlined, thus highlighting the possible systemic causes of local vascular diseases. Our review gives us a system-wide insight into factors leading to multiple synchronous vascular diseases. Because shared molecular pathways might usefully address the diagnostic and therapeutic needs of multiple common complex diseases, the literature analysis presented here is of broad interest to readership in integrative biology, rational drug development and systems medicine. PMID:26669709

  20. Reinforcement pathology and obesity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Lin, Henry; Epstein, Leonard H

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is, in part, a result of positive energy balance or energy intake exceeding physiological needs. Excess energy intake is determined by a series of food choices over time. These choices involve both motivational and executive function processes. Problems arise when there is excessive motivation to eat and low impulse control, a situation we have termed reinforcement pathology. Motivational and executive function processes have also been implicated in the development of drug dependence and addiction. In this review we discuss the application of reinforcement pathology to obesity, and implications of this approach for obesity treatment.

  1. Image management in pathology.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, D S; Doolittle, M

    1996-04-01

    Much of the diagnostic work in pathology, especially surgical pathology and cytology, involves the interpretation of images. Recent advances in digital imaging technologies and telecommunications will allow pathologists to use image-based information in ways that are not possible using conventional glass slides alone. We are entering an age in which image-based information can be more easily and widely shared, both locally and globally. In this article, some of the digital technologies that can allow pathologists to make more effective use of diagnostic images will be discussed.

  2. Complexity and forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard Martin

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that nonlinearity and complexity are the norm in human physiological systems, the relevance of which is informing an enhanced understanding of basic pathological processes such as inflammation, the host response to severe trauma, and critical illness. This article will explore how an understanding of nonlinear systems and complexity might inform the study of the pathophysiology of deaths of medicolegal interest, and how 'complexity thinking' might usefully be incorporated into modern forensic medicine and forensic pathology research, education and practice.

  3. Fetal Programming and Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2016-01-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25880521

  4. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  5. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  6. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  7. Reverse engineering adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Chipman, J Kevin; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. The application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) can be used to overcome these limitations. This approach was used to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas). Gene expression changes in FHM ovaries in response to seven different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions, were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. Potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide were examined using two mutual information-based methods to infer gene regulatory networks and potential AOPs. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict network paths from stressor to adverse outcome as candidate AOPs. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment, thus leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biological processes, biomarkers, or alternative endpoints that can be used to monitor an AOP. Finally, the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology were identified and a road map for the utilization of these tools presented.

  8. Pathology of Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heckendorn, Emily; Auerbach, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the pathology of extranodal lymphoma is presented. The emphasis of this presentation is on the classification system of extranodal lymphomas, including both B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, based on their morphology, phenotype, and molecular alterations.

  9. Next-Generation Pathology.

    PubMed

    Caie, Peter D; Harrison, David J

    2016-01-01

    The field of pathology is rapidly transforming from a semiquantitative and empirical science toward a big data discipline. Large data sets from across multiple omics fields may now be extracted from a patient's tissue sample. Tissue is, however, complex, heterogeneous, and prone to artifact. A reductionist view of tissue and disease progression, which does not take this complexity into account, may lead to single biomarkers failing in clinical trials. The integration of standardized multi-omics big data and the retention of valuable information on spatial heterogeneity are imperative to model complex disease mechanisms. Mathematical modeling through systems pathology approaches is the ideal medium to distill the significant information from these large, multi-parametric, and hierarchical data sets. Systems pathology may also predict the dynamical response of disease progression or response to therapy regimens from a static tissue sample. Next-generation pathology will incorporate big data with systems medicine in order to personalize clinical practice for both prognostic and predictive patient care.

  10. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  11. Beyond "cirrhosis": a proposal from the International Liver Pathology Study Group.

    PubMed

    Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Snover, Dale C; Alves, Venancio; Balabaud, Charles; Bhathal, Prithi S; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Crawford, James M; Dhillon, Amar P; Ferrell, Linda; Guido, Maria; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Paradis, Valerie; Quaglia, Alberto; Theise, Neil D; Thung, Swan N; Tsui, Wilson M S; van Leeuwen, Dirk J

    2012-01-01

    "Cirrhosis" is a morphologic term that has been used for almost 200 years to denote the end stage of a variety of chronic liver diseases. The term implies a condition with adverse prognosis due to the well-known complications of portal hypertension, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. However, recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic liver diseases have changed the natural history of cirrhosis significantly. This consensus document by the International Liver Pathology Study Group challenges the usefulness of the word cirrhosis in modern medicine and suggests that this is an appropriate time to consider discontinuing the use of this term. The role of pathologists should evolve to the diagnosis of advanced stage of chronic liver disease, with emphasis on etiology, grade of activity, features suggestive of progression or regression, presence of other diseases, and risk factors for malignancy, within the perspective of an integrated clinicopathologic assessment.

  12. Adverse drug reactions: part II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must be effectively practiced by all health care providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  13. Adverse drug reactions: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  14. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  15. [Pain as adverse drug reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Schaffarzick, Daniel; Nagano, Marietta; Janowitz, Susanne Melitta; Schweitzer, Ekkehard

    2012-09-01

    We present a multidisciplinary (anaesthesiology--clinical pharmacy--bioinformatics) analysis of pain as possible adverse drug reaction taking different manifestations of pain, indication groups, relevance to the Austrian drug market and possible mechanistic influence of drugs on development and apprehension of pain into consideration.We designed an overview that shows how transmitters that play a part in nociception and antinociception can be influenced by drugs. This allows conclusions to the dolorigene potential of therapeutics.

  16. Digital imaging applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2003-03-01

    Digital imaging has progressed at a rapid rate and is likely to eventually replace chemical photography in most areas of professional and amateur digital image acquisition. In pathology, digital microscopy has implications beyond that of taking a photograph. The arguments for adopting this new medium are compelling, and given similar developments in other areas of pathology and radiologic imaging, acceptance of the digital medium should be viewed as a component of the technological evolution of the laboratory. A digital image may be stored, replicated, catalogued, employed for educational purposes, transmitted for further interpretation (telepathology), analyzed for salient features (medical vision/image analysis), or form part of a wider digital healthcare strategy. Despite advances in digital camera technology, good image acquisition still requires good microscope optics and the correct calibration of all system components, something which many neglect. The future of digital imaging in pathology is very promising and new applications in the fields of automated quantification and interpretation are likely to have profound long-term influence on the practice of anatomic pathology. This paper discusses the state of the art of digital imaging in anatomic pathology.

  17. Thiocolchicoside: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Thiocolchicoside has long been used as a muscle relaxant, despite a lack of proven efficacy beyond the placebo effect. Its chemical structure consists of colchicine, a sugar (ose) and a sulphur-containing radical (thio), and its adverse effects are therefore likely to be similar to those of colchicine. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we reviewed the available data on the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. Liver injury, pancreatitis, seizures, blood cell disorders, severe cutaneous disorders, rhabdomyolysis and reproductive disorders have all been recorded in the French and European pharmacovigilance databases and in the periodic updates that the companies concerned submit to regulatory agencies. These data do not specify the frequency of the disorders nor do they identify the most susceptible patient populations. Thiocolchicoside is teratogenic in experimental animals and also damages chromosomes. Human data are limited to a follow-up of about 30 pregnant women (no major malformations) and reports of altered spermatogenesis, including cases of azoospermia. In practice, there is no justification for exposing patients to the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. It is better to use an effective, well-known analgesic for patients complaining of muscle pain, starting with paracetamol.

  18. Adverse food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Alie; van Hunsel, Florence; Bast, Aalt

    2015-12-01

    Food supplements and herbal products are increasingly popular amongst consumers. This leads to increased risks of interactions between prescribed drugs and these products containing bioactive ingredients. From 1991 up to 2014, 55 cases of suspected adverse drug reactions due to concomitant intake of health-enhancing products and drugs were reported to Lareb, the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre. An overview of these suspected interactions is presented and their potential mechanisms of action are described. Mainly during the metabolism of xenobiotics and due to the pharmacodynamics effects interactions seem to occur, which may result in adverse drug reactions. Where legislation is seen to distinct food and medicine, legislation concerning these different bioactive products is less clear-cut. This can only be resolved by increasing the molecular knowledge on bioactive substances and their potential interactions. Thereby potential interactions can be better understood and prevented on an individual level. By considering the dietary pattern and use of bioactive substances with prescribed medication, both health professionals and consumers will be increasingly aware of interactions and these interactive adverse effects can be prevented.

  19. [Czech eponyms in pathology].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th European Congress of Pathology taking place in Prague is an opportunity to remind our society of the Czech names appearing as eponyms in pathological terminology: Karel Rokitanský - R. protuberance in dermoid cyst; R. thrombogenic theory of atherosclerosis; Mayer - R. - Küster - Hauser - Winckel syndrome (congenital malformation of the vagina and uterus); Václav Treitz - T. duodenal ligament; T. retroperitoneal hernia; T. uremic colitis; Vilém Dušan Lambl - L. excrescences of heart valves; Lamblia (Giardia) intestinalis, and also the foundation of urological cytology; Stanislav Provázek - Prowazek - Halberstädter bodies (trachoma), Rickettsia Prowazeki (typhus fever); Josef Vaněk - V. tumor (gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp), and also discovery of the etiology of pneumocystic pneumonia; Otto Jírovec - Pneumocystis Jiroveci; Blahoslav Bednář - B. tumor (pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans).

  20. [Molecular diagnostics in pathology].

    PubMed

    Stenzinger, A; Penzel, R; Endris, V; Weichert, W

    2013-05-01

    Tissue-based molecular diagnostics is a fast growing diagnostic field, which already complements morphologic classifications in many cases. Pathology based molecular diagnosis is performed almost exclusively on paraffin embedded material and always in conjunction with histopathology. Besides the classic field of tissue based detection of pathogenic organisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, molecular diagnostics of tumor tissue is one of the current hot topics in oncology. In this context the detection of predictive molecular biomarkers, such as specific mutations, allows patient stratification for individually tailored treatment strategies and thereby is one of the key components of individualized patient care in oncology. The rapidly growing number of clinically relevant predictive biomarkers together with impressive technical advances, specifically the development of massive parallel sequencing, will modify the care of patients with malignant diseases. Pathology, therefore, has returned in the very center of interdisciplinary patient care.

  1. Pathologic Fractures: A Neglected Clinical Feature of Parathyroid Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Abshirini, Hassan; Rashidi, Iran; Saki, Nader

    2010-01-01

    The pattern of clinical presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) has changed dramatically from a severe disease to an asymptomatic condition in Western countries. The story is completely different in Eastern countries. Bone and joint related sign and symptoms like bone pain and multiple fractures are common in these patients. Imaging and nuclear medicine studies will be helpful specially in patient who candidate for surgical removal of the abnormal parathyroid gland. Here, we present a 48-year-old man with multiple typical fractures in long bones and a single adenoma in his right inferior parathyroid gland. pHPT is a severe, symptomatic disease with serious complications and high morbidity in Iran. Advanced skeletal disease is the most common pattern of presentation. PMID:21209742

  2. Clinical and pathologic features of thymoma in 15 dogs.

    PubMed

    Aronsohn, M G; Schunk, K L; Carpenter, J L; King, N W

    1984-06-01

    Thymoma was diagnosed in 15 dogs at Angell Memorial Animal Hospital between 1972 and 1983. All thymomas developed in the cranial portion of the mediastinum. An autoimmune paraneoplastic syndrome was observed in 10 (67%) of the dogs and included myasthenia gravis, nonthymic neoplasms, and polymyositis. Clinical signs were variable and inconsistent, depending on whether they were attributable to the cranial mediastinal mass or to the paraneoplastic syndrome. Eleven dogs were necropsied. Two thymomas had gross characteristics of malignancy. In 3 cases, a cell consistent with a subclass of mast cell was found and in 1 thymoma, melanocytes were observed.

  3. Primary Diffuse Leptomeningeal Gliomatosis: Radiological/Pathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old lady who presented with headaches, visual impairment, and seizures, progressing rapidly over the course of a few weeks. Extensive workup excluded an inflammatory or infectious cause. Imaging studies revealed diffuse thickening of the leptomeninges and serial CSF analysis showed raised opening pressures and increased protein levels. A diagnostic biopsy of the lower thoracic dura confirmed the diagnosis of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDGL). She was managed supportively for her symptoms and unfortunately she passed away a few weeks later. PMID:27891270

  4. Adverse responses to local anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M M; Graham, R

    1984-11-01

    Progressive challenge was used to investigate twenty-seven patients with a history of an adverse response to local anaesthesia. True allergy was detected in only one patient. The method does not exclude reactions to additives and preservatives in local anaesthetics. If preservative-free local anaesthetics are used for subsequent exposure in patients with no response to progressive challenge, subsequent exposure is safe. The possibility that some of these patients may be reacting to preservatives in the solutions cannot be excluded by such testing. Where possible preservative-free local anaesthetic preparations should be used for subsequent anaesthesia.

  5. Adverse Outcomes in Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roback, Howard B.

    2000-01-01

    Group forms of therapy have been growing at a rapid rate, in part because of their documented effectiveness and economic considerations such as managed care. It is therefore becoming increasingly important to assess the psychological risks of these interventions. The author provides an overview of the published literature and conference presentations on negative effects in adult outpatient groups. Although much of the literature on adverse outcomes in group therapy focuses on single risk factors (e.g., negative leader, group process, or patient characteristics), the author argues that an interactional model should be encouraged. Means of reducing casualties are also discussed, as well as methodological issues and research directions. PMID:10896735

  6. Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinder P; Kumar, Shwetam; Kathiria, Atman V; Harjai, Rachit; Jawed, Akram; Gupta, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered. PMID:27857468

  7. Pathologic and physiologic phimosis

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Thomas B.; Pike, John G.; Leonard, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the differences between physiologic and pathologic phimosis, review proper foreskin care, and discuss when it is appropriate to seek consultation regarding a phimotic foreskin. SOURCES OF INFORMATION This paper is based on selected findings from a MEDLINE search for literature on phimosis and circumcision referrals and on our experience at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Urology Clinic. MeSH headings used in our MEDLINE search included “phimosis,” “referral and consultation,” and “circumcision.” Most of the available articles about phimosis and foreskin referrals were retrospective reviews and cohort studies (levels II and III evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Phimosis is defined as the inability to retract the foreskin. Differentiating between physiologic and pathologic phimosis is important, as the former is managed conservatively and the latter requires surgical intervention. Great anxiety exists among patients and parentsregarding non-retractile foreskins. Most phimosis referrals seen in pediatric urology clinics are normal physiologically phimotic foreskins. Referrals of patients with physiologic phimosis to urology clinics can create anxiety about the need for surgery among patients and parents, while unnecessarily expanding the waiting list for specialty assessment. Uncircumcised penises require no special care. With normal washing, using soap and water, and gentle retraction during urination and bathing, most foreskins will become retractile over time. CONCLUSION Physiologic phimosis is often seen by family physicians. These patients and their parents require reassurance of normalcy and reinforcement of proper preputial hygiene. Consultation should be sought when evidence of pathologic phimosis is present, as this requires surgical management. PMID:17872680

  8. Marketing the pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, E N

    1995-07-01

    Effective marketing of the pathology practice is essential in the face of an increasingly competitive market. Successful marketing begins with a market-driven planning process. As opposed to the traditional planning process used in health care organizations, a market-driven approach is externally driven. Implementing a market-driven plan also requires recognition of the definition of the service. Each market to which pathologists direct their service defines the service differently. Recognition of these different service definitions and creation of a product to meet these needs could lead to competitive advantages in the marketplace.

  9. Eye pathologies in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Nyaish; Mansoor, Tihami; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, newborn assessment incorporates a screening eye examination for any structural abnormalities, observation of neonate's visual behaviour and direct ophthalmoscopy examination looking for red reflex. Early identification and immediate management of eye related pathologies should commence soon after birth as early diagnosis and prompt intervention may have significant impact on the prognosis for many potentially blinding but treatable disorders such as congenital cataracts and retinoblastoma. If left undetected and untreated, such problems may potentially lead to irreversible damage to the vision which persists into adulthood resulting in lack of self-confidence together with difficulties in educational attainment and job opportunities. PMID:28003988

  10. Formaldehyde in pathology departments.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R P

    1983-01-01

    Toxic effects of formaldehyde in humans are discussed in relation to occupational exposure and tolerance to this agent. Carcinogenic and mutagenic properties of formaldehyde have been reported in animals and this has led to concern about a possible role in human cancer. The current state of affairs is reviewed in the light of a lack of direct evidence linking formaldehyde with cancer in man and in relation to recommended exposure levels. It is important to employ effective means of containment and practical methods for reducing exposure to formaldehyde in pathology departments and post-mortem rooms are described. Images PMID:6223948

  11. Confounders in interpreting pathology for safety and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Douglas C. . E-mail: wolf.doug@epa.gov; Mann, Peter C.

    2005-02-01

    The contribution of pathology to toxicity assessment is invaluable but often not clearly understood. Pathology endpoints are the central response around which human health risk assessment is frequently determined; therefore, it is important that the general toxicology community understand current concepts and nomenclature of toxicologic pathology. Toxicologic pathology encompasses the study of changes in tissue morphology that help define the risk of exposure to xenobiotics. Toxicologic pathology is a discipline that has changed and adapted over time including methods of analysis and nomenclature of lesions. As risk assessments are updated for chemicals in commerce, frequently the older literature must be reviewed and reevaluated. When interpreting pathology data from animal studies, it is important to consider the biological significance of a lesion as well as its relationship to the ultimate adverse health effect. Assessing the potential for a chemical to cause harm to humans must include the examination of the entire pathology database in context of the study design, the mode of action of the chemical of concern, and using the most current interpretation of a lesion to determine the significance for human health effects of a particular tissue response.

  12. Confounders in interpreting pathology for safety and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Douglas C; Mann, Peter C

    2005-02-01

    The contribution of pathology to toxicity assessment is invaluable but often not clearly understood. Pathology endpoints are the central response around which human health risk assessment is frequently determined; therefore, it is important that the general toxicology community understand current concepts and nomenclature of toxicologic pathology. Toxicologic pathology encompasses the study of changes in tissue morphology that help define the risk of exposure to xenobiotics. Toxicologic pathology is a discipline that has changed and adapted over time including methods of analysis and nomenclature of lesions. As risk assessments are updated for chemicals in commerce, frequently the older literature must be reviewed and reevaluated. When interpreting pathology data from animal studies, it is important to consider the biological significance of a lesion as well as its relationship to the ultimate adverse health effect. Assessing the potential for a chemical to cause harm to humans must include the examination of the entire pathology database in context of the study design, the mode of action of the chemical of concern, and using the most current interpretation of a lesion to determine the significance for human health effects of a particular tissue response.

  13. The pathology of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Macher, A M

    1988-01-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new disease caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This retrovirus causes profound immunoincompetence in its infected hosts, who are thereafter susceptible to develop myriad severe and relapsing protozoal, fungal, bacterial, viral, and arthropodal opportunistic infections, as well as unusual malignancies. The more than 50,000 patients who have developed AIDS in the United States have produced a sudden unexpected deluge of diagnostic dilemmas that are stressing laboratories of pathology everywhere. This paper describes the gross and microscopic pathology of the numerous complications in patients infected by HIV: (a) the prodromal AIDS-related complex with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy, (b) lymphoid infiltration of salivary gland and lung, including the complex of lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis-pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia, (c) extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, (d) multifocal mucocutaneous and visceral Kaposi's sarcoma, (e) small cell undifferentiated (oat cell) carcinomas, (f) protozoal infections caused by Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, Acanthamoeba, Cryptosporidium species (sp.), and Isospora belli, (g) the causes of chronic enteritis, (h) mycotic infections caused by Candida sp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Sporothrix schenckii, (i) bacterial infections caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, M. tuberculosis, M. kansasii, Nocardia sp., Listeria monocytogenes, Legionella sp., Treponema pallidum, and others, (j) viral infections caused by cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex and zoster, polyomavirus (progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy), hepatitis B, molluscum contagiosum, and papillomavirus, (k) oral hairy leukoplakia, (l) subacute encephalopathy, and (m) Norwegian scabies. PMID:2836878

  14. [(Impending) pathological fracture].

    PubMed

    Sutter, P M; Regazzoni, P

    2002-01-01

    Pathological fractures will be encountered in increasing frequency due to more patients with cancer, surviving a longer period. The skeleton is the third most frequent localization for metastases. Breast cancer is still the most common primary tumor, but bone metastases from lung cancer seem to be diagnosed more and more. Despite of finding metastases most often in the spinal column, fractures are seen mostly at the femoral site. A pathological fracture and, in almost all cases, an impending fracture are absolute indication for operation. An exact definition of an "impending fracture" is still lacking; it is widely accepted, that 50 per cent of bone mass must be destroyed before visualization in X-ray is possible, thus defining an impending fracture. The score system by Mirels estimates the fracture risk by means of four parameters (localization, per cent of destructed bone mass, type of metastasis, pain). Improving quality of life, relieving pain, preferably with a single operation and a short length of stay are the goals of (operative) treatment. For fractures of the proximal femur, prosthetic replacement, for fractures of the subtrochanteric region or the shaft, intramedullary nails are recommended. Postoperative radiation therapy possibly avoids tumor progression. In patient with a good long term prognosis, tumor should be removed locally aggressive.

  15. "Adversative Conjunction": The Poetics of Linguistic Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    The general use of adversative conjunction in (primarily) English and U.S. poetry is outlined. The contention is that the adversative is not merely a grammatical convenience but sometimes a highly functional tool of rhetorical strategy. (36 references) (LB)

  16. The international serious adverse events consortium.

    PubMed

    Holden, Arthur L; Contreras, Jorge L; John, Sally; Nelson, Matthew R

    2014-11-01

    The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium is generating novel insights into the genetics and biology of drug-induced serious adverse events, and thereby improving pharmaceutical product development and decision-making.

  17. Diagnostic difficulties in inflammatory bowel disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Yantiss, R K; Odze, R D

    2006-01-01

    This review summarizes some of the common diagnostic problems encountered by pathologists when evaluating patients with chronic colitis and in whom inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is either suspected or within the differential diagnosis. Both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) show characteristic, but non-specific, pathological features that may overlap and result in a diagnosis of 'indeterminate colitis' (IC). However, other reasons why pathologists may entertain a diagnosis of IC include failure to recognize or accept certain 'hardcore' histological features as indicative of CD, an attempt to classify cases of chronic colitis based on mucosal biopsy material or in the absence of adequate clinical and radiographic information, and the presence of other disease processes that mask, or mimic, IBD. In addition, some cases of UC may show unusual CD-like features, such as discontinuous or patchy disease, ileal inflammation, extracolonic inflammation, granulomatous inflammation in response to ruptured crypts, aphthous ulcers, or transmural inflammation. Furthermore, other forms of colitis, such as microscopic colitis, diverticulitis and diversion colitis may, on occasion, also show IBD-like changes. The clinical and pathological features that aid in the distinction between these entities, and others, are covered in detail in this review.

  18. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  19. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Pathology in a Neurodegenerative Disorders Brain Bank

    PubMed Central

    Bieniek, Kevin F.; Ross, Owen A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Walton, Ronald L.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E.; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Wszolek, Zbignbiew K.; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F.; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1,721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest

  20. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology in a neurodegenerative disorders brain bank.

    PubMed

    Bieniek, Kevin F; Ross, Owen A; Cormier, Kerry A; Walton, Ronald L; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-12-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of CTE pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest risk factor for CTE pathology. Future

  1. [Pathology of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease].

    PubMed

    Oka, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although genetic testing is available, nerve biopsy is useful in selected patients for the diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). These are sporadic cases of hereditary neuropathy, or familial cases in which genetic testing is negative. CMT is caused by mutations of various genes. The pathological features of CMT have mostly been investigated using nerve biopsy, which may shed light on the presumed functions of mutated gene products. PMP22 duplication in CMT1A induces numerous large onion bulb lesions (OB). Compared to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, the differential features of CMT1A are patchy distribution of OB and non-inflammatory lesions. CMT1B also manifests as OB, but presents abnormal compaction of myelin sheaths caused by uncompacted myelin or excessive myelin folding. CMT2 includes axonal neuropathies and many causative genes have been found. CMT2A (MFN2 mutation) shows abnormal mitochondria with a spherical morphology instead of tubular in the longitudinal direction. CMT4 consists of autosomal recessive forms with demyelinating pathology. Most subtypes have mutations of genes relating to myelin maintenance, and pathologically, they show abnormal folding of the myelin structure.

  2. Pathological aspects of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Esposito*, I.

    2008-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) arises from the biliary epithelium and in most cases represents adenocarcinoma. Pathomorphological evaluation is of decisive impact for the prognosis and management of CC. Morphological subtyping (histotype; hilar vs peripheral type), TNM classification, lymphatic spread, and resection margin status are of prognostic relevance. Distinction from hepatic metastases may be aided by immunohistology and clinico-pathological correlation. There is convincing evidence of the development of CC via premalignant lesions, especially biliary intraepithelial neoplasia, although further knowledge about the biology and diagnostic definition of these lesions has to be accumulated. Currently, there are no established molecular markers of prognosis or therapeutic target structures to be evaluated at the tissue level. Future progress is needed and expected in novel differential diagnostic and predictive markers, in uniform definition of resection margin status and further understanding of molecular and morphological changes in the development of CC. PMID:18773061

  3. Pathology of sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipscomb, T.P.; Harris, Richard K.; Rebar, A.H.; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Haebler, Romona J.; Loughlin, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    In the months following the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), 994 sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from oil-spill-affected areas died (Doroff et al. 1993). Carcasses collected from these areas and otters that died in rehabilitation centers are included in this number. The actual number that died was probably much greater.Within days of the spill, the Exxon Company (USA) funded an effort to rehabilitate oil-contaminated sea otters (Davis 1990). Initially, clinical veterinarians working on the rehabilitation effort performed partial necropsies on some of the sea otters that died. Soon, veterinary pathologists from the University of Alaska and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provided assistance. Later, rehabilitation centers were constructed and other veterinarians with special training in pathology were hired by Exxon to provide diagnostic support.In late April 1989, veterinary pathologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) assumed responsibility for pathologic evaluation of oil-spill-affected sea otters. The USFWS requested assistance from veterinary pathologists of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) in June 1989. Eventually, as part of the Natural Resources Damage Assessment program, AFIP veterinary pathologists were asked to carry out histopathological studies of the tissue specimens collected by all parties and to perform necropsies on carcasses that had been collected and frozen. A veterinary clinical pathologist was requested to assess hematology and clinical chemistry findings in otters that had been held in the rehabilitation centers.In spite of the best efforts of many dedicated people working under extremely difficult conditions, there are significant limitations in the pathological studies. The absence of a detailed necropsy protocol and of full documentation of necropsy findings during the first several weeks after the spill resulted in important data being lost. Often, samples of all major organs were not collected. In some

  4. Pathology of soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Thway, K

    2009-11-01

    Sarcomas are a rare, complex group of childhood and adult neoplasms with differentiation towards mesenchymal tissue, which may arise almost anywhere in the body. Although pathologically diverse, they frequently exhibit similar clinical presentations and radiological features. Correct histopathological diagnosis is therefore crucial, but there is overlap between histological patterns of malignant tumours, between benign and malignant lesions, and with non-mesenchymal tumours. Immunohistochemistry and molecular genetic techniques, the latter to detect tumour-specific alterations, add significantly to histological interpretation, but several groups of tumours still lack reliable immunohistochemical markers or reproducible genetic changes. The classification of sarcomas is incomplete and continues to evolve, and although the biology of many remains relatively poorly understood, our increasing insight into molecular events occurring in these tumours is certain to aid future diagnosis and therapy. This paper aims to give a broad overview of several of the main soft tissue sarcomas from a clinicopathological perspective, discussing laboratory diagnosis and the use and limitations of ancillary investigations, including recent developments in molecular diagnosis.

  5. Applied Pathology for Interventions of Coronary Chronic Total Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phillip; Phan, Hung; Shah, Sara R; Latif, Faisal; Nguyen, Thach

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention of chronically occluded vessels can result in significant improvement in symptoms, relieve myocardial ischemia, and affect a reduction in major adverse cardiac events. Likelihood of achieving successful revascularization can be significantly enhanced with a thorough understanding of the pathology of these occluded coronary arteries. In this chapter, various steps and techniques to cross the CTO lesion and recanalize it are discussed in details.

  6. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    PubMed

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety.

  7. Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee: Recommended ("Best") Practices for Determining, Communicating, and Using Adverse Effect Data from Nonclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Kerlin, Roy; Bolon, Brad; Burkhardt, John; Francke, Sabine; Greaves, Peter; Meador, Vince; Popp, James

    2016-02-01

    Recommendations (best practices) are provided by the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's Adversity Working Group for making consistent interpretations of test article-related effects as "adverse" and assigning a "no observed adverse effect level" (NOAEL) in nonclinical toxicity studies. Adverse is a term indicating "harm" to the test animal, while nonadverse indicates lack of harm. Adverse findings in the study reports should be defined in relation to effects on the test species used and within the context of the given study. Test article-related effects should be described on their own merits, and decisions to consider them as adverse or nonadverse should be justified. Related effects may be discussed together; in particular, markers of toxicity that are not in and of themselves adverse ideally should be discussed in conjunction with the causal toxicity to determine adversity. Adverse findings should be identified in subreports (clinical data, pathology data, etc.) if sufficient information is available, and/or in the final study report as individual or grouped findings, but study NOAELs should be established at the level of the overall study report. Interpretations such as "not biologically relevant" or "not toxicologically important" should be avoided unless defined and supported by scientific rationale. Decisions defining adverse findings and the NOAEL in final study reports should combine the expertise of all contributing scientific disciplines. Where possible, use of NOAELs in data tables should be linked to explanatory text that places them in context. Ideally, in nonclinical summary documents, NOAELs from multiple studies are considered together in defining the most important adverse responses in the most sensitive species. These responses are then considered along with an understanding of their likely mechanisms, as well as other information such as variability in species sensitivity, comparative pathology, reversibility and progression, kinetics, and

  8. Towards a functional pathology of hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Weis, Joachim; Claeys, Kristl G; Roos, Andreas; Azzedine, Hamid; Katona, Istvan; Schröder, J Michael; Senderek, Jan

    2017-04-01

    A growing number of hereditary neuropathies have been assigned to causative gene defects in recent years. The study of human nerve biopsy samples has contributed substantially to the discovery of many of these neuropathy genes. Genotype-phenotype correlations based on peripheral nerve pathology have provided a comprehensive picture of the consequences of these mutations. Intriguingly, several gene defects lead to distinguishable lesion patterns that can be studied in nerve biopsies. These characteristic features include the loss of certain nerve fiber populations and a large spectrum of distinct structural changes of axons, Schwann cells and other components of peripheral nerves. In several instances the lesion patterns are directly or indirectly linked to the known functions of the mutated gene. The present review is designed to provide an overview on these characteristic patterns. It also considers other aspects important for the manifestation and pathology of hereditary neuropathies including the role of inflammation, effects of chemotherapeutic agents and alterations detectable in skin biopsies.

  9. Nontraditional applications in clinical pathology.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Holly L; Register, Thomas C; Tripathi, Niraj K; Bolliger, Anne Provencher; Everds, Nancy; Zelmanovic, David; Poitout, Florence; Bounous, Denise I; Wescott, Debra; Ramaiah, Shashi K

    2014-10-01

    Most published reviews of preclinical toxicological clinical pathology focus on the fundamental aspects of hematology, clinical chemistry, coagulation, and urinalysis in routine toxicology animal species, for example, rats, mice, dogs, and nonhuman primates. The objective of this continuing education course was to present and discuss contemporary examples of nonroutine applications of clinical pathology endpoints used in the drug development setting. Area experts discussed bone turnover markers of laboratory animal species, clinical pathology of pregnant and growing laboratory animals, clinical pathology of nonroutine laboratory animal species, and unique applications of the Siemens Advia(®) hematology analyzer. This article is a summary based on a presentation given at the 31st Annual Symposium of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology, during the Continuing Education Course titled "Nontraditional Applications of Clinical Pathology in Drug Discovery and Preclinical Toxicology."

  10. Recommendations for pathology peer review.

    PubMed

    Morton, Daniel; Sellers, Rani S; Barale-Thomas, Erio; Bolon, Brad; George, Catherine; Hardisty, Jerry F; Irizarry, Armando; McKay, Jennifer S; Odin, Marielle; Teranishi, Munehiro

    2010-12-01

    Pathology peer review verifies and improves the accuracy and quality of pathology diagnoses and interpretations. Pathology peer review is recommended when important risk assessment or business decisions are based on nonclinical studies. For pathology peer review conducted before study completion, the peer-review pathologist reviews sufficient slides and pathology data to assist the study pathologist in refining pathology diagnoses and interpretations. Materials to be reviewed are selected by the peer-review pathologist. Consultations with additional experts or a formal (documented) pathology working group may be used to resolve discrepancies. The study pathologist is solely responsible for the content of the final pathology data and report, makes changes resulting from peer-review discussions, initiates the audit trail for microscopic observations after all changes resulting from peer-review have been made, and signs the final pathologist's report. The peer-review pathologist creates a signed peer-review memo describing the peer-review process and confirming that the study pathologist's report accurately and appropriately reflects the pathology data. The study pathologist also may sign a statement of consensus. It is not necessary to archive working notes created during the peer-review process.

  11. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  12. Rethinking the Measurement of Adversity.

    PubMed

    Mersky, Joshua P; Janczewski, Colleen E; Topitzes, James

    2017-02-01

    Research on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) has unified the study of interrelated risks and generated insights into the origins of disorder and disease. Ten indicators of child maltreatment and household dysfunction are widely accepted as ACEs, but further progress requires a more systematic approach to conceptualizing and measuring ACEs. Using data from a diverse, low-income sample of women who received home visiting services in Wisconsin ( N = 1,241), this study assessed the prevalence of and interrelations among 10 conventional ACEs and 7 potential ACEs: family financial problems, food insecurity, homelessness, parental absence, parent/sibling death, bullying, and violent crime. Associations between ACEs and two outcomes, perceived stress and smoking, were examined. The factor structure and test-retest reliability of ACEs was also explored. As expected, prevalence rates were high compared to studies of more representative samples. Except for parent/sibling death, all ACEs were intercorrelated and associated at the bivariate level with perceived stress and smoking. Exploratory factor analysis confirmed that conventional ACEs loaded on two factors, child maltreatment and household dysfunction, though a more complex four-factor solution emerged once new ACEs were introduced. All ACEs demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability. Implications and future directions toward a second generation of ACE research are discussed.

  13. [Diagnostic significance of pathologic synkinesis for detection of pyramidal pathology].

    PubMed

    Baliasnyĭ, M M

    1991-01-01

    Five types of pathological synkinesis (++blepharo-ocular, ++blepharo-facial, ++bucco-manual, ++digito-digital on the hands, ++pedo-digital) are described. They are of definite importance for revealing pyramidal pathology including its early stages as well as for objective evaluation and observation of the time-course of changes in the illness.

  14. Forest pathology in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forests are characterised by a high degree of endemism, including pathogens as well as their hosts. With the exceptions of koa (Acacia koa Gray), possibly maile (Alyxia oliviformis Gaud.), and, in the past, sandalwood (Santalum spp.), forest species are of little commercial value. On the other hand, these forests are immensely important from a cultural, ecological, and evolutionary standpoint. Forest disease research was lacking during the mid-twentieth century, but increased markedly with the recognition of ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha Gaud.) decline in the 1970s. Because many pathogens are themselves endemic, or are assumed to be, having evolved with their hosts, research emphasis in natural areas is on understanding host-parasite interactions and evolutionary influences, rather than disease control. Aside from management of native forests, attempts at establishing a commercial forest industry have included importation of several species of pine, Araucaria, and Eucalyptus as timber crops, and of numerous ornamentals. Diseases of these species have been introduced with their hosts. The attacking of native species by introduced pathogens is problematic - for example, Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr.) Que??l. on koa and mamane (Sophora chrysophylla (Salisb.) Seem.). Much work remains to be done in both native and commercial aspects of Hawaiian forest pathology.

  15. Rabies: ocular pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Haltia, M; Tarkkanen, A; Kivelä, T

    1989-01-01

    Ocular pathology in the first European case of human bat-borne rabies is described. The patient was a 30-year-old bat scientist who seven weeks after bat bite developed neurological symptoms and died 23 days later. Rabies virus antigens were detected in brain smears. After extensive virological studies the virus turned out to be a rabies-related virus, closely resembling the Duvenhage virus isolated from bats in South Africa in 1980. By light microscopy focal chronic inflammatory infiltration of the ciliary body and of the choroid was found. PAS-positive exudate was seen in the subretinal and in the outer plexiform layers of the retina, and retinal veins showed endothelial damage and perivascular inflammation. Many of the retinal ganglion cells were destroyed. The presence of rabies-related viral antigen in the retinal ganglion cells was shown by positive cytoplasmic immunofluorescence, though electron microscopy failed to identify definite viral structures in the retina. By immunohistochemistry glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in the Müller's cells, which are normally negative for this antigen but express it as a reactive change when the retina is damaged. Synaptophysin, a constituent of presynaptic vesicles of normal retinal neurons, was not detected in the retina. Images PMID:2920157

  16. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies.

  17. Pathology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M; Vidal, E; Marco, A

    2014-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic granulomatous caseous-necrotising inflammatory process that mainly affects the lungs and their draining lymph nodes (Ln.). The pathological changes associated with bTB infection reflect the interplay between the host defence mechanisms and the mycobacterial virulence factors and the balance between the immunologic protective responses and the damaging inflammatory processes. Inhalation is the most common infection route and causes lesions of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract, including its associated lymph nodes. The initial infection (primary complex) may be followed by chronic (post-primary) tuberculosis or may be generalised. Goat tuberculosis often produces liquefactive necrosis and caverns, similarly to human TB. The assessment of the severity of TB lesions is crucial for vaccine trials. Semi-quantitative gross lesion scoring systems have been developed for cattle, but imaging technology has allowed the development of more standardised, objective, and quantitative methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which provides quantitative measures of lesion volume.

  18. Alzheimer's pathology in primary progressive aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Rossor, Martin N.; Warren, Jason D.

    2012-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disorder with language impairment as the primary feature. Different subtypes have been described and the 3 best characterized are progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD) and logopenic/phonological aphasia (LPA). Of these subtypes, LPA is most commonly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. However, the features of PPA associated with AD have not been fully defined. Here we retrospectively identified 14 patients with PPA and either pathologically confirmed AD or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers consistent with AD. Analysis of neurological and neuropsychological features revealed that all patients had a syndrome of LPA with relatively nonfluent spontaneous speech, phonemic errors, and reduced digit span; most patients also had impaired verbal episodic memory. Analysis of the pattern of cortical thinning in these patients revealed left posterior superior temporal, inferior parietal, medial temporal, and posterior cingulate involvement and in patients with more severe disease, increasing involvement of left anterior temporal and frontal cortices and right hemisphere areas in the temporo-parietal junction, posterior cingulate, and medial temporal lobe. We propose that LPA may be a “unihemispheric” presentation of AD, and discuss this concept in relation to accumulating evidence concerning language dysfunction in AD. PMID:20580129

  19. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Infection and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra A; Rey-Jurado, Emma; Gómez, Roberto S; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-08-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is by far the major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTIs) worldwide in infants and children younger than 2 years. The overwhelming number of hospitalizations due to hRSV-induced ALRTI each year is due, at least in part, to the lack of licensed vaccines against this virus. Thus, hRSV infection is considered a major public health problem and economic burden in most countries. The lung pathology developed in hRSV-infected individuals is characterized by an exacerbated proinflammatory and unbalanced Th2-type immune response. In addition to the adverse effects in airway tissues, hRSV infection can also cause neurologic manifestations in the host, such as seizures and encephalopathy. Although the origins of these extrapulmonary symptoms remain unclear, studies with patients suffering from neurological alterations suggest an involvement of the inflammatory response against hRSV. Furthermore, hRSV has evolved numerous mechanisms to modulate and evade the immune response in the host. Several studies have focused on elucidating the interactions between hRSV virulence factors and the host immune system, to rationally design new vaccines and therapies against this virus. Here, we discuss about the infection, pathology, and immune response triggered by hRSV in the host.

  20. Autopsy Renal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2014-09-01

    We provide an overview of assessment of the kidneys at autopsy, with special considerations for pediatric versus adult kidneys. We describe the approach to gross examination, tissue allocation when needed for additional studies of potential medical renal disease, the spectrum of congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and urinary tract, and approach to cystic diseases of the kidney. We also discuss common lesions seen at autopsy, including acute tubular injury, ischemic versus toxic contributions to this injury, interstitial nephritis, and common vascular diseases. Infections commonly involve the kidney at autopsy, and the key features and differential diagnoses are also discussed.

  1. Hospital deaths and adverse events in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse events are considered a major international problem related to the performance of health systems. Evaluating the occurrence of adverse events involves, as any other outcome measure, determining the extent to which the observed differences can be attributed to the patient's risk factors or to variations in the treatment process, and this in turn highlights the importance of measuring differences in the severity of the cases. The current study aims to evaluate the association between deaths and adverse events, adjusted according to patient risk factors. Methods The study is based on a random sample of 1103 patient charts from hospitalizations in the year 2003 in 3 teaching hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology involved a retrospective review of patient charts in two stages - screening phase and evaluation phase. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between hospital deaths and adverse events. Results The overall mortality rate was 8.5%, while the rate related to the occurrence of an adverse event was 2.9% (32/1103) and that related to preventable adverse events was 2.3% (25/1103). Among the 94 deaths analyzed, 34% were related to cases involving adverse events, and 26.6% of deaths occurred in cases whose adverse events were considered preventable. The models tested showed good discriminatory capacity. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR 11.43) and the odds ratio adjusted for patient risk factors (OR 8.23) between death and preventable adverse event were high. Conclusions Despite discussions in the literature regarding the limitations of evaluating preventable adverse events based on peer review, the results presented here emphasize that adverse events are not only prevalent, but are associated with serious harm and even death. These results also highlight the importance of risk adjustment and multivariate models in the study of adverse events. PMID:21929810

  2. Hypertext atlas of fetal and neonatal pathology.

    PubMed

    Jezová, Marta; Múcková, Katarína; Soucek, Ondrej; Feit, Josef; Vlasín, Pavel

    2008-07-15

    Hypertext atlas of fetal and neonatal pathology is a free resource for pregraduate students of medicine, pathologists and other health professionals dealing with prenatal medicine. The atlas can be found at http://www.muni.cz/atlases. The access is restricted to registered users. Concise texts summarize the gross and microscopic pathology, etiology, and clinical signs of both common and rare fetal and neonatal conditions. The texts are illustrated with over 300 images that are accompanied by short comments. The atlas offers histological pictures of high quality. Virtual microscope interface is used to access the high-resolution histological images. Fetal ultrasound video clips are included. Case studies integrate clinical history, prenatal ultrasonographic examination, gross pathology and histological features. The atlas is available in English (and Czech) and equipped with an active index. The atlas is suitable both for medical students and pathologists as a teaching and reference tool. The atlas is going to be further expanded while keeping the high quality of the images.

  3. New Trends of Emerging Technologies in Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Gloria; Fernández-Carrobles, M Milagro; Deniz, Oscar; García-Rojo, Marcial

    2016-01-01

    The future paradigm of pathology will be digital. Instead of conventional microscopy, a pathologist will perform a diagnosis through interacting with images on computer screens and performing quantitative analysis. The fourth generation of virtual slide telepathology systems, so-called virtual microscopy and whole-slide imaging (WSI), has allowed for the storage and fast dissemination of image data in pathology and other biomedical areas. These novel digital imaging modalities encompass high-resolution scanning of tissue slides and derived technologies, including automatic digitization and computational processing of whole microscopic slides. Moreover, automated image analysis with WSI can extract specific diagnostic features of diseases and quantify individual components of these features to support diagnoses and provide informative clinical measures of disease. Therefore, the challenge is to apply information technology and image analysis methods to exploit the new and emerging digital pathology technologies effectively in order to process and model all the data and information contained in WSI. The final objective is to support the complex workflow from specimen receipt to anatomic pathology report transmission, that is, to improve diagnosis both in terms of pathologists' efficiency and with new information. This article reviews the main concerns about and novel methods of digital pathology discussed at the latest workshop in the field carried out within the European project AIDPATH (Academia and Industry Collaboration for Digital Pathology).

  4. Pathology of peliosis.

    PubMed

    Tsokos, Michael; Erbersdobler, Andreas

    2005-04-20

    Peliosis is a pathological entity characterized by the gross appearance of multiple cyst-like, blood-filled cavities within parenchymatous organs. Peliosis has been related to several underlying debilitating illnesses such as tuberculosis, hematological malignancies, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and post-transplant immunodeficiency, as well as intravenous drug abuse, chronic alcoholism, and in conjunction with the intake of oral contraceptives or steroids. The classical pathoanatomical concept is based upon the opinion that peliosis exclusively develops in organs belonging to the mononuclear phagocytic system (liver, spleen, bone marrow, and lymph nodes). However, a paucity of studies indicates that other organs such as lungs, parathyroid glands, and kidneys may be affected too. Concerning the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of onset and maintenance of peliosis, the morphological data obtained by different investigators suggest that there is more than one path of formal pathogenesis (e.g., congenital malformation of vessels manifesting under altered local intravascular pressure conditions, acquired vascular disorder triggered by toxic noxae, active proliferation of vessels corresponding to the benign end on the spectrum of neoplastic vascular lesions). In the liver, at gross inspection, the peliotic lesions give the cut sections a "swiss cheese" appearance. Microscopically, two different types of peliosis can be distinguished in the liver: (1) "parenchymal peliosis" consisting of irregular cavities that are neither lined by sinusoidal cells nor by fibrous tissue, and (2) "phlebectatic peliosis" characterized by regular, spherical cavities lined by endothelium and/or fibrosis. One of the differential diagnoses that most closely resembles peliosis hepatis is secondary hepatic congestion due to veno-occlusive disease or the Budd-Chiari syndrome. In the spleen, the peliotic lesions may be arranged sporadically, disseminated, or in clusters in an

  5. [Corticotherapy and mucocutaneous pathology].

    PubMed

    Kuffer, R

    1975-01-01

    The tremendous advances in treatment brought about by corticotherapy applied to cutaneo-mucosal pathology should not be allowed to obscure the fact that its action is merely palliative, that it should only be proceeded with after careful diagnosis and that it may trigger undesirable side-effects. General corticotherapy is definitely indicated in certain serious dermatoses (e.g. pemphigus vulgaris) in large doses at the beginning of the course of treatment which often has to be kept up indefinitely; it is in these patients that the most serious accidents occur. It is also indicated in other dermatoses (e.g. lichen planus) in smaller doses and in separate courses, generally triggering incidents and accidents of a less serious nature which to a certain extent seem to be attenuated by taking the drug on alternate days. It is counter-indicated in one particular condition: psoriasis. Corticotherapy by intra- and sub-lesional local injection is most useful in the treatment of certain localised skin lesions (e.g. cheloids) and of the oral mucosa (e.g. erosive lichen planus). Either a few drops are injected or a larger quantity in a suspension of microcrystals. Complications have sometimes been observed in the skin (leukoderma, dermoepidermatrophia and, particularly, amaurosis), but never so far after sub-mucosal injections. Local corticotherapy by external application, very widely used in the form of ointments, creams and lotions for numerous cutaneous conditions may cause various more or less serious local side-effects, the systemic effects with depression of the hypophyso-adrenal axis, only seem to occur to any extent with occlusive dressings. It can also be used in the treatment of some conditions of the oral mucosa (e.g. some forms of lichen planus, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid) by means of either a corticosteroid incorporated into a special excipient which adheres to the mucous membrane or in tablets of 17-betamethasone valerate which gradually break up in the

  6. [The use of human immunoglobulins--adverse reactions].

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Zwonarz, Katarzyna

    2010-09-01

    The primary immunodeficiency, mainly humoral immunity, secondary immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases are the indications for immunoglobulins substitution. The prolonged substitution in primary immunodeficiency includes regular intravenous infusion of immunoglobulins in 0.4-0.6 g/kg of body weight every 21-28 days. The purpose of such substitution is decrease of frequency and diminishes the clinical course of infections. The high-dose use of immunoglobulins (1-2 g/kg body weight) is preferred in autoimmune diseases based on suppressive and anti-inflammatory activity of immunoglobulins. The subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulins is an alternative to intravenous way, but the singular dose (0.1 g/kg body weight) is too low for suppressive and anti-inflammatory activity of immunoglobulins, so this substitution is indicated in primary immunodeficiency only. The adverse events of immunoglobulins differentiate because of time of occurrence and clinical character. The rapid symptoms occurred just after beginning of infusion and often present the clinical features of anaphylactoid reaction. During the infusion the occurring adverse symptoms are mild and the life-threatening situations are very rare. The next periods of typical adverse reaction are 24-48 hrs after infusion, 72 hrs and later. The mechanisms leading to adverse reaction to immunoglobulins are based on presence of IgG dimmers, stimulating high production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by immunocompetent cells. High level of cytokines is associated with high fever, chills, flu-like symptoms, feeling malaise and sick. The reaction of anti-IgA antibodies present in patient serum with IgA in immunoglobulins preparation is responsible for moderate and severe adverse clinical symptoms. The late adverse events present the symptoms of aseptic meningo-encephalitis. In case of adverse events the stopping of infusion, additions saline/ glucose infusion, anti-histaminic drugs of I and II generation and steroids

  7. Digital pathology and anatomic pathology laboratory information system integration to support digital pathology sign-out

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huazhang; Birsa, Joe; Farahani, Navid; Hartman, Douglas J.; Piccoli, Anthony; O’Leary, Matthew; McHugh, Jeffrey; Nyman, Mark; Stratman, Curtis; Kvarnstrom, Vanja; Yousem, Samuel; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adoption of digital pathology offers benefits over labor-intensive, time-consuming, and error-prone manual processes. However, because most workflow and laboratory transactions are centered around the anatomical pathology laboratory information system (APLIS), adoption of digital pathology ideally requires integration with the APLIS. A digital pathology system (DPS) integrated with the APLIS was recently implemented at our institution for diagnostic use. We demonstrate how such integration supports digital workflow to sign-out anatomical pathology cases. Methods: Workflow begins when pathology cases get accessioned into the APLIS (CoPathPlus). Glass slides from these cases are then digitized (Omnyx VL120 scanner) and automatically uploaded into the DPS (Omnyx® Integrated Digital Pathology (IDP) software v.1.3). The APLIS transmits case data to the DPS via a publishing web service. The DPS associates scanned images with the correct case using barcode labels on slides and information received from the APLIS. When pathologists remotely open a case in the DPS, additional information (e.g. gross pathology details, prior cases) gets retrieved from the APLIS through a query web service. Results: Following validation of this integration, pathologists at our institution have signed out more than 1000 surgical pathology cases in a production environment. Integration between the APLIS and DPS enabled pathologists to review digital slides while simultaneously having access to pertinent case metadata. The introduction of a digital workflow eliminated costly manual tasks involving matching of glass slides and avoided delays waiting for glass slides to be delivered. Conclusion: Integrating the DPS and APLIS were instrumental for successfully implementing a digital solution at our institution for pathology sign-out. The integration streamlined our digital sign-out workflow, diminished the potential for human error related to matching slides, and improved the sign

  8. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management.

  9. Clinico-Pathological Correlations of the Most Common Neurodegenerative Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Taipa, Ricardo; Pinho, João; Melo-Pires, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative dementias are a group of neurological disorders characterized by deterioration in several cognitive domains in which there is selective and progressive loss of specific populations of neurons. The precise neurobiological basis for the different neurodegenerative dementias remains unknown. It is expected that different pathologies reflect different mechanisms, at least early in the neurodegeneration process. The next decades promise treatments directed to causes and mechanisms, bringing an outstanding challenge to clinicians due to heterogeneous clinical presentations with the same molecular pathology. The purpose of this brief review is to describe the key neuropathological features of the most common neurodegenerative dementias (Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease dementia, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration) and the relationship with the clinical syndromes described in clinico-pathological studies. We expect this overview contributes for the understanding of this broad topic integrating the two ends of the spectrum: clinical and pathological. PMID:22557993

  10. Transient mutism and pathologic laughter in the course of cerebellitis.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Petia S; Bojinova, Veneta S; Milanov, Ivan G

    2009-07-01

    The phenomenon of cerebellar mutism with subsequent dysarthria is most commonly described as a part of posterior fossa syndrome after surgery for neoplasms in childhood. Pathologic laughter, on the other hand, is observed primarily in various neurologic diseases in adults. In the present case, a child manifested transient mutism and pathologic laughter during a severe cerebellitis. Headache, vertigo, and impaired consciousness developed during an acute respiratory infection. Thereafter, severe ataxia, mutism, and involuntary laughter became the main clinical features, as well as pyramidal signs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cerebellar swelling and T(2) hyperintensity. During steroid treatment, a gradual vanishing of the pathologic laughter and improvement of the motor and speech functions occurred. Recovery was slow and incomplete, and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebellar atrophy. This case confirms that mutism is a rare, but possible, manifestation in acute parainfectious cerebellitis and provides a novel example of pathologic laughter during this disease in childhood.

  11. Interpersonal perception of pathological narcissism: a social relations analysis.

    PubMed

    Lukowitsky, Mark R; Pincus, Aaron L

    2013-01-01

    Impairments in self and interpersonal functioning are core features of personality pathology. Clinical theory and research indicate that compromised self-awareness and distorted interpersonal perceptions are particularly prominent in individuals exhibiting pathological narcissism and Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Therefore we conducted a study to gain a better understanding of interpersonal perception of pathological narcissism. A large sample (N=437) of moderately acquainted individuals assigned to 1 of 93 small mixed-sex groups completed self- and informant ratings on the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) in a round-robin design. The social relations model (SRM) was used to partition the variance in dyadic ratings to investigate several hypotheses about interpersonal perception of pathological narcissism. SRM analyses demonstrated evidence of assimilation (the tendency to perceive and rate others similarly) and consensus (the extent to which multiple observers form similar impressions of another person) in interpersonal perception of pathological narcissism. Results also indicated modest self-other agreement and assumed similarity (the tendency for people to perceive others as similar to themselves) for PNI higher order factors and subscale ratings. Finally, results suggested that individuals high in pathological narcissism had some awareness of how peers would rate them (metaperception) but believed that others would rate them similarly to how they rated themselves.

  12. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed Central

    Reason, J

    1995-01-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  13. Strategic approaches to adverse outcome pathway development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are conceptual frameworks for organizing biological and toxicological knowledge in a manner that supports extrapolation of data pertaining to the initiation or early progression of toxicity to an apical adverse outcome that occurs at a level of org...

  14. The Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine: The Most Widely Read Pathology Journal Today.

    PubMed

    Allen, Timothy Craig

    2016-09-01

    The Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine was first published in 1926 as a subspecialty journal of the American Medical Association. It became the official journal of the College of American Pathologists in 1995. Under the dynamic leadership of its most recent editor-in-chief, Philip T. Cagle, MD, and his vibrant editorial board, the Archives has nearly doubled its impact factor and become the most widely read general pathology journal today. Dr Cagle has consistently added leading pathologists to the editorial board, and the collective expertise of these individuals is clearly evident in new, cutting-edge journal masthead sections. The Archives has featured innovative content in the field of digital pathology, including articles on the utilization of smart phones in pathology and incorporation of whole-slide images and videos into the content of articles. Special sections have characterized the Archives during the current editorial board's tenure and have proven immensely popular with the journal's readership. As the Archives celebrates its 90th anniversary, its editorial board remains committed to providing insightful and relevant medical knowledge. The journal's open access Web site ( www.archivesofpathology.org ) allows the dissemination of this knowledge to every corner of the globe at no expense to those who wish to be educated or improve their medical practice.

  15. Objective pathological diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.R.; Watkins, G.; Lam, N.V.; Tsuda, H.; Hermann, C.; Johal, J.; Liu, H.

    1981-05-08

    Pertinent pathological features of lungs obtained at autopsies from 99 coal miners were compared with those observed in the lungs of 268 male town dwellers of comparable age who were not occupationally related to the coal mining or other industries at risk for development of pneumoconiosis. The degree of anthracotic pigment deposition and severity of type of pigmented lesion with its accompanying reticulum fiber formation and fibrosis were significantly greater in lungs of miners. There was a high degree of overlap in degrees of pigment deposition, particularly those quantitated as grades 1 and 2 and in lesions regarded as types 1 and 2. The greatest divergence was observed for prevalence of nodular pulmonary lesions (type 4). There was also a considerable divergence in the type 3 alteration characterized by nonnodular aggregates of carbon-laden macrophages accompanied by minimal reactive fibrosis. It appears that an objective pathological diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis can be rendered only by the demonstration of type 4 lesions. Approximately 25% of coal miners exhibited unequivocal features of CWP. No significant differences concerning incidence or types of emphysema or frequency of chronic cor pulmonale were encountered between the two populations.

  16. Objective pathological diagnosis of coal worker's pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.R.; Watkins, G.; Lam, N.V.; Tsuda, H.; Hermann, C.; Johal, J.; Liu, H.

    1981-05-08

    Pertinent pathological features of lungs obtained at autopsies from 99 coal miners were compared with those observed in the lungs of 268 male town dwellers of comparable age who were not occupationally related to the coal mining or other industries at risk for development of pneumoconiosis. The degree of anthracotic pigment deposition and severity of type of pigmented lesion with its accompanying reticulum fiber formation and fibrosis were significantly greater in lungs of miners. There was a high degree of overlap in degree of pigment deposition, particularly those quantitated as grades 1 and 2 and in lesions regarded as types 1 and 2. The greatest divergence was observed for prevalence of nodular pulmonary lesions (type 4). There was also a considerable divergence in the type 3 alteration characterized by nonnodular aggregates of carbon-laden macrophages accompanied by minimal reactive fibrosis. It appears that an objective pathological diagnosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) can be rendered only by the demonstration of type 4 lesions. Approximately 25% of coal miners exhibited unequivocal features of CWP. No significant differences concerning incidence or types of emphysema or frequency of chronic cor pulmonale were encountered between the two populations.

  17. Assessment of breast pathologies using nonlinear microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yuankai K.; Shen, Dejun; Sheikine, Yuri; Ahsen, Osman O.; Wang, Helen H.; Schmolze, Daniel B.; Johnson, Nicole B.; Brooker, Jeffrey S.; Cable, Alex E.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid intraoperative assessment of breast excision specimens is clinically important because up to 40% of patients undergoing breast-conserving cancer surgery require reexcision for positive or close margins. We demonstrate nonlinear microscopy (NLM) for the assessment of benign and malignant breast pathologies in fresh surgical specimens. A total of 179 specimens from 50 patients was imaged with NLM using rapid extrinsic nuclear staining with acridine orange and intrinsic second harmonic contrast generation from collagen. Imaging was performed on fresh, intact specimens without the need for fixation, embedding, and sectioning required for conventional histopathology. A visualization method to aid pathological interpretation is presented that maps NLM contrast from two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic signals to features closely resembling histopathology using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Mosaicking is used to overcome trade-offs between resolution and field of view, enabling imaging of subcellular features over square-centimeter specimens. After NLM examination, specimens were processed for standard paraffin-embedded histology using a protocol that coregistered histological sections to NLM images for paired assessment. Blinded NLM reading by three pathologists achieved 95.4% sensitivity and 93.3% specificity, compared with paraffin-embedded histology, for identifying invasive cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ versus benign breast tissue. Interobserver agreement was κ = 0.88 for NLM and κ = 0.89 for histology. These results show that NLM achieves high diagnostic accuracy, can be rapidly performed on unfixed specimens, and is a promising method for intraoperative margin assessment. PMID:25313045

  18. Pathology of chronic mountain sickness

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Stella, Javier; Krüger, Hever; Recavarren, Sixto

    1973-01-01

    Arias-Stella, J., Krüger, H., and Recavarren, S. (1973).Thorax, 28, 701-708. Pathology of chronic mountain sickness. Pathological data on chronic mountain sickness are scarce due to the fact that the disease is ameliorated or cured by descent to a low altitude. In this report we describe a case of chronic mountain sickness occurring in a woman of 48 years at Cerro de Pasco (4,300 m above sea level). The necropsy findings are compared with the limited pathological observations reported by others. It is apparent from our findings that in fatal cases the main changes are located within the pulmonary circulation. So far histological studies have been reported only in cases of the secondary form of chronic mountain sickness. The basic pathology of the primary form (Monge's disease) remains to be defined. Images PMID:4787982

  19. [Methods and methodology of pathology].

    PubMed

    Lushnikov, E F

    2016-01-01

    The lecture gives the state-of-the-art of the methodology of human pathology that is an area of the scientific and practice activity of specialists to produce and systematize objective knowledge of pathology and to use the knowledge in clinical medicine. It considers the objects and subjects of an investigation, materials and methods of a pathologist, and the results of his/her work.

  20. Imaging spectrum of pediatric corpus callosal pathology: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hyun Yoo, Jeong; Hunter, Jill

    2013-04-01

    A wide spectrum of pediatric corpus callosal diseases can occur in the pediatric age group. Cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of these patients. We reviewed our imaging record and collected cases of corpus callosal pathology. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the imaging features of various corpus callosal lesions encountered in children.

  1. Synergistic childhood adversities and complex adult psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Karen T; Harris, William W; Putnam, Frank W

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies find a cumulative effect of different types of childhood adversities on increasing risk for serious adult mental and medical outcomes. This study uses the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication sample to investigate the cumulative impact of 8 childhood adversities on complex adult psychopathology as indexed by (a) number of lifetime diagnoses according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994); (b) number of 4 DSM-IV disorder categories (mood, anxiety, impulse control, and substance abuse disorders); and (c) coexistence of internalizing and externalizing disorders. Seven of the 8 childhood adversities were significantly associated with complex adult psychopathology. Individuals with 4 or more childhood adversities had an odds ratio of 7.3, 95% confidence interval [4.7, 11.7] for 4 disorder categories. Additive and multiplicative synergistic effects increasing adult psychopathology were found for specific pairwise combinations of childhood adversities. Synergistic patterns differed by gender suggesting that women are more impacted by sexual abuse and men by economic hardship. The absence of childhood adversities was protective, in that it significantly decreased an individual's risk for subsequent adult mental illness. The results support the clinical impression that increased childhood adversity is associated with more complex adult psychopathology.

  2. [Management of adverse effects with antituberculosis chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Wada, Masako

    2011-02-01

    Tuberculosis has now become a curable disease with chemotherapy. So it is natural that the present issues in tuberculosis management are focused on how to complete standard chemotherapy. In this context, management of adverse effects constitutes an essential part of antituberculosis chemotherapy, as well as directly observed therapy. In this symposium, discussions were held about three major subjects on this issue. First, hepatotoxicity develops frequently and has sometimes fatal outcome, which makes it the most problematic adverse effect. "Management of hepatotoxicity during antituberculosis chemotherapy" was published by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis (JST) in 2006. Dr. Shinsho Yoshiba evaluated this recommendation and pointed out that the criteria for discontinuation of drug based on AST, ALT and bilirubin levels is too sensitive and the concept of predicting fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is lacking. He stressed the importance of monitoring serum prothrombin time for predicting FHF. Next, allergic drug reaction such as fever or skin rash often causes distress, although rarely fatal. As isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP) are key drugs for the cure, readministration of these drugs is often attempted by desensitization therapy. "Recommendation about desensitization therapy of antituberculosis drugs" was also published by JST in 1997. Dr. Yoshihiro Kobashi reported high success rates of 79 percent for INH and 75 percent for RFP according to this recommendation. He also reported correlated factor with the success, such as the longer period from the discontinuation to the desensitization therapy and lower doses of drugs at starting desensitization. Finally, we sometimes experience transient worsening of radiographical findings and general symptoms during antituberculosis chemotherapy. This is presumed to be due to allergic reaction to dead bacilli without requiring discontinuation of the drug. Differential diagnosis includes drug-induced pneumonia requring

  3. CBT for eating disorders: The impact of early changes in eating pathology on later changes in personality pathology, anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Turner, Hannah; Marshall, Emily; Wood, Francesca; Stopa, Lusia; Waller, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    Whilst studies have consistently identified early symptom reduction as an important predictor of treatment outcome, the impact of early change on common comorbid features has not been investigated. This study of CBT for eating disorders explored patterns of early change in eating pathology and longer-term change in personality pathology, anxiety and depression. It also explored the impact of early change in eating pathology on overall change in personality pathology, anxiety and depression. Participants were 179 adults diagnosed with eating disorders who were offered a course of CBT in an out-patient community eating disorders service in the UK. Patients completed a measure of eating disorder psychopathology at the start of treatment and following the 6th session. They also completed measures of personality disorder cognitions, anxiety and depression at the start and end of treatment. There were significant changes in eating pathology over the first six sessions of treatment. Significant improvements were also seen in personality disorder pathology, anxiety and depression by the end of therapy. Effect sizes were medium to large for both completer and intention to treat analyses. Early changes in eating pathology were associated with later changes in common comorbid features, with early reduction in restraint being a key predictor. These findings demonstrate that early symptom change can be achieved in CBT for eating disorders when delivered in routine clinical practice. Such change has long-term benefits that go beyond the domain of eating pathology, enhancing change in personality pathology, anxiety and depression.

  4. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  5. Advances in the pathology of penile carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of penile cancer varies from country to country, with the highest figures reported for countries in Africa, South America, and Asia and lowest in the United States and Europe. Causes of this variation are not clear, but they are thought to be related to human papillomavirus infection, smoking, lack of circumcision, chronic inflammation, and poor genital hygiene. Most penile tumors are squamous cell carcinomas, and a variegated spectrum of distinct morphologies is currently recognized. Each one of these subtypes has distinctive pathologic and clinical features. About half of penile carcinomas are usual squamous cell carcinomas, and the rest corresponds to verrucous, warty, basaloid, warty-basaloid, papillary, pseudohyperplastic, pseudoglandular, adenosquamous, sarcomatoid, and cuniculatum carcinomas. Previous studies have found a consistent association of tumor cell morphology and human papillomavirus presence in penile carcinomas. Those tumors composed of small- to intermediate-sized, basaloid ("blue") cells are often human papillomavirus positive, whereas human papillomavirus prevalence is lower in tumors showing large, keratinizing, maturing eosinophilic ("pink") cells. Human papillomavirus-related tumors affect younger patients, whereas human papillomavirus-unrelated tumors are seen in older patients with phimosis, lichen sclerosus, or squamous hyperplasia. This morphologic distinctiveness is also observed in penile intraepithelial neoplasia. The specific aim of this review is to provide a detailed discussion on the macroscopic and microscopic features of all major subtypes of penile cancer. We also discuss the role of pathologic features in the prognosis of penile cancer, the characteristics of penile precursor lesions, and the use of immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of invasive and precursor lesions.

  6. [Adverse Event Trends Associated with Over-the-counter Drugs: Data Mining of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    PubMed

    Umetsu, Ryogo; Abe, Junko; Ueda, Natsumi; Kato, Yamato; Nakayama, Yoko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs play an important role in self-medication. To ensure patient safety, pharmacists should ask patients to pay attention to possible adverse events (AE) associated with OTC drugs and educate patients about the symptoms related to those AEs. The aims of the present study were as follows: (1) to assess the tendency of AEs to occur with OTC drug use in Japan; (2) to detect a safety signal for OTC drugs using the reporting odds ratio (ROR); and (3) to evaluate clustery features, which include suspected drugs and therapeutic classifications, and safety signal indices (number of reports and the ROR), using cluster analysis. The number of reports of AEs following use of combination cold remedy, antipyretic and analgesic remedy, and herbal medicine was 1007, 566, and 221, respectively. We set the cluster number at five; clustery features obtained were as follows: (1) high reporting rate for skin and subcutaneous tissue disorder AEs was the largest group related to combination cold remedy; (2) high reporting rate for nervous system disorder AEs including dizziness was the second largest group. The same medicinal ingredient may demonstrate similar tendencies of the occurrence of AEs and similar clustery features in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database. Our analysis of AEs associated with OTC drugs may be useful for pharmacists and patients alike. Further studies are required to draw better-informed conclusions.

  7. [Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. Risks and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Voigt, N; Heijman, J; Dobrev, D

    2014-03-01

    Adverse side effects of drugs are a significantly underestimated problem in modern medicine. In this review article, we summarize common adverse side effects of cardiovascular drugs. In particular, we highlight the factors promoting these adverse side effects in patients, including reduced hepatic or renal clearance in elderly patients that often requires dosage adjustment. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs (e.g. through the cytochrome P450 system or P-glycoproteins) can modify the plasma concentration of many compounds, thereby also increasing the likelihood of unwanted side effects. The most prominent cardiac side effects include arrhythmias, e.g. atrioventricular (AV) block, drug-induced long-QT syndrome and torsade de pointes and altered inotropy. Non-cardiac side effects are subsequently discussed grouped by drug class. A better understanding of the risks and side effects of cardiovascular drugs is expected to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with adverse side effects.

  8. Childhood adversities and psychosis: evidence, challenges, implications

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Craig; Gayer‐Anderson, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    There is a substantial body of research reporting evidence of associations between various forms of childhood adversity and psychosis, across the spectrum from experiences to disorder. This has been extended, more recently, to include studies of cumulative effects, of interactions with other factors, of specific effects, and of putative biological and psychological mechanisms. In this paper we evaluate this research and highlight the remaining methodological issues and gaps that temper, but do not dismiss, conclusions about the causal role of childhood adversity. We also consider the emerging work on cumulative, synergistic, and specific effects and on mechanisms; and discuss the broader implications of this line of research for our understanding of psychosis. We conclude that the current balance of evidence is that childhood adversities – particularly exposure to multiple adversities involving hostility and threat – do, in some people, contribute to the onset of psychotic experiences and psychotic disorders. PMID:27265690

  9. Childhood adversity: a review of measurement instruments.

    PubMed

    Burgermeister, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Measurement instruments are needed to stimulate research on the long-term outcomes of childhood adversity. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to locate, describe, and assess instruments to measure retrospective perceptions of childhood adversity. An electronic search of instruments was conducted using a combination of keywords that included child maltreatment, child trauma, and childhood stressful events. Nine instruments were located and described according to format, definition of childhood adversity as measured by the instrument, characteristics of the sample used in development and testing, reliability and validity evidence, and feasibility for use. Six out of the nine instruments were suitable for investigators who require a comprehensive measure of childhood adversity. Corroboration with independent sources and use of randomized samples are needed to improve upon reports of validity.

  10. RACIAL RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION AND ADVERSE BIRTH OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION. The disparity between black and white women's adverse birth outcomes has been subject to much investigation, yet the factors underlying its persistence remain elusive, which has encouraged research on neighborhood-level influences, including racial residential segr...

  11. Adverse Outcome Pathways: From Definition to Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge for both human health and ecological toxicologists is the transparent application of mechanistic (e.g., molecular, biochemical, histological) data to risk assessments. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework designed to meet this need. Specifical...

  12. Design of Adverse Drug Events-Scorecards.

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Chazard, Emmanuel; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Hackl, Werner; Băceanu, Adrian; Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of Adverse Drug Event-Scorecards. The scorecards described are innovative and novel, not having previously been reported in the literature. The Scorecards provide organizations (e.g. hospitals) with summary information about Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) using a Web-based platform. The data used in the Scorecards are routinely updated and report on ADEs detected through data mining processes. The development of the ADE Scorecards is ongoing and they are currently undergoing clinical testing.

  13. [Allergies and adverse events associated with fluoroquinolones].

    PubMed

    Muller, Y; Andrey, D; Emonet, S; Harr, T; Spoerl, D

    2015-04-08

    The prescription ot fluoroquinolones has been constantly increasing over the past decade. consequently, an increasing number of hyper-sensitivity reactions and adverse events have been reported. The aim of the review is to discuss the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions either IgE (immediate) or T cells mediated (delayed). We will make an overview ofthe diagnostic tools available to detect such hypersensitivity reactions. Finally, the specific adverse events associated with fluoroquinolones, including tendinopathy, chondrotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy or retinal detachment will be discussed.

  14. Childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations.

    PubMed

    Fiddler, Maggie; Jackson, Judy; Kapur, Navneet; Wells, Adrian; Creed, Francis

    2004-01-01

    We assessed possible psychological mediators of the relationship between childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations among new outpatients at neurology, cardiology, and gastroenterology clinics. We assessed whether these differed in patients with and without organic disease that explained their symptoms. At first clinic visit we recorded Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS--anxiety and depression subscale scores), Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ--four subscales: consequences, cure, identity, timeline), Health Anxiety Questionnaire (total score), and Symptom Amplification Scale (total score). Subjects were divided into two groups according to whether they had experienced any type of childhood adversity using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Schedule. Outcome was the (log) number of medical consultations for 12 months before and 6 months after the index clinic visits. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine mediators; this was performed separately for patients with symptoms explained and not explained by organic disease. One-hundred and twenty-nine patients (61% response) were interviewed. Fifty-two (40.3%) had experienced childhood adversity; they made a median of 16 doctor visits compared with 10 for those without adversity (adjusted P=.026). IPQ identity score (number of symptoms attributed to the illness) and HAD depression scores were significantly associated with both childhood adversity and number of medical consultations and these variables acted as mediators between childhood adversity and frequency of consultation in the multiple regression analyses. This association was limited to patients with medically unexplained symptoms and was mediated by IPQ Identity Score (number of symptoms attributed to the patient's illness) and HAD depression score. Sexual abuse and overt neglect were the adversities most closely associated with frequent consultations. In patients with medically unexplained symptoms the association

  15. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalized Colombian children

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Agudelo, Daniela; Burgos-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Vaca, Claudia; Serrano-Meriño, Dolores Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The occurrence of adverse drug reactions is an important issue due to the lack of drug safety data in children. Objective: To describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Methods: A prospective cohort study based on intensive pharmacovigilance was conducted during six months in order to monitor the emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatients children under 6 years of age with at least one medication prescribed. The study was conducted in two pediatric wards of two hospitals located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Naranjo´s Algorithm was used to evaluate imputability, the modified Hartwig and Siegel assessment scale to establish severity and the Schumock and Thornton criteria to determine preventability. Results: Of a total of 772 monitored patients, 156 Adverse Drug Reactions were detected on 147 children. The cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions was 19.0% (147/772); the incidence density was 37.6 Adverse Drug Reactions per 1,000 patients-days (147/3,913). The frequency was higher in children under 2 years of age (12.7%). Emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions was higher in male patients (RR= 1.66; 95% CI= 1.22-2.22, p= 0.001) and in those who used systemic antibiotics (RR= 1.82; 95% CI= 1.17-2.82, p= 0.005). Conclusions: Adverse Drug Reactions are common among hospitalized children and represent an additional burden of morbidity and risk, particularly in those who used several medicines, including antibiotics. PMID:27821893

  16. Communication skills in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Bosman, Fred T

    2016-01-01

    Communication is an essential element of good medical practice also in pathology. In contrast to technical or diagnostic skills, communication skills are not easy to define, teach, or assess. Rules almost do not exist. In this paper, which has a rather personal character and cannot be taken as a set of guidelines, important aspects of communication in pathology are explored. This includes what should be communicated to the pathologist on the pathology request form, communication between pathologists during internal (interpathologist) consultation, communication around frozen section diagnoses, modalities of communication of a final diagnosis, with whom and how critical and unexpected findings should be communicated, (in-)adequate routes of communication for pathology diagnoses, who will (or might) receive pathology reports, and what should be communicated and how in case of an error or a technical problem. An earlier more formal description of what the responsibilities are of a pathologist as communicator and as collaborator in a medical team is added in separate tables. The intention of the paper is to stimulate reflection and discussion rather than to formulate strict rules.

  17. Recognizing and reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L. M.; Colley, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Although physicians in practice are most likely to see patients with adverse drug reactions, they may fail to recognize an adverse effect or to attribute it to a drug effect and, when recognized, they may fail to report serious reactions to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To recognize and attribute an adverse event to a drug effect, physicians should review the patient's clinical course, looking at patient risk factors, the known adverse reactions to the suspected drug, and the likelihood of a causal relationship between the drug and the adverse event-based on the temporal relationship, response to stopping or restarting the drug, and whether other factors could explain the reaction. Once an adverse drug reaction has been identified, the patient should be informed and appropriate documentation made in the patient's medical record. Serious known reactions and all reactions to newly released drugs or those not previously known to occur (even if the certainty is low) should be reported to the FDA. PMID:1536067

  18. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: a clinico-radio-pathological dilemma.

    PubMed

    Hada, M S; Sable, M; Kane, S V; Pai, Prathamesh S; Juvekar, S L

    2014-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign neoplasm of mandible in adults. The presentation of this entity is varied and often confused with a variety of mucosal and jaw lesions and clinical, radiological, and pathological feature of CEOT often-mimic malignancy. The objective of this report is to highlight the clinical features and radiological findings which should arouse suspicion of a benign lesion and importance of providing adequate clinical information to the pathologist to attain accurate diagnosis.We discussed two cases with tumors located in the maxilla. Both presented as expansile lesions with one biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma. Both were pursued with clinico-radiological suspicion of benign lesions and confirmed with pathological correlation of histology and immunohistochemistry as CEOT. Therefore a High index of suspicion and clinico-radiological information are the key feature for diagnosis of this rare tumor.

  19. Texture Analysis of Recurrence Plots Based on Wavelets and PSO for Laryngeal Pathologies Detection.

    PubMed

    Souza, Taciana A; Vieira, Vinícius J D; Correia, Suzete E N; Costa, Silvana L N C; de A Costa, Washington C; Souza, Micael A

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the discrimination between healthy and pathological speech signals using recurrence plots and wavelet transform with texture features. Approximation and detail coefficients are obtained from the recurrence plots using Haar wavelet transform, considering one decomposition level. The considered laryngeal pathologies are: paralysis, Reinke's edema and nodules. Accuracy rates above 86% were obtained by means of the employed method.

  20. Using Drug Similarities for Discovery of Possible Adverse Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Emir; Nováček, Vít; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new computational method for discovery of possible adverse drug reactions. The method consists of two key steps. First we use openly available resources to semi-automatically compile a consolidated data set describing drugs and their features (e.g., chemical structure, related targets, indications or known adverse reaction). The data set is represented as a graph, which allows for definition of graph-based similarity metrics. The metrics can then be used for propagating known adverse reactions between similar drugs, which leads to weighted (i.e., ranked) predictions of previously unknown links between drugs and their possible side effects. We implemented the proposed method in the form of a software prototype and evaluated our approach by discarding known drug-side effect links from our data and checking whether our prototype is able to re-discover them. As this is an evaluation methodology used by several recent state of the art approaches, we could compare our results with them. Our approach scored best in all widely used metrics like precision, recall or the ratio of relevant predictions present among the top ranked results. The improvement was as much as 125.79% over the next best approach. For instance, the F1 score was 0.5606 (66.35% better than the next best method). Most importantly, in 95.32% of cases, the top five results contain at least one, but typically three correctly predicted side effect (36.05% better than the second best approach). PMID:28269889

  1. Evaluation of Proper Usage of Glucocorticosteroid Inhalers and Their Adverse Effects in Asthmatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Mohammad Esmayil; Shafiifar, Afsaneh; Mashayekhi, Siminozar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequent use of corticosteroid inhalers (CSIs), especially at higher doses, has been accompanied by concern about both systemic and local adverse reactions. The local adverse reactions of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are considered to constitute infrequent and minor problems. However, while not usually serious, these local adverse reactions are of clinical importance. This study assessed the prevalence of local adverse reactions, their clinical features, role of inhaler devices and current measures that have been suggested to prevent the problem. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in YAS clinic in Tabriz on 500 asthmatic patients. A questionnaire about the patients’ demographic information, methods of using CSIs, local care after using CSIs, using spacer devices, doses of ICSs, and adverse reactions were filled then the patients were clinically examined for local adverse reactions. Results: Only 56% patients were using CSIs properly. In general, the incidence of complications was: oropharyngeal candidiasis 25.6%, laryngeal weakness 8.8%, choking 17.6%, tooth decay 15.2%, speechlessness 36.2%, taste decrease 20.8%, tongue burning 29.8% and tongue abrasion 27.8%. Conclusion: Persistent asthma can be effectively controlled with currently available CSIs. Although not life-threatening, local adverse reactions of ICSs are clinically significant and warrant attention. Use of spacer devices and changes in CSI usage, dosage amount and frequency and rinsing and gargling are the methods that have been used to reduce the incidence of local adverse reactions. PMID:27403173

  2. Broken or maladaptive? Altered trajectories in neuroinflammation and behavior after early life adversity

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Prabarna; Brenhouse, Heather C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to adversity and stress early in development yields vulnerability to mental illnesses throughout the lifespan. Growing evidence suggests that this vulnerability has mechanistic origins involving aberrant development of both neurocircuitry and neuro-immune activity. Here we review the current understanding of when and how stress exposure initiates neuroinflammatory events that interact with brain development. We first review how early life adversity has been associated with various psychopathologies, and how neuroinflammation plays a role in these pathologies. We then summarize data and resultant hypotheses describing how early life adversity may particularly alter neuro-immune development with psychiatric consequences. Finally, we review how sex differences contribute to individualistic vulnerabilities across the lifespan. We submit the importance of understanding how stress during early development might cause outright neural or glial damage, as well as experience-dependent plasticity that may insufficiently prepare an individual for sex-specific or life-stage specific challenges. PMID:25081071

  3. The molecular pathology of noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Zhu, Shu; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infection in humans typically results in acute gastroenteritis but may also occur in many animal species. Noroviruses are recognized as one of the most common causes of acute gastroenteritis in the world, being responsible for almost 20% of all cases. Despite their prevalence and impact, our knowledge of the norovirus life cycle and the pathological processes associated with norovirus-induced disease is limited. Whilst infection of the intestine is the norm, extraintestinal spread and associated pathologies have also been described. In addition, long-term chronic infections are now recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the immunocompromised. This review aims to summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to norovirus pathology and the underlying mechanisms that have been characterized to date.

  4. Pathology of human diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Malik, R A

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic study of a disease provides insights into the precise mechanisms and targets of damage and may provide insights into new therapies. The main targets in diabetic neuropathy are myelinated and unmyelinated fibers as dysfunction and damage to them explains the symptoms of painful neuropathy and the major end points of foot ulceration and amputation as well as mortality. Demyelination and axonal degeneration are established hallmarks of the pathology of human diabetic neuropathy and were derived from pioneering light and electronmicroscopic studies of sural nerve biopsies in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Additional abnormalities, which are relevant to the pathogenesis of human diabetic neuropathy, include pathology of the microvessels and extracellular space. Intraepidermal and sudomotor nerve quantification in skin biopsies provides a minimally invasive means for the detection of early nerve damage. Studies of muscle biopsies are limited and show significant alterations in the expression of neurotrophins, but limited changes in muscle fiber size and capillary density.

  5. [Pathology of the vitreomacular interface].

    PubMed

    Pop, Monica; Gheorghe, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Vitreous role in the pathophysiology of retinal diseases has increased importantly over the recent years. This was possible using Optical Coherence Tomography which reviewed the way the vitreoretinal interface should be looked at and defined and classified new pathologies such as Vitreoretinal Traction Syndrome. Vitreous is not an empty space but an important anatomical structure with role in ocular physiology. With age biochemical changes occur so that vitreous starts to liquefy. Once the vitreous is liquefied (sinchisis) it collapses and passes in the retrohialoid space (sineresis). In complete PVD besides sinchisis there is a weakness of the adherence between the posterior cortex and ILM with total detachment of posterior cortex. Abnormal adhesions are associated with incomplete PVD. The definition and understanting of vitreoretinal pathology is an active and continuous process, PVD being the trigger of a lot of retinal pathologies: epiretinal membrane, macular hole, tractional macular oedema, VMTS, myopic traction maculopathy, exacerbations of exudative ARMD.

  6. Lupus Nephritis: Animal Modeling of a Complex Disease Syndrome Pathology

    PubMed Central

    McGaha, Tracy L; Madaio, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Nephritis as a result of autoimmunity is a common morbidity associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). There is substantial clinical and industry interest in medicinal intervention in the SLE nephritic process; however, clinical trials to specifically treat lupus nephritis have not resulted in complete and sustained remission in all patients. Multiple mouse models have been used to investigate the pathologic interactions between autoimmune reactivity and SLE pathology. While several models bear a remarkable similarity to SLE-driven nephritis, there are limitations for each that can make the task of choosing the appropriate model for a particular aspect of SLE pathology challenging. This is not surprising given the variable and diverse nature of human disease. In many respects, features among murine strains mimic some (but never all) of the autoimmune and pathologic features of lupus patients. Although the diversity often limits universal conclusions relevant to pathogenesis, they provide insights into the complex process that result in phenotypic manifestations of nephritis. Thus nephritis represents a microcosm of systemic disease, with variable lesions and clinical features. In this review, we discuss some of the most commonly used models of lupus nephritis (LN) and immune-mediated glomerular damage examining their relative strengths and weaknesses, which may provide insight in the human condition. PMID:25722732

  7. The use of topical corticoids in oral pathology.

    PubMed

    González-Moles, Miguel-Angel

    2010-11-01

    This review examines the most important aspects of the use of topical corticosteroids in oral pathology. We provide a detailed analysis of the most common types of corticosteroids used, their methods of application and the clinical data that must be managed in order to monitor the effectiveness of the treatment. We also analyze the correctable causes of treatment failure and the possible adverse effects that may occur after applying these drugs. All of this is achieved by conducting a critical review of these concepts.

  8. Towards a Role for Clinical Pathology Diagnostics for Childhood Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, EL; Ji, J; Trickett, P; Kaplan, CD; Mennen, F

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports from the Center for Disease Control and Kaiser Permanente demonstrate that early life adverse experience leads to morbidity and mortality in adulthood. To date there are no objective tests that help care-givers or local child protective services make informed decisions for children with a history of abuse, neglect or trauma. This is the first report from a new group of trans-disciplinary investigators describing a new approach to identify the biological impact of childhood maltreatment using clinical pathology testing. Such new quantitative measurements will be useful to identify children at risk for poor mental and physical health outcomes and to follow response to interventions. PMID:26640822

  9. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way.

  10. Molecular Biomarkers of Knee Pathology.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Vanessa; Strauss, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers has become increasingly important in our fundamental understanding of the molecular basis for disease and subsequently in the advancement of modern medicine. Biomarkers have been identified in a plethora of normal and pathologic conditions and are most often found in blood, tissue, or synovial fluid. Orthopaedic research has more recently focused on biomarkers of cartilage and joint diseases, with an emphasis on understanding the molecular underpinnings of their pathophysiology. This article focuses on the biomarkers identified to date in several select knee pathologies and how further research can contribute to new diagnostic tools and targeted therapeutics.

  11. Medical careers in pathology, 1977.

    PubMed Central

    Baron, D N

    1979-01-01

    A survey has been made, mainly covering the second half of 1977, of career grade posts and senior training posts in pathology in the United Kingdom. The survey included all disciplines of pathology and all types of employment--National Health Service, medical school, and many others. The survey also examined the number of applicants for advertised posts and the number of posts left vacant. There were variations between disciplines and between regions; microbiology and Northern Ireland had most failures in filling posts. Overall about 3% of career grade posts, and 15% of training grade posts, were left unfilled. PMID:429573

  12. Multiwavelet grading of prostate pathological images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh

    2002-05-01

    We have developed image analysis methods to automatically grade pathological images of prostate. The proposed method generates Gleason grades to images, where each image is assigned a grade between 1 and 5. This is done using features extracted from multiwavelet transformations. We extract energy and entropy features from submatrices obtained in the decomposition. Next, we apply a k-NN classifier to grade the image. To find optimal multiwavelet basis, preprocessing, and classifier, we use features extracted by different multiwavelets with either critically sampled preprocessing or repeated row preprocessing and different k-NN classifiers and compare their performances, evaluated by total misclassification rate (TMR). To evaluate sensitivity to noise, we add white Gaussian noise to images and compare the results (TMR's). We applied proposed methods to 100 images. We evaluated the first and second levels of decomposition using Geronimo, Hardin, and Massopust (GHM), Chui and Lian (CL), and Shen (SA4) multiwavelets. We also evaluated k-NN classifier for k=1,2,3,4,5. Experimental results illustrate that first level of decomposition is quite noisy. They also show that critically sampled preprocessing outperforms repeated row preprocessing and has less sensitivity to noise. Finally, comparison studies indicate that SA4 multiwavelet and k-NN classifier (k=1) generates optimal results (with smallest TMR of 3%).

  13. Cardiovascular safety risk assessment for new candidate drugs from functional and pathological data: Conference report.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stephanie K; Redfern, Will S

    2015-01-01

    This is a report on a 2-day joint meeting between the British Society of Toxicological Pathology (BSTP) and the Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS) held in the UK in November 2013. Drug induced adverse effects on the cardiovascular system are associated with the attrition of more marketed and candidate drugs than any other safety issue. The objectives of this meeting were to foster inter-disciplinary approaches to address cardiovascular risk assessment, improve understanding of the respective disciplines, and increase awareness of new technologies. These aims were achieved. This well attended meeting covered both 'purely functional' cardiovascular adverse effects of drugs (e.g., electrophysiological and haemodynamic changes) as well as adverse effects encompassing both functional and pathological changes. Most of the presentations focused on nonclinical safety data, with information on translation to human where known. To reflect the content of the presentations we have cited key references and review articles.

  14. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  15. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  16. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  17. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  18. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  19. Modern Age Pathology of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, Elvira; Graham, Brian B.; Hunt, James M.; Gandjeva, Aneta; Groshong, Steve D.; McLaughlin, Vallerie V.; Jessup, Marsha; Grizzle, William E.; Aldred, Michaela A.; Cool, Carlyne D.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The impact of modern treatments of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) on pulmonary vascular pathology remains unknown. Objectives: To assess the spectrum of pulmonary vascular remodeling in the modern era of PAH medication. Methods: Assessment of pulmonary vascular remodeling and inflammation in 62 PAH and 28 control explanted lungs systematically sampled. Measurements and Main Results: Intima and intima plus media fractional thicknesses of pulmonary arteries were increased in the PAH group versus the control lungs and correlated with pulmonary hemodynamic measurements. Despite a high variability of morphological measurements within a given PAH lung and among all PAH lungs, distinct pathological subphenotypes were detected in cohorts of PAH lungs. These included a subset of lungs lacking intima or, most prominently, media remodeling, which had similar numbers of profiles of plexiform lesions as those in lungs with more pronounced remodeling. Marked perivascular inflammation was present in a high number of PAH lungs and correlated with intima plus media remodeling. The number of profiles of plexiform lesions was significantly lower in lungs of male patients and those never treated with prostacyclin or its analogs. Conclusions: Our results indicate that multiple features of pulmonary vascular remodeling are present in patients treated with modern PAH therapies. Perivascular inflammation may have an important role in the processes of vascular remodeling, all of which may ultimately lead to increased pulmonary artery pressure. Moreover, our study provides a framework to interpret and design translational studies in PAH. PMID:22679007

  20. Cranial Pathologies in a Specimen of Pachycephalosaurus

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joseph E.; Vittore, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Background A frontoparietal dome of a large pachycephalosaurid collected from the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation in 2001 is identified as Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis. The specimen features two large oval depressions on the dorsal surface, accompanied by numerous circular pits on the margin and inner surface of the larger depressions. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to identify the origin of these structures, computed tomography (CT) data and morphological characteristics of the specimen are analyzed and compared with similar osteological structures in fossil and extant archosaurs caused by taphonomic processes, non-pathologic bone resorption, and traumatic infection/inflammatory origins. The results of these analyses suggest that the structures are pathologic lesions likely resulting from a traumatic injury and followed by secondary infection at the site. Conclusions/Significance The presence of lesions on a frontoparietal dome, and the exclusivity of their distribution along the dorsal dome surface, offers further insight into frontoparietal dome function and supports previously hypothesized agonistic behavior in pachycephalosaurids. PMID:22558394

  1. Domoic Acid Toxicologic Pathology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Olga M.

    2008-01-01

    Domoic acid was identified as the toxin responsible for an outbreak of human poisoning that occurred in Canada in 1987 following consumption of contaminated blue mussels [Mytilus edulis]. The poisoning was characterized by a constellation of clinical symptoms and signs. Among the most prominent features described was memory impairment which led to the name Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning [ASP]. Domoic acid is produced by certain marine organisms, such as the red alga Chondria armata and planktonic diatom of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Since 1987, monitoring programs have been successful in preventing other human incidents of ASP. However, there are documented cases of domoic acid intoxication in wild animals and outbreaks of coastal water contamination in many regions world-wide. Hence domoic acid continues to pose a global risk to the health and safety of humans and wildlife. Several mechanisms have been implicated as mediators for the effects of domoic acid. Of particular importance is the role played by glutamate receptors as mediators of excitatory neurotransmission and the demonstration of a wide distribution of these receptors outside the central nervous system, prompting the attention to other tissues as potential target sites. The aim of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of ASP, DOM induced pathology including ultrastructural changes associated to subchronic oral exposure, and discussion of key proposed mechanisms of cell/tissue injury involved in DOM induced brain pathology and considerations relevant to food safety and human health. PMID:18728725

  2. An “ADME Module” in the Adverse Outcome Pathway ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework has generated intense interest for its utility to organize knowledge on the toxicity mechanisms, starting from a molecular initiating event (MIE) to an adverse outcome across various levels of biological organization. While the AOP framework is designed to be chemical agnostic, it is widely recognized that considering chemicals’ absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) behaviors is critical in applying the AOP framework in chemical-specific risk assessment. Currently, information being generated as part of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) AOP Development Programme is being consolidated into an AOP Knowledgebase (http://aopwiki.org). To enhance the use of this Knowledgebase in risk assessment, an ADME Module has been developed to contain the ADME information needed to connect MIEs and other key events in an AOP for specific chemicals. The conceptual structure of this module characterizes the potential of a chemical to reach the target MIE based on either its structure-based features or relative rates of ADME. The key features of this module include (1) a framework for connecting biology-based AOP to biochemical-based ADME and chemical/human activity-based exposure pathways; (2) links to qualitative tools (e.g., structure-based cheminformatic model) that screen for chemicals that could potentially reach the target MIE; (3) links to quantitative tools (e.g., dose-r

  3. Orofacial granulomatosis: clinical signs of different pathologies.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Mario; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Testa, Nunzio Francesco; Cocchi, Roberto; De Lillo, Alfredo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is an uncommon disease characterized by persistent or recurrent soft tissue enlargement, oral ulceration and a variety of other orofacial features. It could be an oral manifestation of a systemic disease. For a correct differential diagnosis, local and systemic conditions characterized by granulomatous inflammation should be excluded using appropriate clinical and laboratory investigations. In fact, the diagnosis of OFG may be confirmed only by histopathological identification of noncaseating granulomas. The literature from 1943 to 2014 was reviewed with emphasis on the etiology of OFG and on clinical manifestations of systemic pathologies associated with OFG. The precise cause of OFG is still unknown, although several theories have been suggested, such as infection, hereditary factors and allergy. OFG is a disease that has a wide spectrum of presentation, which may include the oral manifestation of a systemic condition such as Crohn's disease, sarcoidosis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome.

  4. Surgical pathology of urologic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Javadpour, N.; Barsky, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    This text details recent advances in methods for detecting, diagnosing, and managing genitourinary diseases. Included are chapters on imaging techniques (including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound; tumor markers (such as alphafetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, prostatic specific antigen, and T-antigens); immunocytochemistry; pediatric urologic pathology; and other key topics.

  5. Learning Biology with Plant Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Juliet E.

    This monograph contains 10 plant pathology experiments that were written to correspond to portions of a biology curriculum. Each experiment is suitable to a biology topic and designed to encourage exploration of those biological concepts being taught. Experiments include: (1) The Symptoms and Signs of Disease; (2) Koch's Postulates; (3)…

  6. THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CROME, L.; STERN, J.

    DATA FROM RECENT COMPREHENSIVE STUDIES OF THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION ARE ASSEMBLED, INCLUDING MATERIAL ON ETIOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS. AREAS COVERED ARE (1) GENETIC CAUSES OF MENTAL RETARDATION, (2) DISORDERS OF GESTATION, (3) BIRTH INJURY, (4) GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF POSTNATAL CAUSES OF MENTAL…

  7. Adverse events temporally associated with meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Yergeau, A; Alain, L; Pless, R; Robert, Y

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of severe adverse events temporally associated with meningococcal vaccines administered as part of a mass vaccination program. DESIGN: Retrospective descriptive study of events reported to a passive provincial surveillance system. SETTING: The province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS: The 1,198,751 individuals aged 6 months to 20 years who were vaccinated against meningococcal disease between Dec. 27, 1992, and Mar. 31, 1993. OUTCOME MEASURES: Total numbers and rates of severe adverse events, including allergic reactions, anaphylactic reactions, neurological events (other than abnormal crying and screaming) and other serious or unusual events. RESULTS: A total of 118 reports of severe adverse events were selected from the surveillance system. The most frequent were allergic reactions (9.2 per 100,000 doses). Few anaphylactic or neurologic reactions were reported (0.1 and 0.5 per 100,000 doses respectively). There were no reports of sequelae or of encephalopathy, meningitis or encephalitis. CONCLUSION: Meningococcal vaccines seem to be associated with fewer adverse events than have previously been reported. Existing surveillance programs are useful for determining the incidence of adverse events temporally associated with vaccines. PMID:8630839

  8. Putative adverse outcome pathways relevant to neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bal-Price, Anna; Crofton, Kevin M.; Sachana, Magdalini; Shafer, Timothy J.; Behl, Mamta; Forsby, Anna; Hargreaves, Alan; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lein, Pamela J.; Louisse, Jochem; Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne; Paini, Alicia; Rolaki, Alexandra; Schrattenholz, André; Suñol, Cristina; van Thriel, Christoph; Whelan, Maurice; Fritsche, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework provides a template that facilitates understanding of complex biological systems and the pathways of toxicity that result in adverse outcomes (AOs). The AOP starts with an molecular initiating event (MIE) in which a chemical interacts with a biological target(s), followed by a sequential series of KEs, which are cellular, anatomical, and/or functional changes in biological processes, that ultimately result in an AO manifest in individual organisms and populations. It has been developed as a tool for a knowledge-based safety assessment that relies on understanding mechanisms of toxicity, rather than simply observing its adverse outcome. A large number of cellular and molecular processes are known to be crucial to proper development and function of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). However, there are relatively few examples of well-documented pathways that include causally linked MIEs and KEs that result in adverse outcomes in the CNS or PNS. As a first step in applying the AOP framework to adverse health outcomes associated with exposure to exogenous neurotoxic substances, the EU Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM) organized a workshop (March 2013, Ispra, Italy) to identify potential AOPs relevant to neurotoxic and developmental neurotoxic outcomes. Although the AOPs outlined during the workshop are not fully described, they could serve as a basis for further, more detailed AOP development and evaluation that could be useful to support human health risk assessment in a variety of ways. PMID:25605028

  9. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  10. Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Fibrolamellar Variant: Diagnostic Pathologic Criteria and Molecular Pathology Update. A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Sergi, Consolato M.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FL-HCC) is generally a fairly rare event in routine pathology practice. This variant of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is peculiarly intriguing and,in addition, poorly understood. Young people or children are often the target individuals with this type of cancer. Previously, I highlighted some pathology aspects of FL-HCC, but in this review, the distinctive clinico-pathologic features of FL-HCC and the diagnostic pathologic criteria of FL-HCC are fractionally reviewed and expanded upon. Further, molecular genetics update data with reference to this specific tumor are particularly highlighted as a primer for general pathologists and pediatric histopathologists. FL-HCC may present with metastases, and regional lymph nodes may be sites of metastatic spread. However, peritoneal and pulmonary metastatic foci have also been reported. To the best of our knowledge, FL-HCC was initially considered having an indolent course, but survival outcomes have recently been updated reconsidering the prognosis of this tumor. Patients seem to respond well to surgical resection, but recurrences are common. Thus, alternative therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiation, are ongoing. Overall, it seems that this aspect has not been well-studied for this variant of HCC and should be considered as target for future clinical trials. Remarkably, FL-HCC data seem to point to a liver neoplasm of uncertain origin and unveiled outcome. A functional chimeric transcript incorporating DNAJB1 and PRKACA was recently added to FL-HCC. This sensational result may give remarkable insights into the understanding of this rare disease and potentially provide the basis for its specific diagnostic marker. Detection of DNAJB1-PRKACA seems to be, indeed, a very sensitive and specific finding in supporting the diagnosis of FL-HCC. In a quite diffuse opinion, prognosis of this tumor should be reconsidered following the potentially mandatory application of new molecular

  11. Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Fibrolamellar Variant: Diagnostic Pathologic Criteria and Molecular Pathology Update. A Primer.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Consolato M

    2015-12-30

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FL-HCC) is generally a fairly rare event in routine pathology practice. This variant of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is peculiarly intriguing and,in addition, poorly understood. Young people or children are often the target individuals with this type of cancer. Previously, I highlighted some pathology aspects of FL-HCC, but in this review, the distinctive clinico-pathologic features of FL-HCC and the diagnostic pathologic criteria of FL-HCC are fractionally reviewed and expanded upon. Further, molecular genetics update data with reference to this specific tumor are particularly highlighted as a primer for general pathologists and pediatric histopathologists. FL-HCC may present with metastases, and regional lymph nodes may be sites of metastatic spread. However, peritoneal and pulmonary metastatic foci have also been reported. To the best of our knowledge, FL-HCC was initially considered having an indolent course, but survival outcomes have recently been updated reconsidering the prognosis of this tumor. Patients seem to respond well to surgical resection, but recurrences are common. Thus, alternative therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiation, are ongoing. Overall, it seems that this aspect has not been well-studied for this variant of HCC and should be considered as target for future clinical trials. Remarkably, FL-HCC data seem to point to a liver neoplasm of uncertain origin and unveiled outcome. A functional chimeric transcript incorporating DNAJB1 and PRKACA was recently added to FL-HCC. This sensational result may give remarkable insights into the understanding of this rare disease and potentially provide the basis for its specific diagnostic marker. Detection of DNAJB1-PRKACA seems to be, indeed, a very sensitive and specific finding in supporting the diagnosis of FL-HCC. In a quite diffuse opinion, prognosis of this tumor should be reconsidered following the potentially mandatory application of new molecular

  12. Adverse health consequences of the Iraq War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2013-03-16

    The adverse health consequences of the Iraq War (2003-11) were profound. We conclude that at least 116,903 Iraqi non-combatants and more than 4800 coalition military personnel died over the 8-year course. Many Iraqi civilians were injured or became ill because of damage to the health-supporting infrastructure of the country, and about 5 million were displaced. More than 31,000 US military personnel were injured and a substantial percentage of those deployed suffered post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other neuropsychological disorders and their concomitant psychosocial problems. Many family members of military personnel had psychological problems. Further review of the adverse health consequences of this war could help to minimise the adverse health consequences of, and help to prevent, future wars.

  13. Standardizing drug adverse event reporting data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwei; Jiang, Guoqian; Li, Dingcheng; Liu, Hongfang

    2013-01-01

    Normalizing data in the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), an FDA database, would improve the mining capacity of AERS for drug safety signal detection. In this study, we aim to normalize AERS and build a publicly available normalized Adverse drug events (ADE) data source.he drug information in AERS is normalized to RxNorm, a standard terminology source for medication. Drug class information is then obtained from the National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Adverse drug events (ADE) are aggregated through mapping with the PT (Preferred Term) and SOC (System Organ Class) codes of MedDRA. Our study yields an aggregated knowledge-enhanced AERS data mining set (AERS-DM). The AERS-DM could provide more perspectives to mine AERS database for drug safety signal detection and could be used by research community in the data mining field.

  14. [Adverse reaction to not iodinated contrast].

    PubMed

    Palma-Gómez, Samuel; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; Amaro-Vivian, Laura Elizabeth; Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Adverse reactions to drugs are relatively frequent in clinical practice, and some of them can be life threatening. Reactions to contrast material (CM) represent an important percentage of these adverse reactions. It has been found that 70% of reactions to contrast material happen within the first five minutes of their administration. Despite the fact that hypersensitivity reactions are traditionally classified as non-allergic, in recent years investigators have reported positive skin prick tests in patients with immediate and late reactions to contrast material. This paper reports the case of a female patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has presented on two distinct occasions adverse reactions to contrast material. We discuss on the type of reaction, severity, suggested prophylaxis, prognosis and recommendations, keeping in mind the underlying disease and the need to have further image studies performed.

  15. Adverse perinatal events associated with ART.

    PubMed

    Skora, Daniel; Frankfurter, David

    2012-04-01

    Since the advent of ART, much research has focused on the potential adverse for resultant harm. Prematurity, low birth-weight, PIH, congenital malformations, and CP are closely tied to multiple gestation. With the increase in elective single embryo transfer, there will be a reduction in adversity related to multiple birth. It is understood that underlying causes of infertility, including advanced maternal age, PCOS, thyroid disease, and uterine fibroids, predispose to adverse outcomes. However, imprinting abnormalities do not appear to stem from multiple births, and thus the need to consider the association between fertility treatment and methylation disorders remains essential. These, as well as risks of multi-fetal gestation, must be discussed with patients when considering using assisted reproduction.

  16. Early Adverse Experiences and the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bick, Johanna; Nelson, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Children exposed to various forms of adversity early in life are at increased risk for a broad range of developmental difficulties, affecting both cognitive and emotional adjustment. We review a growing body of evidence suggesting that exposure to adverse circumstances affects the developing brain in ways that increase risk for a myriad of problems. We focus on two forms of adversity, one in which children are exposed to childhood maltreatment in family environments, and another in which children are exposed to extreme psychosocial deprivation in contexts of institutional rearing. We discuss ways in which each of these experiences represent violations of species-expected caregiving conditions, thereby imposing challenges to the developing brain. We also review emerging data pointing to the effectiveness of early intervention in remediating neurodevelopmental consequences associated with maltreatment or institutional rearing. We conclude by discussing implications of this work for public health efforts and highlight important directions for the field. PMID:26334107

  17. Segmentation of Pathological Structures by Landmark-Assisted Deformable Models.

    PubMed

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Korez, Robert; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo; Xing, Lei; Vrtovec, Tomaz

    2017-02-13

    Computerized segmentation of pathological structures in medical images is challenging, as, in addition to unclear image boundaries, image artifacts and traces of surgical activities, the shape of pathological structures may be very different from the shape of normal structures. Even if a sufficient number of pathological training samples are collected, statistical shape modeling cannot always capture shape features of pathological samples as they may be suppressed by shape features of a considerably larger number of healthy samples. At the same time, landmarking can be efficient in analyzing pathological structures but often lacks robustness. In this paper, we combine the advantages of landmark detection and deformable models into a novel supervised multi-energy segmentation framework that can efficiently segment structures with pathological shape. The framework adopts the theory of Laplacian shape editing that was introduced in the field of computer graphics, so that the limitations of statistical shape modeling are avoided. The performance of the proposed framework was validated by segmenting fractured lumbar vertebrae from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images, atrophic corpora callosa from two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance (MR) crosssections and cancerous prostates from 3D MR images, resulting respectively in a Dice coefficient of 84.7 ± 5.0%, 85.3 ± 4.8% and 78.3 ± 5.1%, and boundary distance of 1.14 ± 0.49 mm, 1.42 ± 0.45mm and 2.27 ± 0.52 mm. The obtained results were shown to be superior in comparison to existing deformable modelbased segmentation algorithms.

  18. Pathology effects at radiation doses below those causing increased mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Bruce A.; Gavrilova, Natalia; Grahn, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Mortality data from experiments conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on the long-term effects of external whole-body irradiation on B6CF(1) mice were used to investigate radiation-induced effects at intermediate doses of (60)Co gamma rays or fission-spectrum neutrons either delivered as a single exposure or protracted over 60 once-weekly exposures. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to identify the lowest dose in the ANL data (within radiation quality, pattern of exposure, and sex) at which radiation-induced mortality caused by primary tumors could be detected (approximately 1-2 Gy for gamma rays and 10-15 cGy for neutrons). Doses at and below these levels were then examined for radiation-induced shifts in the spectrum of pathology detected at death. To do this, specific pathology events were pooled into larger assemblages based on whether they were cancer, cardiovascular disease or non-neoplastic diseases detected within the lungs and pleura, liver and biliary tract, reproductive organs, or urinary tract. Cancer and cardiovascular disease were further subdivided into categories based on whether they caused death, contributed to death, or were simply observed at death. Counts of how often events falling within each of these combined pathology categories occurred within a mouse were then used as predictor variables in logistic regression to determine whether irradiated mice could be distinguished from control mice. Increased pathology burdens were detected in irradiated mice at doses lower than those causing detectable shifts in mortality-22 cGy for gamma rays and 2 cGy for neutrons. These findings suggest that (1) models based on mortality data alone may underestimate radiation effects, (2) radiation may have adverse health consequences (i.e. elevated health risks) even when mortality risks are not detected, and (3) radiation-induced pathologies other than cancer do occur, and they involve multiple organ systems.

  19. Pathological Significance of Mitochondrial Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Murphy, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Glycation, the nonenzymatic glycosylation of biomolecules, is commonly observed in diabetes and ageing. Reactive dicarbonyl species such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal are thought to be major physiological precursors of glycation. Because these dicarbonyls tend to be formed intracellularly, the levels of advanced glycation end products on cellular proteins are higher than on extracellular ones. The formation of glycation adducts within cells can have severe functional consequences such as inhibition of protein activity and promotion of DNA mutations. Although several lines of evidence suggest that there are specific mitochondrial targets of glycation, and mitochondrial dysfunction itself has been implicated in disease and ageing, it is unclear if glycation of biomolecules specifically within mitochondria induces dysfunction and contributes to disease pathology. We discuss here the possibility that mitochondrial glycation contributes to disease, focussing on diabetes, ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and highlight the current limitations in our understanding of the pathological significance of mitochondrial glycation. PMID:22778743

  20. Noise reduction for vocal pathologies.

    PubMed

    Matassini, L; Manfredi, C

    2002-01-01

    A noise reduction scheme, particularly suited for the correction of vocal pathologies, is proposed. The filter makes use of concepts originated within the theory of dynamical systems and deterministic chaos. In particular, the idea of embedding scalar data in order to reconstruct a phase space is of fundamental importance here. Furthermore, the concept of an attractor as a result of dynamical constraints is exploited. In order to perform noise reduction one needs redundancy and the human voice provides it even within a phoneme, namely the smallest structural unit of speech. Due to several repetitions of a pattern called pitch inside a phoneme, separation between the pure voice signal and the noise is possible, provided the latter is uncorrelated with the former. With a proper parameter tuning, different kinds of noise can be removed. We describe the idea behind the noise reduction algorithm and present applications to vocal pathologies.

  1. Quality in pathology laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, S

    1995-06-01

    Quality refers not only to analytical quality control, a traditional area of laboratory excellence, but to the entire science of quality management. As measures of quality, structural indicators refer to staffing and physical facilities, process indicators to the institutions operations and, perhaps most importantly, outcome indicators address the ultimate patient care uses that pathology information is put to. Comparison of performance to peer laboratories, external quality control, is a practical, if limited, yardstick of performance. Customer satisfaction and turn-around-time of tests are receiving more recent attention as quality measures. Blood banking, because of its inherently complex cycle from donor phlebotomy to product infusion, requires special considerations with regard to quality management. Reporting of anatomical pathology, where the only gold standard is a consensus of experts, also does not lend itself to classical numerical quality assessment.

  2. Interleukin-22: immunobiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hanash, Alan M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a recently described IL-10 family cytokine that is produced by T-helper (Th)-17 cells, γδ T cells, NKT cells and newly described innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Knowledge of IL-22 biology has rapidly evolved since its discovery in 2000, and a role for IL-22 has been identified in numerous tissues including the intestines, lung, liver, kidney, thymus, pancreas and skin. IL-22 primarily targets non-hematopoietic epithelial and stromal cells where it can promote proliferation and play a role in tissue regeneration. In addition, IL-22 regulates host defense at barrier surfaces. However, IL-22 has also been linked to several conditions involving inflammatory tissue pathology. In this review, we will assess the current understanding of this cytokine, including its physiologic and pathologic effects on epithelial cell function. PMID:25706098

  3. Reducing Adverse Impact: One City's Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Jeff

    Following a workshop on "Innovations in Employment Testing that Improve Validity and Reduce Adverse Impact," the City of Louisville (Kentucky) implemented a strategy to develop a comprehensive testing and recruiting program for police recruits. To improve candidate expectations and preparation, the following activities were undertaken:…

  4. Educational Leadership: The Uses of Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Jack

    1976-01-01

    Skepticism about the power of education challenges the educational administrator to (1) attain a better understanding of the sources of dissatisfaction and their implications for change, (2) learn to cope with adversity and make constructive use of it, and (3) define the leadership requirements needed to address education's problems. (MB)

  5. The adverse outcome pathway knowledge base

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid advancement of the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework has been paralleled by the development of tools to store, analyse, and explore AOPs. The AOP Knowledge Base (AOP-KB) project has brought three independently developed platforms (Effectopedia, AOP-Wiki, and AOP-X...

  6. Clinical spectrum of adverse reactions to tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Collins-Williams, C

    1985-01-01

    Tartrazine, a common additive in foods and drugs, often causes adverse reactions such as recurrent urticaria, angioedema, and asthma and is frequently implicated in hyperkinesis. This paper summarizes the recent literature on the subject and outlines a practical approach for the practicing physician to diagnose and treat these patients in an optimal manner.

  7. The Public Health Burden of Early Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlueter, Lisa J.; Watamura, Sarah Enos

    2017-01-01

    Severe and chronic stress in early childhood has enormous physical and mental health costs across an individual's lifespan. Unfortunately, exposure to early life adversity is common, and costs accrue to individuals and society. This article highlights several promising approaches to buffer children from the negative health consequences associated…

  8. [Analysis of Spontaneously Reported Adverse Events].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Observational study is necessary for the evaluation of drug effectiveness in clinical practice. In recent years, the use of spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) for adverse drug reactions has increased and they have become an important resource for regulatory science. SRS, being the largest and most well-known databases worldwide, are one of the primary tools used for postmarketing surveillance and pharmacovigilance. To analyze SRS, the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER) are reviewed. Authorized pharmacovigilance algorithms were used for signal detection, including the reporting odds ratio. An SRS is a passive reporting database and is therefore subject to numerous sources of selection bias, including overreporting, underreporting, and a lack of a denominator. Despite the inherent limitations of spontaneous reporting, SRS databases are a rich resource and data mining index that provide powerful means of identifying potential associations between drugs and their adverse effects. Our results, which are based on the evaluation of SRS databases, provide essential knowledge that could improve our understanding of clinical issues.

  9. Adverse skin reactions following intravitreal bevacizumab injection

    PubMed Central

    Ameen, S; Entabi, M; Lee, N; Stavrakoglou, A

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe two separate cases of skin eruption following intravitreal bevacizumab injection with evidence to suggest that these were adverse drug reactions to bevacizumab. The authors also discuss how each case was treated and report on the final outcome. PMID:22715260

  10. Due Process in Adverse Personnel Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriven, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A detailed checklist and timeline for ensuring due process are provided for adverse personnel actions, and the need to supplement this with expert, same-jurisdiction legal advice is stressed. This approach emphasizes the importance of treating due process as an ethical as well as a legal requirement. (SLD)

  11. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development and evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway provides a construct for assembling mechanistic information at different levels of biological organization in a form designed to support regulatory decision making. In particular, it frames the link between molecular and cellular events that can be mea...

  12. [Laser trabeculoplasty: therapeutic options and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Wacker, T; Eckert, S

    2010-01-01

    Laser trabeculoplasty is a simple method for treating glaucoma and ocular hypertension and has few adverse effects. There are different laser systems for reducing the intraocular pressure of patients with glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Complications include transient intraocular pressure elevation, iritis, and anterior synechiae.

  13. Resilience in the Face of Adversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    "Resilience" is the capacity for moving ahead under adverse circumstances. School superintendents are advised to stay upbeat and mindful of "both-and" opportunities; stay focused on what they care about; remain flexible and tolerant of ambiguity; be proactive, not reactive; and apply resilience-conserving strategies during…

  14. Clinical and pathological manifestations of human henipavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, K T; Tan, C T

    2012-01-01

    The clinicopathological features of human Nipah virus and Hendra virus infections appear to be similar. The clinical manifestations may be mild, but if severe, includes acute encephalitic and pulmonary syndromes with a high mortality. The pathological features in human acute henipavirus infections comprise vasculopathy (vasculitis, endothelial multinucleated syncytia, thrombosis), microinfarcts and parenchymal cell infection in the central nervous system, lung, kidney and other major organs. Viral inclusions, antigens, nucleocapsids and RNA are readily demonstrated in blood vessel wall and numerous types of parenchymal cells. Relapsing henipavirus encephalitis is a rare complication reported in less than 10% of survivors of the acute infection and appears to be distinct from the acute encephalitic syndrome. Pathological evidence suggests viral recrudescence confined to the central nervous system as the cause.

  15. Factorial Structure of Pathological Personality as Evaluated by Peers

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cannon; Turkheimer, Eric; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how individuals apply features of personality disorders (PDs) to peers. Members of groups nominated peers who exhibited symptoms for each of the 10 PDs in the DSM–IV. Data were gathered in 2 samples: 1st-year college students (n = 1,440) and Air Force recruits (n = 2,075). The peer method reliably identified group members exhibiting specific PD features. Factor analyses identified a clearly interpretable structure relevant to the pathological personality constructs being assessed. The structure replicated well across samples and showed expected relationships to broader models of normal personality. However, cross-method correlations of factor scores were only moderate, suggesting that peer reports are reliably different from self-reports regarding the presence of pathological personality traits. PMID:12653416

  16. Pathology of glomerular deposition diseases.

    PubMed

    Joh, Kensuke

    2007-09-01

    In routine diagnosis on renal biopsy, one of the confusing fields for pathological diagnoses is the glomerulopathies with fibrillary structure. The primary glomerulopathies with a deposit of ultrastructural fibrillary structure, which are negative for Congo-red stain but positive for immunoglobulins, include fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Several paraproteinemias including cryoglobulinemia, monoclonal gammopathy, and light chain deposition disease as well as hematopoietic disorders including plasmacytoma, plasma cell dyscrasia, and B cell lymphoproliferative disorders involve glomerulopathy with an ultrastructural fibrillary structure. A rare glomerulopathy with fibrillary structure that stains negative for Congo-red as well as for immunoglobulins has been also reported. The pathological diagnoses of these glomerulopathies can include either glomerular diseases, or paraproteinemic diseases, or hematopoietic diseases. The terminology is still confusing when glomerular diseases can be combined with paraproteinemic diseases and/or hematopoietic diseases. Therefore, the generic term, 'glomerular deposition disease' (GDD), has been proposed by pathologists with a requirement for clinicians to detect autoantibodies, paraproteins as well as to carry out a bone marrow check. An attempt has been made to rearrange the diseases with related disorders of fibrillary deposits, based on detailed clinical and pathological finding and to elucidate the correlation between GDD, paraproteinemia, and hematopoietic disorder.

  17. Pathologic classification of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tervaert, Thijs W Cohen; Mooyaart, Antien L; Amann, Kerstin; Cohen, Arthur H; Cook, H Terence; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B; Haas, Mark; de Heer, Emile; Joh, Kensuke; Noël, Laure H; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Seshan, Surya V; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bruijn, Jan A

    2010-04-01

    Although pathologic classifications exist for several renal diseases, including IgA nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and lupus nephritis, a uniform classification for diabetic nephropathy is lacking. Our aim, commissioned by the Research Committee of the Renal Pathology Society, was to develop a consensus classification combining type1 and type 2 diabetic nephropathies. Such a classification should discriminate lesions by various degrees of severity that would be easy to use internationally in clinical practice. We divide diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions with a separate evaluation for degrees of interstitial and vascular involvement. Biopsies diagnosed as diabetic nephropathy are classified as follows: Class I, glomerular basement membrane thickening: isolated glomerular basement membrane thickening and only mild, nonspecific changes by light microscopy that do not meet the criteria of classes II through IV. Class II, mesangial expansion, mild (IIa) or severe (IIb): glomeruli classified as mild or severe mesangial expansion but without nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions) or global glomerulosclerosis in more than 50% of glomeruli. Class III, nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions): at least one glomerulus with nodular increase in mesangial matrix (Kimmelstiel-Wilson) without changes described in class IV. Class IV, advanced diabetic glomerulosclerosis: more than 50% global glomerulosclerosis with other clinical or pathologic evidence that sclerosis is attributable to diabetic nephropathy. A good interobserver reproducibility for the four classes of DN was shown (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84) in a test of this classification.

  18. Risk factors and clinical features of text message injuries.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Deepak; Ajeesh, P S

    2012-01-01

    Use of mobile phone and sending text message is a very common in today's life. While sending a text message the users need to use their thumb and other palm muscles extensively. The thumb most of the time adducted on the key pad of the mobile and use high force to type the letters. Studies in literature showed that text messaging has an adverse effect on musculoskeletal system of hand. But the extensive study on the type of disorders set in among the users who extensively use mobile phone for texting. This study aims at to evaluate risk factor and clinical feature of the MSD due to hand held devices. Twenty seven subjects participated in this study. Predefined protocols were used to evaluate type of MSD occurred among the subjects. The study revealed that development of tendinitis in extensor pollicis longus, myofascial pain syndrome (70.37%) of adductor pollicis, 1st interossei and extensor digitorum communis . Other associated problems diagnosed were thoracic outlet syndrome (51.85%), fibromyalgia syndrome (25.93%), hypothyroidism (7.41%), wrist tendinitis (14.81%) and De Quervain's syndrome (7.41%). It has been observed that the pathology were tendinitis of extensor pollicis longus, myofascial pain syndrome of thenar muscles and 1st interossei, extensor digitorum communis.

  19. Metals and cholesterol: two sides of the same coin in Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Bruce X.; Hung, Ya Hui; Bush, Ashley I.; Duce, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease. It begins years prior to the onset of clinical symptoms, such as memory loss and cognitive decline. Pathological hallmarks of AD include the accumulation of β-amyloid in plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau in neurofibrillary tangles. Copper, iron, and zinc are abnormally accumulated and distributed in the aging brain. These metal ions can adversely contribute to the progression of AD. Dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism has also been implicated in the development of AD pathology. To date, large bodies of research have been carried out independently to elucidate the role of metals or cholesterol on AD pathology. Interestingly, metals and cholesterol affect parallel molecular and biochemical pathways involved in AD pathology. The possible links between metal dyshomeostasis and altered brain cholesterol metabolism in AD are reviewed. PMID:24860500

  20. Maternal floor infarction: management of an underrecognized pathology.

    PubMed

    Al-Sahan, Nada; Grynspan, David; von Dadelszen, Peter; Gruslin, Andrée

    2014-01-01

    Maternal floor infarction is a relatively rare condition characterized clinically by severe early onset fetal growth restriction with features of uteroplacental insufficiency. It has a very high recurrence rate and carries a significant risk or fetal demise. Pathological characteristics include massive and diffuse fibrin deposition along the decidua basalis and the perivillous space of the basal plate. We present a case of recurrent maternal floor infarction and propose diagnostic clues as well as potential therapeutic options.

  1. Implication of diethylcarbamazine induced morbidity and the role of cellular responses associated with bancroftian filariasis pathologies.

    PubMed

    Makunde, W H; Kamugisha, M L; Makunde, R A; Malecela-Lazaro, M N; Kitua, A Y

    2006-01-01

    Pre and post-diethylcarbamazine treatment clinical expression, microfilaraemia prevalence and cellular responses were investigated in individuals in Tanga, Tanzania. Fifty-seven male individuals (aged = 15 years old) were identified for further studies on IL-4, IL-6, IL-8. IFN-gamma, IL-beta, TNF-alpha and nitric oxide in plasma and hydrocoele fluid. Microfilarial prevalence in the examined individuals was 12% with a geometric mean intensity (GMI) of 838 mff/ml in a community with a population of 1018 individuals. Microfilaraemic hydrocoele stage II and III were the most frequent pathologies observed with prevalence of 17.5% and 42. 1 %, respectively. All study individuals treated with diethylcarbamazine (DEC) standard dose of 6 mg/kg experienced post-treatment adverse events. There was no direct relationship between elevated IL-6 and the occurrence and severity of clinical adverse effects post-treatment. The findings from this study suggests that, blood elevated cytokine profile is not the main etiological factor in the inflammatory responses developing after treatment of bancroftian filariasis infections and pathology with DEC. Plasma levels of cellular (cytokines) responses during treatment revealed a proportion of symptomatic patients. Prior to treatment, patients with hydroecoele had high levels of IL-6 than those without the pathology. In conclusion these findings do not support the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory cytokines are directly responsible for adverse events to DEC chemotherapy in bancroftian filariasis infections and pathologies such as hydrocoele, lymphoedema and elephantiasis.

  2. From the radiologic pathology archives imaging of osteonecrosis: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Mark D; Foreman, Kristopher L; Klassen-Fischer, Mary K; Fox, Michael G; Chung, Ellen M; Kransdorf, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is common and represents loss of blood supply to a region of bone. Common sites affected include the femoral head, humeral head, knee, femoral/tibial metadiaphysis, scaphoid, lunate, and talus. Symptomatic femoral head osteonecrosis accounts for 10,000-20,000 new cases annually in the United States. In contradistinction, metadiaphyseal osteonecrosis is often occult and asymptomatic. There are numerous causes of osteonecrosis most commonly related to trauma, corticosteroids, and idiopathic. Imaging of osteonecrosis is frequently diagnostic with a serpentine rim of sclerosis on radiographs, photopenia in early disease at bone scintigraphy, and maintained yellow marrow at MR imaging with a serpentine rim of high signal intensity (double-line sign) on images obtained with long repetition time sequences. These radiologic features correspond to the underlying pathology of osseous response to wall off the osteonecrotic process and attempts at repair with vascularized granulation tissue at the reactive interface. The long-term clinical importance of epiphyseal osteonecrosis is almost exclusively based on the likelihood of overlying articular collapse. MR imaging is generally considered the most sensitive and specific imaging modality both for early diagnosis and identifying features that increase the possibility of this complication. Treatment subsequent to articular collapse and development of secondary osteoarthritis typically requires reconstructive surgery. Malignant transformation of osteonecrosis is rare and almost exclusively associated with metadiaphyseal lesions. Imaging features of this dire sequela include aggressive bone destruction about the lesion margin, cortical involvement, and an associated soft-tissue mass. Recognizing the appearance of osteonecrosis, which reflects the underlying pathology, improves radiologic assessment and is important to guide optimal patient management.

  3. A comparison of active adverse event surveillance systems worldwide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Lin; Moon, Jinhee; Segal, Jodi B

    2014-08-01

    Post-marketing drug surveillance for adverse drug events (ADEs) has typically relied on spontaneous reporting. Recently, regulatory agencies have turned their attention to more preemptive approaches that use existing data for surveillance. We conducted an environmental scan to identify active surveillance systems worldwide that use existing data for the detection of ADEs. We extracted data about the systems' structures, data, and functions. We synthesized the information across systems to identify common features of these systems. We identified nine active surveillance systems. Two systems are US based-the FDA Sentinel Initiative (including both the Mini-Sentinel Initiative and the Federal Partner Collaboration) and the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD); two are Canadian-the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effect Studies (CNODES) and the Vaccine and Immunization Surveillance in Ontario (VISION); and two are European-the Exploring and Understanding Adverse Drug Reactions by Integrative Mining of Clinical Records and Biomedical Knowledge (EU-ADR) Alliance and the Vaccine Adverse Event Surveillance and Communication (VAESCO). Additionally, there is the Asian Pharmacoepidemiology Network (AsPEN) and the Shanghai Drug Monitoring and Evaluative System (SDMES). We identified two systems in the UK-the Vigilance and Risk Management of Medicines (VRMM) Division and the Drug Safety Research Unit (DSRU), an independent academic unit. These surveillance systems mostly use administrative claims or electronic medical records; most conduct pharmacovigilance on behalf of a regulatory agency. Either a common data model or a centralized model is used to access existing data. The systems have been built using national data alone or via partnership with other countries. However, active surveillance systems using existing data remain rare. North America and Europe have the most population coverage; with Asian countries making good advances.

  4. Evaluation and treatment of pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    González-Ibáñez, Angels; Rosel, Pilar; Moreno, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this article was to describe a model for evaluating and implementing cognitive-behavioral treatment for pathological gambling. The model takes into account the fact that pathological gamblers form a heterogeneous group with varied biopsychosocial characteristics.

  5. Genetic–pathologic characterization of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yonggoo; Park, Joonhong; Jo, Irene; Lee, Gun Dong; Kim, Jiyeon; Kwon, Ahlm; Choi, Hayoung; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Han, Kyungja; Eom, Ki-Seong; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Sung-Eun; Yang, Jinyoung; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Hyunjung; Ko, Yoon Ho; Park, Haeil; Jin, Jong Youl; Lee, Seungok; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Kim, Myungshin

    2016-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by the proliferation of one or more myeloid lineages. The current study demonstrates that three driver mutations were detected in 82.6% of 407 MPNs with a mutation distribution of JAK2 in 275 (67.6%), CALR in 55 (13.5%) and MPL in 6 (1.5%). The mutations were mutually exclusive in principle except in one patient with both CALR and MPL mutations. The driver mutation directed the pathologic features of MPNs, including lineage hyperplasia, laboratory findings and clinical presentation. JAK2-mutated MPN showed erythroid, granulocytic and/or megakaryocytic hyperplasia whereas CALR- and MPL-mutated MPNs displayed granulocytic and/or megakaryocytic hyperplasia. The lineage hyperplasia was closely associated with a higher mutant allele burden and peripheral cytosis. These findings corroborated that the lineage hyperplasia consisted of clonal proliferation of each hematopoietic lineage acquiring driver mutations. Our study has also demonstrated that bone marrow (BM) fibrosis was associated with disease progression. Patients with overt fibrosis (grade ⩾2) presented an increased mutant allele burden (P<0.001), an increase in chromosomal abnormalities (P<0.001) and a poor prognosis (P<0.001). Moreover, among patients with overt fibrosis, all patients with wild-type JAK2/CALR/MPL (triple-negative) showed genomic alterations by genome-wide microarray study and revealed the poorest overall survival, followed by JAK2-mutated MPNs. The genetic–pathologic characteristics provided the information for understanding disease pathogenesis and the progression of MPNs. The prognostic significance of the driver mutation and BM fibrosis suggests the necessity of a prospective therapeutic strategy to improve the clinical outcome. PMID:27444979

  6. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions... thorough investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of...

  7. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions... thorough investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of...

  8. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions... thorough investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of...

  9. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Sermin; Zadeoglulari, Zeynep; Fuss, Stefan H.; Genc, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health. PMID:22523490

  10. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  11. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  12. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  13. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  14. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  15. Recurrent adverse pregnancy outcome and antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Reece, E A; Gabrielli, S; Cullen, M T; Zheng, X Z; Hobbins, J C; Harris, E N

    1990-07-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies, which include lupus-like anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibody, have been linked to a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes, although their exact pathogenic mechanisms remain poorly defined. The relative risk of complications such as intrauterine growth retardation, spontaneous abortions, and stillbirth in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies also remains undetermined. Heightened attention has been focused on the association, leading to investigations into the pathogenesis. Uncontrolled studies have also explored therapeutic regimens such as aspirin, steroids, and heparin, and clinical trials have used various treatment protocols. Although knowledge into the association of antiphospholipid antibodies and recurrent adverse pregnancy outcome is limited and continues to evolve, this association provides new insights into the disease and offers promise for pharmacologic prophylaxis. In this article, current concepts on pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy are reviewed and recommendations are made for clinical care of these patients.

  16. Automatic adverse drug events detection using letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    We present and test the intuition that letters to the editor in journals carry early signals of adverse drug events (ADEs). Surprisingly these letters have not yet been exploited for automatic ADE detection unlike for example, clinical records and PubMed. Part of the challenge is that it is not easy to access the full-text of letters (for the most part these do not appear in PubMed). Also letters are likely underrated in comparison with full articles. Besides demonstrating that this intuition holds we contribute techniques for post market drug surveillance. Specifically, we test an automatic approach for ADE detection from letters using off-the-shelf machine learning tools. We also involve natural language processing for feature definitions. Overall we achieve high accuracy in our experiments and our method also works well on a second new test set. Our results encourage us to further pursue this line of research.

  17. Expanding the spectrum of neuronal pathology in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Coon, Elizabeth A; Powell, Suzanne Z; Jenkins, Sarah M; Benarroch, Eduardo E; Low, Phillip A; Schmeichel, Ann M; Parisi, Joseph E

    2015-08-01

    Multiple system atrophy is a sporadic alpha-synucleinopathy that typically affects patients in their sixth decade of life and beyond. The defining clinical features of the disease include progressive autonomic failure, parkinsonism, and cerebellar ataxia leading to significant disability. Pathologically, multiple system atrophy is characterized by glial cytoplasmic inclusions containing filamentous alpha-synuclein. Neuronal inclusions also have been reported but remain less well defined. This study aimed to further define the spectrum of neuronal pathology in 35 patients with multiple system atrophy (20 male, 15 female; mean age at death 64.7 years; median disease duration 6.5 years, range 2.2 to 15.6 years). The morphologic type, topography, and frequencies of neuronal inclusions, including globular cytoplasmic (Lewy body-like) neuronal inclusions, were determined across a wide spectrum of brain regions. A correlation matrix of pathologic severity also was calculated between distinct anatomic regions of involvement (striatum, substantia nigra, olivary and pontine nuclei, hippocampus, forebrain and thalamus, anterior cingulate and neocortex, and white matter of cerebrum, cerebellum, and corpus callosum). The major finding was the identification of widespread neuronal inclusions in the majority of patients, not only in typical disease-associated regions (striatum, substantia nigra), but also within anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, basal forebrain and hypothalamus. Neuronal inclusion pathology appeared to follow a hierarchy of region-specific susceptibility, independent of the clinical phenotype, and the severity of pathology was duration-dependent. Neuronal inclusions also were identified in regions not previously implicated in the disease, such as within cerebellar roof nuclei. Lewy body-like inclusions in multiple system atrophy followed the stepwise anatomic progression of Lewy body-spectrum disease inclusion pathology in 25.7% of patients

  18. An Ss Model with Adverse Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Christopher L.; Leahy, John V.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model of the market for a used durable in which agents face fixed costs of adjustment, the magnitude of which depends on the degree of adverse selection in the secondary market. We find that, unlike typical models, the sS bands in our model contract as the variance of the shock increases. We also analyze a dynamic version of the model…

  19. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Charles; Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui; Poulsen, Michael; Martin, Jarad; Jackson, James; Dickie, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  20. BRAF V600E and risk stratification of thyroid microcarcinoma: a multicenter pathological and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Tallini, Giovanni; de Biase, Dario; Durante, Cosimo; Acquaviva, Giorgia; Bisceglia, Michele; Bruno, Rocco; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Casadei, Gian Piero; Costante, Giuseppe; Cremonini, Nadia; Lamartina, Livia; Meringolo, Domenico; Nardi, Francesco; Pession, Annalisa; Rhoden, Kerry J; Ronga, Giuseppe; Torlontano, Massimo; Verrienti, Antonella; Visani, Michela; Filetti, Sebastiano

    2015-10-01

    distinct biological subtype. The mutation is associated with conventional clinico-pathological features considered to be adverse prognostic factors for papillary microcarcinoma, for which it could be regarded as a surrogate marker. BRAF analysis may be useful to identify tumors (BRAF wild type) that have negligible clinical risk.

  1. Childhood Adversities and Adult Cardiometabolic Health: Does the Quantity, Timing, and Type of Adversity Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Esther M.; Montez, Jennifer Karas; Sheehan, Connor McDevitt; Guenewald, Tara L.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adverse events in childhood can indelibly influence adult health. While evidence for this association has mounted, a fundamental set of questions about how to operationalize adverse events has been understudied. Method We used data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States to examine how quantity, timing, and types of adverse events in childhood are associated with adult cardiometabolic health. Results The best-fitting specification of quantity of events was a linear measure reflecting a dose–response relationship. Timing of event mattered less than repeated exposure to events. Regarding the type of event, academic interruptions and sexual/physical abuse were most important. Adverse childhood events elevated the risk of diabetes and obesity similarly for men and women but had a greater impact on women’s risk of heart disease. Discussion Findings demonstrate the insights that can be gleaned about the early-life origins of adult health by examining operationalization of childhood exposures. PMID:25903978

  2. Pathological buying and partnership status.

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; de Zwaan, Martina; Mitchell, James E; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2016-05-30

    This pilot study investigated the partnership status and the level of pathological buying (PB) in 157 female patients with PB and 1153 women from a German population-based sample. Slightly more than half of both samples were currently living with a partner. The results suggest a protective effect of being in a couple relationship in the representative sample. In contrast, having a partner was not related to the severity of PB among patients. Future studies should address the question of whether the characteristics and quality of partnership have an impact on the severity and course of PB, and vice versa.

  3. Correlation of Clinicoserologic and Pathologic Classifications of Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Carla; Bardin, Nathalie; De Paula, André Maues; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Benyamine, Audrey; Franques, Jérôme; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Weiller, Pierre-Jean; Pouget, Jean; Pellissier, Jean-François; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are acquired muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and inflammation on muscle biopsy. Clinicoserologic classifications do not take muscle histology into account to distinguish the subsets of IIM. Our objective was to determine the pathologic features of each serologic subset of IIM and to correlate muscle biopsy results with the clinicoserologic classification defined by Troyanov et al, and with the final diagnoses. We retrospectively studied a cohort of 178 patients with clinicopathologic features suggestive of IIM with the exclusion of inclusion body myositis. At the end of follow-up, 156 of 178 cases were still categorized as IIM: pure dermatomyositis, n = 44; pure polymyositis, n = 14; overlap myositis, n = 68; necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, n = 8; cancer-associated myositis, n = 18; and unclassified IIM, n = 4. The diagnosis of IIM was ruled out in the 22 remaining cases. Pathologic dermatomyositis was the most frequent histologic picture in all serologic subsets of IIM, with the exception of patients with anti-Ku or anti-SRP autoantibodies, suggesting that it supports the histologic diagnosis of pure dermatomyositis, but also myositis of connective tissue diseases and cancer-associated myositis. Unspecified myositis was the second most frequent histologic pattern. It frequently correlated with overlap myositis, especially with anti-Ku or anti-PM-Scl autoantibodies. Pathologic polymyositis was rare and more frequently correlated with myositis mimickers than true polymyositis. The current study shows that clinicoserologic and pathologic data are complementary and must be taken into account when classifying patients with IIM patients. We propose guidelines for diagnosis according to both clinicoserologic and pathologic classifications, to be used in clinical practice. PMID:23269233

  4. Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Network Development for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are descriptive biological sequences that start from a molecular initiating event (MIE) and end with an adverse health outcome. AOPs provide biological context for high throughput chemical testing and further prioritize environmental health risk research. According to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines, AOPs are pathways with one MIE anchored to an adverse outcome (AO) by key events (KEs) and key event relationships (KERs). However, this approach does not always capture the cumulative impacts of multiple MIEs on the AO. For example, hepatic lipid flux due to chemical-induced toxicity initiates from multiple ligand-activated receptors and signaling pathways that cascade across biology to converge upon a common fatty liver (FL, also known as steatosis) outcome. To capture this complexity, a top-down strategy was used to develop a FL AOP network (AOPnet). Literature was queried based on the terms steatosis, fatty liver, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Search results were analyzed for physiological and pathophysiological organ level, cellular and molecular processes, as well as pathway intermediates, to identify potential KEs and MIEs that are key for hepatic lipid metabolism, maintenance, and dysregulation. The analysis identified four apical KE nodes (hepatic fatty acid uptake, de novo fatty acid and lipid synthesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipid efflux) juxtaposed to the FL AO. The apic

  5. Serious Adverse Events After Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Over the past several decades there have been many advances in the equipment, instrumentation and techniques of performing cataract surgery. This review will address the impact of these advances on the safety profile of cataract surgery. Recent Findings Recent studies have demonstrated a decline in the risk of serious postoperative adverse events (endophthalmitis, suprachoroidal hemorrhage, retinal detachment) following cataract surgery. Factors that increase the risk of serious complications from cataract surgery include patient-related factors (male sex, concomitant diabetic retinopathy, same day cataract surgery combined with another intraocular surgery, tamsulosin use) and surgeon-related factors (low surgical volume, limited experience, operating on patients who are most prone to adverse events). Summary Cataract surgery continues to be a very safe surgical procedure with few patients experiencing serious sight-threatening adverse events. Studies in the literature have helped surgeons identify patients who are at high risk for surgical complications and to develop strategies to limit surgical complications when operating on these patients. As multifocal intraocular lenses, femtosecond laser technology, and other surgical innovations continue to gain popularity, it will be interesting in the coming years to determine whether there will be a continued reduction in complications of cataract surgery. PMID:22450221

  6. Statin-Associated Muscle Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohaissen, Maha A.; Ignaszewski, Martha J.; Frohlich, Jiri; Ignaszewski, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Statins are potent medications which reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Their efficacy in cardiovascular risk reduction is well established and indications for their use are expanding. While statins are generally well tolerated and safe, adverse events are relatively common, particularly statin-associated muscle adverse events (SaMAEs), which are the most frequently encountered type of adverse event. Recent guidelines and guideline updates on SaMAEs and statin intolerance have included revised definitions of SaMAEs, incorporating new evidence on their pathogenesis and management. As SaMAEs emerge as a therapeutic challenge, it is important for physicians to be aware of updates on management strategies to ensure better patient outcomes. The majority of patients who are considered statin-intolerant can nevertheless tolerate some forms of statin therapy and successfully achieve optimal LDL-C levels. This review article discusses the recent classification of SaMAEs with emphasis on pathogenesis and management strategies. PMID:28003885

  7. Metabolic and adverse effects of diuretics.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C S

    1999-11-01

    Diuretics are among the most frequently prescribed drugs. They enjoy a very high clinical reputation for safety and efficacy. However, more than 3 decades of clinical investigation have disclosed a number of abnormalities in fluid electrolyte handling, metabolism, and other adverse effects that can complicate therapy with diuretic drugs. Some of these complications are a direct extension of the wanted action of the drug. These include extracellular fluid volume depletion, associated orthostatic hypotension, and prerenal azotemia. Others are not a direct action of the diuretic, but can be explained as an intranephronal compensation to the diuretic action. These include hypokalemia, in part to increased potassium secretion secondary to the enhanced tubular fluid flow and aldosterone secretion induced by diuretic administration. Metabolic abnormalities are usually mild. Hyperglycemia and carbohydrate intolerance have been related to diuretic-induced hypokalemia, which inhibits insulin secretion by the beta cells, and reductions in extracellular fluid volume and cardiac output. This is compounded by increases in catecholamines from sympathetic nerve activity which decrease peripheral glucose utilization. A mild increase in serum cholesterol concentration is seen frequently during initiation of diuretic therapy, but during steady state therapy after 6 to 12 months, values usually return to baseline. Knowledge of the more common adverse effects induced by diuretics helps the physician in predicting patients at risk and taking effective steps to anticipate or treat adverse responses.

  8. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors.

  9. Combating adverse selection in secondary PC markets.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Stewart W; Fitzpatrick, Colin

    2008-04-15

    Adverse selection is a significant contributor to market failure in secondary personal computer (PC) markets. Signaling can act as a potential solution to adverse selection and facilitate superior remarketing of second-hand PCs. Signaling is a means whereby usage information can be utilized to enhance consumer perception of both value and utility of used PCs and, therefore, promote lifetime extension for these systems. This can help mitigate a large portion of the environmental impact associated with PC system manufacture. In this paper, the computer buying and selling behavior of consumers is characterized via a survey of 270 Irish residential users. Results confirm the existence of adverse selection in the Irish market with 76% of potential buyers being unwilling to purchase and 45% of potential vendors being unwilling to sell a used PC. The so-called "closet affect" is also apparent with 78% of users storing their PC after use has ceased. Results also indicate that consumers place a higher emphasis on specifications when considering a second-hand purchase. This contradicts their application needs which are predominantly Internet and word-processing/spreadsheet/presentation applications, 88% and 60% respectively. Finally, a market solution utilizing self monitoring and reporting technology (SMART) sensors for the purpose of real time usage monitoring is proposed, that can change consumer attitudes with regard to second-hand computer equipment.

  10. An investigation of vocal tract characteristics for acoustic discrimination of pathological voices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Won; Kang, Hong-Goo; Choi, Jeung-Yoon; Son, Young-Ik

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of measures related to vocal tract characteristics in classifying normal and pathological speech. Unlike conventional approaches that mainly focus on features related to the vocal source, vocal tract characteristics are examined to determine if interaction effects between vocal folds and the vocal tract can be used to detect pathological speech. Especially, this paper examines features related to formant frequencies to see if vocal tract characteristics are affected by the nature of the vocal fold-related pathology. To test this hypothesis, stationary fragments of vowel /aa/ produced by 223 normal subjects, 472 vocal fold polyp subjects, and 195 unilateral vocal cord paralysis subjects are analyzed. Based on the acoustic-articulatory relationships, phonation for pathological subjects is found to be associated with measures correlated with a raised tongue body or an advanced tongue root. Vocal tract-related features are also found to be statistically significant from the Kruskal-Wallis test in distinguishing normal and pathological speech. Classification results demonstrate that combining the formant measurements with vocal fold-related features results in improved performance in differentiating vocal pathologies including vocal polyps and unilateral vocal cord paralysis, which suggests that measures related to vocal tract characteristics may provide additional information in diagnosing vocal disorders.

  11. Interpersonal guilt in college student pathological gamblers

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Geoffrey W.; Shilkret, Robert; Everett, Joyce E.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Interpersonal guilt is associated with psychopathology, but its relationship to pathological gambling has not been studied. Objectives This study examined the relationship between interpersonal guilt and pathological gambling. Methods In total, 1,979 college students completed a questionnaire containing the South Oaks Gambling Screen, Interpersonal Guilt Questionnaire, and questions about substance use. Students identified as pathological gamblers (n = 145) were matched to non-problem gamblers with respect to demographics and substance use. Results Pathological gamblers had significantly higher interpersonal guilt than their non-problem gambling peers. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Pathological gambling college students have excessive interpersonal guilt, and these findings may lead to novel treatment approaches. PMID:22746179

  12. Quality assurance in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Ong, Beng Beng; Milne, Nathan

    2009-06-01

    One of the requirements for proper running of a pathology laboratory is implementation of a quality assurance programme. Forensic pathology is not exempted, especially so when cases are increasing in complexity. It is not difficult to introduce a quality assurance programme even in a small forensic centre. Among the steps that can be implemented including introduction of a set of minimal standards in performance of the autopsy, timeliness and report writing, a vigorous peer review process either internally or externally and participation in external quality programmes. Proper documentation of the post-mortem process (photography, slides and blocks and various imaging modalities) is to be encouraged. There should be limits set on workload of pathologists as overburden is known to lower standards. A pleasant work environment is also essential. Personal continuous medical education should be made mandatory. Introduction of a quality assurance programme will not only improve standards but minimise possible negligence. The post-mortem reports will be seen to carry more weight in court.

  13. Virtual microscopy in pathology education.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R

    2009-08-01

    Technology for acquisition of virtual slides was developed in 1985; however, it was not until the late 1990s that desktop computers had enough processing speed to commercialize virtual microscopy and apply the technology to education. By 2000, the progressive decrease in use of traditional microscopy in medical student education had set the stage for the entry of virtual microscopy into medical schools. Since that time, it has been successfully implemented into many pathology courses in the United States and around the world, with surveys indicating that about 50% of pathology courses already have or expect to implement virtual microscopy. Over the last decade, in addition to an increasing ability to emulate traditional microscopy, virtual microscopy has allowed educators to take advantage of the accessibility, efficiency, and pedagogic versatility of the computer and the Internet. The cost of virtual microscopy in education is now quite reasonable after taking into account replacement cost for microscopes, maintenance of glass slides, and the fact that 1-dimensional microscope space can be converted to multiuse computer laboratories or research. Although the current technology for implementation of virtual microscopy in histopathology education is very good, it could be further improved upon by better low-power screen resolution and depth of field. Nevertheless, virtual microscopy is beginning to play an increasing role in continuing education, house staff education, and evaluation of competency in histopathology. As Z-axis viewing (focusing) becomes more efficient, virtual microscopy will also become integrated into education in cytology, hematology, microbiology, and urinalysis.

  14. Anatomical pathology is dead? Long live anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, John M; Francis, Glenn D

    2011-10-01

    The standard diagnostic instrument used for over 150 years by anatomical pathologists has been the optical microscope and glass slide. The advent of immunohistochemistry in the routine laboratory in the 1980s, followed by in situ hybridisation in the 1990s, has increased the armamentaria available to the diagnostic pathologist, and this technology has led to changed patient management in a limited number of neoplastic diseases. The first decade of the 21 century has seen an increasing number of publications using proteomic technologies that promise to change disease diagnosis and management, the traditional role of an anatomical pathologist. Despite the plethora of publications on proteomics and pathology, to date there are actually limited data where proteomic technologies do appear to be of greater diagnostic value than the standard histological slide. Though proteomic techniques will become more prevalent in the future, it will need the expertise of an anatomical pathologist to dissect out and validate this added information.

  15. Challenges in disclosure of adverse events and errors in surgery; perspectives from sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed; Garba, Ekundayo Stephen; Asuku, Malachy Eneye

    2012-01-01

    Surgery in sub-Saharan Africa is widely known to be done against a background of poverty and illiteracy, late presentation with complicated pathologies, and a desperate lack of infrastructure. In addition, patient autonomy and self determination are highly flavored by cultural practices and religious beliefs. Any of these factors can influence the pattern and disclosure of adverse events and errors. The impact of these in the relationships between surgeons and patients, and between health institutions and patients must be considered as it may affect disclosure and response to errors. This article identifies the peculiar socioeconomic and cultural challenges that may hinder disclosure and proposes strategies for instituting disclosure of errors and adverse events services in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Online feature selection with streaming features.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xindong; Yu, Kui; Ding, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Xingquan

    2013-05-01

    We propose a new online feature selection framework for applications with streaming features where the knowledge of the full feature space is unknown in advance. We define streaming features as features that flow in one by one over time whereas the number of training examples remains fixed. This is in contrast with traditional online learning methods that only deal with sequentially added observations, with little attention being paid to streaming features. The critical challenges for Online Streaming Feature Selection (OSFS) include 1) the continuous growth of feature volumes over time, 2) a large feature space, possibly of unknown or infinite size, and 3) the unavailability of the entire feature set before learning starts. In the paper, we present a novel Online Streaming Feature Selection method to select strongly relevant and nonredundant features on the fly. An efficient Fast-OSFS algorithm is proposed to improve feature selection performance. The proposed algorithms are evaluated extensively on high-dimensional datasets and also with a real-world case study on impact crater detection. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithms achieve better compactness and higher prediction accuracy than existing streaming feature selection algorithms.

  17. [Features of hormonal homeostasis under adverse industrial and ecologic conditions (a review)].

    PubMed

    Abushakhmanova, A Kh

    2001-01-01

    The paper deals with changes in hormonal homeostasis under the long-term influence of industrial and ecological factors. It presents data available in the literature on adaptive and abnormal hormonal changes in workers exposed to noxious agents and in the residents of ecologically poor regions. Emphasis is laid on hormonal imbalance in the pathogenesis of different diseases, including occupational ones.

  18. Aging display's effect on interpretation of digital pathology slide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Espig, Kathryn S.; Sawhney, Sameer; Pantanowitzc, Liron; Parwani, Anil V.; Xthona, Albert; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2015-03-01

    It is our conjecture that the variability of colors in a pathology image effects the interpretation of pathology cases, whether it is diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic confidence, or workflow efficiency. In this paper, digital pathology images are analyzed to quantify the perceived difference in color that occurs due to display aging, in particular a change in the maximum luminance, white point, and color gamut. The digital pathology images studied include diagnostically important features, such as the conspicuity of nuclei. Three different display aging models are applied to images: aging of luminance and chrominance, aging of chrominance only, and a stabilized luminance and chrominance (i.e., no aging). These display models and images are then used to compare conspicuity of nuclei using CIE ΔE2000, a perceptual color difference metric. The effect of display aging using these display models and images is further analyzed through a human reader study designed to quantify the effects from a clinical perspective. Results from our reader study indicate significant impact of aged displays on workflow as well as diagnosis. Comparing original (not aged) images to aged images, aged images were significantly more difficult to read (p-value of 0.0005) and took longer to score (p-value of 0.02). Moreover, luminance and chrominance aging significantly reduced inter-session percent agreement of diagnostic scores (p-value of 0.0418).

  19. Adverse effects of statins - myths and reality.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Iveta; Reiner, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity as well as cardiovascular events in patients with a very high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and also in subjects with high or moderate risk by reducing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Although they are considered to be drugs with a very good safety profile, because of their wide use there are many concerns that their adverse effects might compromise their proven beneficial effects. Therefore this article reviews all the data and provides an evidence- based insight what are the proven adverse effects of statins and what are the "myths" about them. The most important side effects include myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Another side effect is increased activity of liver tests which occurs occasionally and is reversible. However, recent studies even suggest that statin therapy can improve hepatic steatosis. It is beyond any doubt that statins do slightly increase the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in people with two or more components of metabolic syndrome but the cardiovascular benefits of such a treatment by far exceed this risk. Statin therapy has also been associated with some adverse renal effects, eg. acute renal failure, but recent data suggest even a possible protective effect of these drugs on renal dysfunction. Concerns that statins might increase cancer have not been proven. On the contrary, several studies have indicated a possible benefit of these drugs in patients with different types of cancer. Early concerns about cognitive dysfunction and memory loss associated with statins use could not be proven and most recent data even suggest a possible beneficial effect of statins in the prevention of dementia. Systematic reviews and clinical guidelines suggest that the cardiovascular benefits of statins by far out-weight non-cardiovascular harms in patients with cardiovascular risk.

  20. Determinants of Adverse Events in Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; McDonald, Kathryn; Morton, John; Dalman, Ron L; Bech, Fritz R

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a national priority. Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) monitor potential adverse events during hospital stays. Surgical specialty PSI benchmarks do not exist, which are needed to account for differences in the range of procedures performed, reasons for the procedure, and differences in patient characteristics. A comprehensive profile of adverse events in vascular surgery was created. Study Design The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried for 8 vascular procedures using ICD-9-CM codes from 2005–2009. Factors associated with PSI development were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. Results A total of 1,412,703 patients underwent a vascular procedure and 5.2% developed a PSI. PSIs were more frequent in female, non-white patients with public payers (p<.01). Patients at mid and low volume hospitals had greater odds of developing a PSI (Odds Ratio [OR], 1.17; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.10–1.23 and OR, 1.69; CI, 1.53–1.87). Amputations had highest PSI risk-adjusted rate (RAR) and carotid endarterectomy and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair had lower RAR (p<.0001). PSI RAR increased linearly by severity of patient indication: claudicants (OR, 0.40, CI, 0.35–0.46), rest pain patients (OR, 0.78, CI 0.69–0.90), ulcer (OR: 1.20, CI: 1.07–1.34) and gangrene patients (OR:1.85, CI: 1.66–2.06). Conclusions Patient safety events in vascular surgery were high and varied by procedure, with amputations and open AAA having substantially more potential adverse events. PSIs were associated with black race, public payer, and procedure indication. It is important to note the overall higher rates of PSIs occurring in vascular patients and appropriately adjust benchmarks for this surgical specialty. PMID:22425449

  1. Image microarrays (IMA): Digital pathology's missing tool

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Jason; Cheng, Jerome; Pantanowitz, Liron; Hewitt, Stephen; Yagi, Yukako; Monaco, James; Madabhushi, Anant; Rodriguez-canales, Jaime; Hanson, Jeffrey; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Filie, Armando C.; Feldman, Michael D.; Tomaszewski, John E.; Shih, Natalie NC.; Brodsky, Victor; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Balis, Ulysses J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The increasing availability of whole slide imaging (WSI) data sets (digital slides) from glass slides offers new opportunities for the development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) algorithms. With the all-digital pathology workflow that these data sets will enable in the near future, literally millions of digital slides will be generated and stored. Consequently, the field in general and pathologists, specifically, will need tools to help extract actionable information from this new and vast collective repository. Methods: To address this limitation, we designed and implemented a tool (dCORE) to enable the systematic capture of image tiles with constrained size and resolution that contain desired histopathologic features. Results: In this communication, we describe a user-friendly tool that will enable pathologists to mine digital slides archives to create image microarrays (IMAs). IMAs are to digital slides as tissue microarrays (TMAs) are to cell blocks. Thus, a single digital slide could be transformed into an array of hundreds to thousands of high quality digital images, with each containing key diagnostic morphologies and appropriate controls. Current manual digital image cut-and-paste methods that allow for the creation of a grid of images (such as an IMA) of matching resolutions are tedious. Conclusion: The ability to create IMAs representing hundreds to thousands of vetted morphologic features has numerous applications in education, proficiency testing, consensus case review, and research. Lastly, in a manner analogous to the way conventional TMA technology has significantly accelerated in situ studies of tissue specimens use of IMAs has similar potential to significantly accelerate CAD algorithm development. PMID:22200030

  2. Pathologic findings in nonpalpable invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McKinney, C D; Frierson, H F; Fechner, R E; Wilhelm, M C; Edge, S B

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients with nonpalpable invasive breast cancer have a favorable prognosis. These studies, however, have not analyzed pathologic features of mammographically detected tumors according to tumor size. We describe the histopathologic features of 77 nonpalpable invasive breast cancers, comparing neoplasms less than or equal to 1 cm with larger clinically occult tumors. Forty-seven lesions (61%) were less than or equal to 1 cm (group A) and 30 (39%) were greater than 1 cm (group B). In group A, there were 30 infiltrating ductal carcinomas (IDC); seven infiltrating lobular carcinomas (ILC); and two cases each of mixed ILC and IDC, mixed tubular carcinoma and ILC, and infiltrating cribriform carcinoma. There was one case each of mucinous carcinoma, apocrine carcinoma, tubular carcinoma, and mixed mucinous and IDC. In group B, there were 23 (77%) IDC, five (17%) ILC, and two mixed IDC and ILC. Tumors in group B were more frequently grade 3 (22% versus 7%), but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.21). There were no important differences in the frequency, subtypes and location of carcinoma in situ, or other histopathologic parameters evaluated in the biopsy specimens. Mastectomy specimens with axillary lymph node dissections were available for review in 64 cases (83%). Group B patients had a higher rate of residual invasive carcinoma (31% versus 13%) and lymph node metastases (31% versus 16%), but these differences were not statistically significant. Residual carcinoma in situ was more frequent in group B (54%) compared with group A (26%) (p = .036). Of seven group B cases with negative biopsy margins, residual invasive carcinoma was present in five (71%). We conclude that small nonpalpable invasive breast cancers differ from larger nonpalpable tumors primarily in size. The finding of negative biopsy margins should not be construed as conclusive evidence for the absence of residual infiltrating disease.

  3. Agomelatine: a review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    More pharmacovigilance data on agomelatine became available in 2012. The main sources of information were surveillance data from the French national monitoring system, EU periodic safety update reports (PSURs), and the European pharmacovigilance database. The principal adverse effects of agomelatine consist of hepatic, pancreatic, neuropsychiatric, muscular and cutaneous disorders. The harms associated with agomelatine, which has no proven efficacy in depression, clearly outweigh the benefits. Until regulatory agencies decide to withdraw agomelatine from the market, it is up to healthcare professionals to protect patients from this unnecessarily dangerous drug.

  4. Joint Commission suspends 'auto' adverse decision.

    PubMed

    2010-08-01

    The Joint Commission's revision of its policy on root cause analysis puts greater attention of something that, quite frankly, some ED managers might not have been aware of. The ED manager plays an important role when events occur in the department, such as: knowing who the main Joint Commission contact is in the hospital, and making them aware of a potential adverse or sentinel event that has occurred; participating in the root cause analysis to identify what ED processes might need improvement; making sure the remedial activities recommended can be measured, so The Joint Commission can see an active attempt is being made to improve.

  5. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  6. [Adverse drug effects in the community pharmacy].

    PubMed

    Arnet, Isabelle; Seidling, Hanna M; Hersberger, Kurt E

    2015-12-01

    Community pharmacists represent an important pillar for the identification and the reporting of adverse drug effects (ADE}. Thanks to their broad view on the pharmacotherapy, over-the-counter medication included, they contribute greatly to the improvement of drug safety. In principle, the community pharmacy will face three groups of ADE which require specific attention. This article deals with these specific ADE groups and presents some illustrative examples from daily practice. Furthermore, we suggest some solutions to identify potential relevant interactions - including herbal-drug interactions - and give tips for daily practice, along with some often overseen cutaneous ADE.

  7. Mitigation of adverse environmental and unavoidable impacts

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This portion of the Energy Vision 2020 draft report is a broad scope discussion of the mitigation of adverse environmental and unavoidable impacts. TVA will mitigate site specific environmental impacts from the construction and operation of new power facilities through a combination of planning, pollution prevention, and environmental controls. However, one of the most important mitigative measures associated with Energy Vision 2020 is the multi-attribute tradeoff method used for the evaluation. This method allowed proposed strategies to be reformated in order to reduce potential impacts.

  8. Update in large cell lymphoma: understanding the pathology report.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse aggressive large B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of B-cell malignancies. Although many are readily recognized due to characteristic clinical and pathologic features, several problematic areas still exist in diagnosis of these lymphomas due to a variety of reasons that include imprecise or difficult-to-apply diagnostic criteria, gaps in our understanding of lymphoma biology, and limitations in technologies available in the clinical laboratory compared to the research laboratory. This may result in some degree of confusion in the pathology report, particularly if the issues are not clearly explained, leading to frustration or misinterpretation on the part of the reader. In this review, I will discuss the pathologic features of a subset of the WHO 2008 classification diffuse aggressive large B-cell lymphomas, focusing on areas in which difficulties exist in diagnosis and/or biomarker marker assessment. A deeper understanding of the issues and areas of uncertainty due to limitations in our knowledge about the biology of these diseases should lead to better communication between pathologists and clinicians.

  9. Shock lung and diffuse alveolar damage pathological and pathogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Blennerhassett, J B

    1985-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar damage may be caused by any one or more of a large number of injurious agents. While the etiology may be diverse, the pathology is relatively uniform ranging from an acute exudative phase characterized by protein-rich interstitial and alveolar edema, through to a reactive subacute proliferative phase characterized by interstitial fibroplasia and collagenization together with granular pneumocyte hyperplasia. Interstitial inflammation is a variable feature and of course mixed exudative and proliferative features are common. In the clinically overt adult respiratory distress syndrome, the mortality is formidable. The pathogenesis is damage to endothelial cells and membranous pneumocytes. This may be caused by direct chemical action or indirectly through the mediation of oxidizing free radicles or leukotrienes. In diffuse alveolar damage associated with shock, recent work suggests mediation of the cellular injury via complement activation following tissue injury, with the major pathology being due to lysosomal enzyme damage from phagocytes chemotactically attracted to the lung. Etiological factors in diffuse alveolar damage are numerous and details of appropriate primary therapy are therefore diverse. The pathogenesis and pathology are however relatively uniform, calling for uniform supportive therapeutic measures of the clinical adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  10. Peripheral nerve and neuromuscular junction pathology in Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Darin J.; Todd, Adrian Gary; Lee, Sooyeon; Soustek, Meghan S.; ElMallah, Mai K.; Fuller, David D.; Notterpek, Lucia; Byrne, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease is a systemic metabolic disorder characterized by lack of acid-alpha glucosidase (GAA) resulting in ubiquitous lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Respiratory and ambulatory dysfunction are prominent features in patients with Pompe yet the mechanism defining the development of muscle weakness is currently unclear. Transgenic animal models of Pompe disease mirroring the patient phenotype have been invaluable in mechanistic and therapeutic study. Here, we demonstrate significant pathological alterations at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of the diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscle as prominent features of disease pathology in Gaa knockout mice. Postsynaptic defects including increased motor endplate area and fragmentation were readily observed in Gaa−/− but not wild-type mice. Presynaptic neuropathic changes were also evident, as demonstrated by significant reduction in the levels of neurofilament proteins, and alterations in axonal fiber diameter and myelin thickness within the sciatic and phrenic nerves. Our data suggest the loss of NMJ integrity is a primary contributor to the decline in respiratory and ambulatory function in Pompe and arises from both pre- and postsynaptic pathology. These observations highlight the importance of systemic phenotype correction, specifically restoration of GAA to skeletal muscle and the nervous system for treatment of Pompe disease. PMID:25217571

  11. Diabetes and Alzheimer Disease, Two Overlapping Pathologies with the Same Background: Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien; Reiter, Russel J.

    2015-01-01

    There are several oxidative stress-related pathways interconnecting Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes, two public health problems worldwide. Coincidences are so compelling that it is attractive to speculate they are the same disorder. However, some pathological mechanisms as observed in diabetes are not necessarily the same mechanisms related to Alzheimer's or the only ones related to Alzheimer's pathology. Oxidative stress is inherent to Alzheimer's and feeds a vicious cycle with other key pathological features, such as inflammation and Ca2+ dysregulation. Alzheimer's pathology by itself may lead to insulin resistance in brain, insulin resistance being an intervening variable in the neurodegenerative disorder. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance from diabetes, overlapping with the Alzheimer's pathology, aggravate the progression of the neurodegenerative processes, indeed. But the same pathophysiological background is behind the consequences, oxidative stress. We emphasize oxidative stress and its detrimental role in some key regulatory enzymes. PMID:25815110

  12. Proteome analysis in thyroid pathology.

    PubMed

    Pagni, Fabio; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Bono, Francesca; Garancini, Mattia; Roversi, Gaia; De Sio, Gabriele; Galli, Manuel; Smith, Andrew James; Chinello, Clizia; Magni, Fulvio

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has continuously increased due to its detection in the preclinical stage. Clinical research in thyroid pathology is focusing on the development of new diagnostic tools to improve the stratification of nodules that have biological, practical and economic consequences on the management of patients. Several clinical questions related to thyroid carcinoma remain open and the use of proteomic research in the hunt for new targets with potential diagnostic applications has an important role in the solutions. Many different proteomic approaches are used to investigate thyroid lesions, including mass spectrometry profiling and imaging technologies. These approaches have been applied to different human tissues (cytological specimens, frozen sections, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue or Tissue Micro Arrays). Moreover, other specimens are used for biomarker discovery, such as cell lines and the secretome. Alternative approaches, such as metabolomics and lipidomics, are also used and integrated within proteomics.

  13. [Ductoscopy for pathologic nipple discharge].

    PubMed

    Waaijer, Laurien; van Diest, Paul J; van der Pol, Carmen C; Verolme, Berna; Hennink, Annelies; Witkamp, Arjen J

    2013-01-01

    Pathologic nipple discharge is a symptom that frequently causes female patients to visit the outpatient breast clinic. In the vast majority of cases, the symptom is caused by a benign intraductal laesion. The options for diagnosis and treatment have long been limited; surgery was not infrequently the treatment of choice. With the advent of breast ductoscopy, a micro-endoscopic procedure, it is possible to visualise abnormalities in the ductal system. Tissue for histopathological investigation can be retrieved from the duct and the condition can be treated. The patient with nipple discharge is consequently prevented from having to undergo an invasive and fairly 'blindly' executed procedure under general anaesthesia. The miniscule dimensions of the duct in which the technique is carried out pose the greatest challenge to the further development of the ductoscope.

  14. Adverse environments and children's creativity development: transforming the notion of "success in adversity" in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; Tan, Mei; Liu, Zhengkui

    2015-01-01

    China has been undergoing great social change due to its new focus on urbanization and globalization. Such change has had a tremendous adverse impact on the living conditions of millions of young children, simultaneously generating new interest in children's creativity development. The intersection of these two issues has important implications for China's future as it brings together one of China's core cultural values-"success in adversity"-the importance of creativity, and very real social and economic needs. "Success in adversity" reflects the strongly held belief that individuals who suffer adverse environments can rise to excellence and success through persistence, effort, and creativity. In this article, we briefly explore the historical sources of this belief and how it is closely related to the Chinese conception of creativity. We then present some studies on the creativity of some of China's migrant children. Findings show that while migrant children as a group may not generally exhibit higher creativity than their urban peers as hypothesized, indications of resilience and creative potential suggest that the notion of success in adversity may contribute to the positive development of China's migrant children more substantially when it is informed by research and augmented by research-supported policy.

  15. Lung vasculitis and alveolar hemorrhage: pathology.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary vasculitides are a diverse group of limited and systemic disorders associated with inflammation of pulmonary vessels and parenchyma. These diseases often have distinctive clinical, serological, and histopathological features-extrapulmonary sites of involvement, circulating autoantibodies, predispositions for small or large vessels, and others. Some have characteristic inflammatory lesions; others are characterized by the absence of such lesions. Frequently pathological findings overlap, rendering classification, and diagnosis a challenge. The anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small-vessel diseases constitute the major pulmonary vasculitides. These include Wegener granulomatosis (WG), Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS), and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). Less frequently, diseases such as polyarteritis nodosa, Takayasu arteritis, Behçet syndrome, and connective tissue diseases may involve pulmonary vessels, but these entities are better associated with extrapulmonary disease. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a severe manifestation of pulmonary vasculitis. DAH is most commonly seen in small-vessel vasculitides, specifically MPA and WG. Other syndromes associated with DAH include Goodpasture syndrome, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Less commonly, DAH may be secondary to infection or drugs/toxins. Furthermore, in the absence of discernable systemic disease, DAH may be idiopathic-referred to as isolated pulmonary capillaritis (IPC) or idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH), depending on the presence of capillaritis.

  16. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Mago, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Adverse effects are common, bothersome, and a leading cause of discontinuation of treatment. The methodology for evaluating adverse effects of medications has been greatly neglected, however, especially in comparison to the methodology for assessment of efficacy of medications. Existing methods for assessment and reporting of adverse effects have important limitations leading to lack of much-needed data related to adverse effects. Lastly, there is little systematic research into management of most adverse effects. A series of recommendations are made in this article about how to improve identification, assessment, reporting, and management of adverse effects.

  17. Feature space analysis of MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Windham, Joe P.; Peck, Donald J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents development and performance evaluation of an MRI feature space method. The method is useful for: identification of tissue types; segmentation of tissues; and quantitative measurements on tissues, to obtain information that can be used in decision making (diagnosis, treatment planning, and evaluation of treatment). The steps of the work accomplished are as follows: (1) Four T2-weighted and two T1-weighted images (before and after injection of Gadolinium) were acquired for ten tumor patients. (2) Images were analyed by two image analysts according to the following algorithm. The intracranial brain tissues were segmented from the scalp and background. The additive noise was suppressed using a multi-dimensional non-linear edge- preserving filter which preserves partial volume information on average. Image nonuniformities were corrected using a modified lowpass filtering approach. The resulting images were used to generate and visualize an optimal feature space. Cluster centers were identified on the feature space. Then images were segmented into normal tissues and different zones of the tumor. (3) Biopsy samples were extracted from each patient and were subsequently analyzed by the pathology laboratory. (4) Image analysis results were compared to each other and to the biopsy results. Pre- and post-surgery feature spaces were also compared. The proposed algorithm made it possible to visualize the MRI feature space and to segment the image. In all cases, the operators were able to find clusters for normal and abnormal tissues. Also, clusters for different zones of the tumor were found. Based on the clusters marked for each zone, the method successfully segmented the image into normal tissues (white matter, gray matter, and CSF) and different zones of the lesion (tumor, cyst, edema, radiation necrosis, necrotic core, and infiltrated tumor). The results agreed with those obtained from the biopsy samples. Comparison of pre- to post-surgery and radiation

  18. Parsing (malicious) pleasures: schadenfreude and gloating at others' adversity.

    PubMed

    Leach, Colin Wayne; Spears, Russell; Manstead, Antony S R

    2015-01-01

    We offer the first empirical comparison of the pleasure in seeing (i.e., schadenfreude) and in causing (i.e., gloating) others' adversity. In Study 1, we asked participants to recall and report on an (individual or group) episode of pleasure that conformed to our formal definition of schadenfreude, gloating, pride, or joy, without reference to an emotion word. Schadenfreude and gloating were distinct in the situational features of the episode, participants' appraisals of it, and their expressions of pleasure (e.g., smiling, boasting). In Study 2, we had participants imagine being in an (individual or group) emotion episode designed to fit our conceptualization of schadenfreude or gloating. Individual and group versions of the emotions did not differ much in either study. However, the two pleasures differed greatly in their situational features, appraisals, experience, and expression. This parsing of the particular pleasures of schadenfreude and gloating brings nuance to the study of (malicious) pleasure, which tends to be less finely conceptualized and examined than displeasure despite its importance to social relations.

  19. Parsing (malicious) pleasures: schadenfreude and gloating at others’ adversity

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Colin Wayne; Spears, Russell; Manstead, Antony S. R.

    2015-01-01

    We offer the first empirical comparison of the pleasure in seeing (i.e., schadenfreude) and in causing (i.e., gloating) others’ adversity. In Study 1, we asked participants to recall and report on an (individual or group) episode of pleasure that conformed to our formal definition of schadenfreude, gloating, pride, or joy, without reference to an emotion word. Schadenfreude and gloating were distinct in the situational features of the episode, participants’ appraisals of it, and their expressions of pleasure (e.g., smiling, boasting). In Study 2, we had participants imagine being in an (individual or group) emotion episode designed to fit our conceptualization of schadenfreude or gloating. Individual and group versions of the emotions did not differ much in either study. However, the two pleasures differed greatly in their situational features, appraisals, experience, and expression. This parsing of the particular pleasures of schadenfreude and gloating brings nuance to the study of (malicious) pleasure, which tends to be less finely conceptualized and examined than displeasure despite its importance to social relations. PMID:25767455

  20. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis--a distinctive clinico-pathological entity.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M J; Pomerance, A; Teare, R D

    1975-01-01

    Eleven cases of idiopathic giant cell myocarditis are described, The pathological features are unmistakable with serpiginous areas of myocardial necrosis, at the margins of which giant cells can be seen on histological examination. The aetiology of the condition remains obscure but associated pathology suggests that altered immunity may be a factor. The rapid clinical course is, however, highly suggestive of an infective cause though none has been found. Images PMID:1122272

  1. Adverse outcome pathway development II: best practices.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Daniel L; Crump, Doug; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hecker, Markus; Hutchinson, Thomas H; LaLone, Carlie A; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lettieri, Teresa; Munn, Sharon; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Vergauwen, Lucia; Whelan, Maurice

    2014-12-01

    Organization of existing and emerging toxicological knowledge into adverse outcome pathway (AOP) descriptions can facilitate greater application of mechanistic data, including those derived through high-throughput in vitro, high content omics and imaging, and biomarker approaches, in risk-based decision making. The previously ad hoc process of AOP development is being formalized through development of internationally harmonized guidance and principles. The goal of this article was to outline the information content desired for formal AOP description and some rules of thumb and best practices intended to facilitate reuse and connectivity of elements of an AOP description in a knowledgebase and network context. For example, key events (KEs) are measurements of change in biological state that are indicative of progression of a perturbation toward a specified adverse outcome. Best practices for KE description suggest that each KE should be defined as an independent measurement made at a particular level of biological organization. The concept of "functional equivalence" can help guide both decisions about how many KEs to include in an AOP and the specificity with which they are defined. Likewise, in describing both KEs and evidence that supports a causal linkage or statistical association between them (ie, a key event relationship; KER), best practice is to build from and contribute to existing KE or KER descriptions in the AOP knowledgebase rather than creating redundant descriptions. The best practices proposed address many of the challenges and uncertainties related to AOP development and help promote a consistent and reliable, yet flexible approach.

  2. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development and evaluation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway provides a construct for assembling mechanistic information at different levels of biological organization in a form designed to support regulatory decision making. In particular, it frames the link between molecular and cellular events that can be measured in high throughput toxicity testing and the organism or population-level events that are commonly relevant in defining risk. Recognizing the importance of this emerging framework, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) launched a program to support the development, documentation and consideration of AOPs by the international community in 2012 (http://www.oecd.org/chemicalsafety/testing/adverse-outcome-pathways-molecular-screening-and-toxicogenomics.htm). In 2014, a handbook (https://aopkb.org/common/AOP_Handbook.pdf) was developed to guide users in the documentation and evaluation of AOPs and their entry into an official knowledgebase. The handbook draws on longstanding experience in consideration of mechanistic data (e.g., mode of action analysis) to inform risk assessment. To further assist users, a training program was developed by members of the OECD Extended Advisory Group to teach users the basic principles of AOP development and the best practices as outlined in the OECD AOP handbook. Training sessions began in early 2015, and this course will provide training for interested SOT scientists. Following this course, all participants will be familiar w

  3. [Adverse events of immune checkpoint inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Foller, S; Oppel-Heuchel, H; Fetter, I; Winkler, Y; Grimm, M-O

    2017-04-01

    After immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy was approved for renal cell carcinoma last year, this new immune therapy has spread to urology. Further approvals (atezolizumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab) are expected in 2017 for metastatic urothelial carcinoma that has progressed following treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy. With expanding use of immune checkpoint inhibitors, experience in diagnosing and managing immune-mediated adverse events increases. Although of low incidence, grade 3/4 toxicities play a central role. Organs most common for immune-mediated adverse events are skin, liver (hepatitis), kidneys (nephritis), gastrointestinal tract (diarrhea and colitis), lungs (pneumonitis), and endocrine organs (hyper-, hypothyroidism and hypophysitis). Diagnostic workup includes routine laboratory tests (including liver function tests) and may be supplemented with hormone values. In cases of pneumonitis or hypophysitis, imaging (high-resolution CT, MRI) can confirm diagnoses. Immune-mediated toxicities are treated with therapy interruption and administration of corticosteroids (and in individual cases additional immunosuppression). Dose modification is not intended!

  4. Adverse effects of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Onat, Filiz; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-04-01

    Starting with phenobarbital in the 1900s, it took almost 70-80 years to introduce old-generation agents for the treatment of epilepsy. Then, in eleven years, nine more new antiepileptic drugs were added to the armamentarium. These drugs produce a nearly 40-50% decrease in seizure incidence in refractory patients, but few patients have been able to achieve complete freedom from seizures. So the search for more effective drugs with minimal adverse effect profiles will continue. Although the new antiepileptic drugs do not demonstrate a superior efficacy compared to the older ones, they do offer some advantages in terms of tolerability, fewer drug interactions and simpler pharmacokinetics. However, our knowledge concerning their safety profiles can not yet be considered adequate due to the relatively short time these drugs have been on the market and to the limited number of patients exposed to them. The fact that the serious side effects of felbamate and vigabatrine appeared late after marketing should be taken as an important lesson because it implies the potential for unknown side effects at any time during treatment. Antiepileptic drug treatment should begin with diagnosis of the seizure and epileptic syndrome, followed by selection of the drug most appropriate for treatment of the individual patient, and continued with monitoring of not only the seizures but the adverse effect profile as well.

  5. Immunomodulatory drugs: Oral and systemic adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The main objectives are to present the different adverses effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosupressed patients and study the impact of immunomodualtion on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. Study Design: We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. Results: These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren´s syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. Conclusions: In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic. Key words:Immunomodulatory drugs, oral diseases, adverse effects, therapeutic action. PMID:23986016

  6. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype.

  7. Development of a Pediatric Adverse Events Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Debbie S.; Kirkendall, Eric S.; Gumbs-Petty, Brenda; Quinn, Theresa; Steen, A.; Hicks, Amanda; McMahon, Ann; Nicholas, Savian; Zhao-Wong, Anna; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Turner, Mark; Herreshoff, Emily; Jones, Charlotte; Davis, Jonathan M.; Haber, Margaret; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) established the Pediatric Terminology Harmonization Initiative to establish a core library of terms to facilitate the acquisition and sharing of knowledge between pediatric clinical research, practice, and safety reporting. A coalition of partners established a Pediatric Terminology Adverse Event Working Group in 2013 to develop a specific terminology relevant to international pediatric adverse event (AE) reporting. Pediatric specialists with backgrounds in clinical care, research, safety reporting, or informatics, supported by biomedical terminology experts from the National Cancer Institute’s Enterprise Vocabulary Services participated. The multinational group developed a working definition of AEs and reviewed concepts (terms, synonyms, and definitions) from 16 pediatric clinical domains. The resulting AE terminology contains >1000 pediatric diseases, disorders, or clinical findings. The terms were tested for proof of concept use in 2 different settings: hospital readmissions and the NICU. The advantages of the AE terminology include ease of adoption due to integration with well-established and internationally accepted biomedical terminologies, a uniquely temporal focus on pediatric health and disease from conception through adolescence, and terms that could be used in both well- and underresourced environments. The AE terminology is available for use without restriction through the National Cancer Institute’s Enterprise Vocabulary Services and is fully compatible with, and represented in, the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The terminology is intended to mature with use, user feedback, and optimization. PMID:28028203

  8. Development of a Pediatric Adverse Events Terminology.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Debbie S; Kirkendall, Eric S; Gumbs-Petty, Brenda; Quinn, Theresa; Steen, A; Hicks, Amanda; McMahon, Ann; Nicholas, Savian; Zhao-Wong, Anna; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Turner, Mark; Herreshoff, Emily; Jones, Charlotte; Davis, Jonathan M; Haber, Margaret; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) established the Pediatric Terminology Harmonization Initiative to establish a core library of terms to facilitate the acquisition and sharing of knowledge between pediatric clinical research, practice, and safety reporting. A coalition of partners established a Pediatric Terminology Adverse Event Working Group in 2013 to develop a specific terminology relevant to international pediatric adverse event (AE) reporting. Pediatric specialists with backgrounds in clinical care, research, safety reporting, or informatics, supported by biomedical terminology experts from the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services participated. The multinational group developed a working definition of AEs and reviewed concepts (terms, synonyms, and definitions) from 16 pediatric clinical domains. The resulting AE terminology contains >1000 pediatric diseases, disorders, or clinical findings. The terms were tested for proof of concept use in 2 different settings: hospital readmissions and the NICU. The advantages of the AE terminology include ease of adoption due to integration with well-established and internationally accepted biomedical terminologies, a uniquely temporal focus on pediatric health and disease from conception through adolescence, and terms that could be used in both well- and underresourced environments. The AE terminology is available for use without restriction through the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services and is fully compatible with, and represented in, the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The terminology is intended to mature with use, user feedback, and optimization.

  9. Diagnosis of potential stressors adversely affecting benthic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Greenwich Bay is an urbanized embayment of Narragansett Bay potentially impacted by multiple stressors. The present study identified the important stressors affecting Greenwich Bay benthic fauna. First, existing data and information were used to confirm that the waterbody was impaired. Second, the presence of source, stressor, and effect were established. Then linkages between source, stressor, and effect were developed. This allows identification of probable stressors adversely affecting the waterbody. Three pollutant categories were assessed: chemicals, nutrients, and suspended sediments. This weight of evidence approach indicated that Greenwich Bay was primarily impacted by eutrophication-related stressors. The sediments of Greenwich Bay were carbon enriched and low dissolved oxygen concentrations were commonly seen, especially in the western portions of Greenwich Bay. The benthic community was depauperate, as would be expected under oxygen stress. Although our analysis indicated that contaminant loads in Greenwich Bay were at concentrations where adverse effects might be expected, no toxicity was observed, as a result of high levels of organic carbon in these sediments reducing contaminant bioavailability. Our analysis also indicated that suspended sediment impacts were likely nonexistent for much of the Bay. This analysis demonstrates that the diagnostic procedure was useful to organize and assess the potential stressors impacting the ecological well-being

  10. Consumer reporting of adverse events following immunization

    PubMed Central

    Clothier, Hazel J; Selvaraj, Gowri; Easton, Mee Lee; Lewis, Georgina; Crawford, Nigel W; Buttery, Jim P

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance of adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) is an essential component of vaccine safety monitoring. The most commonly utilized passive surveillance systems rely predominantly on reporting by health care providers (HCP). We reviewed adverse event reports received in Victoria, Australia since surveillance commencement in July 2007, to June 2013 (6 years) to ascertain the contribution of consumer (vaccinee or their parent/guardian) reporting to vaccine safety monitoring and to inform future surveillance system development directions. Categorical data included were: reporter type; serious and non-serious AEFI category; and, vaccinee age group. Chi-square test and 2-sample test of proportions were used to compare categories; trend changes were assessed using linear regression. Consumer reporting increased over the 6 years, reaching 21% of reports received in 2013 (P <0.001), most commonly for children aged less than 7 years. Consumer reports were 5% more likely to describe serious AEFI than HCP (P = 0.018) and 10% more likely to result in specialist clinic attendance (P <0.001). Although online reporting increased to 32% of all report since its introduction in 2010, 85% of consumers continued to report by phone. Consumer reporting of AEFI is a valuable component of vaccine safety surveillance in addition to HCP reporting. Changes are required to AEFI reporting systems to implement efficient consumer AEFI reporting, but may be justified for their potential impact on signal detection sensitivity. PMID:25483686

  11. PUTATIVE ADVERSE OUTCOME PATHWAY FOR INHIBITON ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) provides a framework for organizing knowledge to define links between a molecular initiating event (MIE) and an adverse outcome (AO) occurring at a higher level of biological organization, such as the individual or population. The AOP framework proceeds from a general (e.g., not chemical specific) molecular mode of action, designated as a MIE, through stepwise changes in biological status, defined as key events (KEs), to a final AO that can be used in risk assessment. Because aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals are widely used to treat breast cancer patients, we explored the unintended consequences that might occur in fish exposed to these chemicals through wastewater discharge into the aquatic environment. Unlike mammals, fish have two isoforms of aromatase, one that predominates in the ovary (cyp19a1a) and a second (cyp19a1b) that prevails in the brain. Aromatase activity in fish brain can be 100 to 1000 times that in mammals and is associated with reproduction. We have developed a putative AOP for inhibition of brain aromatase in fish leading to reproductive dysfunction based on review of relevant literature and reproductive experiments with the marine fish cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) exposed to aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals in the laboratory. The first KE in this AOP is a decrease in brain aromatase activity due to exposure to an aromatase inhibitor. KEs then progress through subsequent steps including decreas

  12. A Suggested Molecular Pathology Curriculum for Residents: A Report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Aisner, Dara L; Berry, Anna; Dawson, D Brian; Hayden, Randall T; Joseph, Loren; Hill, Charles E

    2016-03-01

    Molecular pathology is an essential element of pathology training. As more molecular tests have become available, there is an increasing need for pathology trainees to receive a strong foundation in molecular pathology. Appointed by the Training and Education Committee of the Association for Molecular Pathology, the Molecular Curriculum Task Force has developed a suggested curriculum in molecular pathology for residents. The foundations of molecular pathology are presented as a series of goals and objectives that residency programs can use to develop their educational programs. As pathologists continue to expand their roles to include regular clinical consultations in the realm of molecular testing, a strong foundation in molecular pathology and genomic medicine has become essential to the practice of pathology.

  13. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL): a review of an elusive pathologic entity!

    PubMed

    Gillenwater, Ann M; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Fatani, Hanadi; Saintigny, Pierre; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2013-11-01

    Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) is a rare less recognized form of oral leukoplakia. Patients with this condition represent a unique clinically and pathologically progressive characteristic from conventional leukoplakia. Because of the lack of defined pathologic lesions, identifying patients with the early diagnosis of PVL is challenging. This is largely due to the overlapping clinical and pathologic early features with conventional multifocal leukoplakia with dysplasia. The diagnosis can only be achieved through the keen clinical observation of the temporal progression in individual patients to verrucous and/or conventional squamous carcinoma. We present a brief view of the clinicopathologic and biological characteristics of PVL and discuss diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and management.

  14. Myofibroblastoma of the male breast: a rare entity with radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Comer, John D; Cui, Xiaoyan; Eisen, Carolyn Sharyn; Abbey, Genevieve; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan

    A 73-year old man with a history of multiple genitourinary malignancies was found to have a left retroareolar soft tissue mass on CT assessment of disease, and dedicated breast imaging was recommended. Diagnostic mammography and ultrasonography confirmed a solid mass, for which biopsy was recommended. Pathologic analysis demonstrated a spindle cell neoplasm with an immunoreactivity pattern consistent with myofibroblastoma. While this entity is benign, nonspecific imaging features necessitate tissue sampling for pathologic diagnosis, and, given pathologic rarity, open communication between the radiologist and pathologist is important to establish the correct diagnosis and to recommend appropriate management.

  15. Tau protein is essential for stress-induced brain pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Sofia; Vaz-Silva, João; Pinto, Vitor; Dalla, Christina; Kokras, Nikolaos; Bedenk, Benedikt; Mack, Natalie; Czisch, Michael; Almeida, Osborne F. X.; Sousa, Nuno; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is frequently accompanied by cognitive and affective disorders in association with neurostructural adaptations. Chronic stress was previously shown to trigger Alzheimer’s-like neuropathology, which is characterized by Tau hyperphosphorylation and missorting into dendritic spines followed by memory deficits. Here, we demonstrate that stress-driven hippocampal deficits in wild-type mice are accompanied by synaptic missorting of Tau and enhanced Fyn/GluN2B-driven synaptic signaling. In contrast, mice lacking Tau [Tau knockout (Tau-KO) mice] do not exhibit stress-induced pathological behaviors and atrophy of hippocampal dendrites or deficits of hippocampal connectivity. These findings implicate Tau as an essential mediator of the adverse effects of stress on brain structure and function. PMID:27274066

  16. GABA blocks pathological but not acute TRPV1 pain signals.

    PubMed

    Hanack, Christina; Moroni, Mirko; Lima, Wanessa C; Wende, Hagen; Kirchner, Marieluise; Adelfinger, Lisa; Schrenk-Siemens, Katrin; Tappe-Theodor, Anke; Wetzel, Christiane; Kuich, P Henning; Gassmann, Martin; Roggenkamp, Dennis; Bettler, Bernhard; Lewin, Gary R; Selbach, Matthias; Siemens, Jan

    2015-02-12

    Sensitization of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 is central to the initiation of pathological forms of pain, and multiple signaling cascades are known to enhance TRPV1 activity under inflammatory conditions. How might detrimental escalation of TRPV1 activity be counteracted? Using a genetic-proteomic approach, we identify the GABAB1 receptor subunit as bona fide inhibitor of TRPV1 sensitization in the context of diverse inflammatory settings. We find that the endogenous GABAB agonist, GABA, is released from nociceptive nerve terminals, suggesting an autocrine feedback mechanism limiting TRPV1 sensitization. The effect of GABAB on TRPV1 is independent of canonical G protein signaling and rather relies on close juxtaposition of the GABAB1 receptor subunit and TRPV1. Activating the GABAB1 receptor subunit does not attenuate normal functioning of the capsaicin receptor but exclusively reverts its sensitized state. Thus, harnessing this mechanism for anti-pain therapy may prevent adverse effects associated with currently available TRPV1 blockers.

  17. [Pathology of the anterior cingulate cortex in obsessive compulsive disorder].

    PubMed

    Kireev, M V; Medvedev, N S; Korotkov, A D; Poliakov, Iu I; Anichkov, A D; Medvedev, S V

    2013-01-01

    In the present article the features of the functional activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a key element of neuroanatomical brain system of an error detection, in drug-resistant forms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are discussed on a basis of both original and literature data. Available data indicate the presence of functional deficit in the ACC during OCD. This allows to suggest that functions of the ACC in OCD patient are partially redistributed between other brain areas. Thus in contrast to the previously accepted notion, the ACC as the target ofstereotactic surgery for OCD is pathologically altered brain region. Probably this is the reason why stereotactic destruction of ACC does not lead to significant changes in the patient's psyche. The essence of the pathological reorganisation of the functional activity of the brain in OCD remains unclear and requires further investigation.

  18. Microbial imbalance and intestinal pathologies: connections and contributions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ye; Jobin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Microbiome analysis has identified a state of microbial imbalance (dysbiosis) in patients with chronic intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer. The bacterial phylum Proteobacteria is often overrepresented in these individuals, with Escherichia coli being the most prevalent species. It is clear that a complex interplay between the host, bacteria and bacterial genes is implicated in the development of these intestinal diseases. Understanding the basic elements of these interactions could have important implications for disease detection and management. Recent studies have revealed that E. coli utilizes a complex arsenal of virulence factors to colonize and persist in the intestine. Some of these virulence factors, such as the genotoxin colibactin, were found to promote colorectal cancer in experimental models. In this Review, we summarize key features of the dysbiotic states associated with chronic intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer, and discuss how the dysregulated interplay between host and bacteria could favor the emergence of E. coli with pathological traits implicated in these pathologies. PMID:25256712

  19. Image processing and 3D visualization in forensic pathologic examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, William R.; Altschuler, Bruce R.

    1996-02-01

    The use of image processing is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of violent crime. While much work has been done in the use of these techniques for forensic purposes outside of forensic pathology, its use in the pathologic examination of wounding has been limited. We are investigating the use of image processing and three-dimensional visualization in the analysis of patterned injuries and tissue damage. While image processing will never replace classical understanding and interpretation of how injuries develop and evolve, it can be a useful tool in helping an observer notice features in an image, may help provide correlation of surface to deep tissue injury, and provide a mechanism for the development of a metric for analyzing how likely it may be that a given object may have caused a given wound. We are also exploring methods of acquiring three-dimensional data for such measurements, which is the subject of a second paper.

  20. Update in Pathological Diagnosis of Orbital Infections and Inflammations

    PubMed Central

    Lam Choi, Vincent B.; Yuen, Hunter K. L.; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Yanoff, Myron

    2011-01-01

    Orbital infections and inflammations include a broad spectrum of orbital diseases that can be idiopathic, infectious, from primary or secondary inflammatory processes. Being able to properly diagnose and manage these orbital diseases in a timely manner can avoid permanent vision loss and possibly save a patient's life. When clinicians are faced with such patients, quite often the exact diagnosis cannot be made just based on clinical examination, various laboratory tests and imaging are needed. Moreover, orbital biopsies with histopathological analyses are often required, especially for the atypical cases. Thus, it is important for the clinicians to be familiar with the pathological features and characteristics of these orbital diseases. This review provides a comprehensive update on the clinical and pathological diagnosis of these orbital infections and inflammations. PMID:22224014

  1. Thyroid cancer with tracheal invasion: a pathological estimation.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Vincenzo; La Rosa, Stefano; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Tanda, Maria Laura; Sessa, Andrea; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2016-10-01

    We review the clinical and pathologic features of seven cases of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid that invaded the trachea and were treated by thyroidectomy, airway resection with reconstructive surgery over an interval of 15 years. We depicted the peculiarity of invasion of well differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells is perpendicularly oriented to the tracheal lumen, in between cartilaginous rings, along blood vessels and collagen fibers. Tracheal rings appear non-infiltrated in all histological sections of well differentiated PTC infiltrating the trachea. Similar description of inter-cartilage PTC infiltration into the trachea was first provided by Shin et al. in 1993. Interestingly, our pathological revision support the estimation by Shin et al., though that cartilage rings infiltration did occur in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers with exiguous prognosis.

  2. Thyroid cancer with tracheal invasion: a pathological estimation

    PubMed Central

    Pappalardo, Vincenzo; La Rosa, Stefano; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Tanda, Maria Laura; Sessa, Andrea; Dominioni, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    We review the clinical and pathologic features of seven cases of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid that invaded the trachea and were treated by thyroidectomy, airway resection with reconstructive surgery over an interval of 15 years. We depicted the peculiarity of invasion of well differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells is perpendicularly oriented to the tracheal lumen, in between cartilaginous rings, along blood vessels and collagen fibers. Tracheal rings appear non-infiltrated in all histological sections of well differentiated PTC infiltrating the trachea. Similar description of inter-cartilage PTC infiltration into the trachea was first provided by Shin et al. in 1993. Interestingly, our pathological revision support the estimation by Shin et al., though that cartilage rings infiltration did occur in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers with exiguous prognosis. PMID:27867870

  3. Observation on frequency & clinico-pathological significance of various cytogenetic risk groups in multiple myeloma: an experience from India

    PubMed Central

    Kadam Amare, Pratibha S.; Jain, Hemani; Nikalje, Shraddha; Sengar, Manju; Menon, Hari; Inamdar, Nitin; Subramanian, P. G.; Gujral, Sumeet; Shet, Tanuja; Epari, Sridhar; Nair, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by cytogenetic heterogeneity. In comparison with conventional karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can efficiently detect various genetic changes in non-cycling plasma cells in 50-90 per cent of MM cases. The present study was undertaken in MM patients to evaluate the frequency and clinico-pathological significance of various cytogenetic abnormalities in the Indian population. Methods: Interphase FISH was applied on purified plasma cells of 475 patients with MM using specific probes. Interphase FISH for 1q gain/1q amplification was performed on a separate group of 250 newly diagnosed MM patients. Results: Low frequency of Δ13 [-13/del(13q)] (32%) and t(11;14) (5%) was observed in our 475 patients probably due to ethnic diversity. Clustering of Δ13, del(17) (p13.1) and IgH translocations in non-hyperdiploidy confirmed prognostic significance of ploidy in MM. t(4;14) and del(17) (p13.1) were high-risk groups due to correlation with high serum β2-microglobulin, increased plasma cells and advanced disease. Hyperdiploidy and t(14;16) were associated with higher age group. In a separate group of 250 patients, 1q amplification [amp(1q)] in combination with Δ13 and/or del(17p) with t(4;14) revealed association with adverse clinico-laboratory features, which confirmed progressive role of amp(1q) with adverse prognostic impact. Amp(1q) was clustered at 1q21 and 1q25 loci. Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, it appears that comprehensive analysis of various cytogenetic aberrations by interphase FISH is a powerful strategy being adapted for risk stratification of MM. PMID:28256461

  4. Microscopic colitis in patients with mild duodenal damage: A new clinical and pathological entity (“lymphocytic enterocolitis”)?

    PubMed Central

    Bonagura, Gabriele Antonio; Ribaldone, Davide Giuseppe; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Sapone, Nicoletta; Caviglia, Gian Paolo; Saracco, Giorgio Maria; Astegiano, Marco; Pellicano, Rinaldo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the potential association between mild duodenal damage and microscopic colitis (MC). METHODS We retrospectively included 105 consecutive patients with type I Marsh-Oberhuber duodenal damage and negativity for immunoglobulin A anti-endomysium and anti-tissue transglutaminase. The following parameters were analyzed: Sex, age at execution of esophagogastroduodenoscopy, duodenal damage, and number of intraepithelial lymphocytes at biopsies, prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, age at execution of colonoscopy, macroscopic and microscopic features of colonoscopy, family history of gastrointestinal and autoimmune diseases, smoking habits, biochemical parameters of inflammation and autoimmunity, use of proton pump inhibitors or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, adverse reactions to drugs or foods, pathologies known to be associated with celiac disease or MC, living on a gluten-free diet or on a gluten-low diet for at least 1 mo. RESULTS Colonoscopy was performed in 59 patients, but only in 48 of them biopsies were taken in the entire colon. Considering the latter cohort, the diagnosis of MC was met in 25 (52.1%) patients while in 18 patients other pathologic findings were reported: 13 (27%) cases of nonspecific inflammatory bowel disease, 2 (4.2%) cases of Crohn’s disease, 2 (4.2%) cases of eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and 1 (2.1%) case of autoimmune enteritis. Five (10.4%) patients had a normal colonoscopic result. Matching the groups by age, and considering only patients who underwent colonoscopy (42.7 ± 15.5 years) vs those who did not undergo colonoscopy (36.9 ± 10.6 years), a statistical difference was found (P = 0.039). Focusing on symptoms, diarrhea was statistically more prevalent in MC group than in patients who did not undergo colonoscopy (P = 0.03). CONCLUSION Mild duodenal damage is associated with MC in more than half of the cases. This association supports the hypothesis of a link between these two entities. PMID:27895976

  5. 19 CFR 181.116 - Petition regarding adverse marking decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision” and shall be signed by the exporter, producer or his... other than the principal. (c) Content. The Petition for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision...

  6. 19 CFR 181.116 - Petition regarding adverse marking decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision” and shall be signed by the exporter, producer or his... other than the principal. (c) Content. The Petition for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision...

  7. 19 CFR 181.116 - Petition regarding adverse marking decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision” and shall be signed by the exporter, producer or his... other than the principal. (c) Content. The Petition for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision...

  8. 19 CFR 181.116 - Petition regarding adverse marking decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision” and shall be signed by the exporter, producer or his... other than the principal. (c) Content. The Petition for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision...

  9. 19 CFR 181.116 - Petition regarding adverse marking decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision” and shall be signed by the exporter, producer or his... other than the principal. (c) Content. The Petition for NAFTA Review of Adverse Marking Decision...

  10. Adverse Outcome Pathways – Tailoring Development to Support Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) represent an ideal framework for connecting high-throughput screening (HTS) data and other toxicity testing results to adverse outcomes of regulatory importance. The AOP Knowledgebase (AOP-KB) captures AOP information to facilitate the development,...