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Sample records for adverse renal vascular

  1. Determinants of Adverse Events in Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; McDonald, Kathryn; Morton, John; Dalman, Ron L; Bech, Fritz R

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a national priority. Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) monitor potential adverse events during hospital stays. Surgical specialty PSI benchmarks do not exist, which are needed to account for differences in the range of procedures performed, reasons for the procedure, and differences in patient characteristics. A comprehensive profile of adverse events in vascular surgery was created. Study Design The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried for 8 vascular procedures using ICD-9-CM codes from 2005–2009. Factors associated with PSI development were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. Results A total of 1,412,703 patients underwent a vascular procedure and 5.2% developed a PSI. PSIs were more frequent in female, non-white patients with public payers (p<.01). Patients at mid and low volume hospitals had greater odds of developing a PSI (Odds Ratio [OR], 1.17; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.10–1.23 and OR, 1.69; CI, 1.53–1.87). Amputations had highest PSI risk-adjusted rate (RAR) and carotid endarterectomy and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair had lower RAR (p<.0001). PSI RAR increased linearly by severity of patient indication: claudicants (OR, 0.40, CI, 0.35–0.46), rest pain patients (OR, 0.78, CI 0.69–0.90), ulcer (OR: 1.20, CI: 1.07–1.34) and gangrene patients (OR:1.85, CI: 1.66–2.06). Conclusions Patient safety events in vascular surgery were high and varied by procedure, with amputations and open AAA having substantially more potential adverse events. PSIs were associated with black race, public payer, and procedure indication. It is important to note the overall higher rates of PSIs occurring in vascular patients and appropriately adjust benchmarks for this surgical specialty. PMID:22425449

  2. [Diagnostic imaging of peripheral renal vascular disorders].

    PubMed

    Hélénon, O; Correas, J M; Eiss, D; Khairoune, A; Merran, S

    2004-02-01

    Peripheral vascular disorders of the kidney involve the intrarenal branches of the renal vascular tree. It include occlusive (infarction and cortical necrosis) and non-occlusive vascular lesions (acquired arteriovenous fistulas, arteriovenous malformation, false aneurysms and microaneurysms). Initial diagnosis relies on color Doppler US and CT angiography. Angiography plays a therapeutic role. MR imaging provides useful diagnostic information on perfusion disorders especially in patients with renal insufficiency.

  3. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  4. Renal Vascular Structure and Rarefaction

    PubMed Central

    Chade, Alejandro R.

    2014-01-01

    An intact microcirculation is vital for diffusion of oxygen and nutrients and for removal of toxins of every organ and system in the human body. The functional and/or anatomical loss of microvessels is known as rarefaction, which can compromise the normal organ function and have been suggested as a possible starting point of several diseases. The purpose of this overview is to discuss the potential underlying mechanisms leading to renal microvascular rarefaction, and the potential consequences on renal function and on the progression of renal damage. Although the kidney is a special organ that receives much more blood than its metabolic needs, experimental and clinical evidence indicates that renal microvascular rarefaction is associated to prevalent cardiovascular diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and atherosclerosis, either as cause or consequence. On the other hand, emerging experimental evidence using progenitor cells or angiogenic cytokines supports the feasibility of therapeutic interventions capable of modifying the progressive nature of microvascular rarefaction in the kidney. This overview will also attempt to discuss the potential renoprotective mechanisms of the therapeutic targeting of the renal microcirculation. PMID:23720331

  5. Renal vascular lesions in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Descombes, E; Droz, D; Drouet, L; Grünfeld, J P; Lesavre, P

    1997-09-01

    We retrospectively studied the prevalence, histologic features, clinical correlations, and long-term outcome of the intrarenal vascular lesions of lupus nephritis (LN) in a series of 169 renal biopsies performed between 1980 and 1994 in 132 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The most common vascular lesions were nonspecific sclerotic changes, found in 37% of the biopsies (24% if only the cases with moderate to severe changes are considered). The other common vascular lesions were "immunoglobulin microvascular casts," found in 24% of the biopsies. Vasculitis and thrombotic microangiopathy were rare lesions and were seen in only 4 (2.4%) and 1 (0.6%) cases, respectively. Isolated sclerotic vascular changes were present in biopsies from older patients with a longer duration of LN, compared with the group with no vascular lesions, and were associated with a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension. Overall, however, the long-term renal and patient survival of this group did not differ significantly from that of the patients without vascular changes. Immunoglobulin microvascular casts (IMCs) ("lupus vasculopathy") were characterized by the presence of immunoglobulin deposition within the glomerular capillaries and small arterioles. In the present study we extensively investigated the morphologic and immunologic features of this lesion. The lesions were notable for the absence of endothelial or parietal vascular lesions and of fibrin, platelets, and leukocytes, which indicates that thrombosis is not involved in the vascular obstruction. According to our data immunoglobulin precipitation in the microvasculature seems to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this lesion, which is why we propose the term "immunoglobulin microvascular casts." In general, IMCs were associated with the most severe and active forms of diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (World Health Organization [WHO] class IV). However our data show that, in contrast to previous studies

  6. Pharmacological characterization of renal vascular dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Imbs, J L

    1980-01-01

    We present an in vitro method for studying the renal effects of dopamine in the isolated rat kidney. The organ is perfused in an open circuit and can be maintained satisfactorily for up to 180 min. The responses to dopamine were studied in the presence of phenoxybenzamine (10(-5) M) and sotalol (10(-5) M) while stable renal vasoconstriction was maintained by perfusion with prostaglandine F2 alpha. Dopamine induced dose-dependent renal vasodilation with an ED50 of 2.53 X 10(-6) moles/liter, which was not modified by reserpine pretreatment. (+) Butaclamol but not (-) butaclamol shifted the dopamine dose-response curve to the right in a parallel fashion, indicating competitive antagonism. Haloperidol and sulpiride at concentrations without intrinsic effect on vascular resistance also acted as competitive inhibitors for dopamine. Calculation of empirical pA2 values yielded the following relative potencies for these antagonists: (+) butaclamol greater than haloperidol greater than sulpiride. The renal vascular dopamine receptors are tentatively classified as being of the D1 type.

  7. Renal vascular lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Katz, S M; Korn, S; Umlas, S L; DeHoratius, R J

    1990-01-01

    In the past, necrotizing vasculitis has been considered to be one of the dominant intrarenal vascular abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To test the validity of this statement, 70 consecutive renal biopsies from patients with SLE were reviewed. Light microscopy (LM) and immunofluorescence (IF) studies documented abnormalities, including thrombosis and nephrosclerosis, in 30 patients (43 percent), but no cellular infiltration of the vessel walls or other evidence of acute necrotizing vasculitis was seen. It is concluded that while intrarenal vasculopathy with thrombosis and nephrosclerosis is a common finding in SLE, our data and recently published studies suggest that acute necrotizing vasculitis occurs rarely, if at all, in SLE nephritis.

  8. Adverse Outcome Pathway for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptors During Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  9. Prognostic significance of renal vascular pathology in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Vilet, J M; Córdova-Sánchez, B M; Uribe-Uribe, N O; Correa-Rotter, R; Morales-Buenrostro, L E

    2017-01-01

    We performed a retrospective cohort analysis to define the prognostic significance of vascular lesions documented in renal biopsies of lupus nephritis patients. A total of 429 patients were segregated into five groups: (1) no vascular lesions (NVL), (2) arterial sclerosis (AS), (3) non-inflammatory necrotizing vasculitis (NNV), (4) thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), and (5) true renal vasculitis (TRV). Renal outcomes were analyzed by Cox regression models, and correlations between vascular lesions and activity/chronicity scores were determined by Spearman's coefficients. A total of 200 (46.6%) had NVL, 189 (44.0%) AS, six NNV (1.4%), 23 (5.4%) TMA, and 11 (2.6%) TRV. Patients with NVL were younger, with higher renal function; patients with TMA and TRV had lower renal function and higher arterial pressure at baseline. Antiphospholipid syndrome and positive lupus anticoagulant were more frequently observed in the TMA group. Five-year renal survival was 83% for NVL, 63% for AS, 67% for NNV, 31% for TMA, and 33% for TRV. NNV and TRV were significantly correlated with activity scores, while AS and chronic TMA were correlated with chronicity scores. Renal vascular lesions are associated with renal outcomes but do not behave as independent factors. The addition of vascular lesions to currently used scores should be further explored.

  10. PROGRESSIVE RENAL VASCULAR PROLIFERATION AND INJURY IN OBESE ZUCKER RATS

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, Radu; Chade, Alejandro R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Obesity, an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease, may induce renal injury by promoting inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines can induce neovascularization in different organs, including the kidneys. However, whether obesity triggers renal neovascularization and, if so, its effect on renal function has never been investigated. Methods Blood pressure, proteinuria and glomerular-filtration-rate (GFR) were measured in-vivo. Renal microvascular (MV) architecture was studied by 3D micro-CT in lean and obese Zucker rats (LZR and OZR, n=7/group) at 12, 22, and 32 weeks of age. Renal inflammation was assessed by quantifying interleukin (IL)-6, tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-alpha, and ED-1 expression, as renal fibrosis in trichrome-stained cross-sections. Results Mild inflammation and lower GFR was only observed in younger OZR, without renal fibrosis or changes in MV density. Interestingly, renal MV density increased in OZR at 32 weeks of age, accompanied by pronounced increase in renal IL-6 and TNF-alpha, ED-1+ cells, proteinuria, decreased GFR, and fibrosis. Conclusion This study shows increased renal cortical vascularization in experimental obesity, suggesting neovascularization as an evolving process as obesity progresses. Increased renal vascularization, possibly triggered by inflammation, may reflect an initially compensatory mechanism in obesity. However, increased inflammation and inflammatory-induced neovascularization may further promote renal injury as obesity advances. PMID:20536738

  11. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  12. Role of renal vascular potassium channels in physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Salomonsson, Max; Brasen, Jens Christian; Sorensen, Charlotte M

    2017-03-30

    The control of renal vascular tone is important for the regulation of salt and water balance, blood pressure and the protection against damaging elevated glomerular pressure. The K(+) conductance is a major factor in the regulation of the membrane potential (Vm ) in vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) and endothelial cells (EC). The vascular tone is controlled by Vm via its effect on the opening probability of voltage operated Ca(2+) channels (VOCC) in VSMC. When K(+) conductance increases Vm becomes more negative and vasodilation follows, while deactivation of K(+) channels leads to depolarization and vasoconstriction. K(+) channels in EC indirectly participate in the control of vascular tone by endothelium derived vasodilation. Therefore, by regulating the tone of renal resistance vessels, K(+) channels have a potential role in the control of fluid homeostasis and blood pressure as well as in the protection of the renal parenchyma. The main classes of K(+) channels (calcium activated (KCa ), inward rectifier (Kir ), voltage activated (Kv ) and ATP sensitive (KATP )) have been found in the renal vessels. In this review, we summarize results available in the literature and our own studies in the field. We compare the ambiguous in vitro and in vivo results. We discuss the role of single types of K(+) channels and the integrated function of several classes. We also deal with the possible role of renal vascular K(+) channels in the pathophysiology of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and sepsis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Constructing, Quantifying, and Validating an Adverse Outcome Pathway for Vascular Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Constructing, Quantifying, and Validating an Adverse Outcome Pathway for Vascular Developmental Toxicity The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for embryonic vascular disruption1 leading to a range of adverse prenatal outcomes was recently entered into the AOP wiki and accepted as par...

  14. Renal vascular disease in neurofibromatosis type 2: association or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Nuno J V; Gardner, Kate R; Huson, Susan M; Stewart, Helen; Elston, John S; Howard, Emma L; Tullus, Kjell O; Pike, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) remains a challenging diagnosis in childhood where there may be no neurological involvement. A 12-month-old male in whom NF2 was suspected because of characteristic ophthalmological and cutaneous lesions is reported. Cranial MRI showed no tumours. A pathogenic mutation was identified on NF2 gene analysis. The child developed hypertension due to renal vascular disease. Although renal vascular disease is a recognized complication of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), it has not been reported in NF2.

  15. Inclusion of renal vascular lesions in the 2003 ISN/RPS system for classifying lupus nephritis improves renal outcome predictions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Hua; Yu, Feng; Tan, Ying; Qu, Zhen; Chen, Meng-Hua; Wang, Su-Xia; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2013-04-01

    The 2003 International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society (ISN/RPS) pathological classification system of lupus nephritis specified the importance of vascular damage and indicated this should be included in the diagnostic summary. Few pathological studies of lupus nephritis, however, focus on the patterns of renal vascular involvement. Here we assessed renal vascular lesions in lupus nephritis based on the 2003 ISN/RPS classification system and evaluated their association with clinical and pathological data in a large cohort from a single center in China. Among 341 patients with lupus nephritis, 279 were diagnosed with single or multiple renal vascular lesions that included 253 with vascular immune complex deposits, 82 with atherosclerosis, 60 with thrombotic microangiopathy, 13 with noninflammatory necrotizing vasculopathy, and 2 with true renal vasculitis. Patients with thrombotic microangiopathy had the poorest renal outcome. In multivariate Cox hazard analysis after inclusion of renal vascular lesions, the new chronicity index score became a significantly better independent risk factor for renal outcome (hazard ratio 2.32). Thus, renal vascular lesions are common in lupus nephritis and closely correlate with clinical disease activity and renal outcome. Inclusion of a detailed description of renal vascular lesions in the ISN/RPS classification of lupus nephritis may strengthen its predictive value for renal outcome.

  16. Vascular reactivity of rabbit isolated renal and femoral resistance arteries in renal wrap hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khammy, Makhala M; Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2016-02-15

    In rabbits with cellophane renal wrap hypertension, hindquarter and total vascular resistance changes to pressor and depressor agents are amplified compared to those of normotensive rabbits. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro pharmacodynamics of hypertensive and normotensive rabbit small artery segments isolated from the renal and hindquarter vascular beds. Using wire myography, the full range (Emax) and sensitivity (EC50) to a range of agonists of segments of renal interlobar (≈ 600 µm i.d.), renal arcuate (≈ 250 µm i.d.) and deep femoral branch (≈ 250 µm i.d.) arteries were assessed under normalised conditions of passive tension. Interlobar arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive (EC50) than those from normotensive rabbits to noradrenaline (6-fold), methoxamine (3-fold) and angiotensin II (3-fold). Arcuate artery reactivity was largely unaffected by hypertension. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits had enhanced sensitivity only to noradrenaline (2-fold) and methoxamine (4-fold). Sensitivity to relaxation by acetylcholine was unaffected by hypertension in all arteries. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive to sodium nitroprusside than normotensive counterparts. Adenosine caused little relaxation in renal arteries, but full relaxation in deep femoral arteries, unaltered by hypertension. This study found substantial heterogeneity in the pharmacodynamic profile of vessels isolated from different vascular beds and between arterial segments within the kidney. These profiles were differentially affected by hypertension suggesting that hypertension per se is not a resultant of general vascular dysfunction.

  17. Precise renal artery segmentation for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglong; Kagajo, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Oda, Masahiro; Yoshino, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel renal artery segmentation method combining graph-cut and template-based tracking methods and its application to estimation of renal vascular dominant region. For the purpose of giving a computer assisted diagnose for kidney surgery planning, it is important to obtain the correct topological structures of renal artery for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions. Renal artery has a low contrast, and its precise extraction is a difficult task. Previous method utilizing vesselness measure based on Hessian analysis, still cannot extract the tiny blood vessels in low-contrast area. Although model-based methods including superellipsoid model or cylindrical intensity model are low-contrast sensitive to the tiny blood vessels, problems including over-segmentation and poor bifurcations detection still remain. In this paper, we propose a novel blood vessel segmentation method combining a new Hessian-based graph-cut and template modeling tracking method. Firstly, graph-cut algorithm is utilized to obtain the rough segmentation result. Then template model tracking method is utilized to improve the accuracy of tiny blood vessel segmentation result. Rough segmentation utilizing graph-cut solves the bifurcations detection problem effectively. Precise segmentation utilizing template model tracking focuses on the segmentation of tiny blood vessels. By combining these two approaches, our proposed method segmented 70% of the renal artery of 1mm in diameter or larger. In addition, we demonstrate such precise segmentation can contribute to divide renal regions into a set of blood vessel dominant regions utilizing Voronoi diagram method.

  18. Renal systolic time intervals derived from intra-renal artery Doppler as a novel predictor of adverse cardiac outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Hung-Hao; Lee, Meng-Kuang; Lee, Chee-Siong; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Kuo, Po-Lin; Su, Ho-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of renal systolic time intervals measured by electrocardiographic gated Doppler ultrasonography for predicting adverse cardiac events. This longitudinal observation study enrolled 205 patients. Renal systolic time intervals, including pre-ejection period (PEP) and ejection time (ET), and ratio of renal PEP to ET, were measured by electrocardiographic gated Doppler ultrasound. The 14 adverse cardiac events identified in this population included 9 cardiac deaths and 5 hospitalizations for heart failure during an average follow up of 30.9 months (25th–75th percentile: 30–33 months). Renal PEP (hazard ratio = 1.023, P = 0.001), renal ET (hazard ratio = 0.975, P = 0.001) and renal PEP/ET (per 0.01 unit increase, hazard ratio = 1.060, P < 0.001) were associated with poor cardiac outcomes. The addition of renal PEP/ET to a Cox model containing important clinical variables and renal resistive index further improved the value in predicting adverse cardiac events (Chi-square increase, 9.996; P = 0.002). This study showed that parameters of intra-renal hemodynamics were potential predictors of adverse cardiac outcomes. However, the generalizability of these indicators need to be investigated in future large-scale studies. PMID:28266644

  19. Vascular Calcification and Renal Bone Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao; Yen, Jen-Fen; Liu, Wen-Chih

    2014-01-01

    At the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the systemic mineral metabolism and bone composition start to change. This alteration is known as chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). It is well known that the bone turnover disorder is the most common complication of CKD-MBD. Besides, CKD patients usually suffer from vascular calcification (VC), which is highly associated with mortality. Many factors regulate the VC mechanism, which include imbalances in serum calcium and phosphate, systemic inflammation, RANK/RANKL/OPG triad, aldosterone, microRNAs, osteogenic transdifferentiation, and effects of vitamins. These factors have roles in both promoting and inhibiting VC. Patients with CKD usually have bone turnover problems. Patients with high bone turnover have increase of calcium and phosphate release from the bone. By contrast, when bone turnover is low, serum calcium and phosphate levels are frequently maintained at high levels because the reservoir functions of bone decrease. Both of these conditions will increase the possibility of VC. In addition, the calcified vessel may secrete FGF23 and Wnt inhibitors such as sclerostin, DKK-1, and secreted frizzled-related protein to prevent further VC. However, all of them may fight back the inhibition of bone formation resulting in fragile bone. There are several ways to treat VC depending on the bone turnover status of the individual. The main goals of therapy are to maintain normal bone turnover and protect against VC. PMID:25136676

  20. Bilateral Vascular Variations at the Renal Hilum: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naveen; Aithal, Ashwini P.; Guru, Anitha; Nayak, Satheesha B.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging technology with its advancement in the field of urology is the boon for the patients who require minimally invasive approaches for various kidney disorders. These approaches require a precise knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of vascular structures at the hilum of the kidney in terms of their pattern of arrangement and division. The present paper describes a bilateral anomalous arrangement of the structures at the renal hilum as well as their peculiar branching pattern which is of clinical and surgical relevance. Multiple branching of the renal vessels was observed in both kidneys due to which the hila were congested. The right renal artery immediately after its origin divided into 2 branches. The upper branch represented an aberrant artery whereas the lower branch gave 5 divisions. The left renal artery also divided into 2 branches much before the hilum as anterior and posterior divisions. The anterior branch took an arched course and gave 6 branches. The posterior branch gave 3 terminal branches before entering the renal substance. In addition to anomalous hilar structures, normal architecture of both kidneys was altered and the hilum of the left kidney was found on its anterior surface. PMID:23346454

  1. Renal vascular responses to static handgrip: role of muscle mechanoreflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Ray, Chester A.; Cha, Susan; Handly, Brian; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2003-01-01

    During exercise, the sympathetic nervous system is activated, which causes vasoconstriction. The autonomic mechanisms responsible for this vasoconstriction vary based on the particular tissue being studied. Attempts to examine reflex control of the human renal circulation have been difficult because of technical limitations. In this report, the Doppler technique was used to examine renal flow velocity during four muscle contraction paradigms in conscious humans. Flow velocity was divided by mean arterial blood pressure to yield an index of renal vascular resistance (RVR). Fatiguing static handgrip (40% of maximal voluntary contraction) increased RVR by 76%. During posthandgrip circulatory arrest, RVR remained above baseline (2.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.8 +/- 0.2 arbitrary units; P < 0.017) but was only 40% of the end-grip RVR value. Voluntary biceps contraction increased RVR within 10 s of initiation of contraction. This effect was not associated with an increase in blood pressure. Finally, involuntary biceps contraction also raised RVR. We conclude that muscle contraction evokes renal vasoconstriction in conscious humans. The characteristic of this response is consistent with a primary role for mechanically sensitive afferents. This statement is based on the small posthandgrip circulatory arrest response and the vasoconstriction that was observed with involuntary biceps contraction.

  2. Regulation of Vascular and Renal Function by Metabolite Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kishore, Bellamkonda K.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    To maintain metabolic homeostasis, the body must be able to monitor the concentration of a large number of substances, including metabolites, in real time and to use that information to regulate the activities of different metabolic pathways. Such regulation is achieved by the presence of sensors, termed metabolite receptors, in various tissues and cells of the body, which in turn convey the information to appropriate regulatory or positive or negative feedback systems. In this review, we cover the unique roles of metabolite receptors in renal and vascular function. These receptors play a wide variety of important roles in maintaining various aspects of homeostasis—from salt and water balance to metabolism—by sensing metabolites from a wide variety of sources. We discuss the role of metabolite sensors in sensing metabolites generated locally, metabolites generated at distant tissues or organs, or even metabolites generated by resident microbes. Metabolite receptors are also involved in various pathophysiological conditions and are being recognized as potential targets for new drugs. By highlighting three receptor families—(a) citric acid cycle intermediate receptors, (b) purinergic receptors, and (c) short-chain fatty acid receptors—we emphasize the unique and important roles that these receptors play in renal and vascular physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:26667077

  3. Organic Anion Transporter 5 Renal Expression and Urinary Excretion in Rats with Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Hazelhoff, María Herminia; Bulacio, Romina Paula; Torres, Adriana Mónica

    2013-01-01

    It has been described renal damage in rats with vascular calcification. The organic anion transporter 5 (Oat5) is only expressed in kidney, and its urinary excretion was proposed as potential early biomarker of renal injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Oat5 renal expression and its urinary excretion in an experimental model of vascular calcification in comparison with traditional markers of renal injury. Vascular calcification was obtained by the administration of an overdose of vitamin D3 (300,000 IU/kg, b.w., i.m.) to male Wistar rats. Oat5 urinary abundance was evaluated by Western blotting. Traditional markers of renal injury, such as creatinine and urea plasma levels, urinary protein levels, and urinary alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, were determined using commercial kits. Histology was assessed by hematoxylin/eosin staining. Oat5 renal expression was evaluated by Western blotting and by immunohistochemistry. An increased expression of Oat5 in renal homogenates, in apical membranes, and in its urinary excretion was observed in rats with vascular calcification. The traditional parameters used to evaluate renal function were not modified, with the exception of histology. It is possible to postulate the urinary excretion of Oat5 as a potential noninvasive biomarker of renal injury associated with vascular calcification. PMID:24199190

  4. Acute pyelonephritis resulting in intense vascular blush during dynamic renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Deshpande, Sushil; Kulkarni, Mukta; Shetkar, Shubhangi

    2016-01-01

    A thirty-year-old male underwent Tc-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid renal scintigraphy for evaluation of gross hydronephrosis of left kidney. The perfusion phase revealed an intense vascular blush in left renal fossa. The uptake phase of scintigraphy revealed the absence of tracer uptake in left kidney. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) was performed for evaluating the cause of vascular blush. CECT demonstrated features suggestive of acute pyelonephritis (APN) involving lower pole of the hydronephrotic left kidney, corresponding to the site of vascular blush seen on renal scintigraphy. The postnephrectomy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of APN suggested on CECT. PMID:26917903

  5. Renal vascular effects of calcium channel blockers in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Benstein, J A; Dworkin, L D

    1990-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that calcium channel blockers have specific effects on renal hemodynamics in patients with hypertension and may also slow the progression of chronic renal failure. When these agents are studied in vitro, their predominant effect is to reverse afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction induced by catecholamines or angiotensin II. Because efferent resistance may remain high, glomerular filtration rate rises while renal blood flow remains low. The effects in vivo are less consistent. In human hypertension, calcium channel blockers lower renal resistance and may raise both renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. In experimental models of chronic renal disease, calcium channel blockers slow the progression of renal damage; however, variable effects on renal hemodynamics have been found. Other factors implicated in the progression of renal damage, including compensatory renal hypertrophy, platelet aggregation, and calcium deposition, may also be favorably influenced by these agents. Recent studies suggest that calcium channel blockers may have similar protective effects in patients with hypertension and chronic renal disease.

  6. Regulation of Vascular and Renal Function by Metabolite Receptors.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kishore, Bellamkonda K; Pluznick, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    To maintain metabolic homeostasis, the body must be able to monitor the concentration of a large number of substances, including metabolites, in real time and to use that information to regulate the activities of different metabolic pathways. Such regulation is achieved by the presence of sensors, termed metabolite receptors, in various tissues and cells of the body, which in turn convey the information to appropriate regulatory or positive or negative feedback systems. In this review, we cover the unique roles of metabolite receptors in renal and vascular function. These receptors play a wide variety of important roles in maintaining various aspects of homeostasis-from salt and water balance to metabolism-by sensing metabolites from a wide variety of sources. We discuss the role of metabolite sensors in sensing metabolites generated locally, metabolites generated at distant tissues or organs, or even metabolites generated by resident microbes. Metabolite receptors are also involved in various pathophysiological conditions and are being recognized as potential targets for new drugs. By highlighting three receptor families-(a) citric acid cycle intermediate receptors, (b) purinergic receptors, and

  7. Prognostic indicators of adverse renal outcome and death in acute kidney injury hospital survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hamzić-Mehmedbašić, Aida; Rašić, Senija; Balavac, Merima; Rebić, Damir; Delić-Šarac, Marina; Durak-Nalbantić, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding prognostic factors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in acute kidney injury (AKI) hospital survivors are scarce and controversial. Objectives: We aimed to identify predictors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in AKI hospital survivors. Patients and Methods: The study group consisted of 84 AKI hospital survivors admitted to the tertiary medical center during 2-year period. Baseline clinical parameters, with renal outcome 3 months after discharge and 6-month mortality were evaluated. According survival and renal function outcome, patients were divided into two groups. Results: Patients who did not recover renal function were statistically significantly older (P < 0.007) with higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (P < 0.000) and more likely to have anuria and oliguria (P = 0.008) compared to those with recovery. Deceased AKI patients were statistically significantly older (P < 0.000), with higher CCI score (P < 0.000), greater prevalence of sepsis (P =0.004), higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (P < 0.017) and ferritin (P < 0.051) and lower concentrations of albumin (P<0.01) compared to survivors. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of adverse renal outcome were female gender (P =0.033), increasing CCI (P =0.000), presence of pre-existing chronic kidney disease (P =0.000) and diabetes mellitus (P =0.019) as well as acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) (P =0.032), while protective factor for renal function outcome was higher urine output (P =0.009). Independent predictors of post-discharge mortality were female gender (P =0.04), higher CCI score (P =0.001) and sepsis (P =0.034). Conclusion: Female AKI hospital survivors with increasing burden of comorbidities, diagnosis of sepsis and ADHF seem to be at high-risk for poor post-discharge outcome. PMID:27471736

  8. An update on predictive biomarkers for major adverse cardiovascular events in patients undergoing vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Kouvelos, George N; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Moris, Demetrios; Matsagkas, Miltiadis I; Arnaoutoglou, Eleni

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular complications signify a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing vascular surgery adversely affecting both short- and long-term prognosis. During the last decade, unmet needs for a distinct cardiovascular risk assessment have led to an intensive research for establishment of biomarkers with sufficient predictive value. This literature review aims in examining the value of several biomarkers in predicting the incidence of major adverse cardiac events in vascular surgery patients. We reviewed the English language literature and analyzed the biomarkers as independent predictors or in correlation with other factors. We found several biomarkers showing a significant predictive value for a major adverse cardiovascular event in patients undergoing vascular surgery. These biomarkers can be used in clinical practice as outcome predictors, although sensitivity and specificity varies. Detection of subclinical cardiovascular damage may improve total risk estimation and facilitate clinical assessment of patients at risk for future cardiovascular events. The wide variety of sensitivity and specificity in predicting a MACE of these biomarkers exert the need for future trials in which these markers will be tested as adjunctive tools of cardiovascular risk estimation scoring systems.

  9. Statin-Associated Muscular and Renal Adverse Events: Data Mining of the Public Version of the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Sakaeda, Toshiyuki; Kadoyama, Kaori; Okuno, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    Objective Adverse event reports (AERs) submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were reviewed to assess the muscular and renal adverse events induced by the administration of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) and to attempt to determine the rank-order of the association. Methods After a revision of arbitrary drug names and the deletion of duplicated submissions, AERs involving pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, or rosuvastatin were analyzed. Authorized pharmacovigilance tools were used for quantitative detection of signals, i.e., drug-associated adverse events, including the proportional reporting ratio, the reporting odds ratio, the information component given by a Bayesian confidence propagation neural network, and the empirical Bayes geometric mean. Myalgia, rhabdomyolysis and an increase in creatine phosphokinase level were focused on as the muscular adverse events, and acute renal failure, non-acute renal failure, and an increase in blood creatinine level as the renal adverse events. Results Based on 1,644,220 AERs from 2004 to 2009, signals were detected for 4 statins with respect to myalgia, rhabdomyolysis, and an increase in creatine phosphokinase level, but these signals were stronger for rosuvastatin than pravastatin and atorvastatin. Signals were also detected for acute renal failure, though in the case of atorvastatin, the association was marginal, and furthermore, a signal was not detected for non-acute renal failure or for an increase in blood creatinine level. Conclusions Data mining of the FDA's adverse event reporting system, AERS, is useful for examining statin-associated muscular and renal adverse events. The data strongly suggest the necessity of well-organized clinical studies with respect to statin-associated adverse events. PMID:22205938

  10. Data and Safety Monitoring Board evaluation and management of a renal adverse event signal in TOPCAT.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Michael R; Sharma, Kavita; Assmann, Susan F; Linas, Stuart; Gersh, Bernard J; Grady, Christine; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Singh, Steven; Boineau, Robin; McKinlay, Sonja M; Greenberg, Barry H

    2017-04-01

    Clinical trial Data and Safety Monitoring Boards (DSMBs) have a primary obligation of ensuring study participant safety, while maintaining trial integrity. The role of DSMBs is expanding, and ideally should include post-hoc reporting of deliberative processes related to clinically important safety issues or factors that could impact on future trial designs. We describe how the TOPCAT DSMB detected, investigated, and adjudicated an unexpectedly large renal adverse event signal midway through the trial, and offer general guidelines for dealing with similar unanticipated occurrences in future trials. The detection of a greater than expected incidence of deterioration in renal function, occurring in 6.1% of patients in the spironolactone arm compared with 3.9% in the placebo arm (P = 0.009), led to an in-depth DSMB review of associated study medication withdrawals and adverse events. The trial continued uninterrupted throughout the review, which reached the conclusions that spironolactone-associated renal dysfunction did not compromise overall patient safety or interfere with a perceived efficacy signal. Although no discrete mechanism for the spironolactone-associated renal adverse event signal was identified, likely possibilities are discussed. In clinical trials, DSMBs and co-ordinating centres should have the resources to detect, investigate, and adjudicate unexpected safety issues, with goals of ensuring patient safety and preserving the potential for detection of therapeutic effectiveness. In TOPCAT, spironolactone-associated renal dysfunction emerged as a potentially trial-threatening adverse event and, although clinically important, did not lead to compromise of patient safety, trial interruption, termination, or apparent loss of treatment effectiveness.

  11. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition ameliorates angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and renal vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Manuel; Sivritas, Sema H; Mergia, Evanthia; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Yang, Guang; Hering, Lydia; Grave, Katharina; Hoch, Henning; Rump, Lars C; Stegbauer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Changes in renal hemodynamics have a major impact on blood pressure (BP). Angiotensin (Ang) II has been shown to induce vascular dysfunction by interacting with phosphodiesterase (PDE)1 and PDE5. The predominant PDE isoform responsible for renal vascular dysfunction in hypertension is unknown. Here, we measured the effects of PDE5 (sildenafil) or PDE1 (vinpocetine) inhibition on renal blood flow (RBF), BP, and renal vascular function in normotensive and hypertensive mice. During acute short-term Ang II infusion, sildenafil decreased BP and increased RBF in C57BL/6 (WT) mice. In contrast, vinpocetine showed no effect on RBF and BP. Additionally, renal cGMP levels were significantly increased after acute sildenafil but not after vinpocetine infusion, indicating a predominant role of PDE5 in renal vasculature. Furthermore, chronic Ang II infusion (500 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) increased BP and led to impaired NO-dependent vasodilation in kidneys of WT mice. Additional treatment with sildenafil (100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) attenuated Ang II-dependent hypertension and improved NO-mediated vasodilation. During chronic Ang II infusion, urinary nitrite excretion, a marker for renal NO generation, was increased in WT mice, whereas renal cGMP generation was decreased and restored after sildenafil treatment, suggesting a preserved cGMP signaling after PDE5 inhibition. To investigate the dependency of PDE5 effects on NO/cGMP signaling, we next analyzed eNOS-KO mice, a mouse model characterized by low vascular NO/cGMP levels. In eNOS-KO mice, chronic Ang II infusion increased BP but did not impair NO-mediated vasodilation. Moreover, sildenafil did not influence BP or vascular function in eNOS-KO mice. These results highlight PDE5 as a key regulator of renal hemodynamics in hypertension.

  12. Vascular complication in live related renal transplant: An experience of 1945 cases

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Aneesh; Kumar, Jatinder; Sharma, Sandeep; Abhishek; Ansari, M S; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Objective: Among the surgical complications in renal transplantation, the vascular complications are probably most dreaded, dramatic, and likely to cause sudden loss of renal allograft. We present our experience and analysis of the outcome of such complications in a series of 1945 live related renal transplants. Materials and Methods: One thousand nine hundred and forty five consecutive live related renal transplants were evaluated retrospectively for vascular complications. Complications were recorded and analyzed for frequency, time of presentation, clinical presentation, and their management. Results: The age of patients ranged from 6 to 56 years (mean = 42). Vascular complications were found in 25 patients (1.29%). Most common among these was transplant renal artery stenosis found in 11 (0.58%), followed by transplant reznal artery thrombosis in 9 (0.46%), renal vein thrombosis in 3 (0.15%), and aneurysm formation at arterial anastmosis in 2 (0.10%) patient. The time of presentation also varied amongst complications. All cases of arterial thrombosis had sudden onset anuria with minimal or no abdominal discomfort, while venous thrombosis presented as severe oliguria associated with intense graft site pain and tenderness. Management of cases with vascular thrombosis was done by immediate surgical exploration. Two patients of renal artery stenosis were managed with angioplasty and stent placement. Conclusions: Major vascular complications are relatively uncommon after renal transplantation but still constitute an important cause of graft loss in early postoperative period. Aneurysm and vessel thrombosis usually require graft nephrectomy. Transplant renal artery stenosis is amenable to correction by endovascular techniques. PMID:23671364

  13. The interaction between fluid status and angiopoietin-2 in adverse renal outcomes of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Hung-Tien; Lee, Jia-Jung; Lee, Su-Chu; Chen, Tzu-Hui; Lin, Ming-Yen; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Background Fluid overload is not only the characteristic but also an important complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) disturbs endothelium and vessel permeability, which may induce fluid overload. The aim of this study is to examine the interaction between fluid status and Angpt2 in adverse renal outcomes of CKD. Methods This cohort study enrolled 290 patients with CKD stages 3–5 from January 2011 to December 2011 and followed up until December 2015. Fluid status was presented as overhydration (OH) value measured by body composition monitor, while OH>1.1L was defined as fluid overload. Renal outcomes were defined as commencing dialysis and rapid renal function decline (the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate < -5 ml/min/1.73 m2/y). Results During a mean follow-up of 38.6±18.3 months, 125 (43.1%) patients progressed to commencing dialysis and 99(34.7%) patients presented rapid renal function decline. All patients were stratified by OH of 1.1L and the median of circulating Angpt2. These patients with both OH>1.1L and high circulating Angpt2 were more likely to reach commencing dialysis compared to other groups. The risks for commencing dialysis and rapid renal function decline were significantly higher in patients with OH>1.1L and high circulating Angpt2 level compared to those with OH≦1.1L and low circulating Angpt2 (2.14, 1.21–3.78, P = 0.009; 4.96, 1.45–16.97, P = 0.01). There was a significant interaction between OH level and circulating Angpt2 in entering dialysis (P-interaction = 0.02). Conclusions Fluid overload and Angpt2 might have a synergistic effect on adverse renal outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:28333979

  14. Deletion of mineralocorticoid receptors in smooth muscle cells blunts renal vascular resistance following acute cyclosporine administration

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Cristian A.; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Andre-Gregoire, Gwennan; Placier, Sandrine; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Berger, Stefan; Warnock, David G.; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rieu, Philippe; Jaisser, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors such as cyclosporine A (CsA) are still commonly used after renal transplantation, despite CsA–induced nephrotoxicity (CIN), which is partly related to vasoactive mechanisms. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is now recognized as a key player in the control of vascular tone, and both endothelial cell- and vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-MR modulate the vasoactive responses to vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. Here we tested whether vascular MR is involved in renal hemodynamic changes induced by CsA. The relative contribution of vascular MR in acute CsA treatment was evaluated using mouse models with targeted deletion of MR in endothelial cell or SMC. Results indicate that MR expressed in SMC, but not in endothelium, contributes to the increase of plasma urea and creatinine, the appearance of isometric tubular vacuolization, and overexpression of a kidney injury biomarker (neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin) after CsA treatment. Inactivation of MR in SMC blunted CsA–induced phosphorylation of contractile proteins. Finally, the in vivo increase of renal vascular resistance induced by CsA was blunted when MR was deleted from SMC cells, and this was associated with decreased L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Thus, our study provides new insights into the role of vascular MR in renal hemodynamics during acute CIN, and provides rationale for clinical studies of MR antagonism to manage the side effects of calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:26422501

  15. Circulating thrombomodulin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and renal vascular lesion in patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Yao, G H; Liu, Z H; Zhang, X; Zheng, C X; Chen, H P; Zeng, C H; Li, L S

    2008-08-01

    Currently, the detection of renal vascular lesions (VLS) in lupus nephritis (LN) mainly depends on biopsy examination, and lack surrogate biomarkers for clinical dynamic evaluation. The aim of the present study is to explore the correlation between circulatory endothelial damage biomarkers and VLS. Soluble E-selectin, thrombomodulin (TM) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were measured by ELISA. TM and VCAM-1 levels both were significantly elevated in LN with VLS than in LN without VLS (P < 0.01). However, the serum E-selectin was not significantly changed in LN patients with and without VLS. A positive correlation was found between TM and serum creatinine (r = 0.617, P < 0.05) in patients with vascular lesions. In order to further analyse the relationship between TM level and severity degree of vascular lesions in LN patients, we subdivided the patients with vascular lesions into two groups: with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and without TMA. TM level of the patients with TMA is significantly higher than those without TMA (P < 0.01). In conclusion, combined with renal pathological examination, monitoring the circulatory levels of TM and VCAM-1, can provide circulating biomarkers of VLS in LN patients.

  16. [Spontaneous recanalization after embolization of the renal artery with an Amplatzer vascular plug 4].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Martínez, Pablo; Ciampi Dopazo, Juan José; González Fejás, Ariel; Lanciego, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) is an occluding device used in vascular embolizations. Thanks to its excellent maneuverability and effectiveness, it is being used more and more often. The latest version, the AVP 4, enables access to smaller and more tortuous vessels. To date, the only cases of spontaneous recanalization published occurred with earlier versions of the AVP. We present a case of recanalization after renal artery embolization with an AVP 4.

  17. Pseudo-vascular tumor in a renal flow study

    SciTech Connect

    Elgazzar, A.H.; Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; Powers, G.T.

    1985-03-01

    A case in which, for the first time, the superior mesenteric artery caused an appearance mimicking vascular tumor on a kidney radionuclide angiogram (RNA) obtained posteriorly, is reported. A subsequent contrast arteriogram showed that the superior mesenteric artery caused that appearance and confusion with possible vascular tumor on RNA. No similar cases with mesenteric blush simulating vascular tumor have been found in the literature. Mesenteric blushes on RNAs obtained posteriorly have been described only in cases of kidney agenesis and post-nephrectomy. This pattern should be kept in mind when interpreting RNAs to avoid subjecting patients to invasive diagnostic procedures.

  18. Renal vascular response to sodium loading in sons of hypertensive parents.

    PubMed

    Textor, S C; Turner, S T

    1991-06-01

    Studies of normotensive offspring of hypertensive parents offer the potential to identify inherited abnormalities that contribute to essential hypertension. We compared renal and systemic hemodynamic responses to saline infusion between normotensive sons of two hypertensive parents (SOHT) and sons of two normotensive parents (SONT) selected from the general population of Rochester, Minn. Hemodynamic measurements were performed after a week of low sodium intake (10 meq/day) and were repeated after a week of high sodium intake (200 meq/day). Despite being in the normotensive range, blood pressures in SOHT were higher than those in SONT during low sodium (124 +/- 3/85 +/- 3 versus 118 +/- 2/71 +/- 2 mm Hg, p less than 0.01) and high sodium (122 +/- 3/80 +/- 3 versus 112 +/- 2/70 +/- 2 mm Hg, p less than 0.05) conditions. Higher pressures in SOHT were associated with elevated systemic and renal vascular resistance. After a high sodium diet, renal vascular resistance in SOHT rose further during acute saline infusion, whereas systemic vascular resistance did not change. After a low sodium diet, this renal vasoconstrictor response to saline infusion in SOHT was not present, and renal vascular resistance fell to levels not different from SONT. Plasma renin activity, aldosterone, and atrial natriuretic peptide did not differ between SONT and SOHT. Circulating levels of norepinephrine were higher in SOHT. These data demonstrate a renal vasoconstrictor response to saline infusion in normotensive SOHT, which depends on prior sodium intake. This alteration in renal hemodynamics may represent an inherited abnormality related to the development of hypertension.

  19. Impaired renal function impacts negatively on vascular stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are independently associated with increased vascular stiffness. We examined whether renal function contributes to vascular stiffness independently of CAD status. Methods We studied 160 patients with CAD and 169 subjects without CAD. The 4-variable MDRD formula was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); impaired renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with the SphygmoCor® device. Circulating biomarkers were assessed in plasma using xMAP® multiplexing technology. Results Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had greater PWV compared to those with CAD and normal renal function (10.2 [9.1;11.2] vs 7.3 [6.9;7.7] m/s; P < 0.001). In all patients, PWV was a function of eGFR (β = −0.293; P < 0.001) even after adjustment for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and presence or absence of CAD. Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had higher levels of adhesion and inflammatory molecules including E-selectin and osteopontin (all P < 0.05) compared to those with CAD alone, but had similar levels of markers of oxidative stress. Conclusions Renal function is a determinant of vascular stiffness even in patients with severe atherosclerotic disease. This was paralleled by differences in markers of cell adhesion and inflammation. Increased vascular stiffness may therefore be linked to inflammatory remodeling of the vasculature in people with impaired renal function, irrespective of concomitant atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23937620

  20. Renal function, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and other adverse reactions associated with gadolinium-based contrast media.

    PubMed

    Canga, Ana; Kislikova, Maria; Martínez-Gálvez, María; Arias, Mercedes; Fraga-Rivas, Patricia; Poyatos, Cecilio; de Francisco, Angel L M

    2014-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder that affects patients with impaired renal function and is associated with the administration of gadolinium-based contrast media used in MRI. Despite being in a group of drugs that were considered safe, report about this potentially serious adverse reaction was a turning point in the administration guidelines of these contrast media. There has been an attempt to establish safety parameters to identify patients with risk factors of renal failure. The close pharmacovigilance and strict observation of current regulations, with special attention being paid to the value of glomerular filtration, have reduced the published cases involving the use of gadolinium-based contrast media. In a meeting between radiologists and nephrologists we reviewed the most relevant aspects currently and recommendations for its prevention.

  1. Metabolic and renal adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fortuny, Clàudia; Deyà-Martínez, Ángela; Chiappini, Elena; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Noguera-Julian, Antoni

    2015-05-01

    Worldwide, the benefits of combined antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in morbidity and mortality due to perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection are beyond question and outweigh the toxicity these drugs have been associated with in HIV-infected children and adolescents to date. In puberty, abnormal body fat distribution is stigmatizating and leads to low adherence to ARV treatment. The other metabolic comorbidities (mitochondrial toxicity, dyslipidemias, insulin resistance and low bone mineral density) and renal toxicity, albeit nonsymptomatic in most children, are increasingly being reported and potentially put this population at risk for early cardiovascular or cerebrovascular atherosclerotic disease, diabetes, pathologic fractures or premature renal failure in the third and fourth decades of life. Evidence from available studies is limited because of methodological limitations and also because of several HIV-unrelated factors influencing, to some degree, the development of these conditions. Current recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of metabolic and renal adverse effects in HIV-children and adolescents are based on adult studies, observational pediatric studies and experts' consensus. Healthy lifestyle habits (regarding diet, exercise and refraining from toxic substances) and wise use of ARV options are the only preventive tools for the majority of patients. Should abnormal findings arise, switches in one or more ARV drugs have proved useful. Specific therapies are also available for some of these comorbidities, although the experience in the pediatric age is still very scarce. We aim to summarize the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of metabolic and renal adverse effects in vertically HIV-infected children and adolescents.

  2. Effect of the Obesity Epidemic on Kidney Transplantation: Obesity Is Independent of Diabetes as a Risk Factor for Adverse Renal Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jennifer M.; Hajjiri, Zahraa; Metwally, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a growing epidemic in most developed countries including the United States resulting in an increased number of obese patients with end-stage renal disease. A previous study has shown that obese patients with end-stage renal disease have a survival benefit with transplantation compared with dialysis. However, due to serious comorbidities, many centers place restrictions on the selection of obese patients for transplantation. Further, due to obese patients having an increased risk of diabetes, it is unclear whether obesity can be an independent risk, independent of diabetes for increasing adverse renal transplant outcomes. Methods To investigate the role of obesity in kidney transplantation, we used the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database. After filtering for subjects that had the full set of covariates including age, gender, graft type, ethnicity, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, dialysis time and time period of transplantation for our analysis, 191,091 subjects were included in the analyses. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for covariates we determined whether obesity is an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes such as delayed graft function, acute rejection, urine protein and graft failure. Cox regression modeling was used to determine hazard ratios of graft failure. Results Using multivariate model analyses, we found that obese patients have significantly increased risk of adverse transplant outcomes, including delayed graft function, graft failure, urine protein and acute rejection. Cox regression modeling hazard ratios showed that obesity also increased risk of graft failure. Life-table survival curves showed that obesity may be a risk factor independent of diabetes mellitus for a shorter time to graft failure. Conclusions A key observation in our study is that the risks for adverse outcome of obesity are progressive with increasing body mass index. Furthermore, pre-obese overweight

  3. ADMA predicts major adverse renal events in patients with mild renal impairment and/or diabetes mellitus undergoing coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Heunisch, Fabian; Chaykovska, Lyubov; von Einem, Gina; Alter, Markus; Dschietzig, Thomas; Kretschmer, Axel; Kellner, Karl-Heinz; Hocher, Berthold

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is a competitive inhibitor of the nitric oxide (NO)-synthase and a biomarker of endothelial dysfunction (ED). ED plays an important role in the pathogenesis of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). The aim of our study was to evaluate serum ADMA concentration as a biomarker of an acute renal damage during the follow-up of 90 days after contrast medium (CM) application. Blood samples were obtained from 330 consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus or mild renal impairment immediately before, 24 and 48 hours after the CM application for coronary angiography. The patients were followed for 90 days. The composite endpoints were major adverse renal events (MARE) defined as occurrence of death, initiation of dialysis, or a doubling of serum creatinine concentration. Overall, ADMA concentration in plasma increased after CM application, although, there was no differences between ADMA levels in patients with and without CIN. ADMA concentration 24 hours after the CM application was predictive for dialysis with a specificity of 0.889 and sensitivity of 0.653 at values higher than 0.71 μmol/L (area under the curve: 0.854, 95% confidential interval: 0.767–0.941, P < 0.001). This association remained significant in multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for relevant factors of long-term renal outcome. 24 hours after the CM application, ADMA concentration in plasma was predictive for MARE with a specificity of 0.833 and sensitivity of 0.636 at a value of more than 0.70 μmol/L (area under the curve: 0.750, 95% confidence interval: 0.602–0.897, P = 0.004). Multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed that ADMA and anemia were significant predictors of MARE. Further analysis revealed that increased ADMA concentration in plasma was highly significant predictor of MARE in patients with CIN. Moreover, patients with CIN and MARE had the highest plasma ADMA levels 24 hours after CM exposure in our study

  4. ADMA predicts major adverse renal events in patients with mild renal impairment and/or diabetes mellitus undergoing coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Heunisch, Fabian; Chaykovska, Lyubov; von Einem, Gina; Alter, Markus; Dschietzig, Thomas; Kretschmer, Axel; Kellner, Karl-Heinz; Hocher, Berthold

    2017-02-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is a competitive inhibitor of the nitric oxide (NO)-synthase and a biomarker of endothelial dysfunction (ED). ED plays an important role in the pathogenesis of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). The aim of our study was to evaluate serum ADMA concentration as a biomarker of an acute renal damage during the follow-up of 90 days after contrast medium (CM) application.Blood samples were obtained from 330 consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus or mild renal impairment immediately before, 24 and 48 hours after the CM application for coronary angiography. The patients were followed for 90 days. The composite endpoints were major adverse renal events (MARE) defined as occurrence of death, initiation of dialysis, or a doubling of serum creatinine concentration.Overall, ADMA concentration in plasma increased after CM application, although, there was no differences between ADMA levels in patients with and without CIN. ADMA concentration 24 hours after the CM application was predictive for dialysis with a specificity of 0.889 and sensitivity of 0.653 at values higher than 0.71 μmol/L (area under the curve: 0.854, 95% confidential interval: 0.767-0.941, P < 0.001). This association remained significant in multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for relevant factors of long-term renal outcome. 24 hours after the CM application, ADMA concentration in plasma was predictive for MARE with a specificity of 0.833 and sensitivity of 0.636 at a value of more than 0.70 μmol/L (area under the curve: 0.750, 95% confidence interval: 0.602-0.897, P = 0.004). Multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed that ADMA and anemia were significant predictors of MARE. Further analysis revealed that increased ADMA concentration in plasma was highly significant predictor of MARE in patients with CIN. Moreover, patients with CIN and MARE had the highest plasma ADMA levels 24 hours after CM exposure in our study cohort. The impact

  5. THE LOCAL EFFECT OF SEROTONIN UPON RENAL VASCULAR RESISTANCE AND URINE FLOW RATE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and following denervation plus infusion of phentolamine . Blood flow rate was controlled and uncontrolled. Renal vascular resistance increased, on the... phentolamine . Significant changes in urine flow rate were not observed. Gross and microscopic examination of the kidneys revealed no specific pathological

  6. Embolization of Iatrogenic Vascular Injuries of Renal Transplants: Immediate and Follow-Up Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dorffner, Roland; Thurnher, Siegfried; Prokesch, Rupert; Bankier, Alexander; Turetschek, Karl; Schmidt, Alice; Lammer, Johannes

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome in seven patients in whom iatrogenic vascular complications were treated with catheter embolization. Methods: Angiography showed an arteriovenous fistula in six of the seven patients, a pseudoaneurysm in three patients, and an arteriocaliceal fistula in three patients. Embolization was performed with GAW coils or microcoils in all cases. In three patients enbucrilate, polyvinyl alcohol, or absorbable gelatin powder was administered as an adjunct to the coils. Results: Angiographic success with total occlusion of the vascular injury was achieved in five of the seven patients and clinical success was achieved in four of seven cases. In two cases, nephrectomy after embolization was necessary because of renal artery occlusion or acute hemorrhage at the renal artery anastomosis, respectively. Infarction of 30%-50% of the renal parenchyma was seen in two cases. Conclusion: Angiographically successful embolization is not necessarily associated with clinical success. The complication rate is high.

  7. Spiral CT During Selective Accessory Renal Artery Angiography: Assessment of Vascular Territory Before Aortic Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Dorffner, Roland; Thurnher, Siegfried; Prokesch, Rupert; Youssefzadeh, Soraya; Hoelzenbein, Thomas; Lammer, Johannes

    1998-03-15

    We evaluated the vascular territory of accessory renal arteries in cases where the vessel might be overlapped by an aortic stent-graft. Spiral CT during selective accessory renal artery angiography was performed in four patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (including one with a horseshoe kidney). The volume of the vascular territory of each renal artery was measured using a software program provided by the CT unit manufacturer. The supernumerary renal arteries perfused 32%, 37%, 15%, and 16% of the total renal mass, respectively. In two patients, stent-grafts were implanted, which resulted in occlusion of the supernumerary renal artery. The volume of the renal infarction was equal to the volume perfused by the artery as calculated before implantation of the stent-graft.The method proposed is accurate for estimating the size of the expected renal infarction. It might help to determine whether placement of a stent-graft is acceptable.

  8. Combustion-derived nanoparticulate induces the adverse vascular effects of diesel exhaust inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Nicholas L.; Miller, Mark R.; Lucking, Andrew J.; Beveridge, Jon; Flint, Laura; Boere, A. John F.; Fokkens, Paul H.; Boon, Nicholas A.; Sandstrom, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders; Duffin, Rodger; Donaldson, Ken; Hadoke, Patrick W.F.; Cassee, Flemming R.; Newby, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Exposure to road traffic and air pollution may be a trigger of acute myocardial infarction, but the individual pollutants responsible for this effect have not been established. We assess the role of combustion-derived-nanoparticles in mediating the adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution. Methods and results To determine the in vivo effects of inhalation of diesel exhaust components, 16 healthy volunteers were exposed to (i) dilute diesel exhaust, (ii) pure carbon nanoparticulate, (iii) filtered diesel exhaust, or (iv) filtered air, in a randomized double blind cross-over study. Following each exposure, forearm blood flow was measured during intra-brachial bradykinin, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and verapamil infusions. Compared with filtered air, inhalation of diesel exhaust increased systolic blood pressure (145 ± 4 vs. 133 ± 3 mmHg, P< 0.05) and attenuated vasodilatation to bradykinin (P= 0.005), acetylcholine (P= 0.008), and sodium nitroprusside (P< 0.001). Exposure to pure carbon nanoparticulate or filtered exhaust had no effect on endothelium-dependent or -independent vasodilatation. To determine the direct vascular effects of nanoparticulate, isolated rat aortic rings (n= 6–9 per group) were assessed in vitro by wire myography and exposed to diesel exhaust particulate, pure carbon nanoparticulate and vehicle. Compared with vehicle, diesel exhaust particulate (but not pure carbon nanoparticulate) attenuated both acetylcholine (P< 0.001) and sodium-nitroprusside (P= 0.019)-induced vasorelaxation. These effects were partially attributable to both soluble and insoluble components of the particulate. Conclusion Combustion-derived nanoparticulate appears to predominately mediate the adverse vascular effects of diesel exhaust inhalation. This provides a rationale for testing environmental health interventions targeted at reducing traffic-derived particulate emissions. PMID:21753226

  9. Adverse Vascular Risk is Related to Cognitive Decline in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Angela L.; Hohman, Timothy J.; Liu, Dandan; Haj-Hassan, Shereen; Gifford, Katherine A.; Benson, Elleena M.; Skinner, Jeannine S.; Lu, Zengqi; Sparling, Jamie; Sumner, Emily C.; Bell, Susan; Ruberg, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This association is less well-defined in normal cognition (NC) or prodromal AD (mild cognitive impairment (MCI)). Objective Cross-sectionally and longitudinally relate a vascular risk index to cognitive outcomes among elders free of clinical dementia. Methods 3117 MCI (74±8 years, 56% female) and 6603 NC participants (72±8 years, 68% female) were drawn from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center. A composite measure of vascular risk was defined using the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile (FSRP) score (i.e., age, systolic blood pressure, anti-hypertensive medication, diabetes, cigarette smoking, CVD history, atrial fibrillation). Ordinary linear regressions and generalized linear mixed models related baseline FSRP to cross-sectional and longitudinal cognitive outcomes, separately for NC and MCI, adjusting for age, sex, race, education, and follow-up time (in longitudinal models). Results In NC participants, increasing FSRP was related to worse baseline global cognition, information processing speed, and sequencing abilities (p-values<0.0001) and a worse longitudinal trajectory on all cognitive measures (p-values<0.0001). In MCI, increasing FSRP correlated with worse longitudinal delayed memory (p=0.004). In secondary models using an age-excluded FSRP score, associations persisted in NC participants for global cognition, naming, information processing speed, and sequencing abilities. Conclusions An adverse vascular risk profile is associated with worse cognitive trajectory, especially global cognition, naming, and information processing speed, among NC elders. Future studies are needed to understand how effective management of CVD and related risk factors can modify cognitive decline to identify the ideal timeframe for primary prevention implementation. PMID:25471188

  10. Ansys Fluent versus Sim Vascular for 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics in renal arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumbaraddi, Avinash; Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Sawchuk, Alan; Dalsing, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this clinical-need driven research is to investigate the effect of renal artery stenosis (RAS) on the blood flow and wall shear stress in renal arteries through 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) and search for possible critical RASs that significantly alter the pressure gradient across the stenosis by manually varying the size of RAS from 50% to 95%. The identification of the critical RAS is important to understand the contribution of RAS to the overall renal resistance thus appropriate clinical therapy can be determined in order to reduce the hypertension. Clinical CT angiographic data together with Doppler Ultra sound images of an anonymous patient are used serving as the required inputs of the PSCH. To validate the PSCH, we use both Ansys Fluent and Sim Vascular and compare velocity, pressure, and wall-shear stress under identical conditions. Renal Imaging Technology Development Program (RITDP) Grant.

  11. Assessment of renal vascular resistance and blood pressure in dogs and cats with renal disease.

    PubMed

    Novellas, R; Ruiz de Gopegui, R; Espada, Y

    2010-05-15

    This study investigated the possible relationships between renal resistive index (RI) or pulsatility index (PI) and systolic blood pressure and biochemical and haematological parameters in dogs and cats with renal disease. The study included 50 dogs and 20 cats with renal disease. RI and PI were significantly higher in both dogs and cats with renal disease than in 27 healthy dogs and 10 healthy cats. In dogs, a significant negative correlation was found between RI and red blood cell count, and a positive correlation was found between PI and serum creatinine. In cats, a positive correlation was found between RI and serum urea, between PI and serum creatinine, and between PI and serum urea. No relationship could be found between either RI or PI and systolic blood pressure.

  12. Mid-Term Vascular Safety of Renal Denervation Assessed by Follow-up MR Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Axel Schmieder, Raphael; Lell, Michael; Janka, Rolf; Veelken, Roland; Schmieder, Roland E.; Uder, Michael; Ott, Christian

    2016-03-15

    Background/AimsRenal denervation (RDN) emerged as a treatment option for reducing blood pressure (BP) in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH). However, concerns have been raised regarding the incidence of late renal artery stenosis or thromboembolism after RDN. The goal of the current study was, therefore, to conduct a prospective clinical trial on the mid-term vascular integrity of the renal arteries and the perfusion of the renal parenchyma assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the follow-up after catheter-based RDN.MethodsIn our single-centre investigator initiated study, 51 patients with true TRH underwent catheter-based RDN using the Symplicity Flex{sup TM} catheter (Medtronic Inc., Palo Alto, CA). Follow-up MRI was performed at a median of 11 months (interquartile range 6–18 months) after RDN on a 1.5T MR unit. High-resolution MR angiography (MRA) and MRI results were compared to the baseline digital angiography of renal arteries obtained at time of RDN. In case of uncertainties (N = 2) catheter angiography was repeated.ResultsBoth office and 24-h ambulatory BP were significantly reduced 6 and 12 months after RDN. Renal function remained unchanged 6 and 12 months after RDN. In all patients, MRA excluded new or progression of pre-existing low grade renal artery stenosis as well as focal aneurysms at the sites of radiofrequency ablation. In none of the patients new segmental perfusion deficits in either kidney were detected on MRI.ConclusionsNo vascular or parenchymal complications after radiofrequency-based RDN were detected in 51 patients followed up by MRI.

  13. Vascular contractile reactivity in hypotension due to reduced renal reabsorption of Na(+) and restricted dietary Na().

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saeed; Rapoport, Robert M; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2017-03-01

    Reduced renal Na(+) reabsorption along with restricted dietary Na(+) depletes intravascular plasma volume which can then result in hypotension. Whether hypotension occurs and the magnitude of hypotension depends in part on compensatory angiotensin II-mediated increased vascular resistance. We investigated whether the ability of vascular resistance to mitigate the hypotension was compromised by decreased contractile reactivity. In vitro reactivity was investigated in aorta from mouse models of reduced renal Na(+) reabsorption and restricted dietary Na(+) associated with considerable hypotension and renin-angiotensin system activation: (1) the Na(+)-Cl(-)-Co-transporter (NCC) knockout (KO) with Na(+) restricted diet (0.1%, 2 weeks) and (2) the relatively more severe pendrin (apical chloride/bicarbonate exchanger) and NCC double KO. Contractile sensitivity to KCl, phenylephrine, and/or U46619 remained unaltered in aorta from both models. Maximal KCl and phenylephrine contraction expressed as force/aorta length from NCC KO with Na(+)-restricted diet remained unaltered, while in pendrin/NCC double KO were reduced to 49 and 64%, respectively. Wet weight of aorta from NCC KO with Na(+)-restricted diet remained unaltered, while pendrin/NCC double KO was reduced to 67%, consistent with decreased medial width determined with Verhoeff-Van Gieson stain. These findings suggest that hypotension associated with severe intravascular volume depletion, as the result of decreased renal Na(+) reabsorption, may in part be due to decreased contractile reactivity as a consequence of reduced vascular hypertrophy.

  14. Meconium-Associated Umbilical Vascular Myonecrosis: Correlations with Adverse Outcome and Placental Pathology.

    PubMed

    Cimic, Adela; Baergen, Rebecca N

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine passage of meconium is common, occurring in approximately 10-15% of term births. Uncommonly, long-standing meconium exposure is associated with umbilical vascular myonecrosis, but few studies have evaluated specific clinical and pathologic features. This is a retrospective study of 481 term placentas: 139 with meconium-associated myonecrosis, 139 with meconium in fetal membranes, only 62 with meconium in the cord without myonecrosis, and 139 controls without meconium. We studied clinical factors, including clinical evidence of meconium discharge, fetal distress, APGAR scores, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and intrauterine fetal demise (IUFD), and histologic factors, including acute chorioamnionitis, umbilical cord complications, uteroplacental malperfusion, fetal thrombosis, chorangiosis, and fetal nucleated red blood cells. Meconium myonecrosis was significantly associated with clinical meconium, fetal distress, IUGR, IUFD, acute chorioamnionitis, cord complications, fetal thrombosis, chorangiosis, and nucleated red blood cells when compared to controls (P < 0.05). Compared to cases with meconium in the membranes only, clinical meconium, fetal distress, IUGR, chorioamnionitis, thrombosis, chorangiosis, and nucleated red blood cells remained significant. Compared to cases with meconium in the cord without myonecrosis, only chorioamnionitis retained significance. In conclusion, myonecrosis was associated with adverse clinical outcome and placental lesions associated with hypoxia. Chorioamnionitis was significantly more common in all meconium groups compared to controls. As myonecrosis is an important lesion, a clinical history of meconium should trigger a meticulous search for meconium and specifically myonecrosis.

  15. Systemic effects of periodontitis: Lessons learned from research on atherosclerotic vascular disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Papapanou, Panos N.

    2015-01-01

    Studies conducted over the past 25 years have focused on the role of periodontitis, an inflammatory condition of microbial etiology that destroys the tooth supporting tissues, as a systemic inflammatory stressor that can act as an independent risk factor of atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVSD) and adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs). It has been suggested that periodontitis-associated bacteremias and systemic dissemination of inflammatory mediators produced in the periodontal tissues may result in systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, while bacteria of oral origin may translocate into the feto-placental unit. Epidemiologic studies largely support an association between periodontitis and ASVD / APOs independent of known confounders; indeed, periodontitis has been shown to confer statistically significantly elevated risk for clinical events associated with ASVD and APOs in multivariable adjustments. On the other hand, intervention studies demonstrate that although periodontal therapy reduces systemic inflammation and improves endothelial function, it has no positive effect on the incidence of APOs. Studies of the effects of periodontal interventions on ASVD-related clinical events are lacking. This review summarizes key findings from mechanistic, association and intervention studies and attempts to reconcile the seemingly contradictory evidence that originates from different lines of investigation. PMID:26388299

  16. Detection of Accessory Renal Arteries with Virtual Vascular Endoscopy of the Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, Emanuele; Caramella, Davide; Bisogni, Cristina; Laiolo, Edoardo; Trincavelli, Francesco; Viviani, Adriano; Vignali, Claudio; Cioni, Roberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of virtual vascular endoscopy (VVE) in the detection of accessory renal arteries. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the CT angiography data sets of 67 patients (29 male and 38 female; age range 17-72 years, mean age 53 years) imaged for the study of the renal arteries, and affected by renovascular hypertension. All patients also had intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA). CT angiography data sets were processed to obtain maximum intensity projection (MIP) and surface-rendered VVE of the aorta. Axial images, MIP, and VVE were evaluated separately and in combination in the detection of accessory renal arteries. Their results in terms of sensitivity and specificity were then compared with DSA. Results: Axial images had a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 94% for accessory renal artery detection, MIP had a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 98%, and VVE had a sensitivity of 63% and a specificity of 88% (p < 0.05 vs DSA), but these increased to 88% and 98% respectively if endoscopic views were integrated with the other display techniques. Conclusion: VVE based on surface rendering does not add substantial benefits to CTY angiography; by contrast MIP is the most accurate display technique for the detection of accessory renal arteries.

  17. Serum Fetuin-A Levels Are Associated with Vascular Calcifications and Predict Cardiovascular Events in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Céline; Schlieper, Georg; Nguyen, Pauline; Krüger, Thilo; Coche, Emmanuel; Robert, Annie; Floege, Jorgen; Goffin, Eric; Jadoul, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Vascular calcifications predict cardiovascular disease, the major cause of death in renal transplant recipients (RTRs). We studied the determinants of fetuin-A, a potent circulating calcification inhibitor encoded by the AHSG gene, and tested its association with vascular calcifications and long-term survival and cardiovascular events (CVEs) in RTRs. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Two hundred seventy-seven prevalent RTRs from a single center were included. CVEs and deaths were prospectively recorded during a 5-year follow-up. Results Independent determinants of lower serum fetuin-A levels were lower plasma cholesterol, the AHSG rs4918 G allele, and history of smoking. Low serum fetuin-A level was a determinant of aortic calcifications (assessed using spiral CT). Low fetuin-A levels (≤0.47 g/L, first quintile) were independently associated with CVEs and deaths (hazard ratio = 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 3.04). The association was confirmed for all-cause mortality, and the major adverse cardiovascular endpoints were analyzed separately. Patients with low fetuin-A and high high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (>4.36 mg/L, fourth quintile) levels had a 3.5-fold increased risk of all-cause mortality and CVEs. In the presence of inflammation, CVE-free survival was influenced by common variants in the AHSG gene. Conclusions These data show that low fetuin-A levels are independently associated with aortic calcifications and a higher risk of CVEs and mortality. They support fetuin-A as a circulating biomarker able to identify RTRs at risk for vascular calcifications and CVEs. PMID:21527649

  18. Dectin-1 predicts adverse postoperative prognosis of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yu; Liu, Li; Bai, Qi; Wang, Jiajun; Xi, Wei; Qu, Yang; Xiong, Ying; Long, Qilai; Xu, Jiejie; Guo, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1, a classical pattern-recognition receptor, was now identified as an important regulator in immune homeostasis and cancer immunity through its extensive ligands binding functions and subsequent cytokines production. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical significance of dectin-1 expression in 290 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) through immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. We found that dectin-1 was predominantly expressed on ccRCC cells, in accordance with several other online databases. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier method was conducted and high expression of tumoral dectin-1 was associated with shorter patient recurrence free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001 for both). In multivariate analyses, tumoral dectin-1 expression was also confirmed as an independent prognostic factor for patients’ survival together with other clinical parameters (P < 0.001 for RFS and OS). After incorporating these characteristics including tumoral dectin-1 expression, two nomograms were constructed to predict ccRCC patients’ RFS and OS (c-index 0.796 and 0.812, respectively) and performed better than existed integrated models (P < 0.001 for all models comparisons). In conclusion, high tumoral dectin-1 expression was an independent predictor of adverse clinical outcome in ccRCC patients. This molecule and established nomograms might help clinicians in future decision making and therapeutic developments. PMID:27600310

  19. Captopril attenuates hypertension and renal injury induced by the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Tasuku; Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Imig, John D

    2012-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (VEGFi) are known to cause hypertension and renal injury that severely limits their use as an anticancer therapy. We hypothesized that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril not only prevents hypertension, but also decreases renal injury caused by the VEGFi sorafenib. Rats were administered sorafenib (20 mg/kg per day) alone or in combination with captopril (40 mg/kg per day) for 4 weeks. Sorafenib administration increased blood pressure, which plateaued by day 10. Concurrent treatment with captopril for 4 weeks resulted in a 30 mmHg decrease in blood pressure compared with sorafenib alone (155 ± 5 vs 182 ± 6 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). Furthermore, concurrent captopril treatment reduced albuminuria by 50% compared with sorafenib alone (20 ± 8 vs 42 ± 9 mg/day, respectively; P < 0.05) and reduced nephrinuria by eightfold (280 ± 96 vs 2305 ± 665 μg/day, respectively; P < 0.05). Glomerular injury, thrombotic microangiopathy and tubular cast formation were also decreased in captopril-treated rats administered sorafenib. Renal autoregulatory efficiency was determined by evaluating the afferent arteriolar constrictor response to ATP. Sorafenib administration attenuated the vasoconstriction to ATP, whereas concurrent captopril treatment improved ATP reactivity. In conclusion, captopril attenuated hypertension and renal injury and improved renal autoregulatory capacity in rats administered sorafenib. These findings indicate that captopril treatment, in addition to alleviating the detrimental side-effect of hypertension, decreases the renal injury associated with anticancer VEGFi therapies such as sorafenib.

  20. Renal responses to central vascular expansion are suppressed at night in conscious primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, D. A.; Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    The renal and hemodynamic responses of squirrel monkeys to central vascular volume expansion induced by lower body positive pressure (LBPP) during the day and night are investigated. Twelve unanesthetized animals trained to sit in a metabolism chair in which they were restrained only at the waist by a partition separating upper and lower body chambers were subjected to 4 h of continuous LBPP during the day and night, and hemodynamic, urinary and drinking data were monitored. LBPP during day and night is found to induce similar increases in central venous pressure, rises in heart rate and elevations in mean arterial blood pressure. However, although daytime LBPP induced a significant increase in urine flow and sodium excretion, a marked nocturnal inhibition of the renal response to LBPP is observed. Analysis of the time course and circadian regulation patterns of the urinary responses suggests that several separate efferent control pathways are involved.

  1. Effects of tempol on altered metabolism and renal vascular responsiveness in fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Mohammed H; Sattar, Munavvar A; Johns, Edward J

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of tempol (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) on renal vasoconstrictor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II) and adrenergic agonists in fructose-fed Sprague-Dawley rats (a model of metabolic syndrome). Rats were fed 20% fructose in drinking water (F) for 8 weeks. One fructose-fed group received tempol (FT) at 1 mmol·L(-1) in drinking water for 8 weeks or as an infusion (1.5 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) intrarenally. At the end of the treatment regimen, the renal responses to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, methoxamine, and Ang II were determined. F rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension. Tempol reduced blood glucose and insulin levels (all p < 0.05) in FT rats compared with their untreated counterparts. The vasoconstriction response to all agonists was lower in F rats than in control rats by about 35%-65% (all p < 0.05). Vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, and methoxamine but not Ang II were about 41%-75% higher in FT rats compared with F rats (all p < 0.05). Acute tempol infusion blunted responses to noradrenaline, methoxamine, and Ang II in control rats by 32%, 33%, and 62%, while it blunted responses to noradrenaline and Ang II in F rats by 26% and 32%, respectively (all p < 0.05), compared with their untreated counterparts. Superoxide radicals play a crucial role in controlling renal vascular responses to adrenergic agonists in insulin-resistant rats. Chronic but not acute tempol treatment enhances renal vascular responsiveness in fructose-fed rats.

  2. Spontaneous Dissection of the Renal Artery in Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Filipa; Cardoso, Teresa; Sá, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (vEDS) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the COL3A1 gene predisposing to premature arterial, intestinal, or uterine rupture. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman with a recent diagnosis of vEDS admitted in the Emergency Department with a suspicion of a pyelonephritis that evolved to a cardiopulmonary arrest. A fatal retroperitoneal hematoma related with a haemorrhagic dissection of the right renal artery was found after emergency surgery. This case highlights the need to be aware of the particular characteristics of vEDS, such as a severe vascular complication that can lead to a fatal outcome. PMID:26175915

  3. Effect of diesel exhaust particles on renal vascular responses in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Al Suleimani, Y M; Al Mahruqi, A S; Al Za'abi, M; Shalaby, A; Ashique, M; Nemmar, A; Ali, B H

    2017-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the possible association between exposure to particulate air pollution and the increased rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney diseases. The link of this observation to vascular damage has not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aims to investigate possible vascular damage that might be associated with exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DP) in adenine (AD)-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats, and the possible ameliorative effect of gum acacia (GA). CKD was induced by feeding AD (0.75%, w/w), and DP (0.5 mg/kg) was instilled intratracheally every second day and GA was given concomitantly in the drinking water at a dose of 15% w/v. All treatments were given concomitantly for 28 days. Changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were monitored in these animals after anesthesia, together with several other endpoints. Exposure to DP significantly reduced RBF and this was significantly potentiated in AD-treated rats. Phenylephrine-induced decreases in RBF and increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were severely potentiated in rats exposed to DP, and these actions were significantly augmented in AD-treated rats. GA did not significantly affect the vascular impairment induced by AD and DP given together. This study provides experimental evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution can exacerbate the vascular damage seen in patients with CKD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 541-549, 2017.

  4. Renal outcomes and dietary potassium: the overshadowed electrolyte?

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Kristen L; Kendrick, Jessica B

    2014-12-01

    Smyth et al. examined the association between urinary sodium and potassium excretion and adverse renal outcomes in adults at high cardiovascular risk. They found no association between urinary sodium excretion and adverse renal outcomes, but a reduced odds of adverse renal outcomes with higher urinary potassium excretion. It will be important to ascertain whether this finding holds true in individuals free from vascular disease and diabetes, as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  5. Renal, vascular and cardiac fibrosis in rats exposed to passive smoking and industrial dust fibre amosite

    PubMed Central

    Boor, Peter; Casper, Sandra; Celec, Peter; Hurbánková, Marta; Beňo, Milan; Heidland, August; Amann, Kerstin; Šebeková, Katarína

    2009-01-01

    Passive smoking is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Industrial fibrous dust, e.g. the asbestos group member, amosite, causes lung cancer and fibrosis. No data are available on renal involvement after inhalational exposure to these environmental pollutants or of their combination, or on cardiovascular and renal toxicity after exposure to amosite. Male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups (n= 6): control and amosite group received initially two intratracheal instillations of saline and amosite solution, respectively. Smoking group was subjected to standardized daily exposure to tobacco smoke for 2 hrs in a concentration resembling human passive smoking. Combined group was exposed to both amosite and cigarette smoke. All rats were killed after 6 months. Rats exposed to either amosite or passive smoking developed significant glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Combination of both exposures had additive effects. Histomorphological changes preceded the clinical manifestation of kidney damage. In both groups with single exposures, marked perivascular and interstitial cardiac fibrosis was detected. The additive effect in the heart was less pronounced than in the kidney, apparent particularly in changes of vascular structure. Advanced oxidation protein products, the plasma marker of the myeloperoxidase reaction in activated monocytes/macrophages, were increased in all exposed groups, whereas the inflammatory cytokines did not differ between the groups. In rats, passive smoking or amosite instillation leads to renal, vascular and cardiac fibrosis potentially mediated via increased myeloperoxidase reaction. Combination of both pollutants shows additive effects. Our data should be confirmed in subjects exposed to these environmental pollutants, in particular if combined. PMID:19292733

  6. A magnesium based phosphate binder reduces vascular calcification without affecting bone in chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Neven, Ellen; De Schutter, Tineke M; Dams, Geert; Gundlach, Kristina; Steppan, Sonja; Büchel, Janine; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; D'Haese, Patrick C; Behets, Geert J

    2014-01-01

    The alternative phosphate binder calcium acetate/magnesium carbonate (CaMg) effectively reduces hyperphosphatemia, the most important inducer of vascular calcification, in chronic renal failure (CRF). In this study, the effect of low dose CaMg on vascular calcification and possible effects of CaMg on bone turnover, a persistent clinical controversy, were evaluated in chronic renal failure rats. Adenine-induced CRF rats were treated daily with 185 mg/kg CaMg or vehicle for 5 weeks. The aortic calcium content and area% calcification were measured to evaluate the effect of CaMg. To study the effect of CaMg on bone remodeling, rats underwent 5/6th nephrectomy combined with either a normal phosphorus diet or a high phosphorus diet to differentiate between possible bone effects resulting from either CaMg-induced phosphate deficiency or a direct effect of Mg. Vehicle or CaMg was administered at doses of 185 and 375 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks. Bone histomorphometry was performed. Aortic calcium content was significantly reduced by 185 mg/kg/day CaMg. CaMg ameliorated features of hyperparathyroid bone disease. In CRF rats on a normal phosphorus diet, the highest CaMg dose caused an increase in osteoid area due to phosphate depletion. The high phosphorus diet combined with the highest CaMg dose prevented the phosphate depletion and thus the rise in osteoid area. CaMg had no effect on osteoblast/osteoclast or dynamic bone parameters, and did not alter bone Mg levels. CaMg at doses that reduce vascular calcification did not show any harmful effect on bone turnover.

  7. Role of connective tissue growth factor in vascular and renal damage associated with hypertension in rats. Interactions with angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, Natalia; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Rupérez, Mónica; Sanz-Rosa, David; Miana, María; Aragoncillo, Paloma; Mezzano, Sergio; Lahera, Vicente; Egido, Jesus; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2006-12-01

    We have evaluated the role of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in vascular and renal damage associated with hypertension and possible interactions with angiotensin II (Ang II). Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were treated with either the Ang II receptor antagonist candesartan (C;2 mg/Kg(-1)/day(-1)) or antihypertensive triple therapy (TT; in mg/Kg(-1)/day(-1);20 hydralazine +7 hydrochlorothiazide +0.15 reserpine) for 10 weeks. Wistar Kyoto rats were used as a normotensive control group. Hypertension was associated with an increase in aortic media area, media-to-lumen ratio and collagen density. Kidneys from SHR showed minimum renal alterations. Aorta and renal gene expression and immunostaining of CTGF were higher in SHR. Candesartan decreased arterial pressure, aortic media area, media-to-lumen ratio and collagen density. However, although arterial pressure decrease was comparable for both treatments, TT partially reduced these parameters. Candesartan-treated rats showed lower levels of vascular CTGF expression, aortic media area, media-to-lumen ratio and collagen density than TT-treated animals. Treatments improve renal damage and reduce renal gene expression and CTGF immunostaining in SHR in a similar manner. The results show that vascular and renal damage is associated with stimulation of CTGF gene and protein content. These results also might suggest that CTGF could be one downstream mediator of Ang II in hypertension-associated organ damage in SHR.

  8. The para-aortic ridge plays a key role in the formation of the renal, adrenal and gonadal vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Isogai, Sumio; Horiguchi, Mayuko; Hitomi, Jiro

    2010-01-01

    Renal, adrenal, gonadal, ureteral and inferior phrenic arteries vary in their level of origin and in their calibre, number and precise anatomical relationship to other structures. Studies of the origin and early development of these arteries have evoked sharp disputes. The ladder theory of Felix, which states that ‘All the mesonephric arteries may persist; from them are formed the phrenic, suprarenal, renal and internal spermatic arteries’ has been generally quoted in the anatomical textbooks without rigorous verification for 100 years. In this study, we re-examined this theory by performing micro-injection of dye and resin into rat (Rattus norvegicus) embryos. Our results revealed that most of the mesonephric arteries had degenerated before the metanephros started its ascent. The definitive renal, adrenal, gonadal, ureteral and inferior phrenic arteries appeared as new branches from the gonadal artery and/or directly from the abdominal aorta to the para-aortic ridge. Coincidental to this, the anatomical architecture of the inter-renal vascular cage, which consists of the interlobar and arcuate arteries and their collateral veins, was completed within the developing metanephros. We demonstrated that the delicate renal vascular cage switched from the primary renal artery to the definitive renal artery and that the route of venous drainage changed from the posterior cardinal vein to the inferior (caudal) vena cava. PMID:20579173

  9. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2). PMID:27621605

  10. Differential effects of grape juice on gastric emptying and renal function from cisplatin-induced acute adverse toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ko, J-L; Tsai, C-H; Liu, T-C; Lin, M-Y; Lin, H-L; Ou, C-C

    2016-08-01

    Grape skin and seeds contain large amounts of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, resveratrol, and proanthocyanidins, which possess antioxidant activities. Cisplatin is widely used in the treatment of cancer. High doses of cisplatin have also been known to produce acute adverse effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of antioxidant properties of whole grape juice (with skin and seeds) on cisplatin-induced acute gastrointestinal tract disorders and nephrotoxicity in Wistar rats. Gastric emptying is significantly increased in whole grape juice-pretreated rats when compared to cisplatin treatment alone. The expression of ghrelin mRNA of stomach is increased in rats with whole grape juice. However, pretreatment with whole grape juice did not reduce renal function markers in acute renal toxicity. No significant changes were recorded in the oxidative stress/antioxidant status parameters of any study group. In contrast, pretreatment with whole grape juice slightly improved tubular cell vacuolization, tubular dilatation, and cast formation in renal tubules. These results show that consumption of whole grape juice induces somewhat beneficial effects in preventing cisplatin-mediated dyspepsia but does not offer protection against cisplatin-induced acute renal toxicity.

  11. Effects of renal denervation on vascular remodelling in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: A randomised control trial

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Carl; Keegan, Jennifer; Gatehouse, Peter D; Rajani, Ronak; Khattar, Rajdeep S; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Rosen, Stuart D; Lyon, Alexander R; di Mario, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of renal denervation (RDT) on micro- and macro-vascular function in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Design A prospective, randomised, open-controlled trial with blinded end-point analysis. Setting A single-centre London teaching hospital. Participants Twenty-five patients with HFpEF who were recruited into the RDT-PEF trial. Main outcome measures Macro-vascular: 24-h ambulatory pulse pressure, aorta distensibilty (from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), aorta pulse wave velocity (CMR), augmentation index (peripheral tonometry) and renal artery blood flow indices (renal MR). Micro-vascular: endothelial function (peripheral tonometry) and urine microalbuminuria. Results At baseline, 15 patients were normotensive, 9 were hypertensive and 1 was hypotensive. RDT did not lower any of the blood pressure indices. Though there was evidence of abnormal vascular function at rest, RDT did not affect these at 3 or 12 months follow-up. Conclusions RDT did not improve markers of macro- and micro-vascular function. PMID:28228942

  12. Programmatic Considerations to Reduce the Risk of Adverse Renal Stone Events in Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsen, Erik; Pietrzyk, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Microgravity exposure may alter the likelihood that astronauts will experience renal stones. The potential risk includes both acute and chronic health issues, with the potential for significant impact on mission objectives. Methods: To understand the role of the NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) research agenda in both preventing and addressing renal stones in spaceflight, current astronaut epidemiologic data and a summary of programmatic considerations are reviewed. Results: Although there has never been a symptomatic renal stone event in a U.S. crewmember during spaceflight, urine chemistry has been altered - likely due to induced changes in renal physiology as a result of exposure to microgravity. This may predispose astronauts to stone formation, leading the HRP to conduct and sponsor research to: 1) understand the risk of stone formation in space; 2) prevent stones from forming; and 3) address stones that may form by providing novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Discussion: The development of a renal stone during spaceflight is a significant medical concern that requires the HRP to minimize this risk by providing the ability to prevent, diagnose, monitor and treat the condition during spaceflight. A discussion of the risk as NASA understands it is followed by an overview of the multiple mitigations currently under study, including novel ultrasound techniques for stone detection and manipulation, and how they may function as part of a larger exploration medical system.

  13. Associations between Thyroid Hormones, Calcification Inhibitor Levels and Vascular Calcification in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meuwese, Christiaan Lucas; Olauson, Hannes; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Ripsweden, Jonaz; Barany, Peter; Vermeer, Cees; Drummen, Nadja; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vascular calcification is a common, serious and elusive complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As a pro-calcifying risk factor, non-thyroidal illness may promote vascular calcification through a systemic lowering of vascular calcification inhibitors such as matrix-gla protein (MGP) and Klotho. Methods and Material In 97 ESRD patients eligible for living donor kidney transplantation, blood levels of thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4 and TSH), total uncarboxylated MGP (t-ucMGP), desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP), descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA-II), and soluble Klotho (sKlotho) were measured. The degree of coronary calcification and arterial stiffness were assessed by means of cardiac CT-scans and applanation tonometry, respectively. Results fT3 levels were inversely associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores and measures of arterial stiffness, and positively with dp-ucMGP and sKlotho concentrations. Subfractions of MGP, PIVKA-II and sKlotho did not associate with CAC scores and arterial stiffness. fT4 and TSH levels were both inversely associated with CAC scores, but not with arterial stiffness. Discussion The positive associations between fT3 and dp-ucMGP and sKlotho suggest that synthesis of MGP and Klotho is influenced by thyroid hormones, and supports a link between non-thyroidal illness and alterations in calcification inhibitor levels. However, the absence of an association between serum calcification inhibitor levels and coronary calcification/arterial stiffness and the fact that MGP and Klotho undergo post-translational modifications underscore the complexity of this association. Further studies, measuring total levels of MGP and membrane bound Klotho, should examine this proposed pathway in further detail. PMID:26147960

  14. Effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to endothelin-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Amor, Sara; García-Villalón, Angel Luis; Rubio, Carmen; Carrascosa, Jose Ma; Monge, Luis; Fernández, Nuria; Martín-Carro, Beatriz; Granado, Miriam

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular alterations are the most prevalent cause of impaired physiological function in aged individuals with kidney being one the most affected organs. Aging-induced alterations in renal circulation are associated with a decrease in endothelium-derived relaxing factors such as nitric oxide (NO) and with an increase in contracting factors such as endothelin-1(ET-1). As caloric restriction (CR) exerts beneficial effects preventing some of the aging-induced alterations in cardiovascular system, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to ET-1 in aged rats. Vascular function was studied in renal arteries from 3-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (3m) and in renal arteries from 8-and 24-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (8m and 24m), or subjected to 20% caloric restriction during their three last months of life (8m-CR and 24m-CR). The contractile response to ET-1 was increased in renal arteries from 8m and 24m compared to 3m rats. ET-1-induced contraction was mediated by ET-A receptors in all experimental groups and also by ET-B receptors in 24m rats. Caloric restriction attenuated the increased contraction to ET-1 in renal arteries from 8m but not from 24m rats possibly through NO release proceeding from ET-B endothelial receptors. In 24m rats, CR did not attenuate the aging-increased response of renal arteries to ET-1, but it prevented the aging-induced increase in iNOS mRNA levels and the aging-induced decrease in eNOS mRNA levels in arterial tissue. In conclusion, aging is associated with an increased response to ET-1 in renal arteries that is prevented by CR in 8m but not in 24m rats.

  15. Incidence and management of renal adverse events in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma treated with single-agent carfilzomib.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jatin J

    2013-12-01

    Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) frequently experience renal dysfunction owing to patient-specific risk factors, the pathophysiology of MM, and treatment-related adverse events. The presence of renal complications in patients with MM may be associated with advanced disease and is a negative prognostic factor for survival. Frequently these patients receive reduced or modified dosing regimens, which can result in under-dosing and may adversely affect treatment efficacy. Consequently, there is a need for effective therapies with favorable renal safety profiles. Carfilzomib is a selective proteasome inhibitor approved in the United States as a single agent for the treatment of relapsed and refractory MM. Safety studies have demonstrated that single-agent carfilzomib is well tolerated in patients with relapsed and/or refractory MM and concomitant renal dysfunction. This article reviews the etiology and incidence of renal adverse events in patients with MM, the renal safety profile of single-agent carfilzomib from four phase II studies in patients with relapsed and/or refractory MM, and the management of patients with MM who receive carfilzomib and are at risk for renal complications.

  16. Barnidipine ameliorates the vascular and renal injury in L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Alp Yildirim, F Ilkay; Eker Kizilay, Deniz; Ergin, Bülent; Balci Ekmekçi, Özlem; Topal, Gökçe; Kucur, Mine; Demirci Tansel, Cihan; Uydeş Doğan, B Sönmez

    2015-10-05

    The present study was aimed to investigate the influence of Barnidipine treatment on early stage hypertension by determining the function and morphology of the mesenteric and renal arteries as well as the kidney in N(ω)-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Barnidipine (3 mg/kg/day p.o) was applied to rats after 2 weeks of L-NAME (60 mg/kg/day) administration, and continued for the next 3 weeks concomitantly with L-NAME. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) of rats was determined to decrease significantly in Barnidipine treated hypertensive group when compared to that of rats received L-NAME alone. Myograph studies demonstrated that the contractile reactivity to noradrenaline were significantly reduced in both of the resistance arteries while endothelium-dependent relaxations to acethylcholine were significantly diminished particularly in the mesenteric arteries of L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats. The impaired contractile and endothelial responses were completely restored by concomitant treatment of Barnidipine with L-NAME. Histopathological examinations verified structural alterations in the arteries as well as the kidney. Moreover, a decrease in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression was presented both in the arteries and kidney of hypertensive rats which were increased following Barnidipine treatment. Elevated plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were also reduced in Barnidipine treated hypertensive rats. In conclusion, besides to its efficacy in reducing the elevated SBP, amelioration of vascular function, modulation of arterial and renal eNOS expressions as well as reduction of the plasma levels of oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers are possible supportive mechanisms mediating the favorable implications of Barnidipine in L-NAME-induced hypertension model.

  17. Adverse vascular effects of homocysteine are modulated by endothelium-derived relaxing factor and related oxides of nitrogen.

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, J S; Osborne, J A; Jaraki, O; Rabbani, L E; Mullins, M; Singel, D; Loscalzo, J

    1993-01-01

    Elevated levels of homocysteine are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The reactivity of the sulfhydryl group of homocysteine has been implicated in molecular mechanisms underlying this increased risk. There is also increasingly compelling evidence that thiols react in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) to form S-nitrosothiols, compounds with potent vasodilatory and antiplatelet effects. We, therefore, hypothesized that S-nitrosation of homocysteine would confer these beneficial bioactivities to the thiol, and at the same time attenuate its pathogenicity. We found that prolonged (> 3 h) exposure of endothelial cells to homocysteine results in impaired EDRF responses. By contrast, brief (15 min) exposure of endothelial cells, stimulated to secrete EDRF, to homocysteine results in the formation of S-NO-homocysteine, a potent antiplatelet agent and vasodilator. In contrast to homocysteine, S-NO-homocysteine does not support H2O2 generation and does not undergo conversion to homocysteine thiolactone, reaction products believed to contribute to endothelial toxicity. These results suggest that the normal endothelium modulates the potential, adverse effects of homocysteine by releasing EDRF and forming the adduct S-NO-homocysteine. The adverse vascular properties of homocysteine may result from an inability to sustain S-NO formation owing to a progressive imbalance between the production of NO by progressively dysfunctional endothelial cells and the levels of homocysteine. PMID:8380812

  18. The Synthetic Tie2 Agonist Peptide Vasculotide Protects Renal Vascular Barrier Function In Experimental Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rübig, Eva; Stypmann, Jörg; Van Slyke, Paul; Dumont, Daniel J; Spieker, Tilmann; Buscher, Konrad; Reuter, Stefan; Goerge, Tobias; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kümpers, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular barrier dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI). Angiopoietin-1, the natural agonist ligand for the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor, is a non-redundant endothelial survival and vascular stabilization factor. Here we evaluate the efficacy of a polyethylene glycol-clustered Tie2 agonist peptide, vasculotide (VT), to protect against endothelial-cell activation with subsequent microvascular dysfunction in a murine model of ischemic AKI. Renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) was induced by clamping of the renal arteries for 35 minutes. Mice were treated with VT or PEGylated cysteine before IRI. Sham-operated animals served as time-matched controls. Treatment with VT significantly reduced transcapillary albumin flux and renal tissue edema after IRI. The protective effects of VT were associated with activation of Tie2 and stabilization of its downstream effector, VE-cadherin in renal vasculature. VT abolished the decline in renal tissue blood flow, attenuated the increase of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen after IRI, improved recovery of renal function and markedly reduced mortality compared to PEG [HR 0.14 (95% CI 0.05–0.78) P < 0.05]. VT is inexpensive to produce, chemically stable and unrelated to any Tie2 ligands. Thus, VT may represent a novel therapy to prevent AKI in patients. PMID:26911791

  19. Renal Artery Stump to Inferior Vena Cava Fistula: Unusual Clinical Presentation and Transcatheter Embolization with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Manish; Lath, Narayan Soo, Tan Bien; Hiong, Tay Kiang; Htoo, Maung Myint; Richard, Lo; Fui, Alexander Chung Yaw

    2008-07-15

    Fistulous communication between the renal artery stump and inferior vena cava following nephrectomy is rare. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a fistula detected on investigation for hemolytic anemia in the postoperative period. The patient had had a nephrectomy performed 2 weeks prior to presentation for blunt abdominal trauma. The fistula was successfully occluded percutaneously using an Amplatzer vascular plug. The patient recovered completely and was discharged 2 weeks later.

  20. Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as a potential predictor of adverse renal outcomes in immunoglobulin A nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga-Young; Yu, Chung-Hoon; Kim, Jun-Seop; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Kwon, Owen; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Jang-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a well-known biomarker of acute kidney injury. We evaluated the value of plasma NGAL (pNGAL) as an independent predictor of prognosis in immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Methods In total, 91 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN at a single center were evaluated. pNGAL was measured using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (R&D Systems). Adverse renal outcome was defined as chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 or above at the last follow-up. Pearson correlation coefficient and Cox regression were used for analyses. Results The mean age of all patients (male:female, 48:43) was 35 years (range, 18 to 77). pNGAL ranged between 21.68 and 446.40 ng/mL (median, 123.97) and showed a correlation with age (r = 0.332, p = 0.001), creatinine (r = 0.336, p = 0.001), estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = -0.397, p < 0.001), uric acid (r = 0.289, p = 0.006), and the protein-to-creatinine ratio (r = 0.288, p = 0.006). During a mean follow-up period of 37.6 months, 11 patients (12.1%) had CKD stage 3 or above. In a multivariate Cox regression model, hypertension (hazard ratio [HR], 8.779; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.526 to 50.496; p = 0.015), proteinuria > 1 g/day (HR, 5.184; 95% CI, 1.124 to 23.921; p = 0.035), and pNGAL (HR, 1.012; 95% CI, 1.003 to 1.022; p = 0.013) were independent predictors associated with adverse renal outcome. Conclusions pNGAL showed strong correlations with other clinical prognostic factors and was also an independent predictor of adverse renal outcome. We suggest pNGAL as a potential predictor for prognosis in IgAN, while further studies are needed to confirm the clinical value. PMID:25995665

  1. Diabetic nephropathy and endothelial dysfunction: Current and future therapies, and emerging of vascular imaging for preclinical renal-kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wilson Kc; Gao, L; Siu, Parco M; Lai, Christopher Wk

    2016-12-01

    An explosion in global epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus poses major rise in cases with vascular endothelial dysfunction ranging from micro- (retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) to macro-vascular (atherosclerosis and cardiomyopathy) conditions. Functional destruction of endothelium is regarded as an early event that lays the groundwork for the development of renal microangiopathy and subsequent clinical manifestation of nephropathic symptoms. Recent research has shed some light on the molecular mechanisms of type 2 diabetes-associated comorbidity of endothelial dysfunction and nephropathy. Stemming from currently proposed endothelium-centered therapeutic strategies for diabetic nephropathy, this review highlighted some most exploited pathways that involve the intricate coordination of vasodilators, vasoconstrictors and vaso-modulatory molecules in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. We also emphasized the emerging roles of oxidative and epigenetic modifications of microvasculature as our prospective therapeutics for diabetic renal diseases. Finally, this review in particular addressed the potential use of multispectral optoacoustic tomography in real-time, minimally-invasive vascular imaging of small experimental animals for preclinical renal-kinetic drug trials.

  2. Combined ureterorenoscopy for ureteral and renal calculi is not associated with adverse outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Mirac; Ozkanli, Oguz; Avci, Egemen; Basar, Mehmet Murad; Acar, Oguz; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We intended to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of the simultaneous rigid and flexible ureteroscopic treatment of symptomatic ureteral and ipsilateral small simultaneous calyceal stones. Outcomes of combined therapy were compared with monotherapy alone. Material and methods In this retrospective study, group 1 consisted of 45 patients with middle or lower ureteral and ipsilateral small simultaneous calyceal stones treated by combined therapy. Group 2 included 45 patients with middle or lower ureteral stones only and treated by monotherapy. Stone characteristics, operative time, hospital stay, stone free rates, and complications were compared between groups 1 and 2. Stone free status was defined as no fragments and/or the presence of asymptomatic fragments smaller than 4 mm. Results Mean BMI were 29.3 ±0.9 kg/m2 and 27.6 ±0.6 kg/m2 in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Mean ureteral stone size (7.6 ±0.4 mm vs. 8.0 ±0.4 mm, p = 0.261) and ureteral stone burden (56.0 ±5.5 mm2 vs. 54.8 ±6.1 mm2, p = 0.487) were similar between groups. Mean renal stone size and renal stone burden for group 1 were 7.1 ±0.8 mm and 83.7 ±11.3 mm2. The mean operative time was significantly longer (for a mean of 32.5±1.2 minutes) for group 1 (p = 0.001). Ureteral stents were left in 38 (84.4%) and 19 (42.2%) patients in group 1 and group 2 (p = 0.001). Hospital stay and complication rates were similar between groups. SFRs were 100% for ureteral stones in both groups and 88.9% for renal stones within group 1. Conclusions Simultaneous ureteroscopic treatment of the ureteral and ipsilateral small calyceal stones prolongs operative time and increases use of ureteral stent without leaving any residual renal stones. PMID:26251739

  3. [Hypertension and palmar plantar erythroderma. Management of adverse events of angiogenetic inhibitors in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Rolfes, N; Lümmen, G

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of angiogenesis inhibitors has altered the systemic therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Being a"permanent" medication, the management of side effects has special importance, for adverse events may limit therapy. Hypertension (up to 34% of cases) and palmar plantar erythroderma (6-30% of cases) are common side effects.Blood pressure should be monitored during therapy, and arterial hypertension should be treated with a standard medication. If a hypertensive emergency still occurs, a dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment might be indicated.Prophylaxis may prevent or extenuate palmar plantar erythroderma in many cases, enabling regular chemotherapy as planned. In cases with severe clinical symptoms a reduction or interruption of the dose will be necessary. In most cases local therapy is sufficient.

  4. Tumor Vascularity in Renal Masses: Correlation of Arterial Spin-Labeled and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Kapur, Payal; Yuan, Qing; Xi, Yin; Carvo, Ingrid; Signoretti, Sabina; Dimitrov, Ivan; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Margulis, Vitaly; Muradyan, Naira; Brugarolas, James; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J.; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate potential correlations between perfusion by arterial spin-labeled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI derived quantitative measures of vascularity in renal masses >2 cm and to correlate these with microvessel density (MVD) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Methods Informed written consent was obtained from all patients before imaging in this HIPAA-compliant, IRB-approved, prospective study. 36 consecutive patients scheduled for surgery of a known renal mass >2 cm underwent 3T ASL and DCE MRI. ASL measures (PASL) of mean, peak, and low perfusion areas within the mass were correlated to DCE-derived Ktrans, Kep, and Ve in the same locations using a region of interest analysis. MRI data were correlated to MVD measures in the same tumor regions in ccRCC. Spearman correlation was used to evaluate the correlation between PASL and DCE-derived measurements, and MVD. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Histopathologic diagnosis was obtained in 36 patients (25 men; mean age 58 ±12 years). PASL correlated with Ktrans (ρ=0.48, P=0.0091 for the entire tumor and ρ=0.43, P=0.03 for the high flow area, respectively) and Kep (ρ=0.46, P=0.01 for the entire tumor and ρ=0.52, P=0.008 for the high flow area, respectively). PASL (ρ=0.66, P=0.0002), Ktrans (ρ=0.61, P=0.001), and Kep (ρ=0.64, P=0.0006) also correlated with MVD in high and low perfusion areas in ccRCC. Conclusions PASL correlate with the DCE-derived measures of vascular permeability and flow, Ktrans and Kep, in renal masses >2cm in size. Both measures correlate to MVD in clear cell histology. MICROABSTRACT Arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been proposed to quantitatively assess vascularity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However there are intrinsic differences between these two imaging methods, such as the relative contribution of vascular permeability

  5. Glomerular filtration rate and renal volume in dogs with congenital portosystemic vascular anomalies before and after surgical ligation.

    PubMed

    Deppe, T A; Center, S A; Simpson, K W; Erb, H N; Randolph, J F; Dykes, N L; Yeager, A E; Reynolds, A J

    1999-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal volume were evaluated in dogs with confirmed portosystemic vascular anomalies (PSVA) before and after surgical ligation of their PSVA. Pre- and postligation CBC, serum biochemistry, urinalysis, abdominal ultrasonography with measurement of renal volume, and per rectal scintigraphy were performed to document resolution of abnormalities consistent with portosystemic shunting. GFR was estimated by plasma 99mTc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA) clearance before (n = 21) and after (n = 12) surgical correction of PSVA. Preligation 99mTc-DTPA GFR was increased (median, 5.64 mL/minute/kg; range, 3.53-8.49 mL/minute/kg; reference range, 2.83-4.47 mL/minute/kg) in 81% (17/21) of dogs. Postligation 99mTc-DTPA GFR decreased in all 12 evaluated dogs (median change = -42%; P < .001). Preligation renal volume was above the reference range for the left and right kidneys in 71% (10/14) and 69% (11/16) of dogs evaluated, respectively. Right renal volume decreased significantly (n = 5; median change, -45%; P = .03) after surgical ligation of PSVA. These findings document increased GFR and renal volume in dogs with PSVA, which may explain in part the low blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine concentrations encountered in these dogs. Knowledge of changes in GFR associated with PSVA ligation may prove helpful in the anesthetic, drug, and dietary management of affected dogs.

  6. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  7. Involvement of Inflammation and Adverse Vascular Remodelling in the Blood Pressure Raising Effect of Repeatedly Heated Palm Oil in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chun-Yi; Kamisah, Yusof; Faizah, Othman; Jubri, Zakiah; Qodriyah, Hj Mohd Saad; Jaarin, Kamsiah

    2012-01-01

    Oil thermoxidation during deep frying generates harmful oxidative free radicals that induce inflammation and increase the risk of hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeatedly heated palm oil on blood pressure, aortic morphometry, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: control, fresh palm oil (FPO), one-time-heated palm oil (1HPO), five-time-heated palm oil (5HPO), or ten-time-heated palm oil (10HPO). Feeding duration was six months. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and monthly using tail-cuff method. After six months, the rats were sacrificed and the aortic arches were dissected for morphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. FPO group showed significantly lower blood pressure than all other groups. Blood pressure was increased significantly in 5HPO and 10HPO groups. The aortae of 5HPO and 10HPO groups showed significantly increased thickness and area of intima-media, circumferential wall tension, and VCAM-1 than other groups. Elastic lamellae were disorganised and fragmented in 5HPO- and 10HPO-treated rats. VCAM-1 expression showed a significant positive correlation with blood pressure. In conclusion, prolonged consumption of repeatedly heated palm oil causes blood pressure elevation, adverse remodelling, and increased VCAM-1, which suggests a possible involvement of inflammation. PMID:22778962

  8. Heart rate variables in the Vascular Quality Initiative are not reliable predictors of adverse cardiac outcomes or mortality after major elective vascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Scali, Salvatore; Bertges, Daniel; Neal, Daniel; Patel, Virendra; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Cronenwett, Jack; Beck, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Heart rate (HR) parameters are known indicators of cardiovascular complications after cardiac surgery, but there is little evidence of their role in predicting outcome after major vascular surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arrival HR (AHR) and highest intraoperative HR are associated with mortality or major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) after elective vascular surgery in the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI). Methods Patients undergoing elective lower extremity bypass (LEB), aortofemoral bypass (AFB), and open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the VQI were analyzed. MACE was defined as any postoperative myocardial infarction, dysrhythmia, or congestive heart failure. Controlled HR was defined as AHR <75 beats/min on operating room arrival. Delta HR (DHR) was defined as highest intraoperative HR – AHR Procedure-specific MACE models were derived for risk stratification, and generalized estimating equations were used to account for clustering of center effects. HR, beta-blocker exposure, cardiac risk, and their interactions were explored to determine association with MACE or 30-day mortality. A Bonferroni correction with P < .004 was used to declare significance. Results There were 13,291 patients reviewed (LEB, n = 8155 [62%]; AFB, n = 2629 [18%]; open AAA, n = 2629 [20%]). Rates of any preoperative beta-blocker exposure were as follows: LEB, 66.5% (n = 5412); AFB, 57% (n = 1342); and open AAA, 74.2% (n = 1949). AHR and DHR outcome association was variable across patients and procedures. AHR <75 beats/min was associated with increased postoperative myocardial infarction risk for LEB patients across all risk strata (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.9; P = .03), whereas AHR<75 beats/min was associated with decreased dysrhythmia risk (OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.28–0.63; P = .0001) and 30-day death (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.33–0.77; P = .001) in patients at moderate and high cardiac risk. These HR

  9. Osteopontin expression in vascular smooth muscle cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hironori; Honda, Hirokazu; Inada, Yoshifumi; Kato, Noriyuki; Kato, Kenichi; Kitazawa, Kozo; Sugisaki, Tetsuzo

    2006-06-01

    beta-glycerophosphate, a phosphate donor, and uremic sera induce osteopontin (OPN) expression in bovine vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, the correlations of serum phosphorus level with OPN expression, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level with OPN expression in humans have not previously been reported. The purpose of the current study is to compare the expression of OPN in VSMCs with clinical data in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The radial arteries of 33 patients (21 male and 12 female patients) were examined to determine the expression of OPN and collagen type I (Col I) by immunohistochemistry. The correlation of the expression of bone matrix proteins with clinical data was analyzed. Between the low-serum phosphorus (<6 mg/dL) group and high-serum phosphorus (> or =6 mg/dL) group, significant differences were detected in the expression of OPN (P = 0.0049) and the levels of BUN (P = 0.0005), serum phosphorus (P < 0.0001) and calcium x phosphorus products (P < 0.0001). Moreover, between the low-BUN (<70 mg/dL, N = 19) group and high-BUN (> or =70 mg/dL) group, significant differences were detected in the expression of OPN (P = 0.0039) and the levels of BUN (P = 0.0002), serum phosphorus (P = 0.0002) and calcium x phosphorus products (P = 0.0003). We have shown that hyperphosphatemia or azotemia is associated with the expression of OPN in VSMCs in patients with ESRD.

  10. COX-2 is involved in vascular oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction of renal interlobar arteries from obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Mercedes; Sánchez, Ana; Pilar Martínez, María; Benedito, Sara; López-Oliva, Maria-Elvira; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo; Prieto, Dolores

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is related to vascular dysfunction through inflammation and oxidative stress and it has been identified as a risk factor for chronic renal disease. In the present study, we assessed the specific relationships among reactive oxygen species (ROS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and endothelial dysfunction in renal interlobar arteries from a genetic model of obesity/insulin resistance, the obese Zucker rats (OZR). Relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh) were significantly reduced in renal arteries from OZR compared to their counterpart, the lean Zucker rat (LZR), suggesting endothelial dysfunction. Blockade of COX with indomethacin and with the selective blocker of COX-2 restored the relaxations to ACh in obese rats. Selective blockade of the TXA2/PGH2 (TP) receptor enhanced ACh relaxations only in OZR, while inhibition of the prostacyclin (PGI2) receptor (IP) enhanced basal tone and inhibited ACh vasodilator responses only in LZR. Basal production of superoxide was increased in arteries of OZR and involved NADPH and xanthine oxidase activation and NOS uncoupling. Under conditions of NOS blockade, ACh induced vasoconstriction and increased ROS generation that were augmented in arteries from OZR and blunted by COX-2 inhibition and by the ROS scavenger tempol. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) evoked both endothelium- and vascular smooth muscle (VSM)-dependent contractions, as well as ROS generation that was reduced by COX-2 inhibition. In addition, COX-2 expression was enhanced in both VSM and endothelium of renal arteries from OZR. These results suggest that increased COX-2-dependent vasoconstriction contributes to renal endothelial dysfunction through enhanced (ROS) generation in obesity. COX-2 activity is in turn upregulated by ROS.

  11. Ibuprofen-Induced Hypokalemia and Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis: A Patient's Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medications and Their Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Salter, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    We highlight a case of distal renal tubular acidosis secondary to ibuprofen and codeine use. Of particular interest in this case are the patient's perception of over-the-counter (OTC) medication use, her own OTC use prior to admission, and her knowledge of adverse reactions or side effects of these medications prior to taking them.

  12. Ibuprofen-Induced Hypokalemia and Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis: A Patient's Perceptions of Over-the-Counter Medications and Their Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    We highlight a case of distal renal tubular acidosis secondary to ibuprofen and codeine use. Of particular interest in this case are the patient's perception of over-the-counter (OTC) medication use, her own OTC use prior to admission, and her knowledge of adverse reactions or side effects of these medications prior to taking them. PMID:24829833

  13. Effects of Fetal and Neonatal Murine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Infusion on MicroRNA-145 Expression in Renal Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in MRL/lpr Mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, C; Liu, X Y; Wan, W Q; Yi, Z W

    2015-10-01

    For patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus, current medications are insufficient to control their condition, and new treatments are necessary. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of fetal and neonatal murine peripheral blood (FNPB) mononuclear cells and their impact on microRNA-145 (miR-145) in renal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. MRL/lpr mice aged 20 weeks were randomized to 3 groups of 15 (control group, radiation group, infusion group). The renal tissues were subjected to pathological examination. In situ hybridization assay was applied to measure miR-145 expression in renal vessels of MRL/lpr mice. The infusion group had significantly better results for pathological renal tissue lesions than either the control or radiation group. In MRL/lpr mice, there was positive expression of miR-145 in renal VSMCs, although the expression of miR-145 was not discernible in renal vascular intima and adventitia. The miR-145 expression in renal VSMCs in the infusion group was significantly higher than in the control or radiation group, and higher in the radiation group than in the control group; however, the difference was not statistically significant. The increased expression of miR-145 in renal VSMCs might be one of the mechanisms supporting FNPB as a therapy for lupus nephritis; it also suggests that the miR-145 in renal vessels might be a new target for treatment of lupus nephritis.

  14. [Temporary vascular access for extra-renal detoxification: utilization of tunneled silicone double-lumen catheters by the percutaneous route].

