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Sample records for adverse renal vascular

  1. Metoclopramide and renal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Bolsin, S; Monk, C R; Hartnell, G; Harris, R A

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of i.v. metoclopramide on renal vascular resistance in nine healthy volunteers. Peak systolic and end-diastolic frequencies were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasound of a renal interlobar artery, before and after the administration of i.v. metoclopramide 10 mg, and the resistance index derived. There was no significant change in mean arterial pressure or resistance index following metoclopramide. PMID:1997046

  2. Patterning the Renal Vascular Bed

    PubMed Central

    Herzlinger, Doris; Hurtado, Romulo

    2015-01-01

    The renal vascular bed has a stereotypic architecture that is essential for the kidney’s role in excreting metabolic waste and regulating the volume and composition of body fluids. The kidney’s excretory functions are dependent on the delivery of the majority of renal blood flow to the glomerular capillaries, which filter plasma removing from it metabolic waste, as well as vast quantities of solutes and fluids. The renal tubules reabsorb from the glomerular filtrate solutes and fluids required for homeostasis, while the post-glomerular capillary beds return these essential substances back into the systemic circulation. Thus, the kidney’s regulatory functions are dependent on the close proximity or alignment of the post-glomerular capillary beds with the renal tubules. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the mechanisms controlling the embryonic development of the renal vasculature. An understanding of this process is critical for developing novel therapies to prevent vessel rarefaction and will be essential for engineering renal tissues suitable for restoring kidney function to the ever-increasing population of patients with end stage renal disease. PMID:25128732

  3. Determinants of Adverse Events in Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; McDonald, Kathryn; Morton, John; Dalman, Ron L; Bech, Fritz R

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a national priority. Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) monitor potential adverse events during hospital stays. Surgical specialty PSI benchmarks do not exist, which are needed to account for differences in the range of procedures performed, reasons for the procedure, and differences in patient characteristics. A comprehensive profile of adverse events in vascular surgery was created. Study Design The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried for 8 vascular procedures using ICD-9-CM codes from 2005–2009. Factors associated with PSI development were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. Results A total of 1,412,703 patients underwent a vascular procedure and 5.2% developed a PSI. PSIs were more frequent in female, non-white patients with public payers (p<.01). Patients at mid and low volume hospitals had greater odds of developing a PSI (Odds Ratio [OR], 1.17; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.10–1.23 and OR, 1.69; CI, 1.53–1.87). Amputations had highest PSI risk-adjusted rate (RAR) and carotid endarterectomy and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair had lower RAR (p<.0001). PSI RAR increased linearly by severity of patient indication: claudicants (OR, 0.40, CI, 0.35–0.46), rest pain patients (OR, 0.78, CI 0.69–0.90), ulcer (OR: 1.20, CI: 1.07–1.34) and gangrene patients (OR:1.85, CI: 1.66–2.06). Conclusions Patient safety events in vascular surgery were high and varied by procedure, with amputations and open AAA having substantially more potential adverse events. PSIs were associated with black race, public payer, and procedure indication. It is important to note the overall higher rates of PSIs occurring in vascular patients and appropriately adjust benchmarks for this surgical specialty. PMID:22425449

  4. Fingolimod-Associated Peripheral Vascular Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Russo, Margherita; Guarneri, Claudio; Mazzon, Emanuela; Sessa, Edoardo; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2015-10-01

    Fingolimod is the first oral disease-modifying drug approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. The drug is usually well tolerated, and common adverse effects include bradycardia, headache, influenza, diarrhea, back pain, increased liver enzyme levels, and cough. Fingolimod is thought to provide therapeutic benefit by preventing normal lymphocyte egress from lymphoid tissues, thus reducing the infiltration of autoaggressive lymphocytes into the central nervous system. However, because the drug acts on different sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors, it may induce several biological effects by influencing endothelial cell-cell adhesion, angiogenesis, vascular development, and cardiovascular function. We describe a patient with multiple sclerosis who, after 3 weeks of fingolimod administration, developed purplish blotches over the dorsal surface of the distal phalanges of the second and fifth digits and the middle phalanx of the fourth ray, itching, and edema on his left hand, without other evident clinical manifestations. When fingolimod therapy was discontinued, the clinical picture regressed within a few days but reappeared after a rechallenge test. Physicians should be aware of unexpected peripheral vascular adverse effects due to fingolimod use, and patients with vascular-based acropathies should be carefully screened and monitored when taking this drug. PMID:26349949

  5. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  6. Renal vascular thrombosis in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Resontoc, Lourdes Paula R; Yap, Hui-Kim

    2016-06-01

    Neonatal renal vascular thrombosis is rare but has devastating sequelae. The renal vein is more commonly affected than the renal artery. Most neonates with renal vein thrombosis present with at least one of the three cardinal signs, namely, abdominal mass, macroscopic hematuria and thrombocytopenia, while unilateral renal artery thrombosis presents with transient hypertension. Contrast angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis but because of exposure to radiation and contrast agents, Doppler ultrasound scan is widely used instead. Baseline laboratory tests for platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen concentration are essential before therapy is initiated. Maternal blood is tested for lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibody. Evaluation for prothrombotic disorders is warranted when thrombosis is clinically significant, recurrent or spontaneous. Management should involve a multidisciplinary team that includes neonatologists, radiologists, pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. In addition to supportive therapy, recent guidelines recommend at least prophylactic heparin therapy in the majority of cases to prevent thrombus extension. Thrombolytic therapy is reserved for bilateral thrombosis compromising kidney function. Long-term sequelae, such as kidney atrophy, systemic hypertension and chronic kidney disease, are common, and follow-up by pediatric nephrologists is recommended for monitoring of kidney function, early detection and management of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. PMID:26173707

  7. Adverse Outcome Pathway for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptors During Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  8. Renal vascular perfusion index in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Shau, Yio-Wha; Pao, Sun-Hua; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Chang, King-Jen; Shyu, Jeou-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Decreased renal perfusion plays an important role in the progression toward renal failure. In this study, a novel measure was proposed to quantify renal perfusion using canine model. Serial renal vascular images at different vascular areas including the whole vascular tree, interlobar, arcuate and interlobular vessels were captured. Image processing software was designed to analyze the changes of power Doppler intensity of colored pixels within regions-of-interest (ROI). For a given ROI, the power Doppler vascular index (PDVI) was found to fluctuate with the cardiac cycle. It was also noted that the power Doppler signals generated by arterial vessels have different fluctuating waveforms and different phase compared with the signal derived from venous vessels. A power Doppler correlation-map was developed to differentiate the arteries and veins in the ROI. Using the serial power Doppler images and the derived flow direction information, the interlobular perfusion can be strongly quantified. The renal vascular perfusion index (RVPI) defined as the ratio of PDVI(max) versus PDVI(min) was significantly higher in the interlobular vessel areas than three other areas for seven healthy dogs. The RVPI resembles the systolic/diastolic (S/D) ratio that commonly reflects arterial hemodynamics. RVPI and power Doppler correlation-map reveal more "dynamic" sense of vascular perfusion and provide a novel approach for the examination of renal function in clinical practice. PMID:18805627

  9. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  10. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  11. Evaluation of renal vascular anatomy in live renal donors: Role of multi detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Vaidehi Kumudchandra; Patel, Alpeshkumar Shakerlal; Sutariya, Harsh Chandrakant; Gandhi, Shruti Pradipkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of renal vascular variations is important in renal donors to avoid vascular complications during surgery. Venous variations, mainly resulting from the errors of the embryological development, are frequently observed. Aim: This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the renal vascular variants with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography to provide valuable information for surgery and its correlations with surgical findings. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 patients underwent MDCT angiography as a routine work up for live renal donors. The number, course, and drainage patterns of the renal veins were retrospectively observed from the scans. Anomalies of renal veins and inferior vena cava (IVC) were recorded and classified. Multiplanar reformations (MPRs), maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering were used for analysis. The results obtained were correlated surgically. Results: In the present study, out of 200 healthy donors, the standard pattern of drainage of renal veins was observed in only 67% of donors on the right side and 92% of donors on the left side. Supernumerary renal veins in the form of dual and triple renal veins were seen on the right side in about 32.5% of donors (dual right renal veins in 30.5% cases and triple right renal veins in 2.5% cases). Variations on the left side were classified into four groups: supernumerary, retro-aortic, circumaortic, and plexiform left renal veins in 1%, 2.5%, 4%, 0.5%, cases respectively. Conclusions: Developmental variations in renal veins can be easily detected on computed tomography scan, which can go unnoticed and can pose a fatal threat during major surgeries such as donor nephrectomies in otherwise healthy donors if undiagnosed. PMID:27453646

  12. Constructing, Quantifying, and Validating an Adverse Outcome Pathway for Vascular Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Constructing, Quantifying, and Validating an Adverse Outcome Pathway for Vascular Developmental Toxicity The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for embryonic vascular disruption1 leading to a range of adverse prenatal outcomes was recently entered into the AOP wiki and accepted as par...

  13. Renal function trajectory over time and adverse clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sohel, Badrul Munir; Rumana, Nahid; Ohsawa, Masaki; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Kelly, Martina Ann; Al Mamun, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    The growing burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD), with its associated morbidity and mortality, is recognized as a major public health problem globally and causing substantial load on health care systems. The current framework for the definition and staging of CKD, based on eGFR levels or presence of kidney damage, is useful for clinical classification of patients, but identifies a huge number of people as having CKD which is too many to target for intervention. The ability to identify a subset of patients, at high risk for adverse outcomes, would be useful to inform clinical management. The current staging system applies static definitions of kidney function that fail to capture the dynamic nature of the kidney disease over time. Now-a-days, it is possible to capture multiple measurements of different laboratory test results for an individual including eGFR values. A new possibility for identifying individuals at higher risk of adverse outcomes is being explored through assessment and consideration of the rate of change in kidney function over time, and this approach will be feasible in the current context of digitalization of health record keeping system. On the basis of the existing evidence, this paper summarizes important findings that support the concept of dynamic changes in kidney function over time, and discusses how the magnitude of these changes affect the future adverse outcomes of kidney disease, particularly the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), CVD and mortality. PMID:26728745

  14. ALDOSTERONE DYSREGULATION WITH AGING PREDICTS RENAL-VASCULAR FUNCTION AND CARDIO-VASCULAR RISK

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jenifer M.; Underwood, Patricia C.; Ferri, Claudio; Hopkins, Paul N.; Williams, Gordon H.; Adler, Gail K.; Vaidya, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Aging and abnormal aldosterone regulation are both associated with vascular disease. We hypothesized that aldosterone dysregulation influences the age-related risk of renal- and cardio-vascular disease. We conducted an analysis of 562 subjects who underwent detailed investigations under conditions of liberal and restricted dietary sodium intake (1,124 visits) in a Clinical Research Center. Aldosterone regulation was characterized by the ratio of maximal suppression-to-stimulation (supine serum aldosterone on a liberal sodium diet divided by the same measure on a restricted sodium diet). We previously demonstrated that higher levels of this Sodium-modulated Aldosterone Suppression-Stimulation Index (SASSI) indicate greater aldosterone dysregulation. Renal plasma flow (RPF) was determined via p-aminohippurate clearance to assess basal renal hemodynamics, and the renal-vascular responses to dietary sodium manipulation and angiotensin II (AngII) infusion. Cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Framingham Risk Score. In univariate linear regression, older age (β= -4.60, p<0.0001) and higher SASSI (β= -58.63, p=0.001) predicted lower RPF and a blunted RPF response to sodium loading and AngII infusion. We observed a continuous, independent, multivariate-adjusted interaction between age and SASSI, where the inverse relationship between SASSI and RPF was most apparent with older age (p<0.05). Higher SASSI and lower RPF independently predicted higher Framingham Risk Score (p<0.0001) and together displayed an additive effect. Aldosterone regulation and age may interact to mediate renal-vascular disease. Our findings suggest that the combination of aldosterone dysregulation and renal-vascular dysfunction could additively increase the risk of future cardiovascular outcomes; therefore, aldosterone dysregulation may represent a modifiable mechanism of age-related vascular disease. PMID:24664291

  15. Renal osteodystrophy, phosphate homeostasis, and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Keith A; Saab, Georges; Mathew, Suresh; Lund, Richard

    2007-01-01

    New advances in the pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy (ROD) change the perspective from which many of its features and treatment are viewed. Calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and vitamin D have been shown to be important determinants of survival associated with kidney diseases. Now ROD dependent and independent of these factors is linked to survival more than just skeletal frailty. This review focuses on recent discoveries that renal injury impairs skeletal anabolism decreasing the osteoblast compartment of the skeleton and consequent bone formation. This discovery and the discovery that PTH regulates the hematopoietic stem cell niche alters our view of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease (CKD) from that of a disease to that of a necessary adaptation to renal injury that goes awry. Furthermore, ROD is shown to be an underappreciated factor in the level of the serum phosphorus in CKD. The discovery and the elucidation of the mechanism of hyperphosphatemia as a cardiovascular risk in CKD change the view of ROD. It is now recognized as more than a skeletal disorder, it is an important component of the mortality of CKD that can be treated. PMID:17635820

  16. Common celiaco-mesenterico-phrenic trunk and renal vascular variations.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Satheesha

    2006-12-01

    The knowledge of vascular variations like other anatomical variations, is important during the operative, diagnostic, and endovascular procedures in abdomen. This report describes multiple variations in the upper abdominal vessels as found during the routine dissection in a 60-year-old male cadaver. The variations found were; presence of a celiaco-mesenterico-phrenic trunk, a common inferior phrenic trunk, 2 right renal arteries originating from abdominal aorta, 2 suprarenal arteries originating from the lower right renal artery, 3 right renal veins opening separately into inferior vena cava, and termination of right testicular vein into the lowest vein among the 3 right renal veins. The existence of a celiaco-mesenterico-phrenic trunk has not been reported yet. Although, other variations reported in this case exist as individual variations, a concomitant variation of them has not been reported yet. The knowledge of such variations is quite useful in planning any upper abdominal surgery. PMID:17143371

  17. Vascular reactivity of rabbit isolated renal and femoral resistance arteries in renal wrap hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khammy, Makhala M; Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2016-02-15

    In rabbits with cellophane renal wrap hypertension, hindquarter and total vascular resistance changes to pressor and depressor agents are amplified compared to those of normotensive rabbits. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro pharmacodynamics of hypertensive and normotensive rabbit small artery segments isolated from the renal and hindquarter vascular beds. Using wire myography, the full range (Emax) and sensitivity (EC50) to a range of agonists of segments of renal interlobar (≈ 600 µm i.d.), renal arcuate (≈ 250 µm i.d.) and deep femoral branch (≈ 250 µm i.d.) arteries were assessed under normalised conditions of passive tension. Interlobar arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive (EC50) than those from normotensive rabbits to noradrenaline (6-fold), methoxamine (3-fold) and angiotensin II (3-fold). Arcuate artery reactivity was largely unaffected by hypertension. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits had enhanced sensitivity only to noradrenaline (2-fold) and methoxamine (4-fold). Sensitivity to relaxation by acetylcholine was unaffected by hypertension in all arteries. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive to sodium nitroprusside than normotensive counterparts. Adenosine caused little relaxation in renal arteries, but full relaxation in deep femoral arteries, unaltered by hypertension. This study found substantial heterogeneity in the pharmacodynamic profile of vessels isolated from different vascular beds and between arterial segments within the kidney. These profiles were differentially affected by hypertension suggesting that hypertension per se is not a resultant of general vascular dysfunction. PMID:26806799

  18. Vascular access for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Chalhoub, Serge; Langston, Cathy E; Poeppel, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Vascular access is the first and most basic requirement for successful extracorporeal renal replacement therapy (ERRT). Dual-lumen catheters are the most commonly used method of vascular access for ERRT in veterinary patients. An adequately functioning dialysis catheter allows for smooth and efficient patient management, whereas a poorly functioning catheter frustrates the technician, doctor, and patient. These catheters are fairly quick to place but require meticulous care for optimal function. The most common complications are thrombosis and infection. Monitoring catheter performance should be a routine part of dialysis patient care. PMID:21251515

  19. Precise renal artery segmentation for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglong; Kagajo, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Oda, Masahiro; Yoshino, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel renal artery segmentation method combining graph-cut and template-based tracking methods and its application to estimation of renal vascular dominant region. For the purpose of giving a computer assisted diagnose for kidney surgery planning, it is important to obtain the correct topological structures of renal artery for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions. Renal artery has a low contrast, and its precise extraction is a difficult task. Previous method utilizing vesselness measure based on Hessian analysis, still cannot extract the tiny blood vessels in low-contrast area. Although model-based methods including superellipsoid model or cylindrical intensity model are low-contrast sensitive to the tiny blood vessels, problems including over-segmentation and poor bifurcations detection still remain. In this paper, we propose a novel blood vessel segmentation method combining a new Hessian-based graph-cut and template modeling tracking method. Firstly, graph-cut algorithm is utilized to obtain the rough segmentation result. Then template model tracking method is utilized to improve the accuracy of tiny blood vessel segmentation result. Rough segmentation utilizing graph-cut solves the bifurcations detection problem effectively. Precise segmentation utilizing template model tracking focuses on the segmentation of tiny blood vessels. By combining these two approaches, our proposed method segmented 70% of the renal artery of 1mm in diameter or larger. In addition, we demonstrate such precise segmentation can contribute to divide renal regions into a set of blood vessel dominant regions utilizing Voronoi diagram method.

  20. Vascular Calcification and Renal Bone Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao; Yen, Jen-Fen; Liu, Wen-Chih

    2014-01-01

    At the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the systemic mineral metabolism and bone composition start to change. This alteration is known as chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). It is well known that the bone turnover disorder is the most common complication of CKD-MBD. Besides, CKD patients usually suffer from vascular calcification (VC), which is highly associated with mortality. Many factors regulate the VC mechanism, which include imbalances in serum calcium and phosphate, systemic inflammation, RANK/RANKL/OPG triad, aldosterone, microRNAs, osteogenic transdifferentiation, and effects of vitamins. These factors have roles in both promoting and inhibiting VC. Patients with CKD usually have bone turnover problems. Patients with high bone turnover have increase of calcium and phosphate release from the bone. By contrast, when bone turnover is low, serum calcium and phosphate levels are frequently maintained at high levels because the reservoir functions of bone decrease. Both of these conditions will increase the possibility of VC. In addition, the calcified vessel may secrete FGF23 and Wnt inhibitors such as sclerostin, DKK-1, and secreted frizzled-related protein to prevent further VC. However, all of them may fight back the inhibition of bone formation resulting in fragile bone. There are several ways to treat VC depending on the bone turnover status of the individual. The main goals of therapy are to maintain normal bone turnover and protect against VC. PMID:25136676

  1. Vascular calcification and renal bone disorders.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao; Yen, Jen-Fen; Liu, Wen-Chih

    2014-01-01

    At the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the systemic mineral metabolism and bone composition start to change. This alteration is known as chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). It is well known that the bone turnover disorder is the most common complication of CKD-MBD. Besides, CKD patients usually suffer from vascular calcification (VC), which is highly associated with mortality. Many factors regulate the VC mechanism, which include imbalances in serum calcium and phosphate, systemic inflammation, RANK/RANKL/OPG triad, aldosterone, microRNAs, osteogenic transdifferentiation, and effects of vitamins. These factors have roles in both promoting and inhibiting VC. Patients with CKD usually have bone turnover problems. Patients with high bone turnover have increase of calcium and phosphate release from the bone. By contrast, when bone turnover is low, serum calcium and phosphate levels are frequently maintained at high levels because the reservoir functions of bone decrease. Both of these conditions will increase the possibility of VC. In addition, the calcified vessel may secrete FGF23 and Wnt inhibitors such as sclerostin, DKK-1, and secreted frizzled-related protein to prevent further VC. However, all of them may fight back the inhibition of bone formation resulting in fragile bone. There are several ways to treat VC depending on the bone turnover status of the individual. The main goals of therapy are to maintain normal bone turnover and protect against VC. PMID:25136676

  2. Should blunt segmental vascular renal injuries be considered an AAST grade 4 renal injury?

    PubMed Central

    Malaeb, Bahaa; Figler, Brad; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal segmental vascular injury (SVI) following blunt abdominal trauma is not part of the original AAST renal injury grading system. Recent recommendations support classifying SVI as an AAST grade 4 injury. Our primary aim was to compare outcomes following blunt renal SVI and blunt renal collecting system lacerations (CSL). We hypothesize that renal SVI fare well with conservative management alone and should be relegated a less severe renal AAST grade. Methods We retrospectively identified patients with SVI and G4 CSL admitted to a Level 1 trauma center between 2003–2010. Penetrating trauma was excluded. Need for surgical intervention, length of stay, kidney salvage (>25% renal preservation on renography 6–12 weeks after injury), and delayed complication rates were compared between the SVI and CSL injuries. Statistical analysis utilized chi squared, Fisher exact, and t-test. Results 56 patients with SVI and 88 patients with G4 CSL sustained blunt trauma. Age, injury severity score, and length of stay were similar for the two groups. Five patients in each group died of concomitant, non-renal injuries. In the G4 CSL group, 15 patients underwent major interventions and 32 patients underwent minor interventions. Only one patient in the SVI group underwent a major intervention. The renal salvage rate was 85.7% following SVI versus 62.5% following CSL (p=0.107). Conclusions Overall surgical interventions are significantly lower among the SVI cohort than G4 CSL cohort. Further analysis using a larger cohort of patients is recommended before revising the current renal grading system. Adding SVI as a grade 4 injury could potentially increase the heterogeneity of grade 4 injuries and decrease the ability of the AAST renal injury grading system to predict outcomes, such as nephrectomy rate. Level of Evidence IV (retrospective, cohort study) PMID:24458054

  3. p66Shc regulates renal vascular tone in hypertension-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bradley; Palygin, Oleg; Rufanova, Victoriya A; Chong, Andrew; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J; Mattson, David; Roman, Richard J; Williams, Jan M; Cowley, Allen W; Geurts, Aron M; Staruschenko, Alexander; Imig, John D; Sorokin, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    Renal preglomerular arterioles regulate vascular tone to ensure a large pressure gradient over short distances, a function that is extremely important for maintaining renal microcirculation. Regulation of renal microvascular tone is impaired in salt-sensitive (SS) hypertension-induced nephropathy, but the molecular mechanisms contributing to this impairment remain elusive. Here, we assessed the contribution of the SH2 adaptor protein p66Shc (encoded by Shc1) in regulating renal vascular tone and the development of renal vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension-induced nephropathy. We generated a panel of mutant rat strains in which specific modifications of Shc1 were introduced into the Dahl SS rats. In SS rats, overexpression of p66Shc was linked to increased renal damage. Conversely, deletion of p66Shc from these rats restored the myogenic responsiveness of renal preglomerular arterioles ex vivo and promoted cellular contraction in primary vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that were isolated from renal vessels. In primary SMCs, p66Shc restricted the activation of transient receptor potential cation channels to attenuate cytosolic Ca2+ influx, implicating a mechanism by which overexpression of p66Shc impairs renal vascular reactivity. These results establish the adaptor protein p66Shc as a regulator of renal vascular tone and a driver of impaired renal vascular function in hypertension-induced nephropathy. PMID:27270176

  4. Renal vascular responses to static handgrip: role of muscle mechanoreflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Ray, Chester A.; Cha, Susan; Handly, Brian; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2003-01-01

    During exercise, the sympathetic nervous system is activated, which causes vasoconstriction. The autonomic mechanisms responsible for this vasoconstriction vary based on the particular tissue being studied. Attempts to examine reflex control of the human renal circulation have been difficult because of technical limitations. In this report, the Doppler technique was used to examine renal flow velocity during four muscle contraction paradigms in conscious humans. Flow velocity was divided by mean arterial blood pressure to yield an index of renal vascular resistance (RVR). Fatiguing static handgrip (40% of maximal voluntary contraction) increased RVR by 76%. During posthandgrip circulatory arrest, RVR remained above baseline (2.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.8 +/- 0.2 arbitrary units; P < 0.017) but was only 40% of the end-grip RVR value. Voluntary biceps contraction increased RVR within 10 s of initiation of contraction. This effect was not associated with an increase in blood pressure. Finally, involuntary biceps contraction also raised RVR. We conclude that muscle contraction evokes renal vasoconstriction in conscious humans. The characteristic of this response is consistent with a primary role for mechanically sensitive afferents. This statement is based on the small posthandgrip circulatory arrest response and the vasoconstriction that was observed with involuntary biceps contraction.

  5. Are nilotinib-associated vascular adverse events an under-estimated problem?

    PubMed

    Stève-Dumont, Marie; Baldin, Bernadette; Legros, Laurence; Thyss, Antoine; Re, Daniel; Rocher, Fanny; Ajmia, Florian; Spreux, Anne; Drici, Milou-Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adverse events have been reported with nilotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor prescribed for chronic myeloid leukaemia. However, few data specify their incidence, or whether they occur in predisposed patients. Hence, we prospectively studied 30 consecutive patients to assess the frequency of such adverse reactions and determine whether the patients presenting with these adverse events bear predisposing factors. From 3 to 73 months after nilotinib initiation, 10 of the 30 patients experienced vascular events. Three patients of these 10 were devoid of any patent cardiovascular risk factor, except for age. This study points out an occurrence more frequent than expected of vascular adverse events associated with nilotinib (> 30% vs. < 1% in summary of product characteristics), and particularly of vascular events of late onset in patients with no pre-existing risk factors. PMID:25619238

  6. Renal effects and vascular reactivity induced by Tityus serrulatus venom.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Alves, Renata; do Nascimento, Nilberto Robson Falcão; Barbosa, Paulo Sérgio Ferreira; Kerntopf, Marta Regina; Lessa, Lucília Maria Abreu; de Sousa, Clauber Mota; Martins, René Duarte; Sousa, Daniel Freire; de Queiroz, Maria Goretti Rodrigues; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Fonteles, Manassés Claudino; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Monteiro, Helena Serra Azul

    2005-09-01

    Tityus serrulatus, popularly known as yellow scorpion, is one of the most studied scorpion species in South America and its venom has supplied some highly active molecules. The effects of T. serrulatus venom upon the renal physiology in human showed increased renal parameters, urea and creatinine. However, in perfused rat kidney the effects were not tested until now. Isolated kidneys from Wistar rats, weighing 240-280 g, were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 6% (g weight) of previously dialysed bovine serum albumin. The effects of T. serrulatus venom were studied on the perfusion pressure (PP), renal vascular resistance (RVR), urinary flow (UF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), sodium tubular transport (%TNa+), potassium tubular transport (%TK+) and chloride tubular transport (%TCl-). Tityus serrulatus venom (TsV; 10 microg/mL) was added to the system 30 min after the beginning of each experiment (n=6). This 30 min period was used as an internal control. The mesenteric bed was perfused with Krebs solution kept warm at 37 degrees C by a constant flow (4 mL/min), while the variable perfusion pressure was measured by means of a pressure transducer. The direct vascular effects of TsV (10 microg/mL/min; n=6), infused at a constant rate (0.1 mL/min), were examined and compared to the infusion of the vehicle alone at the same rate. TsV increased PP (PP30'=127.8+/-0.69 vs PP60'=154.2+/-14 mmHg*, *p<0.05) and RVR (RVR30'=6.29+/-0.25 vs RVR60'=8.03+/-0.82 mmHg/mLg(-1)min(-1)*, *p<0.05), decreased GFR (GFR30'=0.58+/-0.02 vs GFR60'=0.46+/-0.01mLg(-1)min(-1)*, *p<0.05) and UF (UF30'=0.135+/-0.001 vs UF60'=0.114+/-0.003mLg(-1)min(-1)*, *p<0.05). Tubular transport was not affected during the whole experimental period (120 min). On the other hand, the infusion of TsV (10 microg/mL/min) increased the basal perfusion pressure of isolated arteriolar mesenteric bed (basal pressure: 74.17+/-3.42 vs TsV 151.8+/-17.82 mmHg*, *p<0.05). TsV affects renal haemodynamics

  7. Evaluation of Clinical Outcomes and Renal Vascular Pathology among Patients with Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Claire; Herzenberg, Andrew; Aghdassi, Ellie; Su, Jiandong; Lou, Wendy; Qian, Gan; Yip, Jonathan; Nasr, Samih H.; Thomas, David; Scholey, James W.; Wither, Joan; Urowitz, Murray; Gladman, Dafna; Reich, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives The objective of this study was to determine the clinical significance of renal vascular lesions in lupus nephritis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Renal vascular lesions defined as thrombotic microangiopathy, lupus vasculopathy, uncomplicated vascular immune deposits, and arterial sclerosis were evaluated in relation to renal and vascular morbidity and overall mortality. Results Biopsies from 161 patients revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (13), lupus vasculopathy (5), and arterial sclerosis (93). No renal vascular lesions were found in 24.8% of patients. At the time of biopsy, arterial sclerosis or lupus vasculopathy patients were older (arterial sclerosis=37.9±13.0 and lupus vasculopathy=44.4±8.9 versus controls=33.1±8.9 years, P<0.05), and the mean arterial pressure was higher in all groups compared with controls. Nephritis subtype, activity indices, and proteinuria were similar between groups, estimated GFR was lower in arterial sclerosis (70.5±33.3 versus 84.5±26.6 ml/min per 1.73 m2, P=0.03), and chronicity index (thrombotic microangiopathy=3.5, lupus vasculopathy=4.5, and arterial sclerosis=2.5) was higher in all renal vascular lesions subgroups versus controls (1.0, P<0.05). In 133 patients with similar follow-up, the association between renal vascular lesions and vascular events was significant (Fisher exact test, P=0.002) and remained so after multivariate analysis (exact conditional scores test, P=0.04), where the difference between arterial sclerosis and uncomplicated vascular immune deposits was most noticeable (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]=8.35[0.98, 83.12], P=0.05). The associations between renal vascular lesions, renal outcomes, and death were not significant, likely because of insufficient power. Conclusions Renal vascular lesions are common in SLE patients with nephritis and may be associated with arterial vascular events. PMID:22442181

  8. [Vascular and renal effects of anti-angiogenic therapy].

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel; Azizi, Michel; Bobrie, Guillaume; Bouché, Olivier; Deray, Gilbert; des Guetz, Gaetan; Lecomte, Thierry; Levy, Bernard; Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Nochy, Dominique; Oudard, Stéphane; Rieu, Philippe; Sahali, Dil

    2008-12-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitor drugs (bevacizumab, sunitinib, sorafénib...) are now widely used for treatment of cancers, including colorectal, advanced renal cell and hepatocellular carcinomas, breast cancer). Vascular and renal side-effects of these drugs are not well known. Hypertension is one of the most common side effects. Incidence of hypertension may be different among angiogenis inhibitors and seems dose-depend. Arterial pressure can usually be controlled with anti-hypertensive medications, and treatment with angiogenesis inhibitors can be continued in most cases; however, serious hypertension-induced side effects were reported included malignant hypertension, stroke and reversible posterior leucoencephalopathy. Renal damage is infrequently reported: usually reversible mild or moderate proteinuria and in some rare cases nephritic syndrome, acute renal dysfunction, proliferative or collapsing glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis and thrombotic microangiopathy. Prolongation of the QT interval, congestive heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction have been reported in patients using tinibs. In the present guidelines, we recommend: (1) before the first administration of angiogenesis inhibitors: acute IV or oral antihypertensive medications should not be administered in a patient regardless of arterial pressure levels with postponing the administration because of hypertension is not recommended; (2) initial work-up should include ambulatory measurement of arterial pressure (by the general practitioner or by the patient using home blood pressure (three times in the morning and in the evening during three consecutive days) with a validated (cf: http://afssaps.sante.fr/) upper arm device: ideally, this device should be financed and provided by the pharmaceutical companies marketing the angiogenesis inhibitor drugs. Using 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurement is optional; (3) urine dipstick (and quantification if positive) and estimated glomerular

  9. Renal Athersosclerotic reVascularization Evaluation (RAVE Study): Study protocol of a randomized trial [NCT00127738

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Atri, M; Perkins, N; Pugash, R; Bell, Chaim M

    2007-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether patients with renal vascular disease will have renal or mortality benefit from re-establishing renal blood flow with renal revascularization procedures. The RAVE study will compare renal revascularization to medical management for people with atherosclerotic renal vascular disease (ARVD) and the indication for revascularization. Patients will be assessed for the standard nephrology research outcomes of progression to doubling of creatinine, need for dialysis, and death, as well as other cardiovascular outcomes. We will also establish whether the use of a new inexpensive, simple and available ultrasound test, the renal resistance index (RRI), can identify patients with renal vascular disease who will not benefit from renal revascularization procedures[1]. Methods/design This single center randomized, parallel group, pilot study comparing renal revascularization with medical therapy alone will help establish an infrastructure and test the feasibility of answering this important question in clinical nephrology. The main outcome will be a composite of death, dialysis and doubling of creatinine. Knowledge from this study will be used to better understand the natural history of patients diagnosed with renal vascular disease in anticipation of a Canadian multicenter trial. Data collected from this study will also inform the Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) Clinical Practice Guidelines for the management of Renal and Renal Vascular Disease. The expectation is that this program for ARVD, will enable community based programs to implement a comprehensive guidelines based diagnostic and treatment program, help create an evidence based approach for the management of patients with this condition, and possibly reduce or halt the progression of kidney disease in these patients. Discussion Results from this study will determine the feasibility of a multicentered study for the management of renovascular disease. PMID:17257413

  10. An Overview of Vascular Adverse Events Associated With Facial Soft Tissue Fillers: Recognition, Prevention, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferneini, Elie M; Ferneini, Antoine M

    2016-08-01

    Minimally invasive facial cosmetic surgery procedures have seen an exponential increase in numbers over the past decade. The most commonly performed procedures are neuromodulator and soft tissue filler procedures. Although soft tissue fillers have a high safety and predictability profile, these procedures recently have been associated with serious and dire adverse events. This article will discuss some of the vascular complications associated with facial soft tissue fillers. Management and prevention of these adverse events also will be discussed. PMID:27067061

  11. In-vivo Vascular Wall Shear Rate and Circumferential Strain of Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H.; Rubin, Jonathan M.; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E.; Shih, Albert J.; Weitzel, William F.

    2012-01-01

    This study measures the vascular wall shear rate at the vessel edge using decorrelation based ultrasound speckle tracking. Results for nine healthy and eight renal disease subjects are presented. Additionally, the vascular wall shear rate and circumferential strain during physiologic pressure, pressure equalization and hyperemia are compared for five healthy and three renal disease subjects. The mean and maximum wall shear rates were measured during the cardiac cycle at the top and bottom wall edges. The healthy subjects had significantly higher mean and maximum vascular wall shear rate than the renal disease subjects. The key findings of this research were that the mean vascular wall shear rates and circumferential strain changes between physiologic pressure and hyperemia that was significantly different between healthy and renal disease subjects. PMID:23211936

  12. Adverse Perinatal Outcome in Subsequent Pregnancy after Stillbirth by Placental Vascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Monari, Francesca; Pedrielli, Giulia; Vergani, Patrizia; Pozzi, Elisa; Mecacci, Federico; Serena, Caterina; Neri, Isabella; Facchinetti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate outcome in the pregnancy following a stillbirth (SB) by a placental vascular disorders. Study Design A prospective, observational, multicenter study was conducted in woman with a history of stillbirth (> 22 weeks) between 2005 and June 2013, in 3 Italian University Hospitals. Causes of SB were previously identified after extensive investigations. Pregnant women were enrolled within the first trimester. The main outcome was “adverse neonatal outcome”, including perinatal death, fetal growth restriction, early preterm birth <33+6 weeks, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial hemorrhage or respiratory distress. Results Out of 364 index pregnancies, 320 women (87.9%) had a subsequent pregnancy during the study period. Forty-seven had an early pregnancy loss. Out of 273 babies, 67 (24.5%) had an adverse perinatal outcome, including 1 SB and 1 early neonatal death (3.7/1000). Women who had a SB related to placental vascular disorders (39.6%), were at higher risk of an adverse neonatal outcome compared with women whose SB was unexplained or resulted from other causes (Adj. OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.8). Moreover, also obesity independently predicts an adverse perinatal outcome (Adj OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.1–4.3). Conclusion When previous SB is related to placental vascular disorders there is a high risk for adverse neonatal outcomes in the subsequent pregnancy. Maternal obesity is an additional risk factor. PMID:27228078

  13. Regulation of Vascular and Renal Function by Metabolite Receptors.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kishore, Bellamkonda K; Pluznick, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    To maintain metabolic homeostasis, the body must be able to monitor the concentration of a large number of substances, including metabolites, in real time and to use that information to regulate the activities of different metabolic pathways. Such regulation is achieved by the presence of sensors, termed metabolite receptors, in various tissues and cells of the body, which in turn convey the information to appropriate regulatory or positive or negative feedback systems. In this review, we cover the unique roles of metabolite receptors in renal and vascular function. These receptors play a wide variety of important roles in maintaining various aspects of homeostasis-from salt and water balance to metabolism-by sensing metabolites from a wide variety of sources. We discuss the role of metabolite sensors in sensing metabolites generated locally, metabolites generated at distant tissues or organs, or even metabolites generated by resident microbes. Metabolite receptors are also involved in various pathophysiological conditions and are being recognized as potential targets for new drugs. By highlighting three receptor families-(a) citric acid cycle intermediate receptors, (b) purinergic receptors, and PMID:26667077

  14. Prognostic indicators of adverse renal outcome and death in acute kidney injury hospital survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hamzić-Mehmedbašić, Aida; Rašić, Senija; Balavac, Merima; Rebić, Damir; Delić-Šarac, Marina; Durak-Nalbantić, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding prognostic factors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in acute kidney injury (AKI) hospital survivors are scarce and controversial. Objectives: We aimed to identify predictors of post-discharge mortality and adverse renal function outcome in AKI hospital survivors. Patients and Methods: The study group consisted of 84 AKI hospital survivors admitted to the tertiary medical center during 2-year period. Baseline clinical parameters, with renal outcome 3 months after discharge and 6-month mortality were evaluated. According survival and renal function outcome, patients were divided into two groups. Results: Patients who did not recover renal function were statistically significantly older (P < 0.007) with higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (P < 0.000) and more likely to have anuria and oliguria (P = 0.008) compared to those with recovery. Deceased AKI patients were statistically significantly older (P < 0.000), with higher CCI score (P < 0.000), greater prevalence of sepsis (P =0.004), higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (P < 0.017) and ferritin (P < 0.051) and lower concentrations of albumin (P<0.01) compared to survivors. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of adverse renal outcome were female gender (P =0.033), increasing CCI (P =0.000), presence of pre-existing chronic kidney disease (P =0.000) and diabetes mellitus (P =0.019) as well as acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) (P =0.032), while protective factor for renal function outcome was higher urine output (P =0.009). Independent predictors of post-discharge mortality were female gender (P =0.04), higher CCI score (P =0.001) and sepsis (P =0.034). Conclusion: Female AKI hospital survivors with increasing burden of comorbidities, diagnosis of sepsis and ADHF seem to be at high-risk for poor post-discharge outcome. PMID:27471736

  15. Effects of PAF antagonists on renal vascular escape and tachyphylaxis in perfused rabbit kidney.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M G; Braquet, P; Fonteles, M C

    1991-12-01

    Renal vascular escape is a physiological phenomenon of adaptation that occurs in vascular smooth muscle. It has been described in many preparations subjected to electrical stimulation or treated with vasoactive agents, such as noreprinephrine, angiotensin and vasopressin. We have recently demonstrated that a naturally occurring ginkgolide (BN 52021), which is a PAF antagonist, was able to block norepinephrine-induced escape in perfused rabbit kidney. In the present work other PAF antagonists, such as the ginkgolides BN 52022 and BN 52024, and the synthetic compounds 48740 RP and WEB 2086, were tested. Their effects on renal vascular escape, perfusion pressure and tachyphylaxis were evaluated. They all were shown to block the escape. Among the ginkgolides, BN 52024 is generally recognized as one of the weaker PAF antagonists. However, in spite of this, BN 52024 was able to significantly and simultaneously block renal vascular escape and tachyphylaxis in perfused rabbit kidney infused with norepinephrine. PMID:1819726

  16. Analysis of adverse events of sunitinib in patients treated for advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cedrych, Ida; Jasiówka, Marek; Niemiec, Maciej; Skotnicki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of the metastatic stage of renal cell carcinoma is specific because classical chemotherapy is not applicable here. The treatment is mainly based on molecularly targeted drugs, including inhibitors of tyrosine kinases. In many cases the therapy takes many months, and patients often report to general practitioners due to adverse events. In this article, the effectiveness and side effects of one of these drugs are presented. The aim of the study was to analyse of the toxicity and safety of treatment with sunitinib malate in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma in the metastatic stage. Material and methods Adverse events were analyzed using retrospective analysis of data collected in a group of 39 patients treated in the Department of Systemic and Generalized Malignancies in the Cancer Center in Krakow, Poland. Results Toxicity of treatment affected 50% of patients. The most common side effects observed were hypertension, thrombocytopenia, stomatitis, diarrhea and weakness. Grade 3 serious adverse events according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4 affected up to 10% of patients. The most common serious adverse events were hypertension and fatigue. Conclusions Sunitinib malate is characterized by a particular type of toxicity. Knowledge of the types and range of adverse events of this drug is an important part of oncological and internal medicine care. PMID:27186181

  17. Association Between Vascular Access Dysfunction and Subsequent Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Tseng, Chien-Tzu; Lin, Wei-Hung; Chao, Jo-Yen; Wang, Wei-Ming; Li, Chung-Yi; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between dialysis vascular access dysfunction and the risk of developing major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in hemodialysis patients is unclear and has not yet been investigated. We analyzed data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to quantify this association. Adopting a case–control design nested within a cohort of patients who received hemodialysis from 2001 to 2010, we identified 9711 incident cases of MACE during the stage of stable maintenance dialysis and 19,422 randomly selected controls matched to cases on age, gender, and duration of dialysis. Events of vascular access dysfunction in the 6-month period before the date of MACE onset (ie, index date) for cases and before index dates for controls were evaluated retrospectively. The presence of vascular access dysfunction was associated with a 1.385-fold higher odds of developing MACE as estimated from the logistic regression analysis. This represents a significantly increased adjusted odds ratio (OR) at 1.268 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.186–1.355) after adjustment for comorbidities and calendar years of initiating dialysis. We also noted a significant exposure–response trend (P < 0.001) between the frequency of vascular access dysfunction and MACE, with the greatest risk (adjusted OR = 1.840, 95% CI = 1.549–2.186) noted in patients with ≥3 vascular access events. We concluded that dialysis vascular access dysfunction was significantly associated with an increased risk of MACE. Hence, vascular access failure can be an early sign for MACE in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Active monitoring and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and related diseases, not merely managing vascular access dysfunction, would be required to reduce the risk of MACE. PMID:26131808

  18. Renal-related adverse effects of intravenous contrast media in computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leow, Kheng Song; Wu, Yi Wei; Tan, Cher Heng

    2015-01-01

    Renal-related adverse effects of intravascular contrast media (CM) include contrast-induced nephropathy in computed tomography and angiography. While large retrospective studies have been published, the exact pathogenesis of this condition is still unknown. We review the main international guidelines, including the American College of Radiology white paper and the guidelines of European Society of Urogenital Radiology, Royal College of Radiologists and Canadian Association of Radiologists, as well as their references, regarding this subject. We present a simplified, concise approach to renal-related adverse effects of CM, taking into consideration the basis for each recommendation in these published guidelines. This will allow the reader to better understand the rationale behind appropriate patient preparation for cross-sectional imaging. PMID:25917468

  19. Penile gangrene in diabetes mellitus with renal failure: A poor prognostic sign of systemic vascular calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Singh, Shrawan K.; Mandal, Arup K.

    2007-01-01

    Penile gangrene associated with chronic renal failure is very uncommon. A 52-year-old man with diabetes mellitus, diffuse atherosclerosis, ischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage renal disease presented with blackening of distal penis for 10 days. His general condition was poor and gangrene of prepuce and glans was noted. Doppler and magnetic-resonance angiography revealed bilateral internal iliac artery obstruction. He underwent trocar suprapubic cystostomy and was planned for partial penectomy. But he died of severe diabetic complications in the interim period. Penile gangrene is a manifestation of widespread vascular calcifications associated with end-stage renal disease and is a marker of poor prognosis. PMID:19675807

  20. Impaired renal function impacts negatively on vascular stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are independently associated with increased vascular stiffness. We examined whether renal function contributes to vascular stiffness independently of CAD status. Methods We studied 160 patients with CAD and 169 subjects without CAD. The 4-variable MDRD formula was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); impaired renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with the SphygmoCor® device. Circulating biomarkers were assessed in plasma using xMAP® multiplexing technology. Results Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had greater PWV compared to those with CAD and normal renal function (10.2 [9.1;11.2] vs 7.3 [6.9;7.7] m/s; P < 0.001). In all patients, PWV was a function of eGFR (β = −0.293; P < 0.001) even after adjustment for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and presence or absence of CAD. Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had higher levels of adhesion and inflammatory molecules including E-selectin and osteopontin (all P < 0.05) compared to those with CAD alone, but had similar levels of markers of oxidative stress. Conclusions Renal function is a determinant of vascular stiffness even in patients with severe atherosclerotic disease. This was paralleled by differences in markers of cell adhesion and inflammation. Increased vascular stiffness may therefore be linked to inflammatory remodeling of the vasculature in people with impaired renal function, irrespective of concomitant atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23937620

  1. Metabolic and renal adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fortuny, Clàudia; Deyà-Martínez, Ángela; Chiappini, Elena; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Noguera-Julian, Antoni

    2015-05-01

    Worldwide, the benefits of combined antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in morbidity and mortality due to perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection are beyond question and outweigh the toxicity these drugs have been associated with in HIV-infected children and adolescents to date. In puberty, abnormal body fat distribution is stigmatizating and leads to low adherence to ARV treatment. The other metabolic comorbidities (mitochondrial toxicity, dyslipidemias, insulin resistance and low bone mineral density) and renal toxicity, albeit nonsymptomatic in most children, are increasingly being reported and potentially put this population at risk for early cardiovascular or cerebrovascular atherosclerotic disease, diabetes, pathologic fractures or premature renal failure in the third and fourth decades of life. Evidence from available studies is limited because of methodological limitations and also because of several HIV-unrelated factors influencing, to some degree, the development of these conditions. Current recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of metabolic and renal adverse effects in HIV-children and adolescents are based on adult studies, observational pediatric studies and experts' consensus. Healthy lifestyle habits (regarding diet, exercise and refraining from toxic substances) and wise use of ARV options are the only preventive tools for the majority of patients. Should abnormal findings arise, switches in one or more ARV drugs have proved useful. Specific therapies are also available for some of these comorbidities, although the experience in the pediatric age is still very scarce. We aim to summarize the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of metabolic and renal adverse effects in vertically HIV-infected children and adolescents. PMID:25629891

  2. Embolization of Iatrogenic Vascular Injuries of Renal Transplants: Immediate and Follow-Up Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dorffner, Roland; Thurnher, Siegfried; Prokesch, Rupert; Bankier, Alexander; Turetschek, Karl; Schmidt, Alice; Lammer, Johannes

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome in seven patients in whom iatrogenic vascular complications were treated with catheter embolization. Methods: Angiography showed an arteriovenous fistula in six of the seven patients, a pseudoaneurysm in three patients, and an arteriocaliceal fistula in three patients. Embolization was performed with GAW coils or microcoils in all cases. In three patients enbucrilate, polyvinyl alcohol, or absorbable gelatin powder was administered as an adjunct to the coils. Results: Angiographic success with total occlusion of the vascular injury was achieved in five of the seven patients and clinical success was achieved in four of seven cases. In two cases, nephrectomy after embolization was necessary because of renal artery occlusion or acute hemorrhage at the renal artery anastomosis, respectively. Infarction of 30%-50% of the renal parenchyma was seen in two cases. Conclusion: Angiographically successful embolization is not necessarily associated with clinical success. The complication rate is high.

  3. Spiral CT During Selective Accessory Renal Artery Angiography: Assessment of Vascular Territory Before Aortic Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Dorffner, Roland; Thurnher, Siegfried; Prokesch, Rupert; Youssefzadeh, Soraya; Hoelzenbein, Thomas; Lammer, Johannes

    1998-03-15

    We evaluated the vascular territory of accessory renal arteries in cases where the vessel might be overlapped by an aortic stent-graft. Spiral CT during selective accessory renal artery angiography was performed in four patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (including one with a horseshoe kidney). The volume of the vascular territory of each renal artery was measured using a software program provided by the CT unit manufacturer. The supernumerary renal arteries perfused 32%, 37%, 15%, and 16% of the total renal mass, respectively. In two patients, stent-grafts were implanted, which resulted in occlusion of the supernumerary renal artery. The volume of the renal infarction was equal to the volume perfused by the artery as calculated before implantation of the stent-graft.The method proposed is accurate for estimating the size of the expected renal infarction. It might help to determine whether placement of a stent-graft is acceptable.

  4. Ansys Fluent versus Sim Vascular for 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics in renal arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumbaraddi, Avinash; Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Sawchuk, Alan; Dalsing, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this clinical-need driven research is to investigate the effect of renal artery stenosis (RAS) on the blood flow and wall shear stress in renal arteries through 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) and search for possible critical RASs that significantly alter the pressure gradient across the stenosis by manually varying the size of RAS from 50% to 95%. The identification of the critical RAS is important to understand the contribution of RAS to the overall renal resistance thus appropriate clinical therapy can be determined in order to reduce the hypertension. Clinical CT angiographic data together with Doppler Ultra sound images of an anonymous patient are used serving as the required inputs of the PSCH. To validate the PSCH, we use both Ansys Fluent and Sim Vascular and compare velocity, pressure, and wall-shear stress under identical conditions. Renal Imaging Technology Development Program (RITDP) Grant.

  5. Neonatal vascularization and oxygen tension regulate appropriate perinatal renal medulla/papilla maturation.

    PubMed

    Phua, Yu Leng; Gilbert, Thierry; Combes, Alexander; Wilkinson, Lorine; Little, Melissa H

    2016-04-01

    Congenital medullary dysplasia with obstructive nephropathy is a common congenital disorder observed in paediatric patients and represents the foremost cause of renal failure. However, the molecular processes regulating normal papillary outgrowth during the postnatal period are unclear. In this study, transcriptional profiling of the renal medulla across postnatal development revealed enrichment of non-canonical Wnt signalling, vascular development, and planar cell polarity genes, all of which may contribute to perinatal medulla/papilla maturation. These pathways were investigated in a model of papillary hypoplasia with functional obstruction, the Crim1(KST264/KST264) transgenic mouse. Postnatal elongation of the renal papilla via convergent extension was unaffected in the Crim1(KST264/KST264) hypoplastic renal papilla. In contrast, these mice displayed a disorganized papillary vascular network, tissue hypoxia, and elevated Vegfa expression. In addition, we demonstrate the involvement of accompanying systemic hypoxia arising from placental insufficiency, in appropriate papillary maturation. In conclusion, this study highlights the requirement for normal vascular development in collecting duct patterning, development of appropriate nephron architecture, and perinatal papillary maturation, such that disturbances contribute to obstructive nephropathy. PMID:26800422

  6. Radiologic indicators prior to renal cell cancer thrombectomy: Implications for vascular reconstruction and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Overholser, Stephen; Raheem, Omer; Zapata, David; Kaushik, Dharam; Rodriguez, Ronald; Derweesh, Ithaar H.; Liss, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal cancer may invade the inferior vena cava (IVC) creating more complex surgical intervention. We investigate radiologic findings that may predict vascular reconstruction prior to surgery and future renal cancer-specific mortality. Materials and Methods: Radiologic findings included Mayo Clinic risk factors for vascular reconstruction: Right-sided tumor, anteroposterior diameter of the IVC at the ostium of the renal vein ≥24.0 mm, and radiologic identification of complete occlusion of the IVC. Additional factors included thrombus in the lumen of the hepatic veins and metastasis. Along with other demographic factors, analysis included Chi-squared analysis for vascular reconstruction and logistic regression for mortality. A Kaplan–Meier curve was created for the most significant radiologic factor. Results: Thirty-seven patients underwent IVC tumor thrombectomy at two institutions from April 2007 to February 2015. We found that Mayo risk factors of 0, 1, 2, and 3 and the proportions of vascular reconstruction of 0%, 0%, 12.5%, and 13.6%, respectively (P = 0.788). Hepatic vein involvement was the most significant determinate of renal cell carcinoma-specific mortality in multivariable analysis, controlling for the size of IVC at the hepatic veins, pulmonary metastasis, and Fuhrman grade (P = 0.02, Log-rank P = 0.002). Conclusion: Mayo risk factors did not predict vascular reconstruction in our small cohort of Level II–Level IV IVC thrombus undergoing IVC thrombectomy. Tumor thrombus traveling into the lumen of the hepatic veins was a significant risk factor for accelerated mortality. PMID:27453653

  7. Transduction of interleukin-10 through renal artery attenuates vascular neointimal proliferation and infiltration of immune cells in rat renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingxin; Li, Xueyi; Meng, Dan; Liang, Qiujuan; Wang, Xinhong; Wang, Li; Wang, Rui; Xiang, Meng; Chen, Sifeng

    2016-08-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal failure. Although acute rejection is not a major issue anymore, chronic rejection, especially vascular rejection, is still a major factor that might lead to allograft dysfunction on the long term. The role of the local immune-regulating cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) in chronic renal allograft is unclear. Many clinical observations showed that local IL-10 level was negatively related to kidney allograft function. It is unknown this negative relationship was the result of immunostimulatory property or insufficient immunosuppression property of local IL-10. We performed ex vivo transduction before transplantation through artery of the renal allograft using adeno-associated viral vectors carrying IL-10 gene. Twelve weeks after transplantation, we found intrarenal IL-10 gene transduction significantly inhibited arterial neointimal proliferation, the number of occluded intrarenal artery, interstitial fibrosis, peritubular capillary congestion and glomerular inflammation in renal allografts compared to control allografts receiving PBS or vectors carrying YFP. IL-10 transduction increased serum IL-10 level at 4 weeks but not at 8 and 12 weeks. Renal IL-10 level increased while serum creatinine decreased significantly in IL-10 group at 12 weeks compared to PBS or YFP controls. Immunohistochemical staining showed unchanged total T cells (CD3) and B cells (CD45R/B220), decreased cytotoxic T cells (CD8), macrophages (CD68) and increased CD4+ and FoxP3+ cells in IL-10 group. In summary, intrarenal IL-10 inhibited the allograft rejection while modulated immune response. PMID:27317647

  8. Combustion-derived nanoparticulate induces the adverse vascular effects of diesel exhaust inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Nicholas L.; Miller, Mark R.; Lucking, Andrew J.; Beveridge, Jon; Flint, Laura; Boere, A. John F.; Fokkens, Paul H.; Boon, Nicholas A.; Sandstrom, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders; Duffin, Rodger; Donaldson, Ken; Hadoke, Patrick W.F.; Cassee, Flemming R.; Newby, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Exposure to road traffic and air pollution may be a trigger of acute myocardial infarction, but the individual pollutants responsible for this effect have not been established. We assess the role of combustion-derived-nanoparticles in mediating the adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution. Methods and results To determine the in vivo effects of inhalation of diesel exhaust components, 16 healthy volunteers were exposed to (i) dilute diesel exhaust, (ii) pure carbon nanoparticulate, (iii) filtered diesel exhaust, or (iv) filtered air, in a randomized double blind cross-over study. Following each exposure, forearm blood flow was measured during intra-brachial bradykinin, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and verapamil infusions. Compared with filtered air, inhalation of diesel exhaust increased systolic blood pressure (145 ± 4 vs. 133 ± 3 mmHg, P< 0.05) and attenuated vasodilatation to bradykinin (P= 0.005), acetylcholine (P= 0.008), and sodium nitroprusside (P< 0.001). Exposure to pure carbon nanoparticulate or filtered exhaust had no effect on endothelium-dependent or -independent vasodilatation. To determine the direct vascular effects of nanoparticulate, isolated rat aortic rings (n= 6–9 per group) were assessed in vitro by wire myography and exposed to diesel exhaust particulate, pure carbon nanoparticulate and vehicle. Compared with vehicle, diesel exhaust particulate (but not pure carbon nanoparticulate) attenuated both acetylcholine (P< 0.001) and sodium-nitroprusside (P= 0.019)-induced vasorelaxation. These effects were partially attributable to both soluble and insoluble components of the particulate. Conclusion Combustion-derived nanoparticulate appears to predominately mediate the adverse vascular effects of diesel exhaust inhalation. This provides a rationale for testing environmental health interventions targeted at reducing traffic-derived particulate emissions. PMID:21753226

  9. Renal and Cardiac Endothelial Heterogeneity Impact Acute Vascular Rejection in Pig-to-Baboon Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Knosalla, C.; Yazawa, K.; Behdad, A.; Bodyak, N.; Shang, H.; Bühler, L.; Houser, S.; Gollackner, B.; Griesemer, A.; Schmitt-Knosalla, I.; Schuurman, H.-J.; Awwad, M.; Sachs, D. H.; Cooper, D. K. C.; Yamada, K.; Usheva, A.; Robson, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Xenograft outcomes are dictated by xenoantigen expression, for example, Gal α 1, 3Gal (Gal), but might also depend on differing vascular responses. We investigated whether differential vascular gene expression in kidney and cardiac xenografts correlate with development of thrombotic microangiopathy (TM) and consumptive coagulation (CC). Immunosuppressed baboons underwent miniswine or hDAF pig kidney (n = 6) or heart (n = 7), or Gal-transferase gene-knockout (GalT-KO) (thymo)kidney transplantation (n = 14). Porcine cDNA miniarrays determined donor proinflammatory, apoptosis-related and vascular coagulant/fibrinolytic gene expression at defined time points; validated by mRNA, protein levels and immunopathology. hDAF-transgenic and GalT-KO xenografts, (particularly thymokidneys) exhibited prolonged survival. CC was seen with Gal-expressing porcine kidneys (3 of 6), only 1 of 7 baboons post-cardiac xenotransplantation and was infrequent following GalT-KO grafts (1 of 14). Protective-type genes (heme oxygenase-I, superoxide dismutases and CD39) together with von Willebrand factor and P-selectin were upregulated in all renal grafts. Transcriptional responses in Gal-expressing xenografts were comparable to those seen in the infrequent GalT-KO rejection. In cardiac xenografts, fibrin deposition was associated with increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression establishing that gene expression profiles in renal and cardiac xenografts differ in a quantitative manner. These findings suggest that therapeutic targets may differ for renal and cardiac xenotransplants. PMID:19422330

  10. BMP-7 is an efficacious treatment of vascular calcification in a murine model of atherosclerosis and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Davies, Matthew R; Lund, Richard J; Hruska, Keith A

    2003-06-01

    Chronic renal failure is complicated by high cardiovascular mortality. One key contributor to this mortality is vascular calcification, for which no therapy currently exists. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 is an essential renal morphogen that maintains renal tubular differentiation in the adult and is downregulated in renal failure. Several studies have demonstrated its efficacy in treating various renal diseases in rodents, and it was hypothesized that it would also be an effective treatment of vascular calcification in this setting. Uremia was imposed on LDL receptor null mice (a model of atherosclerosis), which were then treated with bone morphogenetic protein 7 for 15 wk. Uremic animals had increased vascular calcification by histology and chemical analysis. Calcification in treated animals was similar to or less than non-uremic control animals. Cells exhibiting an osteoblast-like phenotype in the vessel wall may be important in the etiology of vascular calcification. Expression of osteocalcin was assessed as a marker of osteoblastic function, and it is shown that it is increased in untreated uremic animals but downregulated to levels similar to non-uremic control animals with treatment. The data are compatible with bone morphogenetic protein 7 deficiency as a pathophysiologic factor in chronic renal failure, and they demonstrate its efficacy as a potential treatment of vascular calcification. PMID:12761256

  11. Impaired Coronary and Renal Vascular Function in Spontaneously Type 2 Diabetic Leptin-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Westergren, Helena U.; Grönros, Julia; Heinonen, Suvi E.; Miliotis, Tasso; Jennbacken, Karin; Sabirsh, Alan; Ericsson, Anette; Jönsson-Rylander, Ann-Cathrine; Svedlund, Sara; Gan, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is associated with macro- and microvascular complications in man. Microvascular dysfunction affects both cardiac and renal function and is now recognized as a main driver of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. However, progression of microvascular dysfunction in experimental models is often obscured by macrovascular pathology and consequently demanding to study. The obese type 2 diabetic leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mouse lacks macrovascular complications, i.e. occlusive atherosclerotic disease, and may therefore be a potential model for microvascular dysfunction. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that these mice with an insulin resistant phenotype might display microvascular dysfunction in both coronary and renal vascular beds. Methods and Results In this study we used non-invasive Doppler ultrasound imaging to characterize microvascular dysfunction during the progression of diabetes in ob/ob mice. Impaired coronary flow velocity reserve was observed in the ob/ob mice at 16 and 21 weeks of age compared to lean controls. In addition, renal resistivity index as well as pulsatility index was higher in the ob/ob mice at 21 weeks compared to lean controls. Moreover, plasma L-arginine was lower in ob/ob mice, while asymmetric dimethylarginine was unaltered. Furthermore, a decrease in renal vascular density was observed in the ob/ob mice. Conclusion In parallel to previously described metabolic disturbances, the leptin-deficient ob/ob mice also display cardiac and renal microvascular dysfunction. This model may therefore be suitable for translational, mechanistic and interventional studies to improve the understanding of microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes. PMID:26098416

  12. Vascular access in elderly patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Bessias, Nikolaos; Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Tziviskou, Effie; Andrikopoulos, Vassilios

    2008-01-01

    During the last few years, the number of elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been increasing worldwide. Establishment of a viable vascular access is of primary importance in these patients. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the available vascular access modalities [namely arteriovenous (AV) fistulae, AV grafts, and central venous catheters (CVCs)] in elderly ESRD patients. AV fistulae seem to be superior when compared with other vascular access alternatives with respect to patency, morbidity and mortality rates. On the other hand, due to the age-related advanced atherosclerosis in the elderly, higher failure rates for AV fistulae in this age group have been described. Two controversial issues, namely the higher infection and thrombosis rates in elderly ESRD patients, are also discussed. Current evidence suggests that old age should not comprise a drawback when selecting the appropriate vascular access modality (AV fistula, AV graft or CVC) for the performance of hemodialysis. The possible vascular access options in elderly ESRD patients should not be different from younger individuals. PMID:18792799

  13. Effects of tempol on altered metabolism and renal vascular responsiveness in fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Mohammed H; Sattar, Munavvar A; Johns, Edward J

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of tempol (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) on renal vasoconstrictor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II) and adrenergic agonists in fructose-fed Sprague-Dawley rats (a model of metabolic syndrome). Rats were fed 20% fructose in drinking water (F) for 8 weeks. One fructose-fed group received tempol (FT) at 1 mmol·L(-1) in drinking water for 8 weeks or as an infusion (1.5 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) intrarenally. At the end of the treatment regimen, the renal responses to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, methoxamine, and Ang II were determined. F rats exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension. Tempol reduced blood glucose and insulin levels (all p < 0.05) in FT rats compared with their untreated counterparts. The vasoconstriction response to all agonists was lower in F rats than in control rats by about 35%-65% (all p < 0.05). Vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, and methoxamine but not Ang II were about 41%-75% higher in FT rats compared with F rats (all p < 0.05). Acute tempol infusion blunted responses to noradrenaline, methoxamine, and Ang II in control rats by 32%, 33%, and 62%, while it blunted responses to noradrenaline and Ang II in F rats by 26% and 32%, respectively (all p < 0.05), compared with their untreated counterparts. Superoxide radicals play a crucial role in controlling renal vascular responses to adrenergic agonists in insulin-resistant rats. Chronic but not acute tempol treatment enhances renal vascular responsiveness in fructose-fed rats. PMID:26789093

  14. Dectin-1 predicts adverse postoperative prognosis of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yu; Liu, Li; Bai, Qi; Wang, Jiajun; Xi, Wei; Qu, Yang; Xiong, Ying; Long, Qilai; Xu, Jiejie; Guo, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1, a classical pattern-recognition receptor, was now identified as an important regulator in immune homeostasis and cancer immunity through its extensive ligands binding functions and subsequent cytokines production. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical significance of dectin-1 expression in 290 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) through immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. We found that dectin-1 was predominantly expressed on ccRCC cells, in accordance with several other online databases. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier method was conducted and high expression of tumoral dectin-1 was associated with shorter patient recurrence free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001 for both). In multivariate analyses, tumoral dectin-1 expression was also confirmed as an independent prognostic factor for patients' survival together with other clinical parameters (P < 0.001 for RFS and OS). After incorporating these characteristics including tumoral dectin-1 expression, two nomograms were constructed to predict ccRCC patients' RFS and OS (c-index 0.796 and 0.812, respectively) and performed better than existed integrated models (P < 0.001 for all models comparisons). In conclusion, high tumoral dectin-1 expression was an independent predictor of adverse clinical outcome in ccRCC patients. This molecule and established nomograms might help clinicians in future decision making and therapeutic developments. PMID:27600310

  15. Dectin-1 predicts adverse postoperative prognosis of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yu; Liu, Li; Bai, Qi; Wang, Jiajun; Xi, Wei; Qu, Yang; Xiong, Ying; Long, Qilai; Xu, Jiejie; Guo, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1, a classical pattern-recognition receptor, was now identified as an important regulator in immune homeostasis and cancer immunity through its extensive ligands binding functions and subsequent cytokines production. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical significance of dectin-1 expression in 290 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) through immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. We found that dectin-1 was predominantly expressed on ccRCC cells, in accordance with several other online databases. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier method was conducted and high expression of tumoral dectin-1 was associated with shorter patient recurrence free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.001 for both). In multivariate analyses, tumoral dectin-1 expression was also confirmed as an independent prognostic factor for patients’ survival together with other clinical parameters (P < 0.001 for RFS and OS). After incorporating these characteristics including tumoral dectin-1 expression, two nomograms were constructed to predict ccRCC patients’ RFS and OS (c-index 0.796 and 0.812, respectively) and performed better than existed integrated models (P < 0.001 for all models comparisons). In conclusion, high tumoral dectin-1 expression was an independent predictor of adverse clinical outcome in ccRCC patients. This molecule and established nomograms might help clinicians in future decision making and therapeutic developments. PMID:27600310

  16. Spontaneous Dissection of the Renal Artery in Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Filipa; Cardoso, Teresa; Sá, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (vEDS) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the COL3A1 gene predisposing to premature arterial, intestinal, or uterine rupture. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman with a recent diagnosis of vEDS admitted in the Emergency Department with a suspicion of a pyelonephritis that evolved to a cardiopulmonary arrest. A fatal retroperitoneal hematoma related with a haemorrhagic dissection of the right renal artery was found after emergency surgery. This case highlights the need to be aware of the particular characteristics of vEDS, such as a severe vascular complication that can lead to a fatal outcome. PMID:26175915

  17. Spontaneous Dissection of the Renal Artery in Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Filipa; Cardoso, Teresa; Sá, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (vEDS) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the COL3A1 gene predisposing to premature arterial, intestinal, or uterine rupture. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman with a recent diagnosis of vEDS admitted in the Emergency Department with a suspicion of a pyelonephritis that evolved to a cardiopulmonary arrest. A fatal retroperitoneal hematoma related with a haemorrhagic dissection of the right renal artery was found after emergency surgery. This case highlights the need to be aware of the particular characteristics of vEDS, such as a severe vascular complication that can lead to a fatal outcome. PMID:26175915

  18. Vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors in aorta and renal vasculature of hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Sabio, J M; Rodriguez-Maresca, M; Luna, J D; García del Río, C; Vargas, F

    1994-10-01

    Vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors in relation to altered thyroid function was studied in two preparations: aortic strips and the isolated perfused kidney. To assess whether the possible alterations in vascular reactivity were restricted to a specific agonist or whether they involved the contractile system, receptor-mediated and nonspecific smooth muscle stimulants were used. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats. Aortic strips from hypothyroid rats were less sensitive to phenylephrine and KCl when the data were expressed in absolute values or as percentages of the maximum responses. Sensitivity and reactivity in strips from hyperthyroid rats were similar to those observed in control strips. Renal vasculature obtained from hypothyroid rats also showed a markedly reduced sensitivity to phenylephrine, with normal maximal responses. The response to vasopressin at 3-10(-11) mol/l was also decreased, as was the reactivity to barium chloride. In contrast, renal vasculature of hyperthyroid rats showed markedly enhanced reactivity to all agonists: the concentration-response curves were characterized by a similar threshold and a greater maximal response. These results demonstrate that hypothyroidism is accompanied by a marked decrease in sensitivity to vasoconstrictors in large arteries as well as in resistance vessels. This decrease may be secondary to a generalized alteration in the contractile system of vascular smooth muscle cells and may play a role in the decreased blood pressure in these animals. In contrast, isolated perfused kidneys of hyperthyroid rats showed increased vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors, which may play a role in the maintenance of elevated blood pressure in these animals. PMID:7831389

  19. Effect of exercise on markers of vascular health in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Piťha, J; Králová Lesná, I; Stávek, P; Mahrová, A; Racek, J; Sekerková, A; Teplan, V; Štollová, M

    2015-01-01

    The cornerstone of cardiovascular risk management is lifestyle intervention including exercise which could exert favorable impact also in renal transplant recipients. Nevertheless, reliable assessment of the effect of lifestyle interventions is complicated and the available data in this population are not consistent. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of physical activity on selected laboratory markers of vascular health including circulating stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, microparticles, and plasma asymmetric dimethyl arginine in renal transplant recipients. Nineteen men and 7 women were recruited in 6-month program of standardized and supervised exercise. Control group consisted of 23 men and 13 women of similar age and body mass index not included into the program. One year after the transplantation, the main difference between intervention and control group was found in the change of endothelial progenitor cells (p=0.006). Surprisingly, more favorable change was seen in the control group in which endothelial progenitor cells significantly increased compared to the intervention group. The explanation of this finding might be a chronic activation of reparative mechanisms of vascular system in the population exposed to multiple risk factors which is expressed as relatively increased number of endothelial progenitor cells. Therefore, their decrease induced by exercise might reflect stabilization of these processes. PMID:26447524

  20. The para-aortic ridge plays a key role in the formation of the renal, adrenal and gonadal vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Isogai, Sumio; Horiguchi, Mayuko; Hitomi, Jiro

    2010-01-01

    Renal, adrenal, gonadal, ureteral and inferior phrenic arteries vary in their level of origin and in their calibre, number and precise anatomical relationship to other structures. Studies of the origin and early development of these arteries have evoked sharp disputes. The ladder theory of Felix, which states that ‘All the mesonephric arteries may persist; from them are formed the phrenic, suprarenal, renal and internal spermatic arteries’ has been generally quoted in the anatomical textbooks without rigorous verification for 100 years. In this study, we re-examined this theory by performing micro-injection of dye and resin into rat (Rattus norvegicus) embryos. Our results revealed that most of the mesonephric arteries had degenerated before the metanephros started its ascent. The definitive renal, adrenal, gonadal, ureteral and inferior phrenic arteries appeared as new branches from the gonadal artery and/or directly from the abdominal aorta to the para-aortic ridge. Coincidental to this, the anatomical architecture of the inter-renal vascular cage, which consists of the interlobar and arcuate arteries and their collateral veins, was completed within the developing metanephros. We demonstrated that the delicate renal vascular cage switched from the primary renal artery to the definitive renal artery and that the route of venous drainage changed from the posterior cardinal vein to the inferior (caudal) vena cava. PMID:20579173

  1. Handling continuous renal replacement therapy-related adverse effects in intensive care unit patients: the dialytrauma concept.

    PubMed

    Maynar Moliner, J; Honore, P M; Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; Herrera Gutiérrez, M; Spapen, H D

    2012-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is increasingly used for the management of critically ill patients. As a consequence, the incidence of complications that accompany CRRT is also rising. However, a standardized approach for preventing or minimizing these adverse events is lacking. Dialytrauma is a newly proposed concept that encompasses all harmful adverse events related to CRRT while providing a framework for prevention or, at the least, early recognition of these events in order to attenuate the consequences. A mainstay of this approach is the utilization of a dedicated checklist for improving CRRT quality and patient safety. In this context, we discuss the most important adverse effects of CRRT and review current strategies to minimize them. PMID:23095418

  2. Unusual case of tacrolimus vascular toxicity after deceased donor renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sugitani, Atsushi; Takahashi, Chihiro; Naka, Takuji; Hisamitsu, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Osamu; Taniguchi, Kenjiro; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kimura, Mari; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Hamazoe, Ryuichi

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of tacrolimus vascular toxicity found on a protocol biopsy shortly after a deceased donor renal transplantation. The patient was immunologically high-risk and acute antibody-mediated rejection during post-transplant dialysis phase was suspected on the protocol biopsy. Although the patient was stable after treatment of rejection, a further examination showed a very rare but specific side-effect of tacrolimus. It is sometimes difficult to make a differential diagnosis during postoperative dialysis period among AMR, primary non-functioning, drug toxicity, infection or just prolonged recovery from the damage of a long agonal phase on the non-heart beating donor. Although the possibilities of coexistence of rejection or other causes such as infection have not been completely excluded, it is important to be aware of this unusual side effect of tacrolimus. PMID:27004749

  3. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2). PMID:27621605

  4. Differential effects of grape juice on gastric emptying and renal function from cisplatin-induced acute adverse toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ko, J-L; Tsai, C-H; Liu, T-C; Lin, M-Y; Lin, H-L; Ou, C-C

    2016-08-01

    Grape skin and seeds contain large amounts of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, resveratrol, and proanthocyanidins, which possess antioxidant activities. Cisplatin is widely used in the treatment of cancer. High doses of cisplatin have also been known to produce acute adverse effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of antioxidant properties of whole grape juice (with skin and seeds) on cisplatin-induced acute gastrointestinal tract disorders and nephrotoxicity in Wistar rats. Gastric emptying is significantly increased in whole grape juice-pretreated rats when compared to cisplatin treatment alone. The expression of ghrelin mRNA of stomach is increased in rats with whole grape juice. However, pretreatment with whole grape juice did not reduce renal function markers in acute renal toxicity. No significant changes were recorded in the oxidative stress/antioxidant status parameters of any study group. In contrast, pretreatment with whole grape juice slightly improved tubular cell vacuolization, tubular dilatation, and cast formation in renal tubules. These results show that consumption of whole grape juice induces somewhat beneficial effects in preventing cisplatin-mediated dyspepsia but does not offer protection against cisplatin-induced acute renal toxicity. PMID:26429932

  5. Reciprocal Influence of Salt Intake on Adrenal Glomerulosa and Renal Vascular Responses to Angiotensin II in Normal Man

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, Norman K.; Chenitz, William R.; Adams, Douglass F.; Williams, Gordon H.

    1974-01-01

    The adrenal glomerulosa cell and the renal vasculature respond to similar arterial angiotensin II (A II) levels. We have assessed the effect of decreased sodium intake on their responses to A II in man. Studies were performed in 42 normal subjects in balance on a daily intake of 100 meq potassium and either 200 or 10 meq sodium/day. Renal blood flow was measured with 133Xe and arterial A II, renin and aldosterone concentrations by radioimmunoassay. A II was infused intravenously (1, 3, or 10 ng/kg/min) for 40—60 min; 14 subjects received graded doses. The A II level increased linearly with dose and plateaued within 3 min; blood pressure and renal vascular resistance showed a similar time-course. Aldosterone rose within 10 and plateaued within 20 min. Dose-response relationships were established between the rate of A II infusion and the adrenal, the renal vascular, and pressor responses. Sodium restriction reduced the pressor (P < 0.01) and the renal vascular response (P < 0.01), but potentiated the adrenal response to A II (P < 0.01). An excellent correlation was found between the plasma A II and aldosterone levels, but the slope of their regression relationship on a high (y = 0.13x + 6) and low salt intake (y = 0.32x + 14) differed significantly (P < 0.0005). Thus, sodium intake reciprocally influences vascular and adrenal responses to A II: salt restriction blunts the vascular response and potentiates the adrenal's, a physiologically important influence in view of aldosterone's role in sodium conservation. PMID:4365595

  6. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affected vascular tone of renal interlobar arteries in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiaqi; Zhu, Zhoufeng; Xia, Shuixiu; Li, Na; Chen, Ningjing; Gao, Qinqin; Li, Lingjun; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Dawei; Zhu, Xiaolin; Tu, Qing; Li, Weisheng; Wu, Chonglong; Li, Jiayue; Zhong, Yuan; Li, Xiang; Mao, Caiping; Xu, Zhice

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy could affect development of fetuses as well as cardiovascular systems in the offspring. This study was the first to demonstrate the influence and related mechanisms of prenatal hypoxia (PH) on renal interlobar arteries (RIA) in the 5-month-old male rat offspring. Following chronic hypoxia during pregnancy, phenylephrine induced significantly higher pressor responses and greater vasoconstrictions in the offspring. Nitric oxide mediated vessel relaxation was altered in the RIA. Phenylephrine-stimulated free intracellular calcium was significantly higher in the RIA of the PH group. The activity and expression of L-type calcium channel (Cav1.2), not T-type calcium channel (Cav3.2), was up-regulated. The whole-cell currents of calcium channels and the currents of Cav1.2 were increased compared with the control. In addition, the whole-cell K(+) currents were decreased in the offspring exposed to prenatal hypoxia. Activity of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and the expression of MaxiKα was decreased in the PH group. The results provide new information regarding the influence of prenatal hypoxia on the development of the renal vascular system, and possible underlying cellular and ion channel mechanisms involved. PMID:25983078

  7. A Pilot Trial of Vascular-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy in Renal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Matin, Surena F.; Tinkey, Peggy T.; Borne, Agatha T.; Stephens, L. Clifton; Sherz, Avigdor; Swanson, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) represents the newest generation of photodynamic therapy and a new paradigm for minimally-invasive ablative therapy. We report on a pilot trial of VTP to evaluate the effect on porcine renal tissue. Materials and Methods Pigs underwent continuous infusion of WST-09 and concurrent illumination with interstitial laser at a wavelength of 763 nm to the lower pole of the kidney. Drug doses were 0.5–1.0mg/kg and light doses 100–200 Joules. Nuclear renography was performed on POD 5. On POD 7 arteriography, pyelography, computed tomography of the abdomen, and necropsy was performed. Results Four of seven animals completed therapy and all evaluations. Three animals died, 1 from surgical complications, and 2 due to an anaphylactoid reaction to the cremophor solvent in the compound. All kidneys in the surviving animals functioned on nuclear renography. Renal function remained unchanged. No lesions or urine leaks were visible on imaging. On necropsy lesion sizes ranged from 5×4×3mm to 7×7×14mm, depending on drug/light dose. Histology showed a distinct demarcation between the treated zone and surrounding parenchyma at the higher doses. The lesions were well-demarcated, with necrotic tubules, glomerular fibrinoid necrosis, thrombosis of capillary loops, interstitial hemorrhage, and lymphocytic infiltrates. Conclusions Significant tissue effect with some necrosis was seen at these low drug/light combinations. This study provides the initial proof of principle that justifies further preclinical investigation of VTP for treatment of renal tumors. A newer water-based formulation should reduce the incidence of reactions in swine. This newer formulation will allow for further safe investigation of this novel treatment paradigm. PMID:18499165

  8. Associations between Thyroid Hormones, Calcification Inhibitor Levels and Vascular Calcification in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meuwese, Christiaan Lucas; Olauson, Hannes; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Ripsweden, Jonaz; Barany, Peter; Vermeer, Cees; Drummen, Nadja; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vascular calcification is a common, serious and elusive complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As a pro-calcifying risk factor, non-thyroidal illness may promote vascular calcification through a systemic lowering of vascular calcification inhibitors such as matrix-gla protein (MGP) and Klotho. Methods and Material In 97 ESRD patients eligible for living donor kidney transplantation, blood levels of thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4 and TSH), total uncarboxylated MGP (t-ucMGP), desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP), descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA-II), and soluble Klotho (sKlotho) were measured. The degree of coronary calcification and arterial stiffness were assessed by means of cardiac CT-scans and applanation tonometry, respectively. Results fT3 levels were inversely associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores and measures of arterial stiffness, and positively with dp-ucMGP and sKlotho concentrations. Subfractions of MGP, PIVKA-II and sKlotho did not associate with CAC scores and arterial stiffness. fT4 and TSH levels were both inversely associated with CAC scores, but not with arterial stiffness. Discussion The positive associations between fT3 and dp-ucMGP and sKlotho suggest that synthesis of MGP and Klotho is influenced by thyroid hormones, and supports a link between non-thyroidal illness and alterations in calcification inhibitor levels. However, the absence of an association between serum calcification inhibitor levels and coronary calcification/arterial stiffness and the fact that MGP and Klotho undergo post-translational modifications underscore the complexity of this association. Further studies, measuring total levels of MGP and membrane bound Klotho, should examine this proposed pathway in further detail. PMID:26147960

  9. Vascular disruption in combination with mTOR inhibition in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Leigh; Shah, Preeti; Hammers, Hans; Lehet, Kristin; Sotomayor, Paula; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Seshadri, Mukund; Pili, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an angiogenesis-dependent and hypoxia-driven malignancy. As a result, there has been an increased interest in the use of antiangiogenic agents for the management of RCC in patients. However, the activity of tumor-vascular disrupting agents (tumor-VDA) has not been extensively examined against RCC. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the tumor-VDA ASA404 (DMXAA, 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid, or vadimezan) in combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus (RAD001) against RCC. In vitro studies were carried out using human umbilical vein endothelial cells and in vivo studies using orthotopic RENCA tumors and immunohistochemical patient tumor-derived RCC xenografts. MRI was used to characterize the vascular response of orthotopic RENCA xenografts to combination treatment. Therapeutic efficacy was determined by tumor growth measurements and histopathologic evaluation. ASA404/everolimus combination resulted in enhanced inhibition of endothelial cell sprouting in the 3-dimensional spheroid assay. MRI of orthotopic RENCA xenografts revealed an early increase in permeability 4 hours posttreatment with ASA404, but not with everolimus. Twenty-four hours after treatment, a significant reduction in blood volume was observed with combination treatment. Correlative CD31/NG2 staining of tumor sections confirmed marked vascular damage following combination therapy. Histologic sections showed extensive necrosis and a reduction in the viable rim following combination treatment compared with VDA treatment alone. These results show the potential of combining tumor-VDAs with mTOR inhibitors in RCC. Further investigation into this novel combination strategy is warranted. PMID:22084164

  10. Vascular Disruption in Combination with mTOR Inhibition in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Leigh; Shah, Preeti; Hammers, Hans; Lehet, Kristin; Sotomayor, Paula; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Seshadri, Mukund; Pili, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an angiogenesis-dependent and hypoxia-driven malignancy. As a result, there has been an increased interest in the use of antiangiogenic agents for the management of RCC in patients. However, the activity of tumor-vascular disrupting agents (tumor-VDA) has not been extensively examined against RCC. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the tumor-VDA ASA404 (DMXAA, 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid, or vadimezan) in combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus (RAD001) against RCC. In vitro studies were carried out using human umbilical vein endothelial cells and in vivo studies using orthotopic RENCA tumors and immunohistochemical patient tumor-derived RCC xenografts. MRI was used to characterize the vascular response of orthotopic RENCA xenografts to combination treatment. Therapeutic efficacy was determined by tumor growth measurements and histopathologic evaluation. ASA404/everolimus combination resulted in enhanced inhibition of endothelial cell sprouting in the 3-dimensional spheroid assay. MRI of orthotopic RENCA xenografts revealed an early increase in permeability 4 hours posttreatment with ASA404, but not with everolimus. Twenty-four hours after treatment, a significant reduction in blood volume was observed with combination treatment. Correlative CD31/NG2 staining of tumor sections confirmed marked vascular damage following combination therapy. Histologic sections showed extensive necrosis and a reduction in the viable rim following combination treatment compared with VDA treatment alone. These results show the potential of combining tumor-VDAs with mTOR inhibitors in RCC. Further investigation into this novel combination strategy is warranted. PMID:22084164

  11. Systematic Review of the Risk of Adverse Outcomes Associated with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitors for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Labib Imran; Lin, Meng; Battistella, Marisa; Wiebe, Natasha; Reiman, Tony; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Thomas, Chandra; Tonelli, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenic therapy targeted at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is now used to treat several types of cancer. We did a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to summarize the adverse effects of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (VEGFi), focusing on those with vascular pathogenesis. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library until April 19, 2012 to identify parallel RCTs comparing a VEGFi with a control among adults with any cancer. We pooled the risk of mortality, vascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and thromboembolism), hypertension and new proteinuria using random-effects models and calculated unadjusted relative risk (RR). We also did meta-regression and assessed publication bias. We retrieved 83 comparisons from 72 studies (n = 38,078) on 11 different VEGFi from 7901 identified citations. The risk of mortality was significantly lower among VEGFi recipients than controls (pooled RR 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94 to 0.98, I2 = 0%, tau2 = 0; risk difference 2%). Compared to controls, VEGFi recipients had significantly higher risk of myocardial infarction (MI) (RR 3.54, 95% CI 1.61 to 7.80, I2 = 0%, tau2 = 0), arterial thrombotic events (RR 1.80, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.59, I2 = 0%, tau2 = 0); hypertension (RR 3.46, 95% CI 2.89 to 4.15, I2 = 58%, tau2 = 0.16), and new proteinuria (RR 2.51, 95% CI 1.60 to 3.94, I2 = 87%, tau2 = 0.65). The absolute risk difference was 0.8% for MI, 1% for arterial thrombotic events, 15% for hypertension and 12% for new proteinuria. Meta-regression did not suggest any statistically significant modifiers of the association between VEGFi treatment and any of the vascular events. Limitations include heterogeneity across the trials. Conclusions VEGFi increases the risk of MI, hypertension, arterial thromboembolism and proteinuria. The absolute magnitude of the excess risk appears

  12. Adverse effects of stromal vascular fraction during regenerative treatment of the intervertebral disc: observations in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Detiger, Suzanne E L; Helder, Marco N; Smit, Theodoor H; Hoogendoorn, Roel J W

    2015-09-01

    Stromal vascular fraction (SVF), an adipose tissue-derived heterogeneous cell mixture containing, among others, multipotent adipose stromal cells (ASCs) and erythrocytes, has proved beneficial for a wide range of applications in regenerative medicine. We sought to establish intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration by injecting SVF intradiscally during a one-step surgical procedure in an enzymatically (Chondroitinase ABC; cABC) induced goat model of disc degeneration. Unexpectedly, we observed a severe inflammatory response that has not been described before, including massive lymphocyte infiltration, neovascularisation and endplate destruction. A second study investigated two main suspects for these adverse effects: cABC and erythrocytes within SVF. The same destructive response was observed in healthy goat discs injected with SVF, thereby eliminating cABC as a cause. Density gradient removal of erythrocytes and ASCs purified by culturing did not lead to adverse effects. Following these observations, we incorporated an extra washing step in the SVF harvesting protocol. In a third study, we applied this protocol in a one-step procedure to a goat herniation model, in which no adverse responses were observed either. However, upon intradiscal injection of an identically processed SVF mixture into our goat IVD degeneration model during a fourth study, the adverse effects surprisingly occurred again. Despite our quest for the responsible agent, we eventually could not identify the mechanism through which the observed destructive responses occurred. Although we cannot exclude that the adverse effects are species-dependent or model-specific, we advertise caution with the clinical application of autologous SVF injections into the IVD until the responsible agent(s) are identified. PMID:25682272

  13. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in animal models of vascular, cardiac, metabolic and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Michel, Martin C; Brunner, Hans R; Foster, Carolyn; Huo, Yong

    2016-08-01

    We have reviewed the effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (ARBs) in various animal models of hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiac function, hypertrophy and fibrosis, glucose and lipid metabolism, and renal function and morphology. Those of azilsartan and telmisartan have been included comprehensively whereas those of other ARBs have been included systematically but without intention of completeness. ARBs as a class lower blood pressure in established hypertension and prevent hypertension development in all applicable animal models except those with a markedly suppressed renin-angiotensin system; blood pressure lowering even persists for a considerable time after discontinuation of treatment. This translates into a reduced mortality, particularly in models exhibiting marked hypertension. The retrieved data on vascular, cardiac and renal function and morphology as well as on glucose and lipid metabolism are discussed to address three main questions: 1. Can ARB effects on blood vessels, heart, kidney and metabolic function be explained by blood pressure lowering alone or are they additionally directly related to blockade of the renin-angiotensin system? 2. Are they shared by other inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system, e.g. angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors? 3. Are some effects specific for one or more compounds within the ARB class? Taken together these data profile ARBs as a drug class with unique properties that have beneficial effects far beyond those on blood pressure reduction and, in some cases distinct from those of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The clinical relevance of angiotensin receptor-independent effects of some ARBs remains to be determined. PMID:27130806

  14. Simultaneous Characterization of Metabolic, Cardiac, Vascular and Renal Phenotypes of Lean and Obese SHHF Rats

    PubMed Central

    Youcef, Gina; Olivier, Arnaud; L'Huillier, Clément P. J.; Labat, Carlos; Fay, Renaud; Tabcheh, Lina; Toupance, Simon; Rodriguez-Guéant, Rosa-Maria; Bergerot, Damien; Jaisser, Frédéric; Lacolley, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Laurent Vallar; Pizard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) are prone to develop heart failure (HF). However, the deleterious effects of MetS on the continuum of events leading to cardiac remodeling and subsequently to HF are not fully understood. This study characterized simultaneously MetS and cardiac, vascular and renal phenotypes in aging Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure lean (SHHF+/? regrouping +/+ and +/cp rats) and obese (SHHFcp/cp, “cp” defective mutant allele of the leptin receptor gene) rats. We aimed to refine the milestones and their onset during the progression from MetS to HF in this experimental model. We found that SHHFcp/cp but not SHHF+/? rats developed dyslipidemia, as early as 1.5 months of age. This early alteration in the lipidic profile was detectable concomitantly to impaired renal function (polyuria, proteinuria but no glycosuria) and reduced carotid distensibility as compared to SHHF+/? rats. By 3 months of age SHHFcp/cp animals developed severe obesity associated with dislipidemia and hypertension defining the onset of MetS. From 6 months of age, SHHF+/? rats developed concentric left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) while SHHFcp/cp rats developed eccentric LVH apparent from progressive dilation of the LV dimensions. By 14 months of age only SHHFcp/cp rats showed significantly higher central systolic blood pressure and a reduced ejection fraction resulting in systolic dysfunction as compared to SHHF+/?. In summary, the metabolic and hemodynamic mechanisms participating in the faster decline of cardiac functions in SHHFcp/cp rats are established long before their physiological consequences are detectable. Our results suggest that the molecular mechanisms triggered within the first three months after birth of SHHFcp/cp rats should be targeted preferentially by therapeutic interventions in order to mitigate the later HF development. PMID:24831821

  15. Vascular Endothelium as a Target of Immune Response in Renal Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Piotti, Giovanni; Palmisano, Alessandra; Maggiore, Umberto; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This review of clinical and experimental studies aims at analyzing the interplay between graft endothelium and host immune system in renal transplantation, and how it affects the survival of the graft. Graft endothelium is indeed the first barrier between self and non-self that is encountered by host lymphocytes upon reperfusion of vascularized solid transplants. Endothelial cells (EC) express all the major sets of antigens (Ag) that elicit host immune response, and therefore represent a preferential target in organ rejection. Some of the Ag expressed by EC are target of the antibody-mediated response, such as the AB0 blood group system, the human leukocyte antigens (HLA), and MHC class I related chain A antigens (MICA) systems, and the endothelial cell-restricted Ag; for each of these systems, the mechanisms of interaction and damage of both preformed and de novo donor-specific antibodies are reviewed along with their impact on renal graft survival. Moreover, the rejection process can force injured EC to expose cryptic self-Ag, toward which an autoimmune response mounts, overlapping to the allo-immune response in the damaging of the graft. Not only are EC a passive target of the host immune response but also an active player in lymphocyte activation; therefore, their interaction with allogenic T-cells is analyzed on the basis of experimental in vitro and in vivo studies, according to the patterns of expression of the HLA class I and II and the co-stimulatory molecules specific for cytotoxic and helper T-cells. Finally, as the response that follows transplantation has proven to be not necessarily destructive, the factors that foster graft endothelium functioning in spite of rejection, and how they could be therapeutically harnessed to promote long-term graft acceptance, are described: accommodation that is resistance of EC to donor-specific antibodies, and endothelial cell ability to induce Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells, that are crucial mediators of tolerance. PMID

  16. Fetuin-A and vascular calcification in Indian end-stage renal disease population

    PubMed Central

    Mann, A.; Makkar, V.; Mann, S.; Dhamija, P.; Soundarajan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Fetuin-A levels, its correlation with vascular calcification and other biochemical markers of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) has not been studied in Indian end-stage renal disease population. Forty patients on dialysis for more than 3 months were studied. Biochemical parameters of CKD-MBD, highly sensitive-C reactive protein (hs-CRP), lipid profile and fetuin-A levels were estimated. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) at the level of L1–L4 was done, and calcification score calculated using AJ 130 smart score. Levels of fetuin-A were correlated with calcification score and biochemical markers of CKD–MBD. Mean fetuin-A levels were 0.33 ± 0.098 g/l. Positive correlation of abdominal aortic calcification scores was found with age (P < 0.01) and duration of dialysis (P = 0.018). No correlation was detected between MSCT score, calcium phosphate product, intact parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, triglycerides and fetuin-A, and there was no correlation between fetuin-A levels, age, dialysis duration and calcium phosphate product but a significant correlations with vitamin D3 (P = 0.034), serum albumin (P = 0.002) was detected. Inverse correlation with hs-CRP was obtained. Patients with ischemic heart disease had numerically lower levels of fetuin-A (P = 0.427) and numerically higher MSCT score (P = 0.135). Patients with low hs-CRP (<10) had numerically higher fetuin-A levels (P = 0.090) and significantly low MSCT scores (P = 0.020). Calcium deposition seen on MSCT increases with age and duration of dialysis but is not related to fetuin-A levels. Inconclusive relationship exists with other parameters of CKD-MBD. Large controlled studies are needed to establish the role of fetuin-A in vascular calcification in Indian population. PMID:26937076

  17. The Synthetic Tie2 Agonist Peptide Vasculotide Protects Renal Vascular Barrier Function In Experimental Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rübig, Eva; Stypmann, Jörg; Van Slyke, Paul; Dumont, Daniel J; Spieker, Tilmann; Buscher, Konrad; Reuter, Stefan; Goerge, Tobias; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kümpers, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular barrier dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI). Angiopoietin-1, the natural agonist ligand for the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor, is a non-redundant endothelial survival and vascular stabilization factor. Here we evaluate the efficacy of a polyethylene glycol-clustered Tie2 agonist peptide, vasculotide (VT), to protect against endothelial-cell activation with subsequent microvascular dysfunction in a murine model of ischemic AKI. Renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) was induced by clamping of the renal arteries for 35 minutes. Mice were treated with VT or PEGylated cysteine before IRI. Sham-operated animals served as time-matched controls. Treatment with VT significantly reduced transcapillary albumin flux and renal tissue edema after IRI. The protective effects of VT were associated with activation of Tie2 and stabilization of its downstream effector, VE-cadherin in renal vasculature. VT abolished the decline in renal tissue blood flow, attenuated the increase of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen after IRI, improved recovery of renal function and markedly reduced mortality compared to PEG [HR 0.14 (95% CI 0.05–0.78) P < 0.05]. VT is inexpensive to produce, chemically stable and unrelated to any Tie2 ligands. Thus, VT may represent a novel therapy to prevent AKI in patients. PMID:26911791

  18. High-Flow Renal Arteriovenous Fistula Treated with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug: Implementation of an Arterial and Venous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N. Ptohis, Nikolaos; Grammenou-Pomoni, Maria; Panagiotou, Irini; Kelekis, Dimitrios; Gouliamos, Athanasios Kelekis, Nikolaos

    2009-05-15

    We present a 28-year-old man with a large symptomatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) treated with embolization using the Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP). Although embolization may be considered the first-line therapy in the treatment of AVFs, there is an inherent high risk of migration of the embolic agents into the venous and pulmonary circulations. This case is illustrative of the ease and safety of using this device in high-flow renal AVFs.

  19. Renal Artery Stump to Inferior Vena Cava Fistula: Unusual Clinical Presentation and Transcatheter Embolization with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Manish; Lath, Narayan Soo, Tan Bien; Hiong, Tay Kiang; Htoo, Maung Myint; Richard, Lo; Fui, Alexander Chung Yaw

    2008-07-15

    Fistulous communication between the renal artery stump and inferior vena cava following nephrectomy is rare. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a fistula detected on investigation for hemolytic anemia in the postoperative period. The patient had had a nephrectomy performed 2 weeks prior to presentation for blunt abdominal trauma. The fistula was successfully occluded percutaneously using an Amplatzer vascular plug. The patient recovered completely and was discharged 2 weeks later.

  20. Specific membrane receptors for atrial natriuretic factor in renal and vascular tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Napier, M A; Vandlen, R L; Albers-Schönberg, G; Nutt, R F; Brady, S; Lyle, T; Winquist, R; Faison, E P; Heinel, L A; Blaine, E H

    1984-01-01

    Membranes from rabbit aorta and from rabbit and rat kidney cortex possess high-affinity (Kd = 10(-10) M) specific binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Similar high-affinity sites are present in an established cell line from pig kidney, LLC-PK1. Results of fractionation studies indicate that the receptors are localized in the plasma membrane of these tissues. The binding is time-dependent and saturable. An excellent quantitative correlation was found between the affinity of synthetic ANF and analogs of intermediate activity to aorta membranes and the half-maximal concentration needed for relaxation of rabbit aorta rings contracted by addition of serotonin. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the receptor in kidney membranes is consistent with the concentration required for in vivo natriuresis in the rat. Biologically inactive synthetic ANF fragments and other peptide hormones such as angiotensin II and vasopressin do not significantly inhibit binding. These data suggest that the receptors for ANF in vascular and renal tissues are responsible for mediating the physiological actions of this peptide in these target tissues. PMID:6091122

  1. Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as a potential predictor of adverse renal outcomes in immunoglobulin A nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga-Young; Yu, Chung-Hoon; Kim, Jun-Seop; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Kwon, Owen; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Jang-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a well-known biomarker of acute kidney injury. We evaluated the value of plasma NGAL (pNGAL) as an independent predictor of prognosis in immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Methods In total, 91 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN at a single center were evaluated. pNGAL was measured using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (R&D Systems). Adverse renal outcome was defined as chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 or above at the last follow-up. Pearson correlation coefficient and Cox regression were used for analyses. Results The mean age of all patients (male:female, 48:43) was 35 years (range, 18 to 77). pNGAL ranged between 21.68 and 446.40 ng/mL (median, 123.97) and showed a correlation with age (r = 0.332, p = 0.001), creatinine (r = 0.336, p = 0.001), estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = -0.397, p < 0.001), uric acid (r = 0.289, p = 0.006), and the protein-to-creatinine ratio (r = 0.288, p = 0.006). During a mean follow-up period of 37.6 months, 11 patients (12.1%) had CKD stage 3 or above. In a multivariate Cox regression model, hypertension (hazard ratio [HR], 8.779; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.526 to 50.496; p = 0.015), proteinuria > 1 g/day (HR, 5.184; 95% CI, 1.124 to 23.921; p = 0.035), and pNGAL (HR, 1.012; 95% CI, 1.003 to 1.022; p = 0.013) were independent predictors associated with adverse renal outcome. Conclusions pNGAL showed strong correlations with other clinical prognostic factors and was also an independent predictor of adverse renal outcome. We suggest pNGAL as a potential predictor for prognosis in IgAN, while further studies are needed to confirm the clinical value. PMID:25995665

  2. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  3. Adverse vascular effects of homocysteine are modulated by endothelium-derived relaxing factor and related oxides of nitrogen.

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, J S; Osborne, J A; Jaraki, O; Rabbani, L E; Mullins, M; Singel, D; Loscalzo, J

    1993-01-01

    Elevated levels of homocysteine are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The reactivity of the sulfhydryl group of homocysteine has been implicated in molecular mechanisms underlying this increased risk. There is also increasingly compelling evidence that thiols react in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) to form S-nitrosothiols, compounds with potent vasodilatory and antiplatelet effects. We, therefore, hypothesized that S-nitrosation of homocysteine would confer these beneficial bioactivities to the thiol, and at the same time attenuate its pathogenicity. We found that prolonged (> 3 h) exposure of endothelial cells to homocysteine results in impaired EDRF responses. By contrast, brief (15 min) exposure of endothelial cells, stimulated to secrete EDRF, to homocysteine results in the formation of S-NO-homocysteine, a potent antiplatelet agent and vasodilator. In contrast to homocysteine, S-NO-homocysteine does not support H2O2 generation and does not undergo conversion to homocysteine thiolactone, reaction products believed to contribute to endothelial toxicity. These results suggest that the normal endothelium modulates the potential, adverse effects of homocysteine by releasing EDRF and forming the adduct S-NO-homocysteine. The adverse vascular properties of homocysteine may result from an inability to sustain S-NO formation owing to a progressive imbalance between the production of NO by progressively dysfunctional endothelial cells and the levels of homocysteine. PMID:8380812

  4. The Relationship Between the Adverse Events and Efficacy of Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Fuli; Wu, Guojun; Zhang, Longlong; Wang, Yangmin; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Li, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Lu, Xitao; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the adverse events and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), with a purpose to guide the judgment of efficacy in sorafenib treatment. Eighty-three mRCC patients who received sorafenib therapy at northwest China were studied retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) with adverse event types and grades. Among 83 patients who underwent sorafenib therapy, 2 cases (2.4%) had completed response (CR), 14 cases (16.9%) had partial response (PR), 57 cases (68.7%) had stable disease (SD), and 10 cases (12.0%) developed progressive disease (PD). The median PFS and OS were 15.0 and 29.0 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 1 or 2 adverse events included hand-foot syndrome (68.7%), diarrhea (54.2%), and alopecia (51.8%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (6.0%), hypertension (4.8%), and diarrhea (3.6%). The frequency and severity of adverse events correlated with tumor response rate (both with P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed the independent predictors of better PFS included rash (OR 0.307, 95%CI 0.148–0.636, P = 0.001) and diarrhea (OR 0.391, 95%CI 0.169–0.783, P = 0.008). Elevated transaminase was the independent predictor of poor PFS (OR 2.606, 95%CI 1.299–5.532, P = 0.012). For OS, rash (OR 0.473, 95%CI 0.253–0.886, P = 0.019) and diarrhea (OR 0.321, 95%CI 0.171–0.605, P = 0.000) correlated with better OS. Sorafenib-related adverse events are associated with efficacy in patients with mRCC from northwest China. Rash and diarrhea are independent protective factors of both PFS and OS, and elevated transaminase is an independent risk factor of PFS. A large prospective study is warranted. PMID:26656362

  5. Smooth muscle calcium and endothelium-derived relaxing factor in the abnormal vascular responses of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Conger, J D; Robinette, J B; Schrier, R W

    1988-01-01

    Abnormal renovascular reactivity, characterized by paradoxical vasoconstriction to a reduction in renal perfusion pressure (RPP) in the autoregulatory range, increased sensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS), and loss of vasodilatation to acetylcholine have all been demonstrated in ischemic acute renal failure (ARF). To determine if ischemic injury alters vascular contractility by increasing smooth muscle cell calcium or calcium influx, the renal blood flow (RBF) response to reductions in RPP within the autoregulatory range and to RNS were tested before and after a 90-min intrarenal infusion of verapamil or diltiazem in 7-d ischemic ARF rats. Both calcium entry blockers, verapamil and diltiazem, blocked the aberrant vasoconstrictor response to a reduction in RPP and RNS (both P less than 0.001). In a second series of experiments the potential role of an ischemia-induced endothelial injury and of the absence of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) production were examined to explain the lack of vasodilatation to acetylcholine. Acetylcholine, bradykinin (a second EDRF-dependent vasodilator), or prostacyclin, an EDRF-independent vasodilator, was infused intrarenally for 90 min, and RBF responses to a reduction in RPP and RNS were tested in 7-d ischemic ARF rats. Neither acetylcholine nor bradykinin caused vasodilatation or altered the slope of the relationship between RBF and RPP. By contrast, prostacyclin increased RBF (P less than 0.001), but did not change the vascular response to changes in RPP. It was concluded that the abnormal pressor sensitivity to a reduction in RPP and RNS was due to changes in renovascular smooth muscle cell calcium activity that could be blocked by calcium entry blockers. A lack of response to EDRF-dependent vasodilators, as a result of ischemic endothelial injury, may contribute to the increased pressor sensitivity of the renal vessels. PMID:3261301

  6. Upregulation of renal and vascular nitric oxide synthase in young spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, N D; Ni, Z; Oveisi, F

    1998-06-01

    The available data on the role of the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the genesis of hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are limited and contradictory. In an attempt to address this issue, male SHR were studied during the early phase of evolution of hypertension (age 8 to 12 weeks) to distinguish the primary changes of NO metabolism from those caused by advanced hypertension, vasculopathy, and aging late in the course of the disease. A group of age-matched male Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) served as controls. The SHR exhibited a marked rise in arterial blood pressure and a significant increase in urinary excretion and plasma concentration of NO metabolites (nitrite/nitrate [NOx]). Likewise, the SHR showed a significant elevation of thoracic aorta NO synthase (NOS) activity coupled with significant increases of kidney, aorta, inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS) proteins. In an attempt to determine whether the enhanced L-arginine/NO pathway is a consequence of hypertension, studies were repeated using 3-week-old animals before the onset of hypertension. The study revealed significant increases in urinary NOx excretion as well as vascular eNOS and renal iNOS proteins. In conclusion, the L-arginine/NO pathway is upregulated in young SHR both before and after the onset of hypertension. Thus, development of hypertension is not due to a primary impairment of NO production in SHR. On the contrary, NO production is increased in young SHR both before and after the onset of hypertension. PMID:9622137

  7. Predictive role of vascular endothelial growth factor polymorphisms in the survival of renal cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y-Q; Chen, J

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a study to investigate the possible role of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms -2578C/A, -1154G/A and -634C/G and clinical factors in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) prognosis in a cohort of 336 RCC cases. A total of 336 patients with RCC were recruited from PLA General Hospital between January 2004 and December 2005. All patients were followed up until December 2010, and no patient was lost to follow-up. The follow-up time of this study was 60 months. At the time of analysis, a total of 210 died during the follow-up. The median overall survival for patients was 29.1 months (95%CI = 17.1 to 41.3 months), and the 5-year survival rate for the patients was 37.5%. Our study showed that Karnofsky performance status ≥60 could delay death from RCC, with HR (95%CI) of 0.57 (0.39-0.84). Patients with anemia, platelet count >400 x 10(9)/L, neutrophilia and lymphocytes >160 g/L had increased risk of death from RCC, with HR (95%CI) of 1.84 (1.18-2.96), 2.01 (1.27-3.25), 1.65 (1.03-2.56) and 1.49 (0.99-2.71), respectively. The VEGF -2578AA and -1154AA genotypes were significantly associated with a poor overall survival of RCC patients, with HR (95%CI) of 2.41 (1.32-5.13) and 3.77 (1.42-15.67), respectively. In conclusion, our study presented the factors regarding the prognosis of RCC patients, and high platelet and neutrophil counts, low lymphocytes, and VEGF -2578C/A and -1154G/A polymorphisms were shown to be independent factors for a lower prognosis of RCC patients. PMID:25062489

  8. Development of cytotoxic antibodies following renal allograft transplantation is associated with reduced graft survival due to chronic vascular rejection.

    PubMed

    Davenport, A; Younie, M E; Parsons, J E; Klouda, P T

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively followed 64 patients who had had no cytotoxic antibodies prior to first cadaveric renal allograft transplantation for post-transplant antibodies. During a mean follow-up period of 62 months (range 45-92) cytotoxic antibodies developed in 36 patients (56%). Sixteen grafts were lost due to chronic vascular rejection in the group of patients who developed antibodies compared to two in those who remained antibody negative, P < 0.01. Renal function was worse in the antibody-positive group, median serum creatinine 215 mumol/l (131-256) (interquartile range) versus 111 mumol/l (98-127) in the antibody-negative group, P = 0.002, and creatinine clearance 39 ml/min (25-55) versus 90 ml/min (55-104), P < 0.001. There were no significant differences in immunosuppressive protocol, HLA-mismatching, blood transfusion history, the number of acute rejection episodes, mean arterial blood pressure, or proteinuria between the groups. The presence of cytotoxic antibodies predated the classical manifestations of chronic vascular rejection. This suggests that humoral mechanisms may play a role in the development of chronic vascular rejection. PMID:7816298

  9. Vascular Type 1A Angiotensin II Receptors Control BP by Regulating Renal Blood Flow and Urinary Sodium Excretion.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Matthew A; Stegbauer, Johannes; Chen, Daian; Gomez, Jose A; Griffiths, Robert C; Azad, Hooman A; Herrera, Marcela; Gurley, Susan B; Coffman, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Inappropriate activation of the type 1A angiotensin (AT1A) receptor contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and its associated complications. To define the role for actions of vascular AT1A receptors in BP regulation and hypertension pathogenesis, we generated mice with cell-specific deletion of AT1A receptors in smooth muscle cells (SMKO mice) using Loxp technology and Cre transgenes with robust expression in both conductance and resistance arteries. We found that elimination of AT1A receptors from vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) caused a modest (approximately 7 mmHg) yet significant reduction in baseline BP and exaggerated sodium sensitivity in mice. Additionally, the severity of angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension was dramatically attenuated in SMKO mice, and this protection against hypertension was associated with enhanced urinary excretion of sodium. Despite the lower BP, acute vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II in the systemic vasculature were largely preserved (approximately 80% of control levels) in SMKO mice because of exaggerated activity of the sympathetic nervous system rather than residual actions of AT1B receptors. In contrast, Ang II-dependent responses in the renal circulation were almost completely eliminated in SMKO mice (approximately 5%-10% of control levels). These findings suggest that direct actions of AT1A receptors in VSMCs are essential for regulation of renal blood flow by Ang II and highlight the capacity of Ang II-dependent vascular responses in the kidney to effect natriuresis and BP control. PMID:25855778

  10. Effects of dopamine in the renal vascular bed of fetal, newborn, and adult sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.T.; Felder, R.A.; Jose, P.A.; Robillard, J.E.

    1987-03-01

    The renal hemodynamic response to renal arterial dopamine infusions was compared in unanesthetized fetal, newborn, and adult sheep. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate remained unchanged during intrarenal dopamine infusions. Dopamine produced dose-related decreases in mean renal blood flow velocity in all three groups. When compared with adult sheep fetal sheep were slightly more sensitive to the vasoconstrictive effects of dopamine ED/sub 50/. Increases in mean renal blood flow velocity were not seen at any dose given until dopamine was infused during ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-adrenoceptor blockade. The largest mean increase in renal flow velocity was 13 +/- 3, 16 +/- 3, and 17 +/- 4% in fetal, newborn, and adult sheep, respectively. cis-Flupentixol inhibited the vasodilation. Renal blood flow was measured using the radioactive microspheres techniques. This study demonstrates the presence of renal vasodilation following renal arterial dopamine infusions in fetal, newborn, and adult sheep when renal ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-adrenoceptors are blocked. Vasodilator responses are similar in all three groups, and increases in renal blood flow velocity are small compared with that of other experimental models.

  11. Adverse Renal and Metabolic Effects Associated with Oral Sodium Phosphate Bowel Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Heher, Eliot C.; Thier, Samuel O.; Rennke, Helmut; Humphreys, Benjamin D.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer can be prevented by the removal of adenomatous polyps during screening colonoscopy, but adequate bowel preparation is required. Oral sodium phosphate (OSP), an effective bowel purgative, is available over the counter and requires a substantially lower volume than polyethylene glycol-based preparative agents. Accumulating reports implicate OSP in electrolyte disturbances as well as acute kidney injury (AKI) in a syndrome termed phosphate nephropathy (a form of nephrocalcinosis). Despite published case reports and case series, the actual incidence, risk factors, and natural history of phosphate nephropathy remain largely undefined. Several recent observational studies have provided new information on these important issues while supporting a link between OSP and acute phosphate nephropathy as well as the development of chronic kidney disease in elderly patients, many of whom had a normal serum creatinine at the time of OSP ingestion. This review summarizes current knowledge about the renal complications of OSP, risk factors for its development, and the pathophysiology of acute and chronic kidney damage in nephrocalcinosis. PMID:18596115

  12. Heart rate variables in the Vascular Quality Initiative are not reliable predictors of adverse cardiac outcomes or mortality after major elective vascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Scali, Salvatore; Bertges, Daniel; Neal, Daniel; Patel, Virendra; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Cronenwett, Jack; Beck, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Heart rate (HR) parameters are known indicators of cardiovascular complications after cardiac surgery, but there is little evidence of their role in predicting outcome after major vascular surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arrival HR (AHR) and highest intraoperative HR are associated with mortality or major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) after elective vascular surgery in the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI). Methods Patients undergoing elective lower extremity bypass (LEB), aortofemoral bypass (AFB), and open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the VQI were analyzed. MACE was defined as any postoperative myocardial infarction, dysrhythmia, or congestive heart failure. Controlled HR was defined as AHR <75 beats/min on operating room arrival. Delta HR (DHR) was defined as highest intraoperative HR – AHR Procedure-specific MACE models were derived for risk stratification, and generalized estimating equations were used to account for clustering of center effects. HR, beta-blocker exposure, cardiac risk, and their interactions were explored to determine association with MACE or 30-day mortality. A Bonferroni correction with P < .004 was used to declare significance. Results There were 13,291 patients reviewed (LEB, n = 8155 [62%]; AFB, n = 2629 [18%]; open AAA, n = 2629 [20%]). Rates of any preoperative beta-blocker exposure were as follows: LEB, 66.5% (n = 5412); AFB, 57% (n = 1342); and open AAA, 74.2% (n = 1949). AHR and DHR outcome association was variable across patients and procedures. AHR <75 beats/min was associated with increased postoperative myocardial infarction risk for LEB patients across all risk strata (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.9; P = .03), whereas AHR<75 beats/min was associated with decreased dysrhythmia risk (OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.28–0.63; P = .0001) and 30-day death (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.33–0.77; P = .001) in patients at moderate and high cardiac risk. These HR

  13. Mild fetal renal pelviectasis. Differentiation from hilar vascularity using color Doppler sonography.

    PubMed

    Betz, B W; Hertzberg, B S; Carroll, B A; Bowie, J D

    1991-05-01

    Ultrasound often detects a sonolucent region in the hilum of the fetal kidney. Although this sonolucency is usually assumed to represent mild dilatation of the fetal renal collecting system, in pediatric and adult kidneys blood vessel lumina can simulate pelviectasis. We used color Doppler ultrasound to differentiate the fetal renal collecting system from hilar blood vessels and to evaluate how often blood vessels account for the sonolucent region often demonstrated in the renal hilum during antenatal sonography. Twenty-nine kidneys in fetuses with sonolucent hilar regions greater than 2 mm in anteroposterior (AP) dimension were studied with color Doppler ultrasound. Doppler signal was demonstrated in blood vessels adjacent to, but not within, the sonolucent area in the hilum of all 29 kidneys. Based on the absence of color signal in the sonolucent hilar regions studied, with color signal seen in adjacent blood vessels, these regions were felt to represent mildly dilated collecting systems rather than renal vasculature. We conclude that color Doppler ultrasound can differentiate mild pelviectasis from hilar blood vessels in the fetal kidney. Sonolucent areas measuring 2 mm or greater in AP dimension are unlikely to be attributable to renal vasculature. PMID:2051542

  14. Advanced glycosylation endproducts block the antiproliferative effect of nitric oxide. Role in the vascular and renal complications of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hogan, M; Cerami, A; Bucala, R

    1992-09-01

    Advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate on long-lived tissue proteins such as basement membrane collagen and have been implicated in many of the long-term complications of diabetes mellitus. These products originate from glucose-derived Schiff base and Amadori products but undergo a series of complex rearrangement reactions to form ultimately protein-bound, fluorescent heterocycles. AGEs can react with and chemically inactivate nitric oxide (NO), a potent endothelial cell-derived vasodilator and antiproliferative factor. Since mesenchymal cell proliferation is an early and characteristic lesion of diabetic vasculopathy and glomerulopathy, we investigated the possibility that collagen-bound AGEs functionally inactivate the antiproliferative effect of NO. In model cell culture systems, AGEs were found to block the cytostatic effect of NO on aortic smooth muscle and renal mesangial cells. The inactivation of endothelial cell-derived NO by basement membrane AGEs may represent a common pathway in the development of the accelerated vascular and renal disease that accompany long-term diabetes mellitus. PMID:1522220

  15. Spectral imaging of microvascular function in a renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a vascular disrupting agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; deDeugd, Casey; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-02-01

    Tumors are highly metabolically active and thus require ample oxygen and nutrients to proliferate. Neovasculature generated by angiogenesis is required for tumors to grow beyond a size of about 1-2mm. Functional tumor vasculature also provides an access point for development of distant metastases. Due to the importance of the microvasculature for tumor growth, proliferation, and metastasis, the microvasculature has emerged as a therapeutic target for treatment of solid tumors. We employed spectral imaging in a rodent window chamber model to observe and measure the oxygen transport function of tumor microvasculature in a human renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a fast acting vascular disrupting agent. Human Caki-1 cells were grown in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber in athymic nude mice. Spectral imaging was used to measure hemoglobin saturation immediately before, immediately after and also at 2, 4, 6, 8, 24 and 48 hours after administration of the tubulin binding agent OXi4503. Up to 4 hours after treatment, tumor microvasculature was disrupted from the tumor core towards the periphery as seen in deoxygenation as well as structural changes of the vasculature. Reoxygenation and neovascularization commenced from the periphery towards the core from 6 - 48 hours after treatment. The timing of the effects of vascular disrupting agents can influence scheduling of repeat treatments and combinatorial treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Spectral imaging can potentially provide this information in certain laboratory models from endogenous signals with microvessel resolution.

  16. [Determinants of vascular wall stiffness in patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Kharlamova, U V; Il'icheva, O E

    2012-01-01

    Examination of 109 patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis revealed significant impairment of arterial wall distensibility (accordingly, decreased Peterson's and Young's elastic moduli, distensibility coefficient). The relative thickness of the common carotid artery and pulse wave velocity were significantly greater than in practically healthy subjects. Independent factors influencing arterial wall rigidity included age, arterial pressure, total cholesterol and homocystein, stable metabolites of nitric oxide, creatinine, calcium, phosphorus levels, calcium x phosphorus product, duration of hemodialysis, interdialytic weight gain. PMID:23516853

  17. High signal intensity in dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Schroeder, Christophe; Froehlich, Johannes M; Pasch, Andreas; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (primarily those with linear chelates) are associated with a dose-dependent signal hyperintensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MRI following administration to selected patients with normal renal function. The accumulation of gadolinium has also been reported in the skin, heart, liver, lung, and kidney of patients with impaired renal function suffering from nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Here we report on three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification (two with confirmed NSF) whose unenhanced T1-weighted MRIs showed conspicuous high signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus after they had been exposed to relatively low doses of linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (0.27, 0.45, and 0.68 mmol/kg). Signal ratios between dentate nucleus and pons and between globus pallidus and thalamus were comparable with previously reported measurements in subjects without renal impairment. Of note, all three analysed patients suffered from transient signs of neurological disorders of undetermined cause. In conclusion, the exposure to 0.27-0.68 mmol/kg of linear gadolinium-based contrast agent was associated with probable gadolinium accumulation in the brain of three patients suffering from impaired renal function and vascular calcification. © 2016 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26929131

  18. Therapeutic Strategies for Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Whom First-Line Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-Directed Therapies Fail.

    PubMed

    Malouf, Gabriel G; Flippot, Ronan; Khayat, David

    2016-05-01

    Metastases are present in one third of renal cell carcinomas at diagnosis. The overall survival duration in metastatic renal cell carcinoma is approximately 22 months, which underlines the need for more effective systemic treatments. Therapies on the basis of antiangiogenic agents and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin have been approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, but only benefits for progression-free survival were demonstrated in the second-line setting. Fortunately, promising treatments are emerging, from new antiangiogenic agents to immune checkpoint inhibitors. For the first time, both an immune checkpoint inhibitor (nivolumab) and a dual inhibitor of the tyrosine kinases c-Met and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (cabozantinib) have demonstrated improvements in overall survival in the second-line setting. Finding the best sequence for these novel agents will be crucial to improving outcomes in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This article comprises both a systematic review of the literature and recommendations for second-line therapeutic strategies for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma in whom inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor have failed. PMID:27170687

  19. Impact of renal function deterioration on adverse events during anticoagulation therapy using non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Koji; Aiba, Takeshi; Arihiro, Shoji; Watanabe, Makoto; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Ishibashi, Kohei; Hirose, Sayako; Wada, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Ikutaro; Okamura, Hideo; Noda, Takashi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Kamakura, Shiro; Shimizu, Wataru; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Kazunori; Kusano, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Renal function is crucial for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) using non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC). The incidence of renal function deterioration during anticoagulation therapy and its impact of adverse events are unknown. In 807 consecutive NVAF patients treated with NOAC and with estimated creatinine clearance (eCCr) ≥ 50 ml/min (mean age 68 ± 11 years, mean CHADS2 score = 1.8 ± 1.4, CHA2DS2-VASc score = 2.8 ± 1.8, HAS-BLED score = 1.7 ± 1.1), we analyzed the time course of renal function and clinical outcomes, and compared these with the data of general Japanese inhabitants from the Suita Study (n = 2140). Of the 807 patients, 751 (93 %) maintained eCCr ≥ 50 ml/min (group A) whereas the remaining 56 (7 %) fell into the eCCr < 50 ml/min (group B) during the 382 ± 288 days of follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that advanced age, lower body weight, and congestive heart failure were independent predictors for renal function deterioration in patients with eCCr ≥ 50 ml/min at baseline. Major and/or minor bleedings were more commonly observed in group B than in group A (21 vs. 8 %; P = 0.0004). The CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and HAS-BLED scores were also significant predictors of renal function deterioration (P < 0.0001). The incidences of renal function deterioration were 1.4, 3.4, 10.5 and 11.7 % in patients with CHADS2 score of 0, 1, 2 and ≥3, respectively. As to CHA2DS2-VASc score, renal function deterioration occurred in 0, 1.7, 9.8 and 15.0 % with a score of 0, 1-2, 3-4 and ≥5, respectively. In the Suita Study of the general population, on the other hand, 122 of 2140 participants with eCCr ≥ 50 ml/min at baseline (5.7 %) fell into the eCCr < 50 ml/min during about 2 years. The incidence of renal function deterioration increased with the CHADS2 score in the general population as well as in our patients. Renal function deterioration was

  20. Association of Angiopoietin-2 and Ki-67 Expression with Vascular Density and Sunitinib Response in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirtti, Tuomas; Ristimäki, Ari; Joensuu, Heikki; Bono, Petri; Saharinen, Pipsa

    2016-01-01

    The Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2, Angpt2) growth factor is a context-dependent antagonist/agonist ligand of the endothelial Tie2 receptor tyrosine kinase and known to promote tumour angiogenesis and metastasis. Angiopoietin antagonists have been tested in clinical cancer trials in combination with VEGF-based anti-angiogenic therapy, including sunitinib, which is widely used as a first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, little is known about Ang2 protein expression in human tumours and the correlation of tumour Ang2 expression with tumour vascularization, tumour cell proliferation and response to anti-angiogenic therapies. Here, we evaluated, using immunohistochemistry, the expression of Ang2, CD31 and the cell proliferation marker Ki-67 in the primary kidney cancer from 136 mRCC patients, who received first-line sunitinib after nephrectomy. Ang2 protein expression was restrained to RCC tumour vessels, and correlated with tumour vascularization and response to sunitinib. High pre-therapeutic Ang2 expression, and more strongly, combined high expression of both Ang2 and CD31, were associated with a high clinical benefit rate (CBR). Low cancer Ki-67 expression, but not Ang2 or CD31 expression, was associated with favourable progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) as compared to patients with high Ki-67 expression (PFS 6.5 vs. 10.6 months, P = 0.009; OS, 15.7 vs. 28.5 months, P = 0.015). In summary, in this study to investigate endothelial Ang2 in mRCC patients treated with first-line sunitinib, high cancer Ang2 expression was associated with the CBR, but not PFS or OS, whereas low Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with long PFS and OS. PMID:27100185

  1. Mesangial cell, glomerular and renal vascular responses to endothelin in the rat kidney. Elucidation of signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Badr, K F; Murray, J J; Breyer, M D; Takahashi, K; Inagami, T; Harris, R C

    1989-01-01

    this peptide in the control of mesangial cell function, glomerular filtration rate, and renal vascular tone. Images PMID:2536045

  2. The effect of altered sodium balance upon renal vascular reactivity to angiotensin II and norepinephrine in the dog. Mechanism of variation in angiotensin responses.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, J A; Cannon, P J

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism whereby the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II (AII) is influenced by sodium balance or disease is unclear. To explore this question, the renal vascular responses (RVR) to intrarenal injections of subpressor doses of AII and norepinephrine were studied in dogs with an electromagnetic flowmeter. Acute and chronic sodium depletion increased plasma renin activity (PRA) and blunted the RVR to AII, while acute sodium repletion and chronic sodium excess plus desoxycorticosterone acetate decreased PRA and enhanced the RVR to AII. The magnitude of the RVR to AII was inversely related to PRA. The RVR to norepinephrine was unaffected by sodium balance and was not related to PRA. Inhibition of the conversion of angiotensin I to AII by SQ 20,881 during sodium depletion lowered mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), increased renal blood flow (RBF), and enhanced the RVR to AII but not to norepinephrine. Administration of bradykinin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs also lowered the MABP and increased RBF but had no effect on the RVR to AII. SQ 20,881 had no effect on MABP, RBF, or the RVR to AII in the dogs with chronic sodium excess and desoxycorticosterone acetate. Administration of indomethacin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs lowered RBF but did not influence the RVR to AII. The results indicate that the RVR to AII is selectively influenced by sodium balance and that the magnitude of the response is inversely related to the availability of endogenous AII. The data did not suggest that the variations in the RVR to AII were because of direct effects of sodium on vascular contraction, changes in the number of vascular AII receptors, or the renal prostaglandins. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the vasoconstrictor effect of AII in the renal vasculature is primarily dependent upon the degree to which the AII vascular receptors are occupied by endogenous hormone. PMID:641142

  3. Identification of Risk Factors for Vascular Thrombosis May Reduce Early Renal Graft Loss: A Review of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Anna Krarup; Jorgensen, Troels Munch; Jespersen, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Renal graft survival has improved over the past years, mainly owing to better immunosuppression. Vascular thrombosis, though rare, therefore accounts for up to one third of early graft loss. We assess current literature on transplantation, identify thrombosis risk factors, and discuss means of avoiding thrombotic events and saving thrombosed grafts. The incidence of arterial thrombosis was reported to 0.2–7.5% and venous thrombosis 0.1–8.2%, with the highest incidence among children and infants, and the lowest in living donor reports. The most significant risk factors for developing thrombosis were donor-age below 6 or above 60 years, or recipient-age below 5-6 years, per- or postoperative hemodynamic instability, peritoneal dialysis, diabetic nephropathy, a history of thrombosis, deceased donor, or >24 hours cold ischemia. Multiple arteries were not a risk factor, and a right kidney graft was most often reported not to be. Given the thrombosed kidney graft is diagnosed in time, salvage is possible by urgent reoperation and thrombectomy. Despite meticulous attentions to reduce thrombotic risk factors, thrombosis cannot be entirely prevented and means to an early detection of this complication is desirable in order to save the kidneys through prompt reoperation. Microdialysis may be a new tool for this. PMID:22701162

  4. Ligand trap for the activin type IIA receptor protects against vascular disease and renal fibrosis in mice with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Agapova, Olga A; Fang, Yifu; Sugatani, Toshifumi; Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-06-01

    The causes of cardiovascular mortality associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are partly attributed to the CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The causes of the early CKD-MBD are not well known. Our discovery of Wnt (portmanteau of wingless and int) inhibitors, especially Dickkopf 1, produced during renal repair as participating in the pathogenesis of the vascular and skeletal components of the CKD-MBD implied that additional pathogenic factors are critical. In the search for such factors, we studied the effects of activin receptor type IIA (ActRIIA) signaling by using a ligand trap for the receptor, RAP-011 (a soluble extracellular domain of ActRIIA fused to a murine IgG-Fc fragment). In a mouse model of CKD that stimulated atherosclerotic calcification, RAP-011 significantly increased aortic ActRIIA signaling assessed by the levels of phosphorylated Smad2/3. Furthermore, RAP-011 treatment significantly reversed CKD-induced vascular smooth muscle dedifferentiation as assessed by smooth muscle 22α levels, osteoblastic transition, and neointimal plaque calcification. In the diseased kidneys, RAP-011 significantly stimulated αklotho levels and it inhibited ActRIIA signaling and decreased renal fibrosis and proteinuria. RAP-011 treatment significantly decreased both renal and circulating Dickkopf 1 levels, showing that Wnt activation was downstream of ActRIIA. Thus, ActRIIA signaling in CKD contributes to the CKD-MBD and renal fibrosis. ActRIIA signaling may be a potential therapeutic target in CKD. PMID:27165838

  5. The Relationship Between the Adverse Events and Efficacy of Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Study from Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Fuli; Wu, Guojun; Zhang, Longlong; Wang, Yangmin; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Li, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Lu, Xitao; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the adverse events and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), with a purpose to guide the judgment of efficacy in sorafenib treatment.Eighty-three mRCC patients who received sorafenib therapy at northwest China were studied retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) with adverse event types and grades.Among 83 patients who underwent sorafenib therapy, 2 cases (2.4%) had completed response (CR), 14 cases (16.9%) had partial response (PR), 57 cases (68.7%) had stable disease (SD), and 10 cases (12.0%) developed progressive disease (PD). The median PFS and OS were 15.0 and 29.0 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 1 or 2 adverse events included hand-foot syndrome (68.7%), diarrhea (54.2%), and alopecia (51.8%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (6.0%), hypertension (4.8%), and diarrhea (3.6%). The frequency and severity of adverse events correlated with tumor response rate (both with P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed the independent predictors of better PFS included rash (OR 0.307, 95%CI 0.148-0.636, P = 0.001) and diarrhea (OR 0.391, 95%CI 0.169-0.783, P = 0.008). Elevated transaminase was the independent predictor of poor PFS (OR 2.606, 95%CI 1.299-5.532, P = 0.012). For OS, rash (OR 0.473, 95%CI 0.253-0.886, P = 0.019) and diarrhea (OR 0.321, 95%CI 0.171-0.605, P = 0.000) correlated with better OS.Sorafenib-related adverse events are associated with efficacy in patients with mRCC from northwest China. Rash and diarrhea are independent protective factors of both PFS and OS, and elevated transaminase is an independent risk factor of PFS. A large prospective study is warranted. PMID:26656362

  6. Urinary Vitamin D Binding Protein and KIM-1 Are Potent New Biomarkers of Major Adverse Renal Events in Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Chaykovska, Lyubov; Heunisch, Fabian; von Einem, Gina; Alter, Markus L.; Hocher, Carl-Friedrich; Tsuprykov, Oleg; Dschietzig, Thomas; Kretschmer, Axel; Hocher, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin-D-binding protein (VDBP) is a low molecular weight protein that is filtered through the glomerulus as a 25-(OH) vitamin D 3/VDBP complex. In the normal kidney VDBP is reabsorbed and catabolized by proximal tubule epithelial cells reducing the urinary excretion to trace amounts. Acute tubular injury is expected to result in urinary VDBP loss. The purpose of our study was to explore the potential role of urinary VDBP as a biomarker of an acute renal damage. Method We included 314 patients with diabetes mellitus or mild renal impairment undergoing coronary angiography and collected blood and urine before and 24 hours after the CM application. Patients were followed for 90 days for the composite endpoint major adverse renal events (MARE: need for dialysis, doubling of serum creatinine after 90 days, unplanned emergency rehospitalization or death). Results Increased urine VDBP concentration 24 hours after contrast media exposure was predictive for dialysis need (no dialysis: 113.06 ± 299.61ng/ml, n = 303; need for dialysis: 613.07 ± 700.45 ng/ml, n = 11, Mean ± SD, p<0.001), death (no death during follow-up: 121.41 ± 324.45 ng/ml, n = 306; death during follow-up: 522.01 ± 521.86 ng/ml, n = 8; Mean ± SD, p<0.003) and MARE (no MARE: 112.08 ± 302.00ng/ml, n = 298; MARE: 506.16 ± 624.61 ng/ml, n = 16, Mean ± SD, p<0.001) during the follow-up of 90 days after contrast media exposure. Correction of urine VDBP concentrations for creatinine excretion confirmed its predictive value and was consistent with increased levels of urinary Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1) and baseline plasma creatinine in patients with above mentioned complications. The impact of urinary VDBP and KIM-1 on MARE was independent of known CIN risk factors such as anemia, preexisting renal failure, preexisting heart failure, and diabetes. Conclusions Urinary VDBP is a promising novel biomarker of major contrast induced nephropathy-associated events 90 days after contrast media

  7. Prognostic tissue biomarker exploration for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma receiving vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Park, Inkeun; Cho, Yong Mee; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Lee, Dae-Ho

    2016-04-01

    In metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), the prognostic role of several tumor tissue biomarkers has been evaluated, but the results were controversial. This study aims to verify the prognostic importance of selected tumor tissue biomarkers in patients with mRCC. The clinicopathological features, immunohistochemical staining and scoring for select tissue biomarkers, treatment, and outcome of patients with mRCC treated with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) between July 2006 and March 2011 at Asan Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea, were reviewed. In total, 123 patients met the inclusion criteria. Most patients had clear-cell carcinoma (107 patients, 87.0 %). First-line VEGFR TKIs were sunitinib (97 patients, 78.9 %), sorafenib (23 patients, 18.7 %), and pazopanib (3 patients, 2.4 %). With a median follow-up period of 60.0 months (95 % confidence interval (CI), 56.3-63.6), median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 25.6 months (95 % CI, 19.2-32.0) and 12.2 months (95 % CI, 8.1-16.3), respectively. In the multivariable analysis for OS, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX; 47.5 % or less vs. more than 47.5 %, p = 0.014), sarcomatoid change (40 % or less vs. more than 40 %, p < 0.001), tumor necrosis (20 % or less vs. more than 20 %, p = 0.006), and Heng's risk group (good vs. intermediate vs. poor, p = 0.011) were identified as independent prognostic factors. In the multivariable analysis for PFS, CAIX (p < 0.001), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN; 45 % or less vs. more than 45 %, p = 0.004), sarcomatoid change (p = 0.002), and tumor necrosis (p = 0.001) were identified as independent factors affecting PFS. CAIX and PTEN had prognostic importance for mRCC patients receiving first-line VEGFR TKI. Future validation and mechanistic studies are required. PMID:26526582

  8. Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Predicts End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Feng-Jung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Jiang, Yi-Der; Chang, Tien-Jyun; Kao, Hsien-Li; Lin, Mao-Shin; Wei, Jung-Nan; Lin, Cheng-Hsin; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) participates in inflammation and catalyzes the deamination of primary amines into aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. We have shown that serum VAP-1 is higher in patients with diabetes and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and can predict cardiovascular mortality in subjects with diabetes. In this study, we investigated if serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD in diabetic subjects. Methods In this prospective cohort study, a total of 604 type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled between 1996 to 2003 at National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan, and were followed for a median of 12.36 years. The development of ESRD was ascertained by linking our database with the nationally comprehensive Taiwan Society Nephrology registry. Serum VAP-1 concentrations at enrollment were measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Results Subjects with serum VAP-1 in the highest tertile had the highest incidence of ESRD (p<0.001). Every 1-SD increase in serum VAP-1 was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.55 (95%CI 1.12–2.14, p<0.01) for the risk of ESRD, adjusted for smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, hypertension, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, total cholesterol, use of statins, ankle-brachial index, estimated GFR, and proteinuria. We developed a risk score comprising serum VAP-1, HbA1c, estimated GFR, and proteinuria, which could predict ESRD with good performance (area under the ROC curve = 0.9406, 95%CI 0.8871–0.9941, sensitivity = 77.3%, and specificity = 92.8%). We also developed an algorithm based on the stage of CKD and a risk score including serum VAP-1, which can stratify these subjects into 3 categories with an ESRD risk of 0.101%/year, 0.131%/year, and 2.427%/year, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD

  9. The second short-term warm ischemia after vascular anastomosis did not affect early renal function recovery in renal transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tao; Zhou, Jiangqiao; Liu, Xiuheng; Ge, Minghuan; Chen, Zhiyuan

    2012-09-01

    Ischemic postconditioning was defined as rapid intermittent interruptions of blood flow in the early phase of reperfusion, which has been found to be protective against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in animal models but not in clinical trials.We describe a case that the allograft renal vein was twisted because of the surgeon's mistake, which caused the warm ischemia of allograft after reperfusion. The allograft restored blood flow without second reperfusion and cold preservation after 9 min of warm ischemia. The patient was followed up for 3 months and the allograft worked well without complications. PMID:22865119

  10. The Effect of Lowering LDL Cholesterol on Vascular Access Patency: Post Hoc Analysis of the Study of Heart and Renal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, William; Emberson, Jonathan; Staplin, Natalie; Blackwell, Lisa; Fellström, Bengt; Walker, Robert; Levin, Adeera; Hooi, Lai Seong; Massy, Ziad A.; Tesar, Vladimir; Reith, Christina; Haynes, Richard; Baigent, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Reducing LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) with statin-based therapy reduces the risk of major atherosclerotic events among patients with CKD, including dialysis patients, but the effect of lowering LDL-C on vascular access patency is unclear. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP) randomized patients with CKD to 20 mg simvastatin plus 10 mg ezetimibe daily versus matching placebo. This study aimed to explore the effects of treatment on vascular access occlusive events, defined as any access revision procedure, access thrombosis, removal of an old dialysis access, or formation of new permanent dialysis access. Results Among 2353 SHARP participants who had functioning vascular access at randomization, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in a 13% proportional reduction in vascular access occlusive events (355 [29.7%] for simvastatin/ezetimibe versus 388 [33.5%] for placebo; risk ratio [RR], 0.87; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.75 to 1.00; P=0.05). There was no evidence that the effects of treatment differed for any of the separate components of this outcome. To test the hypothesis raised by SHARP, comparable analyses were performed using the AURORA (A Study to Evaluate the Use of Rosuvastatin in Subjects on Regular Hemodialysis: An Assessment of Survival and Cardiovascular Events) trial cohort. AURORA did not provide independent confirmation (vascular access occlusive events: 352 [28.9%] for rosuvastatin versus 337 [27.6%] for placebo; RR, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.23; P=0.44). After combining the two trials, the overall effect of reducing LDL-C with a statin-based regimen on vascular access occlusive events was not statistically significant (707 [29.3%] with any LDL-C–lowering therapy versus 725 [30.5%] with placebo; RR, 0.95, 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.05; P=0.29). Conclusions Exploratory analyses from SHARP suggest that lowering LDL-C with statin-based therapy may improve vascular

  11. Urine Injury Biomarkers and Risk of Adverse Outcomes in Recipients of Prevalent Kidney Transplants: The Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation Trial.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Nisha; Carpenter, Myra A; Weiner, Daniel E; Levey, Andrew S; Pfeffer, Marc; Kusek, John W; Cai, Jianwen; Hunsicker, Lawrence G; Park, Meyeon; Bennett, Michael; Liu, Kathleen D; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Recipients of kidney transplants (KTR) are at increased risk for cardiovascular events, graft failure, and death. It is unknown whether urine kidney injury biomarkers are associated with poor outcomes among KTRs. We conducted a post hoc analysis of the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) Trial using a case-cohort study design, selecting participants with adjudicated cardiovascular events, graft failure, or death. Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), IL-18, and liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) were measured in spot urine samples and standardized to urine creatinine concentration. We adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, eGFR, and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Patients had 291 cardiovascular events, 257 graft failure events, and 359 deaths. Each log increase in urine NGAL/creatinine independently associated with a 24% greater risk of cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.24; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.06 to 1.45), a 40% greater risk of graft failure (aHR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.68), and a 44% greater risk of death (aHR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.26 to 1.65). Urine KIM-1/creatinine and IL-18/creatinine independently associated with greater risk of death (aHR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.61 and aHR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.49 per log increase, respectively) but not with risk of cardiovascular events or graft failure. Urine L-FABP did not associate with any study outcomes. In conclusion, among prevalent KTRs, higher urine NGAL, KIM-1, and IL-18 levels independently and differentially associated with greater risk of adverse outcomes. PMID:26538631

  12. Influence of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition on simple renal cysts in patients receiving bevacizumab-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shavit, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although angiogenesis has been implicated in the promotion of renal cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, no studies have investigated the role of angiogenesis in the growth of simple renal cysts. The aim of current study was to investigate the effect of chemotherapy with the antivascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab on renal cyst development and growth in cancer patients. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 136 patients with a variety of cancers that were treated with bevacizumab-based chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The presence of and changes in renal cysts were evaluated by retrospective analysis of computed tomography scans performed for assessment of tumor response to bevacizumab-based therapy. Results The median age of the patients was 64 years. Renal cysts were identified in 66 patients, in whom 33 (50%) had a single cyst and the rest had 2 or more cysts. The average dose of bevacizumab was 2.68 mg/kg per week. Median duration of treatment was 33 weeks. Average cyst size was 1.9±2.4 cm at the beginning of the study and the majority of the cysts (54 patients, 84%) did not change in size or shape during bevacizumab treatment. No patients were identified with new cysts. Cyst size changed in 10 patients (16%): an increase of 15% to 40% from the baseline size in 5 patients and a decrease in size of 10% to 70% in another 5 patients. The duration of bevacizumab therapy was significantly longer in the subgroup of patients with diminished or increased cyst size than in the patients with stable cyst size: 62 weeks versus 29 weeks, respectively (p=0.0002). Conclusions Our data demonstrated that simple renal cysts were stable in size and number in the vast majority of cancer patients treated with bevacizumab. PMID:26682018

  13. Oxidative Stress and Modification of Renal Vascular Permeability Are Associated with Acute Kidney Injury during P. berghei ANKA Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Rosa Maria; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Barreto, Claudiene Rodrigues; Silva, Reinaldo Correia; Hayashida, Caroline Y.; Castoldi, Ângela; Gonçalves, Giselle Martins; Braga, Tarcio Teodoro; Barboza, Renato; Rios, Francisco José; Keller, Alexandre Castro; Cenedeze, Marcos Antonio; Hyane, Meire Ioshie; D'Império-Lima, Maria Regina; Figueiredo-Neto, Antônio Martins; Reis, Marlene Antônia; Marinho, Cláudio Romero Farias; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2012-01-01

    Malaria associated-acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with 45% of mortality in adult patients hospitalized with severe form of the disease. However, the causes that lead to a framework of malaria-associated AKI are still poorly characterized. Some clinical studies speculate that oxidative stress products, a characteristic of Plasmodium infection, as well as proinflammatory response induced by the parasite are involved in its pathophysiology. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the development of malaria-associated AKI during infection by P. berghei ANKA, with special attention to the role played by the inflammatory response and the involvement of oxidative stress. For that, we took advantage of an experimental model of severe malaria that showed significant changes in the renal pathophysiology to investigate the role of malaria infection in the renal microvascular permeability and tissue injury. Therefore, BALB/c mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA. To assess renal function, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and ratio of proteinuria and creatininuria were evaluated. The products of oxidative stress, as well as cytokine profile were quantified in plasma and renal tissue. The change of renal microvascular permeability, tissue hypoxia and cellular apoptosis were also evaluated. Parasite infection resulted in renal dysfunction. Furthermore, we observed increased expression of adhesion molecule, proinflammatory cytokines and products of oxidative stress, associated with a decrease mRNA expression of HO-1 in kidney tissue of infected mice. The measurement of lipoprotein oxidizability also showed a significant increase in plasma of infected animals. Together, our findings support the idea that products of oxidative stress, as well as the immune response against the parasite are crucial to changes in kidney architecture and microvascular endothelial permeability of BALB/c mice infected with P. berghei ANKA. PMID:22952850

  14. Adverse Renal, Endocrine, Hepatic, and Metabolic Events during Maintenance Mood Stabilizer Treatment for Bipolar Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Louise; Walters, Kate; Geddes, John R.; King, Michael; Osborn, David P. J.

    2016-01-01

    0.73; p = 0.013) were also reduced relative to lithium. However, rates of greater than 15% weight gain on valproate, olanzapine, and quetiapine were higher (valproate HR 1.62; 95% CI 1.31–2.01; p < 0.001, olanzapine HR 1.84; 95% CI 1.47–2.30; p < 0.001, quetiapine HR 1.67; 95% CI 1.24–2.20; p < 0.001) than in individuals prescribed lithium, as were rates of hypertension in the olanzapine treated group (HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.06–1.87; p = 0.017). We found no significant difference in rates of chronic kidney disease stage 4 or more severe, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, or hepatotoxicity. Despite estimates being robust following sensitivity analyses, limitations include the potential for residual confounding and ascertainment bias and an inability to examine dosage effects. Conclusions Lithium use is associated with more renal and endocrine adverse events but less weight gain than commonly used alternative mood stabilizers. Risks need to be offset with the effectiveness and anti-suicidal benefits of lithium and the potential metabolic side effects of alternative treatment options. PMID:27483368

  15. The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Cediranib (Recentin; AZD2171) Inhibits Endothelial Cell Function and Growth of Human Renal Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, Dietmar W. Brazelle, W.D.; Juergensmeier, Juliane M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine the therapeutic potential of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling inhibitor cediranib in a human model of renal cell carcinoma (Caki-1). Methods and Materials: The effects of cediranib treatment on in vitro endothelial cell function (proliferation, migration, and tube formation), as well as in vivo angiogenesis and tumor growth, were determined. Results: In vitro, cediranib significantly impaired the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and their ability to form tubes, but had no effect on the proliferation of Caki-1 tumor cells. In vivo, cediranib significantly reduced Caki-1 tumor cell-induced angiogenesis, reduced tumor perfusion, and inhibited the growth of Caki-1 tumor xenografts. Conclusions: The present results are consistent with the notion that inhibition of VEGF signaling leads to an indirect (i.e., antiangiogenic) antitumor effect, rather than a direct effect on tumor cells. These results further suggest that inhibition of VEGF signaling with cediranib may impair the growth of renal cell carcinoma.

  16. Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor-2, HIV-Tat, and Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A in HIV-Infected Children with Renal Disease Activate Rho-A and Src in Cultured Renal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jharna R; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Ray, Patricio E

    2016-01-01

    Renal endothelial cells (REc) are the first target of HIV-1 in the kidney. The integrity of REc is maintained at least partially by heparin binding growth factors that bind to heparan sulfate proteoglycans located on their cell surface. However, previous studies showed that the accumulation of two heparin-binding growth factors, Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF-2), in combination with the viral protein Tat, can precipitate the progression of HIV-renal diseases. Nonetheless, very little is known about how these factors affect the behavior of REc in HIV+ children. We carried out this study to determine how VEGF-A, FGF-2, and HIV-Tat, modulate the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of cultured REc, identify key signaling pathways involved in this process, and develop a functional REc assay to detect HIV+ children affected by these changes. We found that VEGF-A and FGF-2, acting in synergy with HIV-Tat and heparin, affected the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of REc through changes in Rho-A, Src, and Rac-1 activity. Furthermore, urine samples from HIV+ children with renal diseases, showed high levels of VEGF-A and FGF-2, and induced similar changes in cultured REc and podocytes. These findings suggest that FGF-2, VEGF-A, and HIV-Tat, may affect the glomerular filtration barrier in HIV+ children through the induction of synergistic changes in Rho-A and Src activity. Further studies are needed to define the clinical value of the REc assay described in this study to identify HIV+ children exposed to circulating factors that may induce glomerular injury through similar mechanisms. PMID:27097314

  17. Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor-2, HIV-Tat, and Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A in HIV-Infected Children with Renal Disease Activate Rho-A and Src in Cultured Renal Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Jharna R; Gutkind, J Silvio; Ray, Patricio E

    2016-01-01

    Renal endothelial cells (REc) are the first target of HIV-1 in the kidney. The integrity of REc is maintained at least partially by heparin binding growth factors that bind to heparan sulfate proteoglycans located on their cell surface. However, previous studies showed that the accumulation of two heparin-binding growth factors, Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF-2), in combination with the viral protein Tat, can precipitate the progression of HIV-renal diseases. Nonetheless, very little is known about how these factors affect the behavior of REc in HIV+ children. We carried out this study to determine how VEGF-A, FGF-2, and HIV-Tat, modulate the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of cultured REc, identify key signaling pathways involved in this process, and develop a functional REc assay to detect HIV+ children affected by these changes. We found that VEGF-A and FGF-2, acting in synergy with HIV-Tat and heparin, affected the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of REc through changes in Rho-A, Src, and Rac-1 activity. Furthermore, urine samples from HIV+ children with renal diseases, showed high levels of VEGF-A and FGF-2, and induced similar changes in cultured REc and podocytes. These findings suggest that FGF-2, VEGF-A, and HIV-Tat, may affect the glomerular filtration barrier in HIV+ children through the induction of synergistic changes in Rho-A and Src activity. Further studies are needed to define the clinical value of the REc assay described in this study to identify HIV+ children exposed to circulating factors that may induce glomerular injury through similar mechanisms. PMID:27097314

  18. The Use of Vascular Closure Devices and Impact on Major Bleeding and Net Adverse Clinical Events (NACE) in Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty: A Sub-Analysis of the BRAVO study

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Brian; Singh, Vikas; Kini, Annapoorna; Mehran, Roxana; Jacobs, Evan; Knopf, David; Alfonso, Carlos E.; Martinez, Claudia A.; Martinezclark, Pedro; O’Neill, William; Heldman, Alan W.; Yu, Jennifer; Baber, Usman; Kovacic, Jason; Dangas, George; Sharma, Samin; Sartori, Samantha; Cohen, Mauricio G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of suture-mediated vascular closure devices on net adverse clinical events (NACE) after balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). Background Ischemic and bleeding complications are common following transfemoral BAV however; previous studies have been single center and limited by varying definitions of major bleeding. Methods The Effect of Bivalirudin on Aortic Valve Intervention Outcomes (BRAVO) study was a retrospective observational study conducted at two high-volume academic centers over a 6-year period designed to compare the effect of bivalirudin versus unfractionated heparin. This is a sub-analysis of 428 consecutive patients who underwent BAV (with 10-13 French sheaths) to compare the effect of hemostasis with vascular closure devices versus manual compression utilizing standardized definitions. NACE was defined as the composite of major bleeding and major adverse clinical events (MACE). All events were adjudicated by an independent clinical events committee who were blinded to antithrombin use. Results Pre-closure was performed in 269 (62.8%) of patients. While bivalirudin was used more frequently in those with pre-closure (60.6% vs. 37.7%, p<0.001), a history of prior BAV (11.1% vs. 3.6%, p=0.04) and peripheral vascular disease (30.7% vs. 19.7%, p=0.01) was more common in those not undergoing pre-closure (n=159, 37%). Other clinical and demographic features were well balanced between groups. Vascular closure was associated with a significant reduction in NACE (24.5% vs 10.0% p<0.001). Results remained significant after adjusting for baseline differences and bivalirudin use (OR 0.38, 95% CI: 0.21 - 0.68; p=0.001). Conclusions Our study suggests that suture-mediated vascular closure is associated with a substantial reduction in NACE after transfemoral BAV. Large randomized clinical trials should be conducted to confirm our results. PMID:23436434

  19. Effects of Single Pill-Based Combination Therapy of Amlodipine and Atorvastatin on Within-Visit Blood Pressure Variability and Parameters of Renal and Vascular Function in Hypertensive Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Wakui, Hiromichi; Ohsawa, Masato; Kobayashi, Ryu; Dejima, Toru; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Maeda, Akinobu; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Both strict blood pressure (BP) control and improvements in BP profile such as BP variability are important for suppression of renal deterioration and cardiovascular complication in hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we examined the beneficial effects of the single pill-based combination therapy of amlodipine and atorvastatin on achievement of the target BP and clinic BP profile, as well as markers of vascular and renal damages in twenty hypertensive CKD patients. The combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin for 16 weeks significantly decreased clinic BP, and achievement of target BP control was attained in an average of 45% after the combination therapy in spite of the presence of no achievement at baseline. In addition, the combination therapy significantly decreased the within-visit BP variability. With respect to the effects on renal damage markers, combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin for 16 weeks significantly decreased albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, 1034 ± 1480 versus 733 ± 1218 mg/g-Cr, P < 0.05) without decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate. Concerning parameters of vascular function, the combination therapy significantly improved both brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and central systolic BP (cSBP) (baPWV, 1903 ± 353 versus 1786 ± 382 cm/s, P < 0.05; cSBP, 148 ± 19 versus 129 ± 23 mmHg, P < 0.01). Collectively, these results suggest that the combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin may exert additional beneficial effects on renal and vascular damages as well as BP profile in addition to BP lowering in hypertension with CKD. PMID:24809050

  20. Effects of single pill-based combination therapy of amlodipine and atorvastatin on within-visit blood pressure variability and parameters of renal and vascular function in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Tamura, Kouichi; Wakui, Hiromichi; Ohsawa, Masato; Kobayashi, Ryu; Dejima, Toru; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Maeda, Akinobu; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Both strict blood pressure (BP) control and improvements in BP profile such as BP variability are important for suppression of renal deterioration and cardiovascular complication in hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we examined the beneficial effects of the single pill-based combination therapy of amlodipine and atorvastatin on achievement of the target BP and clinic BP profile, as well as markers of vascular and renal damages in twenty hypertensive CKD patients. The combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin for 16 weeks significantly decreased clinic BP, and achievement of target BP control was attained in an average of 45% after the combination therapy in spite of the presence of no achievement at baseline. In addition, the combination therapy significantly decreased the within-visit BP variability. With respect to the effects on renal damage markers, combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin for 16 weeks significantly decreased albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, 1034 ± 1480 versus 733 ± 1218 mg/g-Cr, P < 0.05) without decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate. Concerning parameters of vascular function, the combination therapy significantly improved both brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and central systolic BP (cSBP) (baPWV, 1903 ± 353 versus 1786 ± 382 cm/s, P < 0.05; cSBP, 148 ± 19 versus 129 ± 23 mmHg, P < 0.01). Collectively, these results suggest that the combination therapy with amlodipine and atorvastatin may exert additional beneficial effects on renal and vascular damages as well as BP profile in addition to BP lowering in hypertension with CKD. PMID:24809050

  1. Association Studies of Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Polymorphisms with Serum Concentrations of Glucose and Phosphate, and Vascular Calcification in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Céline; Jadoul, Michel; Devuyst, Olivier; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and linked to arterial calcification. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-protein coupled receptor, plays a pivotal role in extracellular calcium homeostasis and is expressed in the intimal and medial layers of the arterial wall. We investigated whether common CASR gene variants are predictors for aortic and coronary artery calcification or influence risk factors such as serum calcium, phosphate and glucose concentrations in RTRs. Methods Two hundred and eighty four RTRs were investigated for associations between three CASR promoter region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs115759455, rs7652589, rs1501899), three non-synonymous CASR coding region SNPs (A986S, R990G, Q1011E), and aortic and coronary artery calcium mass scores, cardiovascular outcomes and calcification risk factors that included serum phosphate, calcium, total cholesterol and glucose concentrations. Results Multivariate analysis revealed that RTRs homozygous for the minor allele (SS) of the A986S SNP, when compared to those homozygous for the major allele (AA), had raised serum glucose concentrations (8.7±5.4 vs. 5.7±2.1 mmol/L, P<0.05). In addition, RTRs who were heterozygous (CT) at the rs115759455 SNP, when compared to those homozygous for the major allele (CC), had higher serum phosphate concentrations (1.1±0.3 vs. 1.0±0.2 mmol/L, P<0.05). CASR SNPs were not significant determinants for aortic or coronary artery calcification, and were not associated with cardiovascular outcomes or mortality in this RTR cohort. Conclusions Common CASR SNPs may be independent predictors of serum glucose and phosphate concentrations, but are not determinants of vascular calcification or cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:25786244

  2. [Three Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated with Targeted Therapy of Sorafenib for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma : Case Report].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kimiaki; Takai, Manabu; Kawata, Kei; Horie, Kengo; Kikuchi, Mina; Kato, Taku; Mizutani, Kosuke; Seike, Kensaku; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Deguchi, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) used for advanced renal cell carcinoma. Treatment with sorafenib prolongs progression-free survival in patients with advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. However, in spite of its therapeutic efficacy, sorafenib causes a wide range of adverse events. Cardiovascular adverse events have been observed when sorafenib was used with targeted agents. Although these adverse events like hypertension, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac ischemia or infarction were manageable with standard medical therapies in most cases, some had a poor clinical outcome. We report three cases of acute myocardial infarction associated with sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26497860

  3. Adverse effects of drugs on the immature kidney.

    PubMed

    Guignard, J P; Gouyon, J B

    1988-01-01

    The immature kidney may be adversely affected by a variety of vasoactive or diuretic drugs, either administered to the mother during pregnancy, or to the neonate. Inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme administered to the hypertensive pregnant woman can severely and sometimes definitely impair renal function in the fetus, leading to postnatal anuria. Pathogenesis involves interference with the renin-angiotensin system and the prostaglandins. Beta-adrenergic agents administered during labor depress glomerular filtration rate transiently. Tolazoline, an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent useful in the treatment of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate induces intense renal vasoconstriction with consequent hypoperfusion. Indomethacin, a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor used for the pharmacological closure of a patent ductus arteriosus, also increases renal vascular resistance, and decreases urine output. Furosemide, the drug most often used in oliguric neonates, may also adversely affect the newborn infant. Its use has been associated with an increase in the incidence of patent ductus arteriosus, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis and secondary hyperparathyroidism. These observations demonstrate that the proper use of drugs requires that the therapeutic endpoint be clearly defined and the predictable side effects be anticipated. PMID:2901276

  4. RECIST 1.1 Compared With RECIST 1.0 in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Receiving Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Katherine M.; Nishino, Mizuki; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is the most widely accepted method to objectively assess response to therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–targeted therapy. Both RECIST 1.0 and 1.1 have been used to assess response to VEGF-targeted therapies; however, systematic comparisons are lacking. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty-two patients with metastatic RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapies were retrospectively studied. Tumor measurements and response assessment according to RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were compared, including the number of target lesions, baseline measurements, response at each follow-up, best overall response, and time to progression (TTP). Morphologic changes and new enhancement were also assessed over the course of treatment, and TTP was evaluated using morphologic change criteria in combination with RECIST 1.1. RESULTS The number of target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 was significantly fewer than by RECIST 1.0 (median, 2 vs 4; p < 0.0001). At first imaging follow-up, the percentage change of the sums of the diameter measurements by RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were highly concordant (R = 0.857; mean shrinkage, 12.1% by RECIST 1.1 vs 10.8% by RECIST 1.0). Best response assessment was highly concordant between the two criteria (weighted κ = 0.819). There was no evidence of a difference in TTP by the two criteria, with a median TTP of 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.5–13.9) by RECIST 1.1 and 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.8–13.6) by RECIST 1.0. The median TTP by RECIST 1.1 alone was 8.9 months compared with 5.6 months for RECIST 1.1 and morphologic changes combined. CONCLUSION RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 response assessments were overall highly concordant in patients with RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapy, with fewer target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 but no difference in TTP. PMID:25714313

  5. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias. PMID:26740184

  6. Adverse events and infectious burden, microbes and temporal outline from immunosuppressive therapy in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with native renal function

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, JulieAnne G.; Negrete-Lopez, Roberto; Poulton, Caroline J.; Kidd, Jason M.; Katsanos, Suzanne L.; Goetz, Lindsey; Hu, Yichun; Nachman, Patrick H.; Falk, Ronald J.; Hogan, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disease control in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV) with immunosuppression is effective but burdened by adverse events, especially infections. The study goal was to evaluate risks and types of infections in patients with AAV. Methods Biopsy-proven AAV patients (diagnosed 1/1991–6/2011) followed in an inception cohort were evaluated for adverse events. Severe infections (requiring intravenous antibiotics, intensive care unit, or causing death) were recorded. Infection number was grouped as none, 1–2 or ≥3. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Results A total of 489 patients (median age 59; 47% female, 55% myeloperoxidase-ANCA) were followed for 2.8 years (median). At 1, 2 and 5 years cumulative incidence of infection was 51, 58 and 65% and severe infection was 22, 23 and 26%. Pulmonary and upper respiratory infections were most common (42 and 30% ever experienced each, respectively), highest in the first 3 months. Staphylococcus aureus was most frequently seen among positive cultures (41%, 78 S. aureus/192 total positive cultures), and only one Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (6 weeks into treatment). All-cause death in 12 months was associated with infections (% deaths: 0 infections 3%; 1–2 infections 10%, ≥3 infections 13%, P = 0.002). Controlling for age, sex and kidney function, patients with severe infections were 4.2 times more likely to die within 12 months (95% CI 2.0–8.7; P = 0.001). Conclusions More infections increase the risk of a severe infection which increases risk of all-cause mortality. Respiratory and S. aureus infections are dominant. Targeted prophylactic therapy could decrease morbidity. PMID:25805747

  7. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  8. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and endothelial adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) as predictive markers for blood pressure reduction after renal sympathetic denervation.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Oliver; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Gaede, Luise; Troidl, Christian; Rixe, Johannes; Hamm, Christian; Nef, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is a treatment option for patients with resistant arterial hypertension, but in some patients it is not successful. Predictive parameters on the success of RSD remain unknown. The angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFLT-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are known to be associated with endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodeling, and hypertension. We evaluated whether sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 are predictive markers for blood pressure reduction after RSD. Consecutive patients (n=55) undergoing renal denervation were included. Venous serum samples for measurement of sFlt-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were collected before and 6 months after RSD. A therapeutic response was defined as an office systolic blood pressure reduction of >10 mm Hg 6 months after RSD. A significant mean office systolic blood pressure reduction of 31.2 mm Hg was observed in 46 patients 6 months after RSD. Nine patients were classified as nonresponders, with a mean systolic blood pressure reduction of 4.6 mm Hg. At baseline, sFLT-1 levels were significantly higher in responders than in nonresponders (P<0.001) as were ICAM-1 (P<0.001) and VCAM-1 levels (P<0.01). The areas under the curve for sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were 0.82 (interquartile range, 0.718-0.921; P<0.001), 0.754 (0.654-0.854; P<0.001), and 0.684 (0.564-804; P=0.01), respectively, demonstrating prediction of an RSD response. Responders showed significantly higher serum levels of sFLT-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 at baseline compared with nonresponders. Thus, this study identified for the first time potential biomarkers with a predictive value indicating a responder or nonresponder before renal denervation. PMID:24470464

  9. Management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease after Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL).

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Sandra M S; Saad, Ahmed; Textor, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Many patients with occlusive atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial and the Stent Placement and Blood Pressure and Lipid-Lowering for the Prevention of Progression of Renal Dysfunction Caused by Atherosclerotic Ostial Stenosis of the Renal Artery (STAR) and ASTRAL. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Although hemodynamically significant, ARVD can reduce renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate; adaptive mechanisms preserve both cortical and medullary oxygenation over a wide range of vascular occlusion. Progression of ARVD to severe vascular compromise eventually produces cortical hypoxia, however, associated with active inflammatory cytokine release and cellular infiltration of the renal parenchyma. In such cases ARVD produces a loss of glomerular filtration rate that no longer is reversible simply by restoring vessel patency with technically successful renal revascularization. Each of these trials reported adverse renal functional outcomes ranging between 16 and 22% over periods of 2-5 years of follow-up. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of ARVD for clinical nephrologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials and experimental research. PMID:24723543

  10. Antineoplastic Treatment and Renal Injury: An Update on Renal Pathology Due to Cytotoxic and Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Megan L; Higgins, John P; Kambham, Neeraja

    2016-09-01

    Cancer patients experience kidney injury from multiple sources, including the tumor itself, diagnostic procedures, hypovolemia, infection, and drug exposure, superimposed upon baseline chronic damage. This review will focus on cytotoxic or targeted chemotherapy-associated renal injury. In this setting, tubulointerstitial injury and thrombotic microangiopathy (vascular injury) are more common than other forms of kidney injury including glomerular. Cisplatin, pemetrexed, and ifosfamide are well-known causes of acute tubular injury/necrosis. Acute interstitial nephritis seems underrecognized in this clinical setting. Interstitial nephritis is emerging as an "immune-related adverse effect" (irAE's) with immune checkpoint inhibitors in small numbers of patients. Acute kidney injury is rarely reported with targeted therapies such as BRAF inhibitors (vemurafinib, dabrafenib), ALK inhibitors (crizotinib), and mTOR inhibitors (everolimus, temsirolimus), but additional biopsy data are needed. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies that block the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway are most commonly associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Other causes of thrombotic microangiopathy in the cancer patients include cytotoxic chemotherapies such as gemcitabine and mitomycin C, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and cancer itself (usually high-stage adenocarcinoma with marrow and vascular invasion). Cancer patients are historically underbiopsied, but biopsy can reveal type, acuity, and chronicity of renal injury, and facilitate decisions concerning continuation of chemotherapy and/or initiation of renoprotective therapy. Biopsy may also reveal unrelated and unanticipated findings in need of treatment. PMID:27403615

  11. Effects of Sodium Thiosulfate on Vascular Calcification in End-Stage Renal Disease: A Pilot Study of Feasibility, Safety and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Santhosh Jay; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Podaralla, Prashanth; Cabellon, Anton; Zheng, Sijie; Bierhals, Andrew; Spence, Karen; Slatopolsky, Eduardo; Davila-Roman, Victor G.; Delmez, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Vascular calcification is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis. The objective of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of sodium thiosulfate (STS) in the progression of vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients. Methods Chronic hemodialysis patients underwent a battery of cardiovascular tests. Those with coronary artery calcium (Agatston scores >50) received intravenous STS after each dialysis for 5 months (n = 22) and the tests were repeated. Changes in MDCT-determined calcification were assessed as the mean annualized rate of change in 3 vascular beds (coronary, thoracic and carotid arteries) and in L1-L2 vertebral bone density. Results Although individual analyses showed coronary artery calcification progression in 14/22 subjects, there was no progression in the mean annualized rate of change of vascular calcification in the entire group. The L1-L2 vertebral bone density showed no changes. There were no correlations between rates of progression of vascular calcification and phosphorus, fetuin or C-reactive protein levels. Changes in coronary artery calcification scores correlated with those of the thoracic aorta. Conclusion STS treatment is feasible, appears safe and may decrease the rate of progression of vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients. A large, randomized, controlled trial is warranted. PMID:21242673

  12. High-Dose Estradiol-Replacement Therapy Enhances the Renal Vascular Response to Angiotensin II via an AT2-Receptor Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Tahereh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Evans, Roger G.; Denton, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological levels of estrogen appear to enhance angiotensin type 2 receptor- (AT2R-) mediated vasodilatation. However, the effects of supraphysiological levels of estrogen, analogous to those achieved with high-dose estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women, remain unknown. Therefore, we pretreated ovariectomized rats with a relatively high dose of estrogen (0.5 mg/kg/week) for two weeks. Subsequently, renal hemodynamic responses to intravenous angiotensin II (Ang II, 30–300 ng/kg/min) were tested under anesthesia, while renal perfusion pressure was held constant. The role of AT2R was examined by pretreating groups of rats with PD123319 or its vehicle. Renal blood flow (RBF) decreased in a dose-related manner in response to Ang II. Responses to Ang II were enhanced by pretreatment with estradiol. For example, at 300 ng kg−1 min−1, Ang II reduced RBF by 45.7 ± 1.9% in estradiol-treated rats but only by 27.3 ± 5.1% in vehicle-treated rats. Pretreatment with PD123319 blunted the response of RBF to Ang II in estradiol-treated rats, so that reductions in RBF were similar to those in rats not treated with estradiol. We conclude that supraphysiological levels of estrogen promote AT2R-mediated renal vasoconstriction. This mechanism could potentially contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with hormone replacement therapy using high-dose estrogen. PMID:26681937

  13. High Salt Intake Increases Blood Pressure in Normal Rats: Putative Role of 20-HETE and No Evidence on Changes in Renal Vascular Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Walkowska, A.; Kuczeriszka, M.; Sadowski, J.; Olszyński, K.H.; Dobrowolski, L.; Červenka, L.; Hammock, B.D.; Kompanowska-Jezierska, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims High salt (HS) intake may elevate blood pressure (BP), also in animals without genetic salt sensitivity. The development of salt-dependent hypertension could be mediated by endogenous vasoactive agents; here we examined the role of vasodilator epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and vasoconstrictor 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE). Methods In conscious Wistar rats on HS diet systolic BP (SBP) was examined after chronic elevation of EETs using 4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (c-AUCB), a blocker of soluble epoxide hydrolase, or after inhibition of 20-HETE with 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT). Thereafter, in acute experiments the responses of renal artery blood flow (Transonic probe) and renal regional perfusion (laser-Doppler) to intrarenal acetylcholine (ACh) or norepinephrine were determined. Results HS diet increased urinary 20-HETE excretion. The SBP increase was not reduced by c-AUCB but prevented by ABT until day 5 of HS exposure. Renal vasomotor responses to ACh or norepinephrine were similar on standard and HS diet. ABT but not c-AUCB abolished the responses to ACh. Conclusions 20-HETE seems to mediate the early-phase HS diet-induced BP increase while EETs are not engaged in the process. Since HS exposure did not alter renal vasodilator responses to Ach, endothelial dysfunction is not a critical factor in the mechanism of salt-induced blood pressure elevation. PMID:26067851

  14. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  15. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  16. BEST: A Randomized Phase II Study of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, RAF Kinase, and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Combination Targeted Therapy With Bevacizumab, Sorafenib, and Temsirolimus in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma—A Trial of the ECOG–ACRIN Cancer Research Group (E2804)

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Keith T.; Manola, Judith B.; Pins, Michael; McDermott, David F.; Atkins, Michael B.; Dutcher, Janice J.; George, Daniel J.; Margolin, Kim A.; DiPaola, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose On the basis of evidence that resistance to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor inhibition is caused by hypoxia-driven residual VEGF and other proangiogenic factors, combinations of agents from these classes were hypothesized to improve treatment outcomes relative to single-agent VEGF pathway blockade. Patients and Methods A total of 361 patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma were randomly assigned equally to arm A (bevacizumab monotherapy 10 mg/kg intravenously [IV] every 2 weeks), B (bevacizumab 10 mg/kg IV every 2 weeks and temsirolimus 25 mg IV every week), C (bevacizumab 5 mg/kg IV every 2 weeks and sorafenib 200 mg orally twice daily on days 1 to 5, 8 to 12, 15 to 19, and 22 to 26), or D (sorafenib 200 mg twice daily and temsirolimus 25 mg IV weekly). Progression-free survival was the primary end point. Results Among 331 eligible treated patients, median PFS was 7.5 months for bevacizumab alone (90% CI, 5.8 to 10.8 months), 7.6 months for bevacizumab plus temsirolimus (90% CI, 6.7 to 9.2 months), 9.2 months for bevacizumab plus sorafenib (90% CI, 7.5 to 11.4 months), and 7.4 months for sorafenib plus temsirolimus (90% CI, 5.6 to 7.9 months). Hazard ratios from stratified Cox proportional hazards models were 1.01, 0.89, and 1.07 (with respective P values of .95, .49, and .68) for the three combinations, respectively, compared with bevacizumab alone. Adverse events did not differ significantly among treatment arms. Conclusion The activity of sorafenib, temsirolimus, and bevacizumab administered in doublet combinations did not significantly improve median progression-free survival in comparison with bevacizumab monotherapy. PMID:26077237

  17. Implications of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Joshi, Brijen L.; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Hogue, Charles W.; Nyhan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chronological age is a well established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The changes that accumulate in the vasculature with age, though, are highly variable. It is now increasingly recognized that indices of vascular health are more reliable than age per se in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The variation in the accrual of these age-related vascular changes is a function of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we highlight some of the pathophysiological mechanisms that characterize the vascular aging phenotype. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the key outcome studies that address the value of these vascular health indices in general and discuss potential effects on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21474663

  18. Influence of renal function on the usefulness of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide as a prognostic cardiac risk marker in patients undergoing noncardiac vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Goei, Dustin; Schouten, Olaf; Boersma, Eric; Welten, Gijs M J M; Dunkelgrun, Martin; Lindemans, Jan; van Gestel, Yvette R B M; Hoeks, Sanne E; Bax, Jeroen J; Poldermans, Don

    2008-01-01

    N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) is related to stress-induced myocardial ischemia and/or volume overload, both common in patients with renal dysfunction. This might compromise the prognostic usefulness of NT-pro-BNP in patients with renal impairment before vascular surgery. We assessed the prognostic value of NT-pro-BNP in the entire strata of renal function. In 356 patients (median age 69 years, 77% men), cardiac history, glomerular filtration rate (GFR, ml/min/1.73 m(2)), and NT-pro-BNP level (pg/ml) were assessed preoperatively. Troponin T and electrocardiography were assessed postoperatively on days 1, 3, 7, and 30. The end point was the composite of cardiovascular death, Q-wave myocardial infarction, and troponin T release. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the interaction between GFR, NT-pro-BNP and their association with postoperative outcome. Median GFR was 78 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and the median concentration of NT-pro-BNP was 197 pg/ml. The end point was reached in 64 patients (18%); cardiac death occurred in 7 (2.0%), Q-wave myocardial infarction in 34 (9.6%), and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction in 23 (6.5%). After adjustment for confounders, NT-pro-BNP levels and GFR remained significantly associated with the end point (p = 0.005). The prognostic value of NT-pro-BNP was most pronounced in patients with GFR > or =90 (odds ratio [OR] 1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80 to 1.76) compared with patients with GFR 60 to 89 (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.002 to 1.07), and with GFR 30 to 59 (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.21). In patients with GFR <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), NT-pro-BNP levels have no prognostic value (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.01). In conclusion, the discriminative value of NT-pro-BNP is most pronounced in patients with GFR > or =90 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and has no prognostic value in patients with GFR <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2). PMID:18157978

  19. Genetic Pathways of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Marion A. Hofmann; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial calcification of the aorta, coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries becomes more prevalent with age. Genomewide association studies have identified regions of the genome linked to vascular calcification, and these same regions are linked to myocardial infarction risk. The 9p21 region linked to vascular disease and inflammation also associates with vascular calcification. In addition to these common variants, rare genetic defects can serve as primary triggers of accelerated and premature calcification. Infancy-associated calcific disorders are caused by loss of function mutations in ENPP1 an enzyme that produces extracellular pyrophosphate. Adult onset vascular calcification is linked to mutations NTE5, another enzyme that regulates extracellular phosphate metabolism. Common conditions that secondarily enhance vascular calcification include atherosclerosis, metabolic dysfunction, diabetes, and impaired renal clearance. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, along with biophysical properties, converge with these predisposing factors to promote soft tissue mineralization. Vascular calcification is accompanied by an osteogenic profile, and this osteogenic conversion is seen within the vascular smooth muscle itself as well as the matrix. Herein we will review the genetic causes of medial calcification in the smooth muscle layer, focusing on recent discoveries of gene mutations that regulate extracellular matrix phosphate production and the role of S100 proteins as promoters of vascular calcification. PMID:23040839

  20. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  1. Warfarin and Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Poterucha, Timothy J; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, is the most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulant. Use of warfarin is associated with an increase in systemic calcification, including in the coronary and peripheral vasculature. This increase in vascular calcification is due to inhibition of the enzyme matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate Gla protein (MGP). MGP is a vitamin K-dependent protein that ordinarily prevents systemic calcification by scavenging calcium phosphate in the tissues. Warfarin-induced systemic calcification can result in adverse clinical effects. In this review article, we highlight some of the key translational and clinical studies that associate warfarin with vascular calcification. PMID:26714212

  2. Drug-induced renal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghane Shahrbaf, Fatemeh; Assadi, Farahnak

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity are more common among infants and young children and in certain clinical situations such as underlying renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Drugs can cause acute renal injury, intrarenal obstruction, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and acid-base and fluid electrolytes disorders. Certain drugs can cause alteration in intraglomerular hemodynamics, inflammatory changes in renal tubular cells, leading to acute kidney injury (AKI), tubulointerstitial disease and renal scarring. Drug-induced nephrotoxicity tends to occur more frequently in patients with intravascular volume depletion, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sepsis. Therefore, early detection of drugs adverse effects is important to prevent progression to end-stage renal disease. Preventive measures requires knowledge of mechanisms of drug-induced nephrotoxicity, understanding patients and drug-related risk factors coupled with therapeutic intervention by correcting risk factors, assessing baseline renal function before initiation of therapy, adjusting the drug dosage and avoiding use of nephrotoxic drug combinations. PMID:26468475

  3. The internist and the renal resistive index: truths and doubts.

    PubMed

    Boddi, Maria; Natucci, Fabrizia; Ciani, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    The renal resistive index (RRI) is measured by Doppler sonography in an intrarenal artery, and is the difference between the peak systolic and end-diastolic blood velocities divided by the peak systolic velocity. The RRI is used for the study of vascular and renal parenchymal renal abnormalities, but growing evidence indicates that it is also a dynamic marker of systemic vascular properties. Renal vascular resistance is only one of several renal (vascular compliance, interstitial and venous pressure), and extrarenal (heart rate, aortic stiffness, pulse pressure) determinants that combine to determine the RRI values, and not the most important one. RRI cannot always be considered a specific marker of renal disease. To summarize from the literature: (1) hydronephrosis, abdominal hypertension, renal vein thrombosis and acute kidney injury are all associated with an acute increase in interstitial and venous pressure that determine RRI values. In all these conditions, RRI is a reliable marker of the severity of renal damage. (2) The hemodynamic impact of renal artery stenosis can be assayed by the RRI decrease in the homolateral kidney by virtue of decreasing pulse pressure. However, renal diseases that often coexist, increase renal vascular stiffness and hide the hemodynamic effect of renal stenosis. (3) In transplant kidney and in chronic renal disease, high RRI values (>0.80) can independently predict renal and clinical outcomes, but systemic (pulse pressure) rather than renal hemodynamic determinants sustain the predictive role of RRI. (4) Higher RRI detects target renal organ damage in hypertension and diabetes when renal function is still preserved, as a marker of systemic atherosclerotic burden. Is this the fact? We attempt to answer. PMID:26337967

  4. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  5. Carbonic Anhydrase 9 Expression Increases with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Targeted Therapy and Is Predictive of Outcome in Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Grant D.; O’Mahony, Fiach C.; Laird, Alexander; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.; Eory, Lel; Lubbock, Alexander L.R.; Nanda, Jyoti; O’Donnell, Marie; Mackay, Alan; Mullen, Peter; McNeill, S. Alan; Riddick, Antony C.P.; Aitchison, Michael; Berney, Daniel; Bex, Axel; Overton, Ian M.; Harrison, David J.; Powles, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a lack of biomarkers to predict outcome with targeted therapy in metastatic clear cell renal cancer (mccRCC). This may be because dynamic molecular changes occur with therapy. Objective To explore if dynamic, targeted-therapy-driven molecular changes correlate with mccRCC outcome. Design, setting, and participants Multiple frozen samples from primary tumours were taken from sunitinib-naïve (n = 22) and sunitinib-treated mccRCC patients (n = 23) for protein analysis. A cohort (n = 86) of paired, untreated and sunitinib/pazopanib-treated mccRCC samples was used for validation. Array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) analysis and RNA interference (RNAi) was used to support the findings. Intervention Three cycles of sunitinib 50 mg (4 wk on, 2 wk off). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Reverse phase protein arrays (training set) and immunofluorescence automated quantitative analysis (validation set) assessed protein expression. Results and limitations Differential expression between sunitinib-naïve and treated samples was seen in 30 of 55 proteins (p < 0.05 for each). The proteins B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2), mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) (serine/threonine kinase) had both increased intratumoural variance and significant differential expression with therapy. The validation cohort confirmed increased CA9 expression with therapy. Multivariate analysis showed high CA9 expression after treatment was associated with longer survival (hazard ratio: 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.26–0.87; p = 0.02). Array CGH profiles revealed sunitinib was associated with significant CA9 region loss. RNAi CA9 silencing in two cell lines inhibited the antiproliferative effects of sunitinib. Shortcomings of the study include selection of a specific protein for analysis, and the specific time points at which the treated tissue was analysed. Conclusions CA9 levels increase with

  6. Renal Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction with Hemin Augments Renal Hemodynamics, Renal Autoregulation, and Excretory Function

    PubMed Central

    Botros, Fady T.; Dobrowolski, Leszek; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO-1; HO-2) catalyze conversion of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin/bilirubin. To determine the effects of renal HO-1 induction on blood pressure and renal function, normal control rats (n = 7) and hemin-treated rats (n = 6) were studied. Renal clearance studies were performed on anesthetized rats to assess renal function; renal blood flow (RBF) was measured using a transonic flow probe placed around the left renal artery. Hemin treatment significantly induced renal HO-1. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were not different (115 ± 5 mmHg versus 112 ± 4 mmHg and 331 ± 16 versus 346 ± 10 bpm). However, RBF was significantly higher (9.1 ± 0.8 versus 7.0 ± 0.5 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and renal vascular resistance was significantly lower (13.0 ± 0.9 versus 16.6 ± 1.4 [mmHg/(mL/min/g)], P < 0.05). Likewise, glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated (1.4 ± 0.2 versus 1.0 ± 0.1 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and urine flow and sodium excretion were also higher (18.9 ± 3.9 versus 8.2 ± 1.0 μL/min/g, P < 0.05 and 1.9 ± 0.6 versus 0.2 ± 0.1 μmol/min/g, P < 0.05, resp.). The plateau of the autoregulation relationship was elevated, and renal vascular responses to acute angiotensin II infusion were attenuated in hemin-treated rats reflecting the vasodilatory effect of HO-1 induction. We conclude that renal HO-1 induction augments renal function which may contribute to the antihypertensive effects of HO-1 induction observed in hypertension models. PMID:22518281

  7. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  8. HDL in children with CKD promotes endothelial dysfunction and an abnormal vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Rukshana; Speer, Thimoteus; Colin, Sophie; Charakida, Marietta; Zewinger, Stephen; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Hettrich, Inga; Rohrer, Lucia; O'Neill, Francis; McLoughlin, Eve; Long, David; Shanahan, Catherine M; Landmesser, Ulf; Fliser, Danilo; Deanfield, John E

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction begins in early CKD and contributes to cardiovascular mortality. HDL is considered antiatherogenic, but may have adverse vascular effects in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and inflammatory conditions. The effect of renal failure on HDL properties is unknown. We studied the endothelial effects of HDL isolated from 82 children with CKD stages 2-5 (HDL(CKD)), who were free of underlying inflammatory diseases, diabetes, or active infections. Compared with HDL from healthy children, HDL(CKD) strongly inhibited nitric oxide production, promoted superoxide production, and increased vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human aortic endothelial cells, and reduced cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The effects on endothelial cells correlated with CKD grade, with the most profound changes induced by HDL from patients on dialysis, and partial recovery observed with HDL isolated after kidney transplantation. Furthermore, the in vitro effects on endothelial cells associated with increased aortic pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness, and circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction in patients. Symmetric dimethylarginine levels were increased in serum and fractions of HDL from children with CKD. In a longitudinal follow-up of eight children undergoing kidney transplantation, HDL-induced production of endothelial nitric oxide, superoxide, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in vitro improved significantly at 3 months after transplantation, but did not reach normal levels. These results suggest that in children with CKD without concomitant disease affecting HDL function, HDL dysfunction begins in early CKD, progressing as renal function declines, and is partially reversed after kidney transplantation. PMID:24854267

  9. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Acute arterial occlusion - kidney Acute kidney failure Aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Blood clots Renal cell carcinoma Renal venogram X-ray Update Date 4/7/2014 Updated by: Jason ... Failure Kidney Tests X-Rays Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  10. Renal venogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008:chap 6. Rankin S. Renal parenchymal disease, including renal failure, renovascular disease and transportation. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 39. Read ... arteriography Renal vein thrombosis Tumor Venogram Wilms ...

  11. Imaging of haemodialysis: renal and extrarenal findings.

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Ferruccio; Quaia, Emilio; Martingano, Paola; Cavallaro, Marco; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2015-06-01

    Electrolyte alterations and extra-renal disorders are quite frequent in patients undergoing haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The native kidneys may be the site of important pathologies in patients undergoing dialysis, especially in the form of acquired renal cystic disease with frequent malignant transformation. Renal neoplasms represents an important complication of haemodialysis-associated acquired cystic kidney disease and imaging surveillance is suggested. Extra-renal complications include renal osteodistrophy, brown tumours, and thoracic and cardiovascular complications. Other important fields in which imaging techniques may provide important informations are arteriovenous fistula and graft complications. Teaching points • Renal neoplasms represent a dreaded complication of haemodialysis.• In renal osteodystrophy bone resorption typically manifests along the middle phalanges.• Brown tumours are well-defined lytic lesions radiographically, possibly causing bone expansion.• Vascular calcifications are very common in patients undergoing haemodialysis.• Principal complications of the AV fistula consist of thrombosis, aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25680325

  12. The Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Hemodynamics and Renal Vasculature in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Verloop, Willemien L.; Hubens, Lisette E. G.; Spiering, Wilko; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Goldschmeding, Roel; Bleys, Ronald L. A. W.; Voskuil, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Recently, the efficacy of renal denervation (RDN) has been debated. It is discussed whether RDN is able to adequately target the renal nerves. Objective We aimed to investigate how effective RDN was by means of functional hemodynamic measurements and nerve damage on histology. Methods and Results We performed hemodynamic measurements in both renal arteries of healthy pigs using a Doppler flow and pressure wire. Subsequently unilateral denervation was performed, followed by repeated bