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Sample records for adverse pulmonary physiology

  1. Mechanistic and dose considerations for supporting adverse pulmonary physiology in response to formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Chad M. Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Grafstroem, Roland C.

    2008-12-15

    Induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and asthma from formaldehyde inhalation exposure remains a debated and controversial issue. Yet, recent evidences on pulmonary biology and the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of formaldehyde lend support for such adverse effects. Specifically, altered thiol biology from accelerated enzymatic reduction of the endogenous bronchodilator S-nitrosoglutathione and pulmonary inflammation from involvement of Th2-mediated immune responses might serve as key events and cooperate in airway pathophysiology. Understanding what role these mechanisms play in various species and lifestages (e.g., child vs. adult) could be crucial for making more meaningful inter- and intra-species dosimetric extrapolations in human health risk assessment.

  2. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  3. High Oxygen Concentrations Adversely Affect the Performance of Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Craig D; Boloori-Zadeh, Parnian; Silva, Maricris R; Gouldstone, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Although effective in the neonatal population, exogenous pulmonary surfactant has not demonstrated a benefit in pediatric and adult subjects with hypoxic lung injury despite a sound physiologic rationale. Importantly, neonatal surfactant replacement therapy is administered in conjunction with low fractional FIO2 while pediatric/adult therapy is administered with high FIO2 . We suspected a connection between FIO2 and surfactant performance. Therefore, we sought to assess a possible mechanism by which the activity of pulmonary surfactant is adversely affected by direct oxygen exposure in in vitro experiments. The mechanical performance of pulmonary surfactant was evaluated using 2 methods. First, Langmuir-Wilhelmy balance was utilized to study the reduction in surface area (δA) of surfactant to achieve a low bound value of surface tension after repeated compression and expansion cycles. Second, dynamic light scattering was utilized to measure the size of pulmonary surfactant particles in aqueous suspension. For both experiments, comparisons were made between surfactant exposed to 21% and 100% oxygen. The δA of surfactant was 21.1 ± 2.0% and 35.8 ± 2.0% during exposure to 21% and 100% oxygen, respectively (P = .02). Furthermore, dynamic light-scattering experiments revealed a micelle diameter of 336.0 ± 12.5 μm and 280.2 ± 11.0 μm in 21% and 100% oxygen, respectively (P < .001), corresponding to a ∼16% decrease in micelle diameter following exposure to 100% oxygen. The characteristics of pulmonary surfactant were adversely affected by short-term exposure to oxygen. Specifically, surface tension studies revealed that short-term exposure of surfactant film to high concentrations of oxygen expedited the frangibility of pulmonary surfactant, as shown with the δA. This suggests that reductions in pulmonary compliance and associated adverse effects could begin to take effect in a very short period of time. If these findings can be demonstrated in vivo, a role for

  4. Platelets in pulmonary vascular physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Michael H.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    Almost a trillion platelets pass through the pulmonary circulation every minute, yet little is known about how they support pulmonary physiology or contribute to the pathogenesis of lung diseases. When considering this conundrum, three questions jump out: Does platelet production in the lungs occur? Why does severe thrombocytopenia—which undercuts the principal physiological role of platelets to effect hemostasis—not lead to pulmonary hemorrhage? Why does atherothrombosis—which platelets initiate, maintain, and trigger is other critically important arterial beds—not develop in the pulmonary artery? The purpose of this review is to explore these and derivative questions by providing data within a conceptual framework that begins to organize a subject that is largely unassembled. PMID:23130099

  5. Refractory Pulmonary Edema Caused by Late Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis After Lung Transplantation: A Rare Adverse Event.

    PubMed

    Denton, Eve J; Rischin, Adam; McGiffin, David; Williams, Trevor J; Paraskeva, Miranda A; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Greg

    2016-09-01

    After lung transplantation, pulmonary vein thrombosis is a rare, potentially life-threatening adverse event arising at the pulmonary venous anastomosis that typically occurs early and presents as graft failure and hemodynamic compromise with an associated mortality of up to 40%. The incidence, presentation, outcomes, and treatment of late pulmonary vein thrombosis remain poorly defined. Management options include anticoagulant agents for asymptomatic clots, and thrombolytic agents or surgical thrombectomy for hemodynamically significant clots. We present a rare case highlighting a delayed presentation of pulmonary vein thrombosis occurring longer than 2 weeks after lung transplantation and manifesting clinically as graft failure secondary to refractory pulmonary edema. The patient was treated successfully with surgical thrombectomy and remains well. We recommend a high index of suspicion of pulmonary vein thrombosis when graft failure after lung transplantation occurs and is not responsive to conventional therapy, and consideration of investigation with transesophageal echocardiography or computed tomography with venous phase contrast in such patients even more than 2 weeks after lung transplantation.

  6. Regional septal hinge-point injury contributes to adverse biventricular interactions in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Eva Amalie; Okumura, Kenichi; Sun, Mei; Hjortdal, Vibeke E; Redington, Andrew N; Friedberg, Mark K

    2017-07-01

    Death and morbidity in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are often due to right ventricular (RV) failure and associated left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. We investigated regional myocardial remodeling and function as the basis for adverse ventricular-ventricular interactions in experimental chronic RV pressure overload. Two distinct animal models were studied: A rabbit model of increased RV pressure-load through progressive pulmonary artery banding A rat model of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Regional myocardial function was assessed by speckle-tracking strain echocardiography and ventricular pressures measured by catheterization before termination. Regional RV and LV myocardium was analyzed for collagen content, apoptosis and pro-fibrotic signaling gene and protein expression. Although the RV developed more fibrosis than the LV; in both models the LV was substantially affected. In both ventricles, particularly the LV, fibrosis developed predominantly at the septal hinge-point regions in association with decreased regional and global circumferential strain, reduced global RV and LV function and up-regulation of regional transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1) and apoptosis signaling. A group of PAH rats who received the TGFβ blocker SB431542 showed improved RV function and reduced regional hinge-point myocardial fibrosis. RV pressure-loading and PAH lead to biventricular TGFβ1 signaling, fibrosis and apoptosis, predominantly at the septal hinge-point regions, in association with regional myocardial dysfunction. This suggests that altered geometry and wall stress lead to adverse RV-LV interactions through the septal hinge-points to induce LV fibrosis and dysfunction. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  7. Adverse biophysical effects of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on natural pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E; Zhao, Xinxin; Loo, Joachim S C; Zuo, Yi Y

    2011-08-23

    Inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) must first interact with the pulmonary surfactant (PS) lining layer that covers the entire internal surface of the respiratory tract and plays an important role in surface tension reduction and host defense. Interactions with the PS film determine the subsequent clearance, retention, and translocation of the inhaled NPs and hence their potential toxicity. To date, little is known how NPs interact with PS, and whether or not NPs have adverse effects on the biophysical function of PS. We found a time-dependent toxicological effect of hydroxyapatite NPs (HA-NPs) on a natural PS, Infasurf, and the time scale of surfactant inhibition after particle exposure was comparable to the turnover period of surfactant metabolism. Using a variety of in vitro biophysicochemical characterization techniques, we have determined the inhibition mechanism to be due to protein adsorption onto the HA-NPs. Consequently, depletion of surfactant proteins from phospholipid vesicles caused conversion of original large vesicles into much smaller vesicles with poor surface activity. These small vesicles, in turn, inhibited biophysical function of surfactant films after adsorption at the air-water interface. Cytotoxicity study found that the HA-NPs at the studied concentration were benign to human bronchial epithelial cells, thereby highlighting the importance of evaluating biophysical effect of NPs on PS. The NP-PS interaction mechanism revealed by this study may not only provide new insight into the toxicological study of nanoparticles but also shed light on the feasibility of NP-based pulmonary drug delivery.

  8. Adverse ventricular-ventricular interactions in right ventricular pressure load: Insights from pediatric pulmonary hypertension versus pulmonary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Hui, Wei; Bijnens, Bart H; Dragulescu, Andreea; Mertens, Luc; Meijboom, Folkert J; Friedberg, Mark K

    2016-06-01

    -ventricular interactions in right ventricular pressure overload, demonstrating distinct differences between pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH) and pulmonary stenosis (PS). Altered timing of right ventricular free wall contraction and profound septal dyskinesia are associated with interventricular mechanical discoordination and decreased early LV filling in iPAH much more than PS These adverse mechanics affect systolic and diastolic biventricular efficiency, independent of right ventricular systolic pressure. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  9. Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema Alters Physiology but Has Similar Mortality to Pulmonary Fibrosis Without Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Rounds, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Studies have described individuals with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), with preserved lung volumes, significant reductions in gas exchange, and high prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. While physiologic changes in CPFE are well documented, there is little mortality data in the CPFE population compared to appropriate controls. A study was performed to determine the features and outcomes of a group of individuals with imaging and/or pathologic evidence of CPFE to determine if individuals with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema have different features and survival than individuals with pulmonary fibrosis alone. We conducted a retrospective study at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Included in the study were individuals hospitalized over a 5-year period who were given a clinical diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis. Individuals with confirmed imaging or pathologic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis were divided into a study group with concomitant emphysema (CPFE group, n = 20) and a control group without emphysema (isolated pulmonary fibrosis (PF) group, n = 24). The CPFE group, all current or former cigarette smokers, had significantly larger lung volumes, more expiratory airflow obstruction, and worse gas exchange than the isolated pulmonary fibrosis group. Mortality did not differ between the groups. Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema results in unique physiologic features but no difference in survival compared with a group with pulmonary fibrosis alone. PMID:20614219

  10. An Earth-Based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grothberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving micro G for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in micro G. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of micro G by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary physiology, including cardiac output, central venous pressures, lung volumes, and pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of micro G on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventilation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching, and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of micro G will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  11. An Earth-Based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grothberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving micro G for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in micro G. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of micro G by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary physiology, including cardiac output, central venous pressures, lung volumes, and pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of micro G on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventilation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching, and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of micro G will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  12. The Evaluation of a Pulmonary Display to Detect Adverse Respiratory Events Using High Resolution Human Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, S. Blake; Johnson, Ken; Albert, Robert; Syroid, Noah; Drews, Frank; Westenskow, Dwayne

    2006-01-01

    Objective Authors developed a picture-graphics display for pulmonary function to present typical respiratory data used in perioperative and intensive care environments. The display utilizes color, shape and emergent alerting to highlight abnormal pulmonary physiology. The display serves as an adjunct to traditional operating room displays and monitors. Design To evaluate the prototype, nineteen clinician volunteers each managed four adverse respiratory events and one normal event using a high-resolution patient simulator which included the new displays (intervention subjects) and traditional displays (control subjects). Between-group comparisons included (i) time to diagnosis and treatment for each adverse respiratory event; (ii) the number of unnecessary treatments during the normal scenario; and (iii) self-reported workload estimates while managing study events. Measurements Two expert anesthesiologists reviewed video-taped transcriptions of the volunteers to determine time to treat and time to diagnosis. Time values were then compared between groups using a Mann-Whitney-U Test. Estimated workload for both groups was assessed using the NASA-TLX and compared between groups using an ANOVA. P-values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results Clinician volunteers detected and treated obstructed endotracheal tubes and intrinsic PEEP problems faster with graphical rather than conventional displays (p < 0.05). During the normal scenario simulation, 3 clinicians using the graphical display, and 5 clinicians using the conventional display gave unnecessary treatments. Clinician-volunteers reported significantly lower subjective workloads using the graphical display for the obstructed endotracheal tube scenario (p < 0.001) and the intrinsic PEEP scenario (p < 0.03). Conclusion Authors conclude that the graphical pulmonary display may serve as a useful adjunct to traditional displays in identifying adverse respiratory events. PMID:16929038

  13. An Earth-based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grotberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving microgravity for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in microgravity. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of microgravity by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of microgravity on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventillation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of microgravity will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  14. An Earth-based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grotberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving microgravity for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in microgravity. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of microgravity by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of microgravity on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventillation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of microgravity will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  15. Physiological Profile and Limitations in Exercise in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vainshelboim, Baruch; Oliveira, Jose; Fox, Benjamin Daniel; Adir, Yochai; Ollech, Jacob Eliezer; Kramer, Mordechai Reuven

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the physiological profile and limiting factors during exercise among patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A descriptive study involving 34 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (22 men) aged 68 ± 8 years was conducted. All patients completed a pulmonary function test, cardiopulmonary exercise test, Doppler echocardiography, 6-minute walk test, and modified Medical Research Council dyspnea evaluation. Approximately 38% of patients (range, 15%-71%) presented with coexisting comorbidities including pulmonary hypertension and emphysema. Modified Medical Research Council grades 0-2 and 3-4 were assigned to 68% and 32% of patients, respectively. Median values for forced vital capacity and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide percent (%) predicted were 68 (95% CI, 63-76) and 51 (95% CI, 46-55), respectively. Left ventricular systolic function was normal. Aerobic capacity ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2peak = 13.4 mL/kg/min [95% CI, 12.6-14.9]; 62% predicted [95% CI, 56-67]) was moderately reduced with the presence of abnormalities in pulmonary gas exchange and desaturation, circulatory impairments, inefficient ventilation, and skeletal muscle dysfunction. Functional capacity was normal (6-minute walk test distance = 505 m [95% CI, 435-522]; 99% predicted [95% CI, 91-108]). The physiological profile demonstrated the presence of comorbidities in approximately 38% of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and a moderate level of dyspnea. Resting cardiopulmonary function showed moderate pulmonary restriction and severe impairments in diffusion capacity with normal left ventricular systolic function. Multifactorial limitations for a moderately diminished aerobic capacity were revealed during the cardiopulmonary exercise test, although functional capacity was normal. These results emphasize the significance of a meticulous evaluation, including the cardiopulmonary exercise test for an accurate exercise tolerance

  16. Pulmonary adverse effects of welding fume in automobile assembly welders.

    PubMed

    Sharifian, Seyed Akbar; Loukzadeh, Ziba; Shojaoddiny-Ardekani, Ahmad; Aminian, Omid

    2011-01-01

    Welding is one of the key components of numerous manufacturing industries, which has potential physical and chemical health hazards. Many components of welding fumes can potentially affect the lung function. This study investigates the effects of welding fumes on lung function and respiratory symptoms among welders of an automobile manufacturing plant in Iran. This historical cohort study assesses 43 male welders and 129 office workers by a questionnaire to record demographic data, smoking habits, work history and respiratory symptoms as well as lung function status by spirometry. The average pulmonary function values of welders were lower relative to controls with dose-effect relationship between work duration and pulmonary function impairment. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was higher in welders than controls. Our findings suggest that welders are at risk for pulmonary disease.

  17. The prevention of adverse physiological change in space station crewmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaut, Paul C.

    Various physiological countermeasures, consisting primarily of isotonic and isometric exercises but also including prescribed nutrient intake, have been used in all manned spaceflights exceeding about one month in duration. So consistent has been this practice that the effects of weightlessness on the human, unconfounded by the use of countermeasures, are difficult to discern. Equally elusive, in the absence of control studies conducted in weightlessness, is an accurate assessment of the efficacy of the counter-measures themselves. Changes in body composition occurring during and following flights from Gemini through Shuttle, when compared with changes during and following bedrest, demonstrate certain mitigating effects that may be attributable to countermeasures and which provide some rationale for the choice of countermeasures in the Space Station.

  18. The prevention of adverse physiological change in Space Station crewmembers.

    PubMed

    Rambaut, P C

    1988-01-01

    Various physiological countermeasures, consisting primarily of isotonic and isometric exercises but also including prescribed nutrient intake, have been used in all manned spaceflights exceeding about one month in duration. So consistent has been this practice that the effects of weightlessness on the human, unconfounded by the use of countermeasures, are difficult to discern. Equally elusive, in the absence of control studies conducted in weightlessness, is an accurate assessment of the efficacy of the countermeasures themselves. Changes in body composition occurring during and following flights from Gemini through Shuttle, when compared with changes during and following bedrest, demonstrate certain mitigating effects that may be attributable to countermeasures and which provide some rationale for the choice of countermeasures in the Space Station.

  19. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Kamath, Sunil; Wong, Kenneth; Malvar, Jemily; Sposto, Richard; Goodarzian, Fariba; Freyer, David R.; Keens, Thomas G.; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ≥22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ≥30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed

  20. Shock--manifestation of pulmonary atresia with aorto-pulmonary collaterals and single ventricle physiology in a 2-day neonate.

    PubMed

    Kovacikova, L; Skrak, P; Zahorec, M; Masura, J

    2008-01-01

    The combination of pulmonary valve atresia and ventricular septal defect accounts for about 2% of cases of congenital heart disease. Most of the cases have intracardiac anatomy of Tetralogy Fallot and present with cyanosis in neonatal age. To report a case of a newborn with rare combination of pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect and single ventricle physiology presenting with shock very early following birth. We describe a newborn infant who developed shock with severe metabolic acidosis and respiratory distress several hours following birth. Cardiac ultrasound showed pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect with single ventricle physiology. Cardiac cathetrisation revealed major aorto-pulmonary collaterals with an excessive pulmonary blood flow. Resuscitative measures resulted in hemodynamic stability. However, due to unfavorable prognosis, a decision not to undertake surgical palliation was made. Withdrawal of intensive care led to rapid demise of the patient. We report a case of a newborn with pulmonary atresia, ventricular septal defect and single ventricle physiology in whom an excessive flow through major aorto-pulmonary collaterals led to shock and death very early following birth (Fig. 1, Ref. 5). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  1. Adverse effects of industrial multiwalled carbon nanotubes on human pulmonary cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabet, Lyes; Bussy, Cyrill; Amara, Nadia; Setyan, Ari; Grodet, Alain; Rossi, Michel J.; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Boczkowski, Jorge; Lanone, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) produced for industrial purposes, on the human epithelial cell line A549. MWCNT were dispersed in dipalmitoyl lecithin (DPL), a component of pulmonary surfactant, and the effects of dispersion in DPL were compared to those in 2 other media: ethanol (EtOH) and phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Effects of MWCNT were also compared to those of 2 asbestos fibers (chrysotile and crocidolite) and carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, not only in A549 cells, but also on mesothelial cells (MeT5A human cell line), used as an asbestos-sensitive cell type. MWCNT formed agglomerates on top of both cell lines (surface area 15–35 μm2), that were significantly larger and more numerous in PBS than in EtOH and DPL. Whatever the dispersion media, incubation with 100 μg/ml MWCNT induced a similar decrease in metabolic activity without changing cell membrane permeability or apoptosis. Neither MWCNT cellular internalization nor oxidative stress were observed. In contrast, asbestos fibers penetrated into the cells, decreased metabolic activity but not cell membrane permeability and increased apoptosis, without decreasing cell number. CB was internalized without any adverse effects. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that MWCNT produced for industrial purposes exert adverse effects without being internalized by human epithelial and mesothelial pulmonary cell lines. PMID:19034795

  2. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Samantha J.; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B.; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P.; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P.; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E.; Elmore, Susan A.; Morrison, James P.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2014-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  3. Inhaled diesel emissions generated with cerium oxide nanoparticle fuel additive induce adverse pulmonary and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C; Thomas, Ronald F; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E; Elmore, Susan A; Morrison, James P; Johnson, Crystal L; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2014-12-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe.

  4. Pulmonary function and adverse cardiovascular outcomes: Can cardiac function explain the link?

    PubMed

    Burroughs Peña, Melissa S; Dunning, Allison; Schulte, Phillip J; Durheim, Michael T; Kussin, Peter; Checkley, William; Velazquez, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    The complex interaction between pulmonary function, cardiac function and adverse cardiovascular events has only been partially described. We sought to describe the association between pulmonary function with left heart structure and function, all-cause mortality and incident cardiovascular hospitalization. This study is a retrospective analysis of patients evaluated in a single tertiary care medical center. We used multivariable linear regression analyses to examine the relationship between FVC and FEV1 with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular internal dimension in systole and diastole (LVIDS, LVIDD) and left atrial diameter, adjusting for baseline characteristics, right ventricular function and lung hyperinflation. We also used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the relationship between FVC and FEV1 with all-cause mortality and cardiac hospitalization. A total of 1807 patients were included in this analysis with a median age of 61 years and 50% were female. Decreased FVC and FEV1 were both associated with decreased LVEF. In individuals with FVC less than 2.75 L, decreased FVC was associated with increased all-cause mortality after adjusting for left and right heart echocardiographic variables (hazard ratio [HR] 0.49, 95% CI 0.29, 0.82, respectively). Decreased FVC was associated with increased cardiac hospitalization after adjusting for left heart size (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67, 0.96), even in patients with normal LVEF (HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.57, 0.97). In a tertiary care center reduced pulmonary function was associated with adverse cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by left heart remodeling or right heart dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Physiology of isolated anomalous pulmonary venous connection of a single pulmonary vein as determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dyme, Joshua L; Prakash, Ashwin; Printz, Beth F; Kaur, Avnit; Parness, Ira A; Nielsen, James C

    2006-07-01

    The physiology of isolated partially anomalous pulmonary venous connection of a single pulmonary vein has yet to be fully characterized. This study assessed the magnitude of the left-to-right shunt and right ventricular (RV) dilation from a single anomalous pulmonary vein using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects with >1 anomalous pulmonary vein or associated lesions, including atrial septal defects, were excluded. In the 6 subjects identified, the median pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio was 1.55 (range 1.3 to 1.6). The mean RV end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area in the subjects was significantly larger than in a normal reference cohort (108 +/- 16 vs 78 +/- 18 cm(3)/m(2), p = 0.0009) and greater than the upper limit of normal in all 6 subjects. Older age did not correlate with increased magnitude of shunting (r = 0.3, p = 0.5), but increased age did correlate with RV end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area (r = 0.96, p = 0.01). Isolated partially anomalous pulmonary venous connection with only 1 vein connecting anomalously results in a modest left-to-right shunt and mild RV dilation.

  6. Industrial PM2.5 cause pulmonary adverse effect through RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junyan; Lai, Chia-Hsiang; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Chen, Chongjun; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Pin-I; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2017-12-01

    According to the Chinese Ministry of Health, industrial pollution-induced health impacts have been the leading cause of death in China. While industrial fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with adverse health effects, the major action mechanisms of different compositions of PM2.5 are currently unclear. In this study, we treated normal human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells with industrial organic and water-soluble PM2.5 extracts under daily alveolar deposition dose to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying adverse pulmonary effects induced by PM2.5, including oxidative damage, inflammatory response, lung epithelial barrier dysfunction, and the recruitment of macrophages. We found that water-soluble PM2.5 extracts caused more severe cytotoxic effects on BEAS-2B cells compared with that of organic extracts. Both organic and water-soluble PM2.5 extracts induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Inflammatory response, epithelial barrier dysfunction, and the activation of NF-кB caused by both PM2.5 extracts were attenuated by ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. This indicated that both PM2.5 extracts could cause damage to epithelial cells through RhoA/ROCK-dependent NF-кB activation. Furthermore, the upregulation of macrophage adhesion induced by both PM2.5 extracts was also attenuated by Y-27632 in a co-culture model of macrophages and the epithelial cells. Therefore, our results support that industrial PM2.5 extracts-induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK-dependent NF-кB pathway induces pulmonary adverse effect. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of ROCK activation might have therapeutic potential in preventing lung disease associated with PM2.5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of the expectancy, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions reported for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Guenka; Stoimenova, Assena; Dimitrova, Maria; Kamusheva, Maria; Petrova, Daniela; Georgiev, Ognian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Adverse drug reactions can cause increased morbidity and mortality, and therefore information needs to be studied systematically. Little is known about the adverse drug reactions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy. The goal of this study is to assess the expectedness, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy based on their reporting in the national pharmacovigilance system. Methods: This was a prospective, observational, 1-year, real-life study about the pharmacotherapy of a sample of 390 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Prescribed medicines were systematized and national pharmacovigilance databases were searched for reported adverse drug reactions. The expectedness was evaluated through the review of the summary of product characteristics, the seriousness was evaluated by the clinicians based on the life threatening nature of the adverse drug reactions, and the severity was evaluated through Hartwig’s Severity Assessment Scale. Descriptive statistics of the reported adverse drug reactions was performed and the relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction with all international non-proprietary names included in the analysis was calculated. Results: Results confirm that the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a disease with high appearance of adverse drug reactions, and causes many additional costs to the healthcare system. Unexpected and severe adverse drug reactions are frequent. A total of 4.8% of adverse drug reactions were evaluated as life threatening. Majority of adverse drug reactions are classified in Levels 1 (32.6%), 2 (26.4%) and 3 (19%) according to Hartwig’s Severity Assessment Scale. Approximately 22% of reported adverse drug reactions affect people’s everyday life to a greater extent and require additional therapy which might further increase the risk. The relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction was highest for

  8. Adverse Respiratory Events Associated With Hypnotics Use in Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the effects of hypnotics on the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. The case-control study was investigated using data retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed adverse respiratory events (pneumonia, COPD with acute exacerbation, acute respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary arrest) were included in the case group. Patients with COPD and no history of adverse respiratory events were randomly selected for the control group, which was frequency-matched with the case group according to index date, age (per 10 years), and sex. Patients who had used hypnotics within 1 month meant active users. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of were calculated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. Most of the study participants were male (71.6%), and the mean ages of the participants in the case and control groups were 69.2 (±12.4) and 67.5 (±12.3) years, respectively. After potential confounding factors were adjusting for, the adjusted ORs of adverse respiratory events were 12.0 for active users of benzodiazepines (95% CI, 8.11–17.6) and 10.5 for active users of nonbenzodiazepines (95% CI, 7.68–14.2) compared with the adjusted ORs of those who never used hypnotics. The results of this epidemiological study suggested that hypnotics increased the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. PMID:26166105

  9. Teaching Pulmonary Gas Exchange Physiology Using Computer Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapitan, Kent S.

    2008-01-01

    Students often have difficulty understanding the relationship of O[subscript 2] consumption, CO[subscript 2] production, cardiac output, and distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios in the lung to the final arterial blood gas composition. To overcome this difficulty, I have developed an interactive computer simulation of pulmonary gas exchange…

  10. Teaching Pulmonary Gas Exchange Physiology Using Computer Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapitan, Kent S.

    2008-01-01

    Students often have difficulty understanding the relationship of O[subscript 2] consumption, CO[subscript 2] production, cardiac output, and distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios in the lung to the final arterial blood gas composition. To overcome this difficulty, I have developed an interactive computer simulation of pulmonary gas exchange…

  11. Explaining the Association between Early Adversity and Young Adults' Diabetes Outcomes: Physiological, Psychological, and Behavioral Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wickrama, Kandauda A S; Bae, Dayoung; O'Neal, Catherine Walker

    2017-01-31

    Previous studies have documented that early adversity increases young adults' risk for diabetes resulting in morbidity and comorbidity with adverse health conditions. However, less is known about how inter-related physiological (e.g., body mass index [BMI]), psychological (e.g., depressive symptoms), and behavioral mechanisms (e.g., unhealthy eating and sedentary behavior) link early adversity to young adults' diabetes outcomes, although these mechanisms appear to stem from early stressful experiences. The current study tested the patterning of these longitudinal pathways leading to young adults' diabetes using a nationally representative sample of 13,286 adolescents (54% female) over a period of 13 years. The findings indicated that early adversity contributed to elevated BMI, depressive symptoms, and stress-related health behaviors. The impact of these linking mechanisms on hierarchical diabetes outcomes (i.e., prediabetes and diabetes) remained significant after taking their associations with each other into account, showing that these mechanisms operate concurrently. The findings emphasize the importance of early detection for risk factors of young adults' diabetes in order to minimize their detrimental health effects.

  12. Extreme sports: extreme physiology. Exercise-induced pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Ma, Joyce Lok Gee; Dutch, Martin John

    2013-08-01

    We report five patients who presented to an on-site medical team with concurrent haemoptysis and shortness of breath at a recent triathlon event. After initial management in the field, three of the five patients were transported to hospital via ambulance for further management, resulting in patients with haemoptysis and dyspnoea being 17 times more likely to require hospital transport. It is important to consider the differential diagnoses for this presentation, particularly exercise-induced pulmonary oedema.

  13. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data. Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure. The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52–0.62). Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases. PMID:27196497

  14. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-07

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification.

  15. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification.

  16. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification. PMID:26740396

  17. Physiological determinants of pulmonary gas exchange kinetics during exercise.

    PubMed

    Whipp, B J; Ward, S A

    1990-02-01

    We consider how the optimal selection of the profile of imposed work rate, coupled with rigorous, statistically justified analysis of the pattern of the pulmonary gas exchange response, makes it possible to assemble a control model incorporating the proportional role of the muscle, circulation, and gas stores. Gains, time constants, and delays may be assigned to the components of the response and its linearity assessed. These techniques also allow the investigator to examine the features of poorly understood and even unexpected response patterns. Recent interest in the analysis of the non-steady state of exercise-in normal subjects and in patients with gas exchange defects-has led to an improved understanding of the sub-threshold dynamics. At work rates above the lactate threshold, the more complex kinetics are to date poorly described, and hence poorly understood, remaining a fertile area for the application of control-systems techniques to exercise.

  18. Pulmonary physiology: future directions for lung function testing in COPD.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, Vito; Barisione, Giovanni; Crimi, Emanuele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a term that encompasses different pathological conditions having excessive airflow limitation in common. A wide body of knowledge has been accumulated over the last century explaining the mechanisms by which airway (chronic bronchitis) and parenchymal (emphysema) diseases lead to an indistinguishable spirometric abnormality. Although the definition of emphysema is anatomical, early studies showed that its presence can be inferred with good approximation from measurements of lung mechanics and gas exchange, in addition to simple spirometry. Studies using tests of ventilation distribution showed that abnormalities are present in smokers with normal spirometry, although these tests were not predictive of development of COPD. At the beginning of the third millennium, new documents and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of COPD were developed, in which the functional diagnosis of COPD was restricted, for the sake of simplicity, to simple spirometry. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in separating bronchitic from emphysematous phenotype of COPD. For this purpose, high-resolution computed tomography scanning has been added to diagnostic work-up. At the same time, methods for lung function testing have been refined and seem promising for detection of early small airways abnormalities. Among them are the forced oscillation technique and the nitrogen phase III slope analysis of the multiple-breath washout test, which may provide information on ventilation inhomogeneity. Moreover, the combined assessment of diffusing capacity for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide may be more sensitive than the latter alone for partitioning diffusive components at parenchymal level.

  19. Patients with single ventricle physiology undergoing noncardiac surgery are at high risk for adverse events.

    PubMed

    Brown, Morgan L; DiNardo, James A; Odegard, Kirsten C

    2015-08-01

    intraoperative adverse events (9.8%) including: arrhythmias requiring treatment (n = 4), conversion from sedation to a general anesthetic (n = 2), difficult airway (n = 1), inadvertent extubation with desaturation and bradycardia (n = 1), hypotension and desaturation (n = 1), and cardiac arrest (n = 1). Postoperative events (<48 h) included ST segment changes requiring cardiac catheterization (n = 1), and cardiorespiratory arrest (n = 1). Age, size, gender, type of cardiac palliation, patient location, procedure location, and type of procedure were not associated with adverse outcome. After 62 anesthetics (60.8%), patients went postoperatively to the cardiac ICU. There were no deaths at 48 h. We observed no mortality during or after noncardiac surgery in a high-risk subgroup of palliated cardiac patients with single ventricle physiology. However, 11.8% of patients had an adverse event associated with their anesthetic. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Early Adversity, Elevated Stress Physiology, Accelerated Sexual Maturation and Poor Health in Females

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Jay; Ruttle, Paula L.; Boyce, W. Thomas; Armstrong, Jeffrey M.; Essex, Marilyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary-minded developmentalists studying predictive-adaptive-response processes linking childhood adversity with accelerated female reproductive development and health scientists investigating the developmental origins of health and disease (DOoHaD) may be tapping the same process, whereby longer-term health costs are traded off for increased probability of reproducing before dying via a process of accelerated reproductive maturation. Using data from 73 females, we test the following propositions using path analysis: (a) greater exposure to prenatal stress predicts greater maternal depression and negative parenting in infancy, (b) which predicts elevated basal cortisol at 4.5 years, (c) which predicts accelerated adrenarcheal development, (d) which predicts more physical and mental health problems at age 18. Results prove generally consistent with these propositions, including a direct link from cortisol to mental health problems. DOoHaD investigators should consider including early sexual maturation as a core component linking early adversity and stress physiology with poor health later in life in females. PMID:25915592

  1. Early adversity, elevated stress physiology, accelerated sexual maturation, and poor health in females.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Jay; Ruttle, Paula L; Boyce, W Thomas; Armstrong, Jeffrey M; Essex, Marilyn J

    2015-06-01

    Evolutionary-minded developmentalists studying predictive-adaptive-response processes linking childhood adversity with accelerated female reproductive development and health scientists investigating the developmental origins of health and disease (DOoHaD) may be tapping the same process, whereby longer-term health costs are traded off for increased probability of reproducing before dying via a process of accelerated reproductive maturation. Using data from 73 females, we test the following propositions using path analysis: (a) greater exposure to prenatal stress predicts greater maternal depression and negative parenting in infancy, (b) which predicts elevated basal cortisol at 4.5 years, (c) which predicts accelerated adrenarcheal development, (d) which predicts more physical and mental health problems at age 18. Results prove generally consistent with these propositions, including a direct link from cortisol to mental health problems. DOoHaD investigators should consider including early sexual maturation as a core component linking early adversity and stress physiology with poor health later in life in females. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Gender-Age-Physiology Index Stage for Predicting Future Lung Function Decline.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Margaret L; Xia, Meng; Zhou, Yueren; Murray, Susan; Tayob, Nabihah; Brown, Kevin K; Wells, Athol U; Schmidt, Shelley L; Martinez, Fernando J; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease with variable course. The Gender-Age-Physiology (GAP) Index and staging system uses clinical variables to stage mortality risk. It is unknown whether clinical staging predicts future decline in pulmonary function. We assessed whether the GAP stage predicts future pulmonary function decline and whether interval pulmonary function change predicts mortality after accounting for stage. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (N = 657) were identified retrospectively at three tertiary referral centers, and baseline GAP stages were assessed. Mixed models were used to describe average trajectories of FVC and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (Dlco). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess whether declines in pulmonary function ≥ 10% in 6 months predict mortality after accounting for GAP stage. Over a 2-year period, GAP stage was not associated with differences in yearly lung function decline. After accounting for stage, a 10% decrease in FVC or Dlco over 6 months independently predicted death or transplantation (FVC hazard ratio, 1.37; Dlco hazard ratio, 1.30; both, P ≤ .03). Patients with GAP stage 2 with declining pulmonary function experienced a survival profile similar to patients with GAP stage 3, with 1-year event-free survival of 59.3% (95% CI, 49.4-67.8) vs 56.9% (95% CI, 42.2-69.1). Baseline GAP stage predicted death or lung transplantation but not the rate of future pulmonary function decline. After accounting for GAP stage, a decline of ≥ 10% over 6 months independently predicted death or lung transplantation. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Inhaled nitric oxide: a physiologic treatment of persistent pulmonary arterial hypertension in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Thébaud, B; Mercier, J C

    1997-10-01

    Fetal pulmonary circulation is characterized by high resistance and low pulmonary blood flow. Right-to-left shunting through the foramen ovale and/or patent ductus arteriosus is necessary to perfuse the placenta and insure fetal life. At birth, pulmonary arterial blood flow increases immediately by 8- to 10-fold, and allows pulmonary gas exchange and postnatal life. In some circumstances, this adaptation to extra-uterine life is inadequate, because of persistent high pulmonary resistance (PPHN). Due to the lack of a selective pulmonary vasodilator, the treatment of this syndrome remained purely symptomatic using high oxygen levels and barotraumatic mechanical hyperventilation. When this medical treatment failed, the only alternative was extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The discovery of the major role of various endothelium-derived factors including nitric oxide (NO) in the control of vascular reactivity led to dramatic switches in the concepts of severe neonatal respiratory failure and the therapeutic approach of PPHN. It was shown, first in experimental animals then in a few infants with hypoxemic respiratory failure, that NO inhalation selectively vasodilated the vasoconstricted pulmonary vessels, and reversed right-to-left shunting and refractory hypoxemia. Whether inhaled NO also reduces mortality and/or morbidity in hypoxic infants remains to be proven by appropriate randomized clinical trials. However, not only PPHN is associated with pulmonary diseases of various etiologies and underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, but also inhaled NO is used in conjunction with other validated therapeutic strategies including ante- or postnatal steroids, exogenous surfactants, and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Thus, the relevant primary endpoint might be not only crude survival but the most physiological and economical way of obtaining it.

  4. Sildenafil Increases Systemic Saturation and Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure in Patients with Failing Fontan Physiology.

    PubMed

    Morchi, Gira S; Ivy, D Dunbar; Duster, Mark C; Claussen, Lori; Chan, Kak-Chen; Kay, Joseph

    2009-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sildenafil in patients with failing Fontan physiology. DESIGN: A retrospective chart review was performed to compare history and available data in patients with Fontan circulations before and after starting sildenafil. The paired and unpaired Student's t-tests were used for statistical analyses. PATIENTS: Six patients at our institution with Fontan physiology, persistent symptoms of cyanosis or effusion, and poor hemodynamics as measured in the catheterization laboratory were placed on sildenafil. One patient was not included in the analysis because of insufficient length of treatment. All patients had symptoms of failing Fontan hemodynamics with either persistent cyanosis or effusions. In this group, the mean pulmonary artery pressure was greater than 15 mm Hg (17.4 ± 1.5 mm Hg) with mean estimated pulmonary vascular resistance of 3.5 ± 1.0 Wood units × m(2) prior to starting sildenafil. RESULTS: Sildenafil significantly increased the systemic arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation in this group (82.8 ± 7.3% pre-treatment vs. 91.0 ± 5.5% post-treatment, P = .017). In the four out of five patients who have had follow-up catheterizations, there was a significant decrease in pulmonary artery pressure (17.4 ± 1.5 mm Hg pre-treatment vs. 13.8 ± 2.1 mm Hg post-treatment, P = .018) and in estimated pulmonary vascular resistance pre- and post-sildenafil treatment (3.5 ± 1.0 Wood units × m(2) pre-treatment vs. 2.0 ± 0.4 Wood units × m(2) post-treatment, P = .031). CONCLUSIONS: Sildenafil may be a useful adjunct to therapy in patients with failing Fontan physiology likely through its function as a pulmonary vasodilator.

  5. Measurement of cardiovascular and pulmonary function endpoints and other physiological effects following partial or complete substitution of cigarettes with electronic cigarettes in adult smokers.

    PubMed

    D'Ruiz, Carl D; O'Connell, Grant; Graff, Donald W; Yan, X Sherwin

    2017-07-01

    Acute changes in select physiological parameters associated with cardiovascular physiology (systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR)), pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and exhaled CO and NO) and adverse events were measured in 105 clinically confined subjects who were randomized into groups that either completely or partially switched from conventional cigarettes to e-cigarettes or completely discontinued using tobacco and nicotine products altogether. Use of the e-cigarettes for five days under the various study conditions did not lead to higher BP or HR values, negative respiratory health outcomes or serious adverse health events. Reductions in BP and HR vital signs were observed in most of the participants that either ceased tobacco and nicotine products use altogether or switched completely to using e-cigarettes. Pulmonary function tests showed small but non-statistically significant improvements in FVC and FEV1 measurements in most use groups. Statistically significant (p < 0.05) benefits associated with smoking reduction were also noted in exhaled CO and NO levels. All study products were well tolerated. The study findings suggest that there are potential cardiovascular and pulmonary function benefits when smokers switch to using e-cigarette products. This further reinforces the potential that e-cigarettes offer smokers seeking an alternative to conventional tobacco products. Copyright © 2017 Fontem Ventures B.V. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adverse Events in Connective Tissue Disease–Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Rennie L.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Praestgaard, Amy; Merkel, Peter A.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)–associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have a poorer prognosis compared to those with idiopathic PAH, but little is known about the differences in treatment-related adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) between these groups. This study was undertaken to characterize these differences. Methods Individual patient-level data from 10 randomized controlled trials of therapies for PAH were obtained from the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients diagnosed as having either CTD-associated PAH or idiopathic PAH were included. A treatment-by-diagnosis interaction term was used to examine whether the effect of treatment on occurrence of AEs differed between patients with CTD-associated PAH and those with idiopathic PAH. Studies were pooled using fixed-effect models. Results The study sample included 2,370 participants: 716 with CTD-associated PAH and 1,654 with idiopathic PAH. In the active treatment group compared to the placebo group, the risk of AEs was higher among patients with CTD-associated PAH than among those with idiopathic PAH (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.00–2.47 versus OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.69–1.26; P for interaction = 0.061), but there was no difference in the risk of SAEs in analyses adjusted for age, race, sex, hemodynamic findings, and laboratory values. Despite the higher occurrence of AEs in patients with CTD-associated PAH assigned to active therapy compared to those receiving placebo, the risk of drug discontinuation due to an AE was similar to that in patients with idiopathic PAH assigned to active therapy (P for interaction = 0.27). Conclusion Patients with CTD-associated PAH experienced more treatment-related AEs compared to those with idiopathic PAH in therapeutic clinical trials. These findings suggest that the overall benefit of advanced therapies for PAH may be attenuated by the greater frequency of AEs. PMID:26016953

  7. Adverse Outcomes after Non-Chest Surgeries in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Nationwide Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao-Shun; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chung, Chi-Li; Hung, Chih-Jen; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and postoperative outcomes remains unknown. This study investigated outcomes following non-chest surgeries in patients with previous pulmonary TB. Methods Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we analyzed 6911 patients (aged ≥ 20 years) with preoperative diagnosis of pulmonary TB and 6911 propensity score-matched controls receiving non-chest surgeries in 2008–2010. Postoperative outcomes were compared between patients with or without pulmonary TB by calculating adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the multivariate logistic regressions. Results Surgical patients with pulmonary TB had a significantly higher postoperative complication rates than controls, including septicemia, pneumonia, acute renal failure, deep wound infection, overall complications, and 30-day postoperative mortality (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.07–1.86). The ORs of patients with low-income status were as high as 2.27 (95% CI 1.03–5.03). Preoperative use of TB drugs and TB-related medical expenditure also associated with higher postoperative mortality among surgical patients with pulmonary TB. Conclusions Surgical patients with pulmonary TB have significantly increased risks of postoperative complications and mortality after non-chest surgeries. This study suggests the need to improve postoperative care for surgical patients with pulmonary TB. PMID:26172153

  8. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Timothy J; Ford, Earl S; Croft, Janet B; Merrick, Melissa T; Rolle, Italia V; Giles, Wayne H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) before age 18 have been repeatedly associated with several chronic diseases in adulthood such as depression, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and stroke. We examined sex-specific relationships between individual ACEs and the number of ACEs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population. Materials and methods Data from 26,546 women and 19,015 men aged ≥18 years in five states of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed. We used log-linear regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the relationship of eight ACEs with COPD after adjustment for age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, employment, asthma history, health insurance coverage, and smoking status. Results Some 63.8% of women and 62.2% of men reported ≥1 ACE. COPD was reported by 4.9% of women and 4.0% of men. In women, but not in men, there was a higher likelihood of COPD associated with verbal abuse (PR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61), sexual abuse (PR =1.69, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.10), living with a substance abusing household member (PR =1.49, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.81), witnessing domestic violence (PR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.72), and parental separation/divorce (PR =1.47, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.80) during childhood compared to those with no individual ACEs. Reporting ≥5 ACEs (PR =2.08, 95% CI: 1.55, 2.80) compared to none was associated with a higher likelihood of COPD among women only. Conclusion ACEs are related to COPD, especially among women. These findings underscore the need for further research that examines sex-specific differences and the possible mechanisms linking ACEs and COPD. This work adds to a growing body of research suggesting that ACEs may contribute to health problems later in life and suggesting a need for program and policy solutions. PMID:25298732

  9. Changes in clinical and physiologic variables predict survival in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Collard, Harold R; King, Talmadge E; Bartelson, Becki Bucher; Vourlekis, Jason S; Schwarz, Marvin I; Brown, Kevin K

    2003-09-01

    There is significant heterogeneity in survival time among patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Studies of baseline clinical and physiologic variables as predictors of survival time have reported inconsistent results. We evaluated the predictive value of changes in clinical and physiologic variables over time for survival time in 81 patients with biopsy-proven idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Six-month changes in dyspnea score, total lung capacity, thoracic gas volume, FVC, FEV1, diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide, partial pressure of arterial oxygen, oxygen saturation, and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient were predictive of survival time even after adjustment for baseline values. Analyses were repeated on 51 patients with 12-month change data. Twelve-month changes in dyspnea score, total lung capacity, FVC, partial pressure of arterial oxygen, oxygen saturation, and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient were predictive of survival time after adjustment for baseline values. Evaluation of changes in clinical and physiological variables over 6 and 12 months may provide clinicians with more accurate prognostic information than baseline values alone.

  10. Social adversity in adolescence increases the physiological vulnerability to job strain in adulthood: a prospective population-based study.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Hugo; Gustafsson, Per E; Theorell, Töres; Janlert, Urban; Hammarström, Anne

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued that the association between job strain and health could be confounded by early life exposures, and studies have shown early adversity to increase individual vulnerability to later stress. We therefore investigated if early life exposure to adversity increases the individual's physiological vulnerability job strain in adulthood. In a population-based cohort (343 women and 330 men, 83% of the eligible participants), we examined the association between on the one hand exposure to adversity in adolescence, measured at age 16, and job strain measured at age 43, and on the other hand allostatic load at age 43. Adversity was operationalised as an index comprising residential mobility and crowding, parental loss, parental unemployment, and parental physical and mental illness (including substance abuse). Allostatic load summarised body fat, blood pressure, inflammatory markers, glucose, blood lipids, and cortisol regulation. There was an interaction between adversity in adolescence and job strain (B = 0.09, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.16 after adjustment for socioeconomic status), particularly psychological demands, indicating that job strain was associated with increased allostatic load only among participants with adversity in adolescence. Job strain was associated with lower allostatic load in men (β = -0.20, 95% CI -0.35 to -0.06). Exposure to adversity in adolescence was associated with increased levels of biological stress among those reporting job strain in mid-life, indicating increased vulnerability to environmental stressors.

  11. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction.

  12. Monitoring of Physiological Parameters to Predict Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Al Rajeh, Ahmed M.; Hurst, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The value of monitoring physiological parameters to predict chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations is controversial. A few studies have suggested benefit from domiciliary monitoring of vital signs, and/or lung function but there is no existing systematic review. Objectives: To conduct a systematic review of the effectiveness of monitoring physiological parameters to predict COPD exacerbation. Methods: An electronic systematic search compliant with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines was conducted. The search was updated to April 6, 2016. Five databases were examined: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, or MEDLARS Online (Medline), Excerpta Medica dataBASE (Embase), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Cochrane clinical trials database. Results: Sixteen articles met the pre-specified inclusion criteria. Fifteen of these articules reported positive results in predicting COPD exacerbation via monitoring of physiological parameters. Nine studies showed a reduction in peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2%) prior to exacerbation onset. Three studies for peak flow, and two studies for respiratory rate reported a significant variation prior to or at exacerbation onset. A particular challenge is accounting for baseline heterogeneity in parameters between patients. Conclusion: There is currently insufficient information on how physiological parameters vary prior to exacerbation to support routine domiciliary monitoring for the prediction of exacerbations in COPD. However, the method remains promising. PMID:27897995

  13. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe res...

  14. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe res...

  15. Adverse Reactions to Daily and Intermittent Rifampicin Regimens for Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Hong Kong*

    PubMed Central

    Aquinas, Sister Mary; Allan, W. G. L.; Horsfall, P. A. L.; Jenkins, P. K.; Hung-Yan, Wong; Girling, David; Tall, Ruth; Fox, Wallace

    1972-01-01

    This paper reports the nature, incidence, and severity of adverse reactions to regimens of rifampicin and ethambutol given once weekly, twice weekly, or daily and to a standard reserve regimen in a total of 330 Chinese failure patients who completed at least six months' chemotherapy in a therapeutic comparison in Hong Kong. The adverse reactions which occurred on the regimens of intermittent rifampicin were termed cutaneous, abdominal, “flu”, and respiratory; in addition, purpura and abnormal liver function tests were encountered. There was an association of adverse reactions with the interval between doses and with the dose size of rifampicin, the highest incidence occurring with once-weekly rifampicin in high dosage. A procedure was developed for managing adverse reactions to intermittent rifampicin. Of 202 patients treated with intermittent rifampicin 60 developed adverse reactions, but in only 7 (3%) was it necessary to terminate the drug, though a further 10 (5%) were changed to daily rifampicin. On daily rifampicin, generalized hypersensitivity, cutaneous reactions, (one with purpura), and impaired liver function were encountered. Adverse reactions on the standard ethionamide, pyrazinamide, and cycloserine regimen were frequent and some were serious. PMID:4259217

  16. Social Adversity in Adolescence Increases the Physiological Vulnerability to Job Strain in Adulthood: A Prospective Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Westerlund, Hugo; Gustafsson, Per E.; Theorell, Töres; Janlert, Urban; Hammarström, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been argued that the association between job strain and health could be confounded by early life exposures, and studies have shown early adversity to increase individual vulnerability to later stress. We therefore investigated if early life exposure to adversity increases the individual's physiological vulnerability job strain in adulthood. Methodology/Principal Findings In a population-based cohort (343 women and 330 men, 83% of the eligible participants), we examined the association between on the one hand exposure to adversity in adolescence, measured at age 16, and job strain measured at age 43, and on the other hand allostatic load at age 43. Adversity was operationalised as an index comprising residential mobility and crowding, parental loss, parental unemployment, and parental physical and mental illness (including substance abuse). Allostatic load summarised body fat, blood pressure, inflammatory markers, glucose, blood lipids, and cortisol regulation. There was an interaction between adversity in adolescence and job strain (B = 0.09, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.16 after adjustment for socioeconomic status), particularly psychological demands, indicating that job strain was associated with increased allostatic load only among participants with adversity in adolescence. Job strain was associated with lower allostatic load in men (β = −0.20, 95% CI −0.35 to −0.06). Conclusions/Significance Exposure to adversity in adolescence was associated with increased levels of biological stress among those reporting job strain in mid-life, indicating increased vulnerability to environmental stressors. PMID:22558285

  17. A study of clinical and physiological relations of daily physical activity in precapillary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Panagiotou, Marios; Johnson, Martin Kevin; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Baker, Julien Steven; Church, Alistair Colin; Peacock, Andrew J; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2017-06-29

    Daily physical activity is reduced in precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) but the underlying mechanisms are inadequately explored. We sought to investigate clinical and physiological relations of daily physical activity and profile differences between less and more active patients with precapillary PH. A prospective, cross-sectional study of 20 patients with precapillary PH who undertook a) a comprehensive clinical assessment, b) a preliminary treadmill test, c) 7-day monitoring of daily walking intensity with triaxial accelerometry and d) a personalized treadmill test corresponding to the individual patient mean daily walking intensity with real-time physiological measurements. Significant clinical correlations with individual patient mean walking intensity (1.71±0.27 m/s(2)) were observed for log N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (log-NTproBNP: r=-.75, p=<.001), age (r=-.70, p=.001), transfer factor for carbon monoxide %predicted (r=.51, p=0.022) and 6-minute walk distance (r=.50, p=.026). Significant physiological correlations were obtained for heart rate reserve (r=.68, p=.001), quadriceps tissue oxygenation index (Q-StO2: r=.58, p=.008), change in Q-StO2 from rest (r=.60, p=.006) and ventilatory equivalent for oxygen uptake (r=-.56, p=.013). Stepwise multiple regression analyses retained log-NTproBNP (R(2)=0.55), heart rate reserve (R(2)=0.44) and Q-StO (R(2)=0.13) accounting for a significant variance in individual walking intensity. Less active patients had greater physical activity-induced cardiopulmonary impairment, worse quadriceps oxygenation profile and compromised health-related quality of life compared to more active patients. These preliminary findings suggest a significant relation between right ventricular and peripheral muscle oxygenation status and reduced daily physical activity in precapillary PH. Further research is warranted to unravel the physiological determinants, establish clinical predictors, and identify beneficial

  18. A systems engineering approach to validation of a pulmonary physiology simulator for clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Das, A.; Gao, Z.; Menon, P. P.; Hardman, J. G.; Bates, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological simulators which are intended for use in clinical environments face harsh expectations from medical practitioners; they must cope with significant levels of uncertainty arising from non-measurable parameters, population heterogeneity and disease heterogeneity, and their validation must provide watertight proof of their applicability and reliability in the clinical arena. This paper describes a systems engineering framework for the validation of an in silico simulation model of pulmonary physiology. We combine explicit modelling of uncertainty/variability with advanced global optimization methods to demonstrate that the model predictions never deviate from physiologically plausible values for realistic levels of parametric uncertainty. The simulation model considered here has been designed to represent a dynamic in vivo cardiopulmonary state iterating through a mass-conserving set of equations based on established physiological principles and has been developed for a direct clinical application in an intensive-care environment. The approach to uncertainty modelling is adapted from the current best practice in the field of systems and control engineering, and a range of advanced optimization methods are employed to check the robustness of the model, including sequential quadratic programming, mesh-adaptive direct search and genetic algorithms. An overview of these methods and a comparison of their reliability and computational efficiency in comparison to statistical approaches such as Monte Carlo simulation are provided. The results of our study indicate that the simulator provides robust predictions of arterial gas pressures for all realistic ranges of model parameters, and also demonstrate the general applicability of the proposed approach to model validation for physiological simulation. PMID:20538754

  19. Impaired Global Right Ventricular Longitudinal Strain Predicts Long-Term Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyeong; Park, Margaret M.; Farha, Samar; Sharp, Jacqueline; Lundgrin, Erika; Comhair, Suzy; Tang, Wai Hong; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Background New 2-dimensional strain echocardiography enables quantification of right ventricular (RV) mechanics by assessing global longitudinal strain of RV (GLSRV) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the prognostic significance of impaired GLSRV is unclear in these patients. Methods Comprehensive echocardiography was performed in 51 consecutive PAH patients without atrial fibrillation (40 females, 48 ± 14 years old) with long-term follow-up. GLSRV was measured with off-line with velocity vector imaging (VVI, Siemens Medical System, Mountain View, CA, USA). Results GLSRV showed significant correlation with RV fractional area change (r = -0.606, p < 0.001), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (r = -0.579, p < 0.001), and RV Tei index (r = 0.590, p < 0.001). It showed significant correlations with pulmonary vascular resistance (r = 0.469, p = 0.001) and B-natriuretic peptide concentration (r = 0.351, p = 0.012). During a clinical followup time (45 ± 15 months), 20 patients experienced one or more adverse events (12 death, 2 lung transplantation, and 15 heart failure hospitalization). After multivariate analysis, age [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.343, p = 0.040] and GLSRV (HR = 2.122, p = 0.040) were associated with adverse clinical events. Age (HR = 3.200, p = 0.016) and GLSRV (HR = 2.090, p = 0.042) were also significant predictors of death. Impaired GLSRV (≥ -15.5%) was associated with lower event-free survival (HR = 4.906, p = 0.001) and increased mortality (HR = 8.842, p = 0.005). Conclusion GLSRV by VVI showed significant correlations with conventional echocardiographic parameters indicating RV systolic function. Lower GLSRV (≥ -15.5%) was significantly associated with presence of adverse clinical events and deaths in PAH patients. PMID:26140151

  20. Right ventricular involvement and the extent of left ventricular enhancement with magnetic resonance predict adverse outcome in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Smedema, Jan-Peter; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Ector, Joris; Heidbuchel, Hein; Ainslie, Gillian; Crijns, Harry J G M

    2017-10-02

    Cardiac involvement is the main determinant of poor outcomes in sarcoidosis. Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) have been reported to be predictive of adverse outcome in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathies. The aim of our study was to determine whether delayed RV LGE with cardiovascular magnetic resonance would be predictive of adverse events in addition to LV LGE during the long-term follow-up of pulmonary sarcoidosis patients. Eighty-four consecutive biopsy-proven pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were followed for a median of 56 months [38-74] after baseline delayed contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance. The composite primary endpoint consisted of admission for congestive heart failure, sustained ventricular tachycardia, appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy, pacemaker implantation for high degree atrio-ventricular block, or cardiac death. The composite secondary endpoint included all-cause mortality in addition to the primary endpoint. RV and LV LGE were demonstrated in respectively 12 and 27 patients. Five of 10 events included in the primary endpoint occurred in the group with RV LGE. RV LGE, LV, or biventricular LGE yielded Cox hazard ratios of 8.71 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.90-23.81], 9.22 (95% CI 1.96-43.45), and 12.09 (95% CI 3.43-42.68) for the composite primary endpoint. In a multivariate model, the predictive value of biventricular LGE for the composite primary and secondary endpoints was strongest. Kaplan-Meier event-free survival curves were most significant for RV LGE and biventricular LGE (log rank with P < 0.001). Biventricular LGE at presentation is the strongest, independent predictor of adverse outcome during long-term follow-up. Asymptomatic myocardial scar <8% of LV mass carried a favourable long-term outcome. © 2017 The Authors ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  1. In Vivo Assessment of Pulmonary Arterial Wall Fibrosis by Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A New Prognostic Marker of Adverse Clinical Follow-Up§

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Enric; Grignola, Juan C; Aguilar, Rio; Montero, María Angeles; Arredondo, Christian; Vázquez, Manuel; López-Messeguer, Manuel; Bravo, Carlos; Bouteldja, Nadia; Hidalgo, Cristina; Roman, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim is to correlate pulmonary arterial (PA) remodeling estimated by PA fibrosis in PA hypertension (PAH) with clinical follow-up. Histology of PA specimens is also performed. Methods: 19 patients, aged 54±16 (4 men), functional class II-III were studied with right heart catheterization, PA Intravascular Ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in inferior lobe segment. PA wall fibrosis was obtained by OCT ( area of fibrosis/PA cross sectional area × 100). Patients follow-up was blind to OCT. Events were defined as mortality, lung transplantation, need of intravenous prostaglandins or onset of right ventricular failure. Results: OCT measurements showed high intra- and interobserver agreement. There was a good correlation between OCT and histology in PA fibrosis from explanted lungs. Area of fibrosis was 1.4±0.8 mm2, % fibrosis was 22.3±8. Follow-up was 3.5 years (2.5-4.5). OCT %Fib was significantly correlated with PA capacitance (r=-0.536) and with pulmonary vascular rsistance (r=0.55). Patients were divided according to the median value of PA fibrosis. There were 10 patients with a high (≥ 22%) and 9 with a low fibrosis (<22%). Events occurred in 6 (1 death, 1 lung transplantation, 2 intravenous prostaglandins, 2 right heart failure) out of 10 patients with high and in 0 out of 9 patients with low fibrosis (p<0.01). Conclusions: In PAH, the severity of PA remodeling assessed by OCT wall fibrosis was significantly predictive of severely unfavorable clinical outcome. In vivo assessment of pulmonary arterial wall fibrosis by intravascular OCT in PAH is a promising new prognostic marker of adverse clinical outcome. PMID:23730366

  2. Cholinesterase inhibitors and adverse pulmonary events in older people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and concomitant dementia: a population-based, cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Anne; Seitz, Dallas P; Fischer, Hadas D; Gruneir, Andrea; Bell, Chaim M; Gershon, Andrea S; Fu, Longdi; Anderson, Geoff M; Austin, Peter C; Rochon, Paula A; Gill, Sudeep S

    2012-03-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) are a mainstay treatment for individuals with dementia. ChEIs may worsen airflow obstruction because of their pro-cholinergic properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk of serious pulmonary complications in the elderly with concomitant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and dementia who were receiving ChEIs. This was a population-based, cohort study conducted between 2003 and 2010 in residents of Ontario, Canada. Subjects were over the age of 66 years and had concomitant dementia and COPD, identified using linked administrative databases. Exposure to ChEIs was determined using a drug benefits database. The primary outcome was an emergency room (ER) visit or hospitalization for COPD. The risk difference at 60 days and the relative risk (RR) for study outcomes were estimated in the propensity score-matched sample. Of 266,840 individuals with COPD, 45,503 had a concomitant diagnosis of dementia. A total of 7166 unexposed subjects were matched to subjects newly exposed to ChEIs. New users of ChEIs were not at significantly higher risk of ER visits or hospitalizations for COPD (RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.76, 1.07) or COPD exacerbations (RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.91, 1.15). Furthermore, ER visits for any respiratory diagnoses were not increased among new users of ChEIs (RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.87, 1.19) when compared with non-users. Sub-group analyses were consistent with the main analysis. In a large cohort of elderly individuals with COPD and dementia, new users of ChEIs had a similar risk for adverse pulmonary outcomes as those who were not receiving ChEIs.

  3. A prognostic model for short term adverse events in normotensive patients with pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Agterof, Mariette J; Schutgens, Roger E G; Moumli, Noureddine; Eijkemans, M J C; van der Griend, René; Tromp, Ellen A M; Biesma, Douwe H

    2011-08-01

    Risk stratification of patients with PE has gained interest in terms of the identification of patients in whom treatment on an outpatient base can be considered. Previous studies are of limited value due to their focus on adverse clinical events within several months after diagnosis of PE. We developed a prognostic model, based on easily accessible, clinical, and laboratory parameters, to predict adverse events during the first 10 days after the diagnosis of acute PE. We have analyzed the data of 210 outpatients with confirmed PE. Collected data included medical history, pulse rate, blood pressure, NT-proBNP, and D-dimer concentrations. The primary outcome was the occurrence of adverse clinical events in a 10 day follow-up period. Our final prognostic model to predict short-term adverse events consists of NT-proBNP levels, D-dimer concentrations, pulse rate, and the occurrence of active malignancy; the total score ranges from 0 to 37 points. Patients with a low score (no active malignancy, pulse rate <90 bpm, NT-proBNP <500 pg/ml, and D-dimer <3,000 μg/l FEU) have a 10-day adverse event risk <1.5%. This risk increases to over 30% in patients with a maximum score, based on high pulse rate, D-dimer concentrations, and NT-proBNP levels. Our prognostic model, once prospectively validated in an independent sample of patients, can be used in the early risk stratification of PE to estimate the risk of adverse events and to differentiate between candidates for in- or out- hospital treatment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in Saudi Arabia: Patients' clinical and physiological characteristics and hemodynamic parameters. A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, MM; Al-Najashi, K; Khan, A; Al-Dammas, S; Al-Awwad, H; Batubara, E; Al Otai, A; Abdulhameed, J; Fayed, A; Kashour, T

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The main objective of this study is to describe patients' clinical characteristics and physiological and hemodynamic parameters at the time of diagnosis in a pulmonary hypertension center in Saudi Arabia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study reports the results from a single pulmonary hypertension specialized center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, namely Prince Sultan Medical Military City/Cardiac Center (PSMMC & CC). Both newly diagnosed (incidence) and referred (prevalence) cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension are included. All characteristics, including clinical, physiological, and hemodynamic parameters at the time of diagnosis are described. RESULTS: A total of 107 patients were identified as having pulmonary arterial hypertension as diagnosed by right heart catheterization. The mean age at diagnosis was 36 (± 9) years, and there was a female preponderance of 62.6%. The mean duration between symptom onset and diagnosis was 27.8 (± 9.0) months. At the time of enrollment, 56.1% of patients were in functional class III and 16.8% were in functional class IV. Fifty five patients (51.4%) were diagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, 29 patients (27.1%) as congenital heart disease associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension, 16 patients (15.0%) as connective tissue diseases associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension, 4 patients (3.7%) as heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension, and 3 patients (2.8%) as portopulmonary hypertension. CONCLUSION: This data highlights the current situation of pulmonary arterial hypertension in Saudi Arabia. Our patients are much younger than patients described in other international registries but still detected as late in the course of the disease. A majority of patients displays severe functional and hemodynamic compromise. PMID:25276239

  5. Pulmonary haemodynamics in Fontan physiology after lobectomy in a patient with a single ventricle associated with pulmonary sequestration.

    PubMed

    Mii, Sayaka; Yasuda, Kazushi; Murayama, Hiroomi

    2017-03-01

    A 2-year-old girl with a functionally univentricular heart associated with a pulmonary sequestration underwent right lower lobectomy after which increased lung volume with low mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance was documented. A cardiac catheterisation performed after a subsequent total cavopulmonary connection demonstrated favourable Fontan haemodynamics. Lobectomy may have induced compensatory lung growth, contributing to the maintenance of haemodynamics favourable for the long-term success of the Fontan procedure.

  6. Pulmonary Vascular Impedance in Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION , *PULMONARY BLOOD CIRCULATION, BLOOD CIRCULATION, LUNG, PATHOLOGY, VASCULAR DISEASES, ARTERIES, OBSTRUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY...EMBOLISM, HISTOLOGY, DOGS, LABORATORY ANIMALS, BLOOD PRESSURE , EXPERIMENTAL DATA, PHYSIOLOGY.

  7. Behavioral and physiologic adverse effects in adolescent and young adult emergency department patients reporting use of energy drinks and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Deidrya A E; Cotter, Bradford V; Merchant, Roland C; Babu, Kavita M; Baird, Janette R; Nirenberg, Ted; Linakis, James G

    2013-08-01

    This pilot study assessed the prevalence of physiologic and behavioral adverse effects among adolescent (13-17 years) and adult (18-25 years) emergency department patients who reported energy drink and/or caffeinated-only beverage use within the 30 days prior to emergency department presentation. It was hypothesized that energy drink users would report more adverse effects than those who used only traditional caffeinated beverages such as coffee, tea, or soft drinks. This cross-sectional pilot study was conducted in two urban emergency departments, one adult and one pediatric. Eligible patients were enrolled during a 6-week period between June and August 2010. Participants completed a tablet computer-based, self-administered, anonymous questionnaire about their past 30-day energy drink and/or caffeinated-only beverage use, substance use, and experience of 10 physiologic and 10 behavioral symptoms. Multivariable logistic regression and negative binomial regression models, adjusted for age, gender, and substance use, were created to compare the occurrence of each adverse effect between energy drink and caffeinated-only beverage users. Odds ratios (ORs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated. Of those enrolled, 53.3% reported consuming energy drinks, 39.1% caffeinated-only beverages, and 7.6% no energy drinks or caffeinated-only beverages within the past 30 days. In multivariable logistic regression models, energy drink users were more likely than caffeinated-only beverage users to report having "gotten into trouble at home, school, or work" in the past 30 days (OR: 3.12 [1.24-7.88]). In the negative binomial regression multivariable models, more behavioral effects were reported among drug users (IRR: 1.50 [1.18-1.93]), and more physiologic effects were reported among tobacco users (IRR: 1.42 [1.13-1.80]) and females (IRR: 1.48 [1.21-1.80]), but not among energy drink users. Energy drink users and substance users are more likely to report specific physiologic

  8. Abnormal lung gallium-67 uptake preceding pulmonary physiologic impairment in an asymptomatic patient with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, T.F.; Golden, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was suggested by a diffuse, bilateral pulmonary uptake of gallium-67 in an asymptomatic, homosexual male with the antibody to the immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who was undergoing staging evaluation for lymphoma clinically localized to a left inguinal lymph node. Chest radiograph and pulmonary function evaluation, including lung volumes, diffusing capacity and arterial blood gases, were within normal limits. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed Pneumocystis carinii organisms. In this asymptomatic, HIV-positive patient, active alveolar infection, evidenced by abnormal gallium-67 scanning, predated pulmonary physiologic abnormalities. This observation raises questions concerning the natural history of this disease process and the specificity of physiologic tests for excluding disease. It also has implications for the treatment of neoplasia in the HIV-positive patient population.

  9. Assessment of multislice CT to quantify pulmonary emphysema function and physiology in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minsong; Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Presson, Robert G., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate multi-slice computed tomography technology to quantify functional and physiologic changes in rats with pulmonary emphysema. Method: Seven rats were scanned using a 16-slice CT (Philips MX8000 IDT) before and after artificial inducement of emphysema. Functional parameters i.e. lung volumes were measured by non-contrast spiral scan during forced breath-hold at inspiration and expiration followed by image segmentation based on attenuation threshold. Dynamic CT imaging was performed immediately following the contrast injection to estimate physiology changes. Pulmonary perfusion, fractional blood volume, and mean transit times (MTTs) were estimated by fitting the time-density curves of contrast material using a compartmental model. Results: The preliminary results indicated that the lung volumes of emphysema rats increased by 3.52+/-1.70mL (p<0.002) at expiration and 4.77+/-3.34mL (p<0.03) at inspiration. The mean lung densities of emphysema rats decreased by 91.76+/-68.11HU (p<0.01) at expiration and low attenuation areas increased by 5.21+/-3.88% (p<0.04) at inspiration compared with normal rats. The perfusion for normal and emphysema rats were 0.25+/-0.04ml/s/ml and 0.32+/-0.09ml/s/ml respectively. The fractional blood volumes for normal and emphysema rats were 0.21+/-0.04 and 0.15+/-0.02. There was a trend toward faster MTTs for emphysema rats (0.42+/-0.08s) than normal rats (0.89+/-0.19s) with p<0.006, suggesting that blood flow crossing the capillaries increases as the capillary volume decreases and which may cause the red blood cells to leave the capillaries incompletely saturated with oxygen if the MTTs become too short. Conclusion: Quantitative measurement using CT of structural and functional changes in pulmonary emphysema appears promising for small animals.

  10. Lower mortality following pulmonary adverse events and sepsis with ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel in the PLATO study.

    PubMed

    Storey, Robert F; James, Stefan K; Siegbahn, Agneta; Varenhorst, Christoph; Held, Claes; Ycas, Joseph; Husted, Steen E; Cannon, Christopher P; Becker, Richard C; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Åsenblad, Nils; Wallentin, Lars

    2014-01-01

    In the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) study of patients with acute coronary syndromes, ticagrelor reduced mortality compared to clopidogrel but the mechanisms for this mortality reduction remain uncertain. We analysed adverse events (AEs) consistent with either pulmonary infection or sepsis, and subsequent mortality, in 18,421 PLATO patients treated with ticagrelor or clopidogrel. AEs occurring within 7 days of last dose of study medication were defined as "on-treatment". Serial measurements of blood leukocyte counts, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 were performed. Fewer on-treatment pulmonary AEs occurred in the ticagrelor compared to the clopidogrel group (275 vs. 331 respectively; p = 0.019), with fewer deaths following these AEs (33 vs. 71; p < 0.001), particularly in those who remained on study medication three days after AE onset (10 vs. 43; p < 0.001). There were fewer deaths attributed to sepsis in the ticagrelor group (7 vs. 23; p = 0.003). Leukocyte counts were lower in the clopidogrel group during treatment (p < 0.0001 at 1, 3 and 6 months) but not at 1 month post-discontinuation. C-reactive protein increased more at discharge in the ticagrelor group (28.0 ± 38.0 vs. 26.1 ± 36.6 mg/l; p < 0.001) and interleukin-6 remained higher during the first month of treatment with ticagrelor. We conclude that the mortality risk following pulmonary AEs and sepsis in acute coronary syndrome patients appears to be lower during ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel therapy. Further work should assess whether ticagrelor and clopidogrel have differential effects on immune signalling.

  11. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) postmarket reported side effects and adverse events associated with pulmonary hypertension therapy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Maxey, Dawn M; Ivy, D Dunbar; Ogawa, Michelle T; Feinstein, Jeffrey A

    2013-10-01

    Because most medications for pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH) are used off label and based on adult trials, little information is available on pediatric-specific adverse events (AEs). Although drug manufacturers are required to submit postmarket AE reports to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), this information is rarely transmitted to practitioners. In the setting of a recent FDA warning for sildenafil, the authors sought to give a better description of the AEs associated with current therapies in pediatric PH. In January 2010, a written request was made to the Food and Drug Administration for AE records of commonly used PH medications. Reports were screened for pediatric patients, analyzed in terms of AEs, and compared with the medical literature. Arbitrarily, AEs that could be attributed to concomitant medications were not attributed to the PH medication in question. Adverse events occurring in more than 5 % of events for each drug were assumed to be associated with the targeted PH medication. Between November 1997 and December 2009, 588 pediatric AE reports (death in 257 cases) were reported for the three most commonly used therapies: bosentan, epoprostenol, and sildenafil. Many of the AEs were similar to those reported previously. However, 27 AEs not previously reported in the literature (e.g., pulmonary hemorrhage, hemoptysis, and pneumonia) were found. The FDA postmarket records for PH medications in pediatric patients show a significant number of AEs. The discovery of AEs not previously reported will better inform those caring for these complex and critically ill children, and the large number of deaths suggest they may be underreported in current literature.

  12. The physiological rationale of heat and moisture exchangers in post-laryngectomy pulmonary rehabilitation: a review.

    PubMed

    Zuur, J K; Muller, S H; de Jongh, F H C; van Zandwijk, N; Hilgers, F J M

    2006-01-01

    Total laryngectomy results in a permanent disconnection of the upper and lower airways and inevitably leads to chronic pulmonary complaints like frequent involuntary coughing, increased sputum production and repeated daily forced expectoration to clean the airway. Heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs), applied in an attempt to compensate for the lost functions of the upper respiratory tract, have been found to diminish these symptoms and improve the quality of life significantly. An HME has three physical properties that might be responsible for these improvements. First, its heat and moisture exchanging capacity improves intra-airway preservation of heat and water. Since the condensation and evaporation of moisture are accompanied by the release and uptake of thermal energy, these parameters are inseparable. Secondly, the HME's resistance may reduce dynamic airway compression, thereby improving ventilation. Thirdly, to some extent, an HME might filter out particles, thereby cleaning inspiratory breathing air. This article summarizes our present knowledge of changes in respiratory physiology after total laryngectomy and the influence of the HME by reviewing the physiological impact of these three physical properties separately for in vitro and in vivo data.

  13. Echocardiography of the pulmonary circulation and right ventricular function: exploring the physiologic spectrum in 1,480 normal subjects.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Antonello; Naeije, Robert; Grünig, Ekkehard; Caso, Pio; D'Alto, Michele; Di Palma, Enza; Nunziata, Luigi; Riegler, Lucia; Scarafile, Raffaella; Cocchia, Rosangela; Vriz, Olga; Citro, Rodolfo; Calabrò, Raffaele; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Bossone, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Although transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is an excellent noninvasive screening test for pulmonary hypertension, the physiologic range of Doppler echocardiography-derived pulmonary pressures remains not completely investigated. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to explore the full spectrum of pulmonary pressures and right ventricular (RV) functional indexes by TTE in healthy subjects and to investigate clinical and echocardiographic correlates. A random sample of 1,480 healthy individuals (mean age, 36.1 ± 15.5 years; range, 20-80 years; 905 men) underwent a comprehensive TTE. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), mean pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance were estimated by standard Doppler echocardiography formulas. In addition, RV diastolic (Doppler transtricuspid inflow measurements) and systolic indexes (RV fractional area change, RV tissue Doppler peak systolic velocity, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion) were calculated. PASP and mean pulmonary artery pressure values were significantly higher in subjects aged > 50 years and in those with a BMI > 30 kg/m2. In particular, a PASP > 40 mm Hg was found in 118 subjects (8%) of those aged > 50 years and in 103 (7%) of those with a BMI > 30 kg/m2. No differences by age were registered in RV systolic indexes and in pulmonary vascular resistances. On multivariate analysis, in the overall study population, age, BMI, mitral E/e' ratio, and left ventricular stroke volume were the only independent predictors of PASP. This study delineates an estimate of pulmonary hemodynamics in a wide age range cohort of healthy subjects. Pulmonary pressures increased with age and BMI, as expected.

  14. Nesting material as environmental enrichment has no adverse effects on behavior and physiology of laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Van de Weerd, H A; Van Loo, P L; Van Zutphen, L F; Koolhaas, J M; Baumans, V

    1997-11-01

    Environmental enrichment may improve the quality of life of captive animals by altering the environment of animals so that they are able to perform more of the behavior that is within the range of the animal's species-specific repertoire. When enrichment is introduced into an animal's environment, it is important to evaluate the effect of the enrichment program and to assess whether the animal continues to use the enrichment in the long-term. Groups of mice were housed under either standard or enriched conditions for several weeks. Nesting material which was highly preferred in previous studies was used as enrichment. During the period of differential housing several behavioral parameters (behavioral tests and handling) and physiological parameters (urine and plasma corticosterone, food and water intake, body and adrenal weight) were monitored to determine the impact of environmental enrichment. Observations were made to determine whether or not the mice continued to use the enrichment. The results indicated that throughout the study all mice used the nesting material to build nests and that mice from enriched conditions weighed more than mice housed under standard conditions, although the latter consumed more food. No major differences for behavioral and physiological parameters were found between the groups of mice housed under different conditions. Therefore it is not likely that supply of nesting material will jeopardize the outcome of experiments.

  15. Prenatal Diagnosis and Evaluation of Sonographic Predictors for Intervention and Adverse Outcome in Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hellmund, Astrid; Berg, Christoph; Geipel, Annegret; Bludau, Meike; Heydweiller, Andreas; Bachour, Haitham; Müller, Andreas; Müller, Annette; Gembruch, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe antenatal findings and evaluate prenatal risk parameters for adverse outcome or need for intervention in fetuses with congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM). Methods In our retrospective study all fetuses with a prenatal diagnosis of CPAM detected in our tertiary referral center between 2002 and 2013 were analyzed. Sonographic findings were noted and measurements of mass-to-thorax-ratio (MTR), congenital pulmonary airway malformation volume-ratio (CVR) and observed to expected lung-to head-ratio (o/e LHR) were conducted and correlated to fetal or neonatal morbidity and mortality and/or need for prenatal intervention. Results 67 fetuses with CPAM were included in the study. Hydropic fetuses were observed in 16.4% (11/67) of cases, prenatal intervention was undertaken in 9 cases; 7 pregnancies were terminated. The survival rate of non-hydropic fetuses with conservatively managed CPAM was 98.0% (50/51), the survival rate for hydropic fetuses with intention to treat was 42.9% (3/7). 10 (18.2%) children needed respiratory assistance. Fetuses with a CVR of <0.91 were significantly less likely to experience adverse outcome or need for prenatal intervention with sensitivity, specificity and positive/negative predictive value of 0.89, 0.71, 0.62 and 0.93, respectively. A MTR (mass-to-thorax-ratio) of < 0.51 had a positive predictive value of 0.54 and a negative predictive value of 0.96 of adverse events with a sensitivity of 0.95 and a specificity of 0.63. The negative predictive value for o/e LHR of 45% was 0.84 with sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 0.73, 0.68 and 0.52, respectively. Conclusions The majority of cases with CPAM have a favorable outcome. MTR and CVR are able to identify fetuses at risk, the o/e LHR is less sensitive. PMID:26978067

  16. Milano Summer Particulate Matter (PM10) Triggers Lung Inflammation and Extra Pulmonary Adverse Events in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Cristina; Tinaglia, Valentina; Mantecca, Paride; Camatini, Marina; Palestini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a link between particulate matter (PM) exposure and increased mortality and morbidity associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases; accumulating evidences point to a new role for air pollution in CNS diseases. The purpose of our study is to investigate PM10sum effects on lungs and extra pulmonary tissues. Milano PM10sum has been intratracheally instilled into BALB/c mice. Broncho Alveolar Lavage fluid, lung parenchyma, heart and brain were screened for markers of inflammation (cell counts, cytokines, ET-1, HO-1, MPO, iNOS), cytotoxicity (LDH, ALP, Hsp70, Caspase8-p18, Caspase3-p17) for a putative pro-carcinogenic marker (Cyp1B1) and for TLR4 pathway activation. Brain was also investigated for CD68, TNF-α, GFAP. In blood, cell counts were performed while plasma was screened for endothelial activation (sP-selectin, ET-1) and for inflammation markers (TNF-α, MIP-2, IL-1β, MPO). Genes up-regulation (HMOX1, Cyp1B1, IL-1β, MIP-2, MPO) and miR-21 have been investigated in lungs and blood. Inflammation in the respiratory tract of PM10sum-treated mice has been confirmed in BALf and lung parenchyma by increased PMNs percentage, increased ET-1, MPO and cytokines levels. A systemic spreading of lung inflammation in PM10sum-treated mice has been related to the increased blood total cell count and neutrophils percentage, as well as to increased blood MPO. The blood-endothelium interface activation has been confirmed by significant increases of plasma ET-1 and sP-selectin. Furthermore PM10sum induced heart endothelial activation and PAHs metabolism, proved by increased ET-1 and Cyp1B1 levels. Moreover, PM10sum causes an increase in brain HO-1 and ET-1. These results state the translocation of inflammation mediators, ultrafine particles, LPS, metals associated to PM10sum, from lungs to bloodstream, thus triggering a systemic reaction, mainly involving heart and brain. Our results provided additional insight into the toxicity of PM10sum

  17. Risk of Stroke and Post-Stroke Adverse Events in Patients with Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao-Shun; Shih, Chun-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chung, Chi-Li

    2017-01-01

    Background The risk and outcomes of stroke in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations (COPDe) remain unclear. We examined whether patients with COPDe faced increased risk of stroke or post-stroke outcomes. Methods Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 1918 adults with COPDe and selected comparison cohorts of 3836 adults with COPD no exacerbations and 7672 adults without COPD who were frequency matched by age and sex in 2000–2008 (Study 1). Stroke event was identified during 2000–2013 follow-up period. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of stroke associated with COPDe were calculated. In a nested cohort study (Study 2) of 261686 new-diagnosed stroke patients in 2000–2009, we calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs of adverse events after stroke in patients with COPDe. Results Patients with COPDe had increased stroke incidence, with an adjusted HR of 1.28 (95% CI, 1.03–1.59). In the Study 2, COPDe were associated with post-stroke mortality (OR, 1.34, 95% CI 1.20–1.52), epilepsy (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, (1.22–1.67), and pneumonia (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.39–1.62). Previous intubation for COPD and inpatient admissions due to COPD were factors associated with post-stroke adverse events. Conclusion Patients who have had COPDe face increased risks of stroke and post-stroke adverse events. PMID:28060955

  18. Methyl Donor Supplementation Blocks the Adverse Effects of Maternal High Fat Diet on Offspring Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal consumption of a high fat diet during pregnancy increases the offspring risk for obesity. Using a mouse model, we have previously shown that maternal consumption of a high fat (60%) diet leads to global and gene specific decreases in DNA methylation in the brain of the offspring. The present experiments were designed to attempt to reverse this DNA hypomethylation through supplementation of the maternal diet with methyl donors, and to determine whether methyl donor supplementation could block or attenuate phenotypes associated with maternal consumption of a HF diet. Metabolic and behavioral (fat preference) outcomes were assessed in male and female adult offspring. Expression of the mu-opioid receptor and dopamine transporter mRNA, as well as global DNA methylation were measured in the brain. Supplementation of the maternal diet with methyl donors attenuated the development of some of the adverse effects seen in offspring from dams fed a high fat diet; including weight gain, increased fat preference (males), changes in CNS gene expression and global hypomethylation in the prefrontal cortex. Notable sex differences were observed. These findings identify the importance of balanced methylation status during pregnancy, particularly in the context of a maternal high fat diet, for optimal offspring outcome. PMID:23658839

  19. Pulmonary sequelae of neonatal respiratory distress in very low birthweight infants: a clinical and physiological study.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Y C; Beardsmore, C S; Silverman, M

    1982-01-01

    Twenty infants, mechanically ventilated in the neonatal period for respiratory distress syndrome, were compared with 15 healthy controls, matched for birthweight(less than 1501 g) but greater in mean gestational age. Clinical features and lung mechanics (by whole body plethysmography) were recorded at 6-monthly intervals until about one year. THe neonatal course of the mechanically ventilated infants was commonly complicated by tracheobronchial hypersecretion and the later course by a fairly high incidence of lower respiratory tract illness. In this group, thoracic gas volume, dynamic compliance, pulmonary and airways conductance were all abnormal during the middle 4 months of the first year and reverted towards normal towards the end of the first year. The control group had normal lung mechanics. Early lung function tests were of limited value in predicting later lower respiratory tract illness, which was more common in boys, after neonatal mechanical ventilation for longer than 24 hours or raised ambient oxygen for longer than 5 days. There were few predictive physical signs. In this group of very low birthweight infants, respiratory distress syndrome of sufficient severity to require mechanical ventilation led to significant physiological and clinical disturbances of lung function which lasted into the second 6 months of life and which were particularly severe in those who had recurrent lower respiratory tract illness. PMID:7092305

  20. Pulmonary inflation reflex: its lack of physiological significance in coronary circulation of humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R F; Marcus, M L; White, C W

    1988-10-01

    In awake dogs, voluntary deep inspiration results in a marked, reflex-mediated increase in coronary blood flow. To study this reflex in humans, we subselectively measured coronary blood flow velocity (CBFV) with a 3-F coronary Doppler catheter in 12 subjects with angiographically normal coronary arteries. In each subject, intracoronary papaverine increased CBFV to 4.8 +/- 0.2 X resting CBFV and reduced coronary resistance to 0.20 +/- 0.01 X resting coronary resistance, demonstrating normal vasodilator reserve in the vessel under study. Valsalva maneuver reduced CBFV to 0.67 +/- 0.09 X resting CBFV and increased coronary resistance to 1.37 +/- 0.20 X resting coronary resistance (P less than 0.05 vs. control). Maximum voluntary inspiration, however, did not significantly change CBFV (peak response 1.03 +/- 0.05 X resting CBFV) or coronary resistance (0.96 +/- 0.04 X resting). To determine whether augmentation of resting alpha-adrenergic tone would potentiate the reflex, eight patients performed a sustained 33% maximal handgrip for 2 min. Maximal deep inspiration during handgrip failed to result in any significant change in CBFV or coronary resistance. These studies demonstrate that the canine pulmonary inflation reflex has little or no physiological significance in the coronary circulation of conscious humans. Additionally, these data suggest that the magnitude of reflex control of the coronary circulation may vary considerably between dogs and humans.

  1. Atrial natriuretic factor in chronic obstructive lung disease with pulmonary hypertension. Physiological correlates and response to peptide infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Adnot, S; Andrivet, P; Chabrier, P E; Piquet, J; Plas, P; Braquet, P; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Brun-Buisson, C

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the physiological role of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in patients with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD), we infused synthetic alpha-human ANF in seven such patients, and investigated the physiological correlates to circulating peptide levels in 24 patients with COLD. ANF infusion, at incremental rates of 0.01, 0.03, and 0.1 micrograms/kg.min, increased basal plasma immunoreactive (ir) ANF (136 +/- 38 pg/ml) by 3-, 10-, and 26-fold, respectively, and reduced pulmonary artery pressure (from 33 +/- 3 to 25 +/- 2 mmHg, P less than 0.001) and systemic arterial pressure (from 88 +/- 4 to 79 +/- 4 mmHg, P less than 0.001) in a dose-related fashion. Cardiac index increased by 13.5% (P less than 0.01) while heart rate was unchanged. Cardiac filling pressures decreased at 0.1 micrograms/kg.min ANF. Pulmonary and systemic vascular resistance fell by 37% (P less than 0.001) and 19% (P less than 0.001), respectively. Arterial oxygenation was impaired during ANF infusion, suggesting partial reversal of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Plasma renin activity remained unchanged but aldosterone fell by 44% (P less than 0.01). The levels of plasma irANF in 24 patients correlated directly with the degree of hemoconcentration (r = 0.67, P less than 0.001), respiratory acidosis (r = -0.65, P less than 0.001), and pulmonary hypertension (r = 0.52, P less than 0.01). The results suggest that ANF may serve as a potent pulmonary vasodilator involved in the circulatory homeostasis of patients with COLD. PMID:2522105

  2. Stenting for pulmonary artery stenosis complicated by univentricular physiology: subanalysis of JPIC stent survey.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takanari; Tomita, Hideshi; Otsuki, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Ono, Yasuo; Yazaki, Satoshi; Kim, Sung-Hae; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    Stent implantation is an important treatment option for pulmonary artery stenosis (PS), even if complicated by univentricular physiology (UVP). However, there is paucity of evidence concerning not only its hemodynamic and morphologic indications but also on markers for its optimal target attainment in UVP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the acute outcome and factors associated with efficacy of stenting for PS complicating UVP. A subanalysis was performed using the data of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Interventional Cardiology (JPIC) stent survey. We analyzed the morphologic and hemodynamic data of 11 patients with UVP who underwent stenting for PS. We defined "a 50% increase in the minimum lumen diameter (MLD)" as "morphologically effective," and "an achievement of 0 mmHg pressure gradient" as "hemodynamically effective." We analyzed the success rate for each criterion and determined factors which may have contributed to hemodynamic effectiveness. Stenting was morphologically effective in all patients, while it was hemodynamically effective in 6/11 (55%). The percent diameter stenosis after stenting was significantly lower in the "hemodynamically effective" group (2.5 ± 5.5% vs 19.6 ± 13.1%, p=0.017). The cutoff value of percent diameter stenosis after stenting to "hemodynamically effective" was 14.6%; the sensitivity was 80% and the specificity was 100% (area under the curve 0.825, p=0.021). The percent diameter stenosis after stenting significantly contributed to achieving a "0 mmHg" pressure gradient, while in order to achieve a "0 mmHg" pressure gradient, the residual percent diameter stenosis should be less than around 15%. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Early and 1-year outcome and predictors of adverse outcome following monocusp pulmonary valve reconstruction for patients with tetralogy of Fallot: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, Deepa; Sasidharan, Bijulal; Tharakan, Jaganmohan A; Dharan, Baiju S; Mathew, Thomas; Karunakaran, Jayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) with monocusp pulmonary valve reconstruction prevents pulmonary regurgitation (PR) for a variable period. Since postoperative outcome is governed by PR and right ventricular function, we sought to assess the severity of pulmonary regurgitation and right ventricular outflow (RVOT) gradient in the immediate postoperative period and at 1 year and attempted to identify the anatomical substrates responsible for adverse outcomes. Methods: The study included 30 patients. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed before surgery, within 5 days of surgery, and 1 year later. Presence and severity of PR, RVOT gradient, and residual branch pulmonary stenosis were assessed. Right ventricular and monocusp valve functions were studied. Results: Median age was 36.5 months (3-444 months). There were no deaths. Pulmonary regurgitation was mild in 18, moderate in 10, and severe in 2 patients immediately following surgery. At 1 year, 10 patients had severe PR and one had significant RVOT gradient. None of the variables like age, presence of supravalvar pulmonary branch stenosis, main pulmonary artery diameter, or mobility of monocusp valve was found to have any significant association with the progression of PR. McGoon index <1.5 showed a trend toward more PR, while patients with more residual RVOT gradient had lesser regurgitation. Conclusions: Repair of TOF with monocusp pulmonary valve reduces immediate postoperative PR. At 1 year, the monocusp valve underwent loss of function in a significant proportion and PR also progressed. This study could not identify any predictors of progression of PR, though patients with McGoon index <1.5 tended to have more PR while those with more outflow gradient had lesser PR. PMID:24701078

  4. Adverse Childhood Events are Related to the Prevalence of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder Among Adult Women in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Remigio-Baker, Rosemay A; Hayes, Donald K; Reyes-Salvail, Florentina

    2015-12-01

    In the US, women surpass men in the prevalence of lung diseases. Limited studies exist on the association of adverse childhood events (ACEs) to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) particularly among women and cohorts of understudied populations (e.g., Pacific Islanders). This study evaluated the ACEs-asthma and ACEs-COPD relationships among women in Hawaii and the contribution of poor health factors (smoking, binge drinking, and obesity) in these associations. Using data from 3363 women in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System-Hawaii, we assessed how self-reported ACEs [count and type (household dysfunction, and physical, verbal and sexual abuse)] relate to asthma and COPD. Multivariable log-binomial regression, accounting for the sampling design, and model adjustments for socio-demographics, healthcare access, emotional support, current smoking, binge drinking, and BMI status were used to generate prevalence ratios. For every increase in ACE count, the likelihood for asthma increased by 7 % (CI = 1.02-1.13), and for COPD, by 21 % (CI = 1.12-1.31) accounting for socio-demographics, healthcare access, and emotional support. Verbal abuse was also associated with greater likelihood for asthma independent of these covariates (PR = 1.43, CI = 1.14-1.79). Household dysfunction (PR = 1.82, CI = 1.15-2.82) and physical (PR = 2.01, CI = 1.20-3.37), verbal (PR = 2.24, CI = 1.38-3.65) and sexual (PR = 1.81, CI = 1.10-2.97) abuse were all associated with COPD using similar adjustments. Additional adjustment for smoking, binge drinking, and BMI status did not impact the ACE-asthma associations and only modestly attenuated the ACE-COPD relationships. Primary and secondary prevention of ACEs may optimize the health of young girls in Hawaii, and reduce the burden of asthma and COPD among women in the state.

  5. High estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure predicts adverse cardiovascular outcomes in stage 2-4 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bolignano, Davide; Lennartz, Simone; Leonardis, Daniela; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Tripepi, Rocco; Emrich, Insa E; Mallamaci, Francesca; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-07-01

    High estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (ePASP) is an established risk factor for mortality and cardiovascular (CV) events in the general population. High ePASP predicts mortality in dialysis patients but such a relationship has not been tested in patients with early CKD. Here we estimated the prevalence and the risk factors of high ePASP in 468 patients with CKD stage 2-4 and determined its prognostic power for a combined end point including cardiovascular death, acute heart failure, coronary artery disease, and cerebrovascular and peripheral artery events. High ePASP (35 mm Hg and above) was present in 108 CKD patients. In a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for age, diabetes, hemoglobin, left atrial volume (LAV/BSA), left ventricular mass (LVM/BSA), and history of CV disease, age (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 12 1.04-1.09) and LAV/BSA (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.03-1.07) were the sole significant independent predictors of high ePASP. Elevated ePASP predicted a significantly high risk for the combined cardiovascular end point both in unadjusted analyses (HR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.68-4.32) and in analyses adjusting for age, eGFR, hemoglobin, LAV/BSA, LVM/BSA, and the presence of diabetes and CV disease (HR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.05-2.91). High ePASP is relatively common in patients with stage 2-4 CKD and predicts adverse CV outcomes independent of established classical and CKD-specific risk factors. Whether high ePASP is a modifiable risk factor in patients with CKD remains to be determined in randomized clinical trials.

  6. Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals. Hisham A. El-Masri1, Nicole C. Klienstreur2, Linda Adams1, Tamara Tal1, Stephanie Padilla1, Kristin I...

  7. Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals. Hisham A. El-Masri1, Nicole C. Klienstreur2, Linda Adams1, Tamara Tal1, Stephanie Padilla1, Kristin I...

  8. Pulmonary hypertension and interstitial lung disease within PHAROS: impact of extent of fibrosis and pulmonary physiology on cardiac haemodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Swigris, J J; Bolster, M B; Chung, L; Csuka, M E; Domsic, R; Frech, T; Hinchcliff, M; Hsu, V; Hummers, L K; Gomberg-Maitland, M; Mathai, S C; Simms, R; Steen, V D

    2014-01-01

    We sought to examine the relationship between measures of ILD severity and PH in patients with SSc. We identified 55 subjects from 12 PHAROS sites with RHC-proven PH and HRCT evidence of ILD. Subjects with PH due to left heart disease were excluded. Baseline HRCT scans were scored by a standardised system that graded severity of ILD. Summary statistics were generated for baseline characteristics. Spearman correlation and linear regression were used to examine relationships between ILD and PH severity variables. The majority of subjects were white women; nearly half had limited cutaneous SSc. Most subjects were New York Heart Association functional class II or III. Pulmonary function testing revealed moderate restriction (mean FVC 64.3 ± 17.2% predicted) with severe reduction in diffusing capacity (mean DLco 34.2 ± 13.3% predicted). RHC demonstrated mild to moderate PH (mean PAP 35 ± 9 mmHg, mean PVR 5.1 ± 3.7 WU). There was no correlation between severity of ILD (by either HRCT or PFT) and cardiac haemodynamic parameters of PH. No association between severity of ILD and cardiac haemodynamic profiles were identified in this cohort. We believe this underscores the complex nature of PH and ILD in individuals with SSc. We do suspect that some individuals with SSc-ILD will also have concomitant pulmonary vascular disease but simple assessments to grade severity of ILD - by PFT or HRCT estimates of ILD extent - are likely not enough to reliably distinguish between PAH versus PH-ILD. Further research into how to distinguish and manage these subsets is warranted.

  9. Exercise Physiology and Pulmonary Hemodynamic Abnormality in PH Patients with Exercise Induced Venous-To-Systemic Shunt.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Shi, Xue; Yang, Wenlan; Gong, Sugang; Zhao, Qinhua; Wang, Lan; He, Jing; Shi, Xiaofang; Sun, Xingguo; Liu, Jinming

    2014-01-01

    To identify the pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients who develop an exercise induced venous-to-systemic shunt (EIS) by performing the cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), analyse the changes of CPET measurements during exercise and compare the exercise physiology and resting pulmonary hemodynamics between shunt-PH and no-shunt-PH patients. Retrospectively, resting pulmonary function test (PFT), right heart catheterization (RHC), and CPET for clinical evaluation of 104 PH patients were studied. Considering all 104 PH patients by three investigators, 37 were early EIS+, 61 were EIS-, 3 were late EIS+, and 3 others were placed in the discordant group. PeakVO2, AT and OUES were all reduced in the shunt-PH patients compared with the no-shunt-PH subjects, whereas VE/VCO2 slope and the lowest VE/VCO2 increased. Besides, the changes and the response characteristics of the key CPET parameters at the beginning of exercise in the shunt group were notably different from those of the no shunt one. At cardiac catheterization, the shunt patients had significantly increased mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), mean right atrial pressure (mRAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), reduced cardiac output (CO) and cardiac index (CI) compared with the no shunt ones (P<0.05). Resting CO was significantly correlated with exercise parameters of AT (r = 0.527, P<0.001), OUES (r = 0.410, P<0.001) and Peak VO2 (r = 0.405, P<0.001). PVR was significantly, but weakly, correlated with the above mentioned CPET parameters. CPET may allow a non-invasive method for detecting an EIS and assessing the severity of the disease in PH patients.

  10. The five-point Likert scale for dyspnea can properly assess the degree of pulmonary congestion and predict adverse events in heart failure outpatients.

    PubMed

    Weber, Cristina K; Miglioranza, Marcelo H; Moraes, Maria A P de; Sant'anna, Roberto T; Rover, Marciane M; Kalil, Renato A K; Leiria, Tiago Luiz L

    2014-01-01

    Proper assessment of dyspnea is important in patients with heart failure. Our aim was to evaluate the use of the 5-point Likert scale for dyspnea to assess the degree of pulmonary congestion and to determine the prognostic value of this scale for predicting adverse events in heart failure outpatients. We undertook a prospective study of outpatients with moderate to severe heart failure. The 5-point Likert scale was applied during regular outpatient visits, along with clinical assessments. Lung ultrasound with ≥15 B-lines and an amino-terminal portion of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level >1000 pg/mL were used as a reference for pulmonary congestion. The patients were then assessed every 30 days during follow-up to identify adverse clinical outcomes. We included 58 patients (65.5% male, age 43.5 ± 11 years) with a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 27 ± 6%. In total, 29.3% of these patients had heart failure with ischemic etiology. Additionally, pulmonary congestion, as diagnosed by lung ultrasound, was present in 58% of patients. A higher degree of dyspnea (3 or 4 points on the 5-point Likert scale) was significantly correlated with a higher number of B-lines (p = 0.016). Patients stratified into Likert = 3-4 were at increased risk of admission compared with those in class 1-2 after adjusting for age, left ventricular ejection fraction, New York Heart Association functional class and levels of NT-proBNP >1000 pg/mL (HR = 4.9, 95% CI 1.33-18.64, p = 0.017). In our series, higher baseline scores on the 5-point Likert scale were related to pulmonary congestion and were independently associated with adverse events during follow-up. This simple clinical tool can help to identify patients who are more likely to decompensate and whose treatment should be intensified.

  11. Programmed Effects in Neurobehavior and Antioxidative Physiology in Zebrafish Embryonically Exposed to Cadmium: Observations and Hypothesized Adverse Outcome Pathway Framework

    PubMed Central

    Ruiter, Sander; Sippel, Josefine; Bouwmeester, Manon C.; Lommelaars, Tobias; Beekhof, Piet; Hodemaekers, Hennie M.; Bakker, Frank; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; van der Ven, Leo T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a major cause of premature mortality. Recent studies show that predispositions for NCDs may arise from early-life exposure to low concentrations of environmental contaminants. This developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) paradigm suggests that programming of an embryo can be disrupted, changing the homeostatic set point of biological functions. Epigenetic alterations are a possible underlying mechanism. Here, we investigated the DOHaD paradigm by exposing zebrafish to subtoxic concentrations of the ubiquitous contaminant cadmium during embryogenesis, followed by growth under normal conditions. Prolonged behavioral responses to physical stress and altered antioxidative physiology were observed approximately ten weeks after termination of embryonal exposure, at concentrations that were 50–3200-fold below the direct embryotoxic concentration, and interpreted as altered developmental programming. Literature was explored for possible mechanistic pathways that link embryonic subtoxic cadmium to the observed apical phenotypes, more specifically, the probability of molecular mechanisms induced by cadmium exposure leading to altered DNA methylation and subsequently to the observed apical phenotypes. This was done using the adverse outcome pathway model framework, and assessing key event relationship plausibility by tailored Bradford-Hill analysis. Thus, cadmium interaction with thiols appeared to be the major contributor to late-life effects. Cadmium-thiol interactions may lead to depletion of the methyl donor S-adenosyl-methionine, resulting in methylome alterations, and may, additionally, result in oxidative stress, which may lead to DNA oxidation, and subsequently altered DNA methyltransferase activity. In this way, DNA methylation may be affected at a critical developmental stage, causing the observed apical phenotypes. PMID:27827847

  12. A combined application of biochar and phosphorus alleviates heat-induced adversities on physiological, agronomical and quality attributes of rice.

    PubMed

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Tanveer, Mohsin; Ihsan, Muhammad Zahid; Shah, Adnan Noor; Ullah, Abid; Nasrullah; Khan, Fahad; Ullah, Sami; Alharby, Hesham; Nasim, Wajid; Wu, Chao; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-06-01

    Present study examined the influence of high-temperature stress and different biochar and phosphorus (P) fertilization treatments on the growth, grain yield and quality of two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan). Plants were subjected to high day temperature-HDT (35 °C ± 2), high night temperature-HNT (32 °C ± 2), and control temperature-CT (28 °C ± 2) in controlled growth chambers. The different fertilization treatments were control, biochar alone, phosphorous (P) alone and biochar + P. High-temperature stress severely reduced the photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, water use efficiency, and increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except for number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more destructive for grain yield. High temperature stress also hampered the grain appearance and milling quality traits in both rice cultivars. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high-temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Different soil fertilization treatments were helpful in ameliorating the detrimental effects of high temperature. Addition of biochar alone improved some growth and yield parameters but such positive effects were lower when compared with the combined application of biochar and P. The biochar+P application recorded 7% higher grain yield (plant(-1)) of rice compared with control averaged across different temperature treatments and cultivars. The highest grain production and better grain quality in biochar+P treatments might be due to enhanced photosynthesis, water use efficiency, and grain size, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress.

  13. Programmed Effects in Neurobehavior and Antioxidative Physiology in Zebrafish Embryonically Exposed to Cadmium: Observations and Hypothesized Adverse Outcome Pathway Framework.

    PubMed

    Ruiter, Sander; Sippel, Josefine; Bouwmeester, Manon C; Lommelaars, Tobias; Beekhof, Piet; Hodemaekers, Hennie M; Bakker, Frank; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; Pennings, Jeroen L A; van der Ven, Leo T M

    2016-11-02

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a major cause of premature mortality. Recent studies show that predispositions for NCDs may arise from early-life exposure to low concentrations of environmental contaminants. This developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) paradigm suggests that programming of an embryo can be disrupted, changing the homeostatic set point of biological functions. Epigenetic alterations are a possible underlying mechanism. Here, we investigated the DOHaD paradigm by exposing zebrafish to subtoxic concentrations of the ubiquitous contaminant cadmium during embryogenesis, followed by growth under normal conditions. Prolonged behavioral responses to physical stress and altered antioxidative physiology were observed approximately ten weeks after termination of embryonal exposure, at concentrations that were 50-3200-fold below the direct embryotoxic concentration, and interpreted as altered developmental programming. Literature was explored for possible mechanistic pathways that link embryonic subtoxic cadmium to the observed apical phenotypes, more specifically, the probability of molecular mechanisms induced by cadmium exposure leading to altered DNA methylation and subsequently to the observed apical phenotypes. This was done using the adverse outcome pathway model framework, and assessing key event relationship plausibility by tailored Bradford-Hill analysis. Thus, cadmium interaction with thiols appeared to be the major contributor to late-life effects. Cadmium-thiol interactions may lead to depletion of the methyl donor S-adenosyl-methionine, resulting in methylome alterations, and may, additionally, result in oxidative stress, which may lead to DNA oxidation, and subsequently altered DNA methyltransferase activity. In this way, DNA methylation may be affected at a critical developmental stage, causing the observed apical phenotypes.

  14. Integrating Omics Technologies to Study Pulmonary Physiology and Pathology at the Systems Level

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Ravi Ramesh; Davé, Vrushank

    2014-01-01

    Assimilation and integration of “omics” technologies, including genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics has readily altered the landscape of medical research in the last decade. The vast and complex nature of omics data can only be interpreted by linking molecular information at the organismic level, forming the foundation of systems biology. Research in pulmonary biology/medicine has necessitated integration of omics, network, systems and computational biology data to differentially diagnose, interpret, and prognosticate pulmonary diseases, facilitating improvement in therapy and treatment modalities. This review describes how to leverage this emerging technology in understanding pulmonary diseases at the systems level –called a “systomic” approach. Considering the operational wholeness of cellular and organ systems, diseased genome, proteome, and the metabolome needs to be conceptualized at the systems level to understand disease pathogenesis and progression. Currently available omics technology and resources require a certain degree of training and proficiency in addition to dedicated hardware and applications, making them relatively less user friendly for the pulmonary biologist and clinicians. Herein, we discuss the various strategies, computational tools and approaches required to study pulmonary diseases at the systems level for biomedical scientists and clinical researchers. PMID:24802001

  15. Physiologic assessment before video thoracoscopic resection for lung cancer in patients with abnormal pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Benattia, Amira; Debeaumont, David; Guyader, Vincent; Tardif, Catherine; Peillon, Christophe; Cuvelier, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired respiratory function may prevent curative surgery for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) reduces postoperative morbility-mortality and could change preoperative assessment practices and therapeutic decisions. We evaluated the relation between preoperative pulmonary function tests and the occurrence of postoperative complications after VATS pulmonary resection in patients with abnormal pulmonary function. Methods We included 106 consecutive patients with ≤80% predicted value of presurgical expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) and who underwent VATS pulmonary resection for NSCLC from a prospective surgical database. Results Patients (64±9.5 years) had lobectomy (n=91), segmentectomy (n=7), bilobectomy (n=4), or pneumonectomy (n=4). FEV1 and DLCO preoperative averages were 68%±21% and 60%±18%. Operative mortality was 1.89%. Only FEV1 was predictive of postoperative complications [odds ratio (OR), 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.926–0.991, P=0.016], but there was no determinable threshold. Twenty-five patients underwent incremental exercise testing. Desaturations during exercise (OR, 0.462; 95% CI, 0.191–0.878, P=0.039) and heart rate (HR) response (OR, 0.953; 95% CI, 0.895–0.993, P=0.05) were associated with postoperative complications. Conclusions FEV1 but not DLCO was a significant predictor of pulmonary complications after VATS pulmonary resection despite a low rate of severe morbidity. Incremental exercise testing seems more discriminating. Further investigation is required in a larger patient population to change current pre-operative threshold in a new era of minimally invasive surgery. PMID:27293834

  16. Exercise performance and differences in physiological response to pulmonary rehabilitation in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with hyperinflation

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira; Quaranta, Marco; Chakrabarti, Biswajit; Aliverti, Andrea; Calverley, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves exercise capacity in most but not all COPD patients. The factors associated with treatment success and the role of chest wall mechanics remain unclear. We investigated the impact of PR on exercise performance in COPD with severe hyperinflation. Methods: We evaluated 22 COPD patients (age, 66 ± 7 years; FEV1 = 37.1 ± 11.8% of predicted) who underwent eight weeks of aerobic exercise and strength training. Before and after PR, each patient also performed a six-minute walk test and an incremental cycle ergometer test. During the latter, we measured chest wall volumes (total and compartmental, by optoelectronic plethysmography) and determined maximal workloads. Results: We observed significant differences between the pre- and post-PR means for six-minute walk distance (305 ± 78 vs. 330 ± 96 m, p < 0.001) and maximal workload (33 ± 21 vs. 39 ± 20 W; p = 0.02). At equivalent workload settings, PR led to lower oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production (VCO2), and minute ventilation. The inspiratory (operating) rib cage volume decreased significantly after PR. There were 6 patients in whom PR did not increase the maximal workload. After PR, those patients showed no significant decrease in VCO2 during exercise, had higher end-expiratory chest wall volumes with a more rapid shallow breathing pattern, and continued to experience symptomatic leg fatigue. Conclusions: In severe COPD, PR appears to improve oxygen consumption and reduce VCO2, with a commensurate decrease in respiratory drive, changes reflected in the operating chest wall volumes. Patients with severe post-exercise hyperinflation and leg fatigue might be unable to improve their maximal performance despite completing a PR program. PMID:27167433

  17. Exercise performance and differences in physiological response to pulmonary rehabilitation in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with hyperinflation.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira de; Quaranta, Marco; Chakrabarti, Biswajit; Aliverti, Andrea; Calverley, Peter M

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves exercise capacity in most but not all COPD patients. The factors associated with treatment success and the role of chest wall mechanics remain unclear. We investigated the impact of PR on exercise performance in COPD with severe hyperinflation. We evaluated 22 COPD patients (age, 66 ± 7 years; FEV1 = 37.1 ± 11.8% of predicted) who underwent eight weeks of aerobic exercise and strength training. Before and after PR, each patient also performed a six-minute walk test and an incremental cycle ergometer test. During the latter, we measured chest wall volumes (total and compartmental, by optoelectronic plethysmography) and determined maximal workloads. We observed significant differences between the pre- and post-PR means for six-minute walk distance (305 ± 78 vs. 330 ± 96 m, p < 0.001) and maximal workload (33 ± 21 vs. 39 ± 20 W; p = 0.02). At equivalent workload settings, PR led to lower oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production (VCO2), and minute ventilation. The inspiratory (operating) rib cage volume decreased significantly after PR. There were 6 patients in whom PR did not increase the maximal workload. After PR, those patients showed no significant decrease in VCO2 during exercise, had higher end-expiratory chest wall volumes with a more rapid shallow breathing pattern, and continued to experience symptomatic leg fatigue. In severe COPD, PR appears to improve oxygen consumption and reduce VCO2, with a commensurate decrease in respiratory drive, changes reflected in the operating chest wall volumes. Patients with severe post-exercise hyperinflation and leg fatigue might be unable to improve their maximal performance despite completing a PR program.

  18. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  19. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  20. Physiological and phenotypic characteristics of late survivors of tetralogy of fallot repair who are free from pulmonary valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Frigiola, Alessandra; Hughes, Marina; Turner, Mark; Taylor, Andrew; Marek, Jan; Giardini, Alessandro; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Bull, Kate

    2013-10-22

    Pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) after repair of tetralogy of Fallot is commonly required and is burdensome. Detailed anatomic and physiologic characteristics of survivors free from late PVR and with good exercise capacity are not well described in a literature focusing on the indications for PVR. Survival and freedom from PVR were tracked in 1085 consecutive patients receiving standard tetralogy of Fallot repair in a single institution from 1964 to 2009. Of 152 total deaths, 100 occurred within the first postoperative year. Surviving patients between 10 and 50 years of age had an annual risk of death of 4 (confidence limit, 2.8-5.4) times that of normal contemporaries. To date, 189 patients have undergone secondary PVR at mean age of 20±13 years (36% of those alive at 40 years of age). A random sample of 50 survivors (age, 4-57 years) free from PVR underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance, echocardiography, and exercise testing. These patients had mildly dilated right ventricles (right ventricular end-diastolic volume=101±26 mL/m(2)) with good systolic function (right ventricular ejection fraction=59±7%). Most had exercise capacity within normal range (z peak o2=-0.91±1.3; z e/ co2=0.20±1.5). In patients >35 years of age with normal exercise capacity, there was mild residual right ventricular outflow tract obstruction (mean gradient, 24±13 mm Hg), pulmonary annulus diameters <0.5z, and unobstructed branch pulmonary arteries. An important proportion of patients require PVR late after tetralogy of Fallot repair. Patients surviving to 35 years of age without PVR and with a normal exercise capacity may have had a definitive primary repair; their right ventricular outflow tracts are characterized by mild residual obstruction and pulmonary annulus diameter <0.5z.

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of dasatinib and imatinib on physiological parameters of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Bethany; Guha, Mausumee; Hennan, James; Li, Julia; Woicke, Jochen; Simic, Damir; Graziano, Michael; Wallis, Nicola; Sanderson, Thomas; Bunch, Roderick Todd

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) results from occlusion or vasoconstriction of pulmonary vessels, leading to progressive right ventricular failure. Dasatinib, a BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia, has been associated with PAH. In contrast, the BCR-ABL1 TKI imatinib has demonstrated anti-vasoproliferative properties and has been investigated as a potential treatment for PAH. Here we describe studies evaluating the effects of dasatinib and imatinib on cardiovascular and pulmonary functions to understand the reported differential consequences of the two TKIs in a clinical setting. The direct effects of dasatinib and imatinib were explored in vivo to investigate possible mechanisms of dasatinib-induced PAH. In addition, effects of dasatinib and imatinib on PAH-related mediators were evaluated in vitro. In rats, both TKIs increased plasma nitric oxide (NO), did not induce PAH-related structural or molecular changes in PA or lungs, and did not alter hemodynamic lung function compared with positive controls. Similarly, in the pulmonary artery endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells co-culture model, imatinib and dasatinib increased NO and decreased endothelin-1 protein and mRNA. The results of these studies indicated that dasatinib did not induce physiological changes or molecular signatures consistent with PAH when compared to positive controls. Instead, dasatinib induced changes consistent with imatinib. Both dasatinib and imatinib induced biochemical and structural changes consistent with a protective effect for PAH. These data suggest that other factors of unclear etiology contributed to the development of PAH in patients treated with dasatinib.

  2. Physiologic Determinants of Exercise Capacity in Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A Multidimensional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Stephanie; Giovannelli, Jonathan; Langlois, Carole; Bricout, Nicolas; Aguilaniu, Bernard; Bellocq, Agnes; Le Rouzic, Olivier; Dominique, Stephane; Delobbe, Alain; François, Geraldine; Tazi, Abdellatif; Wallaert, Benoit; Chenivesse, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    Background Reduced exercise capacity severely impacts quality of life in pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Ascertaining mechanisms that impair exercise capacity is necessary to identify targets for symptomatic treatments. Methods Dyspnea, pulmonary function tests and cardiopulmonary exercise test were analysed in 62 study participants. Data were compared between subjects with impaired and normal aerobic capacity (V’O2 peak less than 84% versus 84% predicted or more). Data were reduced using a principal component analysis. Multivariate analysis included V’O2 peak as the dependent variable and principal components as covariates. Results V’O2 peak was reduced in 44 subjects (71%). Subjects with impaired aerobic capacity presented: (i) decreased FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, DLCO and DLCO/VA and increased AaDO2, (ii) increased ventilatory equivalents at ventilatory threshold, VD/VT peak, AaDO2 peak and PaCO2 peak and decreased ventilatory reserve and PaO2 peak. There was no difference between groups in dyspnea scores. Principal component analysis extracted 4 principal components interpreted as follows: PC1: gas exchange; PC2: “pseudorestriction”; PC3: exercise-induced hyperpnea; PC4: air trapping. Multivariate analysis explained 65% of V’O2 peak. The 4 principal components were independently associated with V’O2 peak (βcoefficients: PC1: 9.3 [4.6; 14], PC2: 7.5 [3; 11.9], PC3: -5.3 [-9.6;-1.], PC4: -9.8 [-14,9;-4.7]). Conclusion Impaired exercise capacity is frequent in pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. It is mainly caused by pulmonary changes but is not associated with increased dyspnea intensity. Therefore, treating the lung represents a relevant approach for improving exercise capacity, even in patients experiencing mild dyspnea. PMID:28072848

  3. Comparative physiology of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier: the unique avian solution.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2009-12-01

    Two opposing selective pressures have shaped the evolution of the structure of the blood-gas barrier in air breathing vertebrates. The first pressure, which has been recognized for 100 years, is to facilitate diffusive gas exchange. This requires the barrier to be extremely thin and have a large area. The second pressure, which has only recently been appreciated, is to maintain the mechanical integrity of the barrier in the face of its extreme thinness. The most important tensile stress comes from the pressure within the pulmonary capillaries, which results in a hoop stress. The strength of the barrier can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. In addition, the stress is minimized in mammals and birds by complete separation of the pulmonary and systemic circulations. Remarkably, the avian barrier is about 2.5 times thinner than that in mammals and also is much more uniform in thickness. These advantages for gas exchange come about because the avian pulmonary capillaries are unique among air breathers in being mechanically supported externally in addition to the strength that comes from the structure of their walls. This external support comes from epithelial plates that are part of the air capillaries, and the support is available because the terminal air spaces in the avian lung are extremely small due to the flow-through nature of ventilation in contrast to the reciprocating pattern in mammals.

  4. Comparative physiology of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier: the unique avian solution

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Two opposing selective pressures have shaped the evolution of the structure of the blood-gas barrier in air breathing vertebrates. The first pressure, which has been recognized for 100 years, is to facilitate diffusive gas exchange. This requires the barrier to be extremely thin and have a large area. The second pressure, which has only recently been appreciated, is to maintain the mechanical integrity of the barrier in the face of its extreme thinness. The most important tensile stress comes from the pressure within the pulmonary capillaries, which results in a hoop stress. The strength of the barrier can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. In addition, the stress is minimized in mammals and birds by complete separation of the pulmonary and systemic circulations. Remarkably, the avian barrier is about 2.5 times thinner than that in mammals and also is much more uniform in thickness. These advantages for gas exchange come about because the avian pulmonary capillaries are unique among air breathers in being mechanically supported externally in addition to the strength that comes from the structure of their walls. This external support comes from epithelial plates that are part of the air capillaries, and the support is available because the terminal air spaces in the avian lung are extremely small due to the flow-through nature of ventilation in contrast to the reciprocating pattern in mammals. PMID:19793953

  5. The five-point Likert scale for dyspnea can properly assess the degree of pulmonary congestion and predict adverse events in heart failure outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Cristina K; Miglioranza, Marcelo H; de Moraes, Maria A P; Sant'anna, Roberto T; Rover, Marciane M; Kalil, Renato A K; Leiria, Tiago Luiz L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Proper assessment of dyspnea is important in patients with heart failure. Our aim was to evaluate the use of the 5-point Likert scale for dyspnea to assess the degree of pulmonary congestion and to determine the prognostic value of this scale for predicting adverse events in heart failure outpatients. METHODS: We undertook a prospective study of outpatients with moderate to severe heart failure. The 5-point Likert scale was applied during regular outpatient visits, along with clinical assessments. Lung ultrasound with ≥15 B-lines and an amino-terminal portion of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level >1000 pg/mL were used as a reference for pulmonary congestion. The patients were then assessed every 30 days during follow-up to identify adverse clinical outcomes. RESULTS: We included 58 patients (65.5% male, age 43.5±11 years) with a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 27±6%. In total, 29.3% of these patients had heart failure with ischemic etiology. Additionally, pulmonary congestion, as diagnosed by lung ultrasound, was present in 58% of patients. A higher degree of dyspnea (3 or 4 points on the 5-point Likert scale) was significantly correlated with a higher number of B-lines (p = 0.016). Patients stratified into Likert = 3-4 were at increased risk of admission compared with those in class 1-2 after adjusting for age, left ventricular ejection fraction, New York Heart Association functional class and levels of NT-proBNP >1000 pg/mL (HR = 4.9, 95% CI 1.33-18.64, p = 0.017). CONCLUSION: In our series, higher baseline scores on the 5-point Likert scale were related to pulmonary congestion and were independently associated with adverse events during follow-up. This simple clinical tool can help to identify patients who are more likely to decompensate and whose treatment should be intensified. PMID:24838900

  6. Effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation programme on physiologic and psychosocial outcomes in patients with chronic respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Ong, K C; Wong, W P; Jailani, A R; Sew, S; Ong, Y Y

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation programme (PRP) conducted at our centre for patients with chronic lung disease. Thirty-four patients (27 men and 7 women, mean age 67.7 years) with predominantly moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (31 patients), bronchiectasis (2 patients) and interstitial lung disease (1 patient) completed a 6-week outpatient PRP that included education, physical and respiratory care instruction and supervised exercise training. Outcome assessment was performed at baseline, on completion of PRP and 3 months after PRP. Physiologic measures included pulmonary function, incremental exercise and 6-minute walk tests (6MWTs). Disease-specific quality of life was assessed using the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRDQ). There was no significant change in resting spirometry or lung volumes after PRP. Maximal oxygen uptake and work-rate improved significantly after PRP by 132.4 mL kg-1 min-1 and 10.7 W, respectively. 6MWT distance improved significantly by a mean of 67.3 m (P < 0.0001). Maximum Borg dyspnoea scores decreased significantly by 1.2 +/- 0.5 (P < 0.038). All domains of the CRDQ completed by a sub-group of patients improved significantly and the total scores increased by a mean of 21.7 points at the end of the PRP. The improvements gained in maximal exercise capacity immediately following PRP were maintained in 17 patients who returned for repeat assessment 3 months after PRP. Patients who completed a comprehensive PRP at our centre showed significant increase in functional capacity, reduction of exertional dyspnoea and improvement in health status.

  7. Proteomic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cells in physiological condition and in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Toward contractile versus synthetic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Régent, Alexis; Ly, Kim Heang; Lofek, Sébastien; Clary, Guilhem; Tamby, Mathieu; Tamas, Nicolas; Federici, Christian; Broussard, Cédric; Chafey, Philippe; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-10-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are highly specialized cells that regulate vascular tone and participate in vessel remodeling in physiological and pathological conditions. It is unclear why certain vascular pathologies involve one type of vessel and spare others. Our objective was to compare the proteomes of normal human VSMC from aorta (human aortic smooth muscle cells, HAoSMC), umbilical artery (human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells, HUASMC), pulmonary artery (HPASMC), or pulmonary artery VSMC from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-SMC). Proteomes of VSMC were compared by 2D DIGE and MS. Only 19 proteins were differentially expressed between HAoSMC and HPASMC while 132 and 124 were differentially expressed between HUASMC and HAoSMC or HPASMC, respectively (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). As much as 336 proteins were differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). HUASMC expressed increased amount of α-smooth muscle actin compared to either HPASMC or HAoSMC (although not statistically significant). In addition, PAH-SMC expressed decreased amount of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain and proliferation rate was increased compared to HPASMC thus supporting that PAH-SMC have a more synthetic phenotype. Analysis with Ingenuity identified paxillin and (embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, drosophila) like 1 (ELAVL1) as molecules linked with a lot of proteins differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC. There was a trend toward reduced proliferation of PAH-SMC with paxillin-si-RNA and increased proliferation with ELAVL1-siRNA. Thus, VSMCs have very diverse protein content depending on their origin and this is in link with phenotypic differentiation. Paxillin targeting may be a promising treatment of PAH. ELAVL1 also participate in the regulation of PAH-SMC proliferation.

  8. Physiologic Studies of the Pulmonary Capillary Bed after Barium Sulfate Embolization*

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Walter J.; Waldhausen, John A.

    1967-01-01

    22 anesthetized dogs were given a barium sulfate suspension intravenously in a dose sufficient to double mean pulmonary artery pressure. 10 sec breath-holding carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO10) was measured before and after this standard embolization in each dog. No post-embolic decrease in DLCO10 was observed. In the study of this apparent paradox, it was found that the potential for further increase in DLCO10 during exercise remained after embolization. During rest prolongation of breath holding to 60 sec decreased CO absorption significantly more in the embolized than in the nonembolized dogs. While DLCO10 was not affected by standard barium embolization, oxygen diffusing capacity was clearly decreased. The bronchial collateral circulation did not participate in preventing a DLCO10 decrease after embolization since surgical interruption of the bronchial circulation did not alter the response to barium. Microscopic examination of lung sections taken after standard embolization showed plugging of precapillary vessels in the 40-50 μ range. These studies suggest that acute precapillary embolic obstruction of vessels of this size interferes remarkably little with CO absorption over short periods of time, probably because of continued CO absorption in portions of the capillary net distal to the sites of impaction. The remarkable anastomotic nature of this capillary network with multiple sources of access possibly provides the anatomic basis for this observation. This study demonstrates a clear dissociation between acute changes in pulmonary vascular resistance and DLCO10—both during rest and exercise. Images PMID:6061739

  9. Signaling Pathways Linked to Serotonin-Induced Superoxide Anion Production: A Physiological Role for Mitochondria in Pulmonary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Genet, Nafiisha; Billaud, Marie; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Dubois, Mathilde; Gillibert-Duplantier, Jennifer; Isakson, Brant E.; Marthan, Roger; Savineau, Jean-Pierre; Guibert, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a potent vasoconstrictor agonist and contributes to several vascular diseases including systemic or pulmonary hypertension and atherosclerosis. Although superoxide anion (O2•_) is commonly associated to cellular damages due to O2•_ overproduction, we previously demonstrated that, in physiological conditions, O2•_ also participates to the 5-HT contraction in intrapulmonary arteries (IPA). Here, we focused on the signaling pathways leading to O2•_ production in response to 5-HT in rat IPA. Using electron paramagnetic resonance on rat IPA, we showed that 5-HT (100 μM)-induced O2•_ production was inhibited by ketanserin (1 μM—an inhibitor of the 5-HT2 receptor), absence of extracellular calcium, two blockers of voltage-independent calcium permeable channels (RHC80267 50 μM and LOE-908 10 μM) and a blocker of the mitochondrial complex I (rotenone—100 nM). Depletion of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum or nicardipine (1 μM—an inhibitor of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel) had no effect on the 5-HT-induced O2•_ production. O2•_ levels were also increased by α-methyl-5-HT (10 μM—a 5-HT2 receptors agonist) whereas GR127935 (1 μM—an antagonist of the 5-HT1B/D receptor) and citalopram (1 μM—a 5-HT transporter inhibitor) had no effect on the 5-HT-induced O2•_ production. Peroxynitrites were increased in response to 5-HT (100 μM). In isolated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells loaded with rhod-2 or mitosox probes, we respectively showed that 5-HT increased both mitochondrial calcium and O2•_ levels, which were both abrogated in absence of extracellular calcium. Mitochondrial O2•_ levels were also abolished in the presence of rotenone (100 nM). In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells loaded with TMRM, we showed that 5-HT transiently depolarized the mitochondrial membrane whereas in the absence of extracellular calcium the mitochondrial membrane depolarisation was delayed and sustained in

  10. Signaling Pathways Linked to Serotonin-Induced Superoxide Anion Production: A Physiological Role for Mitochondria in Pulmonary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Genet, Nafiisha; Billaud, Marie; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Dubois, Mathilde; Gillibert-Duplantier, Jennifer; Isakson, Brant E; Marthan, Roger; Savineau, Jean-Pierre; Guibert, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a potent vasoconstrictor agonist and contributes to several vascular diseases including systemic or pulmonary hypertension and atherosclerosis. Although superoxide anion ([Formula: see text]) is commonly associated to cellular damages due to [Formula: see text] overproduction, we previously demonstrated that, in physiological conditions, [Formula: see text] also participates to the 5-HT contraction in intrapulmonary arteries (IPA). Here, we focused on the signaling pathways leading to [Formula: see text] production in response to 5-HT in rat IPA. Using electron paramagnetic resonance on rat IPA, we showed that 5-HT (100 μM)-induced [Formula: see text] production was inhibited by ketanserin (1 μM-an inhibitor of the 5-HT2 receptor), absence of extracellular calcium, two blockers of voltage-independent calcium permeable channels (RHC80267 50 μM and LOE-908 10 μM) and a blocker of the mitochondrial complex I (rotenone-100 nM). Depletion of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum or nicardipine (1 μM-an inhibitor of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel) had no effect on the 5-HT-induced [Formula: see text] production. [Formula: see text] levels were also increased by α-methyl-5-HT (10 μM-a 5-HT2 receptors agonist) whereas GR127935 (1 μM-an antagonist of the 5-HT1B/D receptor) and citalopram (1 μM-a 5-HT transporter inhibitor) had no effect on the 5-HT-induced [Formula: see text] production. Peroxynitrites were increased in response to 5-HT (100 μM). In isolated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells loaded with rhod-2 or mitosox probes, we respectively showed that 5-HT increased both mitochondrial calcium and [Formula: see text] levels, which were both abrogated in absence of extracellular calcium. Mitochondrial [Formula: see text] levels were also abolished in the presence of rotenone (100 nM). In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells loaded with TMRM, we showed that 5-HT transiently depolarized the mitochondrial membrane whereas

  11. Adverse Respiratory Events Associated With Hypnotics Use in Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the effects of hypnotics on the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD.The case-control study was investigated using data retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed adverse respiratory events (pneumonia, COPD with acute exacerbation, acute respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary arrest) were included in the case group. Patients with COPD and no history of adverse respiratory events were randomly selected for the control group, which was frequency-matched with the case group according to index date, age (per 10 years), and sex. Patients who had used hypnotics within 1 month meant active users. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of were calculated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models.Most of the study participants were male (71.6%), and the mean ages of the participants in the case and control groups were 69.2 (±12.4) and 67.5 (±12.3) years, respectively. After potential confounding factors were adjusting for, the adjusted ORs of adverse respiratory events were 12.0 for active users of benzodiazepines (95% CI, 8.11-17.6) and 10.5 for active users of nonbenzodiazepines (95% CI, 7.68-14.2) compared with the adjusted ORs of those who never used hypnotics.The results of this epidemiological study suggested that hypnotics increased the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD.

  12. Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic(PBPK) Models Application to Screen Environmental Hazards Related to Adverse Outcome Pathways(AOPs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK models are useful in estimating exposure levels based on in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) calculations. Linkage of large sets of chemically screened vitro signature effects to in vivo adverse outcomes using IVIVE is central to the concepts of toxicology in the 21st ...

  13. Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic(PBPK) Models Application to Screen Environmental Hazards Related to Adverse Outcome Pathways(AOPs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK models are useful in estimating exposure levels based on in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) calculations. Linkage of large sets of chemically screened vitro signature effects to in vivo adverse outcomes using IVIVE is central to the concepts of toxicology in the 21st ...

  14. Cardiovascular recovery from psychological and physiological challenge and risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality

    PubMed Central

    Panaite, Vanessa; Salomon, Kristen; Jin, Alvin; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exaggerated cardiovascular (CV) reactivity to laboratory challenge has been shown to predict future CV morbidity and mortality. CV recovery, has been less studied, and has yielded inconsistent findings, possibly due to presence of moderators. Reviews on the relationship between CV recovery and CV outcomes have been limited to cross-sectional studies and have not considered methodological factors. We performed a comprehensive meta-analytic review of the prospective literature investigating CV recovery to physical and psychological challenge and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Methods We searched PsycINFO and PubMed for prospective studies investigating the relationship between CV recovery and adverse CV outcomes. Studies were coded for variables of interest and for effect sizes (ES). We conducted a random effects weighted meta-analysis. Moderators were examined with ANOVA-analog and meta-regression analyses. Results Thirty seven studies met inclusion criteria (N=125386). Impaired recovery from challenge predicted adverse cardiovascular outcomes (summary effect, r = .17, p < .001). Physical challenge was associated with larger predictive effects than psychological challenge. Moderator analyses revealed that recovery measured at 1 minute post-exercise, passive recovery, use of mortality as an outcome measure, and older sample age were associated with larger effects. Conclusions Poor recovery from laboratory challenges predicts adverse CV outcomes, with recovery from exercise serving as a particularly strong predictor of CV outcomes. The overall ES for recovery and CV outcomes is similar to that observed for CV reactivity and suggests that the study of recovery may have incremental value for understanding adverse CV outcomes. PMID:25829236

  15. Amniotic Fluid Infection, Cytokine Levels, and Mortality and Adverse Pulmonary, Intestinal, and Neurologic Outcomes in Infants at 32 Weeks' Gestation or Less

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    To what extent the risks of neonatal morbidities are directly related to premature birth or to biological mechanisms of preterm birth remains uncertain. We aimed to examine the effect of exposure to amniotic fluid (AF) infection and elevated cytokine levels on the mortality and pulmonary, intestinal, and neurologic outcomes of preterm infants, and whether these associations persist after adjustment for gestational age at birth. This retrospective cohort study included 152 premature singleton infants who were born at ≤ 32 weeks. AF obtained by amniocentesis was cultured; and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 levels in AF were determined. The primary outcome was adverse perinatal outcome defined as the presence of one or more of the followings: stillbirth, neonatal death, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis, intraventricular hemorrhage, and periventricular leukomalacia. Logistic regression analysis was adjusted for gestational age at birth and other potential confounders. In bivariate analyses, elevated AF IL-6 and IL-8 levels were significantly associated with adverse perinatal outcome. These results were not changed after adjusting for potential confounders, such as low Apgar scores, mechanical ventilation, and surfactant application. However, the independent effect of elevated cytokine levels in AF disappeared when additionally adjusted for low gestational age at birth; consequently, low gestational age remained strongly associated with the risk of adverse perinatal outcome. In conclusion, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in AF are associated with increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, but this risk is not independent of low gestational age at birth. Culture-proven AF infection is not associated with this risk. PMID:28145652

  16. Physiological responses during downhill walking: A new exercise modality for subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Burtin, Chris; Hornikx, Miek; Demeyer, Heleen; De Bent, Kristien; van Remoortel, Hans; Osadnik, Christian R; Janssens, Wim; Troosters, Thierry

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle quadriceps low-frequency fatigue (LFF) during exercise promotes improvements in exercise capacity with exercise training. In healthy subjects, eccentric muscle work induced by downhill walking (DW) generates higher muscular stress, whilst metabolic cost is lower compared to level walking (LW). We investigated quadriceps LFF and metabolic cost of DW in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ten participants (67 ± 7 years, FEV1 51 ± 15% predicted) performed DW, DW carrying a load (DWL) of 10% body weight via vest and LW, in random order. Quadriceps potentiated twitch force (TWqpot) was assessed before and after each walk, and muscle damage was assessed before and 24 hours after each walk via serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Ventilation (VE) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were measured via breath-by-breath analysis during each walk. DW and DWL resulted in a greater decrease in TWqpot (-30 ± 14 N in DW, p < 0.05; and -22 ± 16 N in DWL, p < 0.05) compared to LW (-3 ± 21 N, p > 0.05). CK levels only increased 24 hours following DW and DWL (p < 0.05). DW and DWL showed lower VE and VO2 than LW (p < 0.05). DW is associated with enhanced quadriceps LFF and lower cardiorespiratory costs than LW. The addition of a chest load to DW does not seem to enhance these effects. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Pulmonary oedema as a suspected adverse drug reaction following vincristine administration to a cat: a case report.

    PubMed

    Polton, Gerry A; Elwood, Clive M

    2008-07-01

    This report describes recurrent respiratory distress following vincristine administration to a cat with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. The cat was treated with a combination of vincristine, chlorambucil and prednisolone with initial success. After approximately 4 months, dyspnoea developed within 6 h of vincristine administration. Emergency therapy was instituted resulting in a full recovery. Further vincristine was administered; dyspnoea was similarly noted after all but one of these treatments. Dyspnoeic episodes were not attributable to alterations in vincristine dose or method of administration. The repeated temporal association was consistent with a suspected adverse drug reaction to vincristine.

  18. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data.Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure.The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52-0.62).Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases.

  19. Systems physiology of the airways in health and obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T

    2016-09-01

    Fresh air entering the mouth and nose is brought to the blood-gas barrier in the lungs by a repetitively branching network of airways. Provided the individual airway branches remain patent, this airway tree achieves an enormous amplification in cross-sectional area from the trachea to the terminal bronchioles. Obstructive lung diseases such as asthma occur when airway patency becomes compromised. Understanding the pathophysiology of these obstructive diseases thus begins with a consideration of the factors that determine the caliber of an individual airway, which include the force balance between the inward elastic recoil of the airway wall, the outward tethering forces of its parenchymal attachments, and any additional forces due to contraction of airway smooth muscle. Other factors may also contribute significantly to airway narrowing, such as thickening of the airway wall and accumulation of secretions in the lumen. Airway obstruction becomes particularly severe when these various factors occur in concert. However, the effect of airway abnormalities on lung function cannot be fully understood only in terms of what happens to a single airway because narrowing throughout the airway tree is invariably heterogeneous and interdependent. Obstructive lung pathologies thus manifest as emergent phenomena arising from the way in which the airway tree behaves a system. These emergent phenomena are studied with clinical measurements of lung function made by spirometry and by mechanical impedance measured with the forced oscillation technique. Anatomically based computational models are linking these measurements to underlying anatomic structure in systems physiology terms. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:423-437. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  20. High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy in Adults: Physiological Benefits, Indication, Clinical Benefits, and Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masaji

    2016-04-01

    High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is carried out using an air/oxygen blender, active humidifier, single heated tube, and nasal cannula. Able to deliver adequately heated and humidified medical gas at flows up to 60 L/min, it is considered to have a number of physiological advantages compared with other standard oxygen therapies, including reduced anatomical dead space, PEEP, constant F(IO2), and good humidification. Although few large randomized clinical trials have been performed, HFNC has been gaining attention as an alternative respiratory support for critically ill patients. Published data are mostly available for neonates. For critically ill adults, however, evidence is uneven because the reports cover various subjects with diverse underlying conditions, such as hypoxemic respiratory failure, exacerbation of COPD, postextubation, preintubation oxygenation, sleep apnea, acute heart failure, and conditions entailing do-not-intubate orders. Even so, across the diversity, many published reports suggest that HFNC decreases breathing frequency and work of breathing and reduces the need for respiratory support escalation. Some important issues remain to be resolved, such as definitive indications for HFNC and criteria for timing the starting and stopping of HFNC and for escalating treatment. Despite these issues, HFNC has emerged as an innovative and effective modality for early treatment of adults with respiratory failure with diverse underlying diseases.

  1. Adverse Childhood Events Are Related to the Prevalence of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder Among Adult Women In Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Remigio-Baker, Rosemay A.; Hayes, Donald K; Reyes-Salvail, Florentina

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE In the US, women surpass men in the prevalence of lung diseases. Limited studies exist on the association of adverse childhood events (ACEs) to asthma and COPD particularly among women and cohorts of understudied populations (e.g. Pacific Islanders). This study evaluated the ACEs-asthma and ACEs-COPD relationships among women in Hawaii and the contribution of poor health factors (smoking, binge drinking and obesity) in these associations. METHODS Using data from 3,363 women in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System-Hawaii, we assessed how self-reported ACEs (count and type [household dysfunction, and physical, verbal and sexual abuse]) relate to asthma and COPD. Multivariable log-binomial regression, accounting for the sampling design, and model adjustments for socio-demographics, healthcare access, emotional support, current smoking, binge drinking and BMI status were used to generate prevalence ratios. RESULTS For every increase in ACE count, the likelihood for asthma increased by 7% (CI=1.02–1.13), and for COPD, by 21% (CI=1.12–1.31) accounting for socio-demographics, healthcare access and emotional support. Verbal abuse was also associated with greater likelihood for asthma independent of these covariates (PR=1.43, CI=1.14–1.79). Household dysfunction (PR=1.82, CI=1.15–2.82) and physical (PR=2.01, CI=1.20–3.37), verbal (PR=2.24, CI=1.38–3.65) and sexual (PR=1.81, CI=1.10–2.97) abuse were all associated with COPD using similar adjustments. Additional adjustment for smoking, binge drinking and BMI status did not impact the ACE-asthma associations and only modestly attenuated the ACE-COPD relationships. CONCLUSIONS Primary and secondary prevention of ACEs may optimize the health of young girls in Hawaii, and reduce the burden of asthma and COPD among women in the state. PMID:26267594

  2. Protection of palak (Beta vulgaris L. var Allgreen) plants from ozone injury by ethylenediurea (EDU): roles of biochemical and physiological variations in alleviating the adverse impacts.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Supriya; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2009-06-01

    Ameliorative effects of ethylenediurea (N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolinidyl) ethyl]-N' phenylurea, abbreviated as EDU) against ozone stress were studied on selected growth, biochemical, physiological and yield characteristics of palak (Beta vulgaris L. var Allgreen) plants grown in field at a suburban site of Varanasi, India. Mean eight hourly ozone concentration varied from 52 to 73 ppb which was found to produce adverse impacts on plant functioning and growth characteristics. The palak plants were treated with 300 ppm EDU at 10 days after germination at 10 days interval up to the plant maturity. Lipid peroxidation in EDU treated plants declined significantly as compared to non-EDU treated ones. Significant increment in F(v)/F(m) ratio in EDU treated plants as compared to non-EDU treated ones was recorded. EDU treated plants showed significant increment in ascorbic acid contents and reduction in peroxidase activity as compared to non-EDU treated ones. As a result of the protection provided by EDU against ozone induced stress on biochemical and physiological characteristics of palak, the morphological parameters also responded positively. Significant increments were recorded in shoot length, number of leaves plant(-1), leaf area and root and shoot biomass of EDU treated plants as compared to non-EDU treated ones. Contents of Na, K, Ca, Mg and Fe were higher in EDU treated plants as compared to non-EDU treated ones. The present investigation proves the usefulness of EDU in partially ameliorating ozone injury in ambient conditions.

  3. Shared Physiological and Molecular Responses in Marine Fish and Invertebrates to Environmental Hypoxia: Potential Biomarkers of Adverse Impacts on Marine Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P.; Rahman, S.

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of the effects of environmental exposure to hypoxia (dissolved oxygen: <2 mg/L) on critical physiological functions such as reproduction, growth and metabolism in both fish and invertebrates is essential for accurate predictions of its chronic impacts on marine communities. Marked disruption of reproduction and its endocrine control was observed in Atlantic croaker collected from the hypoxic region in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Recent research has shown that growth and its physiological upregulation is also impaired in hypoxia-exposed marine fish. Expression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein (IGFBP), which inhibits growth, was increased in croaker livers, whereas plasma levels of IGF, the primary regulator of growth, were decreased in snapper after hypoxia exposure. In addition, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which regulates changes in metabolism during adaptation to hypoxia, was upregulated in croaker collected from hypoxic environments. Interestingly, similar changes in the expression of IGFBP and HIF-1 have been found in marine crustaceans after hypoxia exposure, suggesting these responses to hypoxia are common to marine fish and invertebrates. Preliminary field studies indicate that hypoxia exposure also causes epigenetic modifications, including increases in global DNA methylation, and that these epigenetic changes can influence reproduction and growth in croaker. Epigenetic modifications can be passed to offspring and persist in future generations no longer exposed to an environmental stressor further aggravating its long-term adverse impacts on population abundance and delaying recovery. The growing availability of complete invertebrate genomes and high-throughput DNA sequencing indicates similar epigenetic studies can now be conducted with marine invertebrates. Collectively, the results indicate that environmental hypoxia exposure disrupts major physiological functions in fish and invertebrates critical for maintenance of

  4. Secondary effects of femoral instrumentation on pulmonary physiology in a standardised sheep model: what is the effect of lung contusion and reaming?

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Frank; Giannoudis, Peter; van Griensven, Martijn; Chawda, Majur; Probst, Christian; Harms, Oliver; Harwood, Paul; Otto, Karl; Fehr, M; Krettek, Christian; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2005-04-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for patients with femoral shaft fractures. However, there is an ongoing debate in multiple trauma patients with associated lung contusion when primary or secondary definitive stabilisation of the long bone fracture should be performed, as nailing is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In a standardised sheep model, this study aimed to quantify the development of acute pulmonary endothelial changes, to assess the activation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) and to observe the effects on the coagulation system associated with the reamed nailing procedure. Furthermore, the effect of coexisting lung contusion in an experimental model was evaluated. The animals were randomly assigned to one of four different groups (6 animals/group). In control groups, only a sham operation (thoracotomy) was performed, whereas in study groups, lung contusion was induced prior to femoral stabilisation either by external fixation or reamed femoral nailing. Using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) pulmonary permeability changes were quantified and PMNL activation was assessed by chemiluminescence. Additionally PMNL diapedesis and interstitial lung oedema were determined by histological analysis. All animals were sacrificed 4 h after the start of the femoral instrumentation. Without an associated lung injury, instrumentation of the femoral canal with the reamed nailing technique induced a transient increase in pulmonary permeability. In the face of an induced lung contusion, reamed femoral nailing resulted in significant increases in PMNL activation, pulmonary permeability and interstitial lung oedema, compared with external fixation. Without pulmonary contusion, reaming of the femoral canal was associated with a transient increase in pulmonary permeability. This was exacerbated in the presence of lung contusion along with increased PMNL activation. External fixation did not

  5. Physiologic determinants of exercise capacity in patients with different types of right-sided regurgitant lesions: Ebstein's malformation with tricuspid regurgitation and repaired tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, S S M; Dimopoulos, K; Sheehan, F H; Gatzoulis, M A; Kilner, P J

    2016-02-15

    Exercise capacity relates to right ventricular (RV) volume overload in congenital heart disease and may improve after surgery. We herewith investigate the relation between exercise capacity, cardiac index, and RV volume overload due to tricuspid regurgitation (TR) in Ebstein's malformation and pulmonary regurgitation (PR) after repair of tetralogy of Fallot (rToF). We measured cardiac index and tricuspid/pulmonary regurgitant fraction by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with Ebstein's malformation (n = 40) or rTOF (n = 53) with at least moderate TR/PR and 24 healthy controls. Exercise tolerance was determined by peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) during cardiopulmonary exercise testing. TR and PR fraction were similar in Ebstein and rTOF patients (43 ± 17% versus 39 ± 12%, respectively). Cardiac index was reduced in Ebstein (2.7 ± 0.6L/min/m(2) compared to controls 3.5 ± 0.9L/min/m(2), p < 0.001) but not in rToF patients (3.2 ± 0.5L/min/m(2)). Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between peak VO2 and cardiac index in Ebstein. Furthermore, peak VO2 correlated with peak heart rate in both groups but not with regurgitation fraction. Despite comparable amounts of regurgitation from a right sided heart valve in patients with Ebstein and rToF, reduction of cardiac index was observed only in the former group. Greater physiologic complexity and adverse ventricular interaction with chronotropic incompetence in Ebstein's malformation may account for this. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Systemic-to-pulmonary collateral flow in patients with palliated univentricular heart physiology: measurement using cardiovascular magnetic resonance 4D velocity acquisition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Systemic-to-pulmonary collateral flow (SPCF) may constitute a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with single-ventricle physiology (SV). However, clinical research is limited by the complexity of multi-vessel two-dimensional (2D) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) flow measurements. We sought to validate four-dimensional (4D) velocity acquisition sequence for concise quantification of SPCF and flow distribution in patients with SV. Methods 29 patients with SV physiology prospectively underwent CMR (1.5 T) (n = 14 bidirectional cavopulmonary connection [BCPC], age 2.9 ± 1.3 years; and n = 15 Fontan, 14.4 ± 5.9 years) and 20 healthy volunteers (age, 28.7 ± 13.1 years) served as controls. A single whole-heart 4D velocity acquisition and five 2D flow acquisitions were performed in the aorta, superior/inferior caval veins, right/left pulmonary arteries to serve as gold-standard. The five 2D velocity acquisition measurements were compared with 4D velocity acquisition for validation of individual vessel flow quantification and time efficiency. The SPCF was calculated by evaluating the disparity between systemic (aortic minus caval vein flows) and pulmonary flows (arterial and venour return). The pulmonary right to left and the systemic lower to upper body flow distribution were also calculated. Results The comparison between 4D velocity and 2D flow acquisitions showed good Bland-Altman agreement for all individual vessels (mean bias, 0.05±0.24 l/min/m2), calculated SPCF (−0.02±0.18 l/min/m2) and significantly shorter 4D velocity acquisition-time (12:34 min/17:28 min,p < 0.01). 4D velocity acquisition in patients versus controls revealed (1) good agreement between systemic versus pulmonary estimator for SPFC; (2) significant SPCF in patients (BCPC 0.79±0.45 l/min/m2; Fontan 0.62±0.82 l/min/m2) and not in controls (0.01 + 0.16 l/min/m2), (3) inverse relation of right

  7. Treatment outcomes of rifampin-sparing treatment in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis with rifampin-mono-resistance or rifampin adverse events: A retrospective cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Shinhee; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Woo Sung; Shim, Tae Sun

    2017-10-01

    Rifampin (RIF) mono-resistant tuberculosis (RMR-TB) is a rare disease. Current guidelines recommend that RMR-TB be treated as multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) but the evidence is scarce. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on pulmonary TB patients to investigate the characteristics and outcomes of RMR-TB. The characteristics of RMR-TB were compared with those with adverse events to rifampin (RAE-TB). Forty-four RMR-TB and 29 RAE-TB patients were enrolled. RMR-TB patients showed more alcohol use, prior history of TB, and radiologically severe disease, while RAE-TB patients were older and had more comorbidities and combined extrapulmonary TB. A fluoroquinolone (FQ) was the drug most commonly added (70.5%, RMR-TB; 82.8%, RAE-TB). Median treatment duration was 453 days in RMR-TB and 371 days in RAE-TB (p = 0.001) and treatment success rates were 87.2% (34/39) and 80.0% (20/25), respectively (p = 0.586). Subanalysis of the RMR-TB group by treatment regimen (standard regimen [n = 11], standard regimen + FQ [n = 12], MDR-TB regimen [n = 21]) revealed a higher rate of radiologically severe disease in the MDR-TB subgroup, with similar treatment success rates for the subgroups (85.7% [6/7]), 91.7% [11/12], and 85.0% [17/20], respectively) despite different durations of treatment (345, 405, and 528 days, respectively). Two recurrences (33.3% [2/6]) developed only in standard regimen subgroup, suggesting that standard regimen is not enough to treat RMR-TB patients. The treatment outcome of RMR-TB with 1(st)-line drugs + FQ was comparable to that of MDR-TB regimen. Shorter treatment duration may be considered for RMR-TB patients compared with MDR-TB patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  9. Lucinactant attenuates pulmonary inflammatory response, preserves lung structure, and improves physiologic outcomes in a preterm lamb model of RDS

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Marla R.; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L.; Gregory, Timothy J.; Mazela, Jan; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute inflammatory responses to supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation have been implicated in the pathophysiological sequelae of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Although surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) has contributed to lung stability, the effect on lung inflammation is inconclusive. Lucinactant contains sinapultide (KL4), a novel synthetic peptide that functionally mimics surfactant protein B, a protein with anti-inflammatory properties. We tested the hypothesis that lucinactant may modulate lung inflammatory response to mechanical ventilation in the management of RDS and may confer greater protection than animal-derived surfactants. Methods Preterm lambs (126.8 ± 0.2 SD d gestation) were randomized to receive lucinactant, poractant alfa, beractant, or no surfactant and studied for 4 h. Gas exchange and pulmonary function were assessed serially. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung histology were assessed at termination. Results SRT improved lung compliance relative to no SRT without significant difference between SRT groups. Lucinactant attenuated lung and systemic inflammatory response, supported oxygenation at lower ventilatory requirements, and preserved lung structural integrity to a greater degree than either no SRT or SRT with poractant alfa or beractant. Conclusion These data suggest that early intervention with lucinactant may more effectively mitigate pulmonary pathophysiological sequelae of RDS than the animal-derived surfactants poractant alfa or beractant. PMID:22821059

  10. Quantitative computed tomography measurements to evaluate airway disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Relationship to physiological measurements, clinical index and visual assessment of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Nambu, Atsushi; Zach, Jordan; Schroeder, Joyce; Jin, Gongyoung; Kim, Song Soo; Kim, Yu-Il; Schnell, Christina; Bowler, Russell; Lynch, David A

    2016-11-01

    To correlate currently available quantitative CT measurements for airway disease with physiological indices and the body-mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity (BODE) index in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study was approved by our institutional review board (IRB number 2778). Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. The subjects included 188 current and former cigarette smokers from the COPDGene cohort who underwent inspiratory and expiratory CT and also had physiological measurements for the evaluation of airflow limitation, including FEF25-75%, airway resistance (Raw), and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The BODE index was used as the index of clinical symptoms. Quantitative CT measures included % low attenuation areas [% voxels≤950 Hounsfield unit (HU) on inspiratory CT, %LAA-950ins], percent gas trapping (% voxels≤-856HU on expiratory CT, %LAA -856exp), relative inspiratory to expiratory volume change of voxels with attenuation values from -856 to -950HU [Relative Volume Change (RVC)-856 to -950], expiratory to inspiratory ratio of mean lung density (E/I-ratio MLD), Pi10, and airway wall thickness (WT), luminal diameter (LD) and airway wall area percent (WA%) in the segmental, subsegmental and subsubsegmental bronchi on inspiratory CT. Correlation coefficients were calculated between the QCT measurements and physiological measurements in all subjects and in the subjects with mild emphysema (%LAA-950ins <10%). Univariate and multiple variable analysis for the BODE index were also performed. Adjustments were made for age, gender, smoking pack years, FEF25-75%, Raw, and sGaw. Quantitative CT measurements had significant correlations with physiological indices. Among them, E/I-ratio MLD had the strongest correlations with FEF25-75% (r=-0.648, <0.001) and sGaw (r=-0.624, <0.001) while in the subjects with mild emphysema subsegmental WA% and segmental WA% had the strongest

  11. Pulmonary function in advanced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, C M; Glanville, A R; Morris, A J; Rubin, D; Harvey, J A; Theodore, J; Robin, E D

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary mechanical function and gas exchange were studied in 33 patients with advanced pulmonary vascular disease, resulting from primary pulmonary hypertension in 18 cases and from Eisenmenger physiology in 15 cases. Evidence of airway obstruction was found in most patients. In addition, mean total lung capacity (TLC) was only 81.5% of predicted and 27% of our subjects had values of TLC less than one standard deviation below the mean predicted value. The mean value for transfer factor (TLCO) was 71.8% of predicted and appreciable arterial hypoxaemia was present, which was disproportionate to the mild derangements in pulmonary mechanics. Patients with Eisenmenger physiology had significantly lower values of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) (p less than 0.05) and of maximum mid expiratory flow (p less than 0.05) and significantly higher pulmonary arterial pressure (p less than 0.05) than those with primary pulmonary hypertension, but no other variables were significantly different between the two subpopulations. It is concluded that advanced pulmonary vascular disease in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger physiology is associated not only with severe hypoxaemia but also with altered pulmonary mechanical function. PMID:3433237

  12. A novel bioreactor for mechanobiological studies of engineered heart valve tissue formation under pulmonary arterial physiological flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Boronyak, Steven M; Le, Trung; Holmes, Andrew; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Sacks, Michael S

    2014-12-01

    The ability to replicate physiological hemodynamic conditions during in vitro tissue development has been recognized as an important aspect in the development and in vitro assessment of engineered heart valve tissues. Moreover, we have demonstrated that studies aiming to understand mechanical conditioning require separation of the major heart valve deformation loading modes: flow, stretch, and flexure (FSF) (Sacks et al., 2009, "Bioengineering Challenges for Heart Valve Tissue Engineering," Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng., 11(1), pp. 289-313). To achieve these goals in a novel bioreactor design, we utilized a cylindrical conduit configuration for the conditioning chamber to allow for higher fluid velocities, translating to higher shear stresses on the in situ tissue specimens while retaining laminar flow conditions. Moving boundary computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed to predict the flow field under combined cyclic flexure and steady flow (cyclic-flex-flow) states using various combinations of flow rate, and media viscosity. The device was successfully constructed and tested for incubator housing, gas exchange, and sterility. In addition, we performed a pilot experiment using biodegradable polymer scaffolds seeded with bone marrow derived stem cells (BMSCs) at a seeding density of 5 × 10(6) cells/cm(2). The constructs were subjected to combined cyclic flexure (1 Hz frequency) and steady flow (Re = 1376; flow rate of 1.06 l/min (LPM); shear stress in the range of 0-9 dynes/cm(2) for 2 weeks to permit physiological shear stress conditions. Assays revealed significantly (P < 0.05) higher amounts of collagen (2051 ± 256 μg/g) at the end of 2 weeks in comparison to similar experiments previously conducted in our laboratory but performed at subphysiological levels of shear stress (<2 dynes/cm(2); Engelmayr et al., 2006, "Cyclic Flexure and Laminar Flow Synergistically Accelerate Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Engineered Tissue Formation: Implications

  13. Integration of Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models with Adverse Outcome Pathways and Environmental Exposure Models to Screen for Environmental Hazards

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Life-stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to include descriptions of several life-stage events such as pregnancy, fetal development, the neonate and child growth. The overall modeling strategy was used for in vitro to in vivo (IVIVE) extrapolat...

  14. Integration of Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models with Adverse Outcome Pathways and Environmental Exposure Models to Screen for Environmental Hazards

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Life-stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to include descriptions of several life-stage events such as pregnancy, fetal development, the neonate and child growth. The overall modeling strategy was used for in vitro to in vivo (IVIVE) extrapolat...

  15. Alleviation of adverse effects of drought stress on growth and some potential physiological attributes in maize (Zea mays L.) by seed electromagnetic treatment.

    PubMed

    Javed, Namra; Ashraf, Muhammad; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Al-Qurainy, Fahad

    2011-01-01

    Effects of varying preseed magnetic treatments on growth, chlorophyll pigments, photosynthesis, water relation attributes, fluorescence and levels of osmoprotectants in maize plants were tested under normal and drought stress conditions. Seeds of two maize cultivars were treated with different (T0 [0 mT], T1 [100 mT for 5 min], T2 [100 mT for 10 min], T3 [150 mT for 5 min] and T4 [150 mT for 10 min]) electromagnetic treatments. Drought stress considerably suppressed growth, chlorophyll a and b pigments, leaf water potential, photosynthetic rate (A), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and substomatal CO(2) concentration (C(i)), while it increased leaf glycinebetaine and proline accumulation in both maize cultivars. However, pretreated seeds with different magnetic treatments significantly alleviated the drought-induced adverse effects on growth by improving chlorophyll a, A, E, g(s), C(i) and photochemical quenching and nonphotochemical quenching, while it had no significant effect on other attributes. However, different magnetic treatments negatively affected the g(s) and C(i) particularly in cv. Agaiti-2002 under drought stress conditions. Of all magnetic treatments, 100 and 150 mT for 10 min were most effective in alleviating the drought-induced adverse effects. Overall, preseed electromagnetic treatments could be used to minimize the drought-induced adverse effects on different crop plants.

  16. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  17. A review of the scientific literature related to the adverse impact of physical restraint: gaining a clearer understanding of the physiological factors involved in cases of restraint-related death.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Richard; Stirling, Chris; Pandyan, Anand D

    2012-07-01

    Deaths occurring during and/or in close proximity to physical restraint have been attributed to positional asphyxia, a conclusion primarily based on opinion and reviews of case studies. This review sought to identify the current scientific evidence available in regard to the aetiology of adverse events or death occurring during or in close proximity to physical restraint. A systematic search of electronic databases (SPORTDiscus, AMED, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO) for papers published in English, between 1980 and 2011, using keywords that related to restraint, restraint position and cardiovascular function resulted in 11 experimental papers being found for review. The term positional asphyxia as a mechanism for sudden death is poorly understood. The literature shows that restraint position has the ability to impede life-maintaining physiological functions, but that the imposed impediment is not uniform across all restraint positions/techniques. Further research is required to ascertain the risks posed by struggling during restraint for more prolonged periods of time and in different positions using varied techniques of restraint. This research should seek to and rank known or future risk factors of adverse events occurring during restraint, seeking to understand the interactions and if present the cumulative effect of these risk factors. Finally, future research should focus on populations other than apparently healthy male adults.

  18. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Julian, Colleen Glyde; Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-08-15

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600-4,100 m) residents aged 18-25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Long term effects of bosentan treatment in adult patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension related to congenital heart disease (Eisenmenger physiology): safety, tolerability, clinical, and haemodynamic effect

    PubMed Central

    D'Alto, M; Vizza, C D; Romeo, E; Badagliacca, R; Santoro, G; Poscia, R; Sarubbi, B; Mancone, M; Argiento, P; Ferrante, F; Russo, M G; Fedele, F; Calabrò, R

    2007-01-01

    Background Oral bosentan is an established treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Objective To evaluate safety, tolerability, and clinical and haemodynamic effects of bosentan in patients with PAH related to congenital heart disease (CHD). Patients 22 patients with CHD related PAH (8 men, 14 women, mean (SD) age 38 (10) years) were treated with oral bosentan (62.5 mg×2/day for the first 4 weeks and then 125 mg×2/day). Main outcome measures Clinical status, liver enzymes, World Health Organisation (WHO) functional class, resting oxygen saturations and 6‐min walk test (6MWT) were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Haemodynamic evaluation with cardiac catheterisation was performed at baseline and at 12 month follow‐up. Results 12 patients had ventricular septal defect, 5 atrioventricular canal, 4 single ventricle, and 1 atrial septal defect. All patients tolerated bosentan well. No major side effects were seen. After a year of treatment, an improvement was seen in WHO functional class (2.5 (0.7) v 3.1 (0.7); p<0.05), oxygen saturation at rest (87 (6%) v 81 (9); p<0.001), heart rate at rest (81 (10) v 87 (14) bpm; p<0.05), distance travelled in the 6MWT (394 (73) v 320 (108) m; p<0.001), oxygen saturation at the end of the 6MWT (71 (14) v 63 (17%); p<0.05), Borg index (5.3 (1.8) v 6.5 (1.3); p<0.001), pulmonary vascular resistances index (14 (9) v 22 (12) WU m2; p<0.001), systemic vascular resistances index (23 (11) v 27 (10) WU.m2; p<0.01), pulmonary vascular resistances index/systemic vascular resistances index (0.6 (0.5) v 0.9 (0.6); p<0.05); pulmonary (4.0 (1.3) v 2.8 (0.9) l/min/m2; p<0.001) and systemic cardiac output (4.2 (1.4) v 3.4 (1.1) l/min/m2; p<0.05). Conclusions Bosentan was safe and well tolerated in adults with CHD related PAH during 12 months of treatment. Clinical status, exercise tolerance, and pulmonary haemodynamics improved considerably. PMID:17135220

  20. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis.

  1. Pulmonary angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pulmonary arteriography; Pulmonary angiogram; Angiogram of the lungs Images Pulmonary arteries References Jackson JE, Meaney JFM. Angiography. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  2. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  3. "Pulmonary valve replacement diminishes the presence of restrictive physiology and reduces atrial volumes": a prospective study in Tetralogy of Fallot patients.

    PubMed

    Pijuan-Domenech, Antonia; Pineda, Victor; Castro, Miguel Angel; Sureda-Barbosa, Carlos; Ribera, Aida; Cruz, Luz M; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Dos-Subirà, Laura; Subirana-Domènech, Teresa; Garcia-Dorado, David; Casaldàliga-Ferrer, Jaume

    2014-11-15

    Pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) reduces right ventricular (RV) volumes in the setting of long-term pulmonary regurgitation after Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) repair; however, little is known of its effect on RV diastolic function. Right atrial volumes may reflect the burden of RV diastolic dysfunction. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the clinical, echocardiographic, biochemical and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) variables, focusing particularly on right atrial response and right ventricular diastolic function prior to and after elective PVR in adult patients with ToF. This prospective study was conducted from January 2009 to April 2013 in consecutive patients > 18 years of age who had undergone ToF repair in childhood and were accepted for elective PVR. Twenty patients (mean age: 35 years; 70% men) agreed to enter the study. PVR was performed with a bioporcine prosthesis. Concomitant RV reduction was performed in all cases when technically possible. Pulmonary end-diastolic forward flow (EDFF) decreased significantly from 5.4 ml/m(2) to 0.3 ml/m(2) (p < 0.00001), and right atrial four-chamber echocardiographic measurements and volumes by 25% (p = 0.0024): mean indexed diastolic/systolic atrial volumes prior to surgery were 43 ml/m(2) (SD+/-4.6)/63 ml/m(2) (SD+/-5.5), and dropped to 33 ml/m(2) (SD+/-3)/46 ml/m(2) (SD+/-2.55) post-surgery. All patients presented right ventricular diastolic and systolic volume reductions, with a mean volume reduction of 35% (p < 0.00001). Right ventricular diastolic dysfunction was common in a population of severely dilated RV patients long term after ToF repair. Right ventricular diastolic parameters improved as did right atrial volumes in keeping with the known reduction in RV volumes, after PVR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sildenafil in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Christopher F; Machado, Roberto F

    2006-01-01

    The therapy of pulmonary hypertension has evolved rapidly in the last 10 years from the use of non-selective vasodilators to drugs that specifically target pulmonary vasodilation, endothelial function, and vascular remodeling. Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor that has an expanding role in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. Case series and small studies, as well as the first large randomized controlled trial, have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of sildenafil in improving mean pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, cardiac index, and exercise tolerance in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It may be useful in adults, children, and neonates after cardiac surgery, with left heart failure, in fibrotic pulmonary disease, high altitude exposure, and thromboembolic disease, and in combination with other therapies for pulmonary hypertension, such as inhaled iloprost. The oral formulation and favorable adverse effect profile make sildenafil an attractive alternative in the treatment of selected patients with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:17323595

  5. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600–4,100 m) residents aged 18–25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26092986

  6. Computer-Aided Tomographic Analysis of Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Correlation with Pulmonary Physiologic Tests and Patient-Centred Measures of Perceived Dyspnea and Functional Disability.

    PubMed

    Salaffi, Fausto; Carotti, Marina; Di Donato, Eleonora; Di Carlo, Marco; Ceccarelli, Luca; Giuseppetti, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed (a) to evaluate an improved quantitative lung fibrosis score based on a computer-aided diagnosis (CaM) system in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc),-related interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD), (b) to investigate the relationship between physiologic parameters (forced vital capacity [FVC] and single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide [DLCO]), patient-centred measures of dyspnea and functional disability and CaM and visual reader-based (CoVR) methods, and (c) to identify potential surrogate measures from quantitative and visual HRCT measurement. 126 patients with SSc underwent chest radiography, HRCT and PFTs. The following patient-centred measures were obtained: modified Borg Dyspnea Index (Borg score), VAS for breathing, and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI). HRCT abnormalities were scored according to the conventional visual reader-based score (CoVR) and by a CaM. The relationships among the HRCT scores, physiologic parameters (FVC and DLCO, % predicted) results and patient-centred measures, were calculated using linear regression analysis and Pearson's correlation. Multivariate regression models were performed to identify the predictor variables on severity of pulmonary fibrosis. Subjects with limited cutaneous SSc had lower HAQ-DI scores than subjects with diffuse cutaneous SSc (p <0.001). CaM and CoVR scores were similar in the 2 groups. In univariate analysis, a strong correlation between CaM and CoVR was observed (p <0.0001). In multivariate analysis the CaM and CoVR scores were predicted by DLco, FVC, Borg score and HAQ-DI. Age, sex, disease duration, anti-topoisomerase antibodies and mRSS were not significantly associated with severity of pulmonary fibrosis on CaM- and CoVR methods. Although a close correlation between CaM score results and CoVR total score was found, CaM analysis showed a more significant correlation with DLco (more so than the FVC), patient-centred measures of perceived

  7. Computer-Aided Tomographic Analysis of Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Correlation with Pulmonary Physiologic Tests and Patient-Centred Measures of Perceived Dyspnea and Functional Disability

    PubMed Central

    Salaffi, Fausto; Carotti, Marina; Di Donato, Eleonora; Di Carlo, Marco; Ceccarelli, Luca; Giuseppetti, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed (a) to evaluate an improved quantitative lung fibrosis score based on a computer-aided diagnosis (CaM) system in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc),—related interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD), (b) to investigate the relationship between physiologic parameters (forced vital capacity [FVC] and single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide [DLCO]), patient-centred measures of dyspnea and functional disability and CaM and visual reader-based (CoVR) methods, and (c) to identify potential surrogate measures from quantitative and visual HRCT measurement. Methods 126 patients with SSc underwent chest radiography, HRCT and PFTs. The following patient-centred measures were obtained: modified Borg Dyspnea Index (Borg score), VAS for breathing, and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI). HRCT abnormalities were scored according to the conventional visual reader-based score (CoVR) and by a CaM. The relationships among the HRCT scores, physiologic parameters (FVC and DLCO, % predicted) results and patient-centred measures, were calculated using linear regression analysis and Pearson’s correlation. Multivariate regression models were performed to identify the predictor variables on severity of pulmonary fibrosis. Results Subjects with limited cutaneous SSc had lower HAQ-DI scores than subjects with diffuse cutaneous SSc (p <0.001). CaM and CoVR scores were similar in the 2 groups. In univariate analysis, a strong correlation between CaM and CoVR was observed (p <0.0001). In multivariate analysis the CaM and CoVR scores were predicted by DLco, FVC, Borg score and HAQ-DI. Age, sex, disease duration, anti-topoisomerase antibodies and mRSS were not significantly associated with severity of pulmonary fibrosis on CaM- and CoVR methods. Conclusions Although a close correlation between CaM score results and CoVR total score was found, CaM analysis showed a more significant correlation with DLco (more so than the FVC

  8. Retrograde catheterization of the pulmonary veins following surgical correction of transposition of the great vessels.

    PubMed

    Carter, G A

    1976-01-01

    Prior to a Mustard repair for transposition of the great vessels, complete physiologic data of the pulmonary bed can be obtained by catheterization of the pulmonary artery with a "J" formed wire, and direct catheterization of the pulmonary veins via an atrial septal defect. Following "physiologic" repair ready access to the pulmonary veins is denied. Evaluation of the pulmonary venous pressure is of great importance, however, in differentiating pulmonary vascular disease from pulmonary hypertension secondary to patch obstruction of pulmonary venous return. This paper describes a technique of catheterization of the pulmonary veins following a Mustard repair for TGV.

  9. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshama, Said Said; EL-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  10. Assessment of the physiologic contribution of right atrial function to total right heart function in patients with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Joseph A; Raina, Amresh; Forfia, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    Total right heart function requires normal function of both the right ventricle and the right atrium. However, the degree to which right atrial (RA) function and right ventricular (RV) function each contribute to total right heart function has not been quantified. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of RA function to total right heart function in a group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients compared to a cohort of normal controls without cardiovascular disease. The normal cohort comprised 35 subjects with normal clinical echocardiograms, while the PAH cohort included 37 patients, of whom 31 had echocardiograms before and after initiation of PAH-specific therapy. Total right heart function was measured via tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE). TAPSE was broken down into two components, the excursion occurring during RA contraction (TAPSERA) and that occurring before RA contraction (TAPSERV). RA fractional area change (RA-FAC) was also compared between the two groups. In the PAH cohort, more than half of the total TAPSE occurred during atrial systole, compared to less than one-third in the normal cohort (51.0% vs. 32.1%; P < 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between RA-FAC and TAPSE in the PAH cohort but not in the normal cohort. TAPSE improved significantly in the posttreatment cohort (1.7 vs. 2.1 cm), but TAPSERA continued to account for about half of the total TAPSE after treatment. RA function accounts for a significantly greater proportion of total right heart function in patients with PAH than in normal subjects.

  11. Assessment of the physiologic contribution of right atrial function to total right heart function in patients with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sivak, Joseph A.; Raina, Amresh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Total right heart function requires normal function of both the right ventricle and the right atrium. However, the degree to which right atrial (RA) function and right ventricular (RV) function each contribute to total right heart function has not been quantified. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of RA function to total right heart function in a group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients compared to a cohort of normal controls without cardiovascular disease. The normal cohort comprised 35 subjects with normal clinical echocardiograms, while the PAH cohort included 37 patients, of whom 31 had echocardiograms before and after initiation of PAH-specific therapy. Total right heart function was measured via tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE). TAPSE was broken down into two components, the excursion occurring during RA contraction (TAPSERA) and that occurring before RA contraction (TAPSERV). RA fractional area change (RA-FAC) was also compared between the two groups. In the PAH cohort, more than half of the total TAPSE occurred during atrial systole, compared to less than one-third in the normal cohort (51.0% vs. 32.1%; P < 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between RA-FAC and TAPSE in the PAH cohort but not in the normal cohort. TAPSE improved significantly in the posttreatment cohort (1.7 vs. 2.1 cm), but TAPSERA continued to account for about half of the total TAPSE after treatment. RA function accounts for a significantly greater proportion of total right heart function in patients with PAH than in normal subjects. PMID:27683609

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities.

  13. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  14. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  15. Space physiology within an exercise physiology curriculum.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jason R; West, John B

    2013-09-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of chronic terrestrial exercise (TEx) and microgravity (μG). We used a series of peer-reviewed publications to demonstrate that many of the physiological adaptations to TEx and μG are opposite. For example, TEx typically improves cardiovascular function and orthostatic tolerance, whereas μG can lead to declines in both. TEx leads to muscle hypertrophy, and μG elicits muscle atrophy. TEx increases bone mineral density and red blood cell mass, whereas μG decreases bone mineral density and red blood cell mass. Importantly, exercise during spaceflight remains a crucial countermeasure to limit some of these adverse physiological adaptations to μG. This curriculum develops critical thinking skills by dissecting peer-reviewed articles and discussing the strengths and weaknesses associated with simulated and actual μG studies. Moreover, the curriculum includes studies on both animals and humans, providing a strong translational component to the curriculum. In summary, we have developed a novel space physiology curriculum delivered during the final weeks of an exercise physiology course in which students gain critical new knowledge that reinforces key concepts presented throughout the semester.

  16. Modelling pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Tawhai, Merryn H; Burrowes, Kelly S

    2008-11-30

    Computational model analysis has been used widely to understand and interpret complexity of interactions in the pulmonary system. Pulmonary blood transport is a multi-scale phenomenon that involves scale-dependent structure and function, therefore requiring different model assumptions for the microcirculation and the arterial or venous flows. The blood transport systems interact with the surrounding lung tissue, and are dependent on hydrostatic pressure gradients, control of vasoconstriction, and the topology and material composition of the vascular trees. This review focuses on computational models that have been developed to study the different mechanisms contributing to regional perfusion of the lung. Different models for the microcirculation and the pulmonary arteries are considered, including fractal approaches and anatomically-based methods. The studies that are reviewed illustrate the different complementary approaches that can be used to address the same physiological question of flow heterogeneity.

  17. Cardiovascular transition at birth: a physiological sequence.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Stuart B; Te Pas, Arjan B; Lang, Justin; van Vonderen, Jeroen J; Roehr, Charles Christoph; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Wallace, Euan M; Polglase, Graeme R

    2015-05-01

    The transition to newborn life at birth involves major cardiovascular changes that are triggered by lung aeration. These include a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF), which is required for pulmonary gas exchange and to replace umbilical venous return as the source of preload for the left heart. Clamping the umbilical cord before PBF increases reduces venous return and preload for the left heart and thereby reduces cardiac output. Thus, if ventilation onset is delayed following cord clamping, the infant is at risk of superimposing an ischemic insult, due to low cardiac output, on top of an asphyxic insult. Much debate has centered on the timing of cord clamping at birth, focusing mainly on the potential for a time-dependent placental to infant blood transfusion. This has prompted recommendations for delayed cord clamping for a set time after birth in infants not requiring resuscitation. However, recent evidence indicates that ventilation onset before cord clamping mitigates the adverse cardiovascular consequences caused by immediate cord clamping. This indicates that the timing of cord clamping should be based on the infant's physiology rather than an arbitrary period of time and that delayed cord clamping may be of greatest benefit to apneic infants.

  18. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  19. Pulmonary delivery of nanoparticle chemotherapy for the treatment of lung cancers: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Gao, Wei; Li, Tonglei; Zhou, Qi Tony

    2017-06-01

    Lung cancer is the second most prevalent and the deadliest among all cancer types. Chemotherapy is recommended for lung cancers to control tumor growth and to prolong patient survival. Systemic chemotherapy typically has very limited efficacy as well as severe systemic adverse effects, which are often attributed to the distribution of anticancer drugs to non-targeted sites. In contrast, inhalation routes permit the delivery of drugs directly to the lungs providing high local concentrations that may enhance the anti-tumor effect while alleviating systemic adverse effects. Preliminary studies in animals and humans have suggested that most inhaled chemotherapies are tolerable with manageable pulmonary adverse effects, including cough and bronchospasm. Promoting the deposition of anticancer drugs in tumorous cells and minimizing access to healthy lung cells can further augment the efficacy and reduce the risk of local toxicities caused by inhaled chemotherapy. Sustained release and tumor localization characteristics make nanoparticle formulations a promising candidate for the inhaled delivery of chemotherapeutic agents against lung cancers. However, the physiology of respiratory tracts and lung clearance mechanisms present key barriers for the effective deposition and retention of inhaled nanoparticle formulations in the lungs. Recent research has focused on the development of novel formulations to maximize lung deposition and to minimize pulmonary clearance of inhaled nanoparticles. This article systematically reviews the challenges and opportunities for the pulmonary delivery of nanoparticle formulations for the treatment of lung cancers.

  20. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » Pulmonary Embolism Explore Pulmonary Embolism What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Deep Vein Thrombosis Lung VQ Scan Overweight and Obesity Send a ...

  1. Pulmonary blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bariola, J Ryan; Vyas, Keyur S

    2011-12-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is acquired in almost all cases via inhalation, and pulmonary disease is the most frequent clinical manifestation of blastomycosis. Pulmonary disease can range from asymptomatic infection to rapidly severe and fatal disease. Most cases will present as pneumonia, either acute or chronic, or as a lung mass. In rare cases pulmonary blastomycosis is associated with the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Blastomycosis can present as isolated pulmonary disease or along with coexisting extrapulmonary disease that usually will involve the skin, bony structures, genitourinary tract, or central nervous system. Diagnosis is largely based on isolation of the organism via culture or visualization of the organism in clinical specimens. Detection of urinary Blastomyces antigen is a recent addition to diagnostic options. Itraconazole is the drug of choice for most forms of the disease; amphotericin B is reserved for the more severe forms. Newer azoles such as voriconazole and posaconazole have a limited role in the treatment of pulmonary blastomycosis. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  2. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations.

  4. Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine.

  5. Pulmonary issues in the older adult.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Delia E

    2014-03-01

    This article elicits why critical care nurses need to become aware of the pulmonary issues of older adults. The population of older adults is increasing. Older adults undergo anatomic and physiologic changes of the protective mechanisms of the pulmonary system. These changes alter the rate and effort of breathing. Speech is slowed because of expiratory strength effort. Cognition changes may be the only indication of impaired oxygenation. Bedside nursing care provides protection from pulmonary complications. Health behaviors of smoking cessation, oral hygiene, and exercise promote pulmonary health even in older adults.

  6. Potassium channels in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Chabot, Sophie; Antigny, Fabrice; Perros, Frédéric; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating cardiopulmonary disorder with various origins. All forms of PAH share a common pulmonary arteriopathy characterised by vasoconstriction, remodelling of the pre-capillary pulmonary vessel wall, and in situ thrombosis. Although the pathogenesis of PAH is recognised as a complex and multifactorial process, there is growing evidence that potassium channels dysfunction in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of PAH. Besides regulating many physiological functions, reduced potassium channels expression and/or activity have significant effects on PAH establishment and progression. This review describes the molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences of potassium channel modulation. Special emphasis is placed on KCNA5 (Kv1.5) and KCNK3 (TASK1), which are considered to play a central role in determining pulmonary vascular tone and may represent attractive therapeutic targets in the treatment of PAH.

  7. Physiology Of Drowning: A Review.

    PubMed

    Bierens, Joost J L M; Lunetta, Philippe; Tipton, Mike; Warner, David S

    2016-03-01

    Drowning physiology relates to two different events: immersion (upper airway above water) and submersion (upper airway under water). Immersion involves integrated cardiorespiratory responses to skin and deep body temperature, including cold shock, physical incapacitation, and hypovolemia, as precursors of collapse and submersion. The physiology of submersion includes fear of drowning, diving response, autonomic conflict, upper airway reflexes, water aspiration and swallowing, emesis, and electrolyte disorders. Submersion outcome is determined by cardiac, pulmonary, and neurological injury. Knowledge of drowning physiology is scarce. Better understanding may identify methods to improve survival, particularly related to hot-water immersion, cold shock, cold-induced physical incapacitation, and fear of drowning.

  8. COX-2 inhibition and hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension: effects on pulmonary vascular remodeling and contractility

    PubMed Central

    Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Ma, Jun; Perrella, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a significant disease process characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance leading to increased right ventricular afterload and ultimately progressing to right ventricular dysfunction and often death. Irreversible remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature is the hallmark of pulmonary hypertension and frequently leads to progressive functional decline in patients with PAH despite treatment with currently available therapies. Metabolites of the arachidonic acid cascade play an important homeostatic role in the pulmonary vasculature and dysregulation of pathways downstream of arachidonic acid play a central role in the pathobiology of PAH. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is upregulated in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) and inflammatory cells during hypoxia and plays a protective role in the lung’s response to hypoxia. We recently demonstrated that absence of COX-2 was detrimental in a mouse model of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Exposure of COX-2 null mice to hypoxia resulted in severe pulmonary hypertension characterized by enhanced pulmonary vascular remodeling and significant upregulation of the ET-1 receptor (ETAR) in the lung following hypoxia. Absence of COX-2 in vitro led to enhanced contractility of PASMC following exposure to hypoxia that could be attenuated by iloprost, a prostaglandin I2 analog. These findings suggest that selective inhibition of COX-2 may have detrimental pulmonary vascular consequences in patients with pre-existing pulmonary hypertension or underlying hypoxemic lung diseases. Here we discuss our recent data demonstrating the adverse consequences of COX-2 inhibition on pulmonary vascular remodeling and PASMC contractility. PMID:19577709

  9. Diurnal Variations in Human Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Medarov, Boris I.; Pavlov, Valentin A.; Rossoff, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary function has circadian modulations. Variations in human pulmonary function during the daytime hours (diurnal variations) remain to be well characterized. Discerning these variations will contribute to better understanding the relationship between biorhythms and lung physiology and to improving clinical management of pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude of pulmonary function variability during the usual daytime hours in a population of patients referred for pulmonary function testing. Diurnal fluctuations of human pulmonary function were examined by studying retrospectively a study population of 4,756 individuals with performed pulmonary function tests. We found the lowest and highest spirometric values in the 12:00–12:59 pm and 3:00–4:59 pm time intervals respectively. The difference in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) between the noon (12:00–12:59 pm) and afternoon (4:00–4:59 pm) intervals was 17.6% (P<0.01). Furthermore, the highest values of diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide [DLCO] and alveolar volume [Va] were identified in the 8:00–8:59 am time interval. These findings, identifying a model of diurnal variations of pulmonary function in individuals referred for pulmonary function testing, are of interest for better understanding lung physiology and human circadian rhythms and may have clinical value in managing lung disorders. PMID:19079662

  10. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: current theories of pathogenesis and their implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J; Levy, R; Churg, A

    2005-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic sign in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), affecting both mortality and quality of life. Although pulmonary hypertension in COPD is traditionally viewed as a result of emphysematous destruction of the vascular bed and/or hypoxia, recent studies indicate that neither of these factors correlates very well with pulmonary artery pressures. New human and animal experimental data are beginning to show that pulmonary hypertension in this setting is probably a result of the direct effect of tobacco smoke on the intrapulmonary vessels with abnormal production of mediators that control vasoconstriction, vasodilatation, and vascular cell proliferation, ultimately leading to aberrant vascular remodelling and aberrant vascular physiology. These changes are in many ways similar to those seen in other forms of pulmonary hypertension and suggest that the treatments used for primary pulmonary hypertension may be beneficial in patients with COPD. PMID:15994270

  11. Rice Physiology

    Treesearch

    P.A. Counce; Davidi R. Gealy; Shi-Jean Susana Sung

    2002-01-01

    Physiology occurs tn physical space through chemical reactions constrained by anatomy and morphology, yet guided by genetics. Physiology has been called the logic of life. Genes encode structural and fimcdonal proteins. These proteins are subsequently processed to produce enzymes that direct and govern the biomechanical processes involved in the physiology of the...

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  13. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 23. Matthay MA, Martin TR, Murray JF. Pulmonary edema. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray & Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  14. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot in the leg called a deep vein thrombosis that breaks loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a ...

  15. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow from the right ventricle (right side pumping chamber) to the lungs. In pulmonary atresia, a ... Reconstructing the heart as a single ventricle (1 pumping chamber instead of 2) Heart transplant Outlook (Prognosis) ...

  16. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis The most common species of fungus that causes ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Review Date 7/31/2016 Updated by: Jatin ...

  17. Pulmonary ceroidosis.

    PubMed

    Sastre, J; Renedo, G; González Mangado, N; Cabrera, P; Lahoz, F

    1987-02-01

    We describe a patient with pulmonary ceroid histiocytosis. Skin pigmentation, chest x-ray film and laboratory findings were normal. Only pulmonary function tests were abnormal (TLC = 63 percent, DLco = 52 percent). Based on these functional data, the patient was submitted to a lung biopsy by thoracotomy. Brown pigmented histiocytes were shown occupying alveolar spaces. Similar brown pigmented hepatocytes were seen in the liver biopsy.

  18. Pulmonary Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini; Chawla, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral opaque lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift is an uncommon cause of respiratory distress in newborn which can be found on simple radiograph of the chest. Pulmonary agenesis is a rare cause of unilateral opaque lung in the newborn. Nearly 50% cases of pulmonary agenesis are associated with other congenital defects including cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal or genitourinary systems. We report an infant with agenesis of the right lung associated with other congenital anomalies.

  19. [Aerosolized iloprost therapy for pulmonary hypertensive crisis in 4 patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Deng, Ke-wu; Zhou, Yu-jie; Xu, Xi-qi; Wu, Ming-ying; Wang, Guo-hong; Bian, Hong; Chen, Bo; Wang, Chun-bo

    2012-10-01

    To summary the efficacy and safety of aerosolized iloprost in patients with pulmonary hypertensive crisis. On the basis of conventional therapy, aerosolized iloprost (10 µg per time for 10 - 15 min in 2 hours interval, 8 times per day) was administered to four patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary hypertensive crisis. Blood pressure, heart rate, systemic artery oxygen saturation, systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) measured by echocardiography and the adverse events were analyzed. After aerosolized iloprost therapy, sPAP was significantly decreased and systemic artery oxygen saturation was improved. Adverse events (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dry cough) were observed in two patients, and the iloprost use was stopped in one patient due to severe vomiting and diarrhea. Aerosolized iloprost could significantly reduce the sPAP and improve the systemic artery oxygen saturation in patients with pulmonary hypertension crisis.

  20. Incidence and economic burden of suspected adverse events and adverse event monitoring during AF therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Lin, J; Hussein, M; Battleman, D

    2009-12-01

    Rhythm- and rate-control therapies are an essential part of atrial fibrillation (AF) management; however, the use of existing agents is often limited by the occurrence of adverse events. The aim of this study was to evaluate suspected adverse events and adverse event monitoring, and associated medical costs, in patients receiving AF rhythm-control and/or rate-control therapy. This retrospective cohort study used claims data from the Integrated Healthcare Information Systems National Managed Care Benchmark Database from 2002-2006. Patients hospitalized for AF (primary diagnosis), and who had at least 365 days' enrollment before and after the initial (index) AF hospitalization, were included in the analysis. Suspected AF therapy-related adverse events and function tests for adverse event monitoring were identified according to pre-specified diagnosis codes/procedures, and examined over the 12 months following discharge from the index hospitalization. Events/function tests had to have occurred within 90 days of a claim for AF therapy to be considered a suspected adverse event/adverse event monitoring. Of 4174 AF patients meeting the study criteria, 3323 received AF drugs; 428 received rhythm-control only (12.9%), 2130 rate-control only (64.1%), and 765 combined rhythm/rate-control therapy (23.0%). Overall, 50.1% of treated patients had a suspected adverse event and/or function test for adverse event monitoring (45.5% with rate-control, 53.5% with rhythm-control, and 61.2% with combined rhythm/rate-control). Suspected cardiovascular adverse events were the most common events (occurring in 36.1% of patients), followed by pulmonary (6.1%), and endocrine events (5.9%). Overall, suspected adverse events/function tests were associated with mean annual per-patient costs of $3089 ($1750 with rhythm-control, $2041 with rate control, and $6755 with combined rhythm/rate-control). As a retrospective analysis, the study is subject to potential selection bias, while its reliance on

  1. Pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Newman, G.E.; Perlmutt, L.M.; Braun, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common medical problem whose incidence is likely to increase in our aging population. Although it is life-threatening, effective therapy exists. The treatment is not, however, without significant complications. Thus, accurate diagnosis is important. Unfortunately, the clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism are nonspecific. Furthermore, in many patients the symptoms of an acute embolism are superimposed on underlying chronic heart or lung disease. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed to identify pulmonary emboli. Laboratory parameters, including arterial oxygen tensions and electrocardiography, are as nonspecific as the clinical signs. They may be more useful in excluding another process than in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The first radiologic examination is the chest radiograph, but the clinical symptoms are frequently out of proportion to the findings on the chest films. Classic manifestations of pulmonary embolism on the chest radiograph include a wedge-shaped peripheral opacity and a segmental or lobar diminution in vascularity with prominent central arteries. However, these findings are not commonly seen and, even when present, are not specific. Even less specific findings include cardiomegaly, pulmonary infiltrate, elevation of a hemidiaphragm, and pleural effusion. Many patients with pulmonary embolism may have a normal chest radiograph. The chest radiograph is essential, however, for two purposes. First, it may identify another cause of the patient's symptoms, such as a rib fracture, dissecting aortic aneurysm, or pneumothorax. Second, a chest radiograph is essential to interpretation of the radionuclide V/Q scan. The perfusion scan accurately reflects the perfusion of the lung. However, a perfusion defect may result from a variety of etiologies. Any process such as vascular stenosis or compression by tumor may restrict blood flow. 84 references.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in infancy.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2013-11-01

    Normal pulmonary vascular development in infancy requires maintenance of low pulmonary vascular resistance after birth, and is necessary for normal lung function and growth. The developing lung is subject to multiple genetic, pathological and/or environmental influences that can adversely affect lung adaptation, development, and growth, leading to pulmonary hypertension. New classifications of pulmonary hypertension are beginning to account for these diverse phenotypes, and or pulmonary hypertension in infants due to PPHN, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with PPHN are directed at selective reduction of PVR, and take advantage of a rapidly advancing understanding of the altered signaling pathways in the remodeled vasculature.

  3. Real-time pulmonary graphics.

    PubMed

    Mammel, Mark C; Donn, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Real-time pulmonary graphics now enable clinicians to view lung mechanics and patient-ventilator interactions on a breath-to-breath basis. Displays of pressure, volume, and flow waveforms, pressure-volume and flow-volume loops, and trend screens enable clinicians to customize ventilator settings based on the underlying pathophysiology and responses of the individual patient. This article reviews the basic concepts of pulmonary graphics and demonstrates how they contribute to our understanding of respiratory physiology and the management of neonatal respiratory failure.

  4. Pulmonary Cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Sorrell, T C; Chen, S C-A

    2015-10-01

    Inhalation of Cryptococcus into the respiratory system is the main route of acquisition of human infection, yet pulmonary cryptococcosis goes mostly unrecognized by many clinicians. This delay in diagnosis, or misdiagnosis, of lung infections is due in part to frequently subtle clinical manifestations such as a subacute or chronic cough, a broad differential of diagnostic possibilities for associated pulmonary masses (cryptococcomas) and, on occasion, negative respiratory tract cultures. Hematogenous dissemination from the lung can result in protean manifestations, the most severe of which is meningoencephalitis. There are few clinical studies of pulmonary cryptococcosis and its pathogenesis is poorly understood. The main purpose of this review is to describe the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pulmonary cryptococcosis to increase clinician's awareness of this diagnostic possibility and to enhance clinical management. Useful pointers to the approach and management of pulmonary cryptococcosis and the implications of disseminated disease are included, together with recommendations for future research. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Physiological Waterfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, David E.

    1976-01-01

    Provides background information, defining areas within organ systems where physiological waterfalls exist. Describes pressure-flow relationships of elastic tubes (blood vessels, airways, renal tubules, various ducts). (CS)

  6. Physiological Waterfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, David E.

    1976-01-01

    Provides background information, defining areas within organ systems where physiological waterfalls exist. Describes pressure-flow relationships of elastic tubes (blood vessels, airways, renal tubules, various ducts). (CS)

  7. Physiology in microgravity.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    2000-07-01

    Studies of physiology in microgravity are remarkably recent, with almost all the data being obtained in the past 40 years. The first human spaceflight did not take place until 1961. Physiological measurements in connection with the early flights were crude, but, in the past 10 years, an enormous amount of new information has been obtained from experiments on Spacelab. The United States and Soviet/Russian programs have pursued different routes. The US has mainly concentrated on relatively short flights but with highly sophisticated equipment such as is available in Spacelab. In contrast, the Soviet/Russian program concentrated on first the Salyut and then the Mir space stations. These had the advantage of providing information about long-term exposure to microgravity, but the degree of sophistication of the measurements in space was less. It is hoped that the International Space Station will combine the best of both approaches. The most important physiological changes caused by microgravity include bone demineralization, skeletal muscle atrophy, vestibular problems causing space motion sickness, cardiovascular problems resulting in postflight orthostatic intolerance, and reductions in plasma volume and red cell mass. Pulmonary function is greatly altered but apparently not seriously impaired. Space exploration is a new frontier with long-term missions to the moon and Mars not far away. Understanding the physiological changes caused by long-duration microgravity remains a daunting challenge.

  8. Physiological Networks: towards systems physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-02-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate new dimensions to the field of systems physiology.

  9. Clinical characteristics of pulmonary embolism with concomitant pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung-Ick; Choi, Keum-Ju; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-04-01

    Although pneumonia is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, patients with pulmonary embolism and concomitant pneumonia are uncommon. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical features of pulmonary embolism with coexisting pneumonia. We retrospectively compared clinical, radiologic and laboratory parameters between patients with pulmonary embolism and concomitant pneumonia (pneumonia group) and those with unprovoked pulmonary embolism (unprovoked group), and then between the pneumonia group and those with pulmonary infarction (infarction group). Of 794 patients with pulmonary embolism, 36 (5%) had coexisting pneumonia and six (1%) had no provoking factor other than pneumonia. Stroke was significantly more common in the pneumonia group, than either the unprovoked group or the infarction group. In the pneumonia group, fever was significantly more common and serum C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher. By contrast, central pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dilation on computed tomography were significantly less frequent in the pneumonia group. In addition, an adverse outcome due to pulmonary embolism was less common in the pneumonia group than in either of the other two groups. The coexistence of pulmonary embolism and pneumonia is rarely encountered in clinical practice, especially without the presence of other factors that could provoke venous thromboembolism and is commonly associated with stroke. It is characterized by lower incidences of central pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dilation and by a lower rate of adverse outcomes due to pulmonary embolism itself.

  10. Rowing Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  11. Faces of adversity.

    PubMed

    Bunkers, Sandra Schmidt

    2008-04-01

    This column introduces ideas for a nursing curriculum addressing living with adversity. The question is posed: How do we educate professional nurses to be with others in compassionate and helpful ways at times of calamitous or disastrous experiences? To answer this question the following possibilities for curriculum development are presented: (a) undergird nursing knowledge with value-laden nursing theory, (b) provide "away experiences" for both undergraduate and graduate students in nursing; (c) include theoretical literature on adversity in the curriculum; and (d) develop programs of research addressing phenomena of health experienced by those living with adversity. The column concludes with a personal story of an "away experience" by Vickie Britson.

  12. Intimate Partner Violence, PTSD, and Adverse Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Mary Ann; Green, Bonnie L.; Kaltman, Stacey I.; Roesch, Darren M.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Krause, Elizabeth D.

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of adverse health outcomes related to intimate partner violence (IPV) is well documented. Yet we know little about the pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Research concerning the psychological, biological, neurological, behavioral, and physiological alterations following exposure to IPV--many of which are associated…

  13. Intimate Partner Violence, PTSD, and Adverse Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Mary Ann; Green, Bonnie L.; Kaltman, Stacey I.; Roesch, Darren M.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Krause, Elizabeth D.

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of adverse health outcomes related to intimate partner violence (IPV) is well documented. Yet we know little about the pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Research concerning the psychological, biological, neurological, behavioral, and physiological alterations following exposure to IPV--many of which are associated…

  14. Treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Amy; Tulloh, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension was once thought to be a rare condition and only managed in specialized centers. Now however, with the advent of echocardiography, it is found in many clinical scenarios, in the neonate with chronic lung disease, in the acute setting in the intensive care unit, in connective tissue disease and in cardiology pre- and postoperatively. We have a better understanding of the pathological process and have a range of medication which is starting to be able to palliate this previously fatal condition. This review describes the areas that are known in this condition and those that are less familiar. The basic physiology behind pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular disease is explained. The histopathologic process and the various diagnostic tools are described and are followed by the current and future therapy at our disposal. PMID:19554091

  15. Developments in pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted therapy for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hadinnapola, Charaka; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare disease characterised by the presence of organised chronic thromboembolic material occluding the proximal pulmonary arteries and a vasculopathy in the distal pulmonary arterial tree. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a potential cure for many patients with CTEPH. However, PEA is not suitable for patients with a significant distal distribution of chronic thromboembolic material or with significant comorbidities. Also, a proportion of patients are left with residual CTEPH post PEA. Until recently, pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted therapies have been used off licence to treat patients with inoperable or residual CTEPH. The CHEST1 study investigated the use of riociguat and was the first randomised controlled trial to show efficacy in inoperable or residual CTEPH. In this review, we explore the pathophysiology of CTEPH and review the current trial evidence for pulmonary arterial hypertension-targeted therapies. We also include a discussion of physiological considerations that require further investigation.

  16. [Sildenafil as a substitute for subcutaneous prostacyclin in pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Cea-Calvo, L; Escribano Subías, P; Tello de Menesses, R; Gómez Sánchez, M A; Delgado Jiménez, J F; Sáenz de la Calzada, C

    2003-10-01

    Subcutaneous prostacyclin (treprostinil) is an effective short-term treatment for pulmonary hypertension. The most frequently described adverse effect-pain in the area of injection-rarely requires that treatment be withdrawn. Sildenafil is a selective fosfodiesterase-5 inhibitor with pulmonary vasodilating effects. We describe the use of sildenafil as a substitute for treprostinil in a patient with pulmonary hypertension associated with lupus erythematosus. Treatment with treprostinil was discontinued due to uncontrollable abdominal pain.

  17. Physiology of the fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kiserud, Torvid

    2005-12-01

    Our understanding of fetal circulatory physiology is based on experimental animal data, and this continues to be an important source of new insight into developmental mechanisms. A growing number of human studies have investigated the human physiology, with results that are similar but not identical to those from animal studies. It is time to appreciate these differences and base more of our clinical approach on human physiology. Accordingly, the present review focuses on distributional patterns and adaptational mechanisms that were mainly discovered by human studies. These include cardiac output, pulmonary and placental circulation, fetal brain and liver, venous return to the heart, and the fetal shunts (ductus venosus, foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus). Placental compromise induces a set of adaptational and compensational mechanisms reflecting the plasticity of the developing circulation, with both short- and long-term implications. Some of these aspects have become part of the clinical physiology of today with consequences for surveillance and treatment.

  18. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  19. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  20. Riociguat for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hambly, Nathan; Granton, John

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical signaling molecule in the pulmonary vasculature. NO activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) resulting in the synthesis of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) - a key mediator of pulmonary artery vasodilatation that may also inhibit smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Pulmonary hypertension, a serious, progressive and often fatal disease is characterized by NO-sGC-sGMP pathway dysregulation. Riociguat is a member of a novel therapeutic class known as soluble guanylate stimulators. Riociguat has a dual mode of action, acting in synergy with endogenous NO and also directly stimulating sGC independently of NO availability. Phase 3 randomized control trials have demonstrated that riociguat improves clinical, physiologic and hemodynamic parameters in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. In this review we will discuss the pharmacologic properties of riociguat and its appropriate implementation into clinical practice.

  1. Physiological and behavioral responses of sheep to gaseous ammonia.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C J C; Pines, M K; Latter, M; Muller, T; Petherick, J C; Norman, S T; Gaughan, J B

    2012-05-01

    Ammonia can accumulate in highly stocked sheep accommodation, for example during live export shipments, and could affect sheep health and welfare. Thus, the objective of this experiment was to test the effects of 4 NH(3) concentrations, 4 (control), 12, 21, and 34 mg/m(3), on the physiology and behavior of wether sheep. Sheep were held for 12 d under a micro-climate and stocking density similar to shipboard conditions recorded on voyages from Australia to the Middle East during the northern hemispheric summer. Ammonia increased macrophage activity in transtracheal aspirations, indicating active pulmonary inflammation; however, it had no effect (P > 0.05) on hematological variables. Feed intake decreased (P = 0.002) in proportion to ammonia concentration, and BW gain decreased (P < 0.001) at the 2 greatest concentrations. Exposure to ammonia increased (P = 0.03) the frequency of sneezing, and at the greatest ammonia concentration, sheep were less active, with less locomotion, pawing, and panting. Twenty-eight days after exposure to NH(3), the pulmonary macrophage activity and BW of the sheep returned to that of sheep exposed to only 4 mg/m(3). It was concluded that NH(3) induced a temporary inflammatory response of the respiratory system and reduced BW gain, which together indicated a transitory adverse effect on the welfare of sheep.

  2. An integrated physiology model to study regional lung damage effects and the physiologic response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This work expands upon a previously developed exercise dynamic physiology model (DPM) with the addition of an anatomic pulmonary system in order to quantify the impact of lung damage on oxygen transport and physical performance decrement. Methods A pulmonary model is derived with an anatomic structure based on morphometric measurements, accounting for heterogeneous ventilation and perfusion observed experimentally. The model is incorporated into an existing exercise physiology model; the combined system is validated using human exercise data. Pulmonary damage from blast, blunt trauma, and chemical injury is quantified in the model based on lung fluid infiltration (edema) which reduces oxygen delivery to the blood. The pulmonary damage component is derived and calibrated based on published animal experiments; scaling laws are used to predict the human response to lung injury in terms of physical performance decrement. Results The augmented dynamic physiology model (DPM) accurately predicted the human response to hypoxia, altitude, and exercise observed experimentally. The pulmonary damage parameters (shunt and diffusing capacity reduction) were fit to experimental animal data obtained in blast, blunt trauma, and chemical damage studies which link lung damage to lung weight change; the model is able to predict the reduced oxygen delivery in damage conditions. The model accurately estimates physical performance reduction with pulmonary damage. Conclusions We have developed a physiologically-based mathematical model to predict performance decrement endpoints in the presence of thoracic damage; simulations can be extended to estimate human performance and escape in extreme situations. PMID:25044032

  3. Pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic obstructive lung disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Adir, Yochai; Harari, Sergio

    2014-09-01

    Severe pulmonary hypertension worsens the prognosis of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). With the aim of better understanding the pathogenesis of this event and identifying the possible targets for therapeutic intervention, a great deal of clinical and translational research is now focused on this relevant field of medicine. Some studies that were published last year have helped to better define the clinical and physiological profiles of patients with COPD or IPF and severe pulmonary hypertension. The importance of pulmonary rehabilitation was confirmed, particularly in patients with pulmonary hypertension associated with IPF. Information on the use of drugs approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension is still very limited, because of some limitations and selection biases in the studies' design. New strategies (i.e. the use of fasudil or sepiapterin in pulmonary hypertension associated with IPF) have been evaluated in animal models. Pulmonary hypertension in COPD or IPF may range from mild to severe. When pulmonary hypertension is more advanced, it can drive a poor outcome. Therefore, future studies should focus on this subset.

  4. Biophysical influence of airborne carbon nanomaterials on natural pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Valle, Russell P; Wu, Tony; Zuo, Yi Y

    2015-05-26

    Inhalation of nanoparticles (NP), including lightweight airborne carbonaceous nanomaterials (CNM), poses a direct and systemic health threat to those who handle them. Inhaled NP penetrate deep pulmonary structures in which they first interact with the pulmonary surfactant (PS) lining at the alveolar air-water interface. In spite of many research efforts, there is a gap of knowledge between in vitro biophysical study and in vivo inhalation toxicology since all existing biophysical models handle NP-PS interactions in the liquid phase. This technical limitation, inherent in current in vitro methodologies, makes it impossible to simulate how airborne NP deposit at the PS film and interact with it. Existing in vitro NP-PS studies using liquid-suspended particles have been shown to artificially inflate the no-observed adverse effect level of NP exposure when compared to in vivo inhalation studies and international occupational exposure limits (OELs). Here, we developed an in vitro methodology called the constrained drop surfactometer (CDS) to quantitatively study PS inhibition by airborne CNM. We show that airborne multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets induce a concentration-dependent PS inhibition under physiologically relevant conditions. The CNM aerosol concentrations controlled in the CDS are comparable to those defined in international OELs. Development of the CDS has the potential to advance our understanding of how submicron airborne nanomaterials affect the PS lining of the lung.

  5. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

  6. Adverse Events of Monoclonal Antibodies Used for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  7. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  8. Pulmonary veins in the normal lung and pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, James M; Bethea, Brian; Liu, Xiang; Gandjeva, Aneta; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Stacher, Elvira; Gandjeva, Marina R; Parish, Elisabeth; Perez, Mario; Smith, Lynelle; Graham, Brian B; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Tuder, Rubin M

    2013-11-15

    Despite the importance of pulmonary veins in normal lung physiology and the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD), pulmonary veins remain largely understudied. Difficult to identify histologically, lung venous endothelium or smooth muscle cells display no unique characteristic functional and structural markers that distinguish them from pulmonary arteries. To address these challenges, we undertook a search for unique molecular markers in pulmonary veins. In addition, we addressed the expression pattern of a candidate molecular marker and analyzed the structural pattern of vascular remodeling of pulmonary veins in a rodent model of PH-LHD and in lung tissue of patients with PH-LHD obtained at time of placement on a left ventricular assist device. We detected urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression preferentially in normal pulmonary veins of mice, rats, and human lungs. Expression of uPAR remained elevated in pulmonary veins of rats with PH-LHD; however, we also detected induction of uPAR expression in remodeled pulmonary arteries. These findings were validated in lungs of patients with PH-LHD. In selected patients with sequential lung biopsy at the time of removal of the left ventricular assist device, we present early data suggesting improvement in pulmonary hemodynamics and venous remodeling, indicating potential regression of venous remodeling in response to assist device treatment. Our data indicate that remodeling of pulmonary veins is an integral part of PH-LHD and that pulmonary veins share some key features present in remodeled yet not normotensive pulmonary arteries.

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  10. Pulmonary mass and multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung neoplasm as amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, J L.; García-Nieto, J C.; Ballesta, F; Prieto, E; Villanueva, M A.; Gallardo, J

    2001-07-01

    Amiodarone is an effective anti-arrhythmic agent. However, during long-term therapy, patients can develop severe adverse pulmonary reactions that are potentially life-threatening. A case of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity is presented in a 78-year-old woman. She developed dyspnea and a pulmonary mass with associated multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung cancer following 5 years of treatment with amiodarone for atrial fibrillation. After drug withdrawal, and without any additional treatment, clinical and radiological improvement was observed, and radiological findings resolved completely within 6 months.

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary hypertension usually limit a person’s ability to exercise and do other activities. CausesWhat causes pulmonary hypertension?Many things can cause pulmonary hypertension. However, sometimes ...

  12. Pulmonary hypertension: a review of pathophysiology and anesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a condition that can result in serious complications in patients undergoing any type of anesthesia during the perioperative period. By definition, pulmonary artery hypertension is caused by a persistent rise in mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg with Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mm Hg or exercise mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥35 mm Hg and pulmonary vascular resistance ≥ 3 wood unit's. The severity of the complications depends on the severity of the underlying condition, other comorbidities, and type of procedure, anesthetic technique, and anesthetic drugs. In this article, we briefly review the pulmonary vascular physiology, pathophysiology of the disease, clinical assessment and diagnosis, treatment options, and the anesthetic management of these patients.

  13. Is non-thyroidal illness syndrome a predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Zehra; Kirakli, Cenk; Cimen, Pınar; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Talay, Fahrettin; Tibet, Gultekin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered to be associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we evaluated the association between NTIS and prolonged weaning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients admitted to the ICU. Materials and methods: In total, 125 patients with COPD admitted to our ICU who underwent invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) were enrolled. We collected each patient’s baseline characteristics including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, body mass index (BMI), and thyroid hormones 24 h after ICU admission. The presence of pulmonary infection was also recorded. The primary outcome was prolonged weaning, defined as patients who failed at least three weaning attempts or required > 7 days of weaning after the first spontaneous breathing trial. Results: Of the 127 patients studied, 64 had normal thyroid function tests and 61 had NTIS. Patients with NTIS had significantly higher APACHE II scores, prolonged weaning, and pulmonary infection. Patients with NTIS had a higher risk for prolonged weaning (odds ratio, OR = 3.21; 95% CI = 1.31-7.83).The presence of pulmonary infection was also an independent risk factors for prolonged weaning. Conclusions: NTIS may be an independent predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated COPD patients. PMID:26309710

  14. Is non-thyroidal illness syndrome a predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients?

    PubMed

    Yasar, Zehra; Kirakli, Cenk; Cimen, Pınar; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Talay, Fahrettin; Tibet, Gultekin

    2015-01-01

    Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered to be associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we evaluated the association between NTIS and prolonged weaning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients admitted to the ICU. In total, 125 patients with COPD admitted to our ICU who underwent invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) were enrolled. We collected each patient's baseline characteristics including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, body mass index (BMI), and thyroid hormones 24 h after ICU admission. The presence of pulmonary infection was also recorded. The primary outcome was prolonged weaning, defined as patients who failed at least three weaning attempts or required > 7 days of weaning after the first spontaneous breathing trial. Of the 127 patients studied, 64 had normal thyroid function tests and 61 had NTIS. Patients with NTIS had significantly higher APACHE II scores, prolonged weaning, and pulmonary infection. Patients with NTIS had a higher risk for prolonged weaning (odds ratio, OR = 3.21; 95% CI = 1.31-7.83).The presence of pulmonary infection was also an independent risk factors for prolonged weaning. NTIS may be an independent predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated COPD patients.

  15. Pulmonary vasodilation in acute and chronic heart failure: empiricism and evidence.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in heart failure is associated with exercise intolerance and adverse outcomes. With the availability of multiple drugs that cause pulmonary vasodilation and decrease pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary hypertension becomes an attractive therapeutic target. Out of several classes of medications, oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors emerge as the most promising in terms of symptomatic improvement, hemodynamic benefits, reverse cardiac remodeling, and functional capacity. Future trials will show whether the use of these drugs translates to decreased morbidity and mortality in heart failure.

  16. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  17. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  18. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines

  20. Pulmonary function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report the successful collection of a large quantity of human resting pulmonary function data on the SLS-1 mission. Preliminary analysis suggests that cardiac stroke volumes are high on orbit, and that an adaptive reduction takes at least several days, and in fact may still be in progress after 9 days on orbit. It also suggests that pulmonary capillary blood volumes are high, and remain high on orbit, but that the pulmonary interstitium is not significantly impacted. The data further suggest that the known large gravitational gradients of lung function have only a modest influence on single breath tests such as the SBN washout. They account for only approximately 25% of the phase III slope of nitrogen, on vital capacity SBN washouts. These gradients are only a moderate source of the cardiogenic oscillations seen in argon (bolus gas) and nitrogen (resident gas), on such tests. They may have a greater role in generating the normal CO2 oscillations, as here the phase relationship to argon and nitrogen reverses in microgravity, at least at mid exhalation in those subjects studied to date. Microgravity may become a useful tool in establishing the nature of the non-gravitational mechanisms that can now be seen to play such a large part in the generation of intra-breath gradients and oscillations of expired gas concentration. Analysis of microgravity multibreath nitrogen washouts, single breath washouts from more physiological pre-inspiratory volumes, both using our existing SLS-1 data, and data from the upcoming D-2 and SLS-2 missions, should be very fruitful in this regard.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K

    2013-02-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines

  2. Moderate altitude is not associated with adverse postoperative outcomes for patients undergoing bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis and Fontan operation: a comparative study among Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Malhotra, Sunil P; Yu, Xiaoyang; Rutledge, Jennifer; Rebeyka, Ivan M; Ross, David B; Rausch, Christopher; Gu, Hong; McCrindle, Brian; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Ivy, Dunbar; Li, Jia

    2013-11-01

    Outcomes of patients with single ventricle physiology undergoing cavopulmonary palliations depend on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and have been suggested to be adversely affected by living at elevated altitude. We compared the pulmonary hemodynamic data in correlation with postoperative outcomes at the 3 centers of Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto at altitudes of 1604, 668, and 103 meters, respectively. Hemodynamic data at pre-bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis (BCPA) and pre-Fontan catheterization between 1995 and 2007 were collected. Death from cardiac failure or heart transplantation in the same period was used to define palliation failure. There was no significant correlation between altitude (ranged from 1 to 2572 meters) and PVR, pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) or transpulmonary gradient (TPG) at pre-BCPA and pre-Fontan catheterization. BCPA failure occurred in 11 (9.2%) patients in Denver, 3 (2.9%) in Edmonton, and 34 (11.9%) in Toronto. Fontan failure occurred in 3 (6.1%) patients in Denver, 5 (7.2%) in Edmonton, and 11 (7.0%) in Toronto. There was no significant difference in BCPA and Fontan failure among the 3 centers. BCPA failure positively correlated with PVR and the presence of a right ventricle as the systemic ventricle. Fontan failure positively correlated with PAP and TPG. Moderate altitude is not associated with an increased PVR or adverse outcomes in patients with a functional single ventricle undergoing BCPA and the Fontan operation. The risk factors for palliation failure are higher PVR, PAP, and TPG and a systemic right ventricle, but not altitude. Our study reemphasizes the importance of cardiac catheterization assessments of pulmonary hemodynamics before BCPA and Fontan operations. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Moderate altitude is not associated with adverse postoperative outcomes for patients undergoing bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis and Fontan operation: A comparative study among Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi; Malhotra, Sunil P.; Yu, Xiaoyang; Rutledge, Jennifer; Rebeyka, Ivan M.; Ross, David B.; Rausch, Christopher; Gu, Hong; McCrindle, Brian; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Ivy, Dunbar; Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Objective Outcomes of patients with single ventricle physiology undergoing cavopulmonary palliations depend on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and have been suggested to be adversely affected by living at elevated altitude. We compared the pulmonary hemodynamic data in correlation with postoperative outcomes at the 3 centers of Denver, Edmonton, and Toronto at altitudes of 1604, 668, and 103 meters, respectively. Methods Hemodynamic data at pre-bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis (BCPA) and pre-Fontan catheterization between 1995 and 2007 were collected. Death from cardiac failure or heart transplantation in the same period was used to define palliation failure. Results There was no significant correlation between altitude (ranged from 1 to 2572 meters) and PVR, pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) or transpulmonary gradient (TPG) at pre-BCPA and pre-Fontan catheterization. BCPA failure occurred in 11 (9.2%) patients in Denver, 3 (2.9%) in Edmonton, and 34 (11.9%) in Toronto. Fontan failure occurred in 3 (6.1%) patients in Denver, 5 (7.2%) in Edmonton, and 11 (7.0%) in Toronto. There was no significant difference in BCPA and Fontan failure among the 3 centers. BCPA failure positively correlated with PVR and the presence of a right ventricle as the systemic ventricle. Fontan failure positively correlated with PAP and TPG. Conclusions Moderate altitude is not associated with an increased PVR or adverse outcomes in patients with a functional single ventricle undergoing BCPA and the Fontan operation. The risk factors for palliation failure are higher PVR, PAP, and TPG and a systemic right ventricle, but not altitude. Our study reemphasizes the importance of cardiac catheterization assessments of pulmonary hemodynamics before BCPA and Fontan operations. PMID:23353110

  4. Pulmonary function in acromegaly.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C C; Hipkin, L J; Murray, G M

    1977-01-01

    The lung volumes of 12 female and eight male patients with acromegaly, chosen because of the absence of associated cardiorespiratory disease, were determined physiologically and radiographically. Enlarged lung volumes were found in half the males but in none of the females, due allowance being made for the presence of a significant thoracic kyphosis. Upper airway narrowing was suggested by an increase in the expiratory-inspiratory flow rate ratio in six patients, four of whom were male, and acromegaly of the larynx was confirmed in the three subjects who consented to laryngoscopy. Upper airway obstruction is more likely to account for respiratory death in acromegaly than disordered pulmonary function in enlarged acromegalic lungs. Neither of these respiratory findings could be correlated with the fasting level of growth hormone but there was a suggestion that they were more likely to occur when the duration of the disorder was longer. PMID:882947

  5. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gökhan; Ciledağ, Aydin; Yüksel, Cabir; Yenigün, Bülent Mustafa; Kutlay, Hakan; Yazicıoğlu, Levent; Perçinel, Sibel; Kaya, Akin

    2011-01-01

    A 30 years old male patient was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism due to thorax-computerized tomography (CT) angiography, revealing a thrombus totally occluding left main pulmonary artery. The lesion was evaluated as tumoural mass. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed pathologic uptake at pulmonary artery mass. Due to localization of tumour, left pneumonectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis revealed to be pulmonary artery sarcoma. The patient was presented because pulmonary artery sarcomas are very rare tumors and can mimick pulmonary thromboembolism. The true prevalence is underestimated as many pulmonary artery sarcomas are misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. PET-CT may help to make a differential diagnosis.

  6. Prolonged elevated heart rate is a risk factor for adverse cardiac events and poor outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J Michael; Crimmins, Michael; Lantigua, Hector; Fernandez, Andres; Zammit, Chris; Falo, Cristina; Agarwal, Sachin; Claassen, Jan; Mayer, Stephan A

    2014-06-01

    Sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity is common after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We sought to determine whether uncontrolled prolonged heart rate elevation is a risk factor for adverse cardiopulmonary events and poor outcome after SAH. We prospectively studied 447 SAH patients between March 2006 and April 2012. Prior studies define prolonged elevated heart rate (PEHR) as heart rate >95 beats/min for >12 h. Major adverse cardiopulmonary events were documented according to the predefined criteria. Global outcome at 3 months was assessed with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). 175 (39 %) patients experienced PEHR. Nonwhite race/ethnicity, admission Hunt-Hess grade ≥4, elevated APACHE-2 physiological subscore, and modified Fisher score were significant admission predictors of PEHR, whereas documented pre-hospital beta-blocker use was protective. After controlling for admission Hunt-Hess grade, Cox regression using time-lagged covariates revealed that PEHR onset in the previous 48 h was associated with an increased hazard for delayed cerebral ischemia, myocardial injury, and pulmonary edema. PEHR was associated with 3-month poor outcome (mRS 4-6) after controlling for known predictors. PEHR is associated with major adverse cardiopulmonary events and poor outcome after SAH. Further study is warranted to determine if early sympatholytic therapy targeted at sustained heart rate control can improve outcome after SAH.

  7. Reproductive physiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Russman, S.E.; Ellis, David H.; Gee, George F.; Mirande, Claire M.

    1996-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the general pattern of avian physiology applies to cranes, we have identified many physiological mechanisms (e.g., effects of disturbance) that need further study. Studies with cranes are expensive compared to those done with domestic fowl because of the crane's larger size, low reproductive rate, and delayed sexual maturity. To summarize, the crane reproductive system is composed of physiological and anatomical elements whose function is controlled by an integrated neural-endocrine system. Males generally produce semen at a younger age than when females lay eggs. Eggs are laid in clutches of two (1 to 3), and females will lay additional clutches if the preceding clutches are removed. Both sexes build nests and incubate the eggs. Molt begins during incubation and body molt may be completed annually in breeding pairs. However, remiges are replaced sequentially over 2 to 3 years, or abruptly every 2 to 3 years in other species. Most immature birds replace their juvenal remiges over a 2 to 3 year period. Stress interferes with reproduction in cranes by reducing egg production or terminating the reproductive effort. In other birds, stress elevates corticosterone levels and decreases LHRH release. We know little about the physiological response of cranes to stress.

  8. [Pulmonary strongyloidiasis].

    PubMed

    Lozada, Heiler; Daza, Jorge E

    2016-10-01

    Strongyloidiasis is an infection caused by the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis, which can be asymptomatic and means a high morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts, severe malnutrition and coinfection with HTLV-1 virus. The parasite has the potential to produce and multiply internal autoinfection in humans, thus an hyperinfection can be developed. A case of pulmonary infection by this parasite is presented in this study, infection which advanced into a respiratory failure and required mechanical ventilation and hemodynamic support in an intensive care unit. The standard treatment combined with ivermectin and albendazole was provided, achieving an appropriate response.

  9. TRP channels and traffic-related environmental pollution-induced pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Akopian, Armen N.; Fanick, E. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutant exposures are major risk factors for adverse health outcomes, with increased morbidity and mortality in humans. Diesel exhaust (DE) is one of the major harmful components of traffic-related air pollution. Exposure to DE affects several physiological systems, including the airways, and pulmonary diseases are increased in highly populated urban areas. Hence, there are urgent needs to (1) create newer and lesser polluting fuels, (2) improve exhaust aftertreatments and reduce emissions, and (3) understand mechanisms of actions for toxic effects of both conventional and cleaner diesel fuels on the lungs. These steps could aid the development of diagnostics and interventions to prevent the negative impact of traffic-related air pollution on the pulmonary system. Exhaust from conventional, and to a lesser extent, clean fuels, contains particulate matter (PM) and more than 400 additional chemical constituents. The major toxic constituents are nitrogen oxides (NOx) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PM and PAHs could potentially act via transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. In this review, we will first discuss the associations between DE from conventional as well as clean fuel technologies and acute and chronic airway inflammation. We will then review possible activation and/or potentiation of TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels by PM and PAHs. Finally, we will discuss and summarize recent findings on the mechanisms whereby TRPs could control the link between DE and airway inflammation, which is a primary determinant leading to pulmonary disease. PMID:26837756

  10. [Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis with dendriform pulmonary ossification].

    PubMed

    Barrera, Ana Madeleine; Vargas, Leslie

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary ossification is a rare and usually asymptomatic finding reported as incidental in lung biopsies. Similarly, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a rare cause of pulmonary infiltrates. We report the case of a 64-year old man with chronic respiratory symptoms in whom these two histopathological findings converged.

  11. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  12. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection to the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Wyttenbach, Marina; Carrel, Thierry; Schuepbach, Peter; Tschaeppeler, Heinz; Triller, Juergen

    1996-03-15

    Anomalous pulmonary venous return represents a rare congenital anomaly with wide anatomic and physiologic variability. We report a case of a newborn with a rare form of total infracardiac anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC). The pulmonary veins draining both lungs formed two vertical veins, which joined to a common pulmonary trunk below the diaphragm. This venous channel connected to the portal vein through the esophageal hiatus. The diagnosis was suggested by color Doppler sonography and confirmed by intravenous digital subtraction angiography, which allowed definition of the anatomy.

  13. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty for inoperable patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: the initial German experience.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Karen M; Wiedenroth, Christoph B; Kamp, Jan-Christopher; Breithecker, Andreas; Fuge, Jan; Krombach, Gabriele A; Haas, Moritz; Hamm, Christian; Kramm, Thorsten; Guth, Stefan; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Hinrichs, Jan B; Cebotari, Serghei; Meyer, Katrin; Hoeper, Marius M; Mayer, Eckhard; Liebetrau, Christoph; Meyer, Bernhard C

    2017-06-01

    Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA) is an emerging treatment for patients with inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).We report on a prospective series of 56 consecutive patients who underwent 266 BPA interventions (median, five per patient) at two German institutions. All patients underwent a comprehensive diagnostic work-up including right heart catheterisation at baseline and 24 weeks after their last intervention.BPA resulted in improvements in WHO functional class, 6 min walk distance (mean change, +33 m), right ventricular function and haemodynamics, including a decline in mean pulmonary artery pressure by 18% and in pulmonary vascular resistance by 26%. Procedure-related adverse events occurred in 9.4% of the interventions. The most common complications were related to pulmonary vascular injury and consecutive pulmonary bleeding. Most of these events were asymptomatic and self-limiting, but one patient died from pulmonary bleeding, resulting in a mortality rate of 1.8%.BPA resulted in haemodynamic and clinical improvements but was also associated with a considerable number of complications, including one fatal pulmonary bleeding. As the effects of BPA on survival are unknown, randomised controlled outcome trials comparing BPA with approved medical therapies in patients with inoperable CTEPH are required to allow for appropriate risk-benefit assessments. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  14. Postoperative Acute Pulmonary Embolism Following Pulmonary Resections.

    PubMed

    Shonyela, Felix Samuel; Yang, Shuangqiang; Liu, Bo; Jiao, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections is highly fatal complication. Many literatures have documented cancer to be the highest risk factor for acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections. Early diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism is highly recommended and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography is the gold standard in diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic therapy have shown a great success in treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. Surgical therapies (embolectomy and inferior vena cava filter replacement) proved to be lifesaving but many literatures favored medical therapy as the first choice. Prophylaxis pre and post operation is highly recommended, because there were statistical significant results in different studies which supported the use of prophylaxis in prevention of acute pulmonary embolism. Having reviewed satisfactory number of literatures, it is suggested that thoroughly preoperative assessment of patient conditions, determining their risk factors complicating to pulmonary embolism and the use of appropriate prophylaxis measures are the key options to the successful minimization or eradication of acute pulmonary embolism after lung resections.

  15. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schölzel, B E; Snijder, R J; Mager, J J; van Es, H W; Plokker, H W M; Reesink, H J; Morshuis, W J; Post, M C

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease is an important cause of severe pulmonary hypertension, and as such is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of this condition reflects the degree of associated right ventricular dysfunction, with predictable mortality related to the severity of the underlying pulmonary hypertension. Left untreated, the prognosis is poor. Pulmonary endarterectomy is the treatment of choice to relieve pulmonary artery obstruction in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and has been remarkably successful. Advances in surgical techniques along with the introduction of pulmonary hypertension-specific medication provide therapeutic options for the majority of patients afflicted with the disease. However, a substantial number of patients are not candidates for pulmonary endarterectomy due to either distal pulmonary vascular obstruction or significant comorbidities. Therefore, careful selection of surgical candidates in expert centres is paramount. The current review focuses on the diagnostic approach to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and the available surgical and medical therapeutic options.

  16. Pharmacotherapeutic management of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Fazzi, Piera

    2003-01-01

    Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment for sarcoidosis. Although the indications for medical therapy of sarcoidosis are controversial, standard therapy for symptomatic, progressive disease consists of corticosteroids. The British Thoracic Society concluded, with respect to systemic corticosteroids for the treatment of sarcoidosis, that some patients required no treatment, some required prednisone for control of symptoms, and others, with persistent disease, appeared to benefit from long-term corticosteroid therapy. Inhaled budesonide can be an effective treatment for lung sarcoidosis, with few adverse effects, when used in combination with oral systemic corticosteroids such as deflazacort administered in a tapered regimen for 6 months. A randomized controlled trial has also demonstrated the efficacy of 3 months of treatment with oral prednisolone in a tapered regimen followed by inhaled budesonide for 15 months in patients with early stage pulmonary sarcoidosis.Alternative drugs are required in chronic resistant sarcoidosis and/or in conditions where systemic corticosteroids are contraindicated. Immunosuppressive agents (chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cyclosporine, azathioprine), anticytokine agents (thalidomide, pentoxifylline), antimalarials (chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine), melatonin and monoclonal antibody (infliximab) have been used in such situations. Chlorambucil and cyclophosphamide have been used in anecdotal cases of pulmonary sarcoidosis as corticosteroid-sparing agents. However, their toxicity and neoplastic potential recommend prudence in patient selection. A comparison between combination therapy with cyclosporine and prednisone and prednisone alone has shown an increased prevalence of serious adverse effects with combined therapy with no between-group differences in treatment efficacy. The cost and toxicity of cyclosporine limit its use to patients in whom its efficacy has been proven. In patients with chronic or refractory

  17. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  18. Pulmonary Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary vasculitis describes a number of distinct disorders that are pathologically characterized by the destruction of blood vessels. The clinical manifestations of each disorder are defined by the size, type, and location of the affected vasculature. The clinical approach to these disorders rests upon an astute clinician considering the diagnosis and identifying the specific patterns of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and pathologic abnormalities. Lung involvement is most commonly seen with the primary, idiopathic, small-vessel, or antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated vasculitides; Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. However, primary, idiopathic medium and large-vessel vasculitis, primary immune complex–mediated vasculitis, and secondary vasculitis are all capable of presenting with lung involvement. In this article, we focus on the more common, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated disorder, vasculitides. PMID:16493151

  19. Pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tarbox, Abigail K.; Swaroop, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is responsible for approximately 100,000 to 200,000 deaths in the United States each year. With a diverse range of clinical presentations from asymptomatic to death, diagnosing PE can be challenging. Various resources are available, such as clinical scoring systems, laboratory data, and imaging studies which help guide clinicians in their work-up of PE. Prompt recognition and treatment are essential for minimizing the mortality and morbidity associated with PE. Advances in recognition and treatment have also enabled treatment of some patients in the home setting and limited the amount of time spent in the hospital. This article will review the risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of PE. PMID:23724389

  20. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  1. [Adverse reactions to vaccines].

    PubMed

    Eseverri, J L; Ranea, S; Marin, A

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reactions to vaccines are highly varied, ranging from mild local reactions to fatal outcomes. In the last few years many adverse reactions have been attributed to vaccines, often without justification. In agreement with the World Health Organization, these reactions can be classified as follows, depending on the cause: vaccination-induced reactions (due to an effect of the vaccine itself or to an idiosyncrasy); reactions due to errors in storage, manipulation and/or administration; and coincidental reactions (no causal relationship with the vaccine). Hypersensitivity reactions fall into six categories, depending on the causative agent: reactions due to some component of the infectious agent or one of its products; reactions due to adjuvants: aluminium hydroxide; reactions due to stabilizers: gelatin; reactions due to preservatives: thiomersal; reactions due to antibiotics: neomycin; and reactions due to a biological culture medium: chicken embryo cells. Allergic children should not be excluded from the normal vaccine calendar. Immunologically, allergic individuals are more susceptible to infection and to microbial and viral diseases, which often play an aggravating role. Rubella, whooping cough, and influenza usually exacerbate respiratory allergies. Non-vaccination carries a marked risk of contracting serious diseases such as poliomyelitis, tetanus, and diphtheria, etc. In a not too distant future, the techniques of genetic recombination and monoclonal antibody production will allow the creation of vaccines from organisms that cannot be cultivated in the laboratory or that produce small quantities of antigen. These techniques will also lead to identification of the antigens with the greatest immunogenic power and, consequently, to extremely pure vaccines. The adverse reactions to vaccines referred to our service account for between 0.59 % and 1.27 % of first visits in the last three years. We recorded a total of 48 adverse reactions to vaccines. Of

  2. Pulmonary function and fuel use: a population survey.

    PubMed

    Saha, Asim; Rao, N Mohan; Kulkarni, P K; Majumdar, P K; Saiyed, H N

    2005-10-31

    In the backdrop of conflicting reports (some studies reported adverse outcomes of biomass fuel use whereas few studies reported absence of any association between adverse health effect and fuel use, may be due to presence of large number of confounding variables) on the respiratory health effects of biomass fuel use, this cross sectional survey was undertaken to understand the role of fuel use on pulmonary function. This study was conducted in a village of western India involving 369 randomly selected adult subjects (165 male and 204 female). All the subjects were interviewed and were subjected to pulmonary function test. Analysis of covariance was performed to compare the levels of different pulmonary function test parameters in relation to different fuel use taking care of the role of possible confounding factors. This study showed that biomass fuel use (especially wood) is an important factor for deterioration of pulmonary function (particularly in female). FEV1 (p < .05), FEV1% (p < .01), PEFR (p < .05) and FEF(25-75) (p < .01) values were significantly lower in biomass fuel using females than nonusers. Comparison of only biomass fuel use vs. only LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) use and only wood vs. only LPG use has showed that LPG is a safer fuel so far as deterioration of pulmonary function is concerned. This study observes some deterioration of pulmonary function in the male subjects also, who came from biomass fuel using families. This study concluded that traditional biomass fuels like wood have adverse effects on pulmonary function.

  3. Inhaled Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nicholas S; Preston, Ioana R; Roberts, Kari E

    2015-06-01

    The inhaled route has a number of attractive features for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, including delivery of drug directly to the target organ, thus enhancing pulmonary specificity and reducing systemic adverse effects. It can also improve ventilation/perfusion matching by dilating vessels supplying ventilated regions, thus improving gas exchange. Furthermore, it can achieve higher local drug concentrations at a lower overall dose, potentially reducing drug cost. Accordingly, a number of inhaled agents have been developed to treat pulmonary hypertension. Most in current use are prostacyclins, including epoprostenol, which has been cleared for intravenous applications but is used off-label in acute care settings as a continuously nebulized medication. Aerosolized iloprost and treprostinil are both prostacyclins that have been cleared by the FDA to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both require frequent administration (6 and 4 times daily, respectively), and both have a tendency to cause airway symptoms, including cough and wheeze, which can lead to intolerance. These agents cannot be used to substitute for the infused routes of prostacyclin because they do not permit delivery of medication at high doses. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) is cleared for the treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension in newborns. It is also used off-label to test acute vasoreactivity in PAH during right-heart catheterization and to treat acute right-heart failure in hospitalized patients. In addition, some studies on long-term application of INO either have been recently completed with results pending or are under consideration. In the future, because of its inherent advantages in targeting the lung, the inhaled route is likely to be tested using a variety of small molecules that show promise as PAH therapies.

  4. Inhibition of heat shock protein 90 improves pulmonary arteriole remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Min; Liu, Su-Xuan; Zhang, Guan-Xin; Yang, Fan; Wang, Yang; Wu, Feng; Zhao, Xian-Xian; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2016-01-01

    While the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathological processes, its role relating to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect in which HSP90 improves pulmonary arteriole remodeling, and explored the therapeutic utility of targeting HSP90 as therapeutic drug for PAH. By Elisa and immunohistochemistry, HSP90 was found to be increased in both plasma and membrane walls of pulmonary arterioles from PAH patients. Moreover, plasma HSP90 levels positively correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure and C-reactive protein. In a monocrotaline-induced rat model of PH, we found that 17-AAG, a HSP90-inhibitor, alleviated the progress of PH, demonstrated by lower pulmonary arterial pressure and absence of right ventricular hypertrophy. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that 17-AAG improved pulmonary arteriole remodeling on the basis of reduced wall thickness and wall area. The inflammatory response attributed to PH could be attenuated by 17-AAG through reduction of NF-κB signaling. Moreover, 17-AAG was found to suppress PDGF-stimulated proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) through induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. In conclusion, HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG could improve pulmonary arteriole remodeling via inhibiting the excessive proliferation of PASMCs, and inhibition of HSP90 may represent a therapeutic avenue for the treatment of PAH. PMID:27472464

  5. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability. PMID:27510377

  6. Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reaction of Amoxicillin Using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    PubMed

    Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Park, Kyounghoon; Yang, Bo Ram; Lee, Joongyub; Jin, Xue Mei; Park, Byung Joo

    2016-09-01

    We conducted pharmacovigilance data mining for a β-lactam antibiotics, amoxicillin, and compare the adverse events (AEs) with the drug labels of 9 countries including Korea, USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Swiss, Italy, France, and Laos. We used the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database, a nationwide database of AE reports, between December 1988 and June 2014. Frequentist and Bayesian methods were used to calculate disproportionality distribution of drug-AE pairs. The AE which was detected by all the three indices of proportional reporting ratio (PRR), reporting odds ratio (ROR), and information component (IC) was defined as a signal. The KAERS database contained a total of 807,582 AE reports, among which 1,722 reports were attributed to amoxicillin. Among the 192,510 antibiotics-AE pairs, the number of amoxicillin-AE pairs was 2,913. Among 241 AEs, 52 adverse events were detected as amoxicillin signals. Comparing the drug labels of 9 countries, 12 adverse events including ineffective medicine, bronchitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, dry mouth, gastroesophageal reflux, hypercholesterolemia, gastric carcinoma, abnormal crying, induration, pulmonary carcinoma, and influenza-like symptoms were not listed on any of the labels of nine countries. In conclusion, we detected 12 new signals of amoxicillin which were not listed on the labels of 9 countries. Therefore, it should be followed by signal evaluation including causal association, clinical significance, and preventability.

  7. Is pirfenidone effective for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Jeldres, Alejandro; Labarca, Gonzalo

    2017-01-17

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has an ominous prognosis and there are virtually no effective therapies. It has been suggested that pirfenidone, an antifibrotic agent, could change its course. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified 13 systematic reviews comprising nine trials addressing the question of this article, seven of which are randomized and whose results were analyzed in this summary. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded pirfenidone decreases disease progression and mortality in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Although it is associated with frequent gastrointestinal and cutaneous adverse effects, these are generally not severe.

  8. Pulmonary contusion: an update on recent advances in clinical management.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Stephen M; Dubose, Joseph J

    2010-08-01

    Pulmonary contusion is a common finding after blunt chest trauma. The physiologic consequences of alveolar hemorrhage and pulmonary parenchymal destruction typically manifest themselves within hours of injury and usually resolve within approximately 7 days. Clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress with hypoxemia and hypercarbia, peak at about 72 h after injury. The timely diagnosis of pulmonary contusion requires a high degree of clinical suspicion when a patient presents with trauma caused by an appropriate mechanism of injury. The clinical diagnosis of acute parenchymal lung injury is usually confirmed by thoracic computed tomography, which is both highly sensitive in identifying pulmonary contusion and highly predictive of the need for subsequent mechanical ventilation. Management of pulmonary contusion is primarily supportive. Associated complications such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and long-term pulmonary disability, however, are frequent sequelae of these injuries.

  9. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  10. D-Dimer elevation and adverse outcomes.

    PubMed

    Halaby, Rim; Popma, Christopher J; Cohen, Ander; Chi, Gerald; Zacarkim, Marcelo Rodrigues; Romero, Gonzalo; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Hernandez, Adrian; Mentz, Robert; Harrington, Robert; Lip, Gregory; Peacock, Frank; Welker, James; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Daaboul, Yazan; Korjian, Serge; Gibson, C Michael

    2015-01-01

    D-Dimer is a biomarker of fibrin formation and degradation. While a D-dimer within normal limits is used to rule out the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism among patients with a low clinical probability of venous thromboembolism (VTE), the prognostic association of an elevated D-dimer with adverse outcomes has received far less emphasis. An elevated D-dimer is independently associated with an increased risk for incident VTE, recurrent VTE, and mortality. An elevated D-dimer is an independent correlate of increased mortality and subsequent VTE across a broad variety of disease states. Therefore, medically ill subjects in whom the D-dimer is elevated constitute a high risk subgroup in which the prospective evaluation of the efficacy and safety of antithrombotic therapy is warranted.

  11. Breathable Medicine: Pulmonary Mode of Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Tay, Samuel Sam Wah; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kumar, Srinivasan Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds require different modes of drug delivery systems to accomplish therapeutic activity without loss of its activity and lead to exhibit no adverse effects. Originating from ancient days, pulmonary mode of drug delivery is gaining much importance compared to other modes of drug delivery systems with respect to specific diseases. Pulmonary drug delivery is a non-invasive route for local and systemic therapies together with more patient convenience, compliance and is a needleless system. In this review, we addressed the vaccine delivery via non- or minimally invasive routes. Polymeric nanoparticles are preferred for use in the pulmonary delivery devices owing to a prolonged retention in lungs. Small site for absorption, mucociliary clearance, short residence time and low bioavailability are some of the limitations in pulmonary drug delivery have been resolved by generating micro- and nano-sized aerosol particles. We have classified the breathable medicine on the basis of available devices for inhalation and also prominent diseases treated through pulmonary mode of drug delivery. Owing to increasing toxicity of pharmacological drugs, the use of natural medicines has been rapidly gaining importance recently. The review article describes breathability of medicines or the pulmonary mode of drug delivery system and their drug release profile, absorption, distribution and efficacy to cure asthma and diabetes.

  12. Rare and very rare adverse effects of clozapine

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Pasquale; Gaetano, Raffaele; Caroleo, Mariarita; Cerminara, Gregorio; Maida, Francesca; Bruno, Antonio; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria; Moreno, Maria Jose Jaén; Russo, Emilio; Segura-García, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine (CLZ) is the drug of choice for the treatment of resistant schizophrenia; however, its suitable use is limited by the complex adverse effects’ profile. The best-described adverse effects in the literature are represented by agranulocytosis, myocarditis, sedation, weight gain, hypotension, and drooling; nevertheless, there are other known adverse effects that psychiatrists should readily recognize and manage. This review covers the “rare” and “very rare” known adverse effects of CLZ, which have been accurately described in literature. An extensive search on the basis of predefined criteria was made using CLZ and its combination with adverse effects as keywords in electronic databases. Data show the association between the use of CLZ and uncommon adverse effects, including ischemic colitis, paralytic ileus, hematemesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, priapism, urinary incontinence, pityriasis rosea, intertriginous erythema, pulmonary thromboembolism, pseudo-pheochromocytoma, periorbital edema, and parotitis, which are influenced by other variables including age, early diagnosis, and previous/current pharmacological therapies. Some of these adverse effects, although unpredictable, are often manageable if promptly recognized and treated. Others are serious and potentially life-threatening. However, an adequate knowledge of the drug, clinical vigilance, and rapid intervention can drastically reduce the morbidity and mortality related to CLZ treatment. PMID:26273202

  13. Respiratory Impairment and the Aging Lung: A Novel Paradigm for Assessing Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Older persons have an increased risk of developing respiratory impairment because the aging lung is likely to have experienced exposures to environmental toxins as well as reductions in physiological capacity. Methods. Systematic review of risk factors and measures of pulmonary function that are most often considered when defining respiratory impairment in aging populations. Results. Across the adult life span, there are frequent exposures to environmental toxins, including tobacco smoke, respiratory infections, air pollution, and occupational dusts. Concurrently, there are reductions in physiological capacity that may adversely affect ventilatory control, respiratory muscle strength, respiratory mechanics, and gas exchange. Recent work has provided a strong rationale for defining respiratory impairment as an age-adjusted reduction in spirometric measures of pulmonary function that are independently associated with adverse health outcomes. Specifically, establishing respiratory impairment based on spirometric Z-scores has been shown to be strongly associated with respiratory symptoms, frailty, and mortality. Alternatively, respiratory impairment may be defined by the peak expiratory flow, as measured by a peak flow meter. The peak expiratory flow, when expressed as a Z-score, has been shown to be strongly associated with disability and mortality. However, because it has a reduced diagnostic accuracy, peak expiratory flow should only define respiratory impairment when spirometry is not readily available or an older person cannot adequately perform spirometry. Conclusions. Aging is associated with an increased risk of developing respiratory impairment, which is best defined by spirometric Z-scores. Alternatively, in selected cases, respiratory impairment may be defined by peak expiratory flow, also expressed as a Z-score. PMID:22138206

  14. Distinguishing hazards and harms, adverse drug effects and adverse drug reactions : implications for drug development, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance, biomarkers, and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2013-03-01

    The terms 'adverse drug effects' and 'adverse drug reactions' are commonly used interchangeably, but they have different implications. Adverse drug reactions arise when a compound (e.g. a drug or metabolite, a contaminant or adulterant) is distributed in the same place as a body tissue (e.g. a receptor, enzyme, or ion channel), and the encounter results in an adverse effect (a physiological or pathological change), which results in a clinically appreciable adverse reaction. Both the adverse effect and the adverse reaction have manifestations by which they can be recognized: adverse effects are usually detected by laboratory tests (e.g. biochemical, haematological, immunological, radiological, pathological) or by clinical investigations (e.g. endoscopy, cardiac catheterization), and adverse reactions by their clinical manifestations (symptoms and/or signs). This distinction suggests five scenarios: (i) adverse reactions can result directly from adverse effects; (ii) adverse effects may not lead to appreciable adverse reactions; (iii) adverse reactions can occur without preceding adverse effects; (iv) adverse effects and reactions may be dissociated; and (v) adverse effects and reactions can together constitute syndromes. Defining an adverse drug reaction as "an appreciably harmful or unpleasant reaction, resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product" suggests a definition of an adverse drug effect: "a potentially harmful effect resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product, which constitutes a hazard and may or may not be associated with a clinically appreciable adverse reaction and/or an abnormal laboratory test or clinical investigation, as a marker of an adverse reaction."

  15. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  16. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. Study of pulmonary circulation].

    PubMed

    Orea Tejeda, A; Atencio, C; Sandoval, J; Lupi Herrera, E

    1982-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare disease of unknown etiology which consists of alveolar deposit of calcium microspheres. We report the procedures for the diagnosis of this disease, as well as the hemodynamic features of the pulmonary circulation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and cor pulmonale were documented. The active and passive factors involved in PAH are analyzed. We conclude that alveolar hypoxia and estructural vascular changes play a major role in the genesis of PAH.

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Robert P; Engel, Peter J; Nathan, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complication of sarcoidosis leading to dyspnea and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) can be due to several factors, including vascular involvement by the granulomatous inflammation, compression of the pulmonary arteries by adenopathy, fibrotic changes within the lung, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Several case series have suggested that some patients with SAPH benefit from specific therapy for pulmonary hypertension. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial found 16 weeks' bosentan therapy to be associated with significant improvement in pulmonary artery pressure. Future studies may better define who would respond to treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  18. Dysfunction of pulmonary vascular endothelium in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: basic considerations for future drug development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Underwood, Malcolm J; Hsin, Michael K Y; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; He, Guo-Wei

    2008-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading health problems worldwide and continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The clinical features of COPD are chronic obstructive bronchiolitis and emphysema. Pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction is a characteristic pathological finding of COPD at different stages of the disease. Functional changes of pulmonary endothelial cells in COPD include antiplatelet abnormalities, anticoagulant disturbances, endothelial activation, atherogenesis, and compromised regulation of vascular tone which may adversely affect the ventilation-perfusion match in COPD. As the most important risk factor of COPD, cigarette smoking may initiate pulmonary vascular impairment through direct injury of endothelial cells or release of inflammatory mediators. Morphological changes such as denudation of endothelium and endothelial cell apoptosis have been observed in the pulmonary vasculature in COPD patients as well as functional alterations. Changes in the expression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), thrombomodulin, selectins, and adhesion molecules in pulmonary endothelial cells as well as complex regulation and interaction of vasoactive substances and growth factors released from endothelium may underlie the mechanisms of pulmonary endothelial dysfunction in COPD. The mechanism of endothelial repair/regeneration in COPD, although not fully understood, may involve upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factors in the early stages along with an increased number of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. These factors should be taken into account when developing new strategies for the pharmacological therapy of patients with COPD.

  19. Physiological Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  20. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, W.E.; Koenig, J.Q.; Bardana, E.J. Jr.

    1989-09-01

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo(a)pyrene and formaldehyde--are possible human carcinogens. Fine particulate matter has been associated with decreased pulmonary function in children and with increased chronic lung disease in Nepal, where exposure to very high amounts of wood smoke occurs in residences. Wood smoke fumes, taken from both outdoor and indoor samples, have shown mutagenic activity in short-term bioassay tests. Because of the potential health effects of wood smoke, exposure to this source of air pollution should be minimal.29 references.

  1. Everest Physiology Pre-2008.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    When Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay reached the summit of Mt. Everest in 1953, it was the culmination of many attempts beginning in 1921. Alexander Kellas had actually predicted as early as 1920 that the mountain could be climbed, but the extreme altitude of 8848 m with the consequent oxygen deprivation had foiled previous attempts. One reason for the success of the 1953 expedition was the work done by the British physiologist Griffith Pugh in 1952 when he studied many of the physiological factors at high altitude including the oxygen requirements. Seven years later, Pugh and Hillary teamed up again for the Silver Hut Expedition in 1960-1961 that elucidated many of the problems of very high altitude. A group of physiologists spent several months at an altitude of 5800 m in a prefabricated hut and studied many aspects of exercise, pulmonary gas exchange, control of ventilation, and blood changes. Maximal exercise was measured as high as 7440 m and raised anew the question of whether Everest could ever be climbed without supplementary oxygen. The answer was shown to be yes in 1978 by Messner and Habeler, and 3 years later the American Medical Research Expedition to Everest clarified the physiological adaptations that allow humans to reach the highest point on earth. Five people reached the summit, the barometric pressure there was measured for the first time, and alveolar gas samples from the summit showed the critical importance of the extreme hyperventilation. However, the maximal oxygen consumption for the summit inspired PO2 of 43 mmHg was shown to be only about 1 l min(-1). In other words, the highest point on earth is very close to the limit of human tolerance to oxygen deprivation. As we celebrate the anniversary of Charles Darwin, it would be nice to have an evolutionary explanation for this, but in fact it is a cosmic coincidence.

  2. Pulmonary applications and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Zeldin, Darryl C; Bonner, James C; Nestmann, Earle R

    2008-09-01

    Because of their unique physicochemical properties, engineered nanoparticles have the potential to significantly impact respiratory research and medicine by means of improving imaging capability and drug delivery, among other applications. These same properties, however, present potential safety concerns, and there is accumulating evidence to suggest that nanoparticles may exert adverse effects on pulmonary structure and function. The respiratory system is susceptible to injury resulting from inhalation of gases, aerosols, and particles, and also from systemic delivery of drugs, chemicals, and other compounds to the lungs via direct cardiac output to the pulmonary arteries. As such, it is a prime target for the possible toxic effects of engineered nanoparticles. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the potential usefulness of nanoparticles and nanotechnology in respiratory research and medicine and to highlight important issues and recent data pertaining to nanoparticle-related pulmonary toxicity.

  3. Adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Mills, Nicholas L; Donaldson, Ken; Hadoke, Paddy W; Boon, Nicholas A; MacNee, William; Cassee, Flemming R; Sandström, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders; Newby, David E

    2009-01-01

    Air pollution is increasingly recognized as an important and modifiable determinant of cardiovascular disease in urban communities. Acute exposure has been linked to a range of adverse cardiovascular events including hospital admissions with angina, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. Long-term exposure increases an individual's lifetime risk of death from coronary heart disease. The main arbiter of these adverse health effects seems to be combustion-derived nanoparticles that incorporate reactive organic and transition metal components. Inhalation of this particulate matter leads to pulmonary inflammation with secondary systemic effects or, after translocation from the lung into the circulation, to direct toxic cardiovascular effects. Through the induction of cellular oxidative stress and proinflammatory pathways, particulate matter augments the development and progression of atherosclerosis via detrimental effects on platelets, vascular tissue, and the myocardium. These effects seem to underpin the atherothrombotic consequences of acute and chronic exposure to air pollution. An increased understanding of the mediators and mechanisms of these processes is necessary if we are to develop strategies to protect individuals at risk and reduce the effect of air pollution on cardiovascular disease.

  4. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) into five groups. These groups are organized based ... lungs. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension Group 2 includes PH with left heart disease. Conditions that affect the ...

  5. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  6. Who Needs Pulmonary Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... recommend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) if you have a chronic (ongoing) lung disease. He or she also may ... may benefit from PR if you have: COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). COPD includes emphysema (em-fi- ...

  7. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... 03-13T18:29:11+00:00 PH and HIV Print PH and HIV Brochure (PDF) Order Copies ... to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and HIV are two separate ...

  8. Living with Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. Living With Pulmonary Embolism Pulmonary embolism (PE) usually is treated in a hospital. After leaving ... you're taking medicine. Medicines used to treat PE can thin your blood too much. This can ...

  9. What Causes Pulmonary Embolism?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Embolism? Major Causes Pulmonary embolism (PE) usually begins as a blood ... from surgery or injured in other ways. Other Causes Rarely, an air bubble, part of a tumor, ...

  10. Living with Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Pulmonary Hypertension Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has no ... seek care right away. Emotional Issues and Support Living with PH may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and ...

  11. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  12. Long term follow-up of infliximab efficacy in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary sarcoidosis refractory to conventional therapy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Eric; Luk, Francis; Manocha, Sonia; Ho, Tung; O'Connor, Carolyn; Hussain, Humaira

    2013-08-01

    Infliximab, a humanized, chimeric, monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α), has been shown to reduce the pulmonary and extra-pulmonary manifestations of sarcoidosis, however, there is little information regarding sustained efficacy with long-term use of infliximab. We retrospectively investigate whether a reduction in disease response is maintained, over a prolonged course of therapy (up to 85 months) with infliximab, and report on adverse events associated with its use. Subjects with multi-organ sarcoidosis were prescribed infliximab, between January 2000 to June 2010 due to failure of conventional therapy and were identified from the Drexel University College of Medicine sarcoidosis clinic. Retrospective patient reported symptom and objective clinical data analyses of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary findings were evaluated pre-infliximab and post or concurrent infliximab therapy. Any adverse events or reasons for discontinuation during infliximab therapy were reported. Twenty-six patients with biopsy proven sarcoidosis received anti-TNF therapy and met the criteria for study inclusion. Clinical evidence of sustained resolution or improvement was demonstrated in 58.5% of all organs assessed (p =<0.001). No clinical change in disease activity was seen in 35.8% of all organs evaluated. Despite infliximab treatment, 5.7% had progressive disease activity. Adverse events were seen in 57.7% of patients treated with infliximab over a 46.2 month average duration of therapy. Three (12%) patients had an adverse event that required permanent discontinuation. Infliximab is efficacious in the treatment of extra-pulmonary sarcoidosis and the efficacy is maintained with prolonged treatment. In patients with pulmonary sarcoid, sustained improvement in pulmonary imaging was seen after initiation of infliximab, however, post-treatment pulmonary function testing was not conclusive. Long-term infliximab therapy was well tolerated for our study group. Copyright © 2012

  13. Immunosuppression of pulmonary natural killer activity by exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, G.R.; Keyes, L.L.; Stutzman, J.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a consequent increase in disease susceptibility. Pulmonary natural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity of continuous ozone exposure. Continuous ozone exposures at 1.0 ppm were performed for 23.5 hours per day for either 1, 5, 7, or 10 consecutive days. Pulmonary immune function was assessed by measuring natural killer (NK) activity from whole-lung homogenates of male Fischer-344 rats. Results of this study indicated that continuous ozone exposure for 1, 5, or 7 days resulted in a significant decrease in pulmonary NK activity. This suppressed pulmonary NK activity returned to control levels after continuous exposure to ozone for 10 days. The suppressed pulmonary NK response was thus attenuated and returned to normal values in the continued presence of ozone gas. This attenuation process is dynamic, complex, and doubtless involves several cell types and/or products of these cells. Pulmonary NK activity was also suppressed at 0.5 ppm ozone, but not at 0.1 ppm ozone, following 23.5 hours of exposure. NK activity is important for defense against viral, bacterial, and neoplastic disease. The depressed NK activity resulting from continuous ozone exposure could therefore result in a compromised ability to defend against pulmonary diseases.

  14. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  15. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  16. Potassium physiology.

    PubMed

    Thier, S O

    1986-04-25

    Potassium is the most abundant exchangeable cation in the body. It exists predominantly in the intracellular fluid at concentrations of 140 to 150 meq/liter and in the extracellular fluid at concentrations of 3.5 to 5 meq/liter. The maintenance of the serum potassium concentration is a complex bodily function and results from the balance between intake, excretion, and distribution between intracellular and extracellular space. Ingested potassium is virtually completely absorbed from and minimally excreted through the intestine under nonpathologic circumstances. Renal excretion of potassium, which is the major chronic protective mechanism against abnormalities in potassium balance, depends on filtration, reabsorption, and a highly regulated distal nephron secretory process. Factors regulating potassium secretion include prior potassium intake, intracellular potassium, delivery of sodium chloride and poorly reabsorbable anions to the distal nephron, the urine flow rate, hormones such as aldosterone and beta-catecholamines, and the integrity of the renal tubular cell. The maintenance of distribution between the inside and outside of cells depends on the integrity of the cell membrane and its pumps, osmolality, pH, and the hormones insulin, aldosterone, beta 2-catecholamines, alpha-catecholamines, and prostaglandins. Both distribution across cell membranes and/or renal excretion of potassium may be altered by pharmacologic agents such as diuretics, alpha- and beta-catechol antagonists and agonists, depolarizing agents, and digitalis. Problems with hypokalemia and hyperkalemia can be analyzed on the basis of potassium physiology and pharmacology; proper treatment depends on an accurate analysis.

  17. Right and left heart dysfunction predict mortality in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Henein, Michael Y; Grönlund, Christer; Tossavainen, Erik; Söderberg, Stefan; Gonzalez, Manuel; Lindqvist, Per

    2017-01-01

    In pulmonary hypertension (PH), the right heart dysfunction is a strong predictor of adverse clinical outcome, while the role of the left heart is not fully determined. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of mortality in precapillary PH including measures of both right and left heart function. We studied 34 patients (mean age 64 ± 13, range 31-82 years, 24 females) with precapillary PH, all of whom underwent detailed Doppler echocardiographic examination of the right and left heart function using conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. Patients were followed up for up to 8 years (mean 4·2 ± 1·9 years). At follow-up, 16 patients survived. Left ventricular (LV) filling time (P = 0·007), pulmonary artery acceleration time (P = 0·009), right atrial pressure (RAP) (P<0·001) and tricuspid regurgitation (TR) severity (P = 0·007) were worse in the deceased group. RV global longitudinal strain (GLS) (P = 0·001), RAP (P≤0·001), LV filling time (P<0·001) and TR severity (P<0·001) were the most accurate predictors, having the largest AUC (>0·65) and carried the highest risk for mortality (P<0·001 for all). The strongest predictors of mortality in precapillary PH indirectly reflect both left and right heart dysfunction including atrial structure and function disturbances. While an interaction pattern is observed, it needs to be confirmed in a larger cohort. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2013-01-01

    Normal pulmonary vascular development in infancy requires maintenance of low pulmonary vascular resistance after birth, and is necessary for normal lung function and growth. The developing lung is subject to multiple genetic, pathological and/or environmental influences that can adversely affect lung adaptation, development, and growth, leading to pulmonary hypertension. New classifications of pulmonary hypertension are beginning to account for these diverse phenotypes, and or pulmonary hypertension in infants due to PPHN, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with PPHN are directed at selective reduction of PVR, and take advantage of a rapidly advancing understanding of the altered signaling pathways in the remodeled vasculature. PMID:24083892

  19. [Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Bourry, N; Chabrot, P; Jeannin, G; Filaire, M; Charpy, C; Bay, J O; Kemeny, J L; Caillaud, D; Escande, G; Boyer, L

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare tumor. We present a case of intimal sarcoma arising from right pulmonary artery and left lower pulmonary vein observed in a 44-year-old man with a non-productive cough. Computed tomographic scans and magnetic resonance imaging showing filling defect enhancement contributed early, suggesting the diagnosis of primary vascular tumor, hypothesis confirmed by pathologist findings.

  20. [Adverse effects and hemodynamic effects of nifedipine as a tocolytic].

    PubMed

    Spiesser-Robelet, L; Martin, B; Carceller, A-M; Bussières, J-F; Touzin, K; Audibert, F; Lachance, C; Ferreira, E

    2015-09-01

    To describe maternal and fetal adverse effects, in particular cardiorespiratory, of nifedipine as tocolytic, as well as effects on hemodynamic parameters. A retrospective evaluative study describing the use of nifedipine as tocolytic at CHU Sainte-Justine in Montreal. Demographic data as well as maternal blood pressure and adverse effects, and maternal and fetal heart rate were collected from medical records of women treated with nifedipine following our tocolysis protocol between January 1st 2004 and March 1st 2007. The medical records of 213 pregnant women were included in the study. Cardiorespiratory adverse effects were noted in 69 (32.4%); of these, 19 (8.9%) had serious cardiorespiratory adverse events, including 6 acute pulmonary edema or overload. Mean maternal systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly decreased and mean maternal and fetal heart rates were significantly increased after the bolus dose. Other adverse effects were reported for 100 (46.9%) women. Nifedipine may cause cardiorespiratory adverse effects warranting a close monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Noninvasive ventilation during pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD patients].

    PubMed

    Gravier, F-É; Bonnevie, T; Medrinal, C; Debeaumont, D; Dupuis, J; Viacroze, C; Muir, J-F; Tardif, C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is currently the gold standard treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the workload achieved may be insufficient to obtain physiological benefits because of the restricted respiratory capacity. In patients with COPD, changes in flow as well as biomechanical factors (distension) compromise respiratory adaptation to exertion. Some studies have shown that noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during exercise has a positive effect on respiratory muscle workload, physiological parameters and perceived exertion. However the evidence remains insufficient regarding the effects of the NIV during comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation programs. The identification of criteria which determine responsive patients is necessary in order to reduce human and time costs and to optimize the use of NIV during exercise. NIV is used during training to overcome dyspnoea and to increase muscle workload. Further studies are needed to verify the effectiveness of NIV in pulmonary rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  3. Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Network Development for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are descriptive biological sequences that start from a molecular initiating event (MIE) and end with an adverse health outcome. AOPs provide biological context for high throughput chemical testing and further prioritize environmental health risk research. According to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines, AOPs are pathways with one MIE anchored to an adverse outcome (AO) by key events (KEs) and key event relationships (KERs). However, this approach does not always capture the cumulative impacts of multiple MIEs on the AO. For example, hepatic lipid flux due to chemical-induced toxicity initiates from multiple ligand-activated receptors and signaling pathways that cascade across biology to converge upon a common fatty liver (FL, also known as steatosis) outcome. To capture this complexity, a top-down strategy was used to develop a FL AOP network (AOPnet). Literature was queried based on the terms steatosis, fatty liver, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Search results were analyzed for physiological and pathophysiological organ level, cellular and molecular processes, as well as pathway intermediates, to identify potential KEs and MIEs that are key for hepatic lipid metabolism, maintenance, and dysregulation. The analysis identified four apical KE nodes (hepatic fatty acid uptake, de novo fatty acid and lipid synthesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipid efflux) juxtaposed to the FL AO. The apic

  4. Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Network Development for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are descriptive biological sequences that start from a molecular initiating event (MIE) and end with an adverse health outcome. AOPs provide biological context for high throughput chemical testing and further prioritize environmental health risk research. According to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines, AOPs are pathways with one MIE anchored to an adverse outcome (AO) by key events (KEs) and key event relationships (KERs). However, this approach does not always capture the cumulative impacts of multiple MIEs on the AO. For example, hepatic lipid flux due to chemical-induced toxicity initiates from multiple ligand-activated receptors and signaling pathways that cascade across biology to converge upon a common fatty liver (FL, also known as steatosis) outcome. To capture this complexity, a top-down strategy was used to develop a FL AOP network (AOPnet). Literature was queried based on the terms steatosis, fatty liver, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Search results were analyzed for physiological and pathophysiological organ level, cellular and molecular processes, as well as pathway intermediates, to identify potential KEs and MIEs that are key for hepatic lipid metabolism, maintenance, and dysregulation. The analysis identified four apical KE nodes (hepatic fatty acid uptake, de novo fatty acid and lipid synthesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipid efflux) juxtaposed to the FL AO. The apic

  5. "End-stage" pulmonary fibrosis in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Teirstein, Alvin T; Morgenthau, Adam S

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is an unusual "end stage" in patients with sarcoidosis. Fibrosis occurs in a minority of patients, and presents with a unique physiologic combination of airways dysfunction (obstruction) superimposed on the more common restrictive dysfunction. Imagin techniques are essential to the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. Standard chest radiographs and CT scans may reveal streaks, bullae, cephalad retraction of the hilar areas, deviation of the trachea and tented diaphragm. Positive gallium and PET scans indicate residual reversible granulomatous disease and are important guides to therapy decisions. Treatment, usually with corticosteroids, is effective in those patients with positive scans, but fibrosis does not improve with any treatment. With severe functional impariment and patient disability, pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure may supervene for which the patient will require treatment. Oxygen, careful diuresis, sildenafil and bosentan may be salutary. These patients are candidates for lung transplantation.

  6. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shomaf, Maha; Obeidat, Nathir; Najjar, Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcomas (PAS) are extremely rare sarcomas of uncertain histogenesis that often mimic pulmonary thromboemboli. This is a report of a 60-year-old female patient who presented with recurrent chest pain and cough. The patient was first diagnosed with pulmonary embolism but she did not improve on anticoagulant therapy. Follow-up imaging studies revealed a mass in the left hilar region extending into the pulmonary trunk and branches of the left pulmonary artery. The tru-cut biopsy revealed an undifferentiated sarcoma. The patient died 10 months after her initial presentation. PMID:26425600

  7. S-Nitrosylation and the Development of Pulmonary Hypertension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-14

    transducing this signal into changes in protein expression to alter pulmonary physiology are unclear. The role S-nitrosothiols ( SNO ) play in the...development of PAH is examined in this research project. In the pulmonary circulation, erythrocytes deliver SNOs to recipient target proteins on the...oxygen saturation to deliver SNOs to the vascular endothelium. We have developed a model in which N- acetyl cysteine (NAC) is used as a tracer to 1

  8. Xenobiotic pulmonary exposure and systemic cardiovascular response via neurological links.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Phoebe A; Abukabda, Alaeddin B; Hardy, Steven L; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2015-11-15

    The cardiovascular response to xenobiotic particle exposure has been increasingly studied over the last two decades, producing an extraordinary scope and depth of research findings. With the flourishing of nanotechnology, the term "xenobiotic particles" has expanded to encompass not only air pollution particulate matter (PM) but also anthropogenic particles, such as engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Historically, the majority of research in these fields has focused on pulmonary exposure and the adverse physiological effects associated with a host inflammatory response or direct particle-tissue interactions. Because these hypotheses can neither account entirely for the deleterious cardiovascular effects of xenobiotic particle exposure nor their time course, the case for substantial neurological involvement is apparent. Indeed, considerable evidence suggests that not only is neural involvement a significant contributor but also a reality that needs to be investigated more thoroughly when assessing xenobiotic particle toxicities. Therefore, the scope of this review is several-fold. First, we provide a brief overview of the major anatomical components of the central and peripheral nervous systems, giving consideration to the potential biologic targets affected by inhaled particles. Second, the autonomic arcs and mechanisms that may be involved are reviewed. Third, the cardiovascular outcomes following neurological responses are discussed. Lastly, unique problems, future risks, and hurdles associated with xenobiotic particle exposure are discussed. A better understanding of these neural issues may facilitate research that in conjunction with existing research, will ultimately prevent the untoward cardiovascular outcomes associated with PM exposures and/or identify safe ENMs for the advancement of human health.

  9. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Zhang, Chong; Feng, Zhiying; Ni, Yiming

    2008-08-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon tumor. We report a case of a 73-year-old male patient with a two-week history of palpitations and shortness of breath, aggravated for two days and was believed to be pulmonary hypertension. Emergency heart ultrasound after admission presented a massive pulmonary embolism in the pulmonary artery. The patient's condition was successfully managed with urgent pulmonary artery embolectomy. The patient demonstrated improvement in hemodynamics after the operation. Histologic and immunohistochemical assays were performed and a diagnosis was made as primary pulmonary artery sarcoma arising from the left pulmonary artery. Resection of the tumor is recommended for the treatment of this rare malignant tumor. The corresponding chemotherapy, follow-up and prognosis are described as well in this case report.

  10. Sildenafil citrate for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hrometz, Sandra L; Shields, Kelly M

    2006-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disease that has a high rate of mortality. For these reasons, early treatment is essential. Treatment choices for pulmonary arterial hypertension are limited by drug tolerability, drug cost and inconvenience associated with administration techniques and dosing schedules. Therefore, a therapy that provides oral dosing with limited side effects would prove useful in managing many patients. Sildenafil citrate, the first and highly publicized oral medication to receive approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for erectile dysfunction, has recently been approved for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This review summarizes the normal physiology of the pulmonary vasculature, and the pathophysiology involved in pulmonary arterial hypertension and the role of sildenafil in its treatment.

  11. Gemcitabine-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity: A Case Report of Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease.

    PubMed

    Turco, Célia; Jary, Marine; Kim, Stefano; Moltenis, Mélanie; Degano, Bruno; Manzoni, Philippe; Nguyen, Thierry; Genet, Bruno; Rabier, Marie-Blanche Valnet; Heyd, Bruno; Borg, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a chemotherapeutic agent frequently used by for the treatment of several malignancies both in the adjuvant and metastatic setting. Although myelosuppression is the most adverse event of this therapy, gemcitabine might induce severe pulmonary toxicities. We describe a case of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) related to gemcitabine. The patient was an 83-year-old man with a metastatic pancreatic cancer who was treated by gemcitabine as first-line therapy. He was in good health and received no other chemotherapy. A dose of 1000 mg/m(2) of gemcitabine was administered over a 30-minute intravenous infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. After a period of 6 months, a complete response was observed. Nevertheless, the patient developed a severe dyspnea, with arterial hypoxemia and very low lung diffusion for carbon monoxide. A CT scan showed diffuse ground glass opacities with septal lines, bilateral pleural effusion, and lymph node enlargement. On echocardiography, there was a suspicion of pulmonary hypertension with elevated systolic pulmonary artery pressure and normal left ventricular pressures. Right heart catheterization confirmed pulmonary hypertension and normal pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. Diagnosis of PVOD was made, and a gemcitabine-induced toxicity was suspected. A symptomatic treatment was started. At last follow-up, patient was in functional class I with near-normal of CT scan, arterial blood gases, and echocardiography. A gemcitabine-induced PVOD is the more likely diagnosis.

  12. Rare associations of tetralogy of Fallot with anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery and totally anomalous pulmonary venous connection.

    PubMed

    Sen, Supratim; Rao, Suresh G; Kulkarni, Snehal

    2016-06-01

    We describe the cases of two patients with tetralogy of Fallot, aged 4 years and 8 months, who were incidentally detected to have concomitant anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery and total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, respectively, on preoperative imaging. They underwent surgical correction with good mid-term outcomes. In this study, we discuss the embryological basis, physiological effects, and review the literature of these two unusual associations. Awareness of these rare associations will avoid missed diagnoses and consequent surgical surprises.

  13. Thoracic magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Kim, Eun Young; Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a pathologic condition characterized by permanently enlarged airspaces distal to the terminal bronchiole with destruction of the alveolar walls. Functional information of the lungs is important to understand the pathophysiology of emphysema and that of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. With the recent developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, functional MRI with variable MR sequences can be used for the evaluation of different physiological and anatomic changes seen in cases of pulmonary emphysema. In this review article, we will focus on a brief description of each method, results of some of the most recent work, and the clinical application of such knowledge.

  14. Implantable Ultralow Pulmonary Pressure Monitoring System for Fetal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Mozziyar; Heller, J. Alex; Schecter, Samuel C.; Shue, Eveline H.; Miniati, Doug; Roy, Shuvo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary hypoplasia is a devastating condition affecting fetal and newborn pulmonary physiology, resulting in great morbidity and mortality. The fetal lung develops in a fluid-filled environment. In this paper, we describe a novel, implantable pressure sensing and recording device which we use to study the pressures present in the fetal pulmonary tree throughout gestation. The system achieves 0.18 cm H2O resolution and can record for 21 days continuously at 256 Hz. Sample tracings of in vivo fetal lamb recordings are shown. PMID:22801521

  15. Anesthesia for Patients with Concomitant Hepatic and Pulmonary Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Geraldine C; O'Connor, Michael F; Renz, John F

    2016-12-01

    Hepatic function and pulmonary function are interrelated with failure of one organ system affecting the other. With improved therapies, patients with concomitant hepatic and pulmonary failure increasingly enjoy a good quality of life and life expectancy. Therefore, the prevalence of such patients is increasing with more presenting for both emergent and elective surgical procedures. Hypoxemia requires a thorough evaluation in patients with end-stage liver disease. The most common etiologies respond to appropriate therapy. Portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome are associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. It is incumbent on the anesthesiologist to understand the physiology of liver failure and its early effect on pulmonary function to ensure a successful outcome.

  16. HIF2α–arginase axis is essential for the development of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cowburn, Andrew S.; Crosby, Alexi; Macias, David; Branco, Cristina; Colaço, Renato D. D. R.; Southwood, Mark; Toshner, Mark; Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Johnson, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is correlated with pulmonary vascular remodeling. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) HIF-1α and HIF-2α are known to contribute to the process of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling; however, the specific role of pulmonary endothelial HIF expression in this process, and in the physiological process of vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia, remains unclear. Here we show that pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α is a critical regulator of hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. The rise in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) normally observed following chronic hypoxic exposure was absent in mice with pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α deletion. The RVSP of mice lacking HIF-2α in pulmonary endothelium after exposure to hypoxia was not significantly different from normoxic WT mice and much lower than the RVSP values seen in WT littermate controls and mice with pulmonary endothelial deletion of HIF-1α exposed to hypoxia. Endothelial HIF-2α deletion also protected mice from hypoxia remodeling. Pulmonary endothelial deletion of arginase-1, a downstream target of HIF-2α, likewise attenuated many of the pathophysiological symptoms associated with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. We propose a mechanism whereby chronic hypoxia enhances HIF-2α stability, which causes increased arginase expression and dysregulates normal vascular NO homeostasis. These data offer new insight into the role of pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α in regulating the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia. PMID:27432976

  17. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  18. Metal ions affecting the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Some metals, such as copper and manganese, are essential to life and play irreplaceable roles in, e.g., the functioning of important enzyme systems. Other metals are xenobiotics, i.e., they have no useful role in human physiology and, even worse, as in the case of lead, may be toxic even at trace levels of exposure. Even those metals that are essential, however, have the potential to turn harmful at very high levels of exposure, a reflection of a very basic tenet of toxicology--"the dose makes the poison." Toxic metal exposure may lead to serious risks to human health. As a result of the extensive use of toxic metals and their compounds in industry and consumer products, these agents have been widely disseminated in the environment. Because metals are not biodegradable, they can persist in the environment and produce a variety of adverse effects. Exposure to metals can lead to damage in a variety of organ systems and, in some cases, metals also have the potential to be carcinogenic. Even though the importance of metals as environmental health hazards is now widely appreciated, the specific mechanisms by which metals produce their adverse effects have yet to be fully elucidated. The unifying factor in determining toxicity and carcinogenicity for most metals is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Metal-mediated formation of free radicals causes various modifications to nucleic acids, enhanced lipid peroxidation, and altered calcium and sulfhydryl homeostasis. Whilst copper, chromium, and cobalt undergo redox-cycling reactions, for metals such as cadmium and nickel the primary route for their toxicity is depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. This chapter attempts to show that the toxic effects of different metallic compounds may be manifested in the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. The knowledge of health effects due to metal exposure is necessary for practising physicians, and should be assessed by inquiring

  19. Pirfenidone treatment in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: nationwide Danish results

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Goran Nadir; Shaker, Saher Burhan; Madsen, Helle Dall; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background Pirfenidone was approved by the European Medicines Agency and introduced in most European countries in 2011 for treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Objective To describe the national Danish experiences of pirfenidone treatment for IPF during 30 months with respect to target population, safety, adherence to the treatment and effect analysis in a well-characterised IPF population in a real-life setting. Methods Retrospective data collection from medical records of all patients in Denmark with IPF from 2011 to 2014. Data included baseline demographics, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), histopathology, forced vital capacity (FVC) and 6-min walk test (6MWT). Longitudinal data on FVC, walk test, adherence to the treatment and vital status were also collected. Results Pirfenidone treatment was initiated in 113 patients. Mean age was 69.6±8.1 years (±SD), and 71% were male. Definite IPF diagnosis required thoracoscopic lung biopsy in 45 patients (39.8%). The remaining 68 cases had a definite (64 patients) or possible usual interstitial pneumonia (four patients) pattern on HRCT. Patients were followed for 0.1–33.8 months (median 9.4 months). Fifty-one patients (45.2%) needed dose adjustment, 18 (16%) patients discontinued therapy and 13 patients (11.5%) died. The annual mean decline in FVC was 164 ml (SE 33.2). The decline in 6MWT was 18.2 m (SE 11.2). Nausea (44.2%), fatigue (38.9%) and skin reactions (32.7%) were frequent adverse events. Conclusion Patients with IPF treated with pirfenidone experienced tolerable adverse events. Patients were maintained on treatment due to a careful follow-up and dose adjustment programme. The annual decline in physiological parameters and mortality rate was comparable to previous randomised controlled trials. PMID:27616539

  20. The natriuretic peptide MR-proANP predicts all-cause mortality and adverse outcome in community patients: a 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Odermatt, Jonas; Hersberger, Lara; Bolliger, Rebekka; Graedel, Lena; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Briel, Matthias; Bucher, Heiner C; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2017-08-28

    The precursor peptide of atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) has a physiological role in fluid homeostasis and is associated with mortality and adverse clinical outcomes in heart failure patients. Little is known about the prognostic potential of this peptide for long-term mortality prediction in community-dwelling patients. We evaluated associations of MR-proANP levels with 10-year all-cause mortality in patients visiting their general practitioner for a respiratory tract infection. In this post-hoc analysis including 359 patients (78.5%) of the original trial, we calculated cox regression models and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to assess associations of MR-proANP blood levels with mortality and adverse outcome including death, pulmonary embolism, and major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events. After a median follow-up of 10.0 years, 9.8% of included patients died. Median admission MR-proANP levels were significantly elevated in non-survivors compared to survivors (80.5 pmol/L, IQR 58.6-126.0; vs. 45.6 pmol/L, IQR 34.2-68.3; p<0.001) and associated with 10-year all-cause mortality (age-adjusted HR 2.0 [95% CI 1.3-3.1, p=0.002]; AUC 0.79). Results were similar for day 7 blood levels and also for the prediction of other adverse outcomes. Increased MR-proANP levels were associated with 10-year all-cause mortality and adverse clinical outcome in a sample of community-dwelling patients. If diagnosis-specific cut-offs are confirmed in future studies, this marker may help to direct preventive measures in primary care.

  1. Airway epithelial-derived factor relaxes pulmonary vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Farah, Omar R; Li, Dongge; McIntyre, Brendan A S; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2009-01-01

    The factors controlling the pulmonary vascular resistance under physiological conditions are poorly understood. We have previously reported on an apparent cross talk between the airway and adjacent pulmonary arterial bed where a factor likely derived from the bronchial epithelial cells reduced the magnitude of agonist-stimulated force in the vascular smooth muscle. The main purpose of this investigation was to evaluate whether bronchial epithelial cells release a pulmonary arterial smooth muscle relaxant factor. Conditioned media from SPOC-1 or BEAS-2B, a rat- and a human-derived bronchial epithelial cell line, respectively, were utilized. This media significantly relaxed precontracted adult but not fetal pulmonary arterial muscle in an oxygen tension-dependent manner. This response was mediated via soluble guanylate cyclase, involving AKT/PI3-kinase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Airway epithelial cell-conditioned media increased AKT phosphorylation in pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMC) and reduced intracellular calcium change following ATP stimulation to a significantly greater extent than observed for bronchial SMC. The present data strongly support the evidence for bronchial epithelial cells releasing a stable and soluble factor capable of inducing pulmonary arterial SMC relaxation. We speculate that under physiological conditions, the maintenance of a low pulmonary vascular resistance, postnatally, is in part modulated by the airway epithelium.

  2. A translational preclinical model of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension: mechanistic pathways driving disease pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Elizabeth R.; Khambata, Valerie S.; Yun Ye, Li; Cheung, Kenneth; Thomas, Matthew; Duggan, Nicholas; Jarai, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease, in which a decline in patient prognosis is frequently associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Animal models exhibiting principle pathophysiological features of IPF and PH could provide greater insight into mechanistic pathways underlying disease progression and a means for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches for intervention. Here, we describe an in vivo disease model, in which animals develop progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and associated PH, as defined by the presence of fibrotic foci adjacent to areas of alveolar injury and remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Associated changes in physiological parameters included a decline in lung function and increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) >25 mmHg. The early fibrotic pathology is associated with a profibrogenic microenvironment, elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteases, MMP‐2, MMP‐7, and MMP‐12, TIMP‐1, the chemoattractant and mitogen, PDGF‐β, and the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL12, that are associated with the recruitment of macrophages, mast cells, and fibrocytes. Principle mechanistic pathways associated with disease pathogenesis are upregulated in the lungs and pulmonary arteries, with sustained increases in gene transcripts for the profibrotic mediator TGF‐β1 and components of the TGF‐β signaling pathway; PAI‐1, Nox‐4, and HIF‐1α. Therapeutic treatment with the ALK‐5/TGF‐β RI inhibitor SB‐525334 reversed established pulmonary fibrosis and associated vascular remodeling, leading to normalization in clinically translatable physiological parameters including lung function and hemodynamic measurements of mPAP. These studies highlight the application of this model in validating potential approaches for targeting common mechanistic pathways driving disease pathogenesis. PMID:25214520

  3. [Human physiology: kidney].

    PubMed

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  4. [Pregnancy in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Rosengarten, Dror; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disorder defined by elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure. PAH can be idiopathic or associated with a variety of medical conditions such as scleroderma, congenital heart disease, left heart failure, lung disease or chronic pulmonary thromboembolism. This progressive disease can cause severe right heart failure and death. Normal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy may produce fatal consequences in PAH patients. Current guidelines recommend that pregnancy be avoided or terminated early in women with PAH. During the past decade, new advanced therapies for PAH have emerged gathering reports of successful pregnancies in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Substantial risk still exists and current recommendations have not changed. Nevertheless, in selected cases, if a patient insists on continuing the pregnancy, being fully aware of the risks involved, an intensive treatment approach should be implemented in experienced centers. This is necessary in order to control pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy and reduce the risk so as to improve outcomes. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of PAH in pregnancy and appropriate management during pregnancy, delivery and the post-partum period.

  5. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking a pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, A; Yates, T J; Kuriakose, P

    2008-01-01

    Sarcomas involving the lung are a rare occurrence, often a result of metastatic disease from primary malignancies involving the skin, liver, breast or heart. Primary pulmonary artery sarcomas are rarer still, with limited cases reported world-wide and consequently data regarding treatment modalities are sparse and largely experimental. These tumors are often mistaken for a pulmonary embolism and seemingly supported by radiological findings. Patients will often present without symptom resolution despite therapeutic anticoagulation. The following case illustrates how a soft tissue sarcoma of the pulmonary artery can mimic a pulmonary embolism, thus, resulting in both a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. A positron emission tomography scan was an invaluable tool in this case, showing increased radiotracer uptake and placing neoplasm at the top of the differential diagnosis. This ultimately led to a biopsy that was vimentin positive, cytokeratin negative and CD117 negative, thus consistent with soft tissue sarcoma.

  6. Alterations in physiology and anatomy during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eng Kien; Tan, Eng Loy

    2013-12-01

    Pregnant women undergo profound anatomical and physiological changes so that they can cope with the increased physical and metabolic demands of their pregnancies. The cardiovascular, respiratory, haematological, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems all undergo important physiological alterations and adaptations needed to allow development of the fetus and to allow the mother and fetus to survive the demands of childbirth. Such alterations in anatomy and physiology may cause difficulties in interpreting signs, symptoms, and biochemical investigations, making the clinical assessment of a pregnant woman inevitably confusing but challenging. Understanding these changes is important for every practicing obstetrician, as the pathological deviations from the normal physiological alterations may not be clear-cut until an adverse outcome has resulted. Only with a sound knowledge of the physiology and anatomy changes can the care of an obstetric parturient be safely optimized for a better maternal and fetal outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Management of a child with pulmonary arterial hypertension presenting with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Flores, Saul; Daily, Joshua; Pratap, Jayant Nick; Cash, Michelle C; Hirsch, Russel

    2016-02-01

    We describe the course and management of a 12-year-old girl with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension who initially presented with severe systemic hypertension. Successful therapy included pulmonary vasodilators and an atrial septostomy, while ensuring adequate maintenance of her systemic vascular resistance to maintain cardiac output. Clear understanding of the physiology and judicious medical management in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension using extreme compensatory mechanisms is vitally important.

  8. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed Ahmed, Magdy M; Aftab, Muhammad; Al-Najjar, Raed M; de la Cruz, Kim I; Benjamin, Robert S; Hallman, Charles H

    2014-10-01

    Primary sarcomas that arise from major blood vessels are exceedingly rare, and some of the published cases have been autopsy reports. Most patients are adults. We report a case of pulmonary artery sarcoma in a 77-year-old man who presented with acute onset of dyspnea. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest revealed a large mass within the pulmonary trunk and its main branches. Because massive pulmonary embolism was suspected, both anticoagulant and thrombolytic therapies were initiated. The patient responded poorly to these therapies, which then necessitated resection of both the mass and the pulmonary valve. A bioprosthetic porcine valve replaced the native valve, and we reconstructed the right ventricular outflow tract with a Dacron patch. Histopathologic examination revealed a high-grade sarcoma with focal myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 7. He was subsequently treated with chemotherapy and radiation and continued to show no evidence of disease. The diagnosis of pulmonary artery sarcoma should be suspected in patients who present with manifestations of pulmonary embolism, especially when there is no evidence of deep venous thrombosis and poor response to anticoagulant therapy. Multimodal therapy can provide prolonged survival.

  9. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Mimicking Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Muhammad; Al-Najjar, Raed M.; de la Cruz, Kim I.; Benjamin, Robert S.; Hallman, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Primary sarcomas that arise from major blood vessels are exceedingly rare, and some of the published cases have been autopsy reports. Most patients are adults. We report a case of pulmonary artery sarcoma in a 77-year-old man who presented with acute onset of dyspnea. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest revealed a large mass within the pulmonary trunk and its main branches. Because massive pulmonary embolism was suspected, both anticoagulant and thrombolytic therapies were initiated. The patient responded poorly to these therapies, which then necessitated resection of both the mass and the pulmonary valve. A bioprosthetic porcine valve replaced the native valve, and we reconstructed the right ventricular outflow tract with a Dacron patch. Histopathologic examination revealed a high-grade sarcoma with focal myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 7. He was subsequently treated with chemotherapy and radiation and continued to show no evidence of disease. The diagnosis of pulmonary artery sarcoma should be suspected in patients who present with manifestations of pulmonary embolism, especially when there is no evidence of deep venous thrombosis and poor response to anticoagulant therapy. Multimodal therapy can provide prolonged survival. PMID:25425986

  10. Nanoparticle-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jasmine Jia'en; Muralikrishnan, Sindu; Ng, Cheng-Teng; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2010-09-01

    In recent decades, advances in nanotechnology engineering have given rise to the rapid development of many novel applications in the biomedical field. However, studies into the health and safety of these nanomaterials are still lacking. The main concerns are the adverse effects to health caused by acute or chronic exposure to nanoparticles (NPs), especially in the workplace environment. The lung is one of the main routes of entry for NPs into the body and, hence, a likely site for accumulation of NPs. Once NPs enter the interstitial air spaces and are quickly taken up by alveolar cells, they are likely to induce toxic effects. In this review, we highlight the different aspects of lung toxicity resulting from NP exposure, such as generation of oxidative stress, DNA damage and inflammation leading to fibrosis and pneumoconiosis, and the underlying mechanisms causing pulmonary toxicity.

  11. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking massive pulmonary embolus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Slater, Matthew; Smith, Pamela P; Karamlou, Tara; Mansoor, Atiya; Ravichandran, Pasala

    2006-08-01

    Intimal sarcomas of the pulmonary artery are rare tumors that are often difficult to distinguish from pulmonary thromboembolic disease, complicating accurate diagnosis and timely therapy. We report the case of a gentleman with a primary pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a massive pulmonary embolism and complete right ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The patient's condition was successfully managed with urgent pulmonary artery thromboendarterectomy, pulmonary valve replacement, and tricuspid valve annuloplasty.

  12. Effects of propofol containing EDTA on mineral metabolism in medical ICU patients with pulmonary dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Papadakos, P J; Tharratt, R S; Hall, J B; Williams, G J

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether the addition of disodium edetate (EDTA) to propofol significantly alters mineral metabolism, adverse events, and outcome in critically ill medical patients with acute pulmonary dysfunction. Multicentre, double-randomised, double-blind, comparative trial. Medical intensive care units of 5 health centres. A total of 85 haemodynamically stable men and women aged 18-81 years who had pulmonary dysfunction or adult respiratory distress syndrome as a primary diagnosis or complication and who were expected to require at least 48 hours of sedation and mechanical ventilation. Patients were randomised to receive propofol with or without EDTA and then to 1 of 2 sedation levels: light (Modified Ramsay Sedation Scale [MRSS] score of 2 to 3) or deep (MRSS score of 4 to 5). Propofol was administered by continuous infusion at an initial rate of 5 microg/kg per min and titrated as needed. Approximately 63 % of patients had a high severity of illness as indicated by an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score > or = 19. As expected, these patients had a higher mortality rate but did not require a higher dose of propofol or propofol with EDTA. Extensive evaluation of cation homeostasis showed that ionised calcium and magnesium concentrations remained remarkably stable during treatment. Total calcium concentration was low as a result of hypoalbuminemia. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentration was elevated in both study groups at baseline, on day 4, and at the end of sedation. There were no significant differences in electrolyte levels and no progression to renal dysfunction. There were also no significant differences in haemodynamic or adverse-event profiles. Treatment-related adverse events occurred in 5 patients in each group; 4 of these (in 3 patients receiving propofol and 1 patient receiving propofol with EDTA) were considered serious. Because a large percentage of patients experienced a change in sedation level, no analyses were performed using

  13. Pulmonary rehabilitation and pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Varadi, Robert G; Goldstein, Roger

    2009-12-01

    Though pulmonary rehabilitation can have potent effects on exercise capacity and quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), not all patients benefit to the same degree. Enabling patients to achieve higher training intensities may improve exercise capacity. Adding pharmacological agents to target the abnormal ventilatory mechanics or skeletal muscle dysfunction may enhance the effects of exercise training. This review discusses the rationale and clinical evidence supporting the use of pharmacological adjuncts during the course of pulmonary rehabilitation.

  14. Cystic pulmonary hydatidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Pathania, Rajnish; Jhobta, Anupam; Thakur, Babu Ram; Chopra, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Worldwide, pulmonary hydatid cyst is a significant problem medically, socially, and economically. Surgery is the definitive therapy of pulmonary hydatidosis. Benzimidazoles may be considered in patients with a surgical contraindication. This review will focus on pathogenesis, lifecycle, clinical features, and management of pulmonary hydatid disease. PMID:27051107

  15. Handbook of pulmonary emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Spaquolo, S.V.; Medinger, A

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: clinical assessment of the patient with pulmonary disease; interpretation of arterial blood gases in the emergency patient; life-threatening pneumonia; extrapulmonic ventilatory failure; acute inhalation lung disease; pulmonary edema; near drowning; chest trauma; upper airway emergencies; chronic lung disease with acute respiratory decompensation; acute respiratory failure in the patient with chronic airflow obstruction; asthma; hemoptysis; embolic pulmonary disease; superior vena cava syndrome; catastrophic pleural disease; ventilatory assistance and its complications; and ventilator emergencies.

  16. Percutaneous femoral arteriovenous shunt creation for advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a single-center safety and efficacy study.

    PubMed

    Bertog, Stefan C; Kolmer, Christina; Kleschnew, Swetlana; Franke, Jennifer; Wunderlich, Nina; Kardos, Peter; Sievert, Horst

    2012-02-01

    Advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease causes a significant reduction in functional capacity because of dyspnea and fatigue, partially related to hypoxemia and compromised oxygen delivery. Percutaneous creation of an arteriovenous shunt may increase oxygen delivery and, hence, improve patients' functional capacity. This is a prospective, single-center, proof-of-concept pilot study. Patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent percutaneous arteriovenous shunt creation. End points were the change in 6-minute walking distance; quality of life, measured by St George's Respiratory Questionnaire; and physiological parameters at 12-week follow-up. Fifteen patients underwent percutaneous arteriovenous shunt creation. Cardiac output and oxygen delivery increased significantly from 4.1 L/min at baseline to 5.9 L/min at 12 weeks (P<0.01) and from 751 mL/min at baseline to 972 mL/min at 12 weeks (P<0.01), respectively; however, there was a trend toward a significant decrease in the 6-minute walking distance between baseline (338 m) and 12-week follow-up (294 m) (P=0.07). There was no significant difference in the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire score, oxygen saturation, or lung function tests. Lower extremity edema, venous stenosis, right heart failure, and deep venous thrombosis occurred in 10, 7, 4, and 4 patients, respectively. Though it causes a significant increase in cardiac output and oxygen delivery , the creation of an arteriovenous shunt in the setting of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease did not improve functional capacity or quality of life. A significant number of adverse events occurred. This concept cannot be recommended for routine clinical use in unselected patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  17. The heart and pulmonary vasculature of the llama (Lama glama)

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D.; Smith, P.; Williams, D.; Harris, P.; Arias-Stella, J.; Krüger, H.

    1974-01-01

    Heath, D., Smith, P., Williams, D., Harris, P., Arias-Stella, J., and Krüger, H. (1974).Thorax, 29, 463-471. The heart and pulmonary vasculature of the llama (Lama glama). A qualitative and quantitative histological study was made of the pulmonary trunk and muscular pulmonary arteries of a male and a pregnant female llama born and living at an altitude of 4,720 m above sea-level in the Peruvian Andes. A similar study was made on the fetal llama. The individual cardiac chambers of the two adults were weighed. Our results show that in the adult llama there is no hypertrophy of the right ventricle or of the media of the pulmonary trunk or small pulmonary arteries. This appears to be of evolutionary significance in respect of survival at high altitude and suggests that the llama does not have a sustained significant pulmonary hypertension. The pulmonary arteries of the fetal llama are thick-walled and we associate this with the physiological pulmonary hypertension of fetal life. Images PMID:4854860

  18. Pulmonary artery sarcoma masquerading as chronic pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Ugur; Sinan, Umit Yasar; Calpar, Ilknur; Yildizeli, Bedrettin; Yanartas, Mehmet; Filinte, Deniz; Kucukoglu, Mehmet Serdar

    2014-10-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with pulmonary artery sarcoma, a very rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. Her tumor was initially misdiagnosed as chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, and she underwent pulmonary endarterectomy. Early diagnosis of primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is crucial. That alternative should always be considered before settling on a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Suspicion should be aroused by the failure of anticoagulant treatment to alleviate pulmonary perfusion abnormalities and systemic symptoms. Surgical resection of the tumor-preferably by pulmonary endarterectomy, followed by reconstruction as needed-is currently the most promising treatment for pulmonary artery sarcoma.

  19. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Masquerading as Chronic Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ugur; Calpar, Ilknur; Yildizeli, Bedrettin; Yanartas, Mehmet; Filinte, Deniz; Kucukoglu, Mehmet Serdar

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with pulmonary artery sarcoma, a very rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. Her tumor was initially misdiagnosed as chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, and she underwent pulmonary endarterectomy. Early diagnosis of primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is crucial. That alternative should always be considered before settling on a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Suspicion should be aroused by the failure of anticoagulant treatment to alleviate pulmonary perfusion abnormalities and systemic symptoms. Surgical resection of the tumor—preferably by pulmonary endarterectomy, followed by reconstruction as needed—is currently the most promising treatment for pulmonary artery sarcoma. PMID:25425987

  20. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotwica, Tomasz; Szumarska, Joanna; Staniszewska-Marszalek, Edyta; Mazurek, Walentyna; Kosmala, Wojciech

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) is an uncommon lesion, which may be associated with different etiologies including congenital cardiovascular diseases, systemic vasculitis, connective tissue diseases, infections, and trauma. Idiopathic PAA is sporadically diagnosed by exclusion of concomitant major pathology. We report a case of a 56-year-old female with an idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation identified fortuitously by echocardiography and confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Neither significant pulmonary valve dysfunction nor pulmonary hypertension and other cardiac abnormalities which might contribute to the PAA development were found. Here, we describe echocardiographic and computed tomography findings and review the literature on PAA management.

  1. Miliary pulmonary cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Shane; Marriott, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    A 32-year-old HIV positive male presents with fevers and a non-productive cough. Initial X-ray and subsequent computerised tomography of the chest shows a bilateral miliary pattern of pulmonary infiltration highly suggestive of disseminated tuberculosis. However subsequent results were consistent with disseminated cryptococcosis, including pulmonary involvement, with cryptococcus identified on transbronchial tissue biopsy, and on blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis are generally of well-defined pleural-based nodules and less commonly alveolar infiltrates, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions or cavitating lesions. Miliary pulmonary infiltrates are an exceptionally rare presentation.

  2. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients & Visitors Giving For Professionals Treatment & Programs Health Information Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial ...

  3. Renal physiology of nocturia.

    PubMed

    Verbalis, Joseph G

    2014-04-01

    Renal function, diurnal fluctuations in arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, sex, and advanced age affect urine formation and may contribute to nocturia. Renal effects of AVP are mediated by AVP V2 receptors in the kidney collecting duct. Changes in AVP concentration have the greatest relative effects on urine volume when AVP levels are low; therefore small changes can have a large effect on renal water excretion. AVP is the major regulator of water excretion by the kidneys, and AVP levels have been shown to affect nocturnal voiding. Results of several studies show that patients with nocturia had no significant variation in plasma AVP, whereas patients without nocturia had significant diurnal variation in plasma AVP. The V2 receptor gene is located on the X chromosome, which has important sex-specific consequences. For example, mutations in the V2 gene can cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, predominantly in men. Age-related changes in water metabolism are associated with overall body composition, kidney, and brain. Older people generally experience decreased extracellular fluid and plasma volume, which leads to increased adverse consequences from net body water gain or loss. Renal function declines with age, and the ability to concentrate urine and conserve sodium is reduced in the elderly. Thirst perception is also decreased in the elderly, who, compared with younger people, tend to hypersecrete AVP in response to higher plasma osmolality, possibly resulting in hyponatremia. These aspects of renal physiology should be considered when antidiuretic drugs are prescribed for the treatment of nocturia.

  4. Impact of Pulmonary Vascular Resistances in Heart Transplantation for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Canter, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is one of the major diagnoses in pediatric heart transplantation recipients of all age groups. Assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance in these patients prior to transplantation is crucial to determine their candidacy, however, it is frequently inaccurate because of their abnormal anatomy and physiology. This problem places them at significant risk for pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure post transplantation. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease depends on their pulmonary blood flow patterns, systemic ventricle function, as well as semilunar valves and atrioventricular valves structure and function. In our review we analyze the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease and end-stage heart failure, and outline the state of the art pre-transplantation medical and surgical management to achieve reverse remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature by using pulmonary vasodilators and mechanical circulatory support. PMID:22548028

  5. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Kartikey A; Puligandla, Pramod S

    2015-02-01

    The management of pulmonary hypertension is multi-faceted, with therapies directed at supporting cardiovascular and pulmonary function, treating the underlying cause (if feasible), and preventing irreversible remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Recently, manipulation of signaling pathways and mediators contained within the pulmonary vascular endothelial cell has become a new target. This article will review the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension and the broad principles involved in its management, with specific emphasis on pharmacological therapies directed at the pulmonary vascular endothelium.

  7. MR and CT imaging of the structural and functional changes of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Runo, James; Jarjour, Nizar; Roldan, Alejandro; Chesler, Naomi; François, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The current Dana Point classification system (2009) divides elevation of pulmonary artery pressure into Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH). Fortunately, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not a common disease. However, with the aging of the first world’s population, heart failure is now an important cause of pulmonary hypertension with up to 9% of the population involved. PAH is usually asymptomatic until late in the disease process. While there are indirect features of PAH found on noninvasive imaging studies, the diagnosis and management still requires right heart catheterization. Imaging features of PAH include: 1. Enlargement of the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries, 2. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance, 3. Tapering of the peripheral pulmonary arteries, 4. Enlargement of the inferior vena cava, and 5. Increased mean transit time. The chronic requirement to generate high pulmonary arterial pressures measurably affects the right heart and main pulmonary artery. This change in physiology causes the following structural and functional alterations that have been shown to have prognostic significance: Relative area change of the pulmonary trunk, RVSVindex, RVSV, RVEDVindex, LVEDVindex, and baseline RVEF <35%. All of these variables can be quantified non-invasively and followed longitudinally in each patient using MRI to modify the treatment regimen. Untreated PAH frequently results in a rapid clinical decline and death within 3 years of diagnosis. Unfortunately, even with treatment, less than 1/2 of these patients are alive at four years. PMID:23612440

  8. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  9. Pulmonary Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Melissa M.; Stokes, Dennis C.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to summarize the literature that documents the long-term impact of cancer treatment modalities on pulmonary function among survivors of cancer and to identify potential areas for further research. Methods: Systematic reviews of clinical trials, observational studies, case series, and review articles were conducted. Articles were limited to the studies that discussed pulmonary toxicity or late effects among pediatric cancer survivors and to follow-up investigations that were conducted a minimum of 2 years after completion of cancer-related treatment or 1 year after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Results: Sixty publications (51 clinical studies/reports and nine reviews) published from January 1970 to June 2010 in PubMed met the inclusion criteria. Data showed an association between radiotherapy, alkylating agents, bleomycin, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and thoracic surgery and pulmonary toxicity, as well as possible interactions among these modalities. Conclusions: Pulmonary toxicity is a common long-term complication of exposure to certain anticancer therapies in childhood and can vary from subclinical to life threatening. Pulmonary function and associated loss of optimal exercise capacity may have adverse effects on long-term quality of life in survivors. Lung function diminishes as a function of normal aging, and the effects of early lung injury from cancer therapy may compound these changes. The information presented in this review is designed to provide a stimulus to promote both observational and interventional research that expands our knowledge and aids in the design of interventions to prevent or ameliorate pulmonary late effects among survivors of childhood cancer. PMID:21415131

  10. Right Aortic Arch Detected Prenatally: A Rare Case With Bilateral Arterial Duct and Nonconfluent Pulmonary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Silvia; Fainardi, Valentina; Spaziani, Gaia; Favilli, Silvia; Chiappa, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    We describe a rare case of right aortic arch (RAA) and nonconfluent pulmonary arteries. RAA and a right-sided arterial duct (AD) were identified on the prenatal scan, but a second left-sided AD and disconnection of the left pulmonary artery were missed. The missed diagnosis in fetal life adversely affected postnatal management. We suggest that fetuses with a prenatal diagnosis of RAA and right-sided AD be delivered in tertiary care centres to rule out an association with bilateral AD and nonconfluent pulmonary arteries after birth. Prompt postnatal diagnosis will enable preservation of flow in the disconnected pulmonary artery through prostaglandin E1 infusion until surgical reconstruction.

  11. Successful video-assisted thoracic surgery for pulmonary endometriosis: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Tomohiro; Fujioka, Shinji; Adachi, Yoshin; Miwa, Ken; Taniguchi, Yuji; Nakamura, Hiroshige

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary endometriosis is a disease in which uterine endometrial cells with stromal components grow in the pulmonary parenchymal tissues or pleura. Surgical resection is considered an effective and radical treatment for pulmonary endometriosis to avoid the adverse effects of long-term hormone therapy in young women of childbearing years with a localized abnormal lesion. We report a case of pulmonary endometriosis with catamenial hemoptysis, an uncommon result of this disease, which was diagnosed histologically and treated successfully by video-assisted thoracic surgery.

  12. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Sometimes doctors can find out what is causing pulmonary fibrosis (lung scarring). For example, exposure to environmental pollutants ...

  14. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  15. Pulmonary circulation at exercise.

    PubMed

    Naeije, Robert; Chesler, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high-flow and low-pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg/min/L in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg/min/L over four to six decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20 to 25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40 to 50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease.

  16. Pulmonary artery wave propagation and reservoir function in conscious man: impact of pulmonary vascular disease, respiration and dynamic stress tests.

    PubMed

    Su, Junjing; Manisty, Charlotte; Simonsen, Ulf; Howard, Luke S; Parker, Kim H; Hughes, Alun D

    2017-08-17

    Wave travel plays an important role in cardiovascular physiology. However, many aspects of pulmonary arterial wave behaviour remain unclear. Wave intensity and reservoir-excess pressure analyses were applied in the pulmonary artery in subjects with and without pulmonary hypertension during spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests. Arterial wave energy decreased during expiration and Valsalva manoeuvre due to decreased ventricular preload. Wave energy also decreased during handgrip exercise due to increased heart rate. In pulmonary hypertension patients, the asymptotic pressure at which the microvascular flow ceases, the reservoir pressure related to arterial compliance and the excess pressure caused by waves increased. The reservoir and excess pressures decreased during Valsalva manoeuvre but remained unchanged during handgrip exercise. This study provides insights into the influence of pulmonary vascular disease, spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests on pulmonary artery wave propagation and reservoir function. Detailed haemodynamic analysis may provide novel insights into the pulmonary circulation. Therefore, wave intensity and reservoir-excess pressure analyses were applied in the pulmonary artery to characterize changes in wave propagation and reservoir function during spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests. Right heart catheterization was performed using a pressure and Doppler flow sensor tipped guidewire to obtain simultaneous pressure and flow velocity measurements in the pulmonary artery in control subjects and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) at rest. In controls, recordings were also obtained during Valsalva manoeuvre and handgrip exercise. The asymptotic pressure at which the flow through the microcirculation ceases, the reservoir pressure related to arterial compliance and the excess pressure caused by arterial waves increased in PAH patients compared to controls. The systolic and diastolic rate constants

  17. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

    1984-03-01

    Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function were found, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

  18. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

    1984-03-01

    Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although we found no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

  19. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation.

  20. Superiority of pulmonary administration of mepenzolate bromide over other routes as treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Kurotsu, Shota; Asano, Teita; Yamakawa, Naoki; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasunobu; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Toru; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Mizushima, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    We recently proposed that mepenzolate bromide (mepenzolate) would be therapeutically effective against chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to its both anti-inflammatory and bronchodilatory activities. In this study, we examined the benefits and adverse effects associated with different routes of mepenzolate administration in mice. Oral administration of mepenzolate caused not only bronchodilation but also decreased the severity of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema; however, compared with the intratracheal route of administration, about 5000 times higher dose was required to achieve this effect. Intravenously or intrarectally administered mepenzolate also showed these pharmacological effects. The intratracheal route of mepenzolate administration, but not other routes, resulted in protective effects against elastase-induced pulmonary damage and bronchodilation at a much lower dose than that which affected defecation and heart rate. These results suggest that the pulmonary route of mepenzolate administration may be superior to other routes (oral, intravenous or intrarectal) to treat COPD patients. PMID:24676126

  1. Pulmonary functions in yogic and sedentary population.

    PubMed

    Vedala, Shobha Rani; Mane, Abhay B; Paul, C Nliranjan

    2014-07-01

    The Pulmonary Function Tests are important for measuring the fitness of an individual from a physiological point of view. Lung function parameters tend to have a relationship with lifestyle such as regular yoga, an ancient system of Indian Philosophy. Yoga is probably the best lifestyle ever devised in the history of mankind. Hence the present analytical study was undertaken to assess the effects of yoga on respiratory system when compared with sedentary subjects. To compare the pulmonary function test among the yogic and sedentary groups. The present study was conducted on 50 subjects practicing yoga and 50 sedentary subjects in the age group of 20-40 years. They were assessed for pulmonary function test in which sedentary group acted as controls. The tests which were recorded as per standard procedure using Medspiror as determinants of pulmonary function were FVC, FEV1, FEV3, PEFR and FVC/FEV1 ratio. Pulmonary Functions were compared between the yoga practitioners and sedentary group. Yoga exercise significantly increased chest wall expansion as observed by higher values of pulmonary functions compared with sedentary controls. The study group were having higher mean of percentage value of FVC 109.1 ± 18.2%, FEV1 of 116.3 ± 15.9%, FEV3 of 105.7 ± 14.9 %, PEFR of 109.2 ± 21.3% and FEV1/FVC ratio of 111.3 ± 6.9% as compared to sedentary group. Regular Yoga practice increases the vital capacity, timed vital capacity, maximum voluntary ventilation, breath holding time and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures.

  2. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography: more than a screening tool for pulmonary embolus.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Christian T; Doben, Andrew R; Leon, Stuart M; Fakhry, Samir M; Eriksson, Evert A

    2015-02-01

    Traumatically injured patients have multiple causes for acute respiratory decompensation. We reviewed the use of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in critically injured patients to evaluate the results and impact on patient care. The charts of trauma patients (age >16 years) admitted to our intensive care unit for greater than 48 hours, who underwent CTPA for acute respiratory decompensation, were reviewed to determine the results of these studies and the effect on patient care. We identified 188 patients who underwent CTPA for acute physiologic changes. Pertinent clinical finding were identified in 95% of studies and included atelectasis/collapse (56%), pleural effusion (18%), pneumonia (15%), and pulmonary embolus (18%). These results prompted interventions designed to improve patient outcome. The most frequent interventions were modifications of ventilator therapy (52%), antibiotic therapy (28%), mini-bronchoalveolar lavage (15%), or bronchoscopy (15%). Diagnostic agreement between chest x-ray and CTPA was poor to moderate (κ = 0.013-0.512). Computed tomography pulmonary angiography is valuable in the evaluation of cardiopulmonary deterioration in critically ill traumatically injured patients. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography offers the ability to identify causes of acute physiologic changes not detected using standard chest x-ray. The results of these studies provide insight into the underlying pathophysiology and offer an opportunity to direct subsequent patient care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunosuppression of pulmonary natural killer activity by exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, G.R.; Keyes, L.L.; Stutzman, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Ozone is an oxidant gas and an ubiquitous oxidant air pollutant with the potential to adversely affect pulmonary immune function with a subsequent increase in disease susceptibility. Pulmonary natural killer (NK) activity was measured in order to assess the pulmonary immunotoxicity of continuous ozone exposure. Continuous ozone exposures at 1.0 ppm were performed for 23.5 hours per day for either 1, 5, 7, or 10 consecutive days. Pulmonary immune function was assessed by measuring NK activity from whole-lung homogenate of male Fischer-344 rats. Results of the study indicated that continuous ozone exposure for 1, 5, or 7 days resulted in a significant decrease in pulmonary NK activity. This suppressed pulmonary NK activity returned to control levels after continuous exposure to ozone for 10 days. This adaption, or attenuation process, is complex and poorly understood. Pulmonary NK activity was also suppressed at 0.5 ppm ozone, but not at 0.1 ppm ozone, for 23.5 hours. NK activity is important for defense against viral, bacterial, and neoplastic disease.

  4. [Nonthrombotic pulmonary embolisms].

    PubMed

    Bach, A G; Schramm, D; Surov, A

    2017-03-01

    The term nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism (NTPE) is defined as embolization of pulmonary arteries caused by foreign bodies (e. g. detached catheter fragments), biological substances (e. g. septic thrombus) or exogenous substances (e. g. gas). The frequency of NTPE is underestimated. Symptoms can cover the spectrum from undetectable to sudden death. In addition to mechanical obstruction of the pulmonary arteries, some NTPEs trigger an inflammatory cascade that causes deterioration of vascular, pulmonary and cardiac function. Radiological imaging in combination with the medical history of patients is sufficient to identify most NTPEs with certainty. The aim of this article is to make readers aware of the symptoms, frequency, relevance, classification, pathophysiology, laboratory findings and radiological findings of the most frequent forms of NTPE. The spectrum of forms presented here includes pulmonary embolisms due to foreign bodies (intravascular, intracorporeal and extracorporeal), amniotic fluid, endogenous tissue, fat, tumors, septic thrombi, hydatids, cement, metallic mercury, gas, silicone and particles.

  5. The pulmonary extracellular lining.

    PubMed Central

    George, G; Hook, G E

    1984-01-01

    The extracellular lining of the lungs is reviewed. The pulmonary extracellular lining is a complex mixture of phospholipids, proteins and carbohydrates which is absolutely essential for the maintenance of normal pulmonary functions such as gas exchange. Without the lining the lungs would collapse. Alterations in the pulmonary extracellular lining may underlie some disease conditions induced by toxic agents, especially those which interfere with the formation of pulmonary surfactant. The extracellular lining could be used to detect and monitor damage and disease caused by agents toxic to the lungs. The lining contains many hydrolytic enzymes which may act to detoxify certain toxic agents such as those which contain ester groups. The pulmonary extracellular lining could play a significant role mediating the toxic action of inhaled agents as well as the removal of those agents from the lungs. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:6376100

  6. Physiology Laboratories Quantifying Gas Exchange in Health and Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two quantitatively-oriented physiology laboratories for veterinary students. The laboratory exercises incorporate the procedures of radiology and physical examination with measurement of pulmonary function. Specific laboratory objectives, procedures and equipment needed for diagnoses of the pathologies are listed. (ML)

  7. Physiology Laboratories Quantifying Gas Exchange in Health and Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two quantitatively-oriented physiology laboratories for veterinary students. The laboratory exercises incorporate the procedures of radiology and physical examination with measurement of pulmonary function. Specific laboratory objectives, procedures and equipment needed for diagnoses of the pathologies are listed. (ML)

  8. Disclosing adverse events to patients.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Michael D; Barach, Paul; Derse, Arthur; Maklan, Claire W; Wlody, Ginger Schafer; Fox, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    The rationale for, and recommended approaches to, disclosing adverse events to patients are examined on the basis of the experience of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The VHA's National Ethics Committee endorses a general policy requiring the routine disclosure of adverse events to patients and offers practical recommendations for implementation. Disclosure is required when the adverse event (1) has a perceptible effect on the patient that was not discussed in advance as a known risk; (2) necessitates a change in the patient's care; (3) potentially poses an important risk to the patient's future health, even if that risk is extremely small; (4) involves providing a treatment or procedure without the patient's consent. From an ethical perspective, disclosure is required and should not be limited to cases in which the injury is obvious or severe. Disclosure of near misses is also discretionary but is advisable at times. In general, disclosure by a clinician involved in the patient's care is appropriate. Although a variety of psychological and cultural factors may make clinicians and organizations reluctant to disclose adverse events to patients, the arguments favoring routine disclosure are compelling. Organizations should develop clear policies supporting disclosure and should create supportive environments that enable clinicians to meet their ethical obligations to disclose adverse events to patients and families.

  9. Pulmonary Extramedullary Hematopoiesis Involving the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Varun; Silverman, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) occurs as a complication of hematologic disorders such as myelofibrosis, sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. The extramedullary tissue usually involves liver, spleen and lymph nodes, less frequently the chest. We present a recent case of a man with myeloproliferative neoplasm who developed pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to EMH in the lung and pulmonary artery. Radiation therapy was considered the best approach, but it didn’t work and the patient died a week after radiation therapy was completed. We also review herein the present literature. PMID:25852851

  10. Chronic antepartum maternal hyperoxygenation in a case of severe fetal Ebstein's anomaly with circular shunt physiology.

    PubMed

    Arunamata, Alisa; Axelrod, David M; Bianco, Katherine; Balasubramanian, Sowmya; Quirin, Amy; Tacy, Theresa A

    2017-01-01

    Perinatal mortality remains high among fetuses diagnosed with Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve. The subgroup of patients with pulmonary valve regurgitation is at particularly high risk. In the setting of pulmonary valve regurgitation, early constriction of the ductus arteriosus may be a novel perinatal management strategy to reduce systemic steal resulting from circular shunt physiology. We report the use of chronic antepartum maternal oxygen therapy for constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus and modulation of fetal pulmonary vascular resistance in a late presentation of Ebstein's anomaly with severe tricuspid valve regurgitation, reversal of flow in the ductus arteriosus, and continuous pulmonary valve regurgitation.

  11. Advances in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Dunbar

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Approved medications for the treatment of adult PAH have been used to treat children, but evidence-based treatment algorithms for children are lacking. Pediatric PAH registries have begun to define the incidence and prevalence of idiopathic PAH and PAH associated with congenital heart disease. A pediatric-specific classification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease has been proposed. Furthermore, the first randomized placebo-controlled trial of type-5 phosphodiesterase therapy in treatment-naïve children with PAH has been completed and reported. This trial highlights the importance of the difficulties of performing clinical trials in children with targeted PAH therapy as well as the importance of long-term follow-up of adverse events. Classification, clinical trials, and therapy for children with PAH must take into account the unique aspects of PAH in children.

  12. Pulmonary pathophysiology and lung mechanics in anesthesiology: a case-based overview.

    PubMed

    Vidal Melo, Marcos F; Musch, Guido; Kaczka, David W

    2012-12-01

    Anesthesia, surgical requirements, and patients' unique pathophysiology all combine to make the accumulated knowledge of respiratory physiology and lung mechanics vital in patient management. This article take a case-based approach to discuss how the complex interactions between anesthesia, surgery, and patient disease affect patient care with respect to pulmonary pathophysiology and clinical decision making. Two disparate scenarios are examined: a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing a lung resection, and a patient with coronary artery disease undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. The impacts of important concepts in pulmonary physiology and respiratory mechanics on clinical management decisions are discussed.

  13. Prognostic value of pulmonary dead space in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A study published in the previous issue of Critical Care demonstrates that measurement of the pulmonary dead-space fraction is superior to hypoxemia as an indicator of a favorable physiologic response to prone positioning in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. These results add to the growing evidence supporting the clinical and research value of measuring pulmonary dead space in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and using this pulmonary physiologic end-point as one indicator of a favorable response to therapy. PMID:22067424

  14. Physiological correlates of pulmonary function in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wells, Greg D; Wilkes, Donna L; Schneiderman, Jane E; Thompson, Sara; Coates, Allan L; Ratjen, Felix

    2014-09-01

    Although peak aerobic capacity (VO(2peak)) has been linked to outcome in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), measuring is time consuming, and requires expensive equipment and expertise that is not readily available in all centers. Other fitness parameters such as peak anaerobic power, measures of power and strength may be simpler to deliver in the clinic. The relationship between these measures and established outcomes such as forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) and peak aerobic power (VO(2peak)) in CF remains unclear. Therefore we evaluated (a) aerobic fitness, (b) anaerobic fitness, and (c) upper and lower body muscle strength to determine their relationship to FEV(1) and VO(2peak) in children with CF. Eighty-two patients (7-18 years) with CF (40 female) from the CF clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto performed a maximal incremental cycling test to exhaustion. Anaerobic power (W) for 10 and 30 sec cycling trials as well as vertical jump (VJ) and hand grip strength (HG) were compared to FEV(1) and VO(2peak). Absolute VO(2peak) (R(2)  = 0.16, P < 0.001), anaerobic power (R(2)  = 0.21, P < 0.001), and hand grip strength (R(2)  = 0.10, P = 0.003) were significantly correlated to lung function whereas measures of explosive lower body strength (VJ) were not. Anaerobic power (R(2)  = 0.16, P = 0.001) and hand grip strength (R(2)  = 0.08, P = 0.01) were related to VO(2peak). Vertical jump was correlated with VO(2peak) (R(2)  = 0.29, P < 0.001) but not FEV(1). Simple fitness tests such as hand grip strength and anaerobic cycle tests may be useful indicators of lung health and fitness. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Palliative Care for the Lung Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Virginia; Koczywas, Marianna; Kim, Jae; Raz, Dan; Hurria, Arti; Hayter, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation, as a quality of life intervention, has a role to play in palliative care for lung cancer patients. Combining the art and skills of clinical care, physiological, and behavioral tools, pulmonary rehabilitation can serve to rebuild the functional capacity of patients limited by breathlessness and deconditioning. Exercise programs are the primary tool used to restore and rebuild the patient's endurance by challenging the entire pathway of oxygen transport and improving gas exchange. Other tools of pulmonary rehabilitation include breathing retraining, self-management skills, airway clearance techniques, bronchodilitation, smoking cessation and oxygen therapy. Pulmonary rehabilitation is now becoming a part of supportive care for patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The ability to be more active without suffering the consequences of dyspnea on exertion boosts the patient's self-efficacy and allows for an improved quality of life, so that lung cancer patients can participate in their family lives during this therapeutic challenge. PMID:26709350

  16. [Pulmonary surfactant homeostasis associated genetic abnormalities and lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaojing; Sun, Xiuzhu; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng; Zhao, Xueming; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Huabin; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is synthesized and secreted by alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells, which is a complex compound formed by proteins and lipids. Surfactant participates in a range of physiological processes such as reducing the surface tension, keeping the balance of alveolar fluid, maintaining normal alveolar morphology and conducting host defense. Genetic disorders of the surfactant homeostasis genes may result in lack of surfactant or cytotoxicity, and lead to multiple lung diseases in neonates, children and adults, including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper has provided a review for the functions and processes of pulmonary surfactant metabolism, as well as the connection between disorders of surfactant homeostasis genes and lung diseases.

  17. Adverse reactions to tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R L; Lowe, R S; Lanier, B Q

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective review of 740 charts of patients with a history of adverse reaction to tetanus toxoid immunization was undertaken. The most common reactions, by history, were local edema and tenderness (33%), fever (15%), and anaphylactoid response (33%). Three patients who had a vesicular eruption at the immunization site were found to have delayed hypersensitivity to mercury. Thirty percent of the patients had received tetanus toxoid within one year and 55% within five years of evaluation. Reactive responses to immediate skin tests were exceedingly rare (less than 1%). None of the challenge patients suffered an adverse reaction.

  18. Sarcoma of the pulmonary trunk and the main pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Huwer, Hanno; Ozbek, Cem; Waldmann, Rita; Winning, Johannes; Isringhaus, Helmut; Kalweit, Gerhard

    2008-04-01

    We report on a sarcoma of the central pulmonary arteries. Surgical therapy consisted in replacing both main pulmonary arteries and the pulmonary trunk including the pulmonary valve. Six months later a left-sided pneumonectomy had to be performed due to an intravascular tumor. Fifteen months after first resection treatment, recurrent tumors of the right pulmonary artery and the right ventricle were resected. Two years after the first operation the patient has no detectable tumor.

  19. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and subchronic episodic ozone exposures in Brown Norway rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this s...

  20. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and subchronic episodic ozone exposures in Brown Norway rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this s...

  1. A Non-Invasive Assessment of Cardiopulmonary Hemodynamics with MRI in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Octavia; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Cuttica, Michael J.; Collins, Jeremy D.; Selvaraj, Senthil; Chatterjee, Neil R.; Guetter, Christoph; Carr, James C.; Carroll, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We propose a method for non-invasive quantification of hemodynamic changes in the pulmonary arteries resulting from pulmonary hypertension (PH). Methods Using a two-element windkessel model, and input parameters derived from standard MRI evaluation of flow, cardiac function and valvular motion, we derive: pulmonary artery compliance (C), mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), time-averaged intra-pulmonary pressure waveforms and pulmonary artery pressures (systolic (sPAP) and diastolic (dPAP)). MRI results were compared directly to reference standard values from right heart catheterization (RHC) obtained in a series of patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension (PH). Results In 7 patients with suspected PH undergoing RHC, MRI and echocardiography, there was no statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between parameters measured by MRI and RHC. Using standard clinical cutoffs to define PH (mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg), MRI was able to correctly identify all patients as having pulmonary hypertension, and to correctly distinguish between pulmonary arterial (mPAP≥ 25 mmHg, PCWP<15 mmHg) and venous hypertension (mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg, PCWP ≥ 15 mmHg) in 5 of 7 cases. Conclusions We have developed a mathematical model capable of quantifying physiological parameters that reflect the severity of PH. PMID:26283577

  2. Pulmonary monosporosis: An uncommon pulmonary mycotic infection

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, P. C.; Christianson, C. S.; Gorelick, D. F.; Larsh, H. W.

    1969-01-01

    Pulmonary monosporosis is an uncommon form of fungal disease of the lung and bronchorespiratory passages. To date, only six isolated cases have been reported in the literature. It is the purpose of this communication to present the clinical findings, laboratory data, radiographic appearance, and description of the pathology findings in three additional cases identified at the Missouri State Sanatorium. The fungus Monosporium apiospermum is present in the soil and has a world-wide distribution. It has been shown to produce localized lesions in the foot called maduromycosis. Pulmonary infection due to this fungus has no characteristic clinical pattern, but the cultural characteristics of M. apiospermum permit specific identification. Histologically, the pulmonary involvement shows a variegated non-specific pattern. In the majority of cases, well-defined, predisposing factors are present. A review of the reported six cases and a study of our three cases strengthens our belief that the organism acts as a secondary invader. To date, no mode of therapy has appeared to exert a beneficial influence on the course of the disease. To our knowledge, no clinical trial using any of the antifungal agents has been attempted. Surgical treatment is indicated whenever the lesions are considered resectable. From our observations, we conclude that pulmonary infection with M. apiospermum could be recognized more frequently if physicians were more aware of this fungal infection and if the mycology laboratories would take additional care in specific identification. Images PMID:5389072

  3. [Pulmonary thromboembolism in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Angulo Vázquez, José; Ramírez García, Andrés; Torres Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Vargas González, Alejandro; Cortés Sanabria, Laura

    2004-08-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a serious and sometimes mortal complication of pregnant and puerperal women. Pulmonary embolism diagnosis can be difficult. In Mexico, it causes between 2.5 and 16% of maternal mortality. To estimate the incidence of pulmonary embolism, to identify most frequently risk factors that contribute to the presence of pulmonary embolism as an obstetrical complication and to determine clinical characteristics and specific diagnostic tests in hospitalized patients at the Hospital de Ginecoobstetricia, Centro Medico Nacional de Occidente, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. We conducted a cross-sectional study from January 1st 1997 to December 31st, 2002. We identified 30 patients with pulmonary embolism confirmed by ventilation-perfusion scan. Incidence of 4.7 cases per 10,000 pregnancies was found. Most frequently, risk factors were varicose veins in lower extremities (0.045), previous thromboembolic event (0.030) and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (0.05). Cesarean section was present in 85% of the cases with pulmonary embolism during puerperium. The most common clinical findings were: dyspnea (100%), chest pain (63%), tachycardia (93%) and tachypnea (93%). Sinus tachycardia (93%) and S1 Q3 T3 were the electrocardiogram findings most commonly observed. 83% of the patients showed abnormalities in chest radiography. 100% presented altered blood values. Mortality rate was of 6.6%. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism should be based on risk factors and clinical findings. Basic laboratory and scan are essential. Early diagnosis and treatment significantly reduce mortality rates.

  4. Current views on the mechanisms of pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J V

    1978-06-01

    Understanding of the causes of pulmonary oedema must be based on knowledge of the mechanism responsible for fluid exchange between the several compartments of the normal lung. Recent physiological studies have clarified the main features of these mechanisms. However in three areas knowledge is still incomplete--the magnitude of the hydrostatic and oncotic forces responsible for fluid movement within the lung, the means by which protein leaks across the wall of small pulmonary vessels and the routes by which fluid and protein pass between the interstitial tissues of the lung and the alveolar space. Further work is needed in these areas. On the basis of this physiological knowledge the mode of development of hydrostatic oedema, the role of lymphatics in pulmonary oedema, and the several stages of pulmonary oedema development that may culminate in alveolar flooding are now clearly understood. Knowledge is less complete about oedema due to increased vascular permeability. In some experimental models, such as alloxan, leakage is due to irreversible injury to the alveolar wall; in other models, including ANTU, oedema formation has been shown to depend upon minor and reversible changes in pulmonary vascular endothelium similar to those that cause exudate formation in areas of acute inflammation. In no instance is detailed information available of both the rate and magnitude of protein leakage and of the morphological basis of increased vascular permeability. Further work is required in this area. Present knowledge allows an adequate explanation of the changes that occur in many clinically important types of pulmonary oedema, including cardiac failure and neurogenic pulmonary oedema. Other types of oedema, notably that which may complicate traumatic shock or extrapulmonary sepsis and high altitude pulmonary oedema, are more complex and the details of their pathogenesis are still obscure.

  5. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  6. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  7. Reverse engineering adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Chipman, J Kevin; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. The application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) can be used to overcome these limitations. This approach was used to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas). Gene expression changes in FHM ovaries in response to seven different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions, were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. Potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide were examined using two mutual information-based methods to infer gene regulatory networks and potential AOPs. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict network paths from stressor to adverse outcome as candidate AOPs. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment, thus leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biological processes, biomarkers, or alternative endpoints that can be used to monitor an AOP. Finally, the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology were identified and a road map for the utilization of these tools presented.

  8. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  9. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  10. Pulmonary vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dongmei; Hickey, Anthony J

    2007-04-01

    This review will discuss developments in the field of pulmonary vaccine delivery. The possibilities of adopting aerosol-generation technology and specific pharmaceutical formulations for the purpose of pulmonary immunization are described. Aerosol-generation systems might offer advantages with respect to vaccine stability and antigenicity. Adjuvants and their inclusion in vaccine-delivery systems are described. Other formulation components, such as surfactants, particulate systems and dispersion of the aerosols are detailed in this paper. The noninvasive, relatively safe and low-cost nature of pulmonary delivery may provide great benefits to the public health vaccination campaign.

  11. Acute pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jessica; Graham, David; O'Reilly, Sarah; Punton, Gillian

    2016-02-03

    Acute pulmonary oedema is a distressing and life-threatening illness that is associated with a sudden onset of symptoms. For the best possible patient outcomes, it is essential that nurses in all clinical areas are equipped to accurately recognise, assess and manage patients with acute pulmonary oedema. This article outlines the pathophysiology of acute cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, and suggests a systematic approach to the recognition and management of its most serious manifestations. Long-term care and symptom recognition are discussed and suggestions for ongoing patient self-management are provided.

  12. Pulmonary embolus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Jennifer C; D'Alton, Mary E

    2013-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism remains in the top three leading causes of maternal death in the US, representing 10.2% of pregnancy-related deaths. Risk of developing a pulmonary embolus appears to increase throughout pregnancy, with a peak in incidence in the early postpartum period. Overall the incidence of VTE is 0.6-1.8 VTEs per 1000 deliveries. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary embolus can prove challenging, but the aim should be to optimize maternal outcome while minimizing hemorrhagic complications. Low-molecular-weight heparin is a safe and effective treatment for the majority of cases of pregnancy-related pulmonary embolus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolated pulmonary Goodpasture syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harrity, P; Gilbert-Barness, E; Cabalka, A; Hong, R; Zimmerman, J

    1991-01-01

    The case of a 13-year-old girl with Goodpasture syndrome is reported. The presentation at this age with only pulmonary hemorrhage is unusual among Goodpasture syndrome patients. The case illustrates well the diagnostic difficulties in Goodpasture syndrome. The choices of treatment modalities available for this disease and the results and risks of such treatment options are reviewed. A discussion and classification of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage is presented. The case emphasizes that Goodpasture syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage in spite of a lack of renal abnormalities and that serum anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody testing can be of great help in confirming the diagnosis.

  14. Pulmonary atelectasis: a pathogenic perioperative entity.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Michelle; Kavanagh, Brian P

    2005-04-01

    Atelectasis occurs in the dependent parts of the lungs of most patients who are anesthetized. Development of atelectasis is associated with decreased lung compliance, impairment of oxygenation, increased pulmonary vascular resistance, and development of lung injury. The adverse effects of atelectasis persist into the postoperative period and can impact patient recovery. This review article focuses on the causes, nature, and diagnosis of atelectasis. The authors discuss the effects and implications of atelectasis in the perioperative period and illustrate how preventive measures may impact outcome. In addition, they examine the impact of atelectasis and its prevention in acute lung injury.

  15. Extracellular Vesicles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Tsukasa; Fujita, Yu; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by the progression of irreversible airflow limitation and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several crucial mechanisms of COPD pathogenesis have been studied, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies, are released from almost all cell types and are recognized as novel cell–cell communication tools. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide variety of molecules, such as microRNAs, messenger RNAs, and proteins, which are involved in physiological functions and the pathology of various diseases. Recently, EVs have attracted considerable attention in pulmonary research. In this review, we summarize the recent findings of EV-mediated COPD pathogenesis. We also discuss the potential clinical usefulness of EVs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents for the treatment of COPD. PMID:27801806

  16. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bobhate, Prashant; Guo, Long; Jain, Shreepal; Haugen, Richard; Coe, James Y; Cave, Dominic; Rutledge, Jennifer; Adatia, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The risks associated with cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are increased compared with adults. We reviewed retrospectively all clinical data in children with PH [mean pulmonary artery pressure (mean PAp) ≥25 mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) ≥3 Wood units m(2)] undergoing cardiac catheterization between 2009 and 2014. Our strategy included a team approach, minimal catheter manipulation and sildenafil administration prior to extubation. Adverse events occurring within 48 h were noted. Seventy-five patients (36 males), median age 4 years (0.3-17) and median weight 14.6 kg (2.6-77 kg), underwent 97 cardiac catheterizations. Diagnoses included idiopathic or heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (29 %), PAH associated with congenital heart disease (52 %), left heart disease (5 %) and lung disease (14 %). Mean PAp was 43 ± 19 mmHg; mean PVRI was 9.7 ± 6 Wood units m(2). There were no deaths or serious arrhythmias. No patient required cardiac massage. Three patients who suffered adverse events had suprasystemic PAp (3/3), heritable PAH (2/3), decreased right ventricular function (3/3), and pulmonary artery capacitance index <1 ml/mmHg/m(2) (3/3) and were treatment naïve (3/3). No patient undergoing follow-up cardiac catheterization suffered a complication. In 45 % of cases, the data acquired from the follow-up cardiac catheterization resulted in an alteration of therapy. Three percent of children with PH undergoing cardiac catheterization suffered adverse events. However, there were no intra or post procedural deaths and no one required cardiac massage or cardioversion. Follow-up cardiac catheterization in patients receiving pulmonary hypertensive targeted therapy is safe and provides useful information.

  17. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  18. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  19. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bautista, Carlos; Hernández-González, Ignacio; Escribano-Subías, Pilar

    2017-03-22

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension which is part, together with pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, of the special designation (subgroup 1') within pulmonary hypertension group 1 in the latest classification of the pulmonary hypertension World Symposium. Recent discovery that gene mutations in eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4 (EIF2AK4) are responsible for inherited forms of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease has changed the role of genetic testing, acquiring relevant importance in the diagnosis of these patients. Despite the advances in genetic, cellular and molecular basis knowledge in the last decade, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease remains as a rare aetiology of pulmonary hypertension without any effective medical treatment approved and poor outcomes. This document aims to review the advances occurred in the understanding of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in the last years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xaubet, Antoni; Ancochea, Julio; Molina-Molina, María

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia associated with the radiological and/or histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Its aetiology is unknown, but probably comprises the action of endogenous and exogenous micro-environmental factors in subjects with genetic predisposition. Its diagnosis is based on the presence of characteristic findings of high-resolution computed tomography scans and pulmonary biopsies in absence of interstitial lung diseases of other aetiologies. Its clinical evolution is variable, although the mean survival rate is 2-5 years as of its clinical presentation. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may present complications and comorbidities which modify the disease's clinical course and prognosis. In the mild-moderate disease, the treatment consists of the administration of anti-fibrotic drugs. In severe disease, the best therapeutic option is pulmonary transplantation. In this paper we review the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease.

  1. Primary pulmonary meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shucheng; Chen, Li; Mao, Yuping; Tong, Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Primary extracranial meningiomas are rare outside the head and neck region. Patient concerns: A 44-year-old female patient had chest pain for more than 1 year. Diagnoses: Preoperative chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a nodule in the right lower lobe, 1.8 cm in diameter. Tumor tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry for vimentin and S-100. Interventions: Histopathologically, the tumor was characterized by whorled nests of spindle-shaped cells accompanied by psammoma bodies. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated tumor cell positivity for vimentin and S-100. This case was diagnosed as a primary pulmonary meningioma. The tumor was removed by a thoracoscopic pulmonary wedge resection. Outcomes: Postoperative cranial and spinal CT scan did not show any intracranial or spinal mass. No recurrence of the tumor was reported at the time of writing up this case report. Lessons: A primary pulmonary meningioma should be considered in the differential diagnosis workup of pulmonary nodules. PMID:28489736

  2. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests. Once you have a diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, exercise testing can help your doctor determine its severity. ... so the doctor can rate your activity level. Exercise testing may be ongoing ... hypertension The World Health Organization has established five groups ...

  3. Pulmonary function tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... measured to estimate the lung volume. To measure diffusion capacity , you breathe a harmless gas, called a ... on your report after pulmonary function tests include: Diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO) Expiratory reserve volume ( ...

  4. [Pulmonary Manifestations of Vasculitis].

    PubMed

    von Vietinghoff, S

    2016-11-01

    The variable symptoms and signs of pulmonary vasculitis are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Vasculitis should be considered in rapidly progressing, severe and unusual manifestations of pulmonary disease. Clinical examination of other organ systems typically affected by vasculitis such as skin and kidney and autoantibody measurements are complementary approaches to manage this situation. Pulmonary involvement is common in small vessel vasculitis including anti-GBM disease (Goodpasture syndrome) and the ANCA-associated vasculitides. Life threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and irreversible damage of other organs, frequently the kidney, are important complications necessitating rapid diagnosis of these conditions.Vasculitides are rare diseases of multiple organs and therapies including biologics are evolving rapidly, requiring cooperation of specialities and with specialized centres to achieve best patient care. All involved physicians should be aware of typical complications of immunosuppressive therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to issue a television public service announcement (PSA). STARS PERFORM FOR SOLD-OUT AUDIENCE AT BROADWAY BELTS ... Patients The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation has a four-star rating from Charity Navigator and is a Better ...

  6. Reperfusion pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Klausner, J.M.; Paterson, I.S.; Mannick, J.A.; Valeri, C.R.; Shepro, D.; Hechtman, H.B. )

    1989-02-17

    Reperfusion following lower-torso ischemia in humans leads to respiratory failure manifest by pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia, and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury has been studied in the sheep lung lymph preparation, where it has been demonstrated that the reperfusion resulting in pulmonary edema is due to an increase in microvascular permeability of the lung to protein. This respiratory failure caused by reperfusion appears to be an inflammatory reaction associated with intravascular release of the chemoattractants leukotriene B{sub 4} and thromboxane. Histological studies of the lung in experimental animals revealed significant accumulation of neutrophils but not platelets in alveolar capillaries. The authors conclude that thromboxane generated and released from the ischemic tissue is responsible for the transient pulmonary hypertension. Second, it is likely that the chemoattractants are responsible for leukosequestration, and third, neutrophils, oxygen-derived free radicals, and thromboxane moderate the altered lung permeability.

  7. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Reesink, H.J.; Kloek, J.J.; Bresser, P.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rapidly progressive and deadly disease, resulting from incomplete resolution of acute pulmonary embolism. Historically, the incidence of CTEPH was significantly underestimated but it may be as high as 3.8% following acute pulmonary embolism. Although the medical management of CTEPH may be supportive, the only curative treatment is pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA). However, a careful screening programme is mandatory to select CTEPH patients who are likely to benefit from PEA. In this review we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical and diagnostic pitfalls, surgical treatment, outcome after surgery, and the potential benefit of medical treatment in inoperable CTEPH patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696637

  8. Evaluation of a pulmonary graphical display in the medical intensive care unit: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Wachter, S Blake; Markewitz, Boaz; Rose, Robert; Westenskow, Dwayne

    2005-06-01

    We developed a pulmonary graphic display that depicts pulmonary physiological variables for intubated, mechanically ventilated patients in a graphical format. The pulmonary graphical display presents multiple respiratory variables and changes are depicted by alterations in shape and color. Learning how this new technology will be integrated and accepted by users is an important step before it is introduced into the clinical arena. This study observed use and acceptance of the pulmonary graphical display by health care providers in an intensive care unit. Investigators noted that physicians, respiratory therapists, and nurses observed the pulmonary graphical display on average six, three, and one times, respectively, per patient room entry. Based on questionnaires, the pulmonary graphical display was perceived as useful, a desirable addition to current ICU monitors, and an accurate representation of respiratory variables.

  9. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  10. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  11. Response to pulmonary vasodilator treatment in a former smoker with combined interstitial lung disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Valentina; Carlomagno, Guido; Fazio, Serafino

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 76-year-old former smoker with a diagnosis of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema associated with pulmonary hypertension and rapidly progressive right heart failure, in whom combined treatment with sitaxsentan and sildenafil resulted in sustained improvement of his clinical condition and exercise performance, without any relevant adverse events. Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema comprises a recently identified syndrome, probably related to tobacco use, and characterized by the coexistence of upper-lobe emphysema and fibrotic changes of the lower lobes, preserved lung volumes, significant hypoxemia, and a high prevalence of pulmonary hypertension, resulting in severe dyspnea. To date, no prospective series, to the best of our knowledge, has reported on the effects of pulmonary vasodilator therapy in such patients.

  12. Apelin and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Charlotte U.; Hilberg, Ole; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens E.; Simonsen, U.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease characterized by pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary arterial remodeling, abnormal angiogenesis and impaired right ventricular function. Despite progress in pharmacological therapy, there is still no cure for PAH. The peptide apelin and the G-protein coupled apelin receptor (APLNR) are expressed in several tissues throughout the organism. Apelin is localized in vascular endothelial cells while the APLNR is localized in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vessels and in the heart. Apelin is regulated by hypoxia inducible factor -1α and bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2. Patients with PAH have lower levels of plasma-apelin, and decreased apelin expression in pulmonary endothelial cells. Apelin has therefore been proposed as a potential biomarker for PAH. Furthermore, apelin plays a role in angiogenesis and regulates endothelial and smooth muscle cell apoptosis and proliferation complementary and opposite to vascular endothelial growth factor. In the systemic circulation, apelin modulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, induces eNOS-dependent vasodilatation, counteracts angiotensin-II mediated vasoconstriction, and has positive inotropic and cardioprotective effects. Apelin attenuates vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries, and chronic treatment with apelin attenuates the development of pulmonary hypertension in animal models. The existing literature thus renders APLNR an interesting potential new therapeutic target for PH. PMID:22140623

  13. Reexpansion pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Tarver, R D; Broderick, L S; Conces, D J

    1996-01-01

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema is a rare complication attending the rapid reexpansion of a chronically collapsed lung, such as occurs after evacuation of a large amount of air or fluid from the pleural space. The condition usually appears unexpectedly and dramatically-immediately or within 1 h in 64% of patients and within 24 h in the remainder. The clinical manifestations are varied; they range from roentgenographic findings alone in asymptomatic patients to severe cardiorespiratory insufficiency. The radiographic evidence of reexpansion pulmonary edema is a unilateral alveolar filling pattern, seen within a few hours of reexpansion of the lung. The edema may progress for 24-48 h and persist for 4-5 days. Human data on the pathophysiology of reexpansion pulmonary edema derive from small series of patients, case reports, and reviews of the literature. On the other hand, a larger body of data exists on experimental reexpansion pulmonary edema in cats, monkeys, rabbits, sheep, and goats. This review examines the clinical and experimental evidence for reexpansion pulmonary edema. In addition, we detail the historical background, clinical setting, treatment, and outcome of reexpansion pulmonary edema.

  14. Pulmonary rehabilitation in emphysema.

    PubMed

    Ries, Andrew L; Make, Barry J; Reilly, John J

    2008-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is an established treatment for patients with chronic lung disease. Benefits include improvement in exercise tolerance, symptoms, and quality of life, with a reduction in the use of health care resources. As an adjunct to surgical programs, such as lung volume reduction surgery, pulmonary rehabilitation plays an important role not just in preparing patients for surgery and facilitating recovery but also in selecting patients and ensuring informed choices about treatment options after optimal medical care. In the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT), subjects completed 6-10 weeks of comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation before randomization and continued rehabilitation throughout the trial, both at home and with intermittent supervision at either an NETT center or an NETT-certified satellite center. Sessions included a combination of upper and lower extremity exercise, education, and psychosocial support. Before randomization, pulmonary rehabilitation resulted in highly significant changes in exercise capacity, dyspnea, and quality of life. As expected, improvements were significantly greater in those without prior rehabilitation experience. Results for patients completing rehabilitation at satellites were similar to those at NETT centers. Prerandomization pulmonary rehabilitation had a significant effect on outcome after lung volume reduction surgery. NETT identified subgroups with differential outcome by treatment (surgical vs. nonsurgical), defined in part by postrehabilitation maximum exercise capacity. Overall, NETT demonstrated the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation in improving function, symptoms, and health status in a large cohort of patients with advanced emphysema treated in a cross-section of programs in the United States.

  15. Adverse Effects of Plasma Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Suchitra; Vyas, Girish N.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma utilization has increased over the last two decades, and there is a growing concern that many plasma transfusions are inappropriate. Plasma transfusion is not without risk, and certain complications are more likely with plasma than other blood components. Clinical and laboratory investigations of the patients suffering reactions following infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) define the etiology and pathogenesis of the panoply of adverse effects. We review here the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of the risks associated with plasma transfusion. Risks commonly associated with FFP include: (1) transfusion related acute lung injury; (2) transfusion associated circulatory overload, and (3) allergic/anaphylactic reactions. Other less common risks include (1) transmission of infections, (2) febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions, (3) RBC allo-immunization, and (4) hemolytic transfusion reactions. The affect of pathogen inactivation/reduction methods on these risks are also discussed. Fortunately, a majority of the adverse effects are not lethal and are adequately treated in clinical practice. PMID:22578374

  16. Adverse Events in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Noha; Alshawa, Anas; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has resulted in durable responses in patients with metastatic disease, unseen with traditional chemotherapy. Several therapies have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of various cancers, including: immune checkpoint inhibitors, cytokines - interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interferon alpha (IFN), and the cancer vaccine sipuleucel-T. These therapies upregulate the immune system to enhance antitumor responses. As a consequence, they can cause inflammatory and immune-related adverse events that can affect one or more organs, can be serious, and on occasion lifethreatening. The management of these adverse events is complex, and requires a multidisciplinary approach involving not only oncologists, but also other internal medicine specialists, to ensure prompt diagnosis and optimal management of these complications.

  17. Adverse drug reactions: part II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must be effectively practiced by all health care providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  18. Adverse drug reactions: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  19. Intersections between adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ness, Roberta B

    2005-09-01

    Reproductive failure in a variety of forms, whether it be infertility, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, prematurity or intrauterine growth restriction, may aggregate within individuals. This observation, although rarely studied, suggests that single pathophysiologies may be associated with a variety of reproductive morbidities. In this review, hyperimmune responsiveness to pregnancy is provided as one example of a process leading to a multitude of adverse impacts on healthy childbearing. Further research on reproductive failure as a spectrum is warranted.

  20. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  1. [Pain as adverse drug reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Schaffarzick, Daniel; Nagano, Marietta; Janowitz, Susanne Melitta; Schweitzer, Ekkehard

    2012-09-01

    We present a multidisciplinary (anaesthesiology--clinical pharmacy--bioinformatics) analysis of pain as possible adverse drug reaction taking different manifestations of pain, indication groups, relevance to the Austrian drug market and possible mechanistic influence of drugs on development and apprehension of pain into consideration.We designed an overview that shows how transmitters that play a part in nociception and antinociception can be influenced by drugs. This allows conclusions to the dolorigene potential of therapeutics.

  2. Thromboembolism in pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Farsad, Mohsen; Pernter, Patrizia; Triani, Antonio; Osele, Luzian; Wiedermann, Christian J

    2009-04-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma, although rare, must be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism. Clinically and radiologically, it may imitate pulmonary embolism, making diagnosis difficult and delaying treatment. Patients often have no symptom resolution despite therapeutic anticoagulation. Visualization of filling defects within a pulmonary artery on contrast-enhanced CT cannot reliably differentiate between pulmonary thromboembolism and malignant lesions like leiomyosarcoma. FDG PET-CT offers the potential for identification of malignant lesions. The authors report a case with pulmonary artery thromboembolism due to thrombi formed on a pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma. Integrated FDG PET-CT showed no FDG-uptake along the major part of the filling defect within the right main pulmonary artery suggesting blood clot and increased uptake along the posterior wall of the right main pulmonary artery and the left lower lobar artery suggesting malignancy.

  3. Pulmonary and generalized lysosomal storage induced by amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Z

    1984-01-01

    Administration of amphiphilic drugs to experimental animals causes formation of myelinoid bodies in many cell types, accumulation of foamy macrophages in pulmonary alveoli and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. These changes are the result of an interaction between the drugs and phospholipids which leads to an alteration in physicochemical properties of the phospholipids. Impairment of the digestion of altered pulmonary secretions in phagosomes of macrophages results in accumulation of foam cells in pulmonary alveoli. Impairment of the metabolism of altered phospholipids removed by autophagy induces an accumulation of myelinoid bodies. The administration of amphiphilic compounds thus causes pulmonary intra-alveolar histiocytosis which is a part of a drug-induced lysosomal storage or generalized lipidosis. The accumulation of drug-lipid complexes in myelinoid bodies and in pulmonary foam cells may lead to alteration of cellular functioning and to clinical disease. Currently over 50 amphiphilic drugs are known. Unique pharmacological properties necessitate clinical use of some of these drugs. The occurrence and severity of potential clinical side effects depend on the nature of each drug, dosage and duration of treatment, simultaneous administration of other drugs and foods, individual metabolic pattern of the patient and other factors. Further studies on factors preventing and potentiating adverse effects of amphiphilic drugs are indicated. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6376111

  4. [Treatment of HIV-associated pulmonary hypertension with treprostinil].

    PubMed

    Cea-Calvo, Luis; Escribano Subías, Pilar; Tello de Menesses, Rocío; Lázaro Salvador, María; Gómez Sánchez, Miguel A; Delgado Jiménez, Juan F; Pindado Rodríguez, Carlos; Ruiz Cano, María J; Sáenz de la Calzada, Carlos

    2003-04-01

    The treatment of pulmonary hypertension associated with infection by human immunodeficiency virus has not been well defined. Treprostinil is a prostacyclin analogue that has recently been shown to be useful for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, whether primary, secondary to congenital heart disease, or associated with collagen disease, in a 12-week, double-blind study. We report the results of a one-year follow-up of three patients with pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection who are being treated with treprostinil at our center. After secondary causes of pulmonary hypertension were excluded by a routine work-up, patients started treatment with subcutaneous prostacyclin (treprostinil) with progressive up-titration of the dose. Functional status and effort capacity were assessed every three months and an echocardiographic study was performed every six months. All patients showed improvement in clinical status, as shown by the NYHA functional class and the results of the six-minute walking test (increase of at least 75 meters). All the patients remain alive after one year of follow-up. Echocardiographic systolic pulmonary pressure decreased in two patients. No serious adverse events were observed. Subcutaneous prostacyclin (treprostinil) seems to be an effective and safe therapeutic option for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

  5. Thiocolchicoside: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Thiocolchicoside has long been used as a muscle relaxant, despite a lack of proven efficacy beyond the placebo effect. Its chemical structure consists of colchicine, a sugar (ose) and a sulphur-containing radical (thio), and its adverse effects are therefore likely to be similar to those of colchicine. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we reviewed the available data on the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. Liver injury, pancreatitis, seizures, blood cell disorders, severe cutaneous disorders, rhabdomyolysis and reproductive disorders have all been recorded in the French and European pharmacovigilance databases and in the periodic updates that the companies concerned submit to regulatory agencies. These data do not specify the frequency of the disorders nor do they identify the most susceptible patient populations. Thiocolchicoside is teratogenic in experimental animals and also damages chromosomes. Human data are limited to a follow-up of about 30 pregnant women (no major malformations) and reports of altered spermatogenesis, including cases of azoospermia. In practice, there is no justification for exposing patients to the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. It is better to use an effective, well-known analgesic for patients complaining of muscle pain, starting with paracetamol.

  6. Adverse food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Alie; van Hunsel, Florence; Bast, Aalt

    2015-12-01

    Food supplements and herbal products are increasingly popular amongst consumers. This leads to increased risks of interactions between prescribed drugs and these products containing bioactive ingredients. From 1991 up to 2014, 55 cases of suspected adverse drug reactions due to concomitant intake of health-enhancing products and drugs were reported to Lareb, the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre. An overview of these suspected interactions is presented and their potential mechanisms of action are described. Mainly during the metabolism of xenobiotics and due to the pharmacodynamics effects interactions seem to occur, which may result in adverse drug reactions. Where legislation is seen to distinct food and medicine, legislation concerning these different bioactive products is less clear-cut. This can only be resolved by increasing the molecular knowledge on bioactive substances and their potential interactions. Thereby potential interactions can be better understood and prevented on an individual level. By considering the dietary pattern and use of bioactive substances with prescribed medication, both health professionals and consumers will be increasingly aware of interactions and these interactive adverse effects can be prevented.

  7. Xenobiotic pulmonary exposure and systemic cardiovascular response via neurological links

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Abukabda, Alaeddin B.; Hardy, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular response to xenobiotic particle exposure has been increasingly studied over the last two decades, producing an extraordinary scope and depth of research findings. With the flourishing of nanotechnology, the term “xenobiotic particles” has expanded to encompass not only air pollution particulate matter (PM) but also anthropogenic particles, such as engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Historically, the majority of research in these fields has focused on pulmonary exposure and the adverse physiological effects associated with a host inflammatory response or direct particle-tissue interactions. Because these hypotheses can neither account entirely for the deleterious cardiovascular effects of xenobiotic particle exposure nor their time course, the case for substantial neurological involvement is apparent. Indeed, considerable evidence suggests that not only is neural involvement a significant contributor but also a reality that needs to be investigated more thoroughly when assessing xenobiotic particle toxicities. Therefore, the scope of this review is several-fold. First, we provide a brief overview of the major anatomical components of the central and peripheral nervous systems, giving consideration to the potential biologic targets affected by inhaled particles. Second, the autonomic arcs and mechanisms that may be involved are reviewed. Third, the cardiovascular outcomes following neurological responses are discussed. Lastly, unique problems, future risks, and hurdles associated with xenobiotic particle exposure are discussed. A better understanding of these neural issues may facilitate research that in conjunction with existing research, will ultimately prevent the untoward cardiovascular outcomes associated with PM exposures and/or identify safe ENMs for the advancement of human health. PMID:26386111

  8. Pulmonary Thromboembolectomy for Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Inho; Cho, Kyu Seok; Kim, Bum Shik; Kim, Soo-Cheol; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Jung-Heon; Youn, Hyo Chul

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute pulmonary thromboembolism is fatal because of abruptly occurring hypoxemia and right ventricular failure. There are several treatment modalities, including anticoagulation, thrombolytics, ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenator), and thromboembolectomy, for managing acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Materials and Methods Medical records from January 1999 to December 2004 at our institution were retrospectively reviewed for pulmonary thromboembolectomy. There were 7 patients (4 men and 3 women), who underwent a total of 8 operations because one patient had post-operative recurrent emboli and underwent reoperation. Surgery was indicatedfor mild hypoxemia and performed with CPB (cardiopulmonary bypass) in a beating heart state. Results The patients had several symptoms, such as dyspnea, chest discomfort, and palpitation. Four patients had deep vein thromboembolisms and 3 had psychotic problems, specifically schizophrenia. Post-operative complications included hemothorax, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion. There were two hospital deaths, one each by brain death and right heart failure. Conclusion Emergency operation should be performed when medical treatments are no longer effective. PMID:22263185

  9. Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists: Effects on Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Buels, Kalmia S.

    2014-01-01

    In healthy lungs, muscarinic receptors control smooth muscle tone, mucus secretion, vasodilation, and inflammation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, cholinergic mechanisms contribute to increased bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion that limit airflow. This chapter reviews neuronal and nonneuronal sources of acetylcholine in the lung and the expression and role of M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in lung physiology. It also discusses the evidence for and against the role of parasympathetic nerves in asthma, and the current use and therapeutic potential of muscarinic receptor antagonists in COPD and asthma. PMID:22222705

  10. Awake operative videothoracoscopic pulmonary resections.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Tommaso C

    2008-08-01

    moderately increasing the depth of sedation while maintaining spontaneous breathing. Finally, as long as the physiologic impact of awake metastasectomy is definitively elucidated, the authors believe this modality should be used for unilateral procedures, while deserving a staged bilateral approach for bilateral lung metastasectomy. Avoidance of general anesthesia results in a faster recovery with immediate return to many daily life activities, including drinking, eating, and walking, and a reduction in hospital stay and procedure-related costs. If confirmed with future studies, these results could advocate earlier resection of peripheral solitary pulmonary nodules, reducing the risk for delaying a diagnosis of unexpected pulmonary malignancy. Furthermore, potential new frontiers of awake thoracoscopic surgery might include assessment of feasibility and safety of anatomic resections in properly selected instances. Ethical and economical concerns push remorselessly for less frequent and less-invasive surgery. Administrators advocate minimal hospitalization and cost-saving treatments, whereas patients ultimately ask for appropriate health care. Thoracic surgeons of the third millennium must accept the challenge of this dynamic and rapidly evolving scenario without loosing the right root, which probably lays just between well-established conventional surgery techniques and newly available advanced technology tools. Awake thoracic surgery will benefit from evidence-based data that are progressively accumulating. Findings will stimulate experts to continue an active clinical investigation in this unpredictably evolving surgical field, which might ultimately lead to a better understanding of cardiorespiratory physiology and effects of the surgical pneumothorax and thoracic epidural anesthesia on perioperative, respiratory function in awake patients. As the Italian architect Renzo Piano recently stated, "Recovering in the past can be reassuring but the future is the only place

  11. Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy in 106 patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    López Gude, María Jesús; Pérez de la Sota, Enrique; Forteza Gil, Alberto; Centeno Rodríguez, Jorge; Eixerés, Andrea; Velázquez, María Teresa; Sánchez Nistal, María Antonia; Pérez Vela, José Luis; Ruiz Cano, María José; Gómez Sanchez, Miguel Ángel; Escribano Subías, Pilar; Cortina Romero, José María

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy is the treatment of choice in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. We report our experience with this technique. Between February 1996 and June 2014, we performed 106 pulmonary thromboendarterectomies. Patient population, morbidity and mortality and the long-term results of this technique (survival, functional improvement and resolution of pulmonary hypertension) are described. Subjects' mean age was 53±14 years. A total of 89% were WHO functional class III-IV, presurgery mean pulmonary pressure was 49±13mmHg and mean pulmonary vascular resistance was 831±364 dynes.s.cm(-5). In-hospital mortality was 6.6%. The most important post-operative morbidity was reperfusion pulmonary injury, in 20% of patients; this was an independent risk factor (p=0.015) for hospital mortality. With a 31-month median follow-up (interquartile range: 50), 3- and 5-year survival was 90 and 84%. At 1 year, 91% were WHO functional class I-II; mean pulmonary pressure (27±11mmHg) and pulmonary vascular resistance (275±218 dynes.s.cm(-5)) were significantly lower (p<0.05) than before the intervention. Although residual pulmonary hypertension was detected in 14 patients, their survival at 3 and 5 years was 91 and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy offers excellent results in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Long-term survival is good, functional capacity improves, and pulmonary hypertension is resolved in most patients. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Specialized physiological studies in support of manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luft, U. C.

    1973-01-01

    The areas of physiological research reported include: (1) evaluation of the single-breath method for determining cardiac output, (2) optimum protocol for the assessment of cardio-pulmonary competence, (3) body fluids and electrolytes under conditions of single and combined stress, (4) re-evaluation of the open-circuit method for measuring metabolic rate with regard to the alleged metabolic production of gaseous nitrogen, and (5) the use of the forced-oscillation method to determine total respiratory conductance in healthy subjects and pulmonary patients.

  13. A review of wave mechanics in the pulmonary artery with an emphasis on wave intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, J; Hilberg, O; Howard, L; Simonsen, U; Hughes, A D

    2016-12-01

    Mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) remain the most common haemodynamic measures to evaluate the severity and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension. However, PVR only captures the non-oscillatory component of the right ventricular hydraulic load and neglects the dynamic compliance of the pulmonary arteries and the contribution of wave transmission. Wave intensity analysis offers an alternative way to assess the pulmonary vasculature in health and disease. Wave speed is a measure of arterial stiffness, and the magnitude and timing of wave reflection provide information on the degree of impedance mismatch between the proximal and distal circulation. Studies in the pulmonary artery have demonstrated distinct differences in arterial wave propagation between individuals with and without pulmonary vascular disease. Notably, greater wave speed and greater wave reflection are observed in patients with pulmonary hypertension and in animal models exposed to hypoxia. Studying wave propagation makes a valuable contribution to the assessment of the arterial system in pulmonary hypertension, and here, we briefly review the current state of knowledge of the methods used to evaluate arterial waves in the pulmonary artery. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Ligating the ductus arteriosus before birth remodels the pulmonary vasculature of the lamb.

    PubMed

    Wild, L M; Nickerson, P A; Morin, F C

    1989-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn includes a developmentally abnormal pulmonary microvasculature which contains excessive amounts of muscle and which cannot adapt to air breathing in the perinatal period. Surgical ligation of the ductus arteriosus of the fetal lamb has produced a physiologic model of pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. The aim of the present investigation is to determine whether surgical ligation of the ductus arteriosus in fetal sheep produces anatomic changes in the pulmonary blood vessels. The pulmonary vasculature of seven neonatal lambs that underwent surgical ligation of the ductus arteriosus from 6 to 17 d before birth was compared to that of five control lambs with a patent ductus arteriosus without fetal surgery and three control lambs with a patent ductus arteriosus that underwent sham surgery. Quantitative microscopic analysis of the barium gelatin-filled peripheral pulmonary vascular bed revealed an increase in the proportion of partially and fully muscularized pulmonary arteries at the level of the terminal bronchiole and within the acinus (p less than 0.0001). This finding demonstrates that medial muscle develops in areas of the distal pulmonary vascular bed where it is normally absent. Periadventitial fibrosis surrounding intraacinar pulmonary arteries was also present. No change in the number of small intraacinar arteries was detected. This structural remodeling of the peripheral pulmonary vascular bed was initiated in utero by ductus arteriosus occlusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Attenuation of pulmonary hypertension, but not emphysematous change, by breeding emphysema model mice at sea level.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Ikegame, Satoshi; Ye, Qing; Harada, Eiji; Ouchi, Hiroshi; Inoshima, Ichiro; Watanabe, Kentaro; Mason, Robert J; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2008-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is a key pro-inflammatory cytokine, thought to be important in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. TNF-alpha overexpression in the lung leads to the phenotypic features of pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular hypertrophy in mice bred in Denver, 5240 feet/1600 m of altitude. This study hypothesized that the altitude could affect the development of pulmonary emphysema as well as pulmonary hypertension. To investigate the effect of the altitude, TNF-alpha transgenic mice were bred at sea level, Fukuoka, Japan. The pulmonary physiology and histology demonstrated similar development of pulmonary emphysema, compared to the mice bred in Denver. With respect to pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy was attenuated. Interestingly, mortality rate was significant lower in the mice bred at sea level. In contrast with the results in Denver, a significant decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors expression was not found. From these data, we consider that the altitude affects development of pulmonary hypertension through the expression of VEGF and its receptors. In contrast, the effect of altitude was not clear regarding the development of pulmonary emphysema.

  16. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term “hypersensitivity” is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as “hypersensitivities” while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  17. Early menarche and childhood adversities in a nationally representative sample.

    PubMed

    Henrichs, Kimberly L; McCauley, Heather L; Miller, Elizabeth; Styne, Dennis M; Saito, Naomi; Breslau, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that early menarche, defined as onset of menses at age 11 or earlier, has increased in prevalence in recent birth cohorts and is associated with multiple poor medical and mental health outcomes in adulthood. There is evidence that childhood adversities occurring prior to menarche contribute to early menarche. Data collected in face-to-face interviews with a nationally representative sample of women age 18 and over (N = 3288), as part of the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication, were analyzed. Associations between pre-menarchal childhood adversities and menarche at age 11 or earlier were estimated in discrete time survival models with statistical adjustment for age at interview, ethnicity, and body mass index. Adversities investigated included physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, biological father absence from the home, other parent loss, parent mental illness, parent substance abuse, parent criminality, inter-parental violence, serious physical illness in childhood, and family economic adversity. Mean age at menarche varied across decadal birth cohorts (χ(2)₍₄₎ = 21.41, p < .001) ranging from a high of 12.9 years in the oldest cohort (age 59 or older at the time of interview) to a low of 12.4 in the second youngest cohort (age 28-37). Childhood adversities were also more common in younger than older cohorts. Of the 11 childhood adversities, 5 were associated with menarche at age 11 or earlier, with OR of 1.3 or greater. Each of these five adversities is associated with a 26% increase in the odds of early menarche (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.14-1.39). The relationship between childhood sexual abuse and early menarche was sustained after adjustment for co-occurring adversities. (OR = 1.77, 95% CI 1.21-2.6). Evidence from this study is consistent with hypothesized physiological effects of early childhood family environment on endocrine development. Childhood sexual abuse is the adversity most strongly

  18. Early menarche and childhood adversities in a nationally representative sample

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence suggests that early menarche, defined as onset of menses at age 11 or earlier, has increased in prevalence in recent birth cohorts and is associated with multiple poor medical and mental health outcomes in adulthood. There is evidence that childhood adversities occurring prior to menarche contribute to early menarche. Methods Data collected in face-to-face interviews with a nationally representative sample of women age 18 and over (N = 3288), as part of the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication, were analyzed. Associations between pre-menarchal childhood adversities and menarche at age 11 or earlier were estimated in discrete time survival models with statistical adjustment for age at interview, ethnicity, and body mass index. Adversities investigated included physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, biological father absence from the home, other parent loss, parent mental illness, parent substance abuse, parent criminality, inter-parental violence, serious physical illness in childhood, and family economic adversity. Results Mean age at menarche varied across decadal birth cohorts (χ2₍₄₎ = 21.41, p < .001) ranging from a high of 12.9 years in the oldest cohort (age 59 or older at the time of interview) to a low of 12.4 in the second youngest cohort (age 28-37). Childhood adversities were also more common in younger than older cohorts. Of the 11 childhood adversities, 5 were associated with menarche at age 11 or earlier, with OR of 1.3 or greater. Each of these five adversities is associated with a 26% increase in the odds of early menarche (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.14-1.39). The relationship between childhood sexual abuse and early menarche was sustained after adjustment for co-occurring adversities. (OR = 1.77, 95% CI 1.21-2.6). Conclusions Evidence from this study is consistent with hypothesized physiological effects of early childhood family environment on endocrine development. Childhood sexual abuse

  19. Pulmonary hypertension imitating HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of undiagnosed pulmonary hypertension in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease presenting with microangiopathic haemolysis, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzymes imitating severe preeclampsia (HELLP syndrome) is described. Connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased prevalence of pulmonary hypertension. Maternal mortality rates with pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy are extremely high. All women with connective tissue disorders should have pulmonary hypertension excluded by echocardiography before attempting conception. End-stage pulmonary hypertension may be associated with haemolysis and thrombocytopenia and thus may imitate severe preeclampsia in pregnant women. There may be a role for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the peripartum management of women with severe pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27656251

  20. Acute responses to inhalation of Iloprost in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Yong; Xiong, Chang-Ming; Ni, Xin-Hai; He, Jian-Guo; Luo, Qin; Zhao, Zhi-Hui; Zhao, Qing; Sun, Xing-Guo

    2012-08-01

    Iloprost has been used to test acute pulmonary vasoreactivity in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We aimed to investigate the acute hemodynamic and oxygenation responses and tolerability to 20 µg aerosolized Iloprost in Chinese patients with pulmonary hypertension. Between March 2005 and May 2010, 212 pulmonary hypertension patients inhaled a single dose of 20 µg Iloprost over 10 - 15 minutes for vasoreactivity testing. The acute hemodynamic and oxygenation responses and adverse events were recorded. Iloprost decreased total pulmonary resistance ((1747 ± 918) dyn×s×cm(-5) vs. (1581 ± 937) dyn×s×cm(-5), P < 0.001), increased stroke volume ((45.0 ± 22.1) ml vs. (47.0 ± 24.2) ml, P = 0.002), and cardiac output ((3.7 ± 1.7) L/ml vs. (3.9 ± 1.9) L/min, P = 0.009). Heart rate and systemic vascular resistance remained stable during inhalation. However, systemic arterial blood oxygen saturation fell slightly ((91.0 ± 6.8)% vs. (90.3 ± 6.7)%, P = 0.002). Pulmonary and systemic arterial blood pressures declined within 1 - 3 minutes after inhalation initiation and reached their lowest levels within 10 - 15 minutes. Idiopathic PAH responded more favorably than pulmonary hypertension due to other causes (P £0.001) and patients with less severe pulmonary hypertension have better responses to Iloprost. No adverse events requiring medical care or leading to termination of inhalation occurred. Inhalation of 20 µg Iloprost showed potent and selective pulmonary hemodynamic effects and was well tolerated in the Chinese pulmonary hypertension patients. Patients with idiopathic PAH and less severe pulmonary hypertension responded more favorably to inhalation of Iloprost.

  1. High altitude pulmonary edema in mountain climbers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Guzek, Aneta; Juszczak, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    Every year thousands of ski, trekking or climbing fans travel to the mountains where they stay at the altitude of more than 2500-3000m above sea level or climb mountain peaks, often exceeding 7000-8000m. High mountain climbers are at a serious risk from the effects of adverse environmental conditions prevailing at higher elevations. They may experience health problems resulting from hypotension, hypoxia or exposure to low temperatures; the severity of those conditions is largely dependent on elevation, time of exposure as well as the rate of ascent and descent. A disease which poses a direct threat to the lives of mountain climbers is high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). It is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema which typically occurs in rapidly climbing unacclimatized lowlanders usually within 2-4 days of ascent above 2500-3000m. It is the most common cause of death resulting from the exposure to high altitude. The risk of HAPE rises with increased altitude and faster ascent. HAPE incidence ranges from an estimated 0.01% to 15.5%. Climbers with a previous history of HAPE, who ascent rapidly above 4500m have a 60% chance of illness recurrence. The aim of this article was to present the relevant details concerning epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, prevention, and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers in the mountain environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Adverse events during rotary-wing transport of mechanically ventilated patients: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W; Kahn, Jeremy M; Schwab, C William; Fuchs, Barry D

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Patients triaged to tertiary care centers frequently undergo rotary-wing transport and may be exposed to additional risk for adverse events. The incidence of physiologic adverse events and their predisposing factors in mechanically ventilated patients undergoing aeromedical transport are unknown. Methods We performed a retrospective review of flight records of all interfacility, rotary-wing transports to a tertiary care, university hospital during 2001 to 2003. All patients receiving mechanical ventilation via endotracheal tube or tracheostomy were included; trauma, scene flights, and fixed transports were excluded. Data were abstracted from patient flight and hospital records. Adverse events were classified as either major (death, arrest, pneumothorax, or seizure) or minor (physiologic decompensation, new arrhythmia, or requirement for new sedation/paralysis). Bivariate associations between hospital and flight characteristics and the presence of adverse events were examined. Results Six hundred eighty-two interfacility flights occurred during the period of review, with 191 patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Fifty-eight different hospitals transferred patients, with diagnoses that were primarily cardiopulmonary (45%) and neurologic (37%). Median flight distance and time were 42 (31 to 83) km and 13 (8 to 22) minutes, respectively. No major adverse events occurred during flight. Forty patients (22%) experienced a minor physiologic adverse event. Vasopressor requirement prior to flight and flight distance were associated with the presence of adverse events in-flight (P < 0.05). Patient demographics, time of day, season, transferring hospital characteristics, and ventilator settings before and during flight were not associated with adverse events. Conclusion Major adverse events are rare during interfacility, rotary-wing transfer of critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients. Patients transferred over a longer distance or transferred on

  3. Pulmonary artery sarcoma masquerading as saddle pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Kanjanauthai, Somsupha; Kanluen, Tony; Ray, Cynthia

    2008-10-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a highly malignant tumour. Therefore, making the diagnosis is very important. We describe a case which presented with dyspnea on exertion and was initially diagnosed as saddle pulmonary embolism per CT thorax with contrast. Despite adequate anticoagulation, symptoms still progressed. Follow-up CT thorax showed an extension of the presumed filling defect or clots into the left main pulmonary artery with new lung nodules. This prompted suspicion that this may not be a pulmonary embolism. Biopsy of the lung nodule revealed high grade soft tissue sarcoma with primary source from the pulmonary artery. Our case highlights that pulmonary artery sarcoma should always be included in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary embolism especially, if symptoms still progress while on adequate anticoagulation, or any pulmonary nodules develop on follow-up exam.

  4. Derivation and evaluation of putative adverse outcome ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition is of concern in fish because COX inhibitors (e.g., ibuprofen) are ubiquitous in aquatic systems/fish tissues, and can disrupt synthesis of prostaglandins that modulate a variety of essential biological functions including reproduction. High content (transcriptomic) empirical data and publicly available high throughput toxicity data (actor.epa.gov) were utilized to develop putative adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for molecular initiating event (MIE) of COX inhibition. Effects of a waterborne, 96h exposure to indomethacin (IN; 100 µg/L), ibuprofen (IB; 200 µg/L) and celecoxib (CX; 20 µg/L) on liver metabolome and ovarian gene expression (using oligonucleotide microarrays) in sexually mature fathead minnows (n=8) were examined. Metabolomic profiles of IN, IB and CX were not significantly different from control or one another. Exposure to IB and CX resulted in differential expression of comparable numbers of genes (IB = 433, CX= 545). In contrast, 2558 genes were differentially expressed in IN-treated fish. Functional analyses (canonical pathway and gene set enrichment) indicated extensive effects of IN on prostaglandin synthesis pathway, oocyte meiosis and several other processes consistent with physiological roles of prostaglandins. Transcriptomic data was congruent with apical endpoint data - IN reduced plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha concentrations, and ovarian COX activity, whereas IB and CX did not. Putative AOPs pathways for

  5. Pulmonary disease management system with distributed wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongji; Ayyagari, Deepak; Colquitt, Nhedti

    2009-01-01

    A pulmonary disease management system with on-body and near-body sensors is introduced in this presentation. The system is wearable for continuous ambulatory monitoring. Distributed sensor data is transferred through a wireless body area network (BAN) to a central controller for real time analysis. Physiological and environmental parameters are monitored and analyzed using prevailing clinical guidelines for self-management of environmentally-linked pulmonary ailments. The system provides patients with reminders, warnings, and instructions to reduce emergency room and physician visits, and improve clinical outcomes.

  6. Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Humans: Tale or Myth

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, A.; Suleiman, M.S.; George, S.J.; Loubani, M.; Morice, A.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic Pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) describes the physiological adaptive process of lungs to preserves systemic oxygenation. It has clinical implications in the development of pulmonary hypertension which impacts on outcomes of patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery. This review examines both acute and chronic hypoxic vasoconstriction focusing on the distinct clinical implications and highlights the role of calcium and mitochondria in acute versus the role of reactive oxygen species and Rho GTPases in chronic HPV. Furthermore it identifies gaps of knowledge and need for further research in humans to clearly define this phenomenon and the underlying mechanism. PMID:28217180

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension in Hemolytic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    The inherited hemoglobin disorders sickle cell disease and thalassemia are the most common monogenetic disorders worldwide. Pulmonary hypertension is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in adult patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia, and hemolytic disorders are potentially among the most common causes of pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders is likely multifactorial, including hemolysis, impaired nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, chronic hypoxemia, chronic thromboembolic disease, chronic liver disease, and asplenia. In contrast to patients with traditional forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients with hemolytic disorders have a mild-to-moderate degree of elevation in mean pulmonary pressures, with mild elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance. The hemodynamic etiology of pulmonary hypertension in these patients is multifactorial and includes pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary venous hypertension, and pulmonary hypertension secondary to a hyperdynamic state. Currently, there are limited data on the effects of any specific treatment modality for pulmonary hypertension in patients with hemolytic disorders. It is likely that maximization of treatment of the primary hemoglobinopathy in all patients and treatment with selective pulmonary vasodilators and antiproliferative agents in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension would be beneficial. However, there is still a major need for large multinational trials of novel therapies for this patient population. PMID:20522578

  8. Infantile pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis: a lethal form of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Eiméar; McNally, Paul; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Phelan, Ethna; Sumner, Kelli; Best, D Hunter; McMahon, Colin J

    2016-04-01

    We describe the cases of two children who both presented in infancy with recurrent severe pulmonary hypertensive crises. Exhaustive clinical work-up failed to identify an underlying aetiology. The patients had no clinical response to steroids, immunoglobulins, or pulmonary vasodilators. Post-mortem examination revealed extensive invasive pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis. There was no evidence of pulmonary venous occlusive disease. Given the lethal nature of this condition, early consideration of referral to a lung transplant centre should be considered in selected patients.

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Deborah

    As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major causes of worldwide mortality, it is important to prevent, diagnose and manage it. COPD creates a huge burden on the NHS and has a significant impact on patients. This is a problem with the increase in morbidity and mortality rates. In primary care there is a lack of knowledge, under-use of quality-assured spirometry and under-diagnosis in about half of all cases. To be able to effectively diagnose, assess and manage COPD, health professionals must understand the physiology and aetiology of the disease. COPD is similar to asthma in its presentation and physiology but management of the condition can differ. The authors therefore looked at the similarities between the two conditions and what tests one can use to make a diagnosis of COPD.

  10. Gene Expression Profiling of Pulmonary Artery in a Rabbit Model of Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianfei; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Xie, Hao; Zhu, Qilin; Huang, Minjie

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) refers to the obstruction of thrombus in pulmonary artery or its branches. Recent studies have suggested that PTE-induced endothelium injury is the major physiological consequence of PTE. And it is reasonal to use PTE-induced endothelium injury to stratify disease severity. According to the massive morphologic and histologic findings, rabbit models could be applied to closely mimic the human PE. Genomewide gene expression profiling has not been attempted in PTE. In this study, we determined the accuracy of rabbit autologous thrombus PTE model for human PTE disease, then we applied gene expression array to identify gene expression changes in pulmonary arteries under PTE to identify potential molecular biomarkers and signaling pathways for PTE. We detected 1343 genes were upregulated and 923 genes were downregulated in PTE rabbits. The expression of several genes (IL-8, TNF-α, and CXCL5) with functional importance were further confirmed in transcript and protein levels. The most significantly differentially regulated genes were related to inflammation, immune disease, pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Totally 87 genes were up-regulated in the inflammatory genes. We conclude that gene expression profiling in rabbit PTE model could extend the understanding of PTE pathogenesis at the molecular level. Our study provides the fundamental framework for future clinical research on human PTE, including identification of potential biomarkers for prognosis or therapeutic targets for PTE. PMID:27798647

  11. Gene Expression Profiling of Pulmonary Artery in a Rabbit Model of Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xudong; Huang, Jianfei; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Xie, Hao; Zhu, Qilin; Huang, Minjie; Ni, Songshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) refers to the obstruction of thrombus in pulmonary artery or its branches. Recent studies have suggested that PTE-induced endothelium injury is the major physiological consequence of PTE. And it is reasonal to use PTE-induced endothelium injury to stratify disease severity. According to the massive morphologic and histologic findings, rabbit models could be applied to closely mimic the human PE. Genomewide gene expression profiling has not been attempted in PTE. In this study, we determined the accuracy of rabbit autologous thrombus PTE model for human PTE disease, then we applied gene expression array to identify gene expression changes in pulmonary arteries under PTE to identify potential molecular biomarkers and signaling pathways for PTE. We detected 1343 genes were upregulated and 923 genes were downregulated in PTE rabbits. The expression of several genes (IL-8, TNF-α, and CXCL5) with functional importance were further confirmed in transcript and protein levels. The most significantly differentially regulated genes were related to inflammation, immune disease, pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Totally 87 genes were up-regulated in the inflammatory genes. We conclude that gene expression profiling in rabbit PTE model could extend the understanding of PTE pathogenesis at the molecular level. Our study provides the fundamental framework for future clinical research on human PTE, including identification of potential biomarkers for prognosis or therapeutic targets for PTE.

  12. Predicting Pulmonary Fibrosis Disease Course From Past Trends in Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Shelley L.; Tayob, Nabihah; Han, Meilan K.; Zappala, Christopher; Kervitsky, Dolly; Murray, Susan; Wells, Athol U.; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive decline in lung function and eventual mortality. We sought to determine if future declines in pulmonary function, mortality, or both can be predicted from prior trends in pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods: Data from 1981 to 2008 on 4,431 PFTs and mortality were analyzed from 734 subjects with IPF. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for mortality analyses. Mixed models were used to describe longitudinal pulmonary function dynamics, since PFTs were observed at varying time points from baseline. Results: During the first year of follow-up, 135 subjects (73%) had stable FVC while 50 subjects (37%) showed a decline in FVC. During months 12 to 24 (1-2 years after diagnosis), a stable FVC occurred with the same frequency among both subjects whose FVC had declined during year 1 and whose FVC had remained stable (84.0% and 80.7%, respectively; P = .59). Among subjects alive at the end of year 1, those with a stable FVC were more likely to be alive at the end of year 2 than those whose FVC declined (hazard ratio [HR], 0.91 [95% CI, 0.87-0.94] and HR, 0.71 [95% CI, 0.62-0.78], respectively). Conclusions: PFT decline predicts early mortality, but not future declines in physiology, regardless of time since diagnosis. PMID:24231810

  13. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects.

  14. Adverse responses to local anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M M; Graham, R

    1984-11-01

    Progressive challenge was used to investigate twenty-seven patients with a history of an adverse response to local anaesthesia. True allergy was detected in only one patient. The method does not exclude reactions to additives and preservatives in local anaesthetics. If preservative-free local anaesthetics are used for subsequent exposure in patients with no response to progressive challenge, subsequent exposure is safe. The possibility that some of these patients may be reacting to preservatives in the solutions cannot be excluded by such testing. Where possible preservative-free local anaesthetic preparations should be used for subsequent anaesthesia.

  15. Adverse Outcomes in Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roback, Howard B.

    2000-01-01

    Group forms of therapy have been growing at a rapid rate, in part because of their documented effectiveness and economic considerations such as managed care. It is therefore becoming increasingly important to assess the psychological risks of these interventions. The author provides an overview of the published literature and conference presentations on negative effects in adult outpatient groups. Although much of the literature on adverse outcomes in group therapy focuses on single risk factors (e.g., negative leader, group process, or patient characteristics), the author argues that an interactional model should be encouraged. Means of reducing casualties are also discussed, as well as methodological issues and research directions. PMID:10896735

  16. Update in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mejía Chew, C R; Alcolea Batres, S; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and progressive disease that mainly affects the pulmonary arterioles (precapillary), regardless of the triggering aetiology. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension in Spain is estimated at 19.2 and 16 cases per million inhabitants, respectively. The diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is based on haemodynamic criteria (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25mmHg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units) and therefore requires the implementation of right cardiac catheterisation. Sequential therapy with a single drug has been used in clinical practice. However, recent European guidelines recommend combined initial therapy in some situations. This review conducts a critical update of our knowledge of this disease according to the latest guidelines and recommendations.

  17. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Liver Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have liver disease, you are at risk for pulmonary hypertension? ... tissue diseases (scleroderma and lupus for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, or HIV infec- tion. ...

  18. How Is Pulmonary Embolism Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Embolism Treated? Pulmonary embolism (PE) is treated with medicines, procedures, and other therapies. The main goals of treating PE are to stop the blood clot from getting ...

  19. How Is Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosed? Pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed based on your medical history, a ... emergency room often are the ones to diagnose PE with the help of a radiologist. A radiologist ...

  20. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... mediastinitis ) Abnormal buildup of fluid in the lungs ( pulmonary edema ) Buildup of fluid between the layers of tissue ... reactions Cardiovascular Chemotherapy Interstitial lung disease Pleural effusion Pulmonary edema Respiratory Systemic lupus erythematosus Patient Instructions Interstitial lung ...

  1. Retrograde pulmonary perfusion as an adjunct to standard pulmonary embolectomy for acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Salvatore; Barbato, Luciano; Grasso, Maria Antonia; Tesler, Ugo Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Mortality rates for pulmonary embolectomy in patients with acute massive pulmonary embolism have decreased in recent years. However, it still ranges from 30 to 45% when surgery is performed on critically ill patients, and the mortality rates reach 60% in patients who have experienced a cardiac arrest before the procedure. The causes of death in these patients are generally attributed to right heart failure due to persistent pulmonary hypertension, intractable pulmonary oedema, and massive parenchymal and intrabronchial haemorrhage. Clinical and experimental findings indicate that venous air embolism causes severe or even lethal damage to the pulmonary microvasculature and the lung parenchyma consequent to the release of endothelium-derived cytokines. These findings are similar to those observed when severely compromised patients undergo pulmonary embolectomy for air entrapped in the pulmonary artery during embolectomy, which may lead to fatal outcomes. Retrograde pulmonary perfusion (RPP), besides enabling the removal of residual thrombotic material from the peripheral branches of the pulmonary artery, fills the pulmonary artery with blood and prevents pulmonary air embolism. We believe that the use of RPP as an adjunct to conventional pulmonary embolectomy decreases the morbidity and mortality rates associated with pulmonary embolectomy in critically ill patients.

  2. [Pulmonary nodules and arachnophobia].

    PubMed

    Colinet, B; Dargent, J-L; Fremault, A

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary nodules are a common reason for consultation and their investigation must always exclude a possible neoplastic cause. This means that, in addition to a thorough history, investigations may be necessary which are sometimes invasive and therefore potentially a cause of iatrogenic harm. The toxic aetiologies for pulmonary nodules are rare. We report a case of a patient with pulmonary nodules occurring predominantly in the right lung, about 1cm in diameter, non-cavitating without calcification, and sometimes surrounded by a peripheral halo. The nodules were a chance finding during preoperative evaluation. After a comprehensive review, a reaction to an inhaled irritant was the preferred hypothesis, specifically overuse of a compound insecticide containing, in addition to the propellant gas and solvent type hydrocarbon - a mixture of piperonyl butoxide, of esbiothrine and permethrin. Removal of this led to the complete disappearance of nodules. Pathological examination identified bronchiolitis obliterans with organising pneumonia accompanied by non-necrotizing granulomas and lipid vacuoles.

  3. Pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Handa, Yoshinori; Kai, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Takuhiro; Mukaida, Hidenori; Egawa, Hiromi; Kaneko, Mayumi

    2016-12-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred to our department due to abnormal shadows on a chest radiograph. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a 3-cm nodule in the right middle lung lobe, and bronchoscopy revealed adenocarcinoma cells with EGFR mutations. A lung resection was performed. Histological analysis revealed tumors comprising tall columnar cells that were similar to an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon that had been resected 13 years previously. Metastatic colorectal carcinoma was initially considered, but immunohistochemical staining indicated pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma. Pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma was first described in 1991, and about 30 cases have since been described in the English literature. However, its concept and etiology are not clear. It is important to distinguish pulmonary enteric adenocarcinoma from metastatic colorectal carcinoma because of obvious differences in therapeutic strategies and prognosis, especially with a past history of colorectal carcinoma. Immunohistochemical and gene mutation analyses seemed to be helpful.

  4. Pulmonary hypertension in women

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Meredith E; Hemnes, Anna R

    2011-01-01

    Female predominance in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been known for several decades and recent interest in the effects of sex hormones on the development of disease has substantially increased our understanding of this epidemiologic observation. Basic science data suggest a beneficial effect of estrogens in the pulmonary vasculature both acutely and chronically, which seems to contradict the known predilection in women. Recent human and rodent data have suggested that altered levels of estrogen, differential signaling and altered metabolism of estrogens in PAH may underlie the gender difference in this disease. Studies of the effects of sex hormones on the right ventricle in animal and human disease will further aid in understanding gender differences in PAH. This article focuses on the effects of sex hormones on the pulmonary vasculature and right ventricle on both a basic science and translational level. PMID:21090930

  5. Postobstructive pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Udeshi, Ashish; Cantie, Shawn Michael; Pierre, Edgar

    2010-09-01

    Postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE; also known as negative pressure pulmonary edema) is a potentially life-threatening complication in which pulmonary edema occurs shortly after the relief of an upper airway obstruction. The incidence of POPE has been reported to be as high as 1 in 1000 general anesthetic cases and commonly presents as acute respiratory distress that requires immediate intervention. This review examines the 2 subclasses of POPE and describes the etiologic factors, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment strategies associated with each. The aim of this review was to equip clinicians with the knowledge base necessary to identify patients at increased risk for POPE and to expeditiously diagnose and treat this potentially catastrophic complication.

  6. Pulmonary manifestations of heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Calvert, C A; Rawlings, C A

    1985-09-01

    The clinical signs associated with heartworm disease are the result of changes in the pulmonary arterial system. These clinical signs are the result of either pulmonary hypertension or lung parenchymal disease associated with vascular changes. An increase in pulmonary arterial pressure produces an increase in right ventricular afterload, which may lead to exercise intolerance, syncope, and right-sided congestive heart failure. Coughing, dyspnea, and hemoptysis are the results of pulmonary parenchymal disease.

  7. Iron, oxygen, and the pulmonary circulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The human pulmonary vasculature vasoconstricts in response to a reduction in alveolar oxygen tension, a phenomenon termed hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). This review describes the time course of this behavior, which occurs in distinct phases, and then explores the importance for HPV of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. Next, the HIF-hydroxylase enzymes that act as molecular oxygen sensors within the HIF pathway are discussed. These enzymes are particularly sensitive to intracellular iron availability, which confers iron-sensing properties on the HIF pathway. Human studies of iron chelation and supplementation are then reviewed. These demonstrate that the iron sensitivity of the HIF pathway evident from in vitro experiments is relevant to human pulmonary vascular physiology. Next, the importance of iron status in high-altitude illness and chronic cardiopulmonary disease is explored, and the therapeutic potential of intravenous iron discussed. The review concludes by highlighting some further complexities that arise from interactions between the HIF pathway and other intracellular iron-sensing mechanisms. PMID:26066825

  8. Pulmonary talcosis: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Cláudia Mauro; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2010-04-01

    Talc is a mineral widely used in the ceramic, paper, plastics, rubber, paint, and cosmetic industries. Four distinct forms of pulmonary disease caused by talc have been defined. Three of them (talcosilicosis, talcoasbestosis, and pure talcosis) are associated with aspiration and differ in the composition of the inhaled substance. The fourth form, a result of intravenous administration of talc, is seen in drug users who inject medications intended for oral use. The disease most commonly affects men, with a mean age in the fourth decade of life. Presentation of patients with talc granulomatosis can range from asymptomatic to fulminant disease. Symptomatic patients typically present with nonspecific complaints, including progressive exertional dyspnea, and cough. Late complications include chronic respiratory failure, emphysema, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cor pulmonale. History of occupational exposure or of drug addiction is the major clue to the diagnosis. The high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of small centrilobular nodules associated with heterogeneous conglomerate masses containing high-density amorphous areas, with or without panlobular emphysema in the lower lobes, is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. The characteristic histopathologic feature in talc pneumoconiosis is the striking appearance of birefringent, needle-shaped particles of talc seen within the giant cells and in the areas of pulmonary fibrosis with the use of polarized light. In conclusion, computed tomography can play an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary talcosis, since suggestive patterns may be observed. The presence of these patterns in drug abusers or in patients with an occupational history of exposure to talc is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis.

  9. Oral sildenafil for treatment of severe pulmonary hypertension in an infant.

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam-lun Ellis; Cheung, Kam-lau; Siu, Kiu-lok; Leung, Ting-fan; Yam, Man-ching; Fok, Tai-fai; Ng, Pak-cheung

    2005-01-01

    We report the use of oral sildenafil in a 5-month-old preterm infant with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary arterial hypertension refractory to inhaled nitric oxide treatment, maximal ventilatory support and conventional vasodilator therapy. Sildenafil was prepared as a liquid suspension by the method of trituration and administered via an orogastric tube to the patient. Forty-eight hours after sildenafil treatment, echocardiography revealed that the tricuspid incompetence was substantially diminished and the contractility of both ventricles improved, indicating a marked reduction in pulmonary arterial pressure. Oral sildenafil treatment was continued for 6 months until complete resolution of pulmonary arterial hypertension, and oxygen supplement was weaned off. There was no adverse effect during the treatment period. Oral sildenafil may be useful in reducing pulmonary vascular resistance and can be considered for treatment of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  10. The Post-Anesthetic Care of Pediatric Patients With Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chau, Destiny F; Gangadharan, Meera; Hartke, Lopa P; Twite, Mark D

    2016-03-01

    Few conditions make even the most experienced pediatric anesthesiologists take pause. Pulmonary hypertension is one such condition due to the associated high perioperative morbidity and mortality. Much is written about the intraoperative management of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This article will instead focus on postoperative care and review the evidence in support of a risk stratification approach for the post-anesthetic disposition of these patients. The total risk for post-anesthetic adverse events includes the patient's baseline risk factors and the incremental risks imposed by the procedure and anesthetic. A proposal with recommendations to guide practitioners and a table summarizing relevant factors are provided. Last, the readers' attention is drawn to the heterogeneity of pulmonary hypertensive disease. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (precapillary) differs significantly from pulmonary venous hypertension (postcapillary); the anesthetic management for one may be relatively contraindicated in the other. Their dissimilarities justify the need to distinguish them for study and research endeavors.

  11. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma - Multimodality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Nari; Seol, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Il Hwan; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and fatal disease. PAS can often be misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. Moreover, the correct diagnosis is frequently delayed due to nonspecific signs and symptoms. The prognosis of patients with PAS is poor. We report a case of a woman with a primary PAS who was initially diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism.

  12. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma - Multimodality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Nari; Seol, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Il Hwan; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and fatal disease. PAS can often be misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. Moreover, the correct diagnosis is frequently delayed due to nonspecific signs and symptoms. The prognosis of patients with PAS is poor. We report a case of a woman with a primary PAS who was initially diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism. PMID:27833785

  13. Severe Acute Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Brentuximab in a Patient with Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Yasmin; Ramirez, Saul; Rosell Cespedes, Elizabeth; Rensoli Velasquez, Marimer; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Gaur, Sumit; Figueroa-Casas, Juan B.; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary toxicity associated with brentuximab appears to be a rare but serious adverse effect that can be potentially fatal. We report the case of a twenty-nine-year-old female with Hodgkin's lymphoma who was treated with brentuximab and later presented with severe acute pulmonary toxicity; she improved after the discontinuation of brentuximab and administration of antibiotics and glucocorticoid therapy. Currently there is very little data in the literature in regard to the clinical manifestations and characteristics of patients taking brentuximab and the potential development of acute severe pulmonary toxicity, as well as the appropriate therapeutic approach, making this particular case of successful treatment and resolution unique. PMID:27190667

  14. Weight of evidence evaluation of a network of adverse ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ongoing honey bee colony losses are of significant international concern because of the essential role these insects play in pollinating many high nutrient crops, such as fruits, vegetables, and nuts. Both chemical and non-chemical stressors have been implicated as possible contributors to colony failure, however, the potential role(s) of commonly-used neonicotinoid insecticides has emerged as particularly concerning. Neonicotinoids act on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the central nervous system to eliminate target pest insects. However, mounting evidence indicates that these neonicotinoids also may adversely affect beneficial pollinators, such as the honey bee, via impairments on learning and memory, and ultimately foraging success. The specific mechanisms linking activation of the nAChR to adverse effects on learning and memory are uncertain. Additionally, clear connections between observed impacts on individual bees and colony level effects are lacking. The objective of this review was to develop adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) as a means to evaluate the biological plausibility and empirical evidence supporting (or refuting) the linkage between activation of the physiological target site, the nAChR, and colony level consequences. Development of AOPs has led to the identification of research gaps which, for example, may be of high priority in understanding how perturbation of pathways involved in neurotransmission can adversely affect norm

  15. A case-control study of the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes due to tuberculosis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Asuquo, B; Vellore, A D; Walters, G; Manney, S; Mignini, L; Kunst, H

    2012-10-01

    We conducted a case-control study at three main inner-city hospitals in Birmingham, UK between 2004 and 2006, to determine the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with tuberculosis (TB) (n = 24), compared with healthy pregnant controls (n = 72). The incidence of TB was 62/100,000 pregnancies, with 54.2% cases having pulmonary TB (41.7% extra-pulmonary; 4.2% both). Infants of mothers with TB had a significantly lower mean birth weight compared with controls (2,735 g vs 3,135 g; p = 0.03). Mean birth weight was lower in pulmonary TB than in the extra-pulmonary TB. Multivariate analysis showed that low birth weight was associated with pre-term delivery (p < 0.001). We conclude that pregnant women with TB are at higher risk of low birth weight due to higher odds of pre-term delivery.

  16. Altered Resting and Exercise Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Akshay

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Obesity, particularly severe obesity, affects both resting and exercise-related respiratory physiology. Severe obesity classically produces a restrictive ventilatory abnormality, characterized by reduced expiratory reserve volume. However, obstructive ventilatory abnormality may also be associated with abdominal obesity. Decreased peak work rates are usually seen among obese subjects in a setting of normal or decreased ventilatory reserve and normal cardiovascular response to exercise. Weight loss may reverse many adverse physiological consequences of severe obesity on the respiratory system. PMID:19700043

  17. The international serious adverse events consortium.

    PubMed

    Holden, Arthur L; Contreras, Jorge L; John, Sally; Nelson, Matthew R

    2014-11-01

    The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium is generating novel insights into the genetics and biology of drug-induced serious adverse events, and thereby improving pharmaceutical product development and decision-making.

  18. "Adversative Conjunction": The Poetics of Linguistic Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    The general use of adversative conjunction in (primarily) English and U.S. poetry is outlined. The contention is that the adversative is not merely a grammatical convenience but sometimes a highly functional tool of rhetorical strategy. (36 references) (LB)

  19. "Adversative Conjunction": The Poetics of Linguistic Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    The general use of adversative conjunction in (primarily) English and U.S. poetry is outlined. The contention is that the adversative is not merely a grammatical convenience but sometimes a highly functional tool of rhetorical strategy. (36 references) (LB)

  20. Bosentan for pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Onda, Naomi; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic factor in patients with interstitial lung disease. No established treatment exists for pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial pneumonia. We describe the case of an 81-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), who was admitted to our hospital due to aggravation of dyspnea and decreased oxygen saturation, as well as onset of orthopnea and rapidly progressing edema. The transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39 mmHg and the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 9 mmHg. After various examinations, the diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to IPF and of congestive heart failure secondary to PH were established. Diuretic therapy was started, but the patient's condition showed poor improvement. Subsequent initiation of oral bosentan therapy led to improvement in symptoms and findings. At the follow-up assessment one year later her pulmonary function showed no significant changes and no apparent worsening of arterial blood gases, with evident improvement of PH, WHO functional class, maximum exercise tolerance on treadmill exercise testing, right heart catheterization, and transthoracic echocardiography. This report describes a case of successful treatment with bosentan for severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We also present a review of the literature on treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic lung disease. Bosentan appears to be efficacious in some patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis.

  1. Pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance relationship in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Denis; Lau, Edmund M T; Papelier, Yves; Attal, Pierre; Hervé, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Right ventricular adaptation to the increased pulmonary arterial load is a key determinant of outcomes in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and total arterial compliance (C) quantify resistive and elastic properties of pulmonary arteries that modulate the steady and pulsatile components of pulmonary arterial load, respectively. PVR is commonly calculated as transpulmonary pressure gradient over pulmonary flow and total arterial compliance as stroke volume over pulmonary arterial pulse pressure (SV/PApp). Assuming that there is an inverse, hyperbolic relationship between PVR and C, recent studies have popularised the concept that their product (RC-time of the pulmonary circulation, in seconds) is "constant" in health and diseases. However, emerging evidence suggests that this concept should be challenged, with shortened RC-times documented in post-capillary PH and normotensive subjects. Furthermore, reported RC-times in the literature have consistently demonstrated significant scatter around the mean. In precapillary PH, the true PVR can be overestimated if one uses the standard PVR equation because the zero-flow pressure may be significantly higher than pulmonary arterial wedge pressure. Furthermore, SV/PApp may also overestimate true C. Further studies are needed to clarify some of the inconsistencies of pulmonary RC-time, as this has major implications for our understanding of the arterial load in diseases of the pulmonary circulation.

  2. Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary valve.

    PubMed

    Scheidl, Stefan; Taghavi, Shahrokh; Reiter, Ursula; Tröster, Natascha; Kovacs, Gabor; Rienmüller, Rainer; Lang, Susanna; Klepetko, Walter; Olschewski, Horst

    2010-04-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma is a rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary valve itself has not been described. Embolization into pulmonary arteries originating from the pulmonary valve intimal sarcoma can mimic chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and mislead the diagnosis. We present and discuss a patient initially diagnosed as chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, treated by pulmonary endarterectomy. After 24 months, a tumor of the pulmonary valve was detected by echocardiography. The patient underwent removal and replacement of the pulmonary valve. Histology revealed pulmonary valve intimal sarcoma.

  3. At high cardiac output, diesel exhaust exposure increases pulmonary vascular resistance and decreases distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Aurélien; Vicenzi, Marco; De Becker, Benjamin; Riga, Jean-Philippe; Esmaeilzadeh, Fatemeh; Faoro, Vitalie; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; van de Borne, Philippe; Argacha, Jean-François

    2015-12-15

    Air pollution has recently been associated with the development of acute decompensated heart failure, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear. A pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of air pollution, combined with its systemic effects, may precipitate decompensated heart failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) under resting and stress conditions but also to determine whether air pollution may potentiate acquired pulmonary hypertension. Eighteen healthy male volunteers were exposed to ambient air (AA) or dilute DE with a particulate matter of <2.5 μm concentration of 300 μg/m(3) for 2 h in a randomized, crossover study design. The effects of DE on PVR, on the coefficient of distensibilty of pulmonary vessels (α), and on right and left ventricular function were evaluated at rest (n = 18), during dobutamine stress echocardiography (n = 10), and during exercise stress echocardiography performed in hypoxia (n = 8). Serum endothelin-1 and fractional exhaled nitric oxide were also measured. At rest, exposure to DE did not affect PVR. During dobutamine stress, the slope of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship increased from 2.8 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in AA to 3.9 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in DE (P < 0.05) and the α coefficient decreased from 0.96 ± 0.15 to 0.64 ± 0.12%/mmHg (P < 0.01). DE did not further enhance the hypoxia-related upper shift of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship. Exposure to DE did not affect serum endothelin-1 concentration or fractional exhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, acute exposure to DE increased pulmonary vasomotor tone by decreasing the distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels at high cardiac output. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Sermin; Zadeoglulari, Zeynep; Fuss, Stefan H.; Genc, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health. PMID:22523490

  5. Reproduction, Physiology and Biochemistry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter focuses on the reproduction, physiology, and biochemistry of the root-knot nematodes. The extensive amount of information on the reproduction and cytogenetics of species of Meloidogyne contrasts with the limited information on physiology, biochemistry, and biochemical pathways. In commo...

  6. Microbial physiology vol. 29

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, A.H. ); Tempest, D.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: Hydrogen metabolism in Rhizobium: energetics, regulation, enzymology and genetics; The physiology and biochemistry of pili; Carboxysomes and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; Archaebacteria: the comparative enzymology of their central metabolic pathways; and Physiology of lipoteichoic acids in bacteria.

  7. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  8. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  9. Progress in physiological optics.

    PubMed

    Boynton, R M

    1967-08-01

    A survey is made of the current state of physiological optics, broadly defined as equated with visual science. After a survey of some historical and definitional matters, recent progress in a number of areas is critically reviewed. Finally, seven examples of important recent discoveries in physiological optics are given.

  10. Space physiology and medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Nicogossian, A.E.; Parker J.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The state of knowledge in space physiology and medicine are reviewed. Overviews of manned space flight, the space environment, spaceflight systems and procedures, physiological adaptation to space flight, health maintenance of space crew members, and medical problems of space flight are presented.

  11. Physiology of sport.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Ron

    2007-07-01

    The elite athlete represents the extreme of the human gene pool, where genetic endowment is developed by an intensive training programme. Sport encompasses many different activities, calling for different physical and mental attributes. Understanding the physiology of exercise provides insights into normal physiological function.

  12. Radiation transmission in adverse weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Stuart W.

    1991-04-01

    A simplified practical approach to determining the effects of weather on the transmission of radiation at visible, infrared (IR), and millimeter (MM) wavelengths, with particular reference to the aircraft landing problem, is outlined. Passive landing systems are studied. Landing categories related to visibility are defined. An extinction coeffcient used to relate the effect of the atmosphere on the radiation detected by the human eye (or an imaging sensor onboard the aircraft) to the landing category and the calculation of this coefficient are discussed. The approach makes use of data from openly available literature. Results have been found useful in indicating the effects of adverse weather on imaging sensor performance for an enhanced vision aircraft-mounted landing system. As an example of the technique, the method of determining the extinction coefficients in fog for infrared radiation is outlined.

  13. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  14. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars W; Secher, Niels H; Ravn, Hanne B; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods 90 patients were randomised to receive pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB with either oxygenated blood (n=30) or histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution (n=29) compared with no pulmonary perfusion (n=31). The coprimary outcomes were the inverse oxygenation index compared at 21 hours after starting CPB and longitudinally in a mixed-effects model (MEM). Secondary outcomes were tracheal intubation time, serious adverse events, mortality, days alive outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and outside the hospital. Results 21 hours after starting CPB patients receiving pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood had a higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (mean difference (MD) 0.94; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.83; p=0.04). The blood group had also a higher oxygenation index both longitudinally (MEM, p=0.009) and at 21 hours (MD 0.99; CI 0.29 to 1.69; p=0.007) compared with the HTK group. The latest result corresponds to a difference in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen of 23 mm Hg with a median fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.32. Yet the blood or HTK groups did not demonstrate a longitudinally higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (MEM, p=0.57 and 0.17). Similarly, at 21 hours there was no difference in the oxygenation index between the HTK group and those no pulmonary perfusion (MD 0.06; 95% CI −0.73 to 0.86; p=0.87). There were no statistical significant differences between the groups for the secondary outcomes. Discussion Pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood during cardiopulmonary bypass appears to improve postoperative oxygenation in patients with COPD undergoing

  15. Possible adverse effects of frying with vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Dobarganes, Carmen; Márquez-Ruiz, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    The question of whether heated fats in the diet may be detrimental to health is nowadays of the upmost concern, but finding an answer is not easy and requires careful consideration of different aspects of lipid oxidation. This review is divided into two sections. The first part deals with the nature of the new compounds formed at high temperature in the frying process as well as their occurrence in the diet while the second part focuses on their possible nutritional and physiological effects. Oxidation products present in abused frying fats and oils are the compounds most suspected of impairing the nutritional properties of the oils or involving adverse physiological effects. The recent studies on their health implications include those related to their fate and those focused on their effects in metabolic pathways and the most prevalent diseases.

  16. [Pulmonary surgery for pulmonary lesion with pulmonary tuberculosis or of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Niimi, S; Kato, T; Hayakawa, Y; Hirota, M; Kako, T

    2001-11-01

    Nine patients with pulmonary tuberculosis underwent open chest surgery for pulmonary lesions of tuberculosis or other than tubercolosis. They were 1 case of lung cancer, 4 cases of pneumothorax, 1 case of multi drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis and 3 cases of tuberculoma. Postoperative complications developed in 3 cases including 2 of pneumothorax and 1 of lung collapse.

  17. Medications and Adverse Voice Effects.

    PubMed

    Nemr, Kátia; Di Carlos Silva, Ariana; Rodrigues, Danilo de Albuquerque; Zenari, Marcia Simões

    2017-08-16

    To identify the medications used by patients with dysphonia, describe the voice symptoms reported on initial speech-language pathology (SLP) examination, evaluate the possible direct and indirect effects of medications on voice production, and determine the association between direct and indirect adverse voice effects and self-reported voice symptoms, hydration and smoking habits, comorbidities, vocal assessment, and type and degree of dysphonia. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study. Fifty-five patients were evaluated and the vocal signs and symptoms indicated in the Dysphonia Risk Protocol were considered, as well as data on hydration, smoking and medication use. We analyzed the associations between type of side effect and self-reported vocal signs/symptoms, hydration, smoking, comorbidities, type of dysphonia, and auditory-perceptual and acoustic parameters. Sixty percent were women, the mean age was 51.8 years, 29 symptoms were reported on the screening, and 73 active ingredients were identified with 8.2% directly and 91.8% indirectly affecting vocal function. There were associations between the use of drugs with direct adverse voice effects, self-reported symptoms, general degree of vocal deviation, and pitch deviation. The symptoms of dry throat and shortness of breath were associated with the direct vocal side effect of the medicine, as well as the general degree of vocal deviation and the greater pitch deviation. Shortness of breath when speaking was also associated with the greatest degree of vocal deviation. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate.

  19. Multidisciplinary approach to identification and remedial intervention for adverse late effects of cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    McCalla, J.L.

    1985-03-01

    Because of advances in surgical technique, radiation therapy, and combined chemotherapy regimens, there has been a dramatic improvement in the survival of children with pediatric malignancies. All treatment modalities are associated with adverse effects that may be manifested months to years after therapy. This article has provided an overview of the physiologic and psychologic adverse effects of antineoplastic therapy and described the multidisciplinary approach used by one institution to identify and initiate appropriate remedial intervention. Nurses can learn to assist in the identification of adverse late effects, provide support to the family, and facilitate appropriate intervention.

  20. Pulmonary vascular and ventricular dysfunction in the susceptible patient (2015 Grover Conference series)

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Machado, Roberto F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary blood vessel structure and tone are maintained by a complex interplay between endogenous vasoactive factors and oxygen-sensing intermediaries. Under physiological conditions, these signaling networks function as an adaptive interface between the pulmonary circulation and environmental or acquired perturbations to preserve oxygenation and maintain systemic delivery of oxygen-rich hemoglobin. Chronic exposure to hypoxia, however, triggers a range of pathogenetic mechanisms that include hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)–dependent upregulation of the vasoconstrictor peptide endothelin 1 in pulmonary endothelial cells. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, chronic hypoxia induces HIF-1α-mediated upregulation of canonical transient receptor potential proteins, as well as increased Rho kinase-Ca2+ signaling and pulmonary arteriole synthesis of the profibrotic hormone aldosterone. Collectively, these mechanisms contribute to a contractile or hypertrophic pulmonary vascular phenotype. Genetically inherited disorders in hemoglobin structure are also an important etiology of abnormal pulmonary vasoreactivity. In sickle cell anemia, for example, consumption of the vasodilator and antimitogenic molecule nitric oxide by cell-free hemoglobin is an important mechanism underpinning pulmonary hypertension. Contemporary genomic and transcriptomic analytic methods have also allowed for the discovery of novel risk factors relevant to sickle cell disease, including GALNT13 gene variants. In this report, we review cutting-edge observations characterizing these and other pathobiological mechanisms that contribute to pulmonary vascular and right ventricular vulnerability. PMID:28090285

  1. Pulmonary hypertension and hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Téllez Villajos, L; Martínez González, J; Moreira Vicente, V; Albillos Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a relatively common phenomenon in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and can appear through various mechanisms. The most characteristic scenario that binds portal and pulmonary hypertension is portopulmonary syndrome. However, hyperdynamic circulation, TIPS placement and heart failure can raise the mean pulmonary artery pressure without increasing the resistances. These conditions are not candidates for treatment with pulmonary vasodilators and require a specific therapy. A correct assessment of hemodynamic, ultrasound and clinical variables enables the differential diagnosis of each situation that produces pulmonary hypertension in patients with cirrhosis.

  2. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Xin; Rice, Shawn J; Belani, Chandra P

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer remains a challenging disease with high morbidity and mortality despite targeted therapy. Symptom burden related to cancer impairs quality of life and functional status in patients with lung cancer and in survivors. Pulmonary rehabilitation has been recognized as an effective, noninvasive intervention for patients with chronic respiratory disease. It is well established that pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with chronic obstruction pulmonary disease through improved exercise capacity and symptoms. Evidence is increasing that the benefit of pulmonary rehabilitation can be applied to patients with lung cancer. Comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation has made its way as a cornerstone of integrated care for patients with lung cancer.

  3. Idiopathic dilatation of pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rahul Kumar; Talwar, Deepak; Gupta, Sameer K; Bansal, Shobhit

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic dilatation of pulmonary arteries (IDPA) is a rare abnormality of pulmonary arteries, the reported incidence in literature being as low as 0.007% in autopsy samples. With the improvement in diagnostic modalities, antemortem diagnosis of IDPA has been increasingly established by excluding diseases that induce pulmonary arterial enlargement. Here, we present a rare case of idiopathic dilatation of the pulmonary artery admitted with shortness of breath where IDPA was diagnosed as an incidental finding using computed tomography pulmonary angiography and cardiac catheterization. PMID:27891002

  4. Physiology in conservation translocations

    PubMed Central

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  5. Pulmonary function testing.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Gregg L; Enright, Paul L

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary function testing is often considered the basis for diagnosis in many categories of pulmonary disease. Although most of the testing methodologies are well established and widely employed, there are still many questions regarding how tests should be performed, how to ensure that reliable data are produced, what reference values and rules should be used, and how pulmonary function tests (PFTs) should be interpreted to best support clinical decision making. This conference was organized around a set of questions aimed at many of these issues. Each presenter was asked to address a specific topic regarding what tests should be done, how those test should be performed to answer a particular clinical question, and to relate test results to an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the patient. These topics included testing of adults and children, with concentration on important disease entities such as COPD, asthma, and unexplained dyspnea. Special emphasis was given to discussing reference values, lower limits of normal, interpretive strategies to optimize disease classification, and those factors directly affecting data quality. Established techniques for spirometry, lung volumes, diffusing capacity, exercise testing, and bronchial challenges were compared and contrasted with new technologies, and with technologies that might be part of pulmonary function laboratories in the near future.

  6. Familial idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, R C; Taussig, L M; Pinnas, J L

    1979-06-01

    Two brothers, aged 3 and 6 years, respectively, had their pulmonary conditions diagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH). Both boys had severe iron-deficiency anemia, chronic cough, hemoptysis, and exertional dyspnea, and one had recurrent epistaxis. The results of light microscopic lung histopathologic studies in both patients showed numerous hemosiderinladen macrophages and chronic interstitial pneumonitis. No specific patterns of immunofluorescence of the alveolar capillary basement membranes were found. The results of electron microscopic examinations showed intact alveolar and capillary basement membranes and no evidence of electron-dense deposits. The lack of clinical or biochemical evidence for renal disease as well as the absence of serum antinuclear and antibasement membrane antibodies excluded associated autoimmune disorders. Evaluation for milk-protein allergy was negative and neither child demonstrated a clinical response to a milk-free diet. Sequential pulmonary function studies performed over four years showed episodes of acute obstructive airway disease that correlated with pulmonary hemorrhage and mild persistent restrictive lung disease. The results of this family study suggested that some cases of IPH may have a genetic basis.

  7. Pulmonary lobectomy - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100094.htm Pulmonary lobectomy - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 3 Go to slide 2 ...

  8. Primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rashid, A; Lehrman, S; Romano, P; Frishman, W; Dobkin, J; Reichel, J

    2000-01-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a condition characterized by sustained elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) without demonstrable cause. The most common symptom at presentation is dyspnea. Other complaints include fatigue, chest pain, syncope, leg edema, and palpitations. Right heart catheterization is diagnostic, showing a mean PAP >25 mmHg at rest and >30 mmHg during exercise, with a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In the National Institutes of Health-PPH registry, the median survival period was 2.8 years. Treatment is aimed at lowering PAP, increasing cardiac output, and decreasing in situ thrombosis. Vasodilators have been used with some success in the treatment of PPH. They include prostacyclin, calcium-channel blockers, nitric oxide and adenosine. Anticoagulation has also been advised for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and in situ thromboses of the lungs. New drug treatments under investigation include L-arginine, plasma endothelin-I, and bosentan. Use of oxygen, digoxin, and diuretics for symptomatic relief have also been recommended. Patients with severe PPH refractory to medical management should be considered for surgery.

  9. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray High-resolution CT scan of the chest Pulmonary function tests Open lung biopsy (surgical biopsy) Treatment Treatment involves washing out the protein substance from the lung (whole-lung lavage) from time to time. Some persons may need a lung ... References Levine SM. ...

  10. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis.

    PubMed

    Malcon, Maura Cavada; Malcon, Claudio Mattar; Cavada, Marina Neves; Caruso, Paulo Eduardo Macedo; Real, Lara Flório

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly. We report the case of an 8-year-old boy with left lung agenesis, without any other congenital malformations. When the patient presented symptoms, including cough, wheezing, and dyspnea, with no clinical improvement after a period of 30 days, imaging studies were conducted and the diagnosis was made.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension in polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Liu, Tao; Cai, Ying-ying; Luo, Lian; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mengmeng; Cai, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is relatively common in connective tissue diseases. However, few studies have focused on the pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with polymyositis (PM). Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of PH and determine the associated factors for PH in patients with PM. Multicenter study of 61 patients with PM underwent evaluation including general information, physical examination, laboratory indictors, thoracic high-resolution CT (HRCT) imaging, and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). TTE was performed to estimate the pulmonary arterial pressure. PH was defined as resting systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) ≥40 mmHg. PH was identified in ten patients (16.39 %) who had few cardiopulmonary symptoms. PM patients with PH had higher prevalence of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pericardial effusion (PE) compared with patients without PH (18 vs. 11.5 %, p = 0.005; 11.5 vs. 9.8 %, p = 0.004; respectively). After controlling for age, gender, and potential factors, ILD and PE were independently associated with PH in patients with PM in multivariate analysis (OR = 8.193, 95 % CI 1.241-54.084, p = 0.029; OR = 8.265, 95 % CI 1.298-52.084, p = 0.025; respectively). Depending on TTE, the possible prevalence of PH was 16.39 % in patients with PM. Both ILD and PE may contribute to the development of PH in PM.

  12. Treprostinil for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Skoro-Sajer, Nika; Lang, Irene; Naeije, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Treprostinil is a stable, long-acting prostacyclin analogue which can be administered as a continuous subcutaneous infusion using a portable miniature delivery system. Subcutaneous treprostinil has been shown in a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to improve exercise capacity, clinical state, functional class, pulmonary hemodynamics, and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, an uncommon disease of poor prognosis. Side effects include facial flush, headache, jaw pain, abdominal cramping, and diarrhea, all typical of prostacyclin, and manageable by symptom-directed dose adjustments, and infusion site pain which may make further treatment impossible in 7%–10% of the patients. Long-term survival in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients treated with subcutaneous treprostinil is similar to that reported with intravenous epoprostenol. There are uncontrolled data suggesting efficacy of subcutaneous treprostinil in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Treprostinil can also be administered intravenously, although increased doses, up to 2–3 times those given subcutaneously, appear to be needed to obtain the same efficacy. Preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial of inhaled treprostinil on top of bosentan and sildenafil therapies have shown significance on the primary endpoint, which was exercise capacity as assessed by the distance walked in 6 minutes. Trials of oral formulations of treprostinil have been initiated. PMID:18827901

  13. Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert R.; Meyers, Valerie E.

    2015-01-01

    Crew members can be directly exposed to celestial dust in several ways. After crew members perform extravehicular activities (EVAs), they may introduce into the habitat dust that will have collected on spacesuits and boots. Cleaning of the suits between EVAs and changing of the Environmental Control Life Support System filters are other operations that could result in direct exposure to celestial dusts. In addition, if the spacesuits used in exploration missions abrade the skin, as current EVA suits have, then contact with these wounds would provide a source of exposure. Further, if celestial dusts gain access to a suit's interior, as was the case during the Apollo missions, the dust could serve as an additional source of abrasions or enhance suit-induced injuries. When a crew leaves the surface of a celestial body and returns to microgravity, the dust that is introduced into the return vehicle will "float," thus increasing the opportunity for ocular and respiratory injury. Because the features of the respirable fraction of lunar dusts indicate they could be toxic to humans, NASA conducted several studies utilizing lunar dust simulants and authentic lunar dust to determine the unique properties of lunar dust that affect physiology, assess the dermal and ocular irritancy of the dust, and establish a permissible exposure limit for episodic exposure to airborne lunar dust during missions that would involve no more than 6 months stay on the lunar surface. Studies, with authentic lunar soils from both highland (Apollo 16) and mare (Apollo17) regions demonstrated that the lunar soil is highly abrasive to a high fidelity model of human skin. Studies of lunar dust returned during the Apollo 14 mission from an area of the moon in which the soils were comprised of mineral constituents from both major geological regions (highlands and mares regions) demonstrated only minimal ocular irritancy, and pulmonary toxicity that was less than the highly toxic terrestrial crystalline

  14. Metabolic Profiling of Right Ventricular-Pulmonary Vascular Function Reveals Circulating Biomarkers of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gregory D.; Ngo, Debby; Hemnes, Anna R.; Farrell, Laurie; Domos, Carly; Pappagianopoulos, Paul P.; Dhakal, Bishnu P.; Souza, Amanda; Shi, Xu; Pugh, Meredith E.; Beloiartsev, Arkadi; Sinha, Sumita; Clish, Clary B.; Gerszten, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pulmonary hypertension and associated right ventricular (RV) dysfunction are important determinants of morbidity and mortality, which are optimally characterized by invasive hemodynamic measurements. OBJECTIVES This study sought to determine whether metabolite profiling could identify plasma signatures of right ventricular-pulmonary vascular (RV-PV) dysfunction. METHODS We measured plasma concentrations of 105 metabolites using targeted mass spectrometry in 71 individuals (discovery cohort) who underwent comprehensive physiological assessment with right-sided heart catheterization and radionuclide ventriculography at rest and during exercise. Our findings were validated in a second cohort undergoing invasive hemodynamic evaluations (n = 71), as well as in an independent cohort with or without known pulmonary arterial (PA) hypertension (n = 30). RESULTS In the discovery cohort, 21 metabolites were associated with 2 or more hemodynamic indicators of RV-PV function (i.e., resting right atrial pressure, mean PA pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance [PVR], and PVR and PA pressure-flow response [ΔPQ] during exercise). We identified novel associations of RV-PV dysfunction with circulating indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)–dependent tryptophan metabolites (TMs), tricarboxylic acid intermediates, and purine metabolites and confirmed previously described associations with arginine–nitric oxide metabolic pathway constituents. IDO-TM levels were inversely related to RV ejection fraction and were particularly well correlated with exercise PVR and ΔPQ. Multisite sampling demonstrated transpulmonary release of IDO-TMs. IDO-TMs also identified RV-PV dysfunction in a validation cohort with known risk factors for pulmonary hypertension and in patients with established PA hypertension. CONCLUSIONS Metabolic profiling identified reproducible signatures of RV-PV dysfunction, highlighting both new biomarkers and pathways for further functional characterization. PMID

  15. Using physiology to guide time to cord clamping.

    PubMed

    Kluckow, Martin; Hooper, Stuart B

    2015-08-01

    Immediate clamping and cutting of the umbilical cord at birth has been the accepted standard of care for decades. The physiologic rationale relating umbilical cord clamping (UCC) to the events of the circulatory transition is not considered in arbitrarily recommended cord clamping times. Systematic review of early versus deferred UCC shows significant hemodynamic benefits to the deferred group. Mechanisms for this protective effect are considered in this review. The original concept of a placental transfusion with a volume load and prevention of low cardiac output relies on the physiological end point of the amount of blood transfused. The newer concept of an ordered physiological transition is increasingly supported. This model places aeration of the lungs and an increase in pulmonary blood flow back at the centre of the circulatory transition with timing of UCC being related to establishment of respiration. The need for "physiologically based" UCC is discussed. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Post-market surveillance to detect adverse events associated with Melody® valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kevin D; Goldstein, Bryan H; Angtuaco, Michael J; Chu, Patricia Y; Fleming, Gregory A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe previously unrecognised or under-recognised adverse events associated with Melody® valve implantation. In rare diseases and conditions, it is typically not feasible to conduct large-scale safety trials before drug or device approval. Therefore, post-market surveillance mechanisms are necessary to detect rare but potentially serious adverse events. We reviewed the United States Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database and conducted a structured literature review to evaluate adverse events associated with on- and off-label Melody® valve implantation. Adverse events were compared with those described in the prospective Investigational Device Exemption and Post-Market Approval Melody® transcatheter pulmonary valve trials. We identified 631 adverse events associated with "on-label" Melody® valve implants and 84 adverse events associated with "off-label" implants. The most frequent "on-label" adverse events were similar to those described in the prospective trials including stent fracture (n=210) and endocarditis (n=104). Previously unrecognised or under-recognised adverse events included stent fragment embolisation (n=5), device erosion (n=4), immediate post-implant severe valvar insufficiency (n=2), and late coronary compression (n=2 cases at 5 days and 3 months after implantation). Under-recognised adverse events associated with off-label implantation included early valve failure due to insufficiency when implanted in the tricuspid position (n=7) and embolisation with percutaneous implantation in the mitral position (n=5). Post-market passive surveillance does not demonstrate a high frequency of previously unrecognised serious adverse events with "on-label" Melody® valve implantation. Further study is needed to evaluate safety of "off-label" uses.

  17. Practical considerations for the pharmacotherapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Bryan M; Mauro, Vincent F; Khouri, Samer J

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease. Before the 1990s, when pharmacologic treatment was finally approved, only supportive therapy was available, consisting of anticoagulation, digoxin, diuretics, and supplemental oxygen. Calcium channel blocker therapy was also an option, but only a small percentage of patients respond to it. However, starting with epoprostenol in 1996, the number of drugs approved to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension increased. Three distinct classes of drugs were developed based on the pathophysiology of the disease: the prostanoids, endothelin-1 receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. The prostanoids are administered either parenterally or by inhalation to replace the lack of prostacyclin within the pulmonary arterial vasculature. The endothelin-1 receptor antagonists were the first class of oral drugs to be developed, but drug interactions and adverse effects are prominent with this class. The phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors increase the second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP) that is induced by nitric oxide stimulation. All of the drugs within these three classes are distinct in and of themselves, and their clinical use requires in-depth knowledge of pulmonary arterial hypertension and its pathophysiology. Because these drugs have different mechanisms of action, combination therapy has shown promise in patients with severe disease, although data are still lacking. This article should serve as a practical guide for clinicians who encounter patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and the drugs used for the treatment of this devastating disease.

  18. Phosphatidylcholine composition of pulmonary surfactant from terrestrial and marine diving mammals

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardner, Manuela; Kleinhenz, Danielle; Piscitelli, Marina; Raverty, Stephen; Haulena, Martin; Zimba, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    Marine mammals are repeatedly exposed to elevated extra-thoracic pressure and alveolar collapse during diving and readily experience alveolar expansion upon inhalation – a unique capability as compared to terrestrial mammals. How marine mammal lungs overcome the challenges of frequent alveolar collapse and recruitment remains unknown. Recent studies indicate that pinniped lung surfactant has more anti-adhesive components compared to terrestrial mammals, which would aid in alveolar opening. However, pulmonary surfactant composition has not yet been investigated in odontocetes, whose physiology and diving behavior differ from pinnipeds. The aim of this study was to investigate the phosphatidylcholine (PC) composition of lung surfactants from various marine mammals and compare these to a terrestrial mammal. We found an increase in anti-adhesive PC species in harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) compared to dog (Canus lupus familiaris), as well as an increase in the fluidizing PCs 16:0/14:0 and 16:0/16:1 in pinnipeds compared to odontocetes. The harbor porpoise (a representative of the odontocetes) did not have higher levels of fluidizing PCs compared to dog. Our preliminary results support previous findings that pinnipeds may have adapted unique surfactant compositions that allow them to dive at high pressures for extended periods without adverse effects. Future studies will need to investigate the differences in other surfactant components to fully assess the surfactant composition in odontocetes. PMID:25812797

  19. Phosphatidylcholine composition of pulmonary surfactant from terrestrial and marine diving mammals.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Danielle B; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardner, Manuela; Kleinhenz, Danielle; Piscitelli, Marina; Raverty, Stephen; Haulena, Martin; Zimba, Paul V

    2015-06-01

    Marine mammals are repeatedly exposed to elevated extra-thoracic pressure and alveolar collapse during diving and readily experience alveolar expansion upon inhalation - a unique capability as compared to terrestrial mammals. How marine mammal lungs overcome the challenges of frequent alveolar collapse and recruitment remains unknown. Recent studies indicate that pinniped lung surfactant has more anti-adhesive components compared to terrestrial mammals, which would aid in alveolar opening. However, pulmonary surfactant composition has not yet been investigated in odontocetes, whose physiology and diving behavior differ from pinnipeds. The aim of this study was to investigate the phosphatidylcholine (PC) composition of lung surfactants from various marine mammals and compare these to a terrestrial mammal. We found an increase in anti-adhesive PC species in harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) compared to dog (Canus lupus familiaris), as well as an increase in the fluidizing PCs 16:0/14:0 and 16:0/16:1 in pinnipeds compared to odontocetes. The harbor porpoise (a representative of the odontocetes) did not have higher levels of fluidizing PCs compared to dog. Our preliminary results support previous findings that pinnipeds may have adapted unique surfactant compositions that allow them to dive at high pressures for extended periods without adverse effects. Future studies will need to investigate the differences in other surfactant components to fully assess the surfactant composition in odontocetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.