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Chazot, C; Vanel, T

    1994-01-01

    Femoral or subclavian central venous catheters are commonly used for temporary vascular access in haemodialysis. We used 36 tunnelized siliconed double lumen catheter (Quinton Permcath or Hickman Bard), most of them in right internal jugular percutaneously. Indication for this catheter were acute or chronic renal failure, plasma exchange, rescue of arterio venous fistula or peritoneal dialysis. Insertion incidents were minors (local haematoma), mean functional time was 51 days. Catheters were changed in 5 cases of infection, 3 cases of obstruction and in 2 accidental remove. Insertion facility, low morbidity, potentially long time use, high blood flow rate with low recirculation argue for this expensive material.

  15. [Long-term development of Permacath Quinton catheters used as a vascular access route for extra-renal detoxification].

    PubMed

    Dupont, D; Morinière, P; Pourchez, T; el Esper, N; Fournier, A

    1994-01-01

    Between July 1984 and July 1991, we have inserted surgically 147 Permcath Quinton catheters in 126 uremic patients for the following reasons: group I: necessity of hemodialysis without vascular access for acute (group Ia: 44 patients) or chronic renal failure (group Ib: 11 patients); group II: difficulty of creation or loss of vascular access (group II: 45 patients); group III: hemodialysis for patients with short life expectation or contraindications for vascular access on their limbs (group III: 26 patients). The duration of use (+/- SD and range) were respectively for each group: 1.6 +/- 2 (0-10); 3.4 +/- 2.8 (1-11); 7.4 +/- 11 (0-50); 6.7 +/- 8.7 (0.1-34.5) months. Seventeen patients (group IV) coming from groups Ib and II preferred to go on with the use of their catheter for 10.5 +/- 13.5 (0.1-50) months rather than to use their arteriovenous fistula. The complications observed on whole population were: 11 septicemia responsible of 2 deaths, 9 cutaneous local infections, 28 total obstructions of the catheter, 17 partial obstructions with insufficient flow; 10 destructions of the catheter. In conclusion the Permcath Quinton catheter is an adequate long term vascular access for hemodialysis. It is well tolerated since it is preferred to the usual arteriovenous fistula by many patients who have both. The incidence of infection is low. However, obstruction (partial ou total) is frequent (29%), necessitating local fibrinolytic treatment.

  16. Nitric Oxide Bioavailability and Its Potential Relevance to the Variation in Susceptibility to the Renal and Vascular Complications in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Kenneth A.; Harry, Diane; Madhavi, Mitra; Zitouni, Karima; Barron, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—We compared the renal and systemic vascular (renovascular) response to a reduction of bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) in type 2 diabetic patients without nephropathy and of African and Caucasian heritage. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Under euglycemic conditions, renal blood flow was determined by a constant infusion of paraminohippurate and changes in blood pressure and renal vascular resistance estimated before and after an infusion of l-Ng-monomethyl-l-arginine. RESULTS—In the African-heritage group, there was a significant fall in renal blood flow (Δ−46.0 ml/min per 1.73 m2; P < 0.05) and rise in systolic blood pressure (Δ10.0 mmHg [95% CI 2.3–17.9]; P = 0.017), which correlated with an increase in renal vascular resistance (r2 = 0.77; P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS—The renal vasoconstrictive response associated with NO synthase inhibition in this study may be of relevance to the observed vulnerability to renal injury in patients of African heritage. PMID:18945925

  17. Vascular smooth muscle G(q) signaling is involved in high blood pressure in both induced renal and genetic vascular smooth muscle-derived models of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harris, David M; Cohn, Heather I; Pesant, Stéphanie; Zhou, Rui-Hai; Eckhart, Andrea D

    2007-11-01

    More than 30% of the US population has high blood pressure (BP), and less than a third of people treated for hypertension have it controlled. In addition, the etiology of most high BP is not known. Having a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying hypertension could potentially increase the effectiveness of treatment. Because G(q) signaling mediates vasoconstriction and vascular function can cause BP abnormalities, we were interested in determining the role of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) G(q) signaling in two divergent models of hypertension: a renovascular model of hypertension through renal artery stenosis and a genetic model of hypertension using mice with VSM-derived high BP. Inhibition of VSM G(q) signaling attenuated BP increases induced by renal artery stenosis to a similar extent as losartan, an ANG II receptor blocker and current antihypertensive therapy. Inhibition of G(q) signaling also attenuated high BP in our genetic VSM-derived hypertensive model. In contrast, BP remained elevated 25% following treatment with losartan, and prazosin, an alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, only decreased BP by 35%. Inhibition of G(q) signaling attenuated VSM reactivity to ANG II and resulted in a 2.4-fold rightward shift in EC(50). We also determined that inhibition of G(q) signaling was able to reverse VSM hypertrophy in the genetic VSM-derived hypertensive model. These results suggest that G(q) signaling is an important signaling pathway in two divergent models of hypertension and, perhaps, optimization of antihypertensive therapy could occur with the identification of particular G(q)-coupled receptors involved.

  18. Association Between Vascular Access Dysfunction and Subsequent Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients on Hemodialysis: A Population-Based Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Tseng, Chien-Tzu; Lin, Wei-Hung; Chao, Jo-Yen; Wang, Wei-Ming; Li, Chung-Yi; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    The association between dialysis vascular access dysfunction and the risk of developing major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in hemodialysis patients is unclear and has not yet been investigated. We analyzed data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to quantify this association. Adopting a case-control design nested within a cohort of patients who received hemodialysis from 2001 to 2010, we identified 9711 incident cases of MACE during the stage of stable maintenance dialysis and 19,422 randomly selected controls matched to cases on age, gender, and duration of dialysis. Events of vascular access dysfunction in the 6-month period before the date of MACE onset (ie, index date) for cases and before index dates for controls were evaluated retrospectively. The presence of vascular access dysfunction was associated with a 1.385-fold higher odds of developing MACE as estimated from the logistic regression analysis. This represents a significantly increased adjusted odds ratio (OR) at 1.268 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.186-1.355) after adjustment for comorbidities and calendar years of initiating dialysis. We also noted a significant exposure-response trend (P < 0.001) between the frequency of vascular access dysfunction and MACE, with the greatest risk (adjusted OR = 1.840, 95% CI = 1.549-2.186) noted in patients with ≥3 vascular access events. We concluded that dialysis vascular access dysfunction was significantly associated with an increased risk of MACE. Hence, vascular access failure can be an early sign for MACE in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Active monitoring and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and related diseases, not merely managing vascular access dysfunction, would be required to reduce the risk of MACE.

  19. Differential changes in vascular mRNA levels between rat iliac and renal arteries produced by cessation of voluntary running.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Roberts, Michael D; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Martin, Jeffrey S; Laughlin, M Harold; Booth, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    Early vascular changes at the molecular level caused by adoption of a sedentary lifestyle are incompletely characterized. Herein, we employed the rodent wheel-lock model to identify mRNAs in the arterial wall that are responsive to the acute transition from higher to lower levels of daily physical activity. Specifically, we evaluated whether short-term cessation of voluntary wheel running alters vascular mRNA levels in rat conduit arteries previously reported to have marked increases (i.e. iliac artery) versus marked decreases (i.e. renal artery) in blood flow during running. We used young female Wistar rats with free access to voluntary running wheels. Following 23 days of voluntary running (average distance of ∼15 km per night; ∼4.4 h per night), rats in one group were rapidly transitioned to a sedentary state by locking the wheels for 7 days (n = 9; wheel-lock 7 day rats) or remained active in a second group for an additional 7 days (n = 9; wheel-lock 0 day rats). Real-time PCR was conducted on total RNA isolated from iliac and renal arteries to evaluate expression of 25 pro-atherogenic and anti-atherogenic genes. Compared with the iliac arteries of wheel-lock 0 day rats, iliac arteries of wheel-lock 7 day rats exhibited increased expression of TNFR1 (+19%), ET1 (+59%) and LOX-1 (+31%; all P < 0.05). Moreover, compared with renal arteries of wheel-lock 0 day rats, renal arteries of wheel-lock 7 day rats exhibited decreased expression of ETb (-23%), p47phox (-32%) and p67phox (-19%; all P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that cessation of voluntary wheel running for 7 days produces modest, but differential changes in mRNA levels between the iliac and renal arteries of healthy rats. This heterogeneous influence of short-term physical inactivity could be attributed to the distinct alteration in haemodynamic forces between arteries.

  20. [Role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 on vascular calcification in rats with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J X; Xu, J S; Han, Y Y; Bai, Y L; Cui, L W; Zhang, H R; Zhang, S L

    2017-02-14

    Objective: To explore the role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) on vascular calcification in chronic renal failure rats. Methods: Nineteen male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operated group (n=6), 5/6 Nephrectomy (Nx) group (n=6), 5/6 Nx+ calcitriol group (n=7). Vascular calcification was determined by von Kossa staining and orthocresolphthalein complexone (OCPC) method. Protein expressions of NFATc1 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) in aortas were measured by immunohistochemistry.In vitro, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were primarily cultured and calcification was induced by β-glycerophosphate (β-GP). These cells were then randomly divided into control group, calcification group (10 mmol/L β-GP) and cyclosporin A (CsA) intervention group (10 mmol/L β-GP+ 1 μg/ml CsA). Calcium deposition was measured by Alizarin red staining and OCPC method; alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to observe the mRNA and protein expression of VSMCs NFATc1 and Runx2 respectively. Results: Compared to that in sham-operated and 5/6 Nx group, the expression of NFATc1 was obviously up-regulated in 5/6 Nx+ calcitriol group (7.20±0.46 vs 1.52±0.77, 2.04±1.31, P<0.05). In vitro, VSMCs calcification was successfully induced by high phosphorus environment, and RT-PCR and Western blotting showed that the expressions of NFATc1 and Runx2 were up-regulated (P<0.05). The calcification level in CsA intervention group was lower than that in calcification group [(60.86±7.95) vs (107.20±11.07) mg/g, P<0.05], and expression of Runx2 (mRNA and protein level) and ALP activity [(48.63±3.02) vs (98.75±3.46) U/g, P<0.05] decreased as well. Conclusion: NFATc1 contributes to accelerating vascular calcification in rat with chronic renal failure, the possible mechanism of which is that NFATc1 promotes VSMCs transformation to

  1. The ability of pretransplant test-dose pharmacokinetic profiles to reduce early adverse events after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kahan, B D; Welsh, M; Rutzky, L; Lewis, R; Knight, R; Katz, S; Napoli, K; Grevel, J; Van Buren, C T

    1992-02-01

    Pretransplant test-dose pharmacokinetic profiles were used to determine individual cyclosporine drug bioavailability and clearance rates in renal transplant patients. Assuming a linear relation between dose and area under the concentration curve (AUC), starting i.v. and p.o. CsA doses were computed from the test-dose results. Target values were 400 ng/ml steady-state concentration (Css) during continuous intravenous infusion, and 500 ng/ml average drug concentration (Cavss = AUC/dosing interval) after oral administration, based upon measurements with the specific monoclonal antibody 3H-tracer radioimmunoassay. The outcomes after dose individualization with a 1-(n = 32), 2-(n = 38), or 3-(n = 41) hr i.v. infusion test dose and a p.o. test dose (n = 111) were compared with 228 historical control patients who received a uniform protocol of CsA i.v. at 2.5 mg/kg/day and p.o. at 14 mg/kg/day. The observed Css after i.v. CsA was within 10% of the target concentration in 73% of recipients tested with the 3-hr protocol, a significantly greater fraction than achieved with either the uniform dose (14%), or the 1-(34%) and 2-(25%) hr protocols. Patients in the 3-hr protocol group showed reduced incidences of delayed graft function, early graft loss, and rejection episodes, and a lower mean serum creatinine value, particularly at 7 but also at 30 days posttransplantation. Administration of the predicted oral dose produced a peak concentration of greater than or equal to 700 ng/ml drug absorption in 60% of recipients at 3 days, 90% at 5 days, and 98% at 7 days. The test-dose method less effectively predicted the appropriate oral CsA dose to produce target Cssav and failed to reduce the 90-day rejection incidence. Despite its limitations with the more-complicated p.o. route, the test-dose method successfully predicts i.v. CsA doses, thereby reducing the incidence of early adverse events.

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor inhibitors in the treatment of renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Roskoski, Robert

    2017-03-19

    One Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene is lost in most renal cell carcinomas while the nondeleted allele exhibits hypermethylation-induced inactivation or inactivating somatic mutations. As a result of these genetic modifications, there is an increased production of VEGF-A and pro-angiogenic growth factors in this disorder. The important role of angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of renal cell carcinomas and other tumors has focused the attention of investigators on the biology of VEGFs and VEGFR1-3 and to the development of inhibitors of the intricate and multifaceted angiogenic pathways. VEGFR1-3 contain an extracellular segment with seven immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane segment, a juxtamembrane segment, a protein kinase domain with an insert of about 70 amino acid residues, and a C-terminal tail. VEGF-A stimulates the activation of preformed VEGFR2 dimers by the auto-phosphorylation of activation segment tyrosines followed by the phosphorylation of additional protein-tyrosines that recruit phosphotyrosine binding proteins thereby leading to signalling by the ERK1/2, AKT, Src, and p38 MAP kinase pathways. VEGFR1 modulates the activity of VEGFR2, which is the chief pathway in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. VEGFR3 and its ligands (VEGF-C and VEGF-D) are involved primarily in lymphangiogenesis. Small molecule VEGFR1/2/3 inhibitors including axitinib, cabozantinib, lenvatinib, sorafenib, sunitinib, and pazopanib are approved by the FDA for the treatment of renal cell carcinomas. Most of these agents are type II inhibitors of VEGFR2 and inhibit the so-called DFG-Aspout inactive enzyme conformation. These drugs are steady-state competitive inhibitors with respect to ATP and like ATP they form hydrogen bonds with the hinge residues that connect the small and large protein kinase lobes. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, is also approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinomas. Resistance to these agents invariably occurs

  3. Associations between Tumor Vascularity, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and PET/MRI Radiomic Signatures in Primary Clear-Cell-Renal-Cell-Carcinoma: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qingbo; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Li; Lin, Weili; Fielding, Julia R; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Khandani, Amir H; Woods, Michael E; Milowsky, Matthew I; Brooks, Samira A; Wallen, Eric M; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-03-03

    Studies have shown that tumor angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor growth, proliferation and metastasis. Also, tumor angiogenesis is an important prognostic factor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), as well as a factor in guiding treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Here, we attempted to find the associations between tumor angiogenesis and radiomic imaging features from PET/MRI. Specifically, sparse canonical correlation analysis was conducted on 3 feature datasets (i.e., radiomic imaging features, tumor microvascular density (MVD), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression) from 9 patients with primary ccRCC. In order to overcome the potential bias of intratumoral heterogeneity of angiogenesis, this study investigated the relationship between regional expressions of angiogenesis and VEGF, and localized radiomic features from different parts within the tumors. Our study highlighted the significant strong correlations between radiomic features and MVD, and also demonstrated that the spatiotemporal features extracted from DCE-MRI provided stronger radiomic correlation to MVD than the textural features extracted from Dixon sequences and FDG PET. Furthermore, PET/MRI, which takes advantage of the combined functional and structural information, had higher radiomics correlation to MVD than solely utilizing PET or MRI alone.

  4. Associations between Tumor Vascularity, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and PET/MRI Radiomic Signatures in Primary Clear-Cell–Renal-Cell-Carcinoma: Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qingbo; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Li; Lin, Weili; Fielding, Julia R.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Khandani, Amir H.; Woods, Michael E.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Brooks, Samira A.; Wallen, Eric. M.; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that tumor angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor growth, proliferation and metastasis. Also, tumor angiogenesis is an important prognostic factor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), as well as a factor in guiding treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Here, we attempted to find the associations between tumor angiogenesis and radiomic imaging features from PET/MRI. Specifically, sparse canonical correlation analysis was conducted on 3 feature datasets (i.e., radiomic imaging features, tumor microvascular density (MVD), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression) from 9 patients with primary ccRCC. In order to overcome the potential bias of intratumoral heterogeneity of angiogenesis, this study investigated the relationship between regional expressions of angiogenesis and VEGF, and localized radiomic features from different parts within the tumors. Our study highlighted the significant strong correlations between radiomic features and MVD, and also demonstrated that the spatiotemporal features extracted from DCE-MRI provided stronger radiomic correlation to MVD than the textural features extracted from Dixon sequences and FDG PET. Furthermore, PET/MRI, which takes advantage of the combined functional and structural information, had higher radiomics correlation to MVD than solely utilizing PET or MRI alone. PMID:28256615

  5. Calcineurin-inhibition Results in Upregulation of Local Renin and Subsequent Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Production in Renal Collecting Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Sziksz, Erna; Pap, Domonkos; Balicza-Himer, Leonóra; Boros, Szilvia; Magda, Balázs; Vannay, Ádám; Kis-Petik, Katalin; Fekete, Andrea; Peti-Peterdi, János; Szabó, Attila J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tacrolimus (Tac) and Cyclosporine A (CyA) calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) are 2 effective immunosuppressants which are essential to prevent allograft rejection. Calcineurin inhibitors are known to be nephrotoxic. However, the precise mechanism of nephrotoxicity is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of CNIs on the local renal renin-angiotensin system in the collecting duct (CD). Methods Three-week-old mice were treated with either vehicle, CyA (2 mg/kg per day), Tac (0.075 mg/kg per day), CyA + Aliskiren (25 mg/kg per day), or Tac + Aliskiren for 3 weeks. Serum creatinine was measured. Renin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contents in CD were evaluated with flow cytometry and multiphoton microscopy. The diameter of vessels was assessed with multiphoton microscopy, and the amount of renal collagen was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Masson staining. Results The elevated level of serum creatinine in CNI groups was abolished by Aliskiren. Flow cytometric analysis found elevated renin content in principal cells, which was prevented by Aliskiren. This result was further confirmed with multiphoton microscopy. The VEGF content in CD correlated with reduced capillary diameter and with the formation of fibrotic islands. Conclusions Calcineurin inhibitors induce production of renin in the CD that may contribute to decreased renal blood flow. In turn, CD responds with increased VEGF production, resulting in disproportional vessel growth, further worsening the local hypoxia and striped fibrosis surrounding the CDs. Aliskiren, a direct renin inhibitor blocks these effects and improves CNI-induced nephropathy by decreasing renin production in the CDs. Our data suggest that Aliskiren may be used for the prevention of CNI nephrotoxicity. PMID:26502369

  6. Spectral imaging of microvascular function in a renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a vascular disrupting agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; deDeugd, Casey; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-02-01

    Tumors are highly metabolically active and thus require ample oxygen and nutrients to proliferate. Neovasculature generated by angiogenesis is required for tumors to grow beyond a size of about 1-2mm. Functional tumor vasculature also provides an access point for development of distant metastases. Due to the importance of the microvasculature for tumor growth, proliferation, and metastasis, the microvasculature has emerged as a therapeutic target for treatment of solid tumors. We employed spectral imaging in a rodent window chamber model to observe and measure the oxygen transport function of tumor microvasculature in a human renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a fast acting vascular disrupting agent. Human Caki-1 cells were grown in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber in athymic nude mice. Spectral imaging was used to measure hemoglobin saturation immediately before, immediately after and also at 2, 4, 6, 8, 24 and 48 hours after administration of the tubulin binding agent OXi4503. Up to 4 hours after treatment, tumor microvasculature was disrupted from the tumor core towards the periphery as seen in deoxygenation as well as structural changes of the vasculature. Reoxygenation and neovascularization commenced from the periphery towards the core from 6 - 48 hours after treatment. The timing of the effects of vascular disrupting agents can influence scheduling of repeat treatments and combinatorial treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Spectral imaging can potentially provide this information in certain laboratory models from endogenous signals with microvessel resolution.

  7. Recovery of renal function after administration of adipose-tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction in rat model of acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chunwoo; Jang, Myoung Jin; Kim, Bo Hyun; Park, Jin Young; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2017-03-10

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major challenge in critical care medicine. The purpose of this study is to determine the therapeutic effects of the adipose-tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and the optimal route for SVF delivery in a rat model of AKI induced by I/R injury. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (10 animals per group): sham, nephrectomy control, I/R injury control, renal arterial SVF infusion and subcapsular SVF injection. To induce AKI by I/R injury, the left renal artery was clamped with a nontraumatic vascular clamp for 40 min, and the right kidney was removed. Rats receiving renal arterial infusion of SVF had a significantly reduced increase in serum creatinine compared with the I/R injury control group at 4 days after I/R injury. The glomerular filtration rate of the renal arterial SVF infusion group was maintained at a level similar to that of the sham and nephrectomy control groups at 14 days after I/R injury. Masson's trichrome staining showed significantly less fibrosis in the renal arterial SVF infusion group compared with that in the I/R injury control group in the outer stripe (P < 0.001). TUNEL labeling showed significantly decreased apoptosis in both the renal arterial SVF infusion and subcapsular SVF injection groups compared with the I/R injury control group in the outer stripe (P < 0.001). Thus, renal function is effectively rescued from AKI induced by I/R injury through the renal arterial administration of SVF in a rat model.

  8. Systemic and renal vascular responses to dietary calcium and vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Zawada, E T; TerWee, J A; McClung, D E

    1986-11-01

    To assess the consequences of hypercalcemia on systemic and renal hemodynamics, vasoactive hormones, and water and electrolyte excretion in intact, conscious mongrel dogs, measurements in 10 dogs receiving 100 mg/kg calcium gluconate and 10,000 U/kg vitamin D daily for 2 weeks were compared with measurements made in 10 time-control dogs not receiving calcium or vitamin D. Hypercalcemia induced by dietary supplementation with calcium and vitamin D resulted in profoundly reduced glomerular filtration rate (40 vs 78 ml/min in controls; p less than 0.005), estimated renal plasma flow (145 vs 267 ml/min in controls; p less than 0.005), and renal blood flow (254 vs 441 ml/min in controls; p less than 0.005). Renal resistance was significantly increased in the hypercalcemic dogs (0.57 +/- 0.07 vs 0.28 +/- 0.01 mm Hg/ml/min; p less than 0.005). Hypercalcemia also resulted in increased fractional excretion of water (4.8 vs 1.4% in controls; p less than 0.005), sodium (1.4 vs 0.6% in controls; p less than 0.005), calcium (1.7 vs 0.7% in controls; p less than 0.01), and magnesium (10.2 vs 4.1% in controls; p less than 0.005). Systolic blood pressure (160 vs 172 mm Hg in controls; p less than 0.05) and stroke volume were lower (0.024 vs 0.036 L/beat in controls; p less than 0.005) in hypercalcemic dogs, presumably because of the diuresis, while total peripheral resistance was higher (36 vs 31 mm Hg/L/min; p less than 0.05) in controls. Magnesium levels were significantly lower in the experimental group (1.3 vs 1.7 mg/dl in controls; p less than 0.0005). Aldosterone levels, plasma renin activity, and urinary prostaglandin excretion were not significantly affected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Increased diuresis, renal vascular reactivity, and blood pressure levels in young rats fed high sodium, moderately high fructose, or their association: a comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Rita de Cássia Vilhena A F; de Souza, Priscila; da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    Excessive intakes of sodium or fructose have been described as risk factors for hypertension. We hypothesized that even a moderately high fructose diet (6% fructose), either alone or in combination with high sodium (4% NaCl), may impair diuresis and renal and systemic vascular reactivity, contributing to the onset of high blood pressure in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed chow containing 4% NaCl (HS), 6% fructose (MHF), or both 4% NaCl and 6% fructose (HSMHF) for 6 weeks and had their diuresis, plasma creatinine, vascular reactivity of perfused kidneys and systemic arterial pressure evaluated. We found no differences in augmented diuresis among animals given HS, MHF, or HSMHF diets. After 6 weeks both the HS and HSMHF groups had increased weight in their left kidneys, but only the HSMHF group showed augmented plasma creatinine. The effects of phenylephrine on renal vascular perfusion pressure were similarly enhanced in kidneys from the HS, MHF, and HSMHF groups, but not on the systemic arterial pressure. Although when evaluated in anesthetized rats, only the HSMHF group presented augmented blood pressure, evaluation in conscious animals revealed that both the MHF and HSMHF diets, but not the HS alone, were able to induce tachycardia and hypertension. In conclusion, a MHF diet containing 6% fructose was enough to render the renal vascular bed hyperreactive to phenylephrine and to induce both hypertension and tachycardia. The combination of 6% fructose with 4% NaCl led to plasma accumulation of creatinine and accelerated the development of tachycardia.

  10. Curative effect and safety of vascularized fibula grafting in renal transplant recipients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y J; Jin, D X; Zhang, C Q; Chen, S B; Sheng, J G; Lee, H S; Zhang, K G; Zeng, B F

    2009-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a common and severe complication after renal transplantation. It is characterized by deterioration of hip joint function, which impairs quality of life. We present 3 renal transplant case reports of patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head who underwent free vascularized fibular grafting at our hospital. Follow-up was from 1(1/2) to 2 years. All 3 patients exhibited good recovery with substantial improvement in joint function. Intraoperative and postoperative findings demonstrated the safety of this surgical procedure.

  11. The Impact of Blood Pressure Variability on Subclinical Ventricular, Renal and Vascular Dysfunction, in Patients with Hypertension and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    CIOBANU, Andrea O; GHERGHINESCU, Carmen Lucia; DULGHERU, Raluca; MAGDA, Stefania; DRAGOI GALRINHO, Ruxandra; FLORESCU, Maria; GUBERNA, Suzana; CINTEZA, Mircea; VINEREANU, Dragos

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Blood pressure variability (BPV) was proved as a cardiovascular risk factor. One of its mechanisms is related to arterial stiffness and ventriculo-arterial coupling; however its impact on subclinical cardiovascular dysfunction has not been evaluated yet. Objectives: To assess the relationship between BPV on 24 hours, and subclinical left ventricle (LV), renal, and vascular dysfunction in diabetic and hypertensive patients. Material and methods: We studied 56 patients (57±9 years, 29 men) with mild-to-moderate hypertension and type 2 diabetes, no cardiovascular disease, normal ejection fraction and normal renal function. 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was used to assess BPV, daytime (d) and night time (n), by: 1. mean (M); 2. standard deviation of mean (SD); 3. variance (Vr); 4. coefficient of variation (CV); 5. day/night variation: reverse dippers, non-dippers, dippers and extreme dippers; conventional and 2D speckle tracking echo to assess LV function; myocardial deformation was measured as global longitudinal strain (GLS). Endothelial (flow mediated dilation, FMD) and arterial function (intima media-thickness, IMT; pulse wave velocity, PWV), microalbuminuria were tested. Outcomes: Daytime BPV correlates inversely with subclinical myocardial function evaluated through GLS. Daytime systolic BPV correlates positively with IMT (all rho > 0.30, all p < 0.05). Also, there is a significantly inverse correlation between mean BP and GLS. We found a direct correlation between mean BP, but not BPV, and microalbuminuria (all rho > - 0.30 and all p < 0.05). We found no correlation between BPV and FMD, PWV. There were no differences for GLS, microalbuminuria and FMD between dipper groups. Conclusions: In diabetic patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension, increased daytime blood pressure variability correlates with subclinical left ventricular dysfunction and arterial function (IMT), while microalbuminuria correlates with elevated

  12. Mesangial cell, glomerular and renal vascular responses to endothelin in the rat kidney. Elucidation of signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Badr, K F; Murray, J J; Breyer, M D; Takahashi, K; Inagami, T; Harris, R C

    1989-01-01

    this peptide in the control of mesangial cell function, glomerular filtration rate, and renal vascular tone. Images PMID:2536045

  13. Identification of Risk Factors for Vascular Thrombosis May Reduce Early Renal Graft Loss: A Review of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Anna Krarup; Jorgensen, Troels Munch; Jespersen, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Renal graft survival has improved over the past years, mainly owing to better immunosuppression. Vascular thrombosis, though rare, therefore accounts for up to one third of early graft loss. We assess current literature on transplantation, identify thrombosis risk factors, and discuss means of avoiding thrombotic events and saving thrombosed grafts. The incidence of arterial thrombosis was reported to 0.2–7.5% and venous thrombosis 0.1–8.2%, with the highest incidence among children and infants, and the lowest in living donor reports. The most significant risk factors for developing thrombosis were donor-age below 6 or above 60 years, or recipient-age below 5-6 years, per- or postoperative hemodynamic instability, peritoneal dialysis, diabetic nephropathy, a history of thrombosis, deceased donor, or >24 hours cold ischemia. Multiple arteries were not a risk factor, and a right kidney graft was most often reported not to be. Given the thrombosed kidney graft is diagnosed in time, salvage is possible by urgent reoperation and thrombectomy. Despite meticulous attentions to reduce thrombotic risk factors, thrombosis cannot be entirely prevented and means to an early detection of this complication is desirable in order to save the kidneys through prompt reoperation. Microdialysis may be a new tool for this. PMID:22701162

  14. The Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Vascular Biomarkers in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jeonggeun; Lee, Chan Joo; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kang, Seok-Min; Choi, Donghoon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and an important risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease. We investigated the impact of DM on subclinical CV damage by comprehensive screening protocol in ESRD patients. Materials and Methods Echocardiography, coronary computed tomography angiogram, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and central blood pressure with pulse wave velocity (PWV) were performed in 91 ESRD patients from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic disease Etiology Research Center-HIgh risk cohort. Results The DM group (n=38) had higher systolic blood pressure than the non-DM group (n=53), however, other clinical CV risk factors were not different between two groups. Central aortic systolic pressure (148.7±29.8 mm Hg vs. 133.7±27.0 mm Hg, p= 0.014), PWV (12.1±2.7 m/s vs. 9.4±2.1 m/s, p<0.001), and early mitral inflow to early mitral annulus velocity (16.7±6.4 vs. 13.7±5.9, p=0.026) were higher in the DM group. Although the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) was not different between the DM and the non-DM group (95% vs. 84.4%, p=0.471), the severity of CAD was higher in the DM group (p=0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, DM was an independent determinant for central systolic pressure (p=0.011), PWV (p<0.001) and the prevalence of CAD (p=0.046). Conclusion Diabetic ESRD patients have higher central systolic pressure and more advanced arteriosclerosis than the non-DM control group. These findings suggest that screening for subclinical CV damage may be helpful for diabetic ESRD patients. PMID:27873498

  15. Urinary potassium excretion and risk of developing hypertension: the prevention of renal and vascular end-stage disease study.

    PubMed

    Kieneker, Lyanne M; Gansevoort, Ron T; Mukamal, Kenneth J; de Boer, Rudolf A; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J L; Joosten, Michel M

    2014-10-01

    Previous prospective cohort studies on the association between potassium intake and risk of hypertension have almost exclusively relied on self-reported dietary data, whereas repeated 24-hour urine excretions, as estimate of dietary uptake, may provide a more objective and quantitative estimate of this association. Risk of hypertension (defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg or initiation of blood pressure-lowering drugs) was prospectively studied in 5511 normotensive subjects aged 28 to 75 years not using blood pressure-lowering drugs at baseline of the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease (PREVEND) study. Potassium excretion was measured in two 24-hour urine specimens at baseline (1997-1998) and midway during follow-up (2001-2003). Baseline median potassium excretion was 70 mmol/24 h (interquartile range, 57-85 mmol/24 h), which corresponds to a dietary potassium intake of ≈91 mmol/24 h. During a median follow-up of 7.6 years (interquartile range, 5.0-9.3 years), 1172 subjects developed hypertension. The lowest sex-specific tertile of potassium excretion (men: <68 mmol/24 h; women: <58 mmol/24 h) had an increased risk of hypertension after multivariable adjustment (hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.37), compared with the upper 2 tertiles (Pnonlinearity=0.008). The proportion of hypertension attributable to low potassium excretion was 6.2% (95% confidence interval, 1.7%-10.9%). No association was found between the sodium to potassium excretion ratio and risk of hypertension after multivariable adjustment. Low urinary potassium excretion was associated with an increased risk of developing hypertension. Dietary strategies to increase potassium intake to the recommended level of 90 mmol/d may have the potential to reduce the incidence of hypertension.

  16. Urinary magnesium excretion and risk of hypertension: the prevention of renal and vascular end-stage disease study.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Michel M; Gansevoort, Ron T; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E; Feskens, Edith J M; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2013-06-01

    Observational studies on dietary or circulating magnesium and risk of hypertension have reported weak-to-modest inverse associations, but have lacked measures of actual dietary uptake. Urinary magnesium excretion, an indicator of intestinal magnesium absorption, may provide a better insight in this association. We examined 5511 participants aged 28 to 75 years free of hypertension in the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease (PREVEND) study, a prospective population-based cohort study. Circulating magnesium was measured in plasma and urinary magnesium in two 24-hour urine collections, both at baseline. Incident hypertension was defined as blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg systolic or ≥90 mm Hg diastolic, or initiation of antihypertensive medication. During a median follow-up of 7.6 years (interquartile range, 5.0-9.3 years), 1172 participants developed hypertension. The median urinary magnesium excretion was 3.8 mmol/24 hour (interquartile range, 2.9-4.8 mmol/24 hour). Urinary magnesium excretion was associated with risk of hypertension in an inverse log-linear fashion, and this association remained after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, parental history of hypertension, and urinary excretion of sodium, potassium, and calcium. Each 1-unit increment in ln-transformed urinary magnesium excretion was associated with a 21% lower risk of hypertension after multivariable adjustment (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.88). No associations were observed between circulating magnesium and risk of hypertension. In conclusion, in this cohort of men and women, urinary magnesium excretion was inversely associated with risk of hypertension across the entire range of habitual dietary intake.

  17. The Relationship Between the Adverse Events and Efficacy of Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Study from Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Fuli; Wu, Guojun; Zhang, Longlong; Wang, Yangmin; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Li, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Lu, Xitao; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the adverse events and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), with a purpose to guide the judgment of efficacy in sorafenib treatment.Eighty-three mRCC patients who received sorafenib therapy at northwest China were studied retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) with adverse event types and grades.Among 83 patients who underwent sorafenib therapy, 2 cases (2.4%) had completed response (CR), 14 cases (16.9%) had partial response (PR), 57 cases (68.7%) had stable disease (SD), and 10 cases (12.0%) developed progressive disease (PD). The median PFS and OS were 15.0 and 29.0 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 1 or 2 adverse events included hand-foot syndrome (68.7%), diarrhea (54.2%), and alopecia (51.8%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (6.0%), hypertension (4.8%), and diarrhea (3.6%). The frequency and severity of adverse events correlated with tumor response rate (both with P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed the independent predictors of better PFS included rash (OR 0.307, 95%CI 0.148-0.636, P = 0.001) and diarrhea (OR 0.391, 95%CI 0.169-0.783, P = 0.008). Elevated transaminase was the independent predictor of poor PFS (OR 2.606, 95%CI 1.299-5.532, P = 0.012). For OS, rash (OR 0.473, 95%CI 0.253-0.886, P = 0.019) and diarrhea (OR 0.321, 95%CI 0.171-0.605, P = 0.000) correlated with better OS.Sorafenib-related adverse events are associated with efficacy in patients with mRCC from northwest China. Rash and diarrhea are independent protective factors of both PFS and OS, and elevated transaminase is an independent risk factor of PFS. A large prospective study is warranted.

  18. Effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on serum lipids and vascular inflammation in patients with end-stage renal disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tianhua; Sun, Yiting; Sun, Wei; Yao, Li; Sun, Li; Liu, Linlin; Ma, Jianfei; Wang, Lining

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (O3FAs) are associated with lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adults. However, this association in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains controversial prompting the need for investigation into the role of O3FAs on serum lipids and vascular inflammation markers. The present meta-analysis summarized the effects of O3FA supplementation on serum lipids and vascular inflammatory markers in patients with ESRD. PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on serum lipids and vascular inflammation markers in patients with ESRD. Standard mean differences (SMD) were used to measure the effect of O3FA supplementation on serum lipids and vascular inflammatory markers. The final pooled analysis included 20 RCTs involving 1,461 patients with ESRD. The results indicated that O3FA supplementation reduced TG by 0.61, LDL by 0.35 and CRP by 0.56. However, O3FA had no significant effect on TC, HDL, albumin, hemoglobin, homocysteine, DBP, glucose, lipoprotein(a), and ferritin. O3FA supplementation is associated with lower several serum lipids and vascular inflammation markers in patients with ESRD. PMID:28008943

  19. Origin of a common trunk for the inferior phrenic arteries from the right renal artery: a new anatomic vascular variant with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Topaz, On; Topaz, Allyne; Polkampally, Pritam R; Damiano, Thomas; King, Christopher A

    2010-01-01

    The inferior phrenic arteries constitute a pair of important vessels, supplying multiple organs including the diaphragm, adrenal glands, esophagus, stomach, liver, inferior vena cava, and retroperitoneum. The vast majority (80-90%) of inferior phrenic arteries originate as separate vessels with near equal frequency from either the abdominal aorta or the celiac trunk. Infrequently, the right and left inferior phrenic arteries can arise in the form of a common trunk from the aorta or from the celiac trunk. We herein present three patients with a new anatomic vascular variant: a common trunk of the inferior phrenic arteries arising from the right renal artery. In one case, the left inferior phrenic branch of the common trunk provided collaterals connecting with a supra-diaphragmatic branch of the left internal mammary artery and in another with the lateral wall of the pericardium. Angiographic identification of a common trunk for the inferior phrenic arteries arising from the right renal artery is important for proper diagnosis and clinical management. The presence of this unique vascular variant can impact revascularization of the renal arteries.

  20. Transcatheter Amplatzer vascular plug-embolization of a giant postnephrectomy arteriovenous fistula combined with an aneurysm of the renal pedicle by through-and-through, arteriovenous access.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Ole; Schäfer, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Although endovascular transcatheter embolization of arteriovenous fistulas is minimally invasive, the torrential flow prevailing within a fistula implies the risk of migration of the deployed embolization devices into the downstream venous and pulmonary circulation. We present the endovascular treatment of a giant postnephrectomy arteriovenous fistula between the right renal pedicle and the residual renal vein in a 63-year-old man. The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate that the Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) can be safely positioned to embolize even relatively large arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). Secondly, we illustrate that this occluder can even be introduced to the fistula via a transvenous catheter in cases where it is initially not possible to advance the deployment-catheter through a tortuous feeder artery. Migration of the vascular plug was ruled out at follow-up 4 months subsequently to the intervention. Thus, the Amplatzer vascular plug and the arteriovenous through-and-through guide wire access with subsequent transvenous deployment should be considered in similar cases.

  1. Comparison of human adipose stromal vascular fraction and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the attenuation of acute renal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liuhua; Song, Qun; Shen, Jiangwei; Xu, Luwei; Xu, Zheng; Wu, Ran; Ge, Yuzheng; Zhu, Jiageng; Wu, Jianping; Dou, Quanliang; Jia, Ruipeng

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells therapy has been suggested as a promising option for the treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI). This study was performed to compare the abilities of xenogenic transplantation of human adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) to facilitate the recovery of renal function and structure in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) induced AKI. SVF or AdMSCs were transplanted to the injured kidney through intra-parenchymal injection. Significantly improved renal function and reduced tubular injury were observed in SVF and AdMSCs groups. Administration of SVF or AdMSCs contributed to significantly improved cell proliferation and markedly reduced cell apoptosis in parallel with reduced microvascular rarefaction in injured kidney. IR injury resulted in higher levels of inflammatory cytokines, whereas xenogenic transplantation of SVF or AdMSCs reduced but not induced inflammatory cytokines expression. Additionally, in vitro study showed that administration of SVF or AdMSCs could also significantly promote the proliferation and survival of renal tubular epithelial cells underwent hypoxia/reoxygenation injury through secreting various growth factors. However, cell proliferation was significantly promoted in SVF group than in AdMSCs group. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that administration of SVF or AdMSCs was equally effective in attenuating acute renal IR injury. PMID:28276451

  2. Treatment options in advanced renal cell carcinoma after first-line treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Basappa, Naveen S.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) was introduced a decade ago and since then, a number of therapeutic options have been developed. Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy is the widely accepted first-line option for mRCC. After progression, treatment in the second-line setting has typically been with either axitinib or everolimus. However, with the advent of several new agents demonstrating efficacy in the second-line setting, including nivolumab, cabozantinib, and the combination of lenvatinib and everolimus, the treatment paradigm has shifted toward these novel therapies with improved patient outcomes. PMID:28096936

  3. The associations between five polymorphisms of vascular endothelial growth factor and renal cell carcinoma risk: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Shen, ChangXin; Fu, YouRong; Yu, Tian; Song, JingJing

    2017-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key mediator that plays an important role in angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. The associations between five polymorphisms of VEGF (rs3025039, rs699947, rs10434, rs1570360, and rs2010963) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk have been extensively investigated, but the currently available results are inconsistent and inconclusive. To obtain a more accurate assessment of the associations, we conducted a meta-analysis in this study. Materials and methods Relevant studies were collected systemically from the following three electronic databases: MEDLINE, Web of Science, and CNKI (Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure). Statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.2 in a fixed- or random-effects model. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to establish the strength of associations. Results A total of eight case–control studies with 1,936 RCC cases and 2,770 controls fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected for this meta-analysis. The pooled OR indicated that rs699947 polymorphism was significantly associated with RCC risk in all genetic models. A significant association was also found between the rs3025039 polymorphism and RCC risk in a homozygous model (TT vs CC: OR =1.38, 95% CI =1.11–1.72, P=0.004), a dominant model (CT+TT vs CC: OR =1.21, 95% CI =1.05–1.39, P=0.01), and a recessive model (TT vs CC+CT: OR =1.28, 95% CI =1.04–1.57, P=0.02). After a subgroup analysis of ethnicity in the allele contrast model of rs3025039 polymorphism, we found a significant relationship in the allele contrast model (T vs C: OR =1.21, 95% CI =1.05–1.40, P=0.007) in the Asian population. With regard to rs10434 polymorphism, significant association was observed only in a homozygous model (GG vs AA: OR =0.75, 95% CI =0.57–0.98, P=0.03). As to rs1570360 or rs2010963, we did not observe any relationship between the two polymorphisms and RCC

  4. Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Predicts End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Feng-Jung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Jiang, Yi-Der; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Kao, Hsien-Li; Lin, Mao-Shin; Wei, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Hsin; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) participates in inflammation and catalyzes the deamination of primary amines into aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. We have shown that serum VAP-1 is higher in patients with diabetes and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and can predict cardiovascular mortality in subjects with diabetes. In this study, we investigated if serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD in diabetic subjects. Methods In this prospective cohort study, a total of 604 type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled between 1996 to 2003 at National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan, and were followed for a median of 12.36 years. The development of ESRD was ascertained by linking our database with the nationally comprehensive Taiwan Society Nephrology registry. Serum VAP-1 concentrations at enrollment were measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Results Subjects with serum VAP-1 in the highest tertile had the highest incidence of ESRD (p<0.001). Every 1-SD increase in serum VAP-1 was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.55 (95%CI 1.12–2.14, p<0.01) for the risk of ESRD, adjusted for smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, hypertension, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, total cholesterol, use of statins, ankle-brachial index, estimated GFR, and proteinuria. We developed a risk score comprising serum VAP-1, HbA1c, estimated GFR, and proteinuria, which could predict ESRD with good performance (area under the ROC curve = 0.9406, 95%CI 0.8871–0.9941, sensitivity = 77.3%, and specificity = 92.8%). We also developed an algorithm based on the stage of CKD and a risk score including serum VAP-1, which can stratify these subjects into 3 categories with an ESRD risk of 0.101%/year, 0.131%/year, and 2.427%/year, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD

  5. Effects of complement inhibition with soluble complement receptor-1 on vascular injury and inflammation during renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J R; Hibbs, M J; Laver, A J; Smith, R A; Sacks, S H

    1996-12-01

    Complement is both an effector of the humoral immune response and a stimulator of leukocyte activation. To examine the influence of complement on the allograft response, we inhibited complement using recombinant human soluble complement receptor-1 (sCR1; TP10), in an unsensitized model of rat renal allograft rejection. Lewis to DA renal transplant recipients were treated daily with 25 mg/kg sCR1 or saline and sacrificed on days 1 to 5 after transplant. Transplanted organs were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for leukocyte subset markers and for the third component of complement, C3, and membrane attack complex deposition. A second set of recipients was followed from day 5 to day 9 to assess graft survival. sCR1-treated recipients displayed > 90% inhibition of plasma complement activity and a marked reduction in tissue C3 and membrane attack complex deposition. Inactivation of complement reduced the vascular injury such that there was almost complete sparing of vascular damage in day 5 sCR1-treated rats. There was a significant reduction in infiltrating leukocytes by day 5 after transplant, and complement inhibition delayed the time to reach a histologically defined end point of graft survival from 5 days in controls to 9 days in the sCR1-treated group. These results imply that the vascular and cell-mediated injury arises, in part, from complement activation. The partial inhibition of these injuries by sCR1 may have functional implications for strategies to inhibit allograft rejection.

  6. Adverse Renal, Endocrine, Hepatic, and Metabolic Events during Maintenance Mood Stabilizer Treatment for Bipolar Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Louise; Walters, Kate; Geddes, John R.; King, Michael; Osborn, David P. J.

    2016-01-01

    0.73; p = 0.013) were also reduced relative to lithium. However, rates of greater than 15% weight gain on valproate, olanzapine, and quetiapine were higher (valproate HR 1.62; 95% CI 1.31–2.01; p < 0.001, olanzapine HR 1.84; 95% CI 1.47–2.30; p < 0.001, quetiapine HR 1.67; 95% CI 1.24–2.20; p < 0.001) than in individuals prescribed lithium, as were rates of hypertension in the olanzapine treated group (HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.06–1.87; p = 0.017). We found no significant difference in rates of chronic kidney disease stage 4 or more severe, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, or hepatotoxicity. Despite estimates being robust following sensitivity analyses, limitations include the potential for residual confounding and ascertainment bias and an inability to examine dosage effects. Conclusions Lithium use is associated with more renal and endocrine adverse events but less weight gain than commonly used alternative mood stabilizers. Risks need to be offset with the effectiveness and anti-suicidal benefits of lithium and the potential metabolic side effects of alternative treatment options. PMID:27483368

  7. Oxidative stress and modification of renal vascular permeability are associated with acute kidney injury during P. berghei ANKA infection.

    PubMed

    Elias, Rosa Maria; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Barreto, Claudiene Rodrigues; Silva, Reinaldo Correia; Hayashida, Caroline Y; Castoldi, Angela; Gonçalves, Giselle Martins; Braga, Tarcio Teodoro; Barboza, Renato; Rios, Francisco José; Keller, Alexandre Castro; Cenedeze, Marcos Antonio; Hyane, Meire Ioshie; D'Império-Lima, Maria Regina; Figueiredo-Neto, Antônio Martins; Reis, Marlene Antônia; Marinho, Cláudio Romero Farias; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2012-01-01

    Malaria associated-acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with 45% of mortality in adult patients hospitalized with severe form of the disease. However, the causes that lead to a framework of malaria-associated AKI are still poorly characterized. Some clinical studies speculate that oxidative stress products, a characteristic of Plasmodium infection, as well as proinflammatory response induced by the parasite are involved in its pathophysiology. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the development of malaria-associated AKI during infection by P. berghei ANKA, with special attention to the role played by the inflammatory response and the involvement of oxidative stress. For that, we took advantage of an experimental model of severe malaria that showed significant changes in the renal pathophysiology to investigate the role of malaria infection in the renal microvascular permeability and tissue injury. Therefore, BALB/c mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA. To assess renal function, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and ratio of proteinuria and creatininuria were evaluated. The products of oxidative stress, as well as cytokine profile were quantified in plasma and renal tissue. The change of renal microvascular permeability, tissue hypoxia and cellular apoptosis were also evaluated. Parasite infection resulted in renal dysfunction. Furthermore, we observed increased expression of adhesion molecule, proinflammatory cytokines and products of oxidative stress, associated with a decrease mRNA expression of HO-1 in kidney tissue of infected mice. The measurement of lipoprotein oxidizability also showed a significant increase in plasma of infected animals. Together, our findings support the idea that products of oxidative stress, as well as the immune response against the parasite are crucial to changes in kidney architecture and microvascular endothelial permeability of BALB/c mice infected with P. berghei ANKA.

  8. Endothelin-like action of Pausinystalia yohimbe aqueous extract on vascular and renal regional hemodynamics in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, A A; Newaz, M; Hercule, H; Saleh, M; Bode, C O; Oyekan, A O

    2003-12-01

    The bark of the African tree Pausinystalia yohimbe has been used as a food additive with aphrodisiac and penile erection enhancing properties. The effect of an aqueous extract of P. yohimbe (CCD-X) on renal circulation was assessed in order to test the hypothesis that it possesses additional effects on nitric oxide production and/or endothelin-1 (ET-1)-like actions. In vivo studies with CCD-X in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrated a dose-dependent (1-1000 ng/kg) increase in mean blood pressure (p < 0.001) and an increase in medullary blood flow (MBF) (p < 0.001). Both the pressor action and renal medullary vasodilation were blocked by endothelinA (ETA) receptor antagonist BMS182874 and endothelinB (ETB) receptor antagonist BQ788 in combination. L-Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 mg/kg) also inhibited the increase in MBF induced by CCD-X. In vitro studies in isolated perfused kidney and in pressurized renal microvessels confirmed the dose-dependent vasoconstrictor action of this extract. ETA receptor antagonist BQ610 and ETB receptor antagonist BQ788 separately and significantly attenuated the renal vasoconstrictor actions of the extract (p < 0.001 ANOVA). These preliminary observations indicate that, in addition to the alpha-adrenergic antagonist actions that characterize yohimbine, CCD-X possesses endothelin-like actions and affects nitric oxide (NO) production in renal circulation. These findings suggest a strong possibility of post-receptor cross-talk between alpha2-adrenoceptors and endothelin, as well as a direct effect of alpha2-adrenoceptors on renal NO production.

  9. Real-world use of pomalidomide and dexamethasone in double refractory multiple myeloma suggests benefit in renal impairment and adverse genetics: a multi-centre UK experience.

    PubMed

    Maciocia, Nicola; Melville, Andrew; Cheesman, Simon; Sharpley, Faye; Ramasamy, Karthik; Streetly, Matthew; Jenner, Matthew; Benjamin, Reuben; Schey, Steve; Maciocia, Paul; Popat, Rakesh; D'sa, Shirley; Rismani, Ali; Cerner, Aviva; Yong, Kwee; Rabin, Neil

    2017-03-01

    Myeloma patients who become refractory to immunomodulatory agents (IMiDs) and bortezomib have poor survival, with limited therapeutic options. Pomalidomide has shown improved survival and good tolerability in this patient cohort in clinical trials, but real world data are scarce. We retrospectively analysed all patients treated with pomalidomide at five UK centres between 2013 and 2016. Of 85 patients identified, 70 had sufficient information for response assessments. Median age was 66 years [40-89], 96·5% were refractory to IMiDs, 72·9% were refractory to both an IMiD and bortezomib and 92·9% were refractory to their last treatment. Of 45 patients with fluorescence in situ hybridization results 64% had adverse risk, 19 patients (22·4%) had an estimated glomerular filtration rate <45 ml/min. Grade ≥3 non-haematological toxicities occurred in 42·4%, and grade ≥3 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in 38% and 24% respectively, but only 18·8% had dose reductions. The overall response rate was 52·9%. At a median follow-up of 13·2 months, median progression-free survival was 5·2 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 4·150-6·238], and median overall survival was 13·7 months (95% CI 11·775-15·707). No significant difference was seen in response, survival or tolerability by renal function, age or cytogenetic risk. This real-world data support the results seen in published clinical trials.

  10. The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Cediranib (Recentin; AZD2171) Inhibits Endothelial Cell Function and Growth of Human Renal Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, Dietmar W. Brazelle, W.D.; Juergensmeier, Juliane M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine the therapeutic potential of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling inhibitor cediranib in a human model of renal cell carcinoma (Caki-1). Methods and Materials: The effects of cediranib treatment on in vitro endothelial cell function (proliferation, migration, and tube formation), as well as in vivo angiogenesis and tumor growth, were determined. Results: In vitro, cediranib significantly impaired the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and their ability to form tubes, but had no effect on the proliferation of Caki-1 tumor cells. In vivo, cediranib significantly reduced Caki-1 tumor cell-induced angiogenesis, reduced tumor perfusion, and inhibited the growth of Caki-1 tumor xenografts. Conclusions: The present results are consistent with the notion that inhibition of VEGF signaling leads to an indirect (i.e., antiangiogenic) antitumor effect, rather than a direct effect on tumor cells. These results further suggest that inhibition of VEGF signaling with cediranib may impair the growth of renal cell carcinoma.

  11. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonist improve vascular function and decrease renal injury in hypertensive obese rats.

    PubMed

    Imig, John D; Walsh, Katie A; Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Nagasawa, Tasuku; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Shaw, Sean M; Hammock, Bruce D

    2012-12-01

    Cardiometabolic syndrome occurs with obesity and consists of pathophysiological factors that increase the risk for cardiovascular events. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition (sEHi) is a novel therapeutic approach that exerts renal and cardiovascular protection. Although sEHi as a therapeutic approach is promising, it could be more effective for the treatment of cardiometabolic syndrome when combined with peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists. We hypothesized that the PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone in combination with a sEHi (tAUCB) will provide synergistic actions to decrease blood pressure, improve vascular function, decrease inflammation, and prevent renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive obese rats (SHROB). SHROB were treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB or the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone for four-weeks and compared with spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Blood pressure increased in SHROB (164 ± 7 mmHg) and decreased 10 mmHg when treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB, or tAUCB and rosiglitazone. Mesenteric artery dilation to the K(ATP) channel opener pinacidil was attenuated in SHROB (E(Max) = 77 ± 7%), compared with WKY (E(Max) = 115 ± 19) and SHR (E(Max) = 93 ± 12%). Vasodilation to pinacidil was improved by rosiglitazone (E(Max) = 92 ± 14%) but not tAUCB. Renal macrophage infiltration increased in SHROB and significantly decreased with rosiglitazone or tAUCB and rosiglitazone treatment. Albuminuria was increased in SHROB (90 ± 20 mg/d) and was significantly decreased by the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone (37 ± 9 mg/d). Glomerular injury in SHROB was also significantly decreased by tAUCB and rosiglitazone. These results indicate that even though sEHi or PPARγ agonist have benefits when used individually, the combination is more beneficial for the multidisease features in cardiometabolic syndrome.

  12. Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor in vascular and renal systems in rats with experimental hyperleptinemia: role in leptin-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna; Wójcicka, Grazyna; Łowicka, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Marta; Bełtowski, Jerzy

    2008-04-15

    We examined the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in the pathogenesis of leptin-induced hypertension in the rat. Leptin, administered in increasing doses (0.1-0.5 mg/kg/day) for 10 days, increased phosphorylation levels of non-receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Src, EGF receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in aorta and kidney, which was accompanied by the increase in plasma concentration and urinary excretion of isoprostanes and H2O2. Blood pressure and renal Na+,K+-ATPase activity were higher, whereas urinary sodium excretion was lower in animals receiving leptin. The effects of leptin on renal Na+,K+-ATPase, natriuresis and blood pressure were abolished by NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, Src kinase inhibitor, PP2, EGF receptor inhibitor, AG1478, protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor, manumycin A, and ERK inhibitor, PD98059. In contrast, inhibitors of insulin-like growth factor-1 and platelet-derived growth factor receptors, AG1024 and AG1295, respectively, only slightly reduced ERK phosphorylation and had no effect on blood pressure in rats receiving leptin. These data indicate that: (1) experimental hyperleptinemia is associated with oxidative stress and c-Src-dependent transactivation of the EGF receptor, which stimulates ERK in vascular wall and the kidney, (2) overactivity of EGF receptor-ERK pathway contributes to leptin-induced hypertension by stimulating renal Na+,K+-ATPase and reducing sodium excretion, (3) inhibitors of c-Src, EGF receptor and ERK may be considered as a novel therapy for hypertension associated with hyperleptinemia, e.g. in patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  13. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonist improve vascular function and decrease renal injury in hypertensive obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Imig, John D; Walsh, Katie A; Khan, Md Abdul Hye; Nagasawa, Tasuku; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Shaw, Sean M; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Cardiometabolic syndrome occurs with obesity and consists of pathophysiological factors that increase the risk for cardiovascular events. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition (sEHi) is a novel therapeutic approach that exerts renal and cardiovascular protection. Although sEHi as a therapeutic approach is promising, it could be more effective for the treatment of cardiometabolic syndrome when combined with peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists. We hypothesized that the PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone in combination with a sEHi (tAUCB) will provide synergistic actions to decrease blood pressure, improve vascular function, decrease inflammation, and prevent renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive obese rats (SHROB). SHROB were treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB or the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone for four-weeks and compared with spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar–Kyoto (WKY) rats. Blood pressure increased in SHROB (164 ±7 mmHg) and decreased 10 mmHg when treated with rosiglitazone, tAUCB, or tAUCB and rosiglitazone. Mesenteric artery dilation to the KATP channel opener pinacidil was attenuated in SHROB (EMax = 77 ±7%), compared with WKY (EMax = 115 ±19) and SHR (EMax = 93 ±12%). Vasodilation to pinacidil was improved by rosiglitazone (EMax = 92 ±14%) but not tAUCB. Renal macrophage infiltration increased in SHROB and significantly decreased with rosiglitazone or tAUCB and rosiglitazone treatment. Albuminuria was increased in SHROB (90 ±20 mg/d) and was significantly decreased by the combination of tAUCB and rosiglitazone (37 ±9 mg/d). Glomerular injury in SHROB was also significantly decreased by tAUCB and rosiglitazone. These results indicate that even though sEHi or PPARγ agonist have benefits when used individually, the combination is more beneficial for the multidisease features in cardiometabolic syndrome. PMID:23354399

  14. Renal vascular lesions as a marker of poor prognosis in patients with lupus nephritis. Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Nefrite Lupica (GISNEL).

    PubMed

    Banfi, G; Bertani, T; Boeri, V; Faraggiana, T; Mazzucco, G; Monga, G; Sacchi, G

    1991-08-01

    The frequency of renal vascular lesions (RVL) and their relevance in the progression of renal damage were evaluated by the Pathology Group of the "Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Nefrite Lupica" (GISNEL). Of 285 patients with lupus nephritis collected from 20 nephrology centers in Italy and classified according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, 79 cases (27.7%) with RVL were identified and classified as follows: (1) lupus vasculopathy (n = 27); (2) hemolytic-uremic syndrome/thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (HUS/TTP) malignant hypertension-like lesions (n = 24); (3) vasculitis (n = 8); (4) arterio-arteriosclerosis (n = 20). At the time of renal biopsy, patients with RVL had mean serum creatinine levels significantly higher than patients without RVL (201.8 +/- 195.9 mumol/L [2.2 +/- 2.2 mg/dL] v 108.1 +/- 108.0 mumol/L [1.2 +/- 1.2 mg/dL]; P less than 0.01). Hypertension was more frequent in patients with RVL than in those without (68.4% v 30.5%; P less than 0.01). The probability of kidney survival assessed according to the Kaplan-Meier method at 5 and 10 years was, respectively, 74.3% +/- 5.9% and 58.0% +/- 8.9% in patients with RVL, compared with 89.6% +/- 2.7% and 85.9% +/- 3.7% in patients without RVL. However, the two groups did not differ significantly as regards overall survival, the probability of survival at 5 and 10 years being 86.5% +/- 4.5% and 78.8% +/- 6.6% in patients with RVL and 92.2% +/- 2.2% and 83.3% +/- 4.4% in patients without RVL.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor-2, HIV-Tat, and Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A in HIV-Infected Children with Renal Disease Activate Rho-A and Src in Cultured Renal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jharna R; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Ray, Patricio E

    2016-01-01

    Renal endothelial cells (REc) are the first target of HIV-1 in the kidney. The integrity of REc is maintained at least partially by heparin binding growth factors that bind to heparan sulfate proteoglycans located on their cell surface. However, previous studies showed that the accumulation of two heparin-binding growth factors, Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF-2), in combination with the viral protein Tat, can precipitate the progression of HIV-renal diseases. Nonetheless, very little is known about how these factors affect the behavior of REc in HIV+ children. We carried out this study to determine how VEGF-A, FGF-2, and HIV-Tat, modulate the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of cultured REc, identify key signaling pathways involved in this process, and develop a functional REc assay to detect HIV+ children affected by these changes. We found that VEGF-A and FGF-2, acting in synergy with HIV-Tat and heparin, affected the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of REc through changes in Rho-A, Src, and Rac-1 activity. Furthermore, urine samples from HIV+ children with renal diseases, showed high levels of VEGF-A and FGF-2, and induced similar changes in cultured REc and podocytes. These findings suggest that FGF-2, VEGF-A, and HIV-Tat, may affect the glomerular filtration barrier in HIV+ children through the induction of synergistic changes in Rho-A and Src activity. Further studies are needed to define the clinical value of the REc assay described in this study to identify HIV+ children exposed to circulating factors that may induce glomerular injury through similar mechanisms. PMID:27097314

  16. FTY720 (Fingolimod) Inhibits HIF1 and HIF2 Signaling, Promotes Vascular Remodeling, and Chemosensitizes in Renal Cell Carcinoma Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Gstalder, Cécile; Ader, Isabelle; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by intratumoral hypoxia and chemoresistance. The hypoxia-inducible factors HIF1α and HIF2α play a crucial role in ccRCC initiation and progression. We previously identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) pathway as a new modulator of HIF1α and HIF2α under hypoxia in various cancer cell models. Here, we report that FTY720, an inhibitor of the S1P signaling pathway, inhibits both HIF1α and HIF2α accumulation in several human cancer cell lines. In a ccRCC heterotopic xenograft model, we show that FTY720 transiently decreases HIF1α and HIF2α intratumoral level and modifies tumor vessel architecture within 5 days of treatment, suggesting a vascular normalization. In mice bearing subcutaneous ccRCC tumor, FTY720 and a gemcitabine-based chemotherapy alone display a limited effect, whereas, in combination, there is a significant effect on tumor size without toxicity. Noteworthy, administration of FTY720 for 5 days before chemotherapy is not associated with a more effective tumor control, suggesting a mode of action mainly independent of the vascular remodeling. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that FTY720 could successfully sensitize ccRCC to chemotherapy and establish this molecule as a potent therapeutic agent for ccRCC treatment, independently of drug scheduling. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(10); 2465-74. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Angiogenesis and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, tumour necrosis factor-α and hypoxia inducible factor-1α in canine renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yhee, J Y; Yu, C H; Kim, J H; Im, K S; Kim, N H; Brodersen, B W; Doster, A R; Sur, J-H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution and characteristics of microvessels in various histological types of canine renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The study compared microvessel density (MVD) and distribution of blood vessels according to histological type and evaluated the presence of angiogenesis-related proteins. Nine archival samples of canine RCC were studied. MVD was calculated as the mean number of blood vessels per mm(2). The diameter of blood vessels was calculated by determining either the length of the long axis of blood vessels (diameter(max)) or the mean distance from the centre of each blood vessel to the tunica adventia (diameter(mean)). A significant difference in MVD was evident between RCCs and normal kidneys (46.6 ± 28.0 versus 8.4 ± 2.2 microvessels/mm(2)). Diameter(max) in canine RCCs (34.1 ± 14.7 μm) was also significantly different from normal canine kidney (23.2 ± 3.4 μm). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was expressed by tumour cells and vascular endothelial cells and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression was observed in vascular endothelial cells in both neoplastic and normal kidney. Although VEGF is involved in angiogenesis and correlates with tumour stage of development, no correlation was found between VEGF expression and MVD. Tumour-associated macrophages expressing TNF-α and hypoxia inducible factor 1α were identified in peritumoural tissue and may play an important role in angiogenesis.

  18. Association of smoking with phenotype at diagnosis and vascular interventions in patients with renal artery fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Savard, Sébastien; Azarine, Arshid; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Azizi, Michel; Plouin, Pierre-François; Steichen, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) remains unclear, but tobacco use is thought to be involved. This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate smoking first as a risk factor for renal artery FMD diagnosis and second as a modifier of the clinical and radiological phenotype of this disease. We retrieved 337 adult patients diagnosed with FMD in a referral center for hypertension management, who were first individually matched to controls with essential hypertension for sex, age, systolic blood pressure, number of antihypertensive drugs, and year of visit. Smoking status and other relevant data were collected at first visit. The proportion of current smokers was higher for patients with FMD than for the controls (30% and 18%, respectively, P<0.001; odds ratio, 2.5 [95% confidence interval, 1.6-3.9]). Second, characteristics of FMD were compared between current smokers and other patients. Among patients with multifocal FMD, current smokers experienced an earlier diagnosis of hypertension (36 versus 42 years, respectively; P<0.001) and FMD (43 versus 51 years; P<0.001) than other patients, and a greater likelihood of renal artery interventions (57% versus 31%; P<0.001) and of kidney asymmetry (21% versus 4%; P=0.001). In conclusion, current smoking is associated with a higher likelihood of renal artery FMD diagnosis. Rather than a higher incidence of FMD, this may reflect a more aggressive course in smokers, who have earlier hypertension leading to increased and earlier recognition of the disease. Smoking cessation should be strongly encouraged in patients with FMD.

  19. The renal and vascular effects of central angiotensin II and atrial natriuretic factor in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Barazanji, K A; Balment, R J

    1990-01-01

    1. The interaction between atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and angiotensin II (Ang II) within the brain to influence renal function and blood pressure was studied in Inactin-anaesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. 2. Central infusion of ANF produced a diuresis which was associated with a significant decrease in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level. There was no change in sodium excretion rate over the 80 min of intracerebroventricular ANF infusion and ANF produced no detectable change in mean arterial blood pressure. 3. Central Ang II administration produced a significant decrease in urine flow, which was associated with elevated plasma AVP, an increase in sodium excretion and a rise in mean arterial blood pressure. 4. Combined ANF and Ang II infusion produced an antidiuresis, which was associated with increased plasma AVP concentration. Both the natriuretic and vasopressor actions of central Ang II were abolished when ANF was co-administered. 5. It is concluded that ANF and Ang II interact centrally; ANF antagonizes the pressor and natriuretic effects but not the antidiuretic effects of central Ang II. These data suggest the possibility of distinct and separate sites within the brain through which Ang II influences vasopressin release and renal sodium handling and elevates blood pressure. PMID:2143782

  20. Rimonabant-mediated changes in intestinal lipid metabolism and improved renal vascular dysfunction in the JCR:LA-cp rat model of prediabetic metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Kelly, Sandra E; Diane, Abdoulaye; Wang, Ye; Mangat, Rabban; Novak, Susan; Vine, Donna F; Proctor, Spencer D

    2010-08-01

    Rimonabant (SR141716) is a specific antagonist of the cannabinoid-1 receptor. Activation of the receptor initiates multiple effects on central nervous system function, metabolism, and body weight. The hypothesis that rimonabant has protective effects against vascular disease associated with the metabolic syndrome was tested using JCR:LA-cp rats. JCR:LA-cp rats are obese if they are cp/cp, insulin resistant, and exhibit associated micro- and macrovascular disease with end-stage myocardial and renal disease. Treatment of obese rats with rimonabant (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), 12-24 wk of age) caused transient reduction in food intake for 2 wk, without reduction in body weight. However, by 4 wk, there was a modest, sustained reduction in weight gain. Glycemic control improved marginally compared with controls, but at the expense of increased insulin concentration. In contrast, rimonabant normalized fasting plasma triglyceride and reduced plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and acute phase protein haptoglobin in cp/cp rats. Furthermore, these changes were accompanied by reduced postprandial intestinal lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48, cholesterol, and haptoglobin. While macrovascular dysfunction and ischemic myocardial lesion frequency were unaffected by rimonabant treatment, both microalbuminuria and glomerular sclerosis were substantially reduced. In summary, rimonabant has a modest effect on body weight in freely eating obese rats and markedly reduces plasma triglyceride levels and microvascular disease, in part due to changes in intestinal metabolism, including lymphatic secretion of apolipoprotein B48 and haptoglobin. We conclude that rimonabant improves renal disease and intestinal lipid oversecretion associated with an animal model of the metabolic syndrome that appears to be independent of hyperinsulinemia or macrovascular dysfunction.

  1. Plasma 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D and the Risk of Developing Hypertension: The Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease Study.

    PubMed

    van Ballegooijen, Adriana J; Gansevoort, Ron T; Lambers-Heerspink, Hiddo J; de Zeeuw, Dick; Visser, Marjolein; Brouwer, Ingeborg A; Kema, Ido P; de Borst, Martin H; Bakker, Stephan J L; Joosten, Michel M

    2015-09-01

    Previous observational studies on the vascular effects of vitamin D have predominantly relied on measurement of its inactive precursor, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, whereas the active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D may be of more physiological relevance. We prospectively studied the associations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D with hypertension risk (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg or initiation of blood pressure-lowering drugs) in 5066 participants aged 28 to 75 years, free of hypertension at baseline from the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease Study, a well-defined cohort with serial follow-up. We measured plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Mean±SD plasma concentration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was 145±47.0 pmol/L and 25-hydroxyvitamin D was 58.6±23.8 nmol/L. During a median follow-up of 6.4 years, 1036 participants (20.5%) developed hypertension. As expected, low 25-hydroxyvitamin D was associated with a higher hypertension risk; each 1-SD decrement in 25-hydroxyvitamin D was associated with a 8% higher hypertension risk (hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.16) after adjustment for potential confounders. However, the association of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was in the opposite direction; each 1-SD decrement of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was associated with a 10% lower hypertension risk (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.96), independent of potential confounders. In contrast to the inverse association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and hypertension risk, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was positively associated with risk of hypertension. Thus, higher circulating concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D are associated with a higher risk of hypertension.

  2. Paraneoplastic hormones: parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and erythropoietin (EPO) are related to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chen-chen; Ding, Guan-xiong; Song, Ning-hong; Li, Xuan; Wu, Zhong; Jiang, Hao-wen; Ding, Qiang

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the correlation between parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), erythropoietin (EPO), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Immunohistochemical studies on PTHrP, EPO and VEGF were performed in 249 patients with ccRCC. Serum calcium level and haematocrit were analyzed. The expression of the factors and clinicopathological parameters were studied statistically for possible correlations. The incidence for hypercalcaemia and polycythaemia were 15.3% and 2.0% respectively. Expression of PTHrP, EPO, and VEGF were respectively related to advanced stage (P < 0.0001 respectively). PTHrP was not related to tumour grade. Expressions of EPO and VEGF were correlated to tumour grade significantly. All factors were expressed higher in hypercalcaemic patients. PTHrP, EPO, and VEGF were positively correlated with each other in non-hypercalcaemic patients yet not in hypercalcaemic ones. PTHrP and EPO are related to VEGF expression and to the progression of ccRCC. This finding offers us new insight on the behaviour of ccRCC and offers possible targets in RCC treatment.

  3. Adverse prognostic value of peritumoral vascular invasion: is it abrogated by adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy? Results from two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials of chemoendocrine adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viale, G.; Giobbie-Hurder, A.; Gusterson, B. A.; Maiorano, E.; Mastropasqua, M. G.; Sonzogni, A.; Mallon, E.; Colleoni, M.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Regan, M. M.; Brown, R. W.; Golouh, R.; Crivellari, D.; Karlsson, P.; Öhlschlegel, C.; Gelber, R. D.; Goldhirsch, A.; Coates, A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Peritumoral vascular invasion (PVI) may assist in assigning optimal adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early breast cancer. Patients and methods: Patients participated in two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials testing chemoendocrine adjuvant therapies in premenopausal (trial VIII) or postmenopausal (trial IX) node-negative breast cancer. PVI was assessed by institutional pathologists and/or central review on hematoxylin–eosin-stained slides in 99% of patients (analysis cohort 2754 patients, median follow-up >9 years). Results: PVI, present in 23% of the tumors, was associated with higher grade tumors and larger tumor size (trial IX only). Presence of PVI increased locoregional and distant recurrence and was significantly associated with poorer disease-free survival. The adverse prognostic impact of PVI in trial VIII was limited to premenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive tumors randomized to therapies not containing goserelin, and conversely the beneficial effect of goserelin was limited to patients whose tumors showed PVI. In trial IX, all patients received tamoxifen: the adverse prognostic impact of PVI was limited to patients with receptor-negative tumors regardless of chemotherapy. Conclusion: Adequate endocrine adjuvant therapy appears to abrogate the adverse impact of PVI in node-negative disease, while PVI may identify patients who will benefit particularly from adjuvant therapy. PMID:19633051

  4. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  5. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... an artery by a blood clot Renal artery stenosis Renal cell cancer Angiomyolipomas (noncancerous tumors of the ...

  6. RECIST 1.1 Compared With RECIST 1.0 in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Receiving Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Katherine M.; Nishino, Mizuki; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is the most widely accepted method to objectively assess response to therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–targeted therapy. Both RECIST 1.0 and 1.1 have been used to assess response to VEGF-targeted therapies; however, systematic comparisons are lacking. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty-two patients with metastatic RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapies were retrospectively studied. Tumor measurements and response assessment according to RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were compared, including the number of target lesions, baseline measurements, response at each follow-up, best overall response, and time to progression (TTP). Morphologic changes and new enhancement were also assessed over the course of treatment, and TTP was evaluated using morphologic change criteria in combination with RECIST 1.1. RESULTS The number of target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 was significantly fewer than by RECIST 1.0 (median, 2 vs 4; p < 0.0001). At first imaging follow-up, the percentage change of the sums of the diameter measurements by RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were highly concordant (R = 0.857; mean shrinkage, 12.1% by RECIST 1.1 vs 10.8% by RECIST 1.0). Best response assessment was highly concordant between the two criteria (weighted κ = 0.819). There was no evidence of a difference in TTP by the two criteria, with a median TTP of 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.5–13.9) by RECIST 1.1 and 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.8–13.6) by RECIST 1.0. The median TTP by RECIST 1.1 alone was 8.9 months compared with 5.6 months for RECIST 1.1 and morphologic changes combined. CONCLUSION RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 response assessments were overall highly concordant in patients with RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapy, with fewer target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 but no difference in TTP. PMID:25714313

  7. [Complex vascular access].

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Cesano, G; Thea, A; Hamido, D; Pacitti, A; Segoloni, G P

    1998-03-01

    Availability of a proper vascular access is a basic condition for a proper extracorporeal replacement in end-stage chronic renal failure. However, biological factors, management and other problems, may variously condition their middle-long term survival. Therefore, personal experience of over 25 years has been critically reviewed in order to obtain useful information. In particular "hard" situations necessitating complex procedures have been examined but, if possible, preserving the peripherical vascular features.

  8. Vascular Cures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  9. Oral Adverse Events Associated with Tyrosine Kinase and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Structured Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Joel B.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Ouwerkerk, Jan; Logan, Richard M.; Brakenhoff, Jan A.; Lacouture, Mario E.; Gelderblom, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background. Oral adverse events (OAEs) associated with multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORIs) are underestimated but frequent and novel presentations of mucosal manifestations. Because optimal antitumor activity requires maintaining the optimal dose, it is essential to avoid unintended treatment delays or interruptions. Methods. We review the reported prevalence and appearance of OAEs with TKIs and mTORIs and the current oral assessment tools commonly used in clinical trials. We discuss the correlations between OAEs and hand–foot skin reaction (HFSR) and rash. Results. The reported prevalence of oral mucositis/stomatitis of any grade is 4% for pazopanib, 28% for sorafenib, 38% for sunitinib, 41% for temsirolimus, and 44% for everolimus. Oral lesions associated with these agents have been reported to more closely resemble aphthous stomatitis than OM caused by conventional agents. In addition, these agents may result in symptoms such as oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and dysphagia, in the absence of clinical lesions. Because of these factors, OAEs secondary to targeted agents may be underreported. In addition, a correlation between OAEs and HFSR was identified. Conclusions. OAEs caused by TKIs and mTORIs may represent dose-limiting toxicities, especially considering the fact that even low grades of OAEs may be troubling to the patient. We discuss how these novel AEs can be assessed because current mucositis assessment tools have limitations. Prospective studies investigating the pathogenesis, risk factors, and management of OAEs are needed in order to minimize the impact on patient's health-related quality of life. PMID:22207567

  10. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias.

  11. Successful microscopic renal autotransplantation for left renal aneurysm associated with segmental arterial mediolysis.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Takashi; Araki, Motoo; Ariyoshi, Yuichi; Wada, Koichiro; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-12-14

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an uncommon, nonarteriosclerotic vascular disease. SAM is characterized by lysis of arterial media and can lead to aneurysm formation. The renal arteries are the third most common arteries associated with SAM. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with left renal artery aneurysm associated with SAM. We successfully performed left renal autotransplantation using microscopic vascular reconstruction. SAM is characterized by vascular fragility; therefore, microscopic surgery is favorable for treating aneurysms associated with SAM.

  12. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  13. Chronic vascular reactions to steel coil occlusion devices.

    PubMed

    Barth, K H; Strandberg, J D; Kaufman, S L; White, R I

    1978-09-01

    Original Gianturco steel coil vascular embolization devices and two modifications were compared for their occlusive effects and for the degree of adverse reaction in the surrounding vessel wall. Modifications consisted of silk or Ivalon replacing the wool strands of the original device. Single coils were placed into the left renal artery of nine mixed breed swine and restudied 3 months later. The bare coils did not occlude the vessels nor lead to significant foreign body reaction. Wool, silk, and Ivalon coils produced prompt and sustained renal artery occlusion. Upon histologic examination of the vessel wall, foreign body and chronic inflammatory reaction was found to be strongest against wool. This reaction was less with silk and markedly diminished with Ivalon. The results indicate that silk and Ivalon coils, while having the same occlusive effect, are preferable to wool coils if less local reaction is desired.

  14. Eppur Si Muove: The dynamic nature of physiological control of renal blood flow by the renal sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter Ricci; Zucker, Irving H

    2017-05-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback and the myogenic response are widely appreciated as important regulators of renal blood flow, but the role of the sympathetic nervous system in physiological renal blood flow control remains controversial. Where classic studies using static measures of renal blood flow failed, dynamic approaches have succeeded in demonstrating sympathetic control of renal blood flow under normal physiological conditions. This review focuses on transfer function analysis of renal pressure-flow, which leverages the physical relationship between blood pressure and flow to assess the underlying vascular control mechanisms. Studies using this approach indicate that the renal nerves are important in the rapid regulation of the renal vasculature. Animals with intact renal innervation show a sympathetic signature in the frequency range associated with sympathetic vasomotion that is eliminated by renal denervation. In conscious rabbits, this sympathetic signature exerts vasoconstrictive, baroreflex control of renal vascular conductance, matching well with the rhythmic, baroreflex-influenced control of renal sympathetic nerve activity and complementing findings from other studies employing dynamic approaches to study renal sympathetic vascular control. In this light, classic studies reporting that nerve stimulation and renal denervation do not affect static measures of renal blood flow provide evidence for the strength of renal autoregulation rather than evidence against physiological renal sympathetic control of renal blood flow. Thus, alongside tubuloglomerular feedback and the myogenic response, renal sympathetic outflow should be considered an important physiological regulator of renal blood flow. Clinically, renal sympathetic vasomotion may be important for solving the problems facing the field of therapeutic renal denervation.

  15. Treatment with pyrophosphate inhibits uremic vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, W Charles; Lomashvili, Koba A; Malluche, Hartmut H; Faugere, Marie-Claude; Riser, Bruce L

    2011-03-01

    Pyrophosphate, which may be deficient in advanced renal failure, is a potent inhibitor of vascular calcification. To explore its use as a potential therapeutic, we injected exogenous pyrophosphate subcutaneously or intraperitoneally in normal rats and found that their plasma pyrophosphate concentrations peaked within 15 min. There was a single exponential decay with a half-life of 33 min. The kinetics were indistinguishable between the two routes of administration or in anephric rats. The effect of daily intraperitoneal pyrophosphate injections on uremic vascular calcification was then tested in rats fed a high-phosphate diet containing adenine for 28 days to induce uremia. Although the incidence of aortic calcification varied and was not altered by pyrophosphate, the calcium content of calcified aortas was significantly reduced by 70%. Studies were repeated in uremic rats given calcitriol to produce more consistent aortic calcification and treated with sodium pyrophosphate delivered intraperitoneally in a larger volume of glucose-containing solution to prolong plasma pyrophosphate levels. This maneuver significantly reduced both the incidence and amount of calcification. Quantitative histomorphometry of bone samples after double-labeling with calcein indicated that there was no effect of pyrophosphate on the rates of bone formation or mineralization. Thus, exogenous pyrophosphate can inhibit uremic vascular calcification without producing adverse effects on bone.

  16. Influence of acute renal failure on coronary vasoregulation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kingma, John G; Vincent, Chantal; Rouleau, Jacques R; Kingma, Iris

    2006-05-01

    Impaired renal function is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events and death, but the pathophysiology is poorly defined. The hypothesis that coronary blood flow regulation and distribution of ventricular blood flow could be compromised during acute renal failure (ARF) was tested. In two separate groups (n = 14 each) of dogs with ARF, (1) coronary autoregulation (pressure-flow relations), vascular reserve (reactive hyperemia), and myocardial blood flow distribution (microspheres) and (2) coronary vessel responses to intracoronary infusion of select endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilators were evaluated. In addition, coronary pressure-flow relations and vascular reserve after inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin release were evaluated. Under resting conditions, myocardial oxygen consumption increased in dogs with ARF compared with no renal failure (NRF; 11.8 +/- 9.2 versus 5.0 +/- 1.5 ml O(2)/min per 100 g; P = 0.01), and the autoregulatory break point of the coronary pressure-flow relation was shifted to higher diastolic coronary pressures (60 +/- 17 versus 52 +/- 8 mmHg in NRF; P = 0.003); the latter was shifted further rightward after inhibition of both nitric oxide and prostaglandin release. The endocardial/epicardial blood flow ratio was comparable for both groups, suggesting preserved ventricular distribution of blood flow. In dogs with ARF, coronary vascular conductance also was reduced (P = 0.001 versus NRF), but coronary zero-flow pressure was unchanged. Vessel reactivity to each endothelium-dependent/independent compound also was blunted significantly. In conclusion, under resting conditions, coronary vascular tone, reserve, and vessel reactivity are markedly diminished with ARF, suggesting impaired vascular function. Consequently, during ARF, small increases in myocardial oxygen demand would induce subendocardial ischemia as a result of a limited capacity to increase oxygen supply and thereby contribute to higher

  17. Influence of Exposure to Chronic Persistent Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Tumor Biology of Clear-Cell Renal-Cell Carcinoma. An Immunohistochemical and Morphometric Study of Angiogenesis and Vascular Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Saurí, Amparo; Valencia-Villa, Gerardo; Romanenko, Alina; Pérez, Jesús; García, Raúl; García, Heydi; Benavent, José; Sancho-Tello, María; Carda, Carmen; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Increased angiogenesis is related to boosted growth and malignancy in carcinomas. "Chronic Persistent Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation" (CPLDIR) exposure increases incidence and aggressive behavior of clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma (CCRCC). The aim was to study the biology of angiogenesis, including microvessel density (MVD), in human clear-cell renal-cell carcinomas (CCRCC) originating from a radio-contaminated geographical area (Ukraine) and to compare with similar tumors diagnosed in non-contaminated regions of Europe (Spain, Valencia) and Latin America (Colombia, Barranquilla). MVD was comparatively examined in 124 patients diagnosed with CCRCC from three geographical areas by means of digital micro-imaging and computerized analysis. Additionally, 50 adult normal kidneys were used for controls (autopsy kidneys from Valencia and Barranquilla). Furthermore, an immunohistochemical study of several vascular related growth factors was undertaken using a similar methodology. MVD as well as VEFG are the most discriminating factors associated with an aggressive behavior of CCRCC. Their expression increased in proportion to the level of exposure to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation in Ukrainian patients in the 25 years since the Chernobyl accident substantiated by comparison with the two control groups of renal carcinomas present in non-irradiated areas (Spain and Colombia). No major biological differences relating to angiogenesis appear to exist between the CCRCC diagnosed in two distant geographical areas of the world. HIF-1α expression was similar in all groups, with no statistical significance. Present findings demonstrate the existence of a significant relationship between MVD and VEGF in CCRCC: an increased expression of VEGF is associated with a high level of angiogenesis.

  18. Atheroembolic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro

    2010-05-08

    Atheroembolic renal disease develops when atheromatous aortic plaques rupture, releasing cholesterol crystals into the small renal arteries. Embolisation often affects other organs, such as the skin, gastrointestinal system, and brain. Although the disease can develop spontaneously, it usually develops after vascular surgery, catheterisation, or anticoagulation. The systemic nature of atheroembolism makes diagnosis difficult. The classic triad of a precipitating event, acute or subacute renal failure, and skin lesions, are strongly suggestive of the disorder. Eosinophilia further supports the diagnosis, usually confirmed by biopsy of an affected organ or by the fundoscopic finding of cholesterol crystals in the retinal circulation. Renal and patient prognosis are poor. Treatment is mostly preventive, based on avoidance of further precipitating factors, and symptomatic, aimed to the optimum treatment of hypertension and cardiac and renal failure. Statins, which stabilise atherosclerotic plaques, should be offered to all patients. Steroids might have a role in acute or subacute progressive forms with systemic inflammation.

  19. BEST: A Randomized Phase II Study of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, RAF Kinase, and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Combination Targeted Therapy With Bevacizumab, Sorafenib, and Temsirolimus in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma—A Trial of the ECOG–ACRIN Cancer Research Group (E2804)

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Keith T.; Manola, Judith B.; Pins, Michael; McDermott, David F.; Atkins, Michael B.; Dutcher, Janice J.; George, Daniel J.; Margolin, Kim A.; DiPaola, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose On the basis of evidence that resistance to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor inhibition is caused by hypoxia-driven residual VEGF and other proangiogenic factors, combinations of agents from these classes were hypothesized to improve treatment outcomes relative to single-agent VEGF pathway blockade. Patients and Methods A total of 361 patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma were randomly assigned equally to arm A (bevacizumab monotherapy 10 mg/kg intravenously [IV] every 2 weeks), B (bevacizumab 10 mg/kg IV every 2 weeks and temsirolimus 25 mg IV every week), C (bevacizumab 5 mg/kg IV every 2 weeks and sorafenib 200 mg orally twice daily on days 1 to 5, 8 to 12, 15 to 19, and 22 to 26), or D (sorafenib 200 mg twice daily and temsirolimus 25 mg IV weekly). Progression-free survival was the primary end point. Results Among 331 eligible treated patients, median PFS was 7.5 months for bevacizumab alone (90% CI, 5.8 to 10.8 months), 7.6 months for bevacizumab plus temsirolimus (90% CI, 6.7 to 9.2 months), 9.2 months for bevacizumab plus sorafenib (90% CI, 7.5 to 11.4 months), and 7.4 months for sorafenib plus temsirolimus (90% CI, 5.6 to 7.9 months). Hazard ratios from stratified Cox proportional hazards models were 1.01, 0.89, and 1.07 (with respective P values of .95, .49, and .68) for the three combinations, respectively, compared with bevacizumab alone. Adverse events did not differ significantly among treatment arms. Conclusion The activity of sorafenib, temsirolimus, and bevacizumab administered in doublet combinations did not significantly improve median progression-free survival in comparison with bevacizumab monotherapy. PMID:26077237

  20. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  1. Kidney Diseases Associated With Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)

    PubMed Central

    Izzedine, Hassan; Escudier, Bernard; Lhomme, Catherine; Pautier, Patricia; Rouvier, Philippe; Gueutin, Victor; Baumelou, Alain; Derosa, Lisa; Bahleda, Rastilav; Hollebecque, Antoine; Sahali, Djillali; Soria, Jean Charles

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Expanded clinical experience with patients taking antiangiogenic compounds has come with increasing recognition of the renal adverse effects. Because renal histology is rarely sought in those patients, the renal consequences are underestimated. Antiangiogenic-treated-cancer patients, who had a renal biopsy for renal adverse effects from 2006 to 2013, were included in the current study. Clinical features and renal histologic findings were reviewed. Our cohort was 100 patients (58 women) with biopsy-proven kidney disease using anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy with a mean age of 59.8 years (range, 20–85 yr). Patients were referred for proteinuria, hypertension, and/or renal insufficiency. Kidney biopsy was performed 6.87 ± 7.18 months after the beginning of treatment. Seventy-three patients experienced renal thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and 27 patients had variable glomerulopathies, mainly minimal change disease and/or collapsing-like focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (MCN/cFSGS). MCN/cFSGS-like lesions developed mainly with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, whereas TMA complicated anti-VEGF ligand. Thirty-one percent of TMA patients had proteinuria up to 1 g/24 h. Half of TMA cases are exclusively renal localized. Pathologic TMA features are intraglomerular exclusively. MCN/cFSGS glomeruli displayed a high abundance of KI-67, but synaptopodin was not detected. Conversely, TMA glomeruli exhibited a normal abundance of synaptopodin-like control, whereas KI-67 was absent. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1–80 mo). Fifty-four patients died due to cancer progression. Hypertension and proteinuria resolved following drug discontinuation and antihypertensive agents. No patient developed severe renal failure requiring dialysis. Drug continuation or reintroduction resulted in a more severe recurrence of TMA in 3 out of 4 patients requiring maintenance of anti-VEGF agents despite renal TMA. In conclusion, TMA and MCN/cFSGS are

  2. A novel microporous polyurethane vascular graft: in vivo evaluation of the UTA prosthesis implanted as infra-renal aortic substitute in dogs.

    PubMed

    Marois, Y; Akoum, A; King, M; Guidoin, R; von Maltzahn, W; Kowligi, R; Eberhart, R C; Teijeira, F J; Verreault, J

    1993-01-01

    A novel microporous polyurethane blood conduit developed at the University of Texas at Arlington was implanted as an infra-renal substitute in dogs. The prosthesis was fabricated by precipitating a solution of the polymer with dry nitrogen onto a rotating mandrel. The grafts were sterilized either by gamma radiation (series I) or ethylene oxide (series II); they were implanted for the following prescheduled periods: 4, 24, 48 hours, and 1 week (short-term) and 2, 4 weeks, 3 and 6 months (medium-term). The thrombohematological characteristics of each animal were evaluated prior to implantation and confirmed that the index of blood coagulability was normal. In the short-term group, five out of eight grafts were patent and three were partially occluded; four grafts in the medium-term group were patent; one was partially occluded; and three were thrombosed at retrieval. One week after implantation, the prostheses were surrounded by an external capsule, which was present mainly at the two anastomoses. The external capsule covered the entire graft at 3 months. No kinking of the grafts was observed and the presence of a mild yellow stain related to bilirubin uptake was detected at 2 weeks, 1, 3, and 6 months. Histological studies have revealed the formation of a thin internal capsule at both anastomoses, 2 weeks postimplantation, which was not anchored to the graft wall. In the medium-term group, the thrombosed grafts failed to develop an internal capsule, whereas the patent graft exhibited a thick internal capsule made of neocollagenous tissue over the entire graft. This new microporous polyurethane prosthesis did not perform satisfactorily as an infra-renal substitute in dogs and its in vivo stability requires further assessment. Thus, the concept of a polyurethane with closed pores does not achieve what was anticipated.

  3. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  4. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease.

  5. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  6. Vasopressin, Sepsis, and Renal Perfusion - A VASST Deficit in Our Understanding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    JUN 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vasopressin, Sepsis, and Renal PerfusionâA VASST Deficit in Our...vasoconstric- tion within the renal vascular bed as evidenced by decreased renal blood flow (RBF) in vivo and increased renal vascular perfusion...decrease in renal per- fusion could potentially result in acute kidney injury (AKI), a syndrome that has been associated with increased mortality in the

  7. Association of miRNA-145 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells with vascular damages in patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Liao, Wang; Yi, Zhuwen; Xiang, Wei; He, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs have been found to contribute to the regulation of multiple cellular processes, including cell apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. The patients with lupus nephritis (LN) exhibit thickened renal vascular membrane and highly proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Of various miRNAs discovered, miR-145 is essential to mediate the proliferation of VSMCs and the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. In this study, we studied the pathological and vascular damage of renal LN, and the correlation between miR-145 expression in VSMCs and the vascular damages. Serum, urine, and renal biopsies were obtained from 41 patients with active LN. The serum and urinary VEGF levels were examined to confirm the renal damage of each patient. Biopsies were stained to observe the glomerular segmental lesions, sclerosis, and to evaluate the vascular damages. The expression of miR-145 was also examined to determine the correlation between its expression and the vascular damages. The expression of miR-145 was mainly detected in the renal VSMCs and the epithelial cells of glomerular proximal convoluted tubule. Nevertheless, the expression of miR-145 reduced as the tunicae media vasorum ratios increased, indicating the development of LN inhibits the expression of miR-145. Furthermore, our studies revealed no significant correlation among renal interstitial vascular damage, glomerular damage and severity classification of LN. Therefore, we suggest the damage of renal interstitial vascular should be considered as one of the factors to evaluate the severity of the LN.

  8. Standardized Definitions for Hemodialysis Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timmy; Mokrzycki, Michele; Moist, Louise; Maya, Ivan; Vazquez, Miguel; Lok, Charmaine

    2014-01-01

    Vascular access dysfunction is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among end-stage renal disease patients 1,2. Vascular access dysfunction exists in all 3 types of available accesses: arteriovenous fistulas, arteriovenous grafts, and tunneled catheters. In order to improve clinical research and outcomes in hemodialysis access dysfunction, the development of a multidisciplinary network of collaborative investigators with various areas of expertise, and common standards for terminology and classification in all vascular access types is required. The North American Vascular Access Consortium (NAVAC) is a newly formed multidisciplinary and multicenter network of experts in the area of hemodialysis vascular access, who include nephrologists and interventional nephrologists from the United States and Canada with: (1) a primary clinical and research focus in hemodialysis vascular access dysfunction, (2) national and internationally recognized experts in vascular access, and (3) a history of productivity measured by peer-reviewed publications and funding among members of this consortium. The consortium’s mission is to improve the quality and efficiency in vascular access research, and impact the research in the area of hemodialysis vascular access by conducting observational studies and randomized controlled trials. The purpose of the consortium’s initial manuscript is to provide working and standard vascular access definitions relating to (1) epidemiology, (2) vascular access function, (3) vascular access patency, and (4) complications in vascular accesses relating to each of the vascular access types. PMID:21906166

  9. Use of computed tomography renal angiography for screening feline renal transplant donors.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Jennifer L; Aronson, Lillian R; Keith, Dennis G; Saunders, H Mark

    2003-01-01

    Preoperative knowledge of the renal vascular anatomy is important for selection of the appropriate feline renal donor. Intravenous urograms (IVUs) have been performed routinely to screen potential donors at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (VHUP), but the vascular phase views lack sufficient detail of the renal vascular anatomy. Computed tomography angiography (CTA), which requires a helical computed tomography (CT) scanner, has been found to provide superior renal vascular anatomic information of prospective human renal donors. The specific aims of this study were as follows: 1) develop the CTA technique for the feline patient; and 2) obtain preliminary information on feline renal vessel anatomy in potential renal donors. Ten healthy, potential feline renal donors were anesthetized and imaged using a third-generation helical CT scanner. The time delay between i.v. contrast medium injection and image acquisition, and other parameters of slice collimation, slice interval, pitch, exposure settings, and reconstruction algorithms were varied to maximize contrast medium opacification of the renal vascular anatomy. Optimal CTA acquisition parameters were determined to be: 1) 10-sec delay post-i.v. bolus of iodinated contrast medium; 2) two serially acquired (corresponding to arterial and venous phases) helical scans through the renal vasculature; 3) pitch of 2 (4 mm/sec patient translation, 2 mm slice collimation); and 4) 120-kVp, 160-mA, and 1-sec exposure settings. Retrospective reconstructed CTA transverse images obtained at a 2-mm slice width and a 1-mm slice interval in combination with two-dimensional reformatted images and three-dimensional reconstructed images were qualitatively evaluated for vascular anatomy; vascular anatomy was confirmed at surgery. Four cats had single renal arteries and veins bilaterally; four cats had double renal veins. One cat had a small accessory artery supplying the caudal pole of the left kidney. One cat had a

  10. Kidney diseases associated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF): an 8-year observational study at a single center.

    PubMed

    Izzedine, Hassan; Escudier, Bernard; Lhomme, Catherine; Pautier, Patricia; Rouvier, Philippe; Gueutin, Victor; Baumelou, Alain; Derosa, Lisa; Bahleda, Rastilav; Hollebecque, Antoine; Sahali, Djillali; Soria, Jean Charles

    2014-11-01

    Expanded clinical experience with patients taking antiangiogenic compounds has come with increasing recognition of the renal adverse effects. Because renal histology is rarely sought in those patients, the renal consequences are underestimated. Antiangiogenic-treated-cancer patients, who had a renal biopsy for renal adverse effects from 2006 to 2013, were included in the current study. Clinical features and renal histologic findings were reviewed. Our cohort was 100 patients (58 women) with biopsy-proven kidney disease using anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy with a mean age of 59.8 years (range, 20-85 yr). Patients were referred for proteinuria, hypertension, and/or renal insufficiency. Kidney biopsy was performed 6.87 ± 7.18 months after the beginning of treatment. Seventy-three patients experienced renal thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and 27 patients had variable glomerulopathies, mainly minimal change disease and/or collapsing-like focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (MCN/cFSGS). MCN/cFSGS-like lesions developed mainly with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, whereas TMA complicated anti-VEGF ligand. Thirty-one percent of TMA patients had proteinuria up to 1 g/24 h. Half of TMA cases are exclusively renal localized. Pathologic TMA features are intraglomerular exclusively. MCN/cFSGS glomeruli displayed a high abundance of KI-67, but synaptopodin was not detected. Conversely, TMA glomeruli exhibited a normal abundance of synaptopodin-like control, whereas KI-67 was absent. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-80 mo). Fifty-four patients died due to cancer progression. Hypertension and proteinuria resolved following drug discontinuation and antihypertensive agents. No patient developed severe renal failure requiring dialysis. Drug continuation or reintroduction resulted in a more severe recurrence of TMA in 3 out of 4 patients requiring maintenance of anti-VEGF agents despite renal TMA. In conclusion, TMA and MCN/cFSGS are the most

  11. Prognostic value of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor 2, platelet-derived growth factor-β (PDGF-β), and PDGF-β receptor expression in papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong; Sohn, Mooyoung; Shim, Myungsun; Choi, Seung-Kwon; Park, Myungchan; Kim, Eunna; Go, Heounjeong; Park, Yangsoon; Cho, Yong Mee; Ro, Jae Y; Jeong, In Gab; Song, Cheryn; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Choung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong

    2017-03-01

    The prognostic value of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-β, and PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-β in papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) is unknown. A total of 145 patients, who were confirmed to have pRCC, were analyzed. Expression levels of molecular markers were assessed via immunohistochemistry. The median follow-up period for all patients was 52.0 (interquartile range, 34.5-90.5) months. Among the cohort of 145 patients, high VEGF expression was observed in 100 (69.0%) patients, whereas high expression of VEGFR2, PDGF-β, and PDGFR-β was observed in 64 (44.1%), 42 (29.0%), and 30 (20.7%) patients, respectively. Only patients with high VEGFR2 expression exhibited improved 10-year recurrence-free survival (85.3% versus 58.1%; P=.005) and cancer-specific survival (86.4% versus 70.1%; P=.014) rates compared with individuals who exhibited low expression. Multivariate analysis revealed that high VEGFR2 expression was an independent prognostic factor for recurrence (hazard ratio, 0.326; P=.006) and cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 0.334; P=.046). During follow-up, 17 patients received targeted drug therapy. Patients with high VEGFR2 expression showed a better initial response (partial response, 40%; stable disease, 20%; progressive disease, 40%) than patients with low expression did (partial response, 0%; stable disease, 58.3%; progressive disease, 41.7%; P=.052). pRCC with high VEGFR2 expression seems to be associated with a better initial response to targeted drug therapy and a better prognostic outcome.

  12. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  13. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  14. Development of the renal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Sequeira Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel

    2011-12-01

    The kidney is a highly vascularized organ that normally receives a fifth of the cardiac output. The unique spatial arrangement of the kidney vasculature with each nephron is crucial for the regulation of renal blood flow, GFR, urine concentration, and other specialized kidney functions. Thus, the proper and timely assembly of kidney vessels with their respective nephrons is a crucial morphogenetic event leading to the formation of a functioning kidney necessary for independent extrauterine life. Mechanisms that govern the development of the kidney vasculature are poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the anatomical development, embryological origin, lineage relationships, and key regulators of the kidney arterioles and postglomerular circulation. Because renal disease is associated with deterioration of the kidney microvasculature and/or the reenactment of embryonic pathways, understanding the morphogenetic events and processes that maintain the renal vasculature may open new avenues for the preservation of renal structure and function and prevent the progression of renal disease.

  15. Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Marc; Moshfegh, Amiel; Talenfeld, Adam; Del Pizzo, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    In light of evidence linking radical nephrectomy and consequent suboptimal renal function to adverse cardiovascular events and increased mortality, research into nephron-sparing techniques for renal masses widely expanded in the past two decades. The American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines now explicitly list partial nephrectomy as the standard of care for the management of T1a renal tumors. Because of the increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, up to 70% of newly detected renal masses are stage T1a, making them more amenable to minimally invasive nephron-sparing therapies including laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy and ablative therapies. Cryosurgery has emerged as a leading option for renal ablation, and compared with surgical techniques it offers benefits in preserving renal function with fewer complications, shorter hospitalization times, and allows for quicker convalescence. A mature dataset exists at this time, with intermediate and long-term follow-up data available. Cryosurgical recommendations as a first-line therapy are made at this time in limited populations, including elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, and those with a solitary kidney. As more data emerge on oncologic efficacy, and technical experience and the technology continue to improve, the application of this modality will likely be extended in future treatment guidelines. PMID:24596441

  16. Impact of pregnancy on underlying renal disease.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Normal pregnancy involves marked renal vasodilation and large increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Studies in rats reveal that the gestational renal vasodilation is achieved by parallel reductions in tone in afferent and efferent arterioles so GFR rises without a change in glomerular blood pressure. There is some evidence from animal studies that increased renal generation of nitric oxide (NO) may be involved. Although chronic renal vasodilation has been implicated in causing progression of renal disease in nonpregnant states by glomerular hypertension, there are no long-term deleterious effects of pregnancies on the kidney when maternal renal function is normal because glomerular blood pressure remains normal. When maternal renal function is compromised before conception, there are no long-term adverse effects on renal function in most types of renal disease, providing that the GFR is well maintained before conception. When serum creatinine exceeds approximately 1.4 mg/dL, pregnancy may accelerate the renal disease increases and when serum creatinine >2 mg/dL, the chances are greater than 1 in 3 that pregnancy will hasten the progression of the renal disease. The available animal studies suggest that glomerular hypertension does not occur despite diverse injuries. Thus, the mechanisms of the adverse interaction between pregnancy and underlying renal disease remain unknown.

  17. Serelaxin as a potential treatment for renal dysfunction in cirrhosis: Preclinical evaluation and results of a randomized phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Anna M.; Semple, Scott I.; Mungall, Will; Lennen, Ross J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Pellicoro, Antonella; Aucott, Rebecca L.; Severin, Thomas; Saini, Rajnish; Yates, Denise; Dongre, Neelesh; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Webb, David J.; Iredale, John P.; Hayes, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic liver scarring from any cause leads to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and a progressive decline in renal blood flow and renal function. Extreme renal vasoconstriction characterizes hepatorenal syndrome, a functional and potentially reversible form of acute kidney injury in patients with advanced cirrhosis, but current therapy with systemic vasoconstrictors is ineffective in a substantial proportion of patients and is limited by ischemic adverse events. Serelaxin (recombinant human relaxin-2) is a peptide molecule with anti-fibrotic and vasoprotective properties that binds to relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1) and has been shown to increase renal perfusion in healthy human volunteers. We hypothesized that serelaxin could ameliorate renal vasoconstriction and renal dysfunction in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Methods and findings To establish preclinical proof of concept, we developed two independent rat models of cirrhosis that were characterized by progressive reduction in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and showed evidence of renal endothelial dysfunction. We then set out to further explore and validate our hypothesis in a phase 2 randomized open-label parallel-group study in male and female patients with alcohol-related cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Forty patients were randomized 1:1 to treatment with serelaxin intravenous (i.v.) infusion (for 60 min at 80 μg/kg/d and then 60 min at 30 μg/kg/d) or terlipressin (single 2-mg i.v. bolus), and the regional hemodynamic effects were quantified by phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography at baseline and after 120 min. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline in total renal artery blood flow. Therapeutic targeting of renal vasoconstriction with serelaxin in the rat models increased kidney perfusion, oxygenation, and function through reduction in renal vascular resistance, reversal of endothelial dysfunction, and increased activation of the

  18. Broken pump or leaky filter? Renal dysfunction in heart failure a contemporary review.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Colin J; Mark, Partick B; Weir, Robin A P

    2008-08-18

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent and progressive complication of chronic heart failure and is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular mortality. It is intimately associated with cardiovascular disease even in its earliest stages. Although cardiovascular and renal disease share many risk factors, the prognostic implications do not simply reflect widespread atherosclerotic vascular disease as this appears to be as important in those with heart failure secondary to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy as it is in those with coronary artery disease. There may be a role in the progression of heart failure, as the deleterious effects of even "mild" renal impairment seem to be borne out in predicting outcome, in a broad range of heart failure patients including those with heart failure and preserved systolic function. Renal dysfunction is both an indication for, as well as frequently limiting intervention with intensive disease modifying therapy. Although renal impairment is common in heart failure and these patients are at higher risk for adverse events including death, they are under represented in clinical trials.

  19. Calcium intake, vascular calcification, and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Spence, Lisa A; Weaver, Connie M

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has reported a possible link between calcium supplementation and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and its endpoints in healthy, older adults. To evaluate the current evidence regarding the impact of calcium supplementation on cardiovascular disease risk and to address research gaps, the present review was conducted. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses were included, when available, along with original articles. The articles included in the review were obtained from PubMed using the following search terms: calcium intake, calcium supplementation, cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, mortality, and vascular calcification. The majority of the studies reviewed demonstrated no statistically significant adverse or beneficial effect of calcium supplementation on cardiovascular disease or its endpoints. While some studies indicate a possible increased risk, there is a lack of consensus on these findings and a need exists to further elucidate a mechanism. More experimental data are necessary to understand the impact of calcium intake, both levels and sources, on vascular calcification and vascular disease. The use of (41)C kinetic modeling in the Ossabaw swine provides an approach for assessing soft tissue calcification in an atherosclerotic and normal state to address research gaps.

  20. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; P<0.05). This association was more pronounced among younger patients and those with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes.

  1. Effect of microgravity on renal and femoral flows during LBNP & intravenous saline load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbeille, P.; Gaffney, F. A.; Beck, L.; Coulon, J.; Porcher, M.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    Renal and femoral hemodynamics were studied in crew members at rest and during lower body negative pressure before and after the D-2 Spacelab mission and with intravenous saline loading. Specific measurements included renal vascular resistance, femoral arterial flow, and vascular resistance, along with other cardiovascular parameters. Cardiovascular adaptation to microgravity is discussed with a focus on changes observed in femoral and renal vascular resistance.

  2. [Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. Risks and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Voigt, N; Heijman, J; Dobrev, D

    2014-03-01

    Adverse side effects of drugs are a significantly underestimated problem in modern medicine. In this review article, we summarize common adverse side effects of cardiovascular drugs. In particular, we highlight the factors promoting these adverse side effects in patients, including reduced hepatic or renal clearance in elderly patients that often requires dosage adjustment. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs (e.g. through the cytochrome P450 system or P-glycoproteins) can modify the plasma concentration of many compounds, thereby also increasing the likelihood of unwanted side effects. The most prominent cardiac side effects include arrhythmias, e.g. atrioventricular (AV) block, drug-induced long-QT syndrome and torsade de pointes and altered inotropy. Non-cardiac side effects are subsequently discussed grouped by drug class. A better understanding of the risks and side effects of cardiovascular drugs is expected to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with adverse side effects.

  3. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  4. Vascular Calcification: Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent and, when present, is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. Vascular smooth muscle cells play an integral role in mediating vessel calcification by undergoing differentiation to osteoblast-like cells and generating matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for calcium-phosphate deposition in the vessel wall. Once believed to be a passive process, it is now recognized that vascular calcification is a complex and highly regulated process that involves activation of cellular signaling pathways, circulating inhibitors of calcification, genetic factors, and hormones. This review will examine several of the key mechanisms linking vascular smooth muscle cells to vessel calcification that may be targeted to reduce vessel wall mineralization and, thereby, reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:25435520

  5. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan for their effective treatment. detect blood clots (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the major veins of ... What are the limitations of Vascular Ultrasound? Vessels deep in the body are harder to see than ...

  6. Vascular Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack) may increase your risk of developing dementia. Atherosclerosis. This condition occurs when deposits of cholesterol and ... in your arteries and narrow your blood vessels. Atherosclerosis can increase your risk of vascular dementia — and ...

  7. [Primary renal angiosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Costero-Barrios, Cesáreo B; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc

    2004-01-01

    The twenty-fourth case of primary renal angiosarcoma is described, according to the available international literature, this present in a 71-year-old male, a mechanic by trade, without carcinogenic antecedents. Hematuria, pain in flank, and left-side tumoral mass of approximately 20 cm in diameter located in kidney by computerized axial tomography (CT) constituted manifestations. A left nefrectomy was performed. No metastasis was found. The tumor replaced 4/5 of the organ and weighed 1145 g. It showed angiomatous structure with atypical proliferation of endothelial cells in a sinusoldal trauma and anastomosatic vascular channels that invaded neighboring parenchymal and capsule. Tymorous cells were positive for CD31 and CD34 and negative for cytokeratins, S100 and HMB 45 proteins. The patient was subjected to treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy (lineal accelerator), but 12 months after surgery he presented retroperitonal tumoral relapse and hepatic metastasis. Diagnostic differentiation with benign vascular tumors is pointed out, as well as carcinomas and sarcomas that showed an outstanding angiomatous component, both primary and/or secondary. Primary renal angiosarcoma exposes the multiplicity of localizations that it is capable of with a tumor of this type, as well as renal parenquimatous capacity to be the seat of a great variety of neoplasias.

  8. Renal physiology of nocturia.

    PubMed

    Verbalis, Joseph G

    2014-04-01

    Renal function, diurnal fluctuations in arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, sex, and advanced age affect urine formation and may contribute to nocturia. Renal effects of AVP are mediated by AVP V2 receptors in the kidney collecting duct. Changes in AVP concentration have the greatest relative effects on urine volume when AVP levels are low; therefore small changes can have a large effect on renal water excretion. AVP is the major regulator of water excretion by the kidneys, and AVP levels have been shown to affect nocturnal voiding. Results of several studies show that patients with nocturia had no significant variation in plasma AVP, whereas patients without nocturia had significant diurnal variation in plasma AVP. The V2 receptor gene is located on the X chromosome, which has important sex-specific consequences. For example, mutations in the V2 gene can cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, predominantly in men. Age-related changes in water metabolism are associated with overall body composition, kidney, and brain. Older people generally experience decreased extracellular fluid and plasma volume, which leads to increased adverse consequences from net body water gain or loss. Renal function declines with age, and the ability to concentrate urine and conserve sodium is reduced in the elderly. Thirst perception is also decreased in the elderly, who, compared with younger people, tend to hypersecrete AVP in response to higher plasma osmolality, possibly resulting in hyponatremia. These aspects of renal physiology should be considered when antidiuretic drugs are prescribed for the treatment of nocturia.

  9. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  10. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD.

  11. Acute kidney injury, long-term renal function and mortality in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Joana; Neves, Joana Briosa; Rodrigues, Natacha; Bekerman, Catarina; Melo, Maria João; Pereira, Marta; Teixeira, Catarina; Mendes, Inês; Jorge, Sofia; Rosa, Rosário; Lopes, José António

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent during hospitalization and may contribute to adverse consequences. We aimed to evaluate long-term adverse renal function and mortality after postoperative AKI in a cohort of patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of adult patients who underwent major non-vascular abdominal surgery between January 2010 and February 2011 at the Department of Surgery II of Hospital de Santa Maria–Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, Portugal. Exclusion criteria were as follows: chronic kidney disease on renal replacement therapy, undergoing renal replacement therapy the week before surgery, death before discharge and loss to follow-up through January 2014. Patients were categorized according to the development of postoperative AKI in the first 48 h after surgery using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes classification. AKI was defined by an increase in absolute serum creatinine (SCr) ≥0.3 mg/dL or by a percentage increase in SCr ≥50% and/or by a decrease in urine output to <0.5 mL/kg/h for >6 h. Adverse renal outcomes (need for long-term dialysis and/or a 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate after hospital discharge) and mortality after discharge were evaluated. Cumulative mortality was analysed with the Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test and outcome predictive factors with the Cox regression. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results Of 390 selected patients, 72 (18.5%) developed postoperative AKI. The median follow-up was 38 months. Adverse renal outcomes and death after hospital discharge were more frequent among AKI patients (47.2 versus 22.0%, P < 0.0001; and 47.2 versus 20.5%, P < 0.0001, respectively). The 4 year cumulative probability of death was 44.4% for AKI patients, while it was 19.8% for patients with no AKI (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, AKI was a risk factor for adverse renal outcomes (adjusted hazard ratio 1.6, P

  12. Influence of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors on Hypertension and Nephrotoxicity in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Semeniuk-Wojtaś, Aleksandra; Lubas, Arkadiusz; Stec, Rafał; Szczylik, Cezary; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-12-09

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common kidney malignancies. An upgraded comprehension of the molecular biology implicated in the development of cancer has stimulated an increase in research and development of innovative antitumor therapies. The aim of the study was to analyze the medical literature for hypertension and renal toxicities as the adverse events of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway inhibitor (anti-VEGF) therapy. Relevant studies were identified in PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov databases. Eligible studies were phase III and IV prospective clinical trials, meta-analyses and retrospective studies that had described events of hypertension or nephrotoxicity for patients who received anti-VEGF therapy. A total of 48 studies were included in the systematic review. The incidence of any grade hypertension ranged from 17% to 49.6%. Proteinuria and increased creatinine levels were ascertained in 8% to 73% and 5% to 65.6% of patients, respectively. These adverse events are most often mild in severity but may sometimes lead to treatment discontinuation. Nephrotoxicity and hypertension are related to multiple mechanisms; however, one of the main disturbances in those patients is VEGF inhibition. There is a significant risk of developing hypertension and renal dysfunction among patients receiving anti-VEGF treatment; however, there is also some evidence that these side effects may be used as biomarkers of response to antiangiogenic agents.

  13. Influence of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors on Hypertension and Nephrotoxicity in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Semeniuk-Wojtaś, Aleksandra; Lubas, Arkadiusz; Stec, Rafał; Szczylik, Cezary; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common kidney malignancies. An upgraded comprehension of the molecular biology implicated in the development of cancer has stimulated an increase in research and development of innovative antitumor therapies. The aim of the study was to analyze the medical literature for hypertension and renal toxicities as the adverse events of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway inhibitor (anti-VEGF) therapy. Relevant studies were identified in PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov databases. Eligible studies were phase III and IV prospective clinical trials, meta-analyses and retrospective studies that had described events of hypertension or nephrotoxicity for patients who received anti-VEGF therapy. A total of 48 studies were included in the systematic review. The incidence of any grade hypertension ranged from 17% to 49.6%. Proteinuria and increased creatinine levels were ascertained in 8% to 73% and 5% to 65.6% of patients, respectively. These adverse events are most often mild in severity but may sometimes lead to treatment discontinuation. Nephrotoxicity and hypertension are related to multiple mechanisms; however, one of the main disturbances in those patients is VEGF inhibition. There is a significant risk of developing hypertension and renal dysfunction among patients receiving anti-VEGF treatment; however, there is also some evidence that these side effects may be used as biomarkers of response to antiangiogenic agents. PMID:27941701

  14. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma with uncommon vascular lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Jammula, Sruti; Panda, Sandip; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pheochromocytoma/paragangliomas have been described to be associated with rare vascular abnormalities like renal artery stenosis. Coexistence of physiologically significant renal artery lesions is a compounding factor that alters management and prognosis of pheochromocytoma patients. Apart from individual case reports, data on such association in Indian population is not available. The aim of this study is to find the nature and prevalence of associated vascular abnormalities. Materials and Methods: From 1990 to 2010, a total of 50 patients were diagnosed with pheochromocytoma/paragangliomas. Hospital charts of these patients were reviewed retrospectively to identify those with unusual vascular abnormalities. Available literature was also reviewed. Results: Of the 50 patients with pheochromocytoma, 7 (14%) had coexisting vascular lesions including renal artery stenosis in 4, aortoarteritis in 1, aortic aneurysm in 1 and inferior vena cava thrombosis in 1. Pheochromocytoma was adrenal in 42 and extra adrenal in 8. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was done in the patients. One patient with renal artery stenosis due to intimal fibrosis was subjected to percutaneous balloon angioplasty; the other three improved after adrenalectomy and lysis of fibrous adhesive bands. The patient with aortoarteritos was treated with oral steroids. Inferior vena cava thrombosis was reversed with anticoagulants. The patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm was advised for annual follow-up on account of its size of 4.5 cm and asymptomatic presentation. Conclusion: There are multiple mechanisms that can lead to renal artery stenosis and other vascular abnormalities in a case of pheochromocytoma. A high index of suspicion is necessary to enable both entities to be diagnosed preoperatively and allow proper planning of surgical therapy. Incomplete diagnosis may lead to persistent hypertension postoperatively in a case of associated renal artery stenosis. PMID:23226643

  15. Autopsy Renal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2014-09-01

    We provide an overview of assessment of the kidneys at autopsy, with special considerations for pediatric versus adult kidneys. We describe the approach to gross examination, tissue allocation when needed for additional studies of potential medical renal disease, the spectrum of congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and urinary tract, and approach to cystic diseases of the kidney. We also discuss common lesions seen at autopsy, including acute tubular injury, ischemic versus toxic contributions to this injury, interstitial nephritis, and common vascular diseases. Infections commonly involve the kidney at autopsy, and the key features and differential diagnoses are also discussed.

  16. Renal Stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Renal stones are never convenient, but they are a particular concern for astronauts who have limited access to treatment during flight. Researchers are examining how earthbound preventions for renal stone formation work in flight, ensuring missions are not ended prematurely due to this medical condition. The micrograph shows calcium oxalate crystals in urine. These small crystals can develop to form renal stones. Principal Investigator: Dr. Peggy Whitson, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  17. Postnatal development of the renal medulla; role of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Madsen, K; Tinning, A R; Marcussen, N; Jensen, B L

    2013-05-01

    Adverse events during foetal development can predispose the individual for cardiovascular disease later in life, a correlation known as foetal programming of adult hypertension. The 'programming' events have been associated with the kidneys due to the significant role in extracellular volume control and long-term blood pressure regulation. Previously, nephron endowment and functional consequences of a low nephron number have been extensively investigated without achieving a full explanation of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. In this review, we will focus on mechanisms of postnatal development in the renal medulla with regard to the programming effects. The renin-angiotensin system is critically involved in mammalian kidney development and impaired signalling gives rise to developmental renal lesions that have been associated with hypertension later in life. A consistent finding in both experimental animal models and in human case reports is atrophy of the renal medulla with developmental lesions to both medullary nephron segments and vascular development with concomitant functional disturbances reaching into adulthood. A review of current knowledge of the role of the renin-angiotensin system for renal medullary development will be given.

  18. The effects of adenosine A2B receptor inhibition on VEGF and nitric oxide axis-mediated renal function in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Leena; Thaker, Aswin

    2014-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy are incompletely understood but include overproduction of various growth factors and cytokines. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a pathogenic event occurring in most forms of podocytopathy; however, the mechanisms that regulate this growth factor induction are not clearly identified. A2B receptors have been found to regulate VEGF expression under hypoxic environment in different tissues. One proposed hypothesis in mediating diabetic nephropathy is the modulation of VEGF-NO balance in renal tissue. We determined the role of adenosine A2B receptor in mediating VEGF overproduction and nitrite in diabetic nephropathy. The renal content of A2B receptors and VEGF was increased after 8 weeks of diabetes induction. The renal and plasma nitrite levels were also reduced in these animals. In vivo administration of A2B adenosine receptor antagonist (MRS1754) inhibited the renal over expression of VEGF and adverse renal function parameters. The antagonist administration also improved the kidney tissue nitrite levels. In conclusion, we demonstrated that VEGF induction via adenosine signaling might be the critical event in regulating VEGF-NO axis in diabetic nephropathy.

  19. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  20. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  1. Endothelial Dysfunction in Renal Failure: Current Update.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Miroslav; Stojanovic, Marko; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is principally characterized by impaired endothelium- dependent transduction mechanisms related to vascular relaxation, as an outcome of decreased release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, mainly nitric oxide, as well as augmented oxidative stress, increased inflammation and predominance of vascular action produced by endothelium-derived contracting factors. Current data strongly suggest that pathological development of different types of kidney impairment with further progression to renal failure includes notable vascular changes associated with endothelial dysfunction. In accordance, this scientific field represents an advancing area of investigation, involving different biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction linked to renal impairment, as well as clinical findings with new information that can provide a more comprehensive understanding of the role of endothelial dysfunction in kidney disease. With regards to quoted facts, the aim of this article was to review the latest data related to endothelial dysfunction and renal failure by selection of relevant articles released from 2010 to 2015.

  2. Vasodilatory responses of renal interlobular arteries to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids analog are not enhanced in Ren-2 transgenic hypertensive rats: evidence against a role of direct vascular effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in progression of experimental heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sporková, A; Husková, Z; Škaroupková, P; Rami Reddy, N; Falck, J R; Sadowski, J; Červenka, L

    2017-03-31

    Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of renal dysfunction and progression of congestive heart failure (CHF) remain poorly understood. Recent studies have revealed striking differences in the role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), active products of cytochrome P-450-dependent epoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid, in the progression of aorto-caval fistula (ACF)-induced CHF between hypertensive Ren-2 renin transgenic rats (TGR) and transgene-negative normotensive Hannover Sprague-Dawley (HanSD) controls. Both ACF TGR and ACF HanSD strains exhibited marked intrarenal EETs deficiency and impairment of renal function, and in both strains chronic pharmacologic inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) (which normally degrades EETs) normalized EETs levels. However, the treatment improved the survival rate and attenuated renal function impairment in ACF TGR only. Here we aimed to establish if the reported improved renal function and attenuation of progression of CHF in ACF TGR observed after she blockade depends on increased vasodilatory responsiveness of renal resistance arteries to EETs. Therefore, we examined the responses of interlobar arteries from kidneys of ACF TGR and ACF HanSD rats to EET-A, a new stable 14,15-EET analog. We found that the arteries from ACF HanSD kidneys rats exhibited greater vasodilator responses when compared to the ACF TGR arteries. Hence, reduced renal vasodilatory responsiveness cannot be responsible for the lack of beneficial effects of chronic sEH inhibition on the development of renal dysfunction and progression of CHF in ACF HanSD rats.

  3. Markers of Renal Disease and Function Are Associated with Systemic Inflammation in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir K; Kitch, Douglas; Tierney, Camlin; Melbourne, Kathleen; Ha, Belinda; McComsey, Grace A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Both renal disease and systemic inflammation predict non-AIDS events and overall mortality in HIV-infected patients. Here we sought to determine the relationships between renal disease and circulating inflammation markers. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5224s to determine if markers of renal disease [urine protein/creatinine (uPCR); urine albumin/creatinine (uACR); estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR, using CKD-EPI creatinine and cystatin C-creatinine] were associated with markers of systemic inflammation [high sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, soluble receptors of TNF-α (sTNFRI and II), soluble vascular cellular and intercellular adhesion molecules]. We correlated these renal and inflammatory markers prior to antiretroviral initiation and at 96 weeks of therapy. Results We found that estimated eGFR (using CKD-EPI cystatin C-creatinine), uPCR, and uACR were significantly correlated with most assessed markers of systemic inflammation prior to antiretroviral initiation. uPCR and eGFR (using CKD-EPI cystatin C-creatinine), but not uACR, remained significantly correlated with most of the assessed inflammatory markers after 96 weeks of ART. Most of these correlations, although statistically significant, were under 0.50. eGFR using CKD-EPI creatinine was much less frequently associated with inflammation markers and only significantly correlated with sTNFR1 at Week 0 and with sTNFRI and II at Week 96. Conclusions Renal disease and function are associated with systemic inflammation in HIV both before and after ART. Systemic inflammation may partially explain the relationships between proteinuria, albuminuria, and reduced renal function and future adverse outcomes. PMID:25990642

  4. Multidetector row computed tomography evaluation of potential living laparoscopic renal donors: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Saravanan; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Small, William C; Torres, William E; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2006-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. Living related kidney donation is the major source of renal grafts due to limited availability of cadaveric kidneys. Open nephrectomy was used to harvest donor kidneys. However, the laparoscopic approach is associated with less postoperative pain and quick recovery. So, most centers now prefer a laparoscopic approach to explant donor kidneys. Laparoscopic approach is technically challenging due to limited operative visibility. Hence, accurate preoperative detection of renal arterial and venous anomalies is imperative to avoid inadvertent vascular injury and bleeding. The preoperative workup of renal donors includes clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, and imaging. Traditionally, the renal donors were evaluated with conventional imaging techniques, which included renal catheter angiography and intravenous urography. However, conventional imaging is invasive, expensive, and less accurate for evaluation of complex renal venous anomalies, small calculi, and diffuse or focal renal parenchymal lesions. The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) revolutionized the CT technology by enabling isotropic resolution with faster scan coverage in a single, short breath-hold. Consequently, MDCT has now replaced conventional imaging for comprehensive imaging of potential living renal donors. MDCT is a minimally invasive technique that can accurately detect urolithiasis, renal arterial and venous anomalies, renal parenchymal lesions, and urinary tract anomalies. Renal vascular anomalies detected by MDCT can help the surgeon in planning donor nephrectomy. MDCT with three-dimensional CT angiography enables accurate preoperative renal vascular mapping. This article reviews the role of MDCT in preoperative evaluation of potential laparoscopic renal donors.

  5. Cortical necrosis in a renal transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhardt, R.; Growcock, G.; Lasher, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    The /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA renogram is a well extabished noninvasive method for evaluating and following transplanted kidneys. The examination is useful in distinguishing rejection from acute tubular necrosis as well as demonstrating several less common complications such as vascular occlusion, urinary extravasation, obstruction, and lymphocele. A previously unreported condition involving a transplant kidney (i.e., renal cortical necrosis) is described which was diagnosed with renal scintigraphy in combination with sonography.

  6. Renal infarction due to lupus vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Varalaxmi, B; Sandeep, P; Sridhar, A V S S N; Raveendra, P; Kishore, C Krishna; Ram, R; Kumar, V Siva

    2015-08-01

    In the ISN/RPS 2003 classification of lupus nephritis (LN) renal vascular lesions are not mentioned. We present a patient with postpartum lupus vasculopathy. The renal biopsy in our patient showed concentric intimal thickening with narrowed lumen. No inflammatory changes were found. It also revealed immunoglobulin and complement deposition on the wall of the arteriole. These changes indicate lupus vasculopathy. The glomeruli revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis, with wire loops and cellular crescent in one glomerulus. The patient showed improvement with immunosuppression.

  7. A Review on Renal Toxicity Profile of Common Abusive Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varun Parkash; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse has become a major social problem of the modern world and majority of these abusive drugs or their metabolites are excreted through the kidneys and, thus, the renal complications of these drugs are very common. Morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine and alcohol are the most commonly abused drugs, and their use is associated with various types of renal toxicity. The renal complications include a wide range of glomerular, interstitial and vascular diseases leading to acute or chronic renal failure. The present review discusses the renal toxicity profile and possible mechanisms of commonly abused drugs including morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine, caffeine and alcohol. PMID:23946695

  8. Human renal allograft blood flow and early renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C B; Etheredge, E E

    1977-01-01

    Renal allograft blood flow (RBF) was measured at operation by electromagnetic flow meter and probes in 45 patients (34 cadaver donors and 11 living related donors). Mean RBF in 26 patients without acute tubular necrosis (ATN), was 412 +/- 80 ml/min and in 19 patients with ATN, 270 +/- 100 ml/min (p less than .001). Only two of 24 transplants (8%) with RBF greater than 350 ml/min had ATN; whereas, 17 of 21 transplants (81 per cent) with RBF less than 350 ml/min had ATN (p less than .001). In cadaver donor transplants, RBF did not correlate with duration of ATN, warm ischemia time, total ischemia time, pulsatile perfusion time or renal vascular resistance during perfusion. Measurement of renal allograft blood flow can predict presence or absence of postoperative ATN in 87% of patients. PMID:335986

  9. Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  10. Adverse events in 50 cats with allergic dermatitis receiving ciclosporin.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Nicole A; McKeever, Patrick J; Eisenschenk, Melissa C

    2011-12-01

    Ciclosporin is an immunosuppressive drug that has been used to treat allergies and other immune-mediated diseases in cats, dogs and humans. Information about the adverse effects of ciclosporin in cats has been limited to smaller studies and case reports. Adverse effects in dogs are mainly gastrointestinal in nature, but humans can also experience hypertension and altered renal function. The aim of this retrospective case series study was to document the occurrence and clinical appearance of adverse events in cats receiving ciclosporin to treat allergic skin disease. The medical records of 50 cats with allergic dermatitis treated with oral ciclosporin (1.9-7.3 mg/kg/day) were reviewed. Adverse events occurred in 66% (33 cats). Adverse events likely to be associated with ciclosporin included the following: vomiting or diarrhoea within 1-8 weeks of receiving ciclosporin (24%), weight loss (16%), anorexia and subsequent hepatic lipidosis (2%) and gingival hyperplasia (2%). Other adverse events less likely to be associated with ciclosporin therapy included the following: weight gain (14%), dental tartar and gingivitis (10%), otitis (4%), chronic diarrhoea (4%), inflammatory bowel disease with indolent gastrointestinal lymphoma (2%), urinary tract infection (2%), cataract (2%), elevated liver enzymes (2%), hyperthyroidism and renal failure (2%) and transient inappropriate urination (2%). Some cats experienced multiple adverse events. Case-control studies are needed to prove cause and effect of ciclosporin with regard to these adverse events.

  11. [Watermelon stomach: Chronic renal failure and/or imatinib?].

    PubMed

    Montagnac, Richard; Blaison, Dominique; Brahimi, Saïd; Schendel, Adeline; Levasseur, Thomas; Takin, Romulus

    2015-11-01

    Watermelon stomach or gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) syndrome is an uncommon cause of sometimes severe upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Essentially based on a pathognomonic endoscopic appearance, its diagnosis may be unrecognised because mistaken with portal hypertensive gastropathy, while treatment of these two entities is different. Its etiopathogeny remains still unclear, even if it is frequently associated with different systemic illnesses as hepatic cirrhosis, autoimmune disorders and chronic renal failure. The mechanism inducing these vascular ectasia may be linked with mechanical stress on submucosal vessels due to antropyloric peristaltic motility dysfunction modulated by neurohormonal vasoactive alterations. Because medical therapies are not very satisfactory, among the endoscopic modalities, argon plasma coagulation seems to be actually the first-line treatment because the most effective and safe. However, surgical antrectomy may be sometimes necessary. Recently GAVE syndrome appeared as a new adverse reaction of imatinib mesylate, one of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors used in chronic myeloid leukemia, and we report here the observation of such a pathology in one patient treated at the same time by haemodialysis and by imatinib mesylate for chronic myeloid leukemia.

  12. Renal Scintigraphy

    MedlinePlus

    ... size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Renal Scintigraphy Sponsored by ...

  13. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  14. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure. PMID:26798459

  15. Renal transplant ultrasound: The nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Khai Gene; Coombs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the principal roles of a nephrologist is to closely monitor renal transplant allograft function and promptly evaluate any dysfunction. Renal transplant sonography has a major role in this assessment process given its ability to easily define renal transplant anatomy and surrounding structures. Abnormalities can be extrarenal or involve vascular, parenchymal and urological components of the graft and these can acutely or chronically influence graft function and survival. Procedural guidance as is required during allograft biopsy, as well as routine surveillance and screening for post transplant complications such as malignancy are also important applications of ultrasound in the management of renal transplant recipients. This article outlines key ultrasound findings and applications in renal transplantation from the clinician's perspective. PMID:28191257

  16. [Update in continuous renal replacement techniques].

    PubMed

    Romero-García, M; de la Cueva-Ariza, L; Delgado-Hito, P

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure affects 25% of patients hospitalized in intensive care units. Despite technological advances, the mortality of these patients is still high due to its associated complications. Continuous renal replacement techniques are one of the treatments for acute renal failure because they make it possible to treat the complications and decrease mortality. The nurse's knowledge and skills regarding these techniques will be decisive for the success of the therapy. Consequently, the nurse's experience and training are key components. The objective of this article is to update the knowledge on continuous renal replacement techniques. Keeping this in mind, a review has been made of the physical and chemical principles such as diffusion and convection, among others. A description of the different continuous renal replacement techniques, a presentation of the main vascular access, and a description of the nursing cares and complications related to techniques used have also been provided.

  17. Fibromuscular Dysplasia-Related Renal Artery Stenosis Associated with Aneurysm: Successive Endovascular Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Serter, Selim Oran, Ismail; Parildar, Mustafa; Memis, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease. FMD of the renal arteries is one of the leading causes of curable hypertension. The simultaneous occurrence of FMD and renal artery aneurysm has been described previously. In this case, we present a fibrodysplastic lesion and an aneurysm in a renal artery treated with a percutanous transluminal angioplasty and coil embolization.

  18. Detection of Asymptomatic Renal Calcifications in Astronauts Using a Novel Ultrasound Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) specifically looking for asymptomatic renal calcifications that may be renal stones is typically not done in the terrestrial setting. Standard abdominal US without a renal focus may discover incidental, mineralized renal material (MRM); however punctate solid areas of MRM is less than 3 mm are usually considered subclinical. Detecting these early calcifications before they become symptomatic renal stones is critical to prevent adverse medical and mission outcomes during spaceflight.

  19. Adverse effects of statins - myths and reality.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Iveta; Reiner, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity as well as cardiovascular events in patients with a very high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and also in subjects with high or moderate risk by reducing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Although they are considered to be drugs with a very good safety profile, because of their wide use there are many concerns that their adverse effects might compromise their proven beneficial effects. Therefore this article reviews all the data and provides an evidence- based insight what are the proven adverse effects of statins and what are the "myths" about them. The most important side effects include myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Another side effect is increased activity of liver tests which occurs occasionally and is reversible. However, recent studies even suggest that statin therapy can improve hepatic steatosis. It is beyond any doubt that statins do slightly increase the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in people with two or more components of metabolic syndrome but the cardiovascular benefits of such a treatment by far exceed this risk. Statin therapy has also been associated with some adverse renal effects, eg. acute renal failure, but recent data suggest even a possible protective effect of these drugs on renal dysfunction. Concerns that statins might increase cancer have not been proven. On the contrary, several studies have indicated a possible benefit of these drugs in patients with different types of cancer. Early concerns about cognitive dysfunction and memory loss associated with statins use could not be proven and most recent data even suggest a possible beneficial effect of statins in the prevention of dementia. Systematic reviews and clinical guidelines suggest that the cardiovascular benefits of statins by far out-weight non-cardiovascular harms in patients with cardiovascular risk.

  20. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  1. Adverse effects of oral antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kayaaslan, Bircan; Guner, Rahmet

    2017-01-01

    Oral nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NAs) are currently the backbone of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection treatment. They are generally well-tolerated by patients and safe to use. To date, a significant number of patients have been treated with NAs. Safety data has accumulated over the years. The aim of this article is to review and update the adverse effects of oral NAs. NAs can cause class adverse effects (i.e., myopathy, neuropathy, lactic acidosis) and dissimilar adverse effects. All NAs carry a “Black Box” warning because of the potential risk for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, these adverse effects are rarely reported. The majority of cases are associated with lamivudine and telbivudine. Adefovir can lead to dose- and time-dependent nephrotoxicity, even at low doses. Tenofovir has significant renal and bone toxicity in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, bone and renal toxicity in patients with CHB are not as prominent as in HIV infection. Entecavir and lamivudine are not generally associated with renal adverse events. Entecavir has been claimed to increase the risk of lactic acidosis in decompensated liver disease and high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores. However, current studies reported that entecavir could be safely used in decompensated cirrhosis. An increase in fetal adverse events has not been reported with lamivudine, telbivudine and tenofovir use in pregnant women, while there is no adequate data regarding entecavir and adefovir. Further long-term experience is required to highlight the adverse effects of NAs, especially in special patient populations, including pregnant women, elderly and patients with renal impairment. PMID:28261380

  2. Mechanisms and Clinical Consequences of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongxing; Mackenzie, Neil C. W.; Farquharson, Colin; MacRae, Vicky E.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification has severe clinical consequences and is considered an accurate predictor of future adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Previously vascular calcification was thought to be a passive process which involved the deposition of calcium and phosphate in arteries and cardiac valves. However, recent studies have shown that vascular calcification is a highly regulated, cell-mediated process similar to bone formation. In this article, we outline the current understanding of key mechanisms governing vascular calcification and highlight the clinical consequences. By understanding better the molecular pathways and genetic circuitry responsible for the pathological mineralization process novel drug targets may be identified and exploited to combat and reduce the detrimental effects of vascular calcification on human health. PMID:22888324

  3. Mechanism of postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in the anesthetized dog.

    PubMed Central

    Katholi, R E; Oparil, S; Urthaler, F; James, T N

    1979-01-01

    The mechanism of postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction was studied in 28 dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (30 mg/kg i.v.). Rapid atrial or ventricular pacing or induction of atrial fibrilation were used to produce at least 20% prompt decrease in cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Return to control cardiac output and blood pressure occurred within 3 minutes after cessation of the arrhythmia, but renal blood flow remained significantly decreased (26%) with gradual recovery by 17.7 +/- 6.6 min. Infusion of phentolamine (0.25 mg/min) into the renal artery, intravenous hexamethonium (l mg/kg), adrenal demedullation, or cooling the cervical vagi prevented postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. In contrast, renal denervation, intravenous bretylium (10 mg/kg), intravenous atropine (0.5 mg/kg) or intrarenal SQ 20881 (0.20 mg/min) has no effect on postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. Intravenous propranolol (0.5 mg/kg) intensified postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. These data suggested that the postarrhythmic renal vasoconstrictive response required intact vagi and was due to alpha adrenergic stimulation by adrenal catecholamines. However, femoral arterial catecholamine levels were not elevated above control during postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. We therefore sought local vascular pathways by which catecholamines might reach the kidneys. An adrenorenal vascular network was found in each dog. Collection of catecholamines from these vessels during postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in six dogs revealed catecholamine concentrations threefold higher than simultaneously collected femoral arterial catecholamines levels. Because ligation of these vessels abolished postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in each dog, we conclude that postarrhythmic renal vasconstriction is due to adrenal catecholamines reaching the kidneys through an adreno-renal vascular network and that the response requires intact vagi. Images PMID:447852

  4. The Renal Renin-Angiotensin System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of sodium balance, extracellular fluid volume, vascular resistance, and, ultimately, arterial blood pressure. In the kidney, angiotensin II exerts its effects to conserve salt and water through a combination of the hemodynamic control of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and…

  5. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  6. EPCs enhance angiogenesis in renal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Miaozhong; Alkhawaji, Ali; Chen, Chuan; Liu, Xiaolin; Jiang, Junqun; Zhang, Jianse; Wang, Zhibin; Li, Ting; Zhang, Weiwen; Mei, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Decellularized renal scaffolds have previously been used for renal regeneration following partial nephrectomy, in which angiogenesis played a key role. In this study, rats underwent partial nephrectomy and repaired with decellularized renal scaffolds. Subsequently, the labeled EPCs were intravenously injected into rats in EPCs group, and the control group received an equal amount of phosphate-buffer saline (PBS). We chose 1, 2 and 4 weeks post operation as time point. Average microvascular density (aMVD) analyses revealed higher angiogenesis in EPCs group compared with the control group. The expression of angiogenic growth factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and hypoxia-inducible factors 1-alpha (HIF-1α), was generally higher in the EPCs group in all weeks (1, 2 and 4), and peaked in week 2. EPCs were observed to home into renal injury site, promoting angiogenesis across the renal parenchyma-scaffold interface to be potentially used as bridges for EPCs to migrate into the implanted scaffolds. Administration of exogenous EPCs promotes angiogenesis and vasculogenesis in decellularized renal scaffolds-mediated renal regeneration, providing adequate microenvironment for kidney recovery post renal injury. PMID:27384488

  7. Lupus vasculopathy combined with acute renal failure in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Te; Fu, Lin-Shien; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hung, Shein-Chung; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2003-12-01

    Several risk factors have been associated with the prognosis of lupus nephritis. However, few studies have focused on renal vascular lesions (such as thrombi due to immune complexes) as a prognostic factor in this disease. Here we present a case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a 12-year-old girl who exhibited acute renal failure and severe hypertension on admission. Renal pathology findings included diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (class IVb) and lupus vasculopathy (LV) with immune complex deposition within glomerular capillaries and the preglomerular arteriolar lumen. Her clinical condition deteriorated rapidly, even after cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone pulse therapy. It improved after 5 days of plasmapheresis and remained stable for up to 6 months under regular treatment. We suggest that renal biopsy performed early in SLE patients with renal involvement should be studied carefully for the presence of vascular lesions. Additionally, plasmapheresis can be considered in patients with LV refractory to other modalities of therapy.

  8. Vascular lesions in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Grishman, E; Venkataseshan, V S

    1988-05-01

    Three groups of kidney specimens from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were examined for histologic evidence of vascular lesions in small arteries and arterioles. Group 1 consisted of 24 autopsy kidneys from patients who died before the advent of steroid therapy, and Group 2, of 26 more recent autopsy specimens from patients treated with steroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Group 3 comprised 276 renal biopsies. Group 1 showed characteristic subendothelial eosinophilic deposits in small arteries and arterioles of 8 cases; Group 2 showed similar lesions in 5 specimens, while 3 others revealed evidence of resorption of deposits. Deposits were characterized by clumping and were delimited toward the media by a thick basement membrane. Only one case showed necrotizing arteritis resembling polyarteritis nodosa. Group 3 presented vascular deposits in 19 cases and thrombotic microangiopathy in 2. Electron microscopic appearance of some of the deposits is described. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a mixture of IgG, IgA, and IgM in 7 cases, a finding that was not seen in a group of non-lupus patients with various vascular lesions. Vascular deposits are generally rare in systemic lupus erythematosus, although in autopsies widely scattered involvement of arteries and arterioles was seen in nearly 1/3 of the cases. The deposits were more common in male patients. The evolution of the lesions could be followed through various stages to eventual sclerosis, particularly in patients treated with steroids or immunosuppressants. Some deposits appeared to resolve after treatment. Patients with vascular deposits had more severe glomerular disease and a more serious clinical course. Thrombotic microangiopathy appears to be a secondary phenomenon whose pathogenesis is unknown.

  9. Renal Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... as “simple” cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and contain water-like fluid. Renal cysts are fairly common in ... simple kidney cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and only water-like fluid inside. They are fairly common in ...

  10. Safety of Eplerenone for Kidney-Transplant Recipients with Impaired Renal Function and Receiving Cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Coralie; Lavaud, Sylvie; Toupance, Olivier; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Jaisser, Frederic; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Animal studies have highlighted the role of vascular mineralocorticoid receptor during Cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists could improve kidney survival but are not commonly used during renal impairment and in association with several immunosuppressive drugs due to a supposed higher risk of adverse events. We tested the tolerance of eplerenone according to its expected adverse events: hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, acute kidney failure, or any other adverse event. Methods We conducted a single-center, prospective, open-label study in 31 kidney-transplant recipients with impaired renal function (30 and 50 mL/min/1.73m2) and receiving cyclosporine A. All patients received eplerenone 25 mg/d for 8 weeks. Serum potassium, renal function and expected adverse events were closely monitored. Results Eight patients experienced mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L), one moderate hyperkalemia (>5.5 mmol/L) and had to receive potassium-exchange resin. No severe hyperkalemia (>6 mmol/L) occurred. One acute kidney failure was observed, secondary to diarrhea. Basal serum potassium and bicarbonate were independently associated with a higher risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L) under treatment (OR 6.5, p = 0.003 and 0.7, p = 0.007, respectively). A cut-off value of 4.35 mmol/L for basal serum potassium was the best factor to predict the risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L). Conclusions Until eGFR falls to 30 mL/min/1.73m2, eplerenone could be safely given to kidney-transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine A, if kalemia is closely monitored. When renal function is impaired and if basal kalemia is >4.35 mmol/L, then clinicians should properly balance risk and benefit of eplerenone use and offer dietary advice. An adequately powered prospective randomized study is now needed to test its efficiency (and safety) in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01834768 PMID:27088859

  11. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  12. How can a vascular surgeon help in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lejay, Anne; Thaveau, Fabien; Caillard, Sophie; Georg, Yannick; Moulin, Bruno; Wolf, Philippe; Geny, Bernard; Chakfe, Nabil

    2017-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is a surgical procedure involving both vascular and ureteric anastomoses. As a matter of fact, it can be performed either by urologists or vascular surgeons. However, vascular surgeon's expertise can be helpful at different times. In the present paper we describe how can vascular surgeons help at the different stages of kidney transplantation process in modern care: 1) before kidney transplantation for recipient preparation in order to allow subsequent graft implantation, either by performing percutaneous embolization of renal arteries in the setting of polycystic kidney disease or treatment of aneurysmal or occlusive lesions that would contra-indicate graft implantation; 2) at the time of surgery graft back table preparation and repair; and 3) after surgery for long-term follow-up, including transplant renal artery stenosis treatment or transplant nephrectomy.

  13. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  14. Adverse effects of cow's milk in infants.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2007-01-01

    The feeding of cow's milk has adverse effects on iron nutrition in infants and young children. Several different mechanisms have been identified that may act synergistically. Probably most important is the low iron content of cow's milk. It makes it difficult for the infant to obtain the amounts of iron needed for growth. A second mechanism is the occult intestinal blood loss, which occurs in about 40% of normal infants during feeding of cow's milk. Loss of iron in the form of blood diminishes with age and ceases after 1 year of age. A third factor is calcium and casein provided by cow's milk in high amounts. Calcium and casein both inhibit the absorption of dietary nonheme iron. Infants fed cow's milk receive much more protein and minerals than they need. The excess has to be excreted in the urine. The high renal solute load leads to higher urine concentration during the feeding of cow's milk than during the feeding of breast milk or formula. When fluid intakes are low and/or when extrarenal water losses are high, the renal concentrating ability of infants may be insufficient for maintaining water balance in the face of high water use for excretion of the high renal solute. The resulting negative water balance, if prolonged, can lead to serious dehydration. There is strong epidemiological evidence that the feeding of cow's milk or formulas with similarly high potential renal solute load places infants at an increased risk of serious dehydration. The feeding of cow's milk to infants is undesirable because of cow's milk's propensity to lead to iron deficiency and because it unduly increases the risk of severe dehydration.

  15. Complications of renal transplantation: evaluation with US and radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Brown, E D; Chen, M Y; Wolfman, N T; Ott, D J; Watson, N E

    2000-01-01

    Following renal transplantation, patients are often evaluated with ultrasonography (US) or radionuclide imaging to assess renal function and the presence of possible complications. Both modalities are inexpensive, noninvasive, and nonnephrotoxic. A basic understanding of the surgical techniques commonly used for renal transplantation is useful when imaging these patients in order to recognize complications and to direct further imaging or intervention. The most frequent complications of renal transplantation include perinephric fluid collections; decreased renal function; and abnormalities of the vasculature, collecting system, and renal parenchyma. Perinephric fluid collections are common following transplantation, and their clinical significance depends on the type, location, size, and growth of the fluid collection, features that are well-evaluated with US. Causes of diminished renal function include acute tubular necrosis, rejection, and toxicity from medications. Radionuclide imaging is the most useful modality for assessing renal function. Vascular complications of transplantation include occlusion or stenosis of the arterial or venous supply, arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms. Although the standard for evaluating these vascular complications is angiography, US is an excellent noninvasive method for screening. Other transplant complications such as abnormalities of the collecting system and renal parenchyma are well-evaluated with both radionuclide imaging and US.

  16. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Yes or no?

    PubMed

    Edipidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue pregnancy, are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Although advances in antenatal and neonatal care continue to improve these outcomes, the risks remain proportionate to the degree of underlying renal dysfunction.The aim of this article, is to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome, in women with chronic renal disease and to provide if possible, useful conclusions whether and when, a woman with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), should decide to get pregnant.This article, reviews briefly the normal physiological changes of renal function during pregnancy, and make an attempt to clarify the nature and severity of the risks, in the settings of chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease, including dialysis patients and transplant recipients.

  17. The renal effects of NSAIDs in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Amy L; Grauer, Gregory F

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life for dogs with osteoarthritis can often be improved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); however, the number of adverse drug events associated with NSAID use reported to the Federal Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine is higher than that for any other companion animal drug. Of those events, adverse renal reactions are the second most reported. NSAIDs produce pharmacologic effects via inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), which decreases production of prostanoids. Prostaglandins are synthesized by both the COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes in the healthy kidney and influence renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, renin release, and Na excretion. There are important species differences in the renal expression of COX-1 and COX-2. For example, dogs have higher basal levels of COX-2 expression in the kidney compared with humans. In addition, in dogs with chronic kidney disease, an increase in COX-2 expression occurs and synthesis of prostaglandins shifts to the COX-2 pathway. For those reasons, NSAIDs that target COX-2 may be expected to adversely affect renal function in dogs, especially dogs with chronic kidney disease. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the literature to report the renal effects of NSAIDs in dogs.

  18. Safety and efficacy evaluation of lanthanum carbonate for hyperphosphatemia in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Ohya, Masaki; Negi, Shigeo; Masumoto, Asuka R; Nakashima, Yuri M; Iwatani, Yuka; Moribata, Mari K; Yamanaka, Shintaro; Tatsuta, Kouichi; Mima, Toru

    2015-01-01

    In end-stage renal disease patients, various abnormalities of bone mineral metabolism adversely affect mortality. Hyperphosphatemia is known to adversely affect mortality and quality of life in chronic kidney disease patients and has been shown to be involved not only in the onset and progression of secondary hyperparathyroidism but also in vascular calcification. Thus, hyperphosphatemia is the main treatment target indicated in several guidelines for chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder treatment. Phosphate binders are typically required for the management of hyperphosphatemia because dietary phosphorus restriction and phosphorus removal by hemodialysis alone are insufficient. We are able to prescribe five phosphate binders (calcium carbonate, sevelamer HCl, lanthanum carbonate (LaC), bixalomer, and ferric citrate) to Japanese hemodialysis patients. LaC is the most powerful noncalcium-containing phosphate binder for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia. In this chapter, we discuss the efficacy and safety of LaC, the safety of which has been under debate. In particular, we consider its toxic effects on the skeletal system. LaC is effective for hyperphosphatemia treatment in end-stage renal failure patients. It has been shown to be able to decrease serum fibroblast growth factor-23 levels. This result suggests that it may have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system in patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. However, the effects of LaC remain obscure. Further investigations are required. No negative effects of LaC on bone metabolism or bone morphometry have been reported, but long-term clinical data are needed.

  19. Renal microenvironments and macrophage phenotypes determine progression or resolution of renal inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Ryu, Mi

    2011-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease involves renal inflammation, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular and vascular atrophy. Macrophages seem to foster all of these histomorphological abnormalities, but their specific contributions remain controversial. Recruited monocytes differentiate into different tissue macrophage phenotypes, but current classifications are largely based on in vitro studies that do not adequately mirror tissue environments in vivo. To overcome this limitation, we propose to classify tissue macrophages according to their predominant roles in the phases of wound healing tissue environments, that is, inflammation, epithelial healing, mesenchymal healing, and fibrolysis. In this review, we discuss the evidence on respective macrophage phenotypes in renal pathology. This view sheds light on several aspects of renal remodeling in kidney disease: (1) renal infection or cell necrosis induces proinflammatory 'M1' macrophages that exacerbate renal cell damage, (2) uptake of apoptotic cells induces anti-inflammatory 'M2c/suppressor' macrophages that promote epithelial and vascular repair, (3) insufficient vascular and epithelial healing despite abundant growth factor secretion promotes profibrotic 'M2a/wound healing' macrophages that accelerate fibrogenesis, and (4) theoretically, fibrolytic macrophages should exist and await investigation.

  20. Vascular Adventitia Calcification and Its Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Cheng, Wenli; Huang, Tiequn; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xi; Song, Meiyue

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on vascular calcification has mainly focused on the vascular intima and media. However, we show here that vascular calcification may also occur in the adventitia. The purpose of this work is to help elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying vascular calcification. The calcified lesions were examined by Von Kossa staining in ApoE−/− mice which were fed high fat diets (HFD) for 48 weeks and human subjects aged 60 years and older that had died of coronary heart disease, heart failure or acute renal failure. Explant cultured fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (SMCs)were obtained from rat adventitia and media, respectively. After calcification induction, cells were collected for Alizarin Red S staining. Calcified lesions were observed in the aorta adventitia and coronary artery adventitia of ApoE-/-mice, as well as in the aorta adventitia of human subjects examined. Explant culture of fibroblasts, the primary cell type comprising the adventitia, was successfully induced for calcification after incubation with TGF-β1 (20 ng/ml) + mineralization media for 4 days, and the phenotype conversion vascular adventitia fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was identified. Culture of SMCs, which comprise only a small percentage of all cells in the adventitia, in calcifying medium for 14 days resulted in significant calcification.Vascular calcification can occur in the adventitia. Adventitia calcification may arise from the fibroblasts which were transformed into myofibroblasts or smooth muscle cells. PMID:26148272

  1. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  2. Tubular Overexpression of Angiopoietin-1 Attenuates Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heedoo; Kim, Yeawon; Liu, Tuoen; Guo, Qiusha; Geminiani, Julio J.; Austin, Paul F.; Chen, Ying Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has highlighted the pivotal role of microvasculature injury in the development and progression of renal fibrosis. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) is a secreted vascular growth factor that binds to the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor. Ang-1/Tie2 signaling is critical for regulating blood vessel development and modulating vascular response after injury, but is dispensable in mature, quiescent vessels. Although dysregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling has been well studied in renal pathologies, much less is known about the role of the Ang-1/Tie2 pathway in renal interstitial fibrosis. Previous studies have shown contradicting effects of overexpressing Ang-1 systemically on renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis when different engineered forms of Ang-1 are used. Here, we investigated the impact of site-directed expression of native Ang-1 on the renal fibrogenic process and peritubular capillary network by exploiting a conditional transgenic mouse system [Pax8-rtTA/(TetO)7 Ang-1] that allows increased tubular Ang-1 production in adult mice. Using a murine unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) fibrosis model, we demonstrate that targeted Ang-1 overexpression attenuates myofibroblast activation and interstitial collagen I accumulation, inhibits the upregulation of transforming growth factor β1 and subsequent phosphorylation of Smad 2/3, dampens renal inflammation, and stimulates the growth of peritubular capillaries in the obstructed kidney. Our results suggest that Ang-1 is a potential therapeutic agent for targeting microvasculature injury in renal fibrosis without compromising the physiologically normal vasculature in humans. PMID:27454431

  3. Plant Vascular Biology 2013: vascular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ursache, Robertas; Heo, Jung-Ok; Helariutta, Ykä

    2014-04-01

    About 200 researchers from around the world attended the Third International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2013) held in July 2013 at the Rantapuisto Conference Center, in Helsinki, Finland (http://www.pvb2013.org). The plant vascular system, which connects every organ in the mature plant, continues to attract the interest of researchers representing a wide range of disciplines, including development, physiology, systems biology, and computational biology. At the meeting, participants discussed the latest research advances in vascular development, long- and short-distance vascular transport and long-distance signalling in plant defence, in addition to providing a context for how these studies intersect with each other. The meeting provided an opportunity for researchers working across a broad range of fields to share ideas and to discuss future directions in the expanding field of vascular biology. In this report, the latest advances in understanding the mechanism of vascular trafficking presented at the meeting have been summarized.

  4. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  5. Thiazolidinediones and their fluid-related adverse effects: facts, fiction and putative management strategies.

    PubMed

    Karalliedde, Janaka; Buckingham, Robin E

    2007-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) or glitazones are agents that are widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. These drugs have a multitude of therapeutic effects including reduction in insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia, anti-inflammatory effects and amelioration of hypertension, microalbuminuria and hepatic steatosis. The TZD molecular target, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear transcription factor, is expressed diffusely in humans, including many tissues comprising the cardiovascular and renal systems. This suggests a potential for TZDs to elicit perturbing effects on these systems, which are independent of their effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. One of the most common adverse effects of TZDs is fluid retention, which can result in, or exacerbate, oedema and congestive heart failure (CHF). The frequency of peripheral oedema is approximately 5% when TZDs are used in mono- or combination oral therapy, and about 15% when used with insulin. Patients with type 2 diabetes are at high risk of myriad morbid complications, including CHF. The development of CHF, particularly in the elderly, is a harbinger of premature mortality. TZD-induced oedema is largely peripheral, may have its origins in changes in haemodynamics, with some contribution from molecules, which regulate cell and tissue permeability (e.g. vascular endothelial growth factor and protein kinase Cbeta), and remains the preponderant manifestation of TZD-induced fluid retention even in those with existing heart failure. Preclinical and pilot clinical data attest to the fact that at least part of the fluid retention derives from a direct effect of TZDs on sodium reabsorption via the renal medullary collecting duct, a mechanism that is sensitive to diuretic agents that have this nephron segment as their site of action, in whole or in part (spironolactone, amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide). Our review suggests various potential clinical strategies by which

  6. The role of renal hemodynamics in the antihypertensive action of mepirodipine, a new calcium antagonist.

    PubMed

    Noda, H; Fujita, T; Ogata, E

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the role of regional hemodynamics in the anti-hypertensive effect of mepirodipine, a new dihydropyridine-derivative calcium antagonist, we measured systemic, renal, hepatic, and forearm hemodynamics in 10 patients with essential hypertension treated with mepirodipine (15 mg/day) for 4 weeks. After the administration of mepirodipine, a significant decline in mean blood pressure (-13.8 +/- 2.3%, p less than 0.01) accompanied by a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (-21.1 +/- 2.6%, p less than 0.01) was observed. Although forearm vascular resistance did not change significantly, both renal (-19.2 +/- 6.7%, p less than 0.01) and hepatic vascular resistance (-17.6 +/- 3.8%, p less than 0.01) decreased considerably. The decrements of mean blood pressure with mepirodipine did not correlate with those of hepatic or forearm vascular resistance but correlated positively with those of renal vascular resistance (r = 0.699, p less than 0.05). Moreover, the increment of renal blood flow with mepirodipine was negatively correlated with the pretreatment level of renal blood flow (r = -0.670, p less than 0.05); renal blood flow increased to a greater extent in patients with lower pretreatment renal blood flow. These findings suggest that the oral administration of mepirodipine in patients with essential hypertension can produce selective vasodilation in the renal vasculature, which may play an important role in the relatively long-term antihypertensive effect of this drug.

  7. Novel Renal Biomarkers to Assess Cardiorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brisco, Meredith A.; Testani, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) in heart failure portends adverse outcomes and often limits aggressive medical and decongestive therapies. Despite the high prevalence in this population, not all forms of RD are prognostically or mechanistically equivalent: RD can result from irreversible nephron loss secondary to diabetic or hypertensive kidney disease or it can develop secondary to the HF itself, i.e. the cardiorenal syndrome. Furthermore, filtration is only one aspect of renal performance such that significant renal impairment secondary to cardiorenal syndrome can exist despite a normal glomerular filtration rate. Renal biomarkers have the potential to inform some of the intricacies involved in accurately assessing cardiorenal interactions. This article discusses novel biomarkers for cardiorenal syndrome and their utility in prognosis, diagnosis, and targeted treatment of heart failure-induced RD. PMID:25239434

  8. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  9. Adjuvant Sunitinib in High-Risk Renal-Cell Carcinoma after Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ravaud, Alain; Motzer, Robert J; Pandha, Hardev S; George, Daniel J; Pantuck, Allan J; Patel, Anup; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Escudier, Bernard; Donskov, Frede; Magheli, Ahmed; Carteni, Giacomo; Laguerre, Brigitte; Tomczak, Piotr; Breza, Jan; Gerletti, Paola; Lechuga, Mariajose; Lin, Xun; Martini, Jean-Francois; Ramaswamy, Krishnan; Casey, Michelle; Staehler, Michael; Patard, Jean-Jacques

    2016-12-08

    Background Sunitinib, a vascular endothelial growth factor pathway inhibitor, is an effective treatment for metastatic renal-cell carcinoma. We sought to determine the efficacy and safety of sunitinib in patients with locoregional renal-cell carcinoma at high risk for tumor recurrence after nephrectomy. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial, we assigned 615 patients with locoregional, high-risk clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma to receive either sunitinib (50 mg per day) or placebo on a 4-weeks-on, 2-weeks-off schedule for 1 year or until disease recurrence, unacceptable toxicity, or consent withdrawal. The primary end point was disease-free survival, according to blinded independent central review. Secondary end points included investigator-assessed disease-free survival, overall survival, and safety. Results The median duration of disease-free survival was 6.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.8 to not reached) in the sunitinib group and 5.6 years (95% CI, 3.8 to 6.6) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.98; P=0.03). Overall survival data were not mature at the time of data cutoff. Dose reductions because of adverse events were more frequent in the sunitinib group than in the placebo group (34.3% vs. 2%), as were dose interruptions (46.4% vs. 13.2%) and discontinuations (28.1% vs. 5.6%). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events were more frequent in the sunitinib group (48.4% for grade 3 events and 12.1% for grade 4 events) than in the placebo group (15.8% and 3.6%, respectively). There was a similar incidence of serious adverse events in the two groups (21.9% for sunitinib vs. 17.1% for placebo); no deaths were attributed to toxic effects. Conclusions Among patients with locoregional clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma at high risk for tumor recurrence after nephrectomy, the median duration of disease-free survival was significantly longer in the sunitinib group than in the placebo group, at a cost of a higher rate of toxic events

  10. Fibrate therapy and renal function.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2009-09-01

    Fibrates are a class of lipid-lowering medications primarily used as second-line agents behind statins. The adverse-effect profile of fibrates has been marked by a puzzling yet reversible rise in serum creatinine values with their use. It is not known whether this finding represents a true change in renal function. One proposed explanation for this phenomenon is that fibrates increase the production of creatinine, in which case a rise in serum creatinine values would not represent a true deterioration in renal function. An alternative theory is that fibrates reduce the production of vasodilatory prostaglandins, which would lead to a true change in renal function in patients who experience a rise in serum creatinine values. Routine serum creatinine monitoring is advisable in fibrate-treated patients, particularly in those with preexisting renal disease. A 30% increase in serum creatinine values in the absence of other causes of serum creatinine change warrants discontinuation of fibrate therapy. Serum creatinine values can take several weeks to return to their baseline values following discontinuation of a fibrate.

  11. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  12. Anatomic variations of the renal vessels: focus on the precaval right renal artery.

    PubMed

    Bouali, Ourdia; Labarre, David; Molinier, François; Lopez, Raphaël; Benouaich, Vincent; Lauwers, Frédéric; Moscovici, Jacques

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of precaval right renal artery and to investigate the distribution of renal arteries and veins. We discuss a theory of development of renal vascular variants. We retrospectively reviewed 120 arterial phase contrast material-enhanced spiral computerized tomography scans of the abdomen (1- to 2-mm section thickness) performed during a two-month period. Forty percent of the study group (48 patients) had one artery and one vein on each side, with typical course. There was a 9.17% prevalence of precaval right renal artery: 10 patients had a lower pole accessory artery in precaval position and one patient had the main and the accessory arteries that pass anterior to the inferior vena cava. In these cases, associated variations of renal vessels were higher than in the patients without precaval artery variant. There were multiple arteries in 28.3% of the right kidneys and in 26.7% of the left ones. Variants of the right renal vein consisted in multiple veins in 20% (24 cases). We detected no case of multiple left renal veins, but we described variations of its course (circum- or retroaortic vein) in 9.17% (11 cases). Twenty-six patients (21.7%) had associated variations of the renal pedicle. The current technical support allows for a minimally invasive study of vessels anatomy. In our study the prevalence of a precaval right renal artery appears to be higher than previously reported (9.17%). Knowledge on anatomical variations of right renal artery and associated renal vessels variations has major clinical implications.

  13. Vascular access today

    PubMed Central

    Pantelias, Konstantinos; Grapsa, Eirini

    2012-01-01

    The number of patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement therapy has increased worldwide. The most common replacement therapy is hemodialysis (HD). Vascular access (VA) has a key role for successful treatment. Despite the advances that have taken place in the field of the HD procedure, few things have changed with regards to VA in recent years. Arteriovenous fistula (AVF), polytetrafluoroethylene graft and the cuffed double lumen silicone catheter are the most common used for VA. In the long term, a number of complications may present and more than one VA is needed during the HD life. The most common complications for all of VA types are thrombosis, bleeding and infection, the most common cause of morbidity in these patients. It has been estimated that VA dysfunction is responsible for 20% of all hospitalizations. The annual cost of placing and looking after dialysis VA in the United States exceeds 1 billion dollars per year. A good functional access is also vital in order to deliver adequate HD therapy. It seems that the native AVF that Brescia and Cimino described in 1966 still remains the first choice for VA. The native forearm AVFs have the longest survival and require the fewest interventions. For this reason, the forearm AVF is the first choice, followed by the upper-arm AVF, the arteriovenous graft and the cuffed central venous catheter is the final choice. In conclusion, VA remains the most important issue for patients on HD and despite the technical improvements, a number of problems and complications have to be resolved. PMID:24175244

  14. Management of renal arterial injuries secondary to penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Dart, C H; Braitman, H E; Larlarb, S

    1979-07-01

    Renal vascular injuries are found relatively frequently after non-penetrating abdominal trauma. Penetrating renal arterial lesions occur much less frequently, involving less than 5 per cent of all penetrating arterial injuries. The association of bowel and other organ injuries makes diagnosis and treatment somewhat complex. Four cases of penetrating renal arterial injuries were seen from January 1972 to June 1976. All patients had multiple bowel lacerations. All arrived in the emergency room in hypovolemic shock. Two patients were resuscitated and successfully treated. Three patients had complete transections and 1 had major branch transection. Two patients had an associated parenchymal lesion. One patient had a through-and-through ureteropelvic injury. Preoperative arteriography was not done because of vascular instability. Renal arterial injuries were suspected by loss of psoas shadow on abdominal x-rays and by retroperitoneal hematomas. Retroperitoneal hematomas were explored to eliminate the possibility of renal injury. Both of the patients operated upon attained good renal function after surgical repairs. Postoperative renal scans and arteriograms showed initially decreased function, which returned toward normal. Repair of renal arterial lesions is possible with good functional result. Preoperative arteriography, renographic scan or excretory urography is not justified routinely because of the seriousness of commonly associated injuries.

  15. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  16. Radiocontrast-Induced Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Misson, Robert T.; Cutler, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretic advantages over the presently used agents. PMID:4013281

  17. Vascular versus tubular renin: role in kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Li, Minghong; Sigmund, Curt D.; Gomez, R. Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Renin, the key regulated enzyme of the renin-angiotensin system regulates blood pressure, fluid-electrolyte homeostasis, and renal morphogenesis. Whole body deletion of the renin gene results in severe morphological and functional derangements, including thickening of renal arterioles, hydronephrosis, and inability to concentrate the urine. Because renin is found in vascular and tubular cells, it has been impossible to discern the relative contribution of tubular versus vascular renin to such a complex phenotype. Therefore, we deleted renin independently in the vascular and tubular compartments by crossing Ren1c fl/fl mice to Foxd1-cre and Hoxb7-cre mice, respectively. Deletion of renin in the vasculature resulted in neonatal mortality that could be rescued with daily injections of saline. The kidneys of surviving mice showed the absence of renin, hypertrophic arteries, hydronephrosis, and negligible levels of plasma renin. In contrast, lack of renin in the collecting ducts did not affect kidney morphology, intra-renal renin, or circulating renin in basal conditions or in response to a homeostatic stress, such as sodium depletion. We conclude that renin generated in the renal vasculature is fundamental for the development and integrity of the kidney, whereas renin in the collecting ducts is dispensable for normal kidney development and cannot compensate for the lack of renin in the vascular compartment. Further, the main source of circulating renin is the kidney vasculature. PMID:26246508

  18. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification with this new online course from the Society for Vascular Medicine. Learn more. Looking for a ... jobs are listed right now. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Primary vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P

    2006-05-01

    Primary vascular access is usually achievable by a distal autogenous arterio-venous fistula (AVF). This article describes the approach to vascular access planning, the usual surgical options and the factors affecting patency.

  20. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Scientific Sessions Website FAQ Copyright © 2017 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved. Phone: +1- ... page Videos Training Programs Journal Access the Journal Society Communications Patient Information Pages Vascular Medicine Journal CME ...

  1. [Surgical complications in 479 renal transplantations].

    PubMed

    Borrego, J; Burgos, F J; Galmes, I; Orofino, L; Rodríguez Luna, J M; Marcen, R; Fernández, E; Escudero, A; Ortuño, J

    1994-04-01

    Exposition of results obtained from the review of the surgical complications found in a series of 479 renal transplantations performed between 1978 and 1992 in our centre, although some of them lack clinical relevance. There was fluid accumulation in 69 patients, distributed between 31 perirenal haematoma. 17 lymphocele, 13 urinoma, 5 perirenal abscesses and 3 mixed. 27.7% required no action. Frequency of renal rupture was 18 cases, 9 due to acute rejection and 9 to vascular thrombosis. Incidence of urinary obstruction was 4.8% with 5.8% of urinary fistula. With regard to the surgical wound, 9 infections, 7 haematomas, 1 eventration and 1 necrotizing fasciitis were observed. Vascular complications consisted in 10 arterial thrombosis, 10 venous thrombosis, 5 mixed thrombosis and 31 arterial stenosis. Treatment instituted for the various cases, its evolution, and an statistical study of risk factors are illustrated.

  2. [Renal artery stenosis : atheromatous disease and fibromuscular dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2009-04-01

    Renal artery stenosis may be due to atheromatous disease or renal fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). Management of both diseases requires treatment of hypertension usually observed in such patients; however, clinical presentation, mechanism and treatment of these 2 diseases are usually different. Renal FMD is now considered as a systemic disease, the cause of which may be genetic (although the exact cause is still elusive). Renal arteries are the most frequent localizations of FMD, but extra renal arteries may also be involved (usually carotid arteries). Risk factors of hypertension-induced renal FMD include estrogen treatment and smoking. Renal FMD are mostly found in young women and in children who present with recent severe and/or refractory symptomatic hypertension. Diagnosis is usually easy (Doppler, CT-scan), and treatment of renal FMD is angioplasty in most cases. Atheromatous renal artery stenosis is usually found in patients with other atheromatous disease (peripheral artery disease, carotid, coronary artery disease...). Clinical presentation include severe or refractory hypertension, recurrent flash pulmonary edema in a patient with hypertension, progressive renal dysfunction spontaneously or after medical treatment with converting-enzyme inhibition or angiotensin II blockade, hypertension in a patient (usually smoker or ex-smoker) with diffuse atheromatous vascular disease. Management of atheromatous renal artery disease is medical treatment in all patients (aggressive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, control of arterial pressure); revascularization is required in some patients only since it rarely cures hypertension: the goal of revascularization is mostly renal function protection, which may be observed in selected patients. Revascularization must be decided by physicians or teams involved in the care of such patients. Patients with atheromatous renal artery disease are at very high renal and cardiovascular risk : aggressive management of

  3. [Ultrasonographic study of blood flow in the renal arteries of patients with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Makarenko, E S; Dombrovskiĭ, V I; Nelasov, N Iu

    2012-01-01

    Vascular duplex ultrasound duplex with simultaneous ECG registration was made to estimate the quantitative and time parameters of blood flow in the renal arteries with grade 1-2 arterial hypertension. There were increases in vascular resistance indices and acceleration phase index and a reduction in systolic phase index. There were correlations of the time parameters of blood flow in the renal arteries with age and lipidogram values.

  4. Identification of Chemical Vascular Disruptors During Development Using An Integrative Predictive Toxicity Model and Zebrafish and in Vitro Functional Angiogenesis Assays.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of chemical vascular disruptors during development using an integrative predictive toxicity model and zebrafish and in vitro functional angiogenesis assays Chemically-induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse pre...

  5. Distal Embolic Protection for Renal Arterial Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Dubel, Gregory J. Murphy, Timothy P.

    2008-01-15

    Distal or embolic protection has intuitive appeal for its potential to prevent embolization of materials generated during interventional procedures. Distal protection devices (DPDs) have been most widely used in the coronary and carotid vascular beds, where they have demonstrated the ability to trap embolic materials and, in some cases, to reduce complications. Given the frequency of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal artery stenosis undergoing stent placement, it is reasonable to propose that these devices may play an important role in limiting distal embolization in the renal vasculature. Careful review of the literature reveals that atheroembolization does occur during renal arterial interventions, although it often goes undetected. Early experience with DPDs in the renal arteries in patients with suitable anatomy suggests retrieval of embolic materials in approximately 71% of cases and renal functional improvement/stabilization in 98% of cases. The combination of platelet inhibition and a DPD may provide even greater benefit. Given the critical importance of renal functional preservation, it follows that everything that can be done to prevent atheroembolism should be undertaken including the use of DPDs when anatomically feasible. The data available at this time support a beneficial role for these devices.

  6. Adverse consequences of immunostimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    release/cytokine storm, tumor lysis syndrome, vascular leak, and autoimmunity that were discussed by this panel.

  7. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access.

  8. Renal morphology in cats with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zini, E; Benali, S; Coppola, L; Guscetti, F; Ackermann, M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E; Aresu, L

    2014-11-01

    In humans, diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important cause of renal damage, with glomerular lesions being predominant. In cats, although diabetes is a common endocrinopathy, it is yet unknown whether it leads to renal damage. The aim of the study was to compare renal histologic features and parameters of renal function in diabetic cats against a control population matched for age, gender, breed, and body weight. Thirty-two diabetic and 20 control cats were included. Kidney sections from paraffin-embedded kidney samples were stained and examined with optical microscopy to identify glomerular, tubulointerstitial, and vascular lesions and to assess their frequency and severity. Serum creatinine and urea concentrations were also compared. Glomerular lesions were observed in 29 cats overall, with mesangial matrix increase being more common (19 cats). Tubulointerstitial lesions were observed in 42 cats, including lymphocytic infiltration (29), fibrosis (22), or tubular necrosis (21). Vascular lesions were observed in 5 cases. The frequency and severity of histologic lesions did not differ between diabetic and control cats; however, among diabetics, those that survived longer after diagnosis had more glomerular and vascular lesions. Serum creatinine and urea concentrations were similar between groups; in diabetic cats median creatinine was 109 μmol/l (range, 51-1200) and urea was 12 mmol/l (range, 4-63), and in controls creatinine was 126 μmol/l (range, 50-875) and urea 11 mmol/l (range, 3-80). The results suggest that DM in cats does not lead to microscopically detectable kidney lesions or clinically relevant renal dysfunction. The authors hypothesize that the short life expectancy of diabetic cats may be the main reason for the difference from human diabetics.

  9. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  10. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  11. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  12. Initiation of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of vascular development occurs during embryogenesis and the development of lateral organs, such as lateral roots and leaves. Understanding the mechanism underlying the initiation of vascular development has been an important goal of plant biologists. Auxin flow is a crucial factor involved in the initiation of vascular development. In addition, recent studies have identified key factors that regulate the establishment of vascular initial cells in embryos and roots. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in this field and discuss the initiation of vascular development.

  13. A biphasic parameter estimation method for quantitative analysis of dynamic renal scintigraphic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, T. S.; Zhang, Jeff L.; Ong, C. K.; Shuter, B.

    2006-06-01

    Dynamic renal scintigraphy is an established method in nuclear medicine, commonly used for the assessment of renal function. In this paper, a biphasic model fitting method is proposed for simultaneous estimation of both vascular and parenchymal parameters from renal scintigraphic data. These parameters include the renal plasma flow, vascular and parenchymal mean transit times, and the glomerular extraction rate. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the stability and confidence of the parameter estimates obtained by the proposed biphasic method, before applying the method on actual patient study cases to compare with the conventional fitting approach and other established renal indices. The various parameter estimates obtained using the proposed method were found to be consistent with the respective pathologies of the study cases. The renal plasma flow and extraction rate estimated by the proposed method were in good agreement with those previously obtained using dynamic computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  15. [Adverse events of immune checkpoint inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Foller, S; Oppel-Heuchel, H; Fetter, I; Winkler, Y; Grimm, M-O

    2017-04-01

    After immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy was approved for renal cell carcinoma last year, this new immune therapy has spread to urology. Further approvals (atezolizumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab) are expected in 2017 for metastatic urothelial carcinoma that has progressed following treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy. With expanding use of immune checkpoint inhibitors, experience in diagnosing and managing immune-mediated adverse events increases. Although of low incidence, grade 3/4 toxicities play a central role. Organs most common for immune-mediated adverse events are skin, liver (hepatitis), kidneys (nephritis), gastrointestinal tract (diarrhea and colitis), lungs (pneumonitis), and endocrine organs (hyper-, hypothyroidism and hypophysitis). Diagnostic workup includes routine laboratory tests (including liver function tests) and may be supplemented with hormone values. In cases of pneumonitis or hypophysitis, imaging (high-resolution CT, MRI) can confirm diagnoses. Immune-mediated toxicities are treated with therapy interruption and administration of corticosteroids (and in individual cases additional immunosuppression). Dose modification is not intended!

  16. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero G in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Four rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast, five of the seven remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted and their urinary flow rate. Potassium excretion increased. End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause in the rat a decrease in distal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis. The adequacy of other nonatrial volume control mechanisms in regulating renal salt and water conservation in opposition to the studied atrial-renal (Henry-Gauer) reflex of thoracic vascular distension is confirmed.

  17. Menstruation. A hazard in radionuclide renal transplant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Orzel, J A; Jaffers, G J

    1986-06-01

    Serial Tc-99m DTPA studies were performed to evaluate renal transplant blood flow and function in a 34-year-old woman. A hypervascular pelvic mass with increased blood pool activity was intermittently identified. This hypervascular lesion suggested a pathologic condition of the pelvis, and its blood pool simulated bladder activity, confusing interpretation of renal function. This perplexing vascular lesion was the uterus, with varying degrees of blood flow and blood pool activity depending on the timing of the renal study in relation to the menstrual cycle.

  18. Menstruation. A hazard in radionuclide renal transplant evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Jaffers, G.J.

    1986-06-01

    Serial Tc-99m DTPA studies were performed to evaluate renal transplant blood flow and function in a 34-year-old woman. A hypervascular pelvic mass with increased blood pool activity was intermittently identified. This hypervascular lesion suggested a pathologic condition of the pelvis, and its blood pool simulated bladder activity, confusing interpretation of renal function. This perplexing vascular lesion was the uterus, with varying degrees of blood flow and blood pool activity depending on the timing of the renal study in relation to the menstrual cycle.

  19. Rupturing of renal angiomyolipoma due to physical examination.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Suat; Al, Behçet; Yildirim, Cuma; Oktay, Mehmet Murat; Yilmaz, Demet Ari

    2012-06-28

    Renal angiomyolipoma (AML) is relatively a rare benign tumour including vascular smooth muscle, and fatty elements; and the majority of renal AML run an asymptomatic, benign course. Potentially life-threatening complication of renal AML is tumour rupturing that can be seen after a low-velocity trauma. Flank pain and haematuria may be considered not important in emergency department if underlying cause is not kept in mind. In present study, the authors aimed to discuss a patient who developed ruptured AML during physical examination.

  20. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  1. Adverse effects of anabolic steroids in athletes. A constant threat.

    PubMed

    Maravelias, C; Dona, A; Stefanidou, M; Spiliopoulou, C

    2005-09-15

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are used as ergogenic aids by athletes and non-athletes to enhance performance by augmenting muscular development and strength. AAS administration is often associated with various adverse effects that are generally dose related. High and multi-doses of AAS used for athletic enhancement can lead to serious and irreversible organ damage. Among the most common adverse effects of AAS are some degree of reduced fertility and gynecomastia in males and masculinization in women and children. Other adverse effects include hypertension and atherosclerosis, blood clotting, jaundice, hepatic neoplasms and carcinoma, tendon damage, psychiatric and behavioral disorders. More specifically, this article reviews the reproductive, hepatic, cardiovascular, hematological, cerebrovascular, musculoskeletal, endocrine, renal, immunologic and psychologic effects. Drug-prevention counseling to athletes is highlighted and the use of anabolic steroids is must be avoided, emphasizing that sports goals may be met within the framework of honest competition, free of doping substances.

  2. Renal involvement in the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS)-APS nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tektonidou, Maria G

    2009-06-01

    Although the kidney represents a major target organ in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), renal involvement in APS was poorly recognized until recently. The most well-recognized renal manifestations of APS are the renal artery thrombosis/stenosis, renal infarction, hypertension, renal vein thrombosis, end-stage renal disease, increased allograft vascular thrombosis, some types of glomerular disease, and a small-vessel vaso-occlusive nephropathy, recently defined as APS nephropathy. APS nephropathy was first described in primary APS patients, characterized by acute thrombotic lesions in glomeruli and/or arterioles (thrombotic microangiopathy) and chronic vascular lesions such as fibrous intimal hyperplasia of arterioles and interlobular arteries, organized thrombi with or without recanalization, and fibrous arterial and arteriolar occlusions or focal cortical atrophy. APS nephropathy was also detected in further studies including patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-related APS and SLE/non-APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies, independently of lupus nephritis. The same histologic lesions, especially thrombotic mictroangiopathy, were also observed in patients with catastrophic APS. The most frequent clinical and laboratory characteristics of APS nephropathy in all the above groups of patients are hypertension (often severe), proteinuria (ranging from mild to nephrotic range), hematuria, and acute or chronic renal insufficiency.

  3. 99mtechnetium penicillamine: a renal cortical scanning agent.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Davis, G; Halpern, S; Ashburn, W

    1977-04-01

    99mTechnetium penicillamine, a renal cortical imaging agent, can be used to provide a rapid, safe and non-invasive assessment of renal morphology and the renal vascular supply. Since this agent is not excreted significantly during the imaging procedure cortical scans of high quality can be obtained without image deterioration owing to a superimposed collecting system. These scans, which are clearly superior in anatomical detail to earlier scans using 131I hippuran, can be obtained along with the 131I hippuran renogram when the patient comes to the nuclear medicine department. Herein we demonstrate the anatomical detail it is now possible to achieve by presenting the cortical renal scans and accompanying radiograms from 5 patients with different renal pathology.

  4. Prostaglandin control of renal circulation in the unanesthetized dog and baboon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, J. A.; Vatner, S. F.; Heyndrickx, G. R.; Boettcher, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of indomethacin and meclofenamate, inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis, were evaluated in the regulation of renal blood flow in conscious and anesthetized dogs and in tranquilized baboons, instrumented with arterial pressure catheters and renal blood flow probes. Indomethacin, 10 mg/kg, did not alter renal blood flow or resistance significantly in the conscious dog. In the anesthetized dog, however, indomethacin caused a reduction in renal blood flow and an elevation of renal vascular resistance. Meclofenamate, 4 mg/kg, reduced renal flow and increased renal vascular resistance in conscious dogs. In conscious dogs and tranquilized primates, indomethacin and meclofenamate reduced the reactive hyperemia in the renal bed. Methoxamine and angiotensin II infused in graded doses induced significantly greater renal vasoconstriction in conscious dogs in the presence of indomethacin. Thus, in the conscious animal, prostaglandins appear to play only a minor part in the control of renal circulation at rest, but they are of greater importance in mediating the renal responses to reactive hyperemia and to vasoconstriction.

  5. Vascular Manifestations of von Recklinghausen's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fye, Kenneth H.; Jacobs, Richard P.; Roe, Robert L.

    1975-01-01

    A casual relationship between von Recklinghausen's disease, or neurofibromatosis, and arteriolar abnormalities has been reported in the European literature. A patient was seen who had biopsy-proved neurofibromatosis and renovascular hypertension and retroperitoneal bleeding. An arteriographic study showed multiple small aneurysms throughout the coeliac axis, the superior mesenteric artery and in several small intrarenal vessels. Renal vein renin levels were elevated particularly in the right renal vein, supporting the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. Both the aneurysms seen in angiographic studies and the retroperitoneal hemorrhage are probably vascular manifestations of von Recklinghausen's disease. Support for this conclusion is enhanced by the absence of clinical, laboratory or histologic data supporting the only tenable differential diagnosis, periarteritis nodosa. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:803743

  6. Effect of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium management in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, V E; Wilson, D M; Burnett, J C; Johnson, C M; Offord, K P

    1991-10-01

    We compared the tubular transport of sodium and the erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity in hypertensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and in normotensive control subjects. In addition, we assessed the effects of inhibition of converting enzyme on renal hemodynamics and sodium excretion in hypertensive patients with ADPKD to provide information on mechanisms responsible for the increased renal vascular resistance and filtration fraction and the adjustment of the pressure-natriuresis relationship during saline expansion, observed in patients with ADPKD, hypertension, and preserved renal function. In comparison with normotensive control subjects, the hypertensive patients with ADPKD had lower renal plasma flows, higher renal vascular resistances and filtration fractions, and similar proximal and distal fractional reabsorptions of sodium. The administration of enalapril resulted in significant increases in the renal plasma flow and significant reductions in mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and filtration fraction, but the glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged. Despite the significant reduction in mean arterial pressure during inhibition of converting enzyme, the distal fractional reabsorption of sodium decreased while the total fractional excretion of sodium remained unchanged or increased slightly. No significant differences were detected between the normotensive control subjects and the hypertensive patients with ADPKD in erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport activity, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone concentration, or atrial natriuretic factor. These results suggest that the renal renin-angiotensin system plays a central role in the alterations in renal hemodynamics and sodium management associated with the development of hypertension in ADPKD.

  7. Diuretic use in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2011-12-20

    Diuretics are agents commonly used in diseases characterized by excess extracellular fluid, including chronic kidney disease, the nephrotic syndrome, cirrhosis and heart failure. Multiple diuretic classes, including thiazide-type diuretics, loop diuretics and K(+)-sparing diuretics, are used to treat patients with these diseases, either individually or as combination therapies. An understanding of what determines a patient's response to a diuretic is a prerequisite to the correct use of these drugs. The response of patients with these diseases to diuretics, which is related to the dose, is best described by a sigmoid curve whose contour can become distorted by any of the several sodium-retaining states that are directly or indirectly associated with renal disease. Diuretic actions are of considerable importance to patients who have renal disease, as their effective use assists in extracellular fluid volume control, reducing excretion of protein in urine and lessening the risk of developing hyperkalemia. Diuretic-related adverse events that involve the uric acid, Na(+) and K(+) axes are not uncommon; therefore the clinician must be vigilant in looking for biochemical disturbances. As a result of diuretic-related adverse events, clinicians must be resourceful in the dose amount and frequency of dosing.

  8. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  9. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  10. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  11. Homocysteine and non-cardiac vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Katsiki, Niki; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2017-03-17

    Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels are predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Hyperhomocysteinemia has also been associated with total and CVD mortality. However, whether Hcy is just a marker or plays a causal role in CVD remains to be elucidated. In this narrative review, we discuss the associations between Hcy and non-cardiac vascular diseases, namely stroke, peripheral artery disease (PAD), carotid artery disease, chronic kidney disease (CKD), atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS), abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and erectile dysfunction (ED). The effects of several drugs on Hcy levels are also considered. Folic acid, vitamin B6 and B12 supplementation can significantly decrease circulating Hcy concentrations but their effects on CVD risk reduction are conflicting. No current guidelines recommend the routine screening of Hcy levels in patients with non-cardiac vascular diseases. Therefore, further research is needed to elucidate the use of Hcy in the clinical practice.

  12. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Eddington, Helen; Sinha, Smeeta; Kalra, Philip A

    2009-03-01

    Vascular calcification, which is associated with arterial stiffness, is now known to be an important predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with renal disease. This calcification starts developing in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is present in over 50% of patients at the time of dialysis commencement. Once calcification is present it continues to progress, though some medications have been shown to slow this progression. Vascular calcification and bone abnormalities are now both encompassed by the term of CKD-mineral bone disorder and are thought to be part of the same disease process in CKD. Vascular calcification and arterial stiffness have been extensively researched in the renal population and many factors are known to be associated with their presence and progression. This calcification is an important factor to be considered in the management of the renal patient but there are different methods available for its measurement. These details will be discussed further in this review along with evidence available for management of this important complication of renal disease.

  13. Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Dichgans, Martin; Leys, Didier

    2017-02-03

    Cerebrovascular disease typically manifests with stroke, cognitive impairment, or both. Vascular cognitive impairment refers to all forms of cognitive disorder associated with cerebrovascular disease, regardless of the specific mechanisms involved. It encompasses the full range of cognitive deficits from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. In principle, any of the multiple causes of clinical stroke can cause vascular cognitive impairment. Recent work further highlights a role of microinfarcts, microhemorrhages, strategic white matter tracts, loss of microstructural tissue integrity, and secondary neurodegeneration. Vascular brain injury results in loss of structural and functional connectivity and, hence, compromise of functional networks within the brain. Vascular cognitive impairment is common both after stroke and in stroke-free individuals presenting to dementia clinics, and vascular pathology frequently coexists with neurodegenerative pathology, resulting in mixed forms of mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Vascular dementia is now recognized as the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, and there is increasing awareness that targeting vascular risk may help to prevent dementia, even of the Alzheimer type. Recent advances in neuroimaging, neuropathology, epidemiology, and genetics have led to a deeper understanding of how vascular disease affects cognition. These new findings provide an opportunity for the present reappraisal of vascular cognitive impairment. We further briefly address current therapeutic concepts.

  14. Importance of insulin resistance to vascular repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cubbon, Richard M; Mercer, Ben N; Sengupta, Anshuman; Kearney, Mark T

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic insulin resistance is apparent across a spectrum of clinical disorders, including obesity and diabetes, and is characterized by an adverse clustering of cardiovascular risk factors related to abnormal cellular responses to insulin. These disorders are becoming increasingly prevalent and represent a major global public health concern because of their association with significant increases in atherosclerosis-related mortality. Endogenous repair mechanisms are thought to retard the development of vascular disease, and a growing evidence base supports the adverse impact of the insulin-resistant phenotype upon indices of vascular repair. Beyond the impact of systemic metabolic changes, emerging data from murine studies also provide support for abnormal insulin signaling at the level of vascular cells in retarding vascular repair. Interrelated pathophysiological factors, including reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, oxidative stress, altered growth factor activity, and abnormal intracellular signaling, are likely to act in conjunction to impede vascular repair while also driving vascular damage. Understanding of these processes is shaping novel therapeutic paradigms that aim to promote vascular repair and regeneration, either by recruiting endogenous mechanisms or by the administration of cell-based therapies.

  15. Renal function in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burlet, A; Drukker, A; Guignard, J P

    1999-01-01

    We performed renal function tests in 18 young patients, 1.8-14.6 years of age, with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). Glomerular filtration rate was normal (116 +/- 4.5 ml/min/1.73 m2), and renal plasma flow was decreased (410 +/- 25 ml/min/1.73 m2) with a rise in the filtration fraction (29 +/- 1.1%). The suggested pathophysiologic explanation of these findings is that the blood hyperviscosity seen in patients with CCHD causes an overall increase in renal vascular resistance with a rise in intraglomerular blood pressure. Despite a sluggish flow of blood in the glomerular capillary bed, the effective filtration pressure was adjusted to conserve the glomerular filtration rate. In addition to these renal hemodynamic parameters, we also studied renal acidification and tubular sodium and water handling during a forced water diuresis. Our data indicate that children with CCHD have a mild to moderate normal ion gap metabolic acidosis due to a low proximal tubular threshold for bicarbonate. Proximal tubular sodium and water reabsorption under these conditions were somewhat increased, though not significantly, probably due to intrarenal hydrostatic forces, in particular the rise in the oncotic pressure in the postglomerular capillaries in patients with high hematocrit values. The distal tubular functions such as sodium handling and acidification were not affected.

  16. Clinicopathological spectrum of kidney diseases in cancer patients treated with vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors: a report of 5 cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Usui, Joichi; Glezerman, Ilya G; Salvatore, Steven P; Chandran, Chandra B; Flombaum, Carlos D; Seshan, Surya V

    2014-09-01

    Recently, cancer therapies have been supplemented by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors as anti-angiogenic agents. However, kidney-related adverse reactions associated with these agents clinically manifest as hypertension and proteinuria, the most severe form being thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). We present the spectrum of pathological features in VEGF inhibitor-associated kidney disease. Clinicopathological findings of kidney disease were retrospectively studied in 5 cancer patients treated with anti-VEGF agents. Although 4 cases received bevacizumab (anti-VEGF-A), one was given sorafenib (small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor affecting VEGF-R2). All patients presented with acute kidney injury, hypertension, and/or proteinuria. All kidney biopsies showed recent and chronic endothelial injury of varying severity and vascular sclerosis, including 2 with typical active features of TMA. Furthermore, acute tubular injury with focal necrosis was seen in all cases. While administration of VEGF inhibitor was discontinued in 4 cases, it was resumed for 5 more doses, following steroid therapy in 1 case. Cessation of VEGF inhibitor therapy was successful in reversing anemia and led to improvement of hypertension and proteinuria in 4 of the 5 cases. One case with TMA progressed to end-stage renal disease. A range of renal pathologic lesions secondary to endothelial injury are noted often accompanied by acute tubular damage following anti-VEGF therapy, the most severe being TMA. While most of the clinical manifestations are reversible with discontinuation of therapy, the role of other nephrotoxic chemotherapeutic agents in enhancing renal injury including severe TMA and other host factors with possible poor outcome should be considered.

  17. Angiotensin and thromboxane in the enhanced renal adrenergic nerve sensitivity of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Robinette, J B; Conger, J D

    1990-01-01

    The roles of intrarenal angiotensin (A) and thromboxane (TX) in the vascular hypersensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS) and paradoxical vasoconstriction to renal perfusion pressure (RPP) reduction in the autoregulatory range in 1 wk norepinephrine (NE)-induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats were investigated. Renal blood flow (RBF) responses were determined before and during intrarenal infusion of an AII and TXA2 antagonist. Saralasin or SQ29548 alone partially corrected the slopes of RBF to RNS and RPP reduction in NE-ARF rats (P less than 0.02). Saralasin + SQ29548 normalized the RBF response to RNS. While combined saralasin + SQ29548 eliminated the vasoconstriction to RPP reduction, similar to the effect of renal denervation, appropriate vasodilatation was not restored. Renal vein norepinephrine efflux during RNS was disproportionately increased in NE-ARF (P less than 0.001) and was suppressed by saralasin + SQ29548 infusion (P less than 0.005). It is concluded that the enhanced sensitivity to RNS and paradoxical vasoconstriction to RPP reduction in 1 wk NE-ARF kidneys are the result of intrarenal TX and AII acceleration of neurotransmitter release to adrenergic nerve activity. PMID:2243129

  18. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  19. Use of the inferior epigastric artery to revascularize a lower pole renal artery in renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Young, J S; Rohr, M S

    1995-02-01

    The increasing use of living-related donors has increased the incidence wherein the transplant surgeon is required to use special vascular surgical techniques to transplant kidneys with anomalous arterial anatomy. One of the most commonly encountered arterial anomalies is the presence of a lower pole renal artery. In many cases, this artery can be anastomosed to the main renal artery, and the main renal artery can then be anastomosed into the recipient vessel. However, there are cases where the lower pole renal artery is too distant from the main renal artery to allow an anastomosis to be performed. The lower pole renal artery of the graft must be revascularized to avoid ischemic injury to the ureter. Thus, alternate methods for the revascularization of this vessel must be found. We describe the use of the recipient inferior epigastric artery as an arterial supply for the donor lower pole artery. In our case report, this method provided excellent flow to the lower kidney and was documented by later studies.

  20. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  1. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  2. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  3. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  4. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Review Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  5. Challenges and future of renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    de Francisco, Angel L M; Piñera, Celestino

    2006-01-01

    Renal community increasingly recognizes the challenges of very high mortality, morbidity and low quality of life among dialysis patients. Current hemodialysis (HD) schedule provides less than 10% of the clearance power of the natural kidneys and therefore current standard HD treatment is still a long way from providing adequate renal replacement. In the future it would be expected to improve dialysis control with the development of new technology: membranes, dialysate buffer, electrolyte concentration, system interface, arteriovenous access monitoring. Online technology must be adapted to routine HD for new prescription monitoring such as creatinine online sensing technology, sodium-specific electrode or hydrogen ion concentration. Online convective therapies offer the opportunity for a more biological renal replacement therapy increasing convective transport in order to "reproduce" glomerular function and improving small and middle molecular clearance in an economically feasible and safe way. The paradigm of thrice-weekly dialysis is faced with diminishing returns, with the possible exception of long dialysis sessions. More frequent (daily) dialysis represents a very promising tool for improving dialysis outcomes and quality of life. Future technologies for renal replacement include bioartificial kidneys based in continuous hemofiltration and bioartificial tubules. Although Phase I/II clinical trial on 10 patients with acute renal failure has been reported the procedure requires further evaluation. Organogenesis, therapeutic cloning, or cloning and organogenesis combined might in the future produce a functional and histocompatible kidney. The continuous increase in incidence and prevalence of renal-replacement therapy is a world-wide phenomenon, although the rates in Europe are still much lower than in the U.S. The increase in rates applies especially to older patients, patients with diabetes mellitus and renal vascular disease and the consequences of this

  6. Acute renal injury induced by valacyclovir hydrochloride: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanning; Cong, Yuxi; Teng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Acyclovir has been a frequently used antiviral agent in the clinical treatment of leukemia, acute encephalitis, malignant tumor and herpes simplex. The adverse effects of this drug have been widely described in clinical practice. In the present study, a case of a 35-year-old female patient diagnosed with herpes simplex, who developed acute renal injury following treatment with valacyclovir hydrochloride, is described. Kidney biopsy, light microscopy and laboratory examination were performed, and all findings revealed the signs of evident vacuolar degeneration of capillary endothelial and renal tubular epithelial cells, erythrocyte aggregation in partial renal tubule and microvilli exfoliation from epithelial cells. Renal interstitial edema was clearly identified. The clinical evidence observed from this female patient indicated that renal functions should be closely monitored during valacyclovir hydrochloride administration. A variety of effective measures, such as hydration, alkalizing urine, promoting the discharge of medication and the use of antagonists are recommended following the administration of antiviral agents. PMID:28101180

  7. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  8. Lupus vasculopathy combined with renal infarction: unusual manifestation of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Toshiro; Kanasaki, Keizo; Morita, Yoshikata; Yokomaku, Yukiyo; Narita, Mitsuhiro; Koyama, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Yuki; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Koya, Daisuke

    2005-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman with a 10-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus was admitted to our hospital because of the onset of hypertension and renal dysfunction. Renal arteriogram revealed multiple renal infarctions, and cut-off or tapering-stenosis in the interlobular arteries. Renal biopsy showed concentric intimal thickening with narrowed lumen in some arterioles and deposition of IgG/IgM/complement 3 in the wall of arteriole without any active lesions or immune complex deposition in glomeruli. The present case indicates that this type of renal vascular lesion in lupus nephritis, lupus vasculopathy, may cause renal infarction and the loss of renal function without active glomerular lesions.

  9. Renal Tubular Acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Renal Tubular Acidosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Renal Tubular Acidosis Print A A A What's in ... Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Acidosis tubular renal Each time our internal organs do something, such ...

  10. [Idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Ait Bolbarod, A; el Mrini, M; Kadiri, R; Benjelloun, S

    1996-06-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula. The diagnosis was established angiographically in a 24 year old man presenting gross hematuria. Embolization of the fistula was performed. Efficiency of this treatment was appreciated clinically and by duplex renal ultrasonography. The characteristics of renal arteriovenous fistulas are reviewed.

  11. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  12. Effects of radiofrequency ablation on individual renal function: assessment by technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Takashi; Sato, Shuhei; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Mimura, Hidefumi; Yasui, Kotaro; Gobara, Hideo; Saika, Takashi; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2006-04-01

    We quantitatively evaluated total and individual renal function by technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc-99m MAG3) renal scintigraphy before and after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumors. Eleven patients who underwent Tc-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy 1 week before and after RFA were evaluated (7 men and 4 women; age range: 23-83 years; mean age: 60.6 years). Five patients had solitary kidneys, and five had normally or minimally functioning contralateral kidneys. One patient had a renal cell carcinoma in the contralateral kidney. One patient with a solitary kidney underwent RFA a second time for a residual tumor. In patients with a solitary kidney, MAG3 clearance decreased after 5 of 6 RFAs, and in patients with a normally functioning contralateral kidney, MAG3 clearance decreased after 4 of 5 RFAs, but no significant differences were observed between before and after treatments. In addition to the total MAG3 clearance, the split MAG3 clearance was evaluated in patients with a normally functioning contralateral kidney. MAG3 clearance decreased in 4 of 5 treated kidneys, while it adversely increased in the contralateral kidneys after 4 of 5 RFAs. No significant differences, however, were observed between before and after treatments. The results of our study revealed no significant differences in sCr, BUN, CCr, or MAG3 clearance between pre- and post-RFA values. These results support data regarding the functional impact and safety of renal RFA in published reports. We evaluated total and individual renal function quantitatively using Tc-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy before and after treatment. This scintigraphy was very useful in assessing the effects of RFA on renal function.

  13. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors as Modulators of Vascular Function and Their Application in Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is regulated by multiple neuronal, hormonal, renal and vascular control mechanisms. Changes in signaling mechanisms in the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and extracellular matrix cause alterations in vascular tone and blood vessel remodeling and may lead to persistent increases in vascular resistance and hypertension (HTN). In VSM, activation of surface receptors by vasoconstrictor stimuli causes an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), which forms a complex with calmodulin, activates myosin light chain (MLC) kinase and leads to MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. Vasoconstrictor agonists could also increase the production of diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C (PKC). PKC is a family of Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent isozymes that have different distributions in various blood vessels, and undergo translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, cytoskeleton or the nucleus during cell activation. In VSM, PKC translocation to the cell surface may trigger a cascade of biochemical events leading to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase (MEK), a pathway that ultimately increases the myofilament force sensitivity to [Ca2+]i, and enhances actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. PKC translocation to the nucleus may induce transactivation of various genes and promote VSM growth and proliferation. PKC could also affect endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the extracellular matrix further affecting vascular reactivity and remodeling. In addition to vasoactive factors, reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic factors could affect PKC activity. Increased PKC expression and activity have been observed in vascular disease and in certain forms of experimental and human HTN. Targeting of vascular PKC using PKC inhibitors may function in concert with

  14. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation.

  15. Muscle spasms: an unexpected adverse drug reaction of pemetrexed?

    PubMed Central

    de Rouw, Hendrika J. A.; Jessurun, Naomi T.; Masen-Poos, Lucie J. P.; Derijks, Hieronymus J.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we describe a 53-year-old woman with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, treated with pemetrexed and cisplatin combination therapy, followed by pemetrexed monotherapy. The patient developed severe muscle spasms at least twice, shortly after administration of pemetrexed monotherapy. A possible explanation for this observation is that in combination with cisplatin therapy, the patient was hyperhydrated before administration to promote renal excretion and reduce toxicity. Pemetrexed is also renally excreted, which supports the finding that toxicity did not occur when the patient was hyperhydrated. After discontinuation of pemetrexed the symptoms did not reoccur. All aspects of this case point to a possible relationship between pemetrexed and an adverse drug reaction (ADR). We conclude that muscle spasms are a rare, but possibly dose-related ADR of pemetrexed-based therapy. PMID:28203304

  16. Hereditary and Sporadic Papillary Renal Carcinomas with c-met Mutations Share a Distinct Morphological Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lubensky, Irina A.; Schmidt, Laura; Zhuang, Zhengping; Weirich, Gregor; Pack, Svetlana; Zambrano, Norman; Walther, McClellan M.; Choyke, Peter; Linehan, W. Marston; Zbar, Berton

    1999-01-01

    Germline mutations of c-met oncogene at 7q31 have been detected in patients with hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma. In addition, c-met mutations were shown to play a role in 13% of patients with papillary renal cell carcinoma and no family history of renal tumors. The histopathology of papillary renal cell carcinoma with c-met mutations has not been previously described. We analyzed the histopathology of 103 bilateral archival papillary renal cell carcinomas and 4 metastases in 29 patients from 6 hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma families with germline c-met mutations and 6 papillary renal cell carcinomas with c-met mutations from 5 patients with no family history of renal tumors. Twenty-five sporadic renal tumors with prominent papillary architecture and without somatic c-met mutations were evaluated for comparison. All papillary renal cell carcinomas with c-met mutations were 75 to 100% papillary/tubulopapillary in architecture and showed chromophil basophilic, papillary renal cell carcinoma type 1 histology. Fuhrman nuclear grade 1–2 was seen in tumors from 23 patients, and nuclear grade 3 was observed focally in 8 patients. Seventeen patients had multiple papillary adenomas and microscopic papillary lesions in the surrounding renal parenchyma. Clear cells with intracytoplasmic lipid and glycogen were focally present in tumors of 94% papillary renal cell carcinoma patients. Clear cells of papillary renal cell carcinoma had small basophilic nuclei, and clear cell areas lacked a fine vascular network characteristic of conventional (clear) cell renal cell carcinoma. We conclude that papillary renal cell carcinoma patients with c-met mutations develop multiple, bilateral, papillary macroscopic and microscopic renal lesions. Renal tumors with c-met genotype show a distinctive papillary renal cell carcinoma type 1 phenotype and are genetically and histologically different from renal tumors seen in other hereditary renal syndromes and most sporadic

  17. A Literature Review of Renal Surgical Anatomy and Surgical Strategies for Partial Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Klatte, Tobias; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Gratzke, Christian; Kaouk, Jihad; Kutikov, Alexander; Macchi, Veronica; Mottrie, Alexandre; Porpiglia, Francesco; Porter, James; Rogers, Craig G.; Russo, Paul; Thompson, R. Houston; Uzzo, Robert G.; Wood, Christopher G.; Gill, Inderbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Context A detailed understanding of renal surgical anatomy is necessary to optimize preoperative planning and operative technique and provide a basis for improved outcomes. Objective To evaluate the literature regarding pertinent surgical anatomy of the kidney and related structures, nephrometry scoring systems, and current surgical strategies for partial nephrectomy (PN). Evidence acquisition A literature review was conducted. Evidence synthesis Surgical renal anatomy fundamentally impacts PN surgery. The renal artery divides into anterior and posterior divisions, from which approximately five segmental terminal arteries originate. The renal veins are not terminal. Variations in the vascular and lymphatic channels are common; thus, concurrent lymphadenectomy is not routinely indicated during PN for cT1 renal masses in the setting of clinically negative lymph nodes. Renal-protocol contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is used for standard imaging. Anatomy-based nephrometry scoring systems allow standardized academic reporting of tumor characteristics and predict PN outcomes (complications, remnant function, possibly histology). Anatomy-based novel surgical approaches may reduce ischemic time during PN; these include early unclamping, segmental clamping, tumor-specific clamping (zero ischemia), and unclamped PN. Cancer cure after PN relies on complete resection, which can be achieved by thin margins. Post-PN renal function is impacted by kidney quality, remnant quantity, and ischemia type and duration. Conclusions Surgical renal anatomy underpins imaging, nephrometry scoring systems, and vascular control techniques that reduce global renal ischemia and may impact post-PN function. A contemporary ideal PN excises the tumor with a thin negative margin, delicately secures the tumor bed to maximize vascularized remnant parenchyma, and minimizes global ischemia to the renal remnant with minimal complications. Patient summary In this report

  18. Spontaneous rupture of the kidney in the patients with synchronous renal hemangioma and nephrogenic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Memmedoğlu, Akif; Musayev, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Most renal neoplasms in adults are epithelial in origin and mesenchymal tumors are rarely encountered. Vascular tumors and tumor-like lesions account for a very small subset. Hemangioma of the kidney is a rarely seen benign vascular neoplasm that probably arises from angioblastic cells. Its general sign is macroscopic hematuria with or without pain. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult or impossible. Previously, spontaneous rupture of the kidney caused by renal hemangioma was not reported in the English literature. In this study, two cases with a history of nephrogenic hypertension who presented with spontaneous renal rupture are presented. There wasn’t any trauma history in the background of our patients. A long-standing nephrogenic hypertension was present in both patients. Patients underwent radical nephrectomy due to rupture of the renal tumor. In histopathological examination, capillary hemangioma was detected in the renal medulla in both cases. Patients didn’t need antihypertensive therapy during the postoperative period. PMID:26623154

  19. ROLE OF ATP IN REGULATING RENAL MICROVASCULAR FUNCTION AND IN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhengrong; Inscho, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an essential energy substrate for cellular metabolism but it can also influence many biological processes when released into the extracellular milieu. Research has established that extracellular ATP acts as an autocrine/paracrine factor that regulates many physiological functions. Alternatively, excessive extracellular ATP levels contribute to pathophysiological processes such as inflammation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and atherosclerosis. Renal P2 receptors are widely distributed throughout glomeruli, vasculature and tubular segments, and participate in controlling renal vascular resistance, mediating renal autoregulation, and regulating tubular transport function. This review will focus on the role of ATP-P2 receptor signaling in regulating renal microvascular function and autoregulation, recent advances on the role of ATP-P2 signaling in hypertension-associated renal vascular injury, and emerging new directions. PMID:21768526

  20. Visceral leishmaniasis in renal transplant recipients: successful treatment with liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome).

    PubMed

    Boletis, J N; Pefanis, A; Stathakis, C; Helioti, H; Kostakis, A; Giamarellou, H

    1999-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a rare disease in renal transplant recipients. Liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) is known to be effective against VL. However, previously there has been no experience with administration of such treatment to renal transplant recipients. We report herein four patients with VL complicating renal transplantation who were treated successfully with liposomal amphotericin B (total dose, 23-40 mg/kg). Neither adverse reactions nor clinical relapses of VL were observed.

  1. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  2. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD.

  3. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  4. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  5. Cigarette smoking and cardio-renal events in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Wencan; Ren, Kaili; Xie, Yanmei; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Haller, Steven T.; Jamerson, Kenneth; Dworkin, Lance D.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Murphy, Timothy P.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Henrich, William L.; Tian, Jiang; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Cooper, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes cardiovascular disease and is associated with poor kidney function in individuals with diabetes mellitus and primary kidney diseases. However, the association of smoking on patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis has not been studied. The current study utilized data from the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL, NCT00081731) clinical trial to evaluate the effects of smoking on the risk of cardio-renal events and kidney function in this population. Baseline data showed that smokers (n = 277 out of 931) were significantly younger at enrollment than non-smokers (63.3±9.1 years vs 72.4±7.8 years; p<0.001). In addition, patients who smoke were also more likely to have bilateral renal artery stenoses and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Longitudinal analysis showed that smokers experienced composite endpoint events (defined as first occurrence of: stroke; cardiovascular or renal death; myocardial infarction; hospitalization for congestive heart failure; permanent renal replacement; and progressive renal insufficiency defined as 30% reduction of GFR from baseline sustained for ≥ 60 days) at a substantially younger age compared to non-smokers (67.1±9.0 versus 76.1±7.9, p<0.001). Using linear regression and generalized linear modeling analysis controlled by age, sex, and ethnicity, smokers had significantly higher cystatin C levels (1.3±0.7 vs 1.2±0.9, p<0.01) whereas creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were not different from non-smokers. From these data we conclude that smoking has a significant association with deleterious cardio-renal outcomes in patients with renovascular hypertension. PMID:28306749

  6. Cigarette smoking and cardio-renal events in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Christopher A; Brewster, Pamela S; He, Wencan; Ren, Kaili; Xie, Yanmei; Tuttle, Katherine R; Haller, Steven T; Jamerson, Kenneth; Dworkin, Lance D; Cutlip, Donald E; Murphy, Timothy P; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Henrich, William L; Tian, Jiang; Shapiro, Joseph I; Cooper, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes cardiovascular disease and is associated with poor kidney function in individuals with diabetes mellitus and primary kidney diseases. However, the association of smoking on patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis has not been studied. The current study utilized data from the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL, NCT00081731) clinical trial to evaluate the effects of smoking on the risk of cardio-renal events and kidney function in this population. Baseline data showed that smokers (n = 277 out of 931) were significantly younger at enrollment than non-smokers (63.3±9.1 years vs 72.4±7.8 years; p<0.001). In addition, patients who smoke were also more likely to have bilateral renal artery stenoses and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Longitudinal analysis showed that smokers experienced composite endpoint events (defined as first occurrence of: stroke; cardiovascular or renal death; myocardial infarction; hospitalization for congestive heart failure; permanent renal replacement; and progressive renal insufficiency defined as 30% reduction of GFR from baseline sustained for ≥ 60 days) at a substantially younger age compared to non-smokers (67.1±9.0 versus 76.1±7.9, p<0.001). Using linear regression and generalized linear modeling analysis controlled by age, sex, and ethnicity, smokers had significantly higher cystatin C levels (1.3±0.7 vs 1.2±0.9, p<0.01) whereas creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were not different from non-smokers. From these data we conclude that smoking has a significant association with deleterious cardio-renal outcomes in patients with renovascular hypertension.

  7. Vascular complications of diabetes: mechanisms of injury and protective factors

    PubMed Central

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; King, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In patients with diabetes, atherosclerosis is the main reason for impaired life expectancy, and diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy are the largest contributors to end-stage renal disease and blindness, respectively. An improved therapeutic approach to combat diabetic vascular complications might include blocking mechanisms of injury as well as promoting protective or regenerating factors, for example by enhancing the action of insulin-regulated genes in endothelial cells, promoting gene programs leading to induction of antioxidant or anti-inflammatory factors, or improving the sensitivity to vascular cell survival factors. Such strategies could help prevent complications despite suboptimal metabolic control. PMID:23312281

  8. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  9. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  10. Placental growth factor mediates aldosterone-dependent vascular injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Iris Z; Newfell, Brenna G; Aronovitz, Mark; Mohammad, Najwa N; McGraw, Adam P; Perreault, Roger E; Carmeliet, Peter; Ehsan, Afshin; Mendelsohn, Michael E

    2010-11-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists reduce cardiovascular ischemia and mortality by unknown mechanisms. Aldosterone is a steroid hormone that signals through renal mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) to regulate blood pressure. MRs are expressed and regulate gene transcription in human vascular cells, suggesting that aldosterone might have direct vascular effects. Using gene expression profiling, we identify the pro-proliferative VEGF family member placental growth factor (PGF) as an aldosterone-regulated vascular MR target gene in mice and humans. Aldosterone-activated vascular MR stimulated Pgf gene transcription and increased PGF protein expression and secretion in the mouse vasculature. In mouse vessels with endothelial damage and human vessels from patients with atherosclerosis, aldosterone enhanced expression of PGF and its receptor, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt1). In atherosclerotic human vessels, MR antagonists inhibited PGF expression. In vivo, aldosterone infusion augmented vascular remodeling in mouse carotids following wire injury, an effect that was lost in Pgf-/- mice. In summary, we have identified PGF as what we believe to be a novel downstream target of vascular MR that mediates aldosterone augmentation of vascular injury. These findings suggest a non-renal mechanism for the vascular protective effects of aldosterone antagonists in humans and support targeting the vascular aldosterone/MR/PGF/Flt1 pathway as a therapeutic strategy for ischemic cardiovascular disease.

  11. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  12. [Vascular access in the elderly: AVF vs CVC. A comment].

    PubMed

    Bertoli, S V; Musetti, C

    2008-01-01

    The aging population starting hemodialysis treatment raises the question as to which is the best vascular access in an older patient with multiple complications. The center effect is an important element in the choice of a vascular access, as shown by the DOPPS data and by a recent audit held in Lombardy. However, other data show an increase in the use of permanent CVCs in the last years and other factors must be taken into account in this clinical choice. Also the timing of proposing a vascular access to a patient has changed over the years (see K-DOQI 2006 vs 2000). Most of the literature agrees on the strategy of a global clinical evaluation of the patient to decide when to place a vascular access and which type of access to use. Native and prosthetic fistulas are considered superior to CVCs although the latter have certain advantages in selected patients, such as those with severe cardiac problems. The nephrologist has a major role in vascular access management as part of a team made up also by a vascular surgeon and an interventional radiologist. Only in a center where both native and prosthetic fistulas can be constructed and permanent CVCs be placed can a nephrologist choose the most appropriate vascular access for individual patients after evaluation not only of their renal function but their cardiovascular risk as well.

  13. Use of functional mass in renal scintigraphy to detect segmental arterial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Stibolt, T.B. Jr.; Bacher, J.D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Lock, A.; Jones, A.E.; Bailey, J.J.

    1982-04-01

    Renography using a gamma camera, a minicomputer, (/sup 123/I)orthoiodohippurate ((/sup 123/I)OIH), and a canine model was employed to evaluate computer-generated maps of regional renal function. Renograms were obtained before and after ligations of the right renal arterial branch in four dogs, with subsequent angiographic and histologic confirmation of the lesions. Postoperative time-activity curves were normal. Washout and persistence index in three of four right kidneys showed regional abnormality. Functional renal mapping may provide a clinical technique for evaluating human renal vascular hypertension.

  14. Effect of a stable prostacyclin analogue on canine renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Tobimatsu, M; Ueda, Y; Toyoda, K; Saito, S; Konomi, K

    1987-01-01

    The effect of OP-41483 (Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Osaka, Japan), a stable prostacyclin analogue, on canine renal allograft rejection was investigated. Administration for 4 days after transplantation significantly increased renal cortical blood flow and urine output when compared with untreated dogs with renal allografts. Serum creatinine levels remained relatively low during postoperative days 1-4. Mean animal survival time was prolonged. Vascular lesions and mononuclear cell infiltration were greatly diminished in biopsy specimens removed on day 4. This stable prostacyclin analogue provided a degree of protection against canine renal allograft rejection. Images Figs. 1A and B. PMID:3545109

  15. International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing of renal services in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tricia; Roderick, Paul

    2007-12-01

    In England and Wales, the quantity and quality of renal services have improved significantly in the last decade. While acceptance rates for renal replacement therapy appear low by international standards, they are now commensurate with many other northern European countries. The major growth in renal services has been in hemodialysis, especially at satellite units. Health care is predominantly publicly funded through a tax-based National Health Service, and such funding has increased in the last 10 years. Improvements in health outcomes in England and Wales are expected to continue due to the recent implementation of standards, initiatives, and monitoring mechanisms for renal transplantation, vascular access, and patient transport.

  16. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  17. Selective renal vasodilation and active renal artery perfusion improve renal function in dogs with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, K; Shimizu, J; Yi, G H; Gu, A; Wang, J; Keren, G; Burkhoff, D

    2001-09-01

    Renal failure is common in heart failure due to renovascular constriction and hypotension. We tested whether selective pharmacological renal artery vasodilation and active renal artery perfusion (ARP) could improve renal function without adverse effects on systemic blood pressure in a canine model of acute heart failure (AHF). AHF was induced by coronary microembolization in 16 adult mongrel dogs. In five dogs, selective intrarenal (IR) papaverine (1, 2, and 4 mg/min) was administered into the left renal artery. In six dogs, ARP was performed in the left renal artery to normalize mean renal arterial pressure followed by administration of IR papaverine (2 mg/min). In five dogs, ARP plus intravenous furosemide was tested. Urine output (UO) and cortical renal blood flow decreased during AHF and were restored by 2 mg/min IR papaverine (UO: baseline 4.2 +/- 0.6, AHF 1.6 +/- 1.3, IR papaverine 5.8 +/- 1.1 ml/15 min; cortical blood flow: baseline 4.3 +/- 0.2, AHF 2.4 +/- 0.6, IR papaverine 4.2 +/- 1.2 ml/min/g) with no significant change in aortic pressure. ARP also increased urine output and cortical renal blood flow (UO: baseline 5.0 +/- 1.1, AHF 0.5 +/- 0.4, ARP 3.8 +/- 3.1 ml/15 min; cortical blood flow: baseline 4.0 +/- 0.5, AHF 2.0 +/- 0.8, ARP 3.52 +/- 1.1 ml/min/g). A combination of these methods in AHF further increased urine output to twice the normal baseline (10.5 +/- 7.5 ml/15 min). Addition of furosemide synergistically increased UO above that achieved with ARP alone (5.5 +/- 2.6 versus 40.3 +/- 24.7 ml/15 min, p = 0.03). In conclusion, ARP and selective renal vasodilation may effectively promote salt and water excretion in the setting of heart failure, particularly when systemic blood pressure is low.

  18. Effects of a new dihydropyridine derivative, S12968 (pranedipine), and its stereoisomer, S12967, on renal effects of endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Montañés, I; Flores, O; Eleno, N; López-Novoa, J M

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess in rats the prevention by two enantiomers of a new dihydropyridine derivative (pranedipine) (called S12967 for the dextrogyre (+) and S12968 for the levogyre (-) molecules) of the renal and cardiovascular effects induced by endothelin-1. The injection of endothelin-1 (1 nmol/kg body weight) induced a sharp and transient decrease in urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion, glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and renal blood flow, a significant increase in renal vascular resistance, and a small but significant increase in arterial pressure. Treatment with S12968 alone (0.3 mg/kg) induced a 2.5-fold increase in urine flow and potassium excretion and a 4.5-fold increase in sodium excretion. Pretreatment with S12968 completely blocked the endothelin-1 induced increase in arterial pressure, did not affect the acute effect of endothelin-1 on urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion, filtration rate, and renal blood flow, but blunted the effect on renal vascular resistance. Administration of S12967 alone (1 mg/kg) did not induce changes in either renal function or arterial pressure. In S12967-treated animals, endothelin-1 also induced a transient increase in arterial pressure nad renal vascular resistance but failed to change renal function in a significant manner. In summary, the above reported experiments show that at the higher, nonhypotensive doses, the levogyre enantiomer (S12968) of a new dihydropyridine derivative (pranedipine) completely prevented the hypertensive effect of endothelin 1, and partially prevented the effect of endothelin-1 on renal vascular resistance. The dextrogyre enantiomer (S12967) had almost no effect on either mean arterial pressure or renal vascular resistance but completely blocked the endothelin-1-induced decrease in urine flow and urinary sodium excretion.

  19. Targeting heme oxygenase-1 in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Durante, William

    2010-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) metabolizes heme to generate carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and iron. Biliverdin is subsequently metabolized to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular disease. Pharmacological induction or gene transfer of HO-1 ameliorates vascular dysfunction in animal models of atherosclerosis, post-angioplasty restenosis, vein graft stenosis, thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and hypertension, while inhibition of HO-1 activity or gene deletion exacerbates these disorders. The vasoprotection afforded by HO-1 is largely attributable to its end products: CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These end products exert potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and anti-thrombotic actions. In addition, CO and bile pigments act to preserve vascular homeostasis at sites of arterial injury by influencing the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or leukocytes. Several strategies are currently being developed to target HO-1 in vascular disease. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 by heme derivatives, dietary antioxidants, or currently available drugs, is a promising near-term approach, while HO-1 gene delivery is a long-term therapeutic goal. Direct administration of CO via inhalation or through the use of CO-releasing molecules and/or CO-sensitizing agents provides an attractive alternative approach in targeting HO-1. Furthermore, delivery of bile pigments, either alone or in combination with CO, presents another avenue for protecting against vascular disease. Since HO-1 and its products are potentially toxic, a major challenge will be to devise clinically effective therapeutic modalities that target HO-1 without causing any adverse effects.

  20. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  1. Vascular anomalies in children.

    PubMed

    Weibel, L

    2011-11-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided in two major categories: tumours (such as infantile hemangiomas) and malformations. Hemangiomas are common benign neoplasms that undergo a proliferative phase followed by stabilization and eventual spontaneous involution, whereas vascular malformations are rare structural anomalies representing morphogenetic errors of developing blood vessels and lymphatics. It is important to properly diagnose vascular anomalies early in childhood because of their distinct differences in morbidity, prognosis and need for a multidisciplinary management. We discuss a number of characteristic clinical features as clues for early diagnosis and identification of associated syndromes.

  2. Residential Proximity to Environmental Hazards and Adverse Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Maantay, Juliana A.; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2011-01-01

    How living near environmental hazards contributes to poorer health and disproportionate health outcomes is an ongoing concern. We conducted a substantive review and critique of the literature regarding residential proximity to environmental hazards and adverse pregnancy outcomes, childhood cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses, end-stage renal disease, and diabetes. Several studies have found that living near hazardous wastes sites, industrial sites, cropland with pesticide applications, highly trafficked roads, nuclear power plants, and gas stations or repair shops is related to an increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Government agencies should consider these findings in establishing rules and permitting and enforcement procedures to reduce pollution from environmentally burdensome facilities and land uses. PMID:22028451

  3. Renal Failure Prevalence in Poisoned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arefi, Mohammad; Taghaddosinejad, Fakhroddin; Salamaty, Peyman; Soroosh, Davood; Ashraf, Hami; Ebrahimi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Renal failure is an important adverse effect of drug poisoning. Determining the prevalence and etiology of this serious side effect could help us find appropriate strategies for the prevention of renal failure in most affected patients. Objectives: The present study is aimed to identify drugs that induce renal failure and also to find the prevalence of renal failure in patients referred to emergency departments with the chief complaint of drug poisoning, in order to plan better therapeutic strategies to minimize the mortality associated with drug poisoning induced renal failure. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study surveyed 1500 poisoned patients referred to the Emergency Department of Baharloo Hospital in Tehran during 2010. Demographic data including age and gender as well as clinical data including type of medication, duration of hospital stay, and presence of renal failure were recorded. Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared statistics were used to analyze the results. Results: A total number of 435 patients were poisoned with several drugs, 118 patients were intoxicated with sedative-hypnotic drugs, 279 patients were exposed to opium, and 478 patients were administered to other drugs. The method of intoxication included oral 84.3%, injective 9%, inhalation 4.3% and finally a combination of methods 2.3%. Laboratory results revealed that 134 cases had renal failure and 242 had rhabdomyolysis. The incidence of rhabdomyolysis and renal failure increased significantly with age, and also with time of admission to the hospital. Renal failure was reported in 25.1% of patients exposed to opium, vs. 18.2% of patients poisoned with aluminum phosphide, 16.7% of those with organophosphate, 8% with multiple drugs, 6.7% with alcohol, heavy metals and acids, and 1.7% with sedative hypnotics. Conclusions: Based on the findings of this study, there is a high probability of renal failure for patients poisoned with drugs such as opium, aluminum phosphide

  4. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal autoregulatory mechanisms maintain renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) independent of renal perfusion pressure (RPP) over a defined range (80–180 mmHg). Such autoregulation is mediated largely by the myogenic and the macula densa-tubuloglomerular feedback (MD-TGF) responses that regulate preglomerular vasomotor tone primarily of the afferent arteriole. Differences in response times allow separation of these mechanisms in the time and frequency domains. Mechanotransduction initiating the myogenic response requires a sensing mechanism activated by stretch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and coupled to intracellular signaling pathways eliciting plasma membrane depolarization and a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Proposed mechanosensors include epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), integrins, and/or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Increased [Ca2+]i occurs predominantly by Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC). Increased [Ca2+]i activates inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) to mobilize Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Myogenic vasoconstriction is sustained by increased Ca2+ sensitivity, mediated by protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase that favors a positive balance between myosin light-chain kinase and phosphatase. Increased RPP activates MD-TGF by transducing a signal of epithelial MD salt reabsorption to adjust afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. A combination of vascular and tubular mechanisms, novel to the kidney, provides for high autoregulatory efficiency that maintains RBF and GFR, stabilizes sodium excretion, and buffers transmission of RPP to sensitive glomerular capillaries, thereby protecting against hypertensive barotrauma. A unique aspect of the myogenic response in the renal vasculature is modulation of its strength and speed by the MD-TGF and by a connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CT-GF) mechanism

  5. Angiography in the Isolated Perfused Kidney: Radiological Evaluation of Vascular Protection in Tissue Ablation by Nonthermal Irreversible Electroporation

    SciTech Connect

    Wendler, Johann Jakob; Pech, Maciej; Blaschke, Simon; Porsch, Markus; Janitzky, Andreas; Ulrich, Matthias; Dudeck, Oliver; Ricke, Jens; Liehr, Uwe-Bernd

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a novel nonthermal tissue ablation technique by local application of high-voltage current within microseconds leading to a delayed apoptosis. The purpose of this experimental study was the first angiographic evaluation of the acute damage of renal vascular structure in NTIRE. Methods: Results of conventional dynamic digital substraction angiography (DSA) and visualization of the terminal vascular bed of renal parenchyma by high-resolution X-ray in mammography technique were evaluated before, during, and after NTIRE of three isolated perfused porcine ex vivo kidneys. Results: In the dedicated investigation, no acute vascular destruction of the renal parenchyma and no dysfunction of the kidney perfusion model were observed during or after NTIRE. Conspicuous were concentric wave-like fluctuations of the DSA contrast agent simultaneous to the NTIRE pulses resulting from NTIRE pulse shock wave. Conclusion: The NTIRE offers an ablation method with no acute collateral vascular damage in angiographic evaluation.

  6. [Recurrent vascular access trombosis associated with the prothrombin mutation G20210A in a adult patient in haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Quintana, L F; Coll, E; Monteagudo, I; Collado, S; López-Pedret, J; Cases, A

    2005-01-01

    Vascular access-related complications are a frequent cause of morbidity in haemodialysis patients and generate high costs. We present the case of an adult patient with end-stage renal disease and recurrent vascular access thrombosis associated with the prothrombin mutation G20210A and renal graft intolerance. The clinical expression of this heterozygous gene mutation may have been favoured by inflammatory state, frequent in dialysis patients. In this patient, the inflammatory response associated with the renal graft intolerance would have favored the development of recurrent vascular access thrombosis in a adult heterozygous for prothrombin mutation G20210A. In the case of early dysfunction of haemodialysis vascular access and after ruling out technical problems, it is convenient to carry out a screening for thrombophilia.

  7. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  8. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed these disorders were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names ... be used. These include as undifferentiated systemic rheumatic (connective tissue) diseases or overlap syndromes. Images Dermatomyositis, heliotrope eyelids ...

  9. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  10. Influence of dietary protein on renal function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bovée, K C

    1991-11-01

    Two previously published studies in dogs with reduced renal function are reviewed. In the first study, renal function and biochemical responses to dietary changes were studied in four dogs with stable chronic renal failure. The objective was to determine if dogs with moderate stable failure adjust to diets with varied protein and electrolyte content. These dogs were found to have the capacity to adapt to a wide range of dietary protein and electrolyte intake. The only exception was found in dogs fed a reduced-protein diet, which failed to appropriately adjust renal tubular excretion of sodium and phosphate. The only advantage of reduced dietary protein in this study was a reduction in blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Disadvantages of reduced-protein diets were reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow. In the second study, the hypothesis that large amounts of dietary protein sustain renal hyperfunction and produce progressive glomerulosclerosis in dogs as previously reported in rats was tested. Results failed to find a pattern of deterioration of renal function over 4 y. Light microscopic changes and electron microscopy also failed to find glomerular injury similar to that reported in rodents. These results do not support the hypothesis that feeding a high protein diet had a significant adverse effect on renal function or morphology.

  11. Renal scintiscanning. A review

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E. Rhys

    1970-01-01

    Renal scintiscanning is a simple investigation that does not require special preparation and is well tolerated by patients. Radiopharmaceuticals used in linear scanning are accumulated in the renal cortex. This accumulation is diminished: (a) when the cortex is destroyed, e.g. by pyelonephritis, injury, etc.; and (b) when the amount available to the cortex is reduced, e.g. by ischaemia. The scintigram depicts the kidneys unimpeded by bowel contents, gives a qualitative assessment of renal function and shows the distribution of zones of normal function. Recent technical improvements show great promise in deriving a quantitative measure of renal function in some circumstances. The location of normally functioning cortex is often important in the management of renal diseases and the value of scintiscanning is then considerable. It is occasionally useful in planning surgery. The anatomy of the renal collecting system can be shown only by urography. High dose techniques achieve this even in the face of renal failure, and scintiscanning has few indications in investigating lesions that distort the renal anatomy, e.g. tumours and cysts. Renal scintiscanning is a very valuable additional method to urography, arteriography and renography in investigation of renal disorders. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4905447

  12. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E; Bouchard, J; Mehta, R L

    2009-09-01

    Renal replacement therapy became a common clinical tool to treat patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) since the 1960s. During this time dialytic options have expanded considerably; biocompatible membranes, bicarbonate dialysate and dialysis machines with volumetric ultrafiltration control have improved the treatment for acute kidney injury. Along with advances in methods of intermittent hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement therapies have gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of dialysis-requiring AKI. However, many of the fundamental aspects of the renal replacement treatment such as indication, timing of dialytic intervention, and choice of dialysis modality are still controversial and may influence AKI patient's outcomes. This review outlines current concepts in the use of dialysis techniques for AKI and suggests an approach for selecting the optimal method of renal replacement therapy.

  13. Renal cortical pyruvate depletion during AKI.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Becker, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediary in energy metabolism and can exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the fate of pyruvate during AKI remains unknown. Here, we assessed renal cortical pyruvate and its major determinants (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pyruvate dehydrogenase [PDH], and H2O2 levels) in mice subjected to unilateral ischemia (15-60 minutes; 0-18 hours of vascular reflow) or glycerol-induced ARF. The fate of postischemic lactate, which can be converted back to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase, was also addressed. Ischemia and glycerol each induced persistent pyruvate depletion. During ischemia, decreasing pyruvate levels correlated with increasing lactate levels. During early reperfusion, pyruvate levels remained depressed, but lactate levels fell below control levels, likely as a result of rapid renal lactate efflux. During late reperfusion and glycerol-induced AKI, pyruvate depletion corresponded with increased gluconeogenesis (pyruvate consumption). This finding was underscored by observations that pyruvate injection increased renal cortical glucose content in AKI but not normal kidneys. AKI decreased PDH levels, potentially limiting pyruvate to acetyl CoA conversion. Notably, pyruvate therapy mitigated the severity of AKI. This renoprotection corresponded with increases in cytoprotective heme oxygenase 1 and IL-10 mRNAs, selective reductions in proinflammatory mRNAs (e.g., MCP-1 and TNF-α), and improved tissue ATP levels. Paradoxically, pyruvate increased cortical H2O2 levels. We conclude that AKI induces a profound and persistent depletion of renal cortical pyruvate, which may induce additional injury.

  14. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero g or space, in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast 5 of the 7 remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted (C sub Na/GFR, p .05) and their urinary flow rate (V, p .05). Potassium excretion increased (U sub k V, p .05). End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause, in rats, a decrease in distal tubular sodium, water and potassium reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis.

  15. Hazards with disinfecting agents in renal units!

    PubMed

    Stragier, A

    1992-02-01

    As already described in the April 1991 issue of EDTNA/ERCA Journal (Volume XVII, No. 2), the specific characteristics of various disinfecting agents delineate their respective application areas. Obviously, in a renal unit one needs a large range of disinfecting agents as they are being used for cleaning and disinfection of: water treatment devices; water tanks and distribution systems; single patient units; patient vascular access sites; dialysis connection procedure; dialyser reuse; instruments; floors, etc.... We have been taught never to mix different disinfecting agents as this might reduce their efficiency. However, it had never been hitherto reported that this might be dangerous or even cause an explosion! In this paper, we describe in detail how we were confronted with such an explosion. We further report that similar hazards occurred in other units and present an overview of possible hazards with the most common disinfecting agents. Finally, we emphasize some preventive guidelines to be put forth in renal units.

  16. Vascular compression syndromes.

    PubMed

    Czihal, Michael; Banafsche, Ramin; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Koeppel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Dealing with vascular compression syndromes is one of the most challenging tasks in Vascular Medicine practice. This heterogeneous group of disorders is characterised by external compression of primarily healthy arteries and/or veins as well as accompanying nerval structures, carrying the risk of subsequent structural vessel wall and nerve damage. Vascular compression syndromes may severely impair health-related quality of life in affected individuals who are typically young and otherwise healthy. The diagnostic approach has not been standardised for any of the vascular compression syndromes. Moreover, some degree of positional external compression of blood vessels such as the subclavian and popliteal vessels or the celiac trunk can be found in a significant proportion of healthy individuals. This implies important difficulties in differentiating physiological from pathological findings of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging with provocative manoeuvres. The level of evidence on which treatment decisions regarding surgical decompression with or without revascularisation can be relied on is generally poor, mostly coming from retrospective single centre studies. Proper patient selection is critical in order to avoid overtreatment in patients without a clear association between vascular compression and clinical symptoms. With a focus on the thoracic outlet-syndrome, the median arcuate ligament syndrome and the popliteal entrapment syndrome, the present article gives a selective literature review on compression syndromes from an interdisciplinary vascular point of view.

  17. Resident vascular progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Torsney, Evelyn; Xu, Qingbo

    2011-02-01

    Homeostasis of the vessel wall is essential for maintaining its function, including blood pressure and patency of the lumen. In physiological conditions, the turnover rate of vascular cells, i.e. endothelial and smooth muscle cells, is low, but markedly increased in diseased situations, e.g. vascular injury after angioplasty. It is believed that mature vascular cells have an ability to proliferate to replace lost cells normally. On the other hand, recent evidence indicates stem/progenitor cells may participate in vascular repair and the formation of neointimal lesions in severely damaged vessels. It was found that all three layers of the vessels, the intima, media and adventitia, contain resident progenitor cells, including endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, Sca-1+ and CD34+ cells. Data also demonstrated that these resident progenitor cells could differentiate into a variety of cell types in response to different culture conditions. However, collective data were obtained mostly from in vitro culture assays and phenotypic marker studies. There are many unanswered questions concerning the mechanism of cell differentiation and the functional role of these cells in vascular repair and the pathogenesis of vascular disease. In the present review, we aim to summarize the data showing the presence of the resident progenitor cells, to highlight possible signal pathways orchestrating cell differentiation toward endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and to discuss the data limitations, challenges and controversial issues related to the role of progenitors. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  18. Vascular access for hemodialysis: thrills and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Victoria; Nichols, W Kirt

    2010-06-01

    Hemodialysis is a life saving treatment for Americans with end stage renal disease. In the last decade, liberal selection of patients treated by hemodialysis has resulted in patients who are substantially older, diabetics, who have higher co-morbidities including extensive atherosclerotic vascular disease. Many of these patients start hemodialysis treatments with a synthetic graft access rather than with their own native vessels. Grafts are appropriate for patients with inadequate vessels for construction of an arterio-venous (A-V) fistulas. The National Kidney Foundation published the Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative (DOQI) guidelines in 1997, a set of evidenced based guidelines regarding the optimal management of vascular access. One important guideline had been to increase the number of patient dialyzing with Arterio-Venous (A-V) fistulas rather than A-V grafts which are prone to frequent stenosis, thrombosis, and thus are more costly and labor intensive. The prevalence of patient dialyzing with fistulas depends on several factors; timing of the referral, anatomy and adequacy of the patients vessels, type of fistula placed, fistula maturation, minimal accepted dialysis blood flow and patency of the fistula. The management of a vascular access for hemodialysis is a challenging area of practice for those who care for the hemodialysis patient population. The multidisciplinary approach to management of patients with hemodialysis access includes support, education, collaboration and ongoing communication with the multidisciplinary team, patients, and their family members.

  19. Systemic barriers to improving vascular access outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sands, Jeffrey J; Ferrell, Lori M; Perry, Michael A

    2002-04-01

    Vascular access dysfunction is the most frequent cause of hospitalization for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Our system of vascular access care and industry standards developed for historic reasons have resulted in a haphazard approach to access management. The Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative has provided a road map for improving vascular access management. However, despite widespread acceptance, these recommendations are not routinely followed. This is largely the result of inertia coupled with systemic barriers to improving access outcomes. These barriers include lack of funded pre-ESRD care and preoperative imaging, lack of reimbursement for access monitoring, unavailable surgical and interventional suites, erosion of the real value of the composite rate, bundling of additional new services without rate adjustment, poor accountability of surgeons and hospitals, and a reimbursement system that rewards procedures and, in particular, graft and catheter placement. Currently, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services is reevaluating the composite rate and its included bundle of services. To provide the best access care with the fewest complications while insuring multidisciplinary involvement and accountability, a realistic appraisal and realignment of incentives must be developed to insure improvement of access care in the United States.

  20. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  1. Renal haemodynamics and plasma renin in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B; Kornerup, H J

    1976-05-01

    1. Blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) were measured in twenty-three patients with essential hypertension and in twenty-one control subjects. Plasma renin concentration was measured in all the hypertensive patients and in fifteen control subjects. 2. GFR and RPF were similar in the hypertensive group and in the control group, whereas the renal vascular resistance was significantly higher in the hypertensive patients. GFR and RPF decreased with increasing blood pressure in both groups. Increasing age induced a further reduction in GFR and RPF in the control subjects but not in the hypertensive patients. 3. Plasma renin concentration in the hypertensive group did not differ from that in the control subjects. The concentration was not correlated to age in either the hypertensive or normal group. 4. Plasma renin index was positively correlated to GFR and RPF and inversely correlated to filtration fraction and renal vascular resistance. 5. It is concluded that GFR and RPF depend on blood pressure in both hypertensive patients and normotensive control subjects. In contrast to the control group, the age effect was negligible in the hypertensive group. It is suggested that renin release depends on changes in renal vascular resistance in the arterioles at the glomerulus and the results support the baroreceptor theory of renin release.

  2. The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Vascular Inflammation and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, Maricica; Kafoury, Ramzi; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Ndebele, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The RAAS through its physiological effectors plays a key role in promoting and maintaining inflammation. Inflammation is an important mechanism in the development and progression of CVD such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. In addition to its main role in regulating blood pressure and its role in hypertension, RAAS has proinflammatory and profibrotic effects at cellular and molecular levels. Blocking RAAS provides beneficial effects for the treatment of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Evidence shows that inhibition of RAAS positively influences vascular remodeling thus improving CVD outcomes. The beneficial vascular effects of RAAS inhibition are likely due to decreasing vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and positive effects on regeneration of endothelial progenitor cells. Inflammatory factors such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, TNFα, IL-6, and CRP have key roles in mediating vascular inflammation and blocking RAAS negatively modulates the levels of these inflammatory molecules. Some of these inflammatory markers are clinically associated with CVD events. More studies are required to establish long-term effects of RAAS inhibition on vascular inflammation, vascular cells regeneration, and CVD clinical outcomes. This review presents important information on RAAS's role on vascular inflammation, vascular cells responses to RAAS, and inhibition of RAAS signaling in the context of vascular inflammation, vascular remodeling, and vascular inflammation-associated CVD. Nevertheless, the review also equates the need to rethink and rediscover new RAAS inhibitors. PMID:24804145

  3. INTERPRETING SPONTANEOUS RENAL LESIONS IN SAFETY AND RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interpreting Spontaneous Renal Lesions in Safety and Risk Assessment
    Douglas C. Wolf, D.V.M., Ph.D.

    Introduction

    Risk assessment is a process whereby the potential adverse health effects from exposure to a xenobiotic are predicted after evaluation of the availab...

  4. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  5. Renal parenchymal histopathology predicts life-threatening chronic kidney disease as a result of radical nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Sejima, Takehiro; Honda, Masashi; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The preoperative prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency plays an important role in the decision-making process regarding renal surgery options. Furthermore, the prediction of both postoperative renal insufficiency and postoperative cardiovascular disease occurrence, which is suggested to be an adverse consequence caused by renal insufficiency, contributes to the preoperative policy decision as well as the precise informed consent for a renal cell carcinoma patient. Preoperative nomograms for the prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, calculated using patient backgrounds, are advocated. The use of these nomograms together with other types of nomograms predicting oncological outcome is beneficial. Post-radical nephrectomy attending physicians can predict renal insufficiency based on the normal renal parenchymal pathology in addition to preoperative patient characteristics. It is suggested that a high level of global glomerulosclerosis in nephrectomized normal renal parenchyma is closely associated with severe renal insufficiency. Some studies showed that post-radical nephrectomy severe renal insufficiency might have an association with increased mortality as a result of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, such pathophysiology should be recognized as life-threatening, surgically-related chronic kidney disease. On the contrary, the investigation of the prediction of mild post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, which is not related to adverse consequences in the postoperative long-term period, is also promising because the prediction of mild renal insufficiency might be the basis for the substitution of radical nephrectomy for nephron-sparing surgery in technically difficult or compromised cases. The deterioration of quality of life caused by post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency should be investigated in conjunction with life-threatening matters.

  6. Vascular tracers alter hemodynamics and airway pressure in anesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-11-01

    The technique of vascular labeling was developed to mark sites of increased microvascular permeability. We used the vascular labeling technique in anesthetized sheep and found that hemodynamics and airway pressure were adversely affected by intraarterial infusions of two vascular tracers. Monastral blue (nine sheep) immediately caused systemic arterial hypotension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and bronchoconstriction. All three physiological responses were partially blocked by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) but not by an H1-antihistamine (chlorpheniramine). Colloidal gold (nine sheep) caused immediate, but less dramatic, pulmonary arterial hypertension which was not attenuated by the blocking agents. We conclude that these two vascular tracers caused detrimental physiological side effects in sheep at the usual doses used to label injured microvessels in other species.

  7. Successful Embolization of a Renal Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Arteriovenous Fistula and Extravasations Using Onyx After Partial Nephrectomy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Sopilko, Igor; Svihra, Jan; Kliment, Jan

    2009-01-15

    Partial nephrectomy can be associated with vascular complications. Computed tomography (CT) with CT angiography is ideal for noninvasive imaging of this process. The treatment of choice is selective embolization. Successful transcatheter embolization of right renal subsegmental artery pseudoaneurysm with arteriovenous fistula and extravasations using Onyx was performed in a 66-year-old woman with macrohematuria 12 days after partial nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma.

  8. Predictors of renal and patient outcomes in atheroembolic renal disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro; Pola, Alessandra; Guerini, Simona; Zubani, Roberto; Movilli, Ezio; Savoldi, Silvana; Malberti, Fabio; Maiorca, Rosario

    2003-06-01

    Atheroembolic renal disease (AERD) is part of a multisystemic disease accompanied by high cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Interrelationships between traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, vascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and markers of clinical severity of the disease in determining outcome remain poorly understood. Patients with AERD presenting to a single center between 1996 and 2002 were followed-up with prospective collection of clinical and biochemical data. The major outcomes included end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Ninety-five patients were identified (81 male). AERD was iatrogenic in 87%. Mean age was 71.4 yr. Twenty-three patients (24%) developed ESRD; 36 patients (37.9%) died. Cox regression analysis showed that significant independent predictors of ESRD were long-standing hypertension (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1; P < 0.001) and preexisting chronic renal impairment (HR = 2.12; P = 0.02); use of statins was independently associated with decreased risk of ESRD (HR = 0.02; P = 0.003). Age (HR = 1.09; P = 0.009), diabetes (HR = 2.55; P = 0.034), and ESRD (HR = 2.21; P = 0.029) were independent risk factors for patient mortality; male gender was independently associated with decreased risk of death (HR = 0.27; P = 0.007). Cardiovascular comorbidities, precipitating factors, and clinical severity of AERD had no prognostic impact on renal and patient survival. It is concluded that AERD has a strong clinical impact on patient and renal survival. The study clearly shows the importance of preexisting chronic renal impairment in determining both renal and patient outcome, this latter being mediated by the development of ESRD. The protective effect of statins on the development of ESRD should be evaluated in a prospective study.

  9. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Renal Imaging in Adults.

    PubMed

    Keramida, Georgia; James, Jacqueline M; Prescott, Mary C; Peters, Adrien Michael

    2015-09-01

    To understand pitfalls and limitations in adult renography, it is necessary to understand firstly the physiology of the kidney, especially the magnitude and control of renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and tubular fluid flow rate, and secondly the pharmacokinetics and renal handling of the three most often used tracers, Tc-99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), Tc-99m-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Tc-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The kidneys may be imaged dynamically with Tc-99m-MAG3 or Tc-99m-DTPA, with or without diuretic challenge, or by static imaging with Tc-99m-DMSA. Protocols are different according to whether the kidney is native or transplanted. Quantitative analysis of dynamic data includes measurement of renal vascularity (important for the transplanted kidney), absolute tracer clearance rates, differential renal function (DRF) and response to diuretic challenge. Static image reveals functional renal parenchymal damage, both focal and global, is useful in the clinical management of obstructive uropathy, renal stone disease and hypertension (under angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition), and is the preferred technique for determining DRF. Diagnosis based on morphological appearances is important in transplant management. Even though nuclear medicine is now in the era of hybrid imaging, renal imaging remains an important subspecialty in nuclear medicine and requires a sound basing in applied physiology, the classical supporting discipline of nuclear medicine.

  10. Renal involvement in primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marcantoni, Carmelita; Emmanuele, Carmela; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis and/or pregnancy-related problems associated with persistently elevated levels of antiphospholipid antibodies. The kidney is a major target organ in both primary and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome. This review describes several aspects of the renal involvement in the primary form of the syndrome, in particular the histological pattern of the so-called antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN). APSN is a vascular nephropathy characterized by small vessel vaso-occlusive lesions associated with fibrous intimal hyperplasia of interlobular arteries, recanalizing thrombi in arteries and arterioles, and focal atrophy, a constellation of morphological lesions suggestive of primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

  11. Vascular calcifications, vertebral fractures and mortality in haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-García, Minerva; Gómez-Alonso, Carlos; Naves-Díaz, Manuel; Diaz-Lopez, Jose Bernardino; Diaz-Corte, Carmen; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Vascular calcifications and the bone fractures caused by abnormal bone fragility, also called osteoporotic fractures, are frequent complications associated with chronic kidney diseases (CKD). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between vascular calcifications, osteoporotic bone fractures and survival in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Methods. A total of 193 HD patients were followed up to 2 years. Vascular calcifications and osteoporotic vertebral fractures (quoted just as vertebral fractures in the text) were assessed by thoracic, lumbar spine, pelvic and hand X-rays and graded according to their severity. Clinical, biochemical and therapeutic data gathered during the total time spent on HD were collected. Results. The prevalence of aortic calcifications was higher in HD patients than in a random-based general population (79% versus 37.5%, P < 0.001). Total time on any renal replacement therapy (RRT) and diabetes were positively associated with a higher prevalence of vascular calcifications. In addition to these factors, time on HD was also positively associated with the severity of vascular calcifications, and higher haemoglobin levels were associated with a lower prevalence of severe vascular calcifications in large and medium calibre arteries. The prevalence of vertebral fractures in HD patients was similar to that of the general population (26.5% versus 24.1%). Age and time on HD showed a positive and statistically significant association with the prevalence of vertebral fractures. Vascular calcifications in the medium calibre arteries were associated with a higher rate of prevalent vertebral fractures. In women, severe vascular calcifications and vertebral fractures were positively associated with mortality [RR = 3.2 (1.0–10.0) and RR = 4.8 (1.7–13.4), respectively]. Conclusions. Positive associations between vascular calcifications, vertebral fractures and mortality have been found in patients on HD. PMID:18725376

  12. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    an appropriate MHT dose, route of administration, and estrogen/progestin combination could maximize the vascular benefits of MHT and minimize other adverse effects, especially if given within a reasonably short time after menopause to women that seek MHT for the relief of menopausal symptoms. PMID:21864249

  13. Visualization of serotonin effects on renal vessels of rats.

    PubMed

    Endlich, K; Kühn, R; Steinhausen, M

    1993-02-01

    We studied the effects of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) on glomerular blood flow (GBF) and on renal vessel diameters in the hydronephrotic kidney and in vascular casts of normal kidneys of rats. 5-HT (60 min after local application of 10(-8) mol.liter-1) constricted the arcuate arteries (-10 +/- 2% to -14 +/- 2%, mean +/- SEM), dilated the interlobular arteries (+13 +/- 2%) and afferent arterioles (+17 +/- 3%), and decreased GBF (-44 +/- 5%). In contrast to normal autoregulation, reduction of renal perfusion pressure after local application of 5-HT from 118 +/- 3 mm Hg by 10 and 20 mm Hg reduced GBF by 12 +/- 2% and 23 +/- 3%, respectively. The 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin (60 min after local application of 10(-6) mol.liter-1), dilated all preglomerular vessels and increased GBF. In the presence of ritanserin, 5-HT lost nearly all vascular effects. During infusion of 5-HT (5 micrograms.min-1 i.v. for 20 min) vascular reactions were similar to those under local application. After cyclooxygenase inhibition with indomethacin, infusion of 5-HT failed to constrict the arcuate arteries whereas vasodilation of the small preglomerular vessels remained unaffected. Analyzing vascular casts of normal kidneys we observed considerable vascular spasms and an average vasoconstriction of the interlobar arteries of 19 +/- 9% after i.v. infusion of 5-HT. We believe that 5-HT decreases GBF by 5-HT2 receptor-mediated constriction of the large renal vessels which are modulated by the prostaglandin system, whereas 5-HT dilates the small preglomerular vessels, most likely via 5-HT1-like receptors. Furthermore, our data indicate that 5-HT impairs the myogenic component of renal autoregulation in the low pressure range.

  14. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  15. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  16. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  17. Reverse engineering adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Chipman, J Kevin; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. The application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) can be used to overcome these limitations. This approach was used to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas). Gene expression changes in FHM ovaries in response to seven different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions, were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. Potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide were examined using two mutual information-based methods to infer gene regulatory networks and potential AOPs. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict network paths from stressor to adverse outcome as candidate AOPs. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment, thus leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biological processes, biomarkers, or alternative endpoints that can be used to monitor an AOP. Finally, the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology were identified and a road map for the utilization of these tools presented.

  18. The use of vascular access audit and infections in home hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rousseau-Gagnon, Mathieu; Faratro, Rose; D'Gama, Celine; Fung, Stella; Wong, Elizabeth; Chan, Christopher T

    2016-04-01

    Vascular access-related infection is an important adverse event in home hemodialysis (HHD). We hypothesize that errors in self-cannulation or manipulation of dialysis vascular access are associated with increased incidence of access-related infection. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all prevalent HHD patients at the University Health Network. All vascular access-related infections were recorded from 2006 to 2013. Errors in dialysis access were ascertained by nurse-administered vascular access checklist. Ninety-two patients had completed at least one vascular access audit. Median HHD vintage was 2.3 (0.9-5.0) years in patients with appropriate vascular access technique and 5.8 (1.5-9.4) years in patients with erroneous vascular access technique. The overall rate of infection between patients with and without appropriate vascular access technique was similar (0.27 and 0.28 infections per year, P = 0.166). Among patients who were identified with errors in dialysis access manipulation, patients with five or more errors were associated with higher rate of access-related infection (mean of 0.47 vs. 0.16 infection per patient-year, P < 0.001). The use of vascular access audit is a feasible strategy, which can identify errors in vascular access technique. Patients with a longer median HHD vintage are associated with higher risk of inappropriate vascular access technique. Patients with multiple errors in vascular access technique are associated with a higher risk of dialysis access-related infection. Prospective evaluation of the impact of vascular access audit on adverse vascular access events is warranted.

  19. Analysis of renal diseases detected in renal biopsies of adult patients: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Salman; Drohlia, Murtaza F; Nasir, Kiran; Salman, Beena; Ahmad, Aasim

    2017-01-01

    Renal biopsy is crucial while evaluating for the diagnosis of glomerular, vascular, tubulointerstitial, and genetic diseases. It gives vital information which helps in estimating the disease prognosis, progression, and management. This is the retrospective analysis of all adult patients aged above 18 years, who underwent percutaneous renal biopsy at The Kidney Center Post Graduate Training Institute, Karachi, over a duration of 18 years, i.e., January 1, 1996, to December 2013. Renal graft biopsies and those which were inadequate were excluded from analysis. Of the1962 biopsies performed, we included 1521 biopsies in our assessment. The mean age of the population was 38 ± 15.26 years (range 18-88 years). There were 920 (60.5%) males and 601 (39.5%) females. The most common clinical indication of kidney biopsy was nephrotic syndrome, i.e., 741 (45.7%), followed by chronic kidney disease, 253 (16.6%); acute renal failure, 184; (12.1%) and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN), 124 (8.2%). Primary GN was found in the majority of the patients, 984 (64.7%), followed by secondary GN in 249 (16.4%), tubulointerstitial disease in 224 (14.7%), and vascular disease in 64 (4.2%). In primary GN, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was the most common histopathological diagnosis in 297 (19.5%) patients, followed by MGN in 224 (14.7%), chronic GN in 98 (6.4%), crescentic GN in 93 (6.1%), minimal change disease in 87 (5.7%), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in 58 (3.8%), and postinfection glomerulonephritis in 53 (3.5%) patients. This study shows that focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is the most common lesion in renal biopsy in the young age group followed by membranous nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy and chronic interstitial nephritis were dominant secondary pathological lesions in older age group, whereas lupus nephritis was the most common secondary disease in young age females.

  20. Renal hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to urapidil in hypertensive man

    SciTech Connect

    de Leeuw, P.W.; van Es, P.N.; de Bruyn, H.A.; Birkenhaeger, W.H.D.

    1988-01-01

    In order to evaluate the acute effects of urapidil on renal vascular tone and on pressor systems we performed a randomized placebo-controlled crossover study in 8 patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension. Each subject received, on two separate days one week apart, an intravenous injection of either placebo or urapidil (25 mg, to be increased to 50 mg if blood pressure did not fall within 5 minutes). Before and following this injection we measured blood pressure and heart rate (Dinamap), renal plasma flow (/sup 125/I-hippuran), renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and catecholamines. The results show that urapidil, when compared to placebo, significantly reduced blood pressure, while increasing heart rate, renal blood flow, noradrenaline and adrenaline. Dopamine levels, on the other hand, were suppressed. While renin and angiotensin II were only mildly stimulated, aldosterone levels increased markedly. It is concluded that urapidil, given intravenously, has an immediate blood pressure lowering effect associated with a fall in renal vascular tone and an increase in renal perfusion. As a consequence both the sympathetic system and the renin-angiotensin system are stimulated, although the latter only to a mild degree. The rise in aldosterone may be related to withdrawal of dopaminergic tone.

  1. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies.

  2. A Graded Evaluation of Outcomes Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy with Major Vascular Resection in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Olga; Talamonti, Mark S; Stocker, Susan J; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Winchester, David J; Bentrem, David J; Prinz, Richard A; Baker, Marshall S

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies examining short- and long-term outcomes of pancreaticoduodenectomy with vascular resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma have not graded perioperative complication severity. These studies may provide incomplete assessments of the efficacy of vascular resection. In the current study, we evaluated 36 patients who had pancreaticoduodenectomy with major vascular resection. These were matched 1:3 by tumor stage and age to patients who had pancreaticoduodenectomy without vascular resection. Charts were reviewed to identify all complications and 90-day readmissions. Complications were graded as either severe or minor adverse postoperative outcomes, taking into account the total length of stay. There were no statistical differences in patient demographics, comorbidities, or symptoms between the groups. Patients who had vascular resection had significantly increased rates of severe adverse postoperative outcomes, readmissions, lengths of hospital stay, as well as higher hospital costs. Hypoalbuminemia and major vascular resection were independent predictors of severe adverse postoperative outcomes. On multivariate Cox-regression survival analysis, patients who had vascular resection had decreased recurrence-free (12 vs. 17 months) and overall (17 vs. 29 months) survival. Major vascular resection was a predictor of mortality, may be an independent prognostic factor for survival, and may warrant incorporation into future staging systems.

  3. Role of Vitamin D in Uremic Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jing-Quan

    2017-01-01

    The risk of cardiovascular death is 10 times higher in patients with CKD (chronic kidney disease) than in those without CKD. Vascular calcification, common in patients with CKD, is a predictor of cardiovascular mortality. Vitamin D deficiency, another complication of CKD, is associated with vascular calcification in patients with CKD. GFR decline, proteinuria, tubulointerstitial injury, and the therapeutic dose of active form vitamin D aggravate vitamin D deficiency and reduce its pleiotropic effect on the cardiovascular system. Vitamin D supplement for CKD patients provides a protective role in vascular calcification on the endothelium by (1) renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inactivation, (2) alleviating insulin resistance, (3) reduction of cholesterol and inhibition of foam cell and cholesterol efflux in macrophages, and (4) modulating vascular regeneration. For the arterial calcification, vitamin D supplement provides adjunctive role in regressing proteinuria, reverse renal osteodystrophy, and restoring calcification inhibitors. Recently, adventitial progenitor cell has been linked to be involved in the vascular calcification. Vitamin D may provide a role in modulating adventitial progenitor cells. In summary, vitamin D supplement may provide an ancillary role for ameliorating uremic vascular calcification. PMID:28286758

  4. Renal pelvis or ureter cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer ... Cancer can grow in the urine collection system, but it is uncommon. Renal pelvis and ureter cancers ...

  5. The molecular mechanisms of hemodialysis vascular access failure

    PubMed Central

    Franzoni, Marco; Misra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    The arteriovenous fistula has been used for more than 50 years to provide vascular access for patients undergoing hemodialysis. More than 1.5 million patients worldwide have end stage renal disease and this population will continue to grow. The arteriovenous fistula is the preferred vascular access for patients, but its patency rate at 1 year is only 60%. The majority of arteriovenous fistulas fail because of intimal hyperplasia. In recent years, there have been many studies investigating the molecular mechanisms responsible for intimal hyperplasia and subsequent thrombosis. These studies have identified common pathways including inflammation, uremia, hypoxia, sheer stress, and increased thrombogenicity. These cellular mechanisms lead to increased proliferation, migration, and eventually stenosis. These pathways work synergistically through shared molecular messengers. In this review, we will examine the literature concerning the molecular basis of hemodialysis vascular access malfunction. PMID:26806833

  6. Cigarette smoking: an important renal risk factor – far beyond carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Orth, SR

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that smoking has a negative impact on renal function, being one of the most important remediable renal risk factors. It has been clearly shown that the risk for high-normal urinary albumin excretion and microalbuminuria is increased in smoking compared to non-smoking subjects of the general population. Data from the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT) indicate that at least in males, smoking increases the risk to reach end-stage renal failure. Smoking is particularly "nephrotoxic" in older subjects, subjects with essential hypertension and patients with preexisting renal disease. Of interest, the magnitude of the adverse renal effect of smoking seems to be independent of the underlying renal disease. Death-censored renal graft survival is decreased in smokers, indicating that smoking also damages the renal transplant. Cessation of smoking has been show to reduce the rate of progression of renal failure both in patients with renal disease or a renal transplant. The mechanisms of smoking-induced renal damage are only partly understood and comprise acute hemodynamic (e.g., increase in blood pressure and presumably intraglomerular pressure) and chronic effects (e.g., endothelial cell dysfunction). Renal failure per se leads to an increased cardiovascular risk. The latter is further aggravated by smoking. Particularly survival of smokers with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is abysmal. In the present review article the current state of knowledge about the renal risks of smoking is reviewed. It is the aim of the article to point out that smoking not only increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma or uroepithelial cell carcinoma, but also the risk of a faster decline of renal function. The latter is a relatively new negative aspect which has not been widely recognized. PMID:19570254

  7. Cigarette smoking: an important renal risk factor – far beyond carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Orth, SR

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that smoking has a negative impact on renal function, being one of the most important remediable renal risk factors. It has been clearly shown that the risk for high-normal urinary albumin excretion and microalbuminuria is increased in smoking compared to non-smoking subjects of the general population. Data from the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT) indicate that at least in males, smoking increases the risk to reach end-stage renal failure. Smoking is particularly "nephrotoxic" in older subjects, subjects with essential hypertension and patients with preexisting renal disease. Of interest, the magnitude of the adverse renal effect of smoking seems to be independent of the underlying renal disease. Death-censored renal graft survival is decreased in smokers, indicating that smoking also damages the renal transplant. Cessation of smoking has been show to reduce the rate of progression of renal failure both in patients with renal disease or a renal transplant. The mechanisms of smoking-induced renal damage are only partly understood and comprise acute hemodynamic (e.g., increase in blood pressure and presumably intraglomerular pressure) and chronic effects (e.g., endothelial cell dysfunction). Renal failure per se leads to an increased cardiovascular risk. The latter is further aggravated by smoking. Particularly survival of smokers with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is abysmal. In the present review article the current state of knowledge about the renal risks of smoking is reviewed. It is the aim of the article to point out that smoking not only increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma or uroepithelial cell carcinoma, but also the risk of a faster decline of renal function. The latter is a relatively new negative aspect which has not been widely recognized.

  8. Compensatory renal growth and function in postnephrectomized patients with Wilms tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.D.; Reid, C.F.; Richard, G.A.; Talbert, J.L.; Rogers, B.M.

    1982-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether or not renal growth and function were adversely affected in the remaining kidneys of patients who had undergone nephrectomy for Wilms tumor. These patients received chemotherapy and some radiotherapy (tumoricidal agents which might affect the remaining kidney). Renal growth was compared between the treatment groups and normal renal growth. Hypertrophy did occur and did not appear to be affected by subsequent treatment. Renal function was minimally altered in all treatment groups irrespective of the type of treatment.

  9. Efferent pathways in sodium overload-induced renal vasodilation in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Nathalia O; de Oliveira, Thiago S; Naves, Lara M; Filgueira, Fernando P; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L; Schoorlemmer, Gerard H M; de Castro, Carlos H; Freiria-Oliveira, André H; Xavier, Carlos H; Colugnati, Diego B; Rosa, Daniel A; Blanch, Graziela T; Borges, Clayton L; Soares, Célia M A; Reis, Angela A S; Cravo, Sergio L; Pedrino, Gustavo R

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia stimulates the secretion of oxytocin (OT), but the physiological role of OT remains unclear. The present study sought to determine the involvement of OT and renal nerves in the renal responses to an intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline. Male Wistar rats (280-350 g) were anesthetized with sodium thiopental (40 mg. kg(-1), i.v.). A bladder cannula was implanted for collection of urine. Animals were also instrumented for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal blood flow (RBF). Renal vascular conductance (RVC) was calculated as the ratio of RBF by MAP. In anesthetized rats (n = 6), OT infusion (0.03 µg • kg(-1), i.v.) induced renal vasodilation. Consistent with this result, ex vivo experiments demonstrated that OT caused renal artery relaxation. Blockade of OT receptors (OXTR) reduced these responses to OT, indicating a direct effect of this peptide on OXTR on this artery. Hypertonic saline (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml • kg(-1) b.wt., i.v.) was infused over 60 s. In sham rats (n = 6), hypertonic saline induced renal vasodilation. The OXTR antagonist (AT; atosiban, 40 µg • kg(-1) • h(-1), i.v.; n = 7) and renal denervation (RX) reduced the renal vasodilation induced by hypernatremia. The combination of atosiban and renal denervation (RX+AT; n = 7) completely abolished the renal vasodilation induced by sodium overload. Intact rats excreted 51% of the injected sodium within 90 min. Natriuresis was slightly blunted by atosiban and renal denervation (42% and 39% of load, respectively), whereas atosiban with renal denervation reduced sodium excretion to 16% of the load. These results suggest that OT and renal nerves are involved in renal vasodilation and natriuresis induced by acute plasma hypernatremia.

  10. The making of indigenous vascular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Madathipat; Viswanathan, Sidharth; Balasubramaniam, K.; Muraleedharan, C.V.; Lal, Arthur Vijayan; Mohanan, P.V.; Mohanty, Meera; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Vascular illnesses are on the rise in India, due to increase in lifestyle diseases and demographic transition, requiring intervention to save life, organ or limbs using vascular prosthesis. The aim of this study was to develop indigenous large diameter vascular graft for treatment of patients with vascular pathologies. Methods: The South India Textile Research Association, at Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India, developed seamless woven polyester (Polyethylene terephthalate) graft at its research wing. Further characterization and testing followed by clinical trials were conducted at Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. Fifteen in vivo experiments were carried out in 1992-1994 in pigs as animal model. Controlled (phase I) clinical trial in ten patients was performed along with control graft. Thereafter, phase II trial involved 22 patients who underwent multi-centre clinical trial in four centres across India. Results: Laboratory testing showed that polyester graft was non-toxic, non-leeching and non-haemolytic with preserved long-term quality, further confirming in pigs by implanting in thoracic aorta, comparable to control Dacron grafts. Perigraft incorporation and smooth neointima formation which are prime features of excellent healing characteristics, were noted at explantation at planned intervals. Subsequently in the phase I and II clinical trials, all patients had excellent recovery without mortality or device-related adverse events. Patients receiving the test graft were followed up for 10 and 5 years, respectively. Serial clinical, duplex scans and CT angiograms performed periodically confirmed excellent graft performance. Interpretation & conclusions: Indigenously developed Chitra vascular graft was comparable to commercially available Dacron graft, ready for clinical use at affordable cost to patients as against costly imported grafts. PMID:27748302

  11. Associations of Proanthocyanidin Intake with Renal Function and Clinical Outcomes in Elderly Women

    PubMed Central

    Ivey, Kerry L.; Lewis, Joshua R.; Lim, Wai H.; Lim, Ee M.; Hodgson, Jonathan M.; Prince, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Progression to chronic renal failure involves accelerated atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction play a role in renal failure pathophysiology. In addition to improving vascular health and function, proanthocyanidins have been shown to exert renoprotective effects in animal models. Thus we hypothesize that proanthocyanidins may contribute to the maintenance of healthy renal function. Objective Determine the association of habitual proanthocyanidin intake with renal function and the risk of clinical renal outcomes in a population of elderly women. Design 948 women aged over 75 y, free of prevalent renal disease at baseline, were randomly selected from ambulant Caucasian women. Proanthocyanidin consumption was determined using a validated food frequency questionnaire and the United States Department of Agriculture proanthocyanidin food content database. Fasting serum cystatin C and creatinine were assessed at baseline. Renal failure hospitalisations and deaths were assessed over 5 years of follow-up through the Western Australia Data Linkage System. Results Compared to participants with low consumption, participants in the highest tertile of proanthocyanidin intake had a 9% lower cystatin C concentration (P<0.001). High proanthocyanidin consumers were at 50% lower risk of moderate chronic kidney insufficiency, and 65% lower risk of experiencing a 5-year renal disease event (P<0.05). These relationships remained significant following adjustment for renal disease risk factors and diet-related potential confounders. Conclusion Increased consumption of proanthocyanidins was associated with better renal function and substantially reduced renal associated events, which has been supported by mechanistic and animal model data. Proanthocyanidin intake should be further examined as a dietary contributor to better renal health. PMID:23940710

  12. Two Cases of Adverse Reactions of Hyaluronic Acid–based Filler Injections

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing; Dong, Ming; Li, Tong; Ma, Qiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the natural components of the human body with high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and nonimmunogenicity, which makes it the ideal biomedical filling agent currently available. However, for many medical practitioners, HA filler injections remain a relatively new item to carry out. Learning while practicing, it is inevitable to encounter some difficulties and adverse reactions in its application. Here we report two cases of adverse reactions to HA-based filler injections, including anaphylactic reaction on the face and vascular thrombosis after augmentation rhinoplasty with HA filler. In this report, we highlight the management and prevention of the adverse reactions, especially in case 2, because vascular thrombosis is one of the severe complications and injectors should know how to avoid it and how to deal with it, thereby increasing the safety of HA-based procedures. PMID:28293495

  13. Incretin-Based Therapy for Prevention of Diabetic Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic vascular complications are the most common cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with numbers of affected individuals steadily increasing. Diabetic vascular complications can be divided into two categories: macrovascular andmicrovascular complications. Macrovascular complications include coronary artery diseaseand cerebrovascular disease, while microvascular complications include retinopathy and chronic kidney disease. These complications result from metabolic abnormalities, including hyperglycemia, elevated levels of free fatty acids, and insulin resistance. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to mediate the adverse effects of these metabolic disorders on vascular tissues, including stimulation of protein kinase C signaling and activation of the polyol pathway by oxidative stress and inflammation. Additionally, the loss of tissue-specific insulin signaling induced by hyperglycemia and toxic metabolites can induce cellular dysfunction and both macro- and microvascular complications characteristic of diabetes. Despite these insights, few therapeutic methods are available for the management of diabetic complications. Recently, incretin-based therapeutic agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, have been reported to elicit vasotropic actions, suggesting a potential for effecting an actual reduction in diabetic vascular complications. The present review will summarize the relationship between multiple adverse biological mechanisms in diabetes and putative incretin-based therapeutic interventions intended to prevent diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26881236

  14. Adverse drug reactions: part II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must be effectively practiced by all health care providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  15. Adverse drug reactions: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  16. Association of systemic hypertension with renal injury in dogs with induced renal failure.

    PubMed

    Finco, Delmar R

    2004-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is hypothesized to cause renal injury to dogs. This study was performed on dogs with surgically induced renal failure to determine whether hypertension was associated with altered renal function or morphology. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) were measured before and after surgery. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine protein:creatinine ratios (UPC) were measured at 1, 12, 24, 36, and 56-69 weeks after surgery, and renal histology was evaluated terminally. The mean of weekly MAP, SAP, and DAP measurements for each dog over the 1st 26 weeks was used to rank dogs on the basis of MAP, SAP, or DAP values. A statistically significant association was found between systemic arterial pressure ranking and ranked measures of adverse renal responses. When dogs were divided into higher pressure and lower pressure groups on the basis of SAP, group 1 (higher pressure, n = 9) compared with group 2 (lower pressure, n = 10) had significantly lower GFR values at 36 and 56-69 weeks; higher UPC values at 12 and 56-69 weeks; and higher kidney lesion scores for mesangial matrix, tubule damage, and fibrosis. When dogs were divided on MAP and DAP values, group 1 compared with group 2 had significantly lower GFR values at 12, 24, 36, and 56-69 weeks; higher UPC values at 12 and 56-69 weeks; and higher kidney lesion scores for mesangial matrix, tubule damage, fibrosis, and cell infiltrate. These results demonstrate an association between increased systemic arterial pressure and renal injury. Results from this study might apply to dogs with some types of naturally occurring renal failure.

  17. The Spectrum of Renal Involvement in Patients With Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Couvrat-Desvergnes, Grégoire; Masseau, Agathe; Benveniste, Olivier; Bruel, Alexandra; Hervier, Baptiste; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Buob, David; Hachulla, Eric; Rémy, Philippe; Azar, Raymond; Namara, Evelyne Mac; MacGregor, Brigitte; Daniel, Laurent; Lacraz, Adeline; Broucker, Thomas De; Rouvier, Philippe; Carli, Philippe; Laville, Maurice; Dantan, Etienne; Hamidou, Mohamed; Moreau, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding the incidence and outcome of renal involvement in patients with inflammatory myopathies (IM) remain scarce. We assessed the incidence and causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 150 patients with dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and antisynthetase syndrome followed in 3 French referral centers. Renal involvement occurred in 35 (23.3%) patients: AKI in 16 (10.7%), and CKD in 31 (20.7%) patients. The main cause of AKI was drug or myoglobinuria-induced acute tubular necrosis. Male sex, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac involvement, and initial proteinuria >0.3 g/d were associated with the occurrence of AKI. The outcome of patients with AKI was poor: 13 (81%) progressed to CKD and 2 (12.5%) reached end-stage renal disease. In multivariate survival analysis, age at IM onset, male sex, a history of cardiovascular events, and a previous episode of AKI were associated with the risk of CKD. We also identified 14 IM patients who underwent a kidney biopsy in 10 nephrology centers. Renal pathology disclosed a wide range of renal disorders, mainly immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We identified in 5 patients a peculiar pattern of severe acute renal vascular damage consisting mainly of edematous thickening of the intima of arterioles. We found that AKI and CKD are frequent in patients with IM. Prevention of AKI is crucial in these patients, as AKI is a major contributor to their relatively high risk of CKD. A peculiar pattern of acute vascular damage is part of the spectrum of renal diseases associated with IM. PMID:24378741

  18. The spectrum of renal involvement in patients with inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Couvrat-Desvergnes, Grégoire; Masseau, Agathe; Benveniste, Olivier; Bruel, Alexandra; Hervier, Baptiste; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Buob, David; Hachulla, Eric; Rémy, Philippe; Azar, Raymond; Mac Namara, Evelyne; MacGregor, Brigitte; Daniel, Laurent; Lacraz, Adeline; De Broucker, Thomas; Rouvier, Philippe; Carli, Philippe; Laville, Maurice; Dantan, Etienne; Hamidou, Mohamed; Moreau, Anne; Fakhouri, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Data regarding the incidence and outcome of renal involvement in patients with inflammatory myopathies (IM) remain scarce. We assessed the incidence and causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 150 patients with dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and antisynthetase syndrome followed in 3 French referral centers. Renal involvement occurred in 35 (23.3%) patients: AKI in 16 (10.7%), and CKD in 31 (20.7%) patients. The main cause of AKI was drug or myoglobinuria-induced acute tubular necrosis. Male sex, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac involvement, and initial proteinuria >0.3 g/d were associated with the occurrence of AKI. The outcome of patients with AKI was poor: 13 (81%) progressed to CKD and 2 (12.5%) reached end-stage renal disease. In multivariate survival analysis, age at IM onset, male sex, a history of cardiovascular events, and a previous episode of AKI were associated with the risk of CKD. We also identified 14 IM patients who underwent a kidney biopsy in 10 nephrology centers. Renal pathology disclosed a wide range of renal disorders, mainly immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We identified in 5 patients a peculiar pattern of severe acute renal vascular damage consisting mainly of edematous thickening of the intima of arterioles. We found that AKI and CKD are frequent in patients with IM. Prevention of AKI is crucial in these patients, as AKI is a major contributor to their relatively high risk of CKD. A peculiar pattern of acute vascular damage is part of the spectrum of renal diseases associated with IM.

  19. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  20. [Pain as adverse drug reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Schaffarzick, Daniel; Nagano, Marietta; Janowitz, Susanne Melitta; Schweitzer, Ekkehard

    2012-09-01

    We present a multidisciplinary (anaesthesiology--clinical pharmacy--bioinformatics) analysis of pain as possible adverse drug reaction taking different manifestations of pain, indication groups, relevance to the Austrian drug market and possible mechanistic influence of drugs on development and apprehension of pain into consideration.We designed an overview that shows how transmitters that play a part in nociception and antinociception can be influenced by drugs. This allows conclusions to the dolorigene potential of therapeutics.

  1. [Vascularization of hepatoceliular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tumanova, U N; Shchegolev, A I

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives the data available in the literature on vascularization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sinusoidal capillarization and unpaired arteries are shown to play an important role in the development and progression of HCC. The density of microvessels detected by immunohistochemical techniques is a morphological indicator of the degree of angiogenic processes. Higher-grade HCC is followed by changes in its vascularization and concurrent with a progressive increase in the proportion of blood entering along the hepatic artery. The morphological indicators of microvessel density are recommended to use as addi- tional criteria for determining the prognosis of the disease, designing targeted anti-angiogenic drugs, and evaluating the efficiency of performed therapy.

  2. Thiocolchicoside: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Thiocolchicoside has long been used as a muscle relaxant, despite a lack of proven efficacy beyond the placebo effect. Its chemical structure consists of colchicine, a sugar (ose) and a sulphur-containing radical (thio), and its adverse effects are therefore likely to be similar to those of colchicine. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we reviewed the available data on the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. Liver injury, pancreatitis, seizures, blood cell disorders, severe cutaneous disorders, rhabdomyolysis and reproductive disorders have all been recorded in the French and European pharmacovigilance databases and in the periodic updates that the companies concerned submit to regulatory agencies. These data do not specify the frequency of the disorders nor do they identify the most susceptible patient populations. Thiocolchicoside is teratogenic in experimental animals and also damages chromosomes. Human data are limited to a follow-up of about 30 pregnant women (no major malformations) and reports of altered spermatogenesis, including cases of azoospermia. In practice, there is no justification for exposing patients to the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. It is better to use an effective, well-known analgesic for patients complaining of muscle pain, starting with paracetamol.

  3. Adverse food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Alie; van Hunsel, Florence; Bast, Aalt

    2015-12-01

    Food supplements and herbal products are increasingly popular amongst consumers. This leads to increased risks of interactions between prescribed drugs and these products containing bioactive ingredients. From 1991 up to 2014, 55 cases of suspected adverse drug reactions due to concomitant intake of health-enhancing products and drugs were reported to Lareb, the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre. An overview of these suspected interactions is presented and their potential mechanisms of action are described. Mainly during the metabolism of xenobiotics and due to the pharmacodynamics effects interactions seem to occur, which may result in adverse drug reactions. Where legislation is seen to distinct food and medicine, legislation concerning these different bioactive products is less clear-cut. This can only be resolved by increasing the molecular knowledge on bioactive substances and their potential interactions. Thereby potential interactions can be better understood and prevented on an individual level. By considering the dietary pattern and use of bioactive substances with prescribed medication, both health professionals and consumers will be increasingly aware of interactions and these interactive adverse effects can be prevented.

  4. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of faldaprevir in patients with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fenglei; Moschetti, Viktoria; Lang, Benjamin; Halabi, Atef; Petersen-Sylla, Marc; Yong, Chan-Loi; Elgadi, Mabrouk

    2015-01-01

    Faldaprevir is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor with negligible urinary excretion. We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single oral dose of faldaprevir (480 mg) in 32 HCV-negative subjects with renal impairment or normal renal function. Compared with subjects with normal renal function, the adjusted geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals in parentheses) for overall exposure area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) were 113.6% (41.6 to 310.2%), 178.3% (85.2 to 373.0%), and 169.2% (73.2 to 391.2%) for subjects with mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment, respectively. Overall, 5/8 (63%) subjects with normal renal function and 20/24 (83%) subjects with renal impairment reported adverse events, with gastrointestinal events being the most common. No severe or serious adverse events or deaths were reported. These results suggest that moderate or severe renal impairment can result in a modest increase in faldaprevir exposure. The increase in exposure may be related to decrease in the activity of the liver uptake transporter OATP1B1 as a result of renal impairment. Given this relatively slight increase in exposure, a dose adjustment in HCV patients with renal impairment is not warranted. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01957657.).

  5. [Sarcoidosis : Renal manifestations].

    PubMed

    Löffler, C; Bergner, R

    2017-04-12

    Renal involvement in sarcoidosis is much more common than generally assumed from old epidemiological studies and is often only detected when actively searched for. Many patients with renal sarcoidosis present with no or only few symptoms. The diagnostic work-up of sarcoidosis should always include a possible renal involvement. In cases of impaired renal function, proteinuria or a pathological urine sediment, a renal biopsy specimen should be obtained to assess the type, severity and prognosis of the kidney disease. Treatment is primarily based on the use of corticosteroids. Steroid-sparing agents, such as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and infliximab can be applied; however, the evidence for efficacy of these therapies is mostly based on case series and expert opinions. Discontinuation of immunosuppression therapy bears a high risk of relapse.

  6. Renovascular acute renal failure precipitated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for pancreatic stones

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Nicolas; Goffette, Pierre; Deprez, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic stones is considered a safe and efficient method to facilitate fragmentation and stone removal. We describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with a solitary functioning kidney who presented an acute-onset anuria and renovascular renal failure the day after ESWL. We speculate that vascular calcifications in the area targeted by shock waves played a critical role in renal artery obstruction in the present case. PMID:26251710

  7. [Volume Homeostasis and Renal Function in Rats Exposed to Simulated and Actual Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Bryan J.

    1993-01-01

    This project has investigated mechanisms that influence alterations in compartmental fluid and electrolyte balance in microgravity and evaluates countermeasures to control renal fluid and electrolyte losses. Determining the alterations due to space flight in fluid compartments and renal function is an important component in understanding long term adaptation to spaceflight and the contribution to post-flight orthostatic intolerance. Four definition phase studies and two studies examining neuro-humoral and vascular mechanisms have been completed.

  8. Renal Vein and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis: A Rare Extrasplanchnic Complication of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Dhaval; Chaubal, Alisha; Pipaliya, Nirav; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder often associated with various complications. Approximately one fourth of patients with acute pancreatitis develop vascular complications, of which venous thrombosis forms a major group. Extrasplanchnic venous thrombosis is less common, and simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis is reported only twice. We report a case of alcohol-related acute pancreatitis complicated by simultaneous renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis. PMID:28008405

  9. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context.

  10. Acute thrombosis of a transplanted renal artery after gastric ulcer bleeding in a patient with a long-term well-functioning renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Kuan; Leu, Jyh-Gang; Wei, Cheng-Chun; Hsieh, Shih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acute thrombosis of a transplanted renal artery is a serious vascular complication following renal allograft transplantation, which usually occurs within the first month after transplantation and often results in graft loss. It rarely occurs beyond the first month, except in a rejected kidney or in a kidney with high-grade transplant renal artery stenosis. Result: A 65-year-old male with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pulmonary tuberculosis, and end-stage renal disease was previously treated with hemodialysis (HD). He received a kidney transplant and had a well-functioning graft for 2 years. He presented to our emergency department with gastric ulcer bleeding and received treatment involving an endoscopic submucosal epinephrine injection, a proton pump inhibitor, and blood transfusions. Nine days later, he complained of sudden lower abdominal pain and had acute anuric kidney failure. Renal ultrasonography revealed an absence of blood flow to the allograft kidney. Renal artery angiogram demonstrated complete occlusion of the transplanted renal artery. After thrombectomy and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with stent placement, 60% stenosis of the proximal renal artery with distal perfusion was noted. However, his graft function did not improve, and he received HD again. Histopathology of the transplanted kidney revealed ischemic tubular nephropathy with focal infarction without rejection. Conclusion: This is the first case of acute thrombosis of the transplanted renal artery following gastric ulcer bleeding in a patient with a long-term well-functioning graft kidney. PMID:27472705

  11. The Biology of Hemodialysis Vascular Access Failure

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Akshaar; Misra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are essential for patients and clinicians faced with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While this method of vascular access for hemodialysis is preferred to others due to its reduced rate of infection and complications, they are plagued by intimal hyperplasia. The pathogenesis of intimal hyperplasia and subsequent thrombosis is brought on by uremia, hypoxia, and shear stress. These forces upregulate inflammatory and proliferative cytokines acting on leukocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and platelets. This activation begins initially with the progression of uremia, which induces platelet dysfunction and primes the body for an inflammatory response. The vasculature subsequently undergoes changes in oxygenation and shear stress during AVF creation. This propagates a strong inflammatory response in the vessel leading to cellular proliferation. This combined response is then further subjected to the stressors of cannulation and dialysis, eventually leading to stenosis and thrombosis. This review aims to help interventional radiologists understand the biological changes and pathogenesis of access failure. PMID:27011423

  12. Renal handling of matrix Gla-protein in humans with moderate to severe hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Schurgers, Leon J; Vermeer, Cees; Scholte, Jan B J; Houben, Alphons J H M; de Leeuw, Peter W; Kroon, Abraham A

    2008-09-01

    Vascular calcifications are common among patients with hypertension. The vitamin K-dependent protein matrix Gla-protein plays an important role in preventing arterial calcification. Since a decrease in renal clearance is a prevalent clinical problem in patients with hypertension, we aimed to study the renal clearance of matrix Gla-protein from the circulation in these patients having a wide range of creatinine clearances. Ninety moderate to severe hypertensive patients who were scheduled for renal angiography were enrolled in the study. In these patients, renal arterial and renal venous blood was sampled prior to the administration of contrast material in order to determine the total renal and single kidney clearance of matrix Gla-protein. The average renal fractional extraction of matrix Gla-protein was 12.8%. There was no significant correlation between creatinine clearance (range 26-154) and renal fractional extraction of matrix Gla-protein in this population. The extraction of matrix Gla-protein was not influenced by the presence of a renal artery stenosis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the kidney is able to extract matrix Gla-protein from the plasma at a constant level of 12.8%, independent of renal function in hypertensive subjects.

  13. Is Aerosolized Pentamidine for Pneumocystis Pneumonia Prophylaxis in Renal Transplant Recipients Not as Safe as We Might Think?

    PubMed

    Macesic, N; Urbancic, K; Ierino, F; Grayson, M L

    2016-04-01

    Outbreaks ofPneumocystispneumonia have been described in renal transplant recipients. Aerosolized pentamidine is frequently used for prophylaxis in this setting. We report our experience with aerosolized pentamidine use in 56 renal transplant recipients. We found high rates of adverse reactions in patients with chronic respiratory disease.

  14. Renal flow studies after abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy and axillo-bifemoral bypass graft: case report

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Yussen, P.S.

    1988-03-01

    Vascular disorders affecting the kidneys are either acquired or congenital. Included in this category are common multiplicity of renal arteries, the rare arteriovenous malformation, stresses due to fibromuscular disease or atherosclerosis including abdominal aortic aneurysms, arterial thrombosis, venous thrombosis, and infarction. In contrast to the group of cystic and neoplastic kidneys where scintigraphic or pathologic are not diagnostic, scintigraphic or pathologic anatomy in vascular disease is often diagnostic by nuclear medicine techniques. The authors present an interesting case of evaluation of acute renal failure in a patient abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy and axillo-bifemoral bypass graft.

  15. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Heart and vascular services URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  16. Pathogenesis of Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Laurence M.; Ballieux, Fanny; Vikkula, Miikka

    2010-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are localized defects of vascular development. Most of them occur sporadically, i.e. there is no familial history of lesions, yet in a few cases clear inheritance is observed. These inherited forms are often characterized by multifocal lesions that are mainly small in size and increase in number with patient’s age. On the basis of these inherited forms, molecular genetic studies have unraveled a number of inherited mutations giving direct insight into the pathophysiological cause and the molecular pathways that are implicated. Genetic defects have been identified for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), inherited cutaneomucosal venous malformation (VMCM), glomuvenous malformation (GVM), capillary malformation - arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM), cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) and some isolated and syndromic forms of primary lymphedema. We focus on these disorders, the implicated mutated genes and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. We also call attention to the concept of Knudson’s double-hit mechanism to explain incomplete penetrance and the large clinical variation in expressivity of inherited vascular anomalies. This variability renders the making of correct diagnosis of the rare inherited forms difficult. Yet, the identification of the pathophysiological causes and pathways involved in them has had an unprecedented impact on our thinking of their etiopathogenesis, and has opened the doors towards a more refined classification of vascular anomalies. It has also made it possible to develop animal models that can be tested for specific molecular therapies, aimed at alleviating the dysfunctions caused by the aberrant genes and proteins. PMID:21095468

  17. OBESITY AND VASCULAR DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; James, Milinda E.; Goodwill, Adam G.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most profound challenges facing public health and public health policy in Western society is the increased incidence and prevalence of both overweight and obesity. While this condition can have significant consequences for patient mortality and quality of life, it can be further exacerbated as overweight/obesity can be a powerful stimulus for the development of additional risk factors for a negative cardiovascular outcome, including increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. This manuscript will present the effects of systemic obesity on broad issues of vascular function in both afflicted human populations and in the most relevant animal models. Among the topics that will be covered are alterations to vascular reactivity (both dilator and constrictor responses), adaptations in microvascular network and vessel wall structure, and alterations to the patterns of tissue/organ perfusion as a result of the progression of the obese condition. Additionally, special attention will be paid to the contribution of chronic inflammation as a contributor to alterations in vascular function, as well as the role of perivascular adipose tissue in terms of impacting vessel behavior. When taken together, it is clearly apparent that the development of the obese condition can have profound, and frequently difficult to predict, impacts on integrated vascular function. Much of this complexity appears to have its basis in the extent to which other co-morbidities associated with obesity (e.g., insulin resistance) are present and exert contributing effects. PMID:18571908

  18. Nonthrombogenic polymer vascular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, C; Senshu, K; Okano, T

    1995-01-01

    Although many synthetic vascular grafts have been developed and evaluated experimentally or clinically, none of them have met long-term patency when applied as a small diameter vascular substitute. We have recently developed a small caliber vascular graft (3 mm i.d.) using a nonthrombogenic polymer coating. The graft consists of three layered structures: Dacron for the outer layer, polyurethane in the middle layer, and a HEMA/styrene block copolymer (HEMA-st) coating for the inner layer. HEMA-st is an amphiphilic block copolymer composed of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and styrene which has demonstrated improved blood compatibility over existing biomedical polymers in both in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Ten grafts were evaluated in a dog bilateral carotid replacement model. The grafts were electively retrieved at 7, 14, 30, 92, and 372 days after implantation. All grafts were patent without detectable thrombi along the graft length including anastomotic sites. Scanning electron micrographs of retrieved graft lumen showed fairly clean surfaces covered with a homogenous protein-like layer without microthrombi or endothelial cell lining. The thickness of the surface protein layer measured by a transmission electron microscopy was what can be described as monolayer protein adsorption regardless of implantation periods of as much as 372 days. A stable monolayer adsorbed protein layer formed on HEMA-st surfaces demonstrated nonthrombogenic activities in vivo and secure long-term patency of small caliber vascular grafts with the absence of an endothelial cell lining.

  19. Amputation in vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, K.

    1980-01-01

    The management of vascular amputees in the Roehampton Limb Surgery Unit since its opening in 1975 is outlined and the results in 167 cases presented. Of the 35 patients over the age of 80, 57% were walking independently at the time of their discharge from the unit. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7377693

  20. Vascular Multiplicity Should Not Be a Contra-Indication for Live Kidney Donation and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    van Bruggen, Mark; Kimenai, Hendrikus J. A. N.; Tran, Thi C. K.; Terkivatan, Türkan; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; IJzermans, Jan N. M.; Dor, Frank J. M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether vascular multiplicity should be considered as contraindication and therefore ‘extended donor criterion’ is still under debate. Methods Data from all live kidney donors from 2006–2013 (n = 951) was retrospectively reviewed. Vascular anatomy as imaged by MRA, CTA or other modalities was compared with intraoperative findings. Furthermore, the influence of vascular multiplicity on outcome of donors and recipients was studied. Results In 237 out of 951 donors (25%), vascular multiplicity was present. CTA had the highest accuracy levels regarding vascular anatomy assessment. Regarding outcome of donors with vascular multiplicity, warm ischemia time (WIT) and skin-to-skin time were significantly longer if arterial multiplicity (AM) was present (5.1 vs. 4.0 mins and 202 vs. 178 mins). Skin-to-skin time was significantly longer, and complication rates were higher in donors with venous multiplicity (203 vs. 180 mins and 17.2% vs. 8.4%). Outcome of renal transplant recipients showed a significantly increased WIT (30 vs. 26.7 minutes), higher rate of DGF (13.9% vs. 6.9%) and lower rate of BPAR (6.9% vs. 13.9%) in patients receiving a kidney with AM compared to kidneys with singular anatomy. Conclusions We conclude that vascular multiplicity should not be a contra-indication, since it has little impact on clinical outcome in the donor as well as in renal transplant recipients. PMID:27077904

  1. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  2. Urogenital Vascular Anomalies with Bilateral Kinking of Ureter: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tadipi, Suresh; Sadashiv, Roshni; Muralidharan, Sangeeta; Pimid, Maegyvear

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the urogenital vascular anomalies in the abdomen are very common. However, they warrant attention due to their importance in operative, diagnostic, and endovascular procedures. During routine dissection of abdomen in a male cadaver, unique urogenital vascular anomalies were observed. On the right side, the right renal artery was found to be originated from the abdominal aorta at the level of L2 and divided into five branches; the right testicular artery and inferior suprarenal artery originated from the lower branch. We also observed, accessory renal artery arising from abdominal aorta at the level of L3 and double renal veins on right side. On the left side, we found left renal artery originating from the abdominal aorta at the level of L2 and divided into two branches. Double testicular (medial and lateral) arteries were also observed. In addition to these vascular variations, bilateral kinking of ureter at the pelviureteric junction was also observed. Although the variations in the origin of urogenital vessels in the abdomen are common, deeper understanding of the urogenital vascular variations and their relations to adjacent structures is significant during surgical and radiological procedures. PMID:28223889

  3. Massive uncomplicated vascular immune complex deposits in the kidney of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Takazoe, K; Shimada, T; Nakano, H; Kawamura, T; Utsunomiya, Y; Kanai, T; Kitajima, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Joh, K; Mitarai, T; Sakai, O

    1997-09-01

    The case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reported which was accompanied by renal dysfunction and massive vascular immune deposits in the kidney without active glomerular lesions. The renal biopsy showed arterioles and small arteries with circumferential periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and Masson trichrome-positive homogenous material in the subendothelial area in the absence of thrombotic, necrotizing or inflammatory lesions. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy examination demonstrated immune deposits in the vascular walls. Glomeruli showed only minor abnormalities with a trend to collapse. There was no improvement in renal dysfunction over a 4-year period until the patient's death, despite steroid therapy producing a decrease in disease activity. The autopsy showed similar vascular changes to those seen in the biopsy, however; glomeruli were either sclerotic or showed a trend to collapse. Massive uncomplicated vascular immune complex deposition without active glomerular lesions is rare. The present case indicates that this type of lupus vasculopathy may be a prognostic factor for the loss of renal function in SLE mediated by hemodynamic glomerular injury.

  4. [Renal markers and predictors, and renal and cardiovascular risk factors].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Andrade, C

    2002-01-01

    An important task of the nephrologists during the last century, it has been the search of elements and means that allow us, with the adequate precision, to correlate the functional deterioration of the kidney, and the patient's clinical reality. And the continuous searching of factors and markers that injure them, the prognosis, and early diagnosis, to be able to predict the degree of the organs and patient's survival. Almost parallel survival presage in the natural history of the illness, almost one century ago. In the second half of the XX century, in the developed countries, appear modifications of the social, cultural, and sanitary conditions, that make appear some very different partner-sanitary and epidemic circumstances, and take place like they are, among others: 1. An increase of per cápita private rents, what takes place to increase of the level of social life and the population's health. With increment of the longevity, and smaller incidence and prevalence of classic process, as malnutrition, infections, infantile mortality, so increasing the weight of the cardiovascular diseases and death. This is potentiated for the increment and the incidence of environmental cardiovascular risk's factors (like high caloric and fatty-rich diets, smoke, alcohol, disappearance of the physical work, inactivity, etc). And that situations are also product of the change of the outline of human and social values and guides. 2. Access of the whole population to a sanitary attention of more quality and effectiveness. It allows the biggest survival of patients that suffer vascular crisis, (as angina, miocardial infarction or cerebrovascular accident), that few years ago they have had a higher morbimortality and an inferior survival (2). 3. The execution of big epidemic studies has been able to, not only characterize and test with scientific evidence to numerous factors and markers, that induce renal and cardiovascular prejudicial changes, but risk and death probability

  5. [Acute renal failure and Plasmodium falciparum malaria: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kissou, S A; Cessouma, R; Barro, M; Traoré, H; Nacro, B

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is an endemic disease caused by one of the several Plasmodium species. Severe malaria is mainly due to Plasmodium falciparum in highly endemic areas. Acute renal failure (ARF) is a criterion of malaria severity as defined by WHO. Often observed in adults, particularly in India and Southeast Asia, this complication remains a rare complication of malaria in children. We report a case of oliguric ARF that occurred in a 7-year-old girl a few days after the onset of fever. The vascular obstruction by parasitized erythrocytes often causing tubular necrosis is the primary mechanism of renal failure. As a possible diagnosis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, renal failure and quartan hemoglobinuric nephropathy are other possible causes of renal failure in malaria. Renal biopsy, which was not performed in our patient, would have been a great help, but was not available. The outcome was favorable with recovery of renal function after 3 weeks of diuretic therapy. This development is not always the rule and the prognosis depends on early diagnosis and treatment options.

  6. [Pulmonary-renal crosstalk in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Donoso F, Alejandro; Arriagada S, Daniela; Cruces R, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of renal replacement therapy, mortality of acute renal failure remains high, especially when occurring simultaneously with distant organic failure as it is in the case of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this update, birideccional deleterious relationship between lung and kidney on the setting of organ dysfunction is reviewed, which presents important clinical aspects of knowing. Specifically, the renal effects of acute respiratory distress syndrome and the use of positive-pressure mechanical ventilation are discussed, being ventilator induced lung injury one of the most common models for studying the lung-kidney crosstalk. The role of renal failure induced by mechanical ventilation (ventilator-induced kidney injury) in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure is emphasized. We also analyze the impact of the acute renal failure in the lung, recognizing an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability, inflammation, and alteration of sodium and water channels in the alveolar epithelial. This conceptual model can be the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies to use in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

  7. Feasibility of renal transplantation after unroofing of a large renal cyst in an expanded criteria donor

    PubMed Central

    Kanagarajah, Prashanth; Ekwenna, Obi; Ayyathurai, Rajinikanth; Burk, George W.; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    We present a case in which a deceased donor kidney with a large simple cyst was successfully unroofed and transplanted to a 61-year-old male. The donor was a 62-year-old male with a history of hypertension for 2 years; cerebral vascular accident was the cause of death. A large 8-cm cyst distorting the renal hilum was identified upon the procurement of the deceased donor kidney. Prior to transplantation, the large cyst was unroofed from the allograft; the frozen section confirmed a benign cyst and the transplant was performed. Postoperatively, the serum creatinine level was 1.4 mg/ml at 22-month follow-up and the patient was normotensive. Deceased donor kidneys with giant cysts distorting the renal hilum can be effectively transplanted. PMID:24049388

  8. Digital processing of histopathological aspects in renal transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Albuquerque Araujo, Arnaldo; de Andrade, Marcos C.; Bambirra, Eduardo A.; dos Santos, A. M. M.

    1993-07-01

    We describe here our initial experience with the digital image processing of histopathological aspects from multiple renal biopsies of transplanted kidney in a patient treated with Cyclosporine (CsA), a powerful immunosupressor drug whose use has improved the chances of a successful vascularized organ transplantation (Tx). Unfortunately, CsA promotes morphological alterations to the glomerular structure of the kidneys. To characterize this process, glomeruli, tufts, and lumen areas distributions are measured. The results are presented in form of graphics.

  9. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M; Wang, Ping Z; Bai, Xue F

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed.

  10. Fetal kidney stem cells ameliorate cisplatin induced acute renal failure and promote renal angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashwani Kumar; Jadhav, Sachin H; Tripathy, Naresh Kumar; Nityanand, Soniya

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether fetal kidney stem cells (fKSC) ameliorate cisplatin induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats and promote renal angiogenesis. METHODS: The fKSC were isolated from rat fetuses of gestation day 16 and expanded in vitro up to 3rd passage. They were characterized for the expression of mesenchymal and renal progenitor markers by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The in vitro differentiation of fKSC towards epithelial lineage was evaluated by the treatment with specific induction medium and their angiogenic potential by matrigel induced tube formation assay. To study the effect of fKSC in ARF, fKSC labeled with PKH26 were infused in rats with cisplatin induced ARF and, the blood and renal tissues of the rats were collected at different time points. Blood biochemical parameters were studied to evaluate renal function. Renal tissues were evaluated for renal architecture, renal cell proliferation and angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry, renal cell apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick-end labeling assay and early expression of angiogenic molecules viz. vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by western blot. RESULTS: The fKSC expressed mesenchymal markers viz. CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105 as well as renal progenitor markers viz. Wt1, Pax2 and Six2. They exhibited a potential to form CD31 and Von Willebrand factor expressing capillary-like structures and could be differentiated into cytokeratin (CK)18 and CK19 positive epithelial cells. Administration of fKSC in rats with ARF as compared to administration of saline alone, resulted in a significant improvement in renal function and histology on day 3 (2.33 ± 0.33 vs 3.50 ± 0.34, P < 0.05) and on day 7 (0.83 ± 0.16 vs 2.00 ± 0.25, P < 0.05). The infused PKH26 labeled fKSC were observed to engraft in damaged renal tubules and showed increased proliferation and reduced

  11. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  12. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  13. Adverse responses to local anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M M; Graham, R

    1984-11-01

    Progressive challenge was used to investigate twenty-seven patients with a history of an adverse response to local anaesthesia. True allergy was detected in only one patient. The method does not exclude reactions to additives and preservatives in local anaesthetics. If preservative-free local anaesthetics are used for subsequent exposure in patients with no response to progressive challenge, subsequent exposure is safe. The possibility that some of these patients may be reacting to preservatives in the solutions cannot be excluded by such testing. Where possible preservative-free local anaesthetic preparations should be used for subsequent anaesthesia.

  14. Adverse Outcomes in Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roback, Howard B.

    2000-01-01

    Group forms of therapy have been growing at a rapid rate, in part because of their documented effectiveness and economic considerations such as managed care. It is therefore becoming increasingly important to assess the psychological risks of these interventions. The author provides an overview of the published literature and conference presentations on negative effects in adult outpatient groups. Although much of the literature on adverse outcomes in group therapy focuses on single risk factors (e.g., negative leader, group process, or patient characteristics), the author argues that an interactional model should be encouraged. Means of reducing casualties are also discussed, as well as methodological issues and research directions. PMID:10896735

  15. Drug-induced impairment of renal function

    PubMed Central

    Pazhayattil, George Sunny; Shirali, Anushree C

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical agents provide diagnostic and therapeutic utility that are central to patient care. However, all agents also carry adverse drug effect profiles. While most of these are clinically insignificant, some drugs may cause unacceptable toxicity that impacts negatively on patient morbidity and mortality. Recognizing adverse effects is important for administering appropriate drug doses, instituting preventive strategies, and withdrawing the offending agent due to toxicity. In the present article, we will review those drugs that are associated with impaired renal function. By focusing on pharmaceutical agents that are currently in clinical practice, we will provide an overview of nephrotoxic drugs that a treating physician is most likely to encounter. In doing so, we will summarize risk factors for nephrotoxicity, describe clinical manifestations, and address preventive and treatment strategies. PMID:25540591

  16. Renal oncocytoma: new observations

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, M.J.; Hartman, D.S.; Friedman, A.C.; Sherman, J.L.; Lautin, E.M.; Pyatt, R.S.; Ho, C.K.; Csere, R.; Fromowitz, F.B.

    1984-10-01

    Renal oncocytomas are uncommon, benign tumors that can be treated by local incision or heminephrectomy; their preoperative differentiation from renal cell carcinoma, treated by radical nephrectomy, would be invaluable. A particularly important finding, a central scar, not stressed in previous reports, is frequently demonstrated by CT examination. The authors evaluated radiographic studies of 18 pathologically confirmed cases of oncocytoma and compared findings with results of CT, sonography, and angiogrpahy studies of 18 renal cell carcinoma cases. Oncocytomas can be suggested if a stellate scar is identified within an otherwise homogeneous tumor on ultrasound (US) and CT; if the mass appears homogeneous but no scar is present, angiography should be performed.

  17. Challenges in renal transplantation in Yemen.

    PubMed

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H

    2015-02-16

    Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in Yemen in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in Yemen in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports.

  18. Vascular imaging in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Mueller, Peter R

    2008-07-01

    Though a myriad of vascular conditions affect the elderly, atherosclerosis remains the most common vascular disorder, followed by venous thromboembolism and varicose veins. In this article, the authors discuss the imaging of atherosclerosis affecting various vascular territories and pay special attention to the elderly population. The authors also discuss imaging findings of segmental arterial mediolysis, giant cell arteritis, and venous thromboembolism.

  19. Protective role of sulphoraphane against vascular complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Matsui, Takanori

    2016-10-01

    Context Diabetes is a global health challenge. Although large prospective clinical trials have shown that intensive control of blood glucose or blood pressure reduces the risk for development and progression of vascular complications in diabetes, a substantial number of diabetic patients still experience renal failure and cardiovascular events, which could account for disabilities and high mortality rate in these subjects. Objective Sulphoraphane is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in widely consumed cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts, and an inducer of phase II antioxidant and detoxification enzymes with anticancer properties. We reviewed here the protective role of sulphoraphane against diabetic vascular complications. Methods In this review, literature searches were undertaken in Medline and in CrossRef. Non-English language articles were excluded. Keywords [sulphoraphane and (diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic complications, vascular, cardiomyocytes, heart or glycation)] have been used to select the articles. Results There is accumulating evidence that sulphoraphane exerts beneficial effects on vascular damage in both cell culture and diabetic animal models via antioxidative properties. Furthermore, we have recently found that sulphoraphane inhibits in vitro formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), suppresses the AGE-induced inflammatory reactions in rat aorta by reducing receptor for AGEs (RAGE) expression and decreases serum levels of AGEs in humans. Conclusion These findings suggest that blockade of oxidative stress and/or the AGE-RAGE axis by sulphoraphane may be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing vascular complications in diabetes.

  20. Aspirin for vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rands, Gianetta; Orrell, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin is widely prescribed for patients with a diagnosis of vascular dementia. In a survey of UK geriatricians and psychiatrists 80% of patients with clinical diagnoses of vascular dementia were prescribed aspirin. However, a number of queries remain unanswered. Is there convincing evidence that aspirin benefits patients with vascular dementia? Does aspirin affect cognition and behaviour, or improve prognosis? Does the risk of cerebral or gastric haemorrhage outweigh any benefit? Objectives To assess the randomised trial evidence for efficacy and safety of aspirin in the treatment of vascular dementia. Search methods We searched ALOIS: the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group’s Specialized Register on 12 March 2012 using the terms: aspirin OR “acetylsalicylic acid”. ALOIS contains records of clinical trials identified from monthly searches of a number of major healthcare databases, numerous trial registries and grey literature sources. In addition, relevant websites were searched and some journals were handsearched. Specialists in the field were approached for unpublished material and any publications found were searched for additional references. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of aspirin for vascular dementia were eligible for inclusion. Data collection and analysis Retrieved studies were analysed independently by both review authors. Methodology and results were critically appraised and outcomes scanned included cognition, behavioural change, mortality and institutionalisation. Main results No trials were eligible for inclusion in this review. Authors’ conclusions The most recent search for references to relevant research was carried out in March 2012. No trials were found for inclusion in this systematic review. Low-dose aspirin is frequently used as ‘treatment as normal’ in control groups and as a baseline treatment in pharmacological trials. There is still no good evidence that

  1. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental–social cues and physiological–behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time–dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  2. Treatment of renal failure from diabetic nephropathy with cadaveric homograft

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, Claude; Laplante, Louis

    1973-01-01

    We report two patients with terminal renal failure secondary to diabetic nephropathy treated with cadaveric kidney transplantation. Neither of these patients had peripheral vascular disease or peripheral neuropathy. There was a proliferative diabetic retinopathy with hemorrhages and exudates in one patient and only background diabetic changes in the ocular fundi of the other; there have been no significant changes in visual acuity or retinopathy in either patient following the transplantation. Both have good kidney function after 8 and 15 months and are completely rehabilitated. The requirement for insulin decreased in both patients during the period of renal insufficiency and increased following transplantation; this seemed to be related to the large dose of steroids given because now that a maintenance level of steroids has been established, both patients require the same dosage of insulin as they did before the onset of renal insufficiency. PMID:4574972

  3. Renal failure in patients with left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami M; Adeseun, Gbemisola A; Ahmed, Irfan; Mitter, Nanhi; Rame, J Eduardo; Rudnick, Michael R

    2013-03-01

    Implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly being used as a bridge to transplantation or as destination therapy in patients with end stage heart failure refractory to conventional medical therapy. A significant number of these patients have associated renal dysfunction before LVAD implantation, which may improve after LVAD placement due to enhanced perfusion. Other patients develop AKI after implantation. LVAD recipients who develop AKI requiring renal replacement therapy in the hospital or who ultimately require long-term outpatient hemodialysis therapy present management challenges with respect to hemodynamics, volume, and dialysis access. This review discusses the mechanics of a continuous-flow LVAD (the HeartMate II), the effects of continuous blood flow on the kidney, renal outcomes of patients after LVAD implantation, dialysis modality selection, vascular access, hemodynamic monitoring during the dialytic procedure, and other issues relevant to caring for these patients.

  4. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed.

  5. Melatonin differentially affects vascular blood flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jonathan S; Sauder, Charity L; Ray, Chester A

    2011-02-01

    Melatonin is synthesized and released into the circulation by the pineal gland in a circadian rhythm. Melatonin has been demonstrated to differentially alter blood flow to assorted vascular beds by the activation of different melatonin receptors in animal models. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of melatonin on blood flow to various vascular beds in humans. Renal (Doppler ultrasound), forearm (venous occlusion plethysmography), and cerebral blood flow (transcranial Doppler), arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were measured in 10 healthy subjects (29±1 yr; 5 men and 5 women) in the supine position for 3 min. The protocol began 45 min after the ingestion of either melatonin (3 mg) or placebo (sucrose). Subjects returned at least 2 days later at the same time of day to repeat the trial after ingesting the other substance. Melatonin did not alter heart rate and mean arterial pressure. Renal blood flow velocity (RBFV) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) were lower during the melatonin trial compared with placebo (RBFV, 40.5±2.9 vs. 45.4±1.5 cm/s; and RVC, 0.47±0.02 vs. 0.54±0.01 cm·s(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively). In contrast, forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) were greater with melatonin compared with placebo (FBF, 2.4±0.2 vs. 1.9±0.1 ml·100 ml(-1)·min(-1); and FVC, 0.029±0.003 vs. 0.023±0.002 arbitrary units, respectively). Melatonin did not alter cerebral blood flow measurements compared with placebo. Additionally, phentolamine (5-mg bolus) after melatonin reversed the decrease in RVC, suggesting that melatonin increases sympathetic outflow to the kidney to mediate renal vasoconstriction. In summary, exogenous melatonin differentially alters vascular blood flow in humans. These data suggest the complex nature of melatonin on the vasculature in humans.

  6. New Insights Into Tobacco-Induced Vascular Disease: Clinical Ramifications.

    PubMed

    Cooke, John P

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains more than 4,000 compounds. These include phenols, carbonyls, and nitrosamines that may be irritants and carcinogens; particulate matter such as tars; volatiles and gases such as carbon monoxide; and nicotine. Many of these compounds may contribute to the adverse health effects of tobacco. For example, recent findings have shown that the angiogenic and proliferative effects of nicotine are mediated by activation of nicotinic receptors on the vascular cells. Nicotine-induced activation of vascular cells may contribute to pathological neovascularization in cancer, age-related macular degeneration, and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on how nicotine adversely affects cardiovascular health and highlights intriguing new data about nicotine's potent angiogenic and proliferative properties.

  7. Vascular calcification, bone and mineral metabolism after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    D’Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The development of end stage renal failure can be seen as a catastrophic health event and patients with this condition are considered at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease among any other patient groups and risk categories. Although kidney transplantation was hailed as an optimal solution to such devastating disease, many issues related to immune-suppressive drugs soon emerged and it became evident that cardiovascular disease would remain a vexing problem. Progression of chronic kidney disease is accompanied by profound alterations of mineral and bone metabolism that are believed to have an impact on the cardiovascular health of patients with advanced degrees of renal failure. Cardiovascular risk factors remain highly prevalent after kidney transplantation, some immune-suppression drugs worsen the risk profile of graft recipients and the alterations of mineral and bone metabolism seen in end stage renal failure are not completely resolved. Whether this complex situation promotes progression of vascular calcification, a hall-mark of advanced chronic kidney disease, and whether vascular calcifications contribute to the poor cardiovascular outcome of post-transplant patients is reviewed in this article. PMID:26722649

  8. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term “hypersensitivity” is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as “hypersensitivities” while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  9. An incidental detection of aortic aneurysm on Tc-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Sadic, Murat; Demirel, Koray; Koca, Gökhan; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    A 71-year-old man with newly diagnosed hypertension was referred for Technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc-99m MAG3) renal scintigraphy to evaluate the recent onset of impairment in renal functions. Dynamic imaging revealed activity flow which was suspicious for aortic aneurysm (AA) with a concurrent decrease in left renal blood flow. CT angiography of the thoracoabdominal aorta confirmed that this area corresponded to AA. The purpose of this report was to present the first case of incidental detection of AA on Tc-99m MAG3 scintigraphy and highlight the importance of correlative imaging for the diagnosis of abnormal radioactivity accumulation in the region of vascular structures.

  10. [Renal angiomyolipoma rupture as a cause of lumbar pain: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Melissa; Calleja, Félix; Hola, José; Daviú, Antonio; Jara, Danilo; Vallejos, Humberto

    2008-08-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor formed by smooth muscle, adipose tissue and blood vessels. It is commonly found incidentally and its clinical manifestations are pain and abdominal mass or spontaneous tumor rupture with retroperitoneal bleeding. The clinical presentation of a hemorrhagic shock secondary to a retroperitoneal hematoma is uncommon. We report a 40 year-old male who presented to the emergency room with lumbar pain and deterioration of hemodynamic parameters. The CT scan showed a left renal injury associated to an expansive retroperitoneal process. The abdominal exploration, vascular control of the renal pedicle and nephrectomy allowed a successful outcome.

  11. Crossed Renal Ectopia and Aorto-Occlusive Disease: A Management Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Eugene; Campbell, Ian; Choong, Andrew MTL; Dunglison, Nigel; Aziz, Maged

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of a patient with aortoiliac occlusive disease on the background of type A crossed renal ectopia, for whom open surgical intervention was required. Aortic exposure in patients with concomitant crossed renal ectopia can present technical challenges to the vascular surgeon. The knowledge of variations in the ectopic renal blood supply is of paramount importance when performing surgery to treat this condition and affects the choice of surgical exposure. We present and discuss the operative details of our patient and outline an approach to this subset of patients. PMID:26509134

  12. Clues to vascular disorders at non-contrast CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Esterson, Yonah B; Berkowitz, Jennifer L; Friedman, Barak; Hines, John J; Shah, Priya K; Grimaldi, Gregory M

    2017-04-01

    Non-contrast chest CT scans are commonly performed while CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis are performed in a select subset of patients; those with limited renal function, an allergy to iodinated contrast, in the setting of suspected renal calculus, retroperitoneal hematoma, common duct calculus, abdominal aortic aneurysm with or without rupture, and in patients undergoing a PET-CT scan. In the absence of intravenous contrast, vascular structures may prove challenging to evaluate, yet their assessment is an important component of every non-contrast CT examination. We describe the key imaging features of both arterial and venous pathology, and review clues and common associated non-vascular findings, which can help the radiologist identify vascular disorders at non-contrast CT. Briefly, alternative imaging options are discussed.

  13. Renal and perirenal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.E.; Andriole, V.T.

    1987-12-01

    Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has increased as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscess now includes acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, as well as the previously recognized renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. In general, the clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them; various radiographic studies can distinguish them, however. The intrarenal abscess is usually treated successfully with antibiotic therapy alone. Antistaphylococcal therapy is indicated for the renal cortical abscess, whereas therapy directed against the common gram-negative uropathogens is indicated for most of the other entities. The perinephric abscess is often an elusive diagnosis, has a more serious prognosis, and is more difficult to treat. Drainage of the abscess and sometimes partial or complete nephrectomy are required for resolution. 73 references.

  14. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ureters. Causes Renal papillary necrosis often occurs with analgesic nephropathy . This is damage to one or both ... Treatment depends on the cause. For example, if analgesic nephropathy is the cause, your doctor will recommend ...

  15. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Krapf R, Seldin DW, Alpern RJ. Clinical syndromes of metabolic acidosis. In: Alpern RJ, Caplan M, Moe OW, ... 529. Read More Distal renal tubular acidosis Fanconi syndrome Low potassium level Metabolic acidosis Osteomalacia Respiratory acidosis Rickets Review Date 10/ ...

  16. Renal primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, Tanner; Parwani, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors exist as a part of the Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor family. These tumors most commonly arise in the chest wall and paraspinal regions; cases with a renal origin are rare entities, but have become increasingly reported in recent years. Although such cases occur across a wide age distribution, the average age for a patient with a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor is the mid- to late 20s, with both males and females susceptible. Histologically, these tumors are characterized by pseudorosettes. Immunohistochemically, CD99 is an important diagnostic marker. Clinically, these are aggressive tumors, with an average 5-year disease-free survival rate of only 45% to 55%. Given that renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor bears many similarities to other renal tumors, it is important to review the histologic features, immunostaining profile, and genetic abnormalities that can be used for its correct diagnosis.

  17. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better with treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of distal renal tubular acidosis. Get medical help right away if you develop emergency symptoms ...

  18. Brain Vascular Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Laviña, Bàrbara

    2016-01-01

    Recent major improvements in a number of imaging techniques now allow for the study of the brain in ways that could not be considered previously. Researchers today have well-developed tools to specifically examine the dynamic nature of the blood vessels in the brain during development and adulthood; as well as to observe the vascular responses in disease situations in vivo. This review offers a concise summary and brief historical reference of different imaging techniques and how these tools can be applied to study the brain vasculature and the blood-brain barrier integrity in both healthy and disease states. Moreover, it offers an overview on available transgenic animal models to study vascular biology and a description of useful online brain atlases. PMID:28042833

  19. Pelvic Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Brian M.; Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) comprise a wide spectrum of lesions that are classified by content and flow characteristics. These lesions, occurring in both focal and diffuse forms, can involve any organ and tissue plane and can cause significant morbidity in both children and adults. Since treatment strategy depends on the type of malformation, correct diagnosis and classification of a vascular lesion are crucial. Slow-flow VMs (venous and lymphatic malformations) are often treated by sclerotherapy, whereas fast-flow lesions (arteriovenous malformations) are generally managed with embolization. In addition, some cases of VMs are best treated surgically. This review will present an overview of VMs in the female pelvis as well as a discussion of endovascular therapeutic techniques. PMID:24436563

  20. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on.

  1. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  2. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  3. Anaesthesia for vascular emergencies.

    PubMed

    Ellard, L; Djaiani, G

    2013-01-01

    Patients presenting with vascular emergencies including acute aortic syndrome, ruptured thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms, thoracic aortic trauma and acute lower limb ischaemia have a high risk of peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Although anatomical suitability is not universal, endovascular surgery may improve mortality and the results of ongoing randomised controlled trials are awaited. Permissive hypotension pre-operatively should be the standard of care with the systolic blood pressure kept to 50-100 mmHg as long as consciousness is maintained. The benefit of local anaesthesia over general anaesthesia is not definitive and this decision should be tailored for a given patient and circumstance. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage for prevention of paraplegia is often impractical in the emergency setting and is not backed by strong evidence; however, it should be considered postoperatively if symptoms develop. We discuss the pertinent anaesthetic issues when a patient presents with a vascular emergency and the impact that endovascular repair has on anaesthetic management.

  4. "Adversative Conjunction": The Poetics of Linguistic Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    The general use of adversative conjunction in (primarily) English and U.S. poetry is outlined. The contention is that the adversative is not merely a grammatical convenience but sometimes a highly functional tool of rhetorical strategy. (36 references) (LB)

  5. The international serious adverse events consortium.

    PubMed

    Holden, Arthur L; Contreras, Jorge L; John, Sally; Nelson, Matthew R

    2014-11-01

    The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium is generating novel insights into the genetics and biology of drug-induced serious adverse events, and thereby improving pharmaceutical product development and decision-making.

  6. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  7. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve ablation for loin pain haematuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Giovanni; Fulignati, Pierluigi; Spinelli, Alessio; Rovella, Valentina; Di Daniele, Nicola

    2013-09-01

    Loin pain haematuria syndrome (LPHS) is a severe renal pain condition of uncertain origin and often resistant to treatment. Nephrectomy and renal autotrasplantation have occasionally been performed in very severe cases. Its pathogenesis is controversial. A 40-year-old hypertensive lady was diagnosed with LPHS after repeated diagnostic imaging procedures had ruled out any renal, abdominal or spinal conditions to justify pain. Notwithstanding treatment with three drugs, she had frequent hypertensive crises during which the loin pain was dramatically exacerbated. Vascular causes of the pain and hypertension were investigated and excluded. Her renal function was normal. The patient was referred to a multidisciplinary pain clinic, but had no significant improvement in her pain symptoms despite the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, adjuvant antidepressants and opioid-like agents. The pain and the discomfort were so severe that her quality of life was very poor, and her social and professional activities were compromised. Nephrectomy and renal autotransplantation have occasionally been performed in these cases. Since visceral pain signals flow through afferent sympathetic fibres, we felt that percutaneous catheter-based radiofrequency ablation of the renal sympathetic nerve fibres (recently introduced for the treatment of drug-resistant hypertension) could be valuable for pain relief. We treated the patient with radiofrequency ablation (Medtronic Symplicity Catheter) applied only to the right renal artery. After a 6-month follow-up, the patient is pain free and normotensive with all drugs withdrawn. She has experienced no hypertensive crises in the meantime. This observation suggests that percutaneous sympathetic denervation could prove to be an effective mini-invasive strategy for the treatment of chronic renal pain, and LPHS in particular.

  8. Renal pathology in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Peernel

    2006-01-01

    The class of Reptilia varies widely. Both the gross morphology and microscopic anatomy of the kidneys are specific for each species. In each species of reptile, the physiology of the renal system has adapted to the specific conditions of life, including, among other factors, the type of food, environmental temperature, and the availability of water. The pathology of the kidneys in reptiles has been poorly studied, but in recent years a number of investigators have specifically studied reptilian renal pathology.

  9. [Imaging renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bazan, F; Busto, M

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the eighth most common malignancy in adults and the most common malignancy in the kidney. It is thus a very common disease for radiologists. This review aims to provide a general overview of the imaging techniques used to diagnose, characterize, and help plan the treatment of renal cell carcinoma as well as to review basic aspects related to staging, imaging-guided percutaneous treatment, and follow-up in the most common clinical scenarios.

  10. Low birth weight increases susceptibility to renal injury in a rat model of mild ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Norma B

    2011-08-01

    Renal injury due to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is the major cause of acute kidney injury. Whether enhanced susceptibility to renal injury due to I/R can be programmed during fetal life is unknown. Epidemiological studies indicate that low birth weight (LBW) individuals are more susceptible to renal injury than normal birth weight (NBW) individuals. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LBW is associated with an increased susceptibility to renal injury induced by mild renal I/R (15-min ischemia). Systemic and renal hemodynamic parameters were determined in NBW and LBW adult male rats after mild renal I/R; renal superoxide production and tubular injury were also assessed. A subgroup was pretreated with tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, initiated 15 min before ischemia. Mild renal I/R did not alter renal hemodynamic parameters, induce tubular injury, or induce superoxide production in NBW rats. However, renal hemodynamic parameters declined, superoxide production increased, and histological indicators of tubular injury were present following mild renal I/R in LBW rats. Acute treatment with tempol prevented these alterations in LBW rats subjected to mild renal I/R. Thus, these findings suggest that adverse conditions during fetal life can compromise the renal response to subtle insults leading to an increased susceptibility to renal injury, suggesting that LBW individuals may be an "at risk" population for renal disease. Additionally, the outcome of tempol treatment proposes a possible mechanistic pathway involved in mediating enhanced susceptibility to renal injury programmed during fetal life.

  11. Targeting vascular calcification: softening-up a hard target.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Alexander; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2009-04-01

    Widespread vascular calcification is a ubiquitous feature of aging and is prevalent in association with a number of common pathologies including atherosclerosis, renal failure, and diabetes. Once thought of as innocuous, emerging evidence suggests that calcification is causal in precipitating vascular events and mediating chronic cardiovascular damage, independent of disease context. Importantly, a large body of data has shed light on the factors that favor the formation of calcification in vivo, as well as on the complex mechanisms that initiate and promote it. This has identified some novel targets and allowed for the possibility that calcification can potentially be blocked and ultimately regressed. Targets include local and circulating inhibitors of calcification as well as factors that may ameliorate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis. Despite this, the vasculature remains a difficult tissue to target and currently there are no effective treatments in general use. More crucially, any potential treatments will need to be carefully evaluated as they may impinge on bone metabolism. Our best hope for the near future is to normalize factors associated with accelerated calcification in pathologies such as renal failure where, aberrant mineral metabolism, as well as treatment regimes, may contribute to the initiation and progression of calcification.

  12. Pre-operative renal artery embolization and suprarenal IVC filter placement for prevention of fat embolization in renal angiomyolipoma with venous extension.

    PubMed

    Cornman-Homonoff, Joshua; Li, David; Schiffman, Marc

    2017-01-26

    Though generally considered benign, angiomyolipomas can invade through the renal vein into the inferior vena cava, putting patients at risk of catastrophic pulmonary fat embolization. Venous invasion is thus an indication for surgical resection but is thought to increase the risk of adverse operative outcomes including intraoperative hemorrhage and embolization of fat and/or tumor thrombus. We report a novel approach to mitigating these complications illustrated in the case of a 43-year-old woman with IVC-invasive renal AML who underwent successful radical nephrectomy after concurrent pre-operative renal artery embolization and placement of a retrievable suprarenal IVC filter.

  13. Immune mechanisms in hypertension and vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-02-01

    Over the last 20 years it has become recognized that low-grade inflammation plays a role in cardiovascular disease. More recently, participation of the innate and the adaptive immune response in mechanisms that contribute to inflammation in cardiovascular disease has been reported in atherosclerosis and hypertension. Different subsets of lymphocytes and their cytokines are involved in vascular remodelling in hypertension, chronic kidney disease and heart disease. Effector T-cells include Th1 (interferon-γ-producing) and Th2 (interleukin-4 producing) lymphocytes, as well as Th17 (which produce interleukin-17) and T-suppressor lymphocytes such as T(reg)-cells (regulatory T-cells), which express the transcription factor Foxp3 (forkhead box P3) and participate respectively as pro- and anti-inflammatory cells. Pro-inflammatory T-lymphocytes participate in mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in part by mediating the effects of angiotensin II and mineralocorticoids. Involvement of immune mechanisms in cardiac, vascular and renal changes in hypertension has been demonstrated in many experimental models, an example being the Dahl-salt sensitive rat and the spontaneously hypertensive rat. How activation of immunity is triggered remains unknown, but neo-antigens could be generated by elevated blood pressure through damage-associated molecular pattern receptors or other mechanisms. Once activated, Th1 cells may contribute to blood pressure elevation by affecting the kidney, vascular remodelling of blood vessels directly via the effects of the cytokines produced or through their effects on perivascular fat. T(reg)-cells protect from blood pressure elevation by acting upon similar targets. Recent data suggests that participation of these mechanisms that have been demonstrated already in murine models also occurs in humans. These novel findings may open the way for new therapeutic approaches to improve outcomes in hypertension and cardiovascular disease in humans.

  14. Worsening renal function in heart failure: the need for a consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Sheerin, Noella J; Newton, Phillip J; Macdonald, Peter S; Leung, Dominic Y C; Sibbritt, David; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Johnson, Kay; Krum, Henry; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common cause of hospitalisation. This is a period of vulnerability both in altered pathophysiology and also the potential for iatrogenesis due to therapeutic interventions. Renal dysfunction is often associated with heart failure and portends adverse outcomes. Identifying heart failure patients at risk of renal dysfunction is important in preventing progression to chronic kidney disease or worsening renal function, informing adjustment to medication management and potentially preventing adverse events. However, there is no working or consensus definition in international heart failure management guidelines for worsening renal function. In addition, there appears to be no concordance or adaptation of chronic kidney disease guidelines by heart failure guideline development groups for the monitoring of chronic kidney disease in heart failure. Our aim is to encourage the debate for an agreed definition given the prognostic impact of worsening renal function in heart failure. We present the case for the uptake of the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for acute kidney injury with some minor alterations. This has the potential to inform study design and meta-analysis thereby building the knowledgebase for guideline development. Definition consensus supports data element, clinical registry and electronic algorithm innovation as instruments for quality improvement and clinical research for better patient outcomes. In addition, we recommend all community managed heart failure patients have their baseline renal function classified and routinely monitored in accordance with established renal guidelines to help identify those at increased risk for worsening renal function or progression to chronic kidney disease.

  15. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  16. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  17. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty of Dysplastic Stenoses of the Renal Artery: Results on 70 Adults

    SciTech Connect

    Fraissinette, Bruno de; Garcier, Jean Marc; Dieu, Valerie; Mofid, Reza; Ravel, Anne; Boire, Jean Yves; Boyer, Louis

    2003-02-15

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of the dilatation (PTRA) of renal arterial dysplastic stenosis (RADS). Methods: Seventy patients suffering from hypertension (87RADS) were treated at our institution for medial (83%) or non-classified fibrodysplasias (17%). Four patients suffered from renal insufficiency. Two endoprostheses were implanted. We evaluated blood pressure with the USCSRH criteria and renal insufficiency with the Martin criteria. Results: Ninety-five percent technical success and 87.9% clinical success for blood pressure were obtained, with worse results for patients older than 57 years or with a history of hypertension greater than 9 years. Results were better when the RADS was responsible for an ipsilateral renal atrophy or for poorly controlled hypertension. No renal insufficiency worsened during the follow-up. Conclusion: PTRA is a first-line treatment for renovascular hypertension caused by RADS. The results were encouraging despite a high average age of the subjects and frequent associated extrarenal vascular lesions.

  18. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  19. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent MRI to Assess Renal Oxygenation in Renal Diseases: Progresses and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pruijm, Menno; Milani, Bastien; Burnier, Michel

    2017-01-01

    BOLD-MRI (blood oxygenation-level dependent magnetic resonance imaging) allows non-invasive measurement of renal tissue oxygenation in humans, without the need for contrast products. BOLD-MRI uses the fact that magnetic properties of hemoglobin depend of its oxygenated state:: the higher local deoxyhemoglobin, the higher the so called apparent relaxation rate R2* (sec−1), and the lower local tissue oxygen content. Several factors other than deoxyhemoglobin (such as hydration status, dietary sodium intake, and susceptibility effects) influence the BOLD signal, and need to be taken into account when interpreting results. The last 5 years have witnessed important improvements in the standardization of these factors, and the appearance of new, highly reproducible analysis techniques of BOLD-images, that are reviewed in this article. Using these new BOLD-MRI analysis techniques, it has recently been shown that persons suffering from chronic kidney diseases (CKD) have lower cortical oxygenation than normotensive controls, thus confirming the chronic hypoxia hypothesis. The acute alterations in R2* after the administration of furosemide are smaller in CKD, and represent an estimate of the oxygen-dependent tubular transport of sodium. BOLD-MRI-alone or in combination with other functional MRI methods- can be used to monitor the renal effects of drugs, and is increasingly used in the preclinical setting. The near future will tell whether or not BOLD-MRI represents a new tool to predict renal function decline an adverse renal outcome. PMID:28105019

  20. Renal effects of nabumetone, a COX-2 antagonist: impairment of function in isolated perfused rat kidneys contrasts with preserved renal function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Reichman, J; Cohen, S; Goldfarb, M; Shina, A; Rosen, S; Brezis, M; Karmeli, F; Heyman, S N

    2001-01-01

    The constitutive cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 enzyme has been considered the physiologically important isoform for prostaglandin synthesis in the normal kidney. It has, therefore, been suggested that selective inhibitors of the 'inducible' isoform (COX-2) may be free from renal adverse effects. We studied the renal effects of the predominantly COX-2 antagonist nabumetone in isolated perfused kidneys. As compared with controls, kidneys removed after in vivo administration of oral nabumetone (15 mg/kg) disclosed altered renal function with reduced glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction, and urine volume and enhanced hypoxic outer medullary tubular damage. By contrast, renal function and morphology were not affected in vivo by nabumetone or its active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid. The latter agent (10-20 mg/kg i.v.) did not significantly alter renal microcirculation, as opposed to a selective substantial reduction in medullary blood flow noted with the nonselective COX inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.v.). In a rat model of acute renal failure, induced by concomitant administration of radiocontrast, nitric oxide synthase, and COX inhibitors, the decline in kidney function and the extent of hypoxic medullary damage with oral nabumetone (80 mg/kg) were comparable to a control group, and significantly less than those induced by indomethacin. In rats subjected to daily oral nabumetone for 3 consecutive weeks, renal function and morphology were preserved as well. Both nabumetone and 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid reduced renal parenchymal prostaglandin E2 to the same extent as indomethacin. It is concluded that while nabumetone adversely affects renal function and may intensify hypoxic medullary damage ex vivo, rat kidneys are not affected by this agent in vivo, both in acute and chronic studies. COX selectivity may not explain the renal safety of nabumetone.

  1. Overview of Pregnancy in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Prasoon

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation offers best hope to women with end-stage renal disease who wish to become pregnant. Pregnancy in a kidney transplant recipient continues to remain challenging due to side effects of immunosuppressive medication, risk of deterioration of allograft function, risk of adverse maternal complications of preeclampsia and hypertension, and risk of adverse fetal outcomes of premature birth, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. The factors associated with poor pregnancy outcomes include presence of hypertension, serum creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dL, and proteinuria. The recommended maintenance immunosuppression in pregnant women is calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus/cyclosporine), azathioprine, and low dose prednisone; and it is considered safe. Sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil should be stopped 6 weeks prior to conception. The optimal time to conception continues to remain an area of contention. It is important that counseling for childbearing should start as early as prior to getting a kidney transplant and should be done at every clinic visit after transplant. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated and should not be discouraged. This review will help the physicians in medical optimization and counseling of renal transplant recipients of childbearing age. PMID:28042483

  2. Successful third renal transplantation in a child with an occluded inferior vena cava: A novel technique to use the venous interposition between the transplant renal vein and the infrahepatic inferior vena cava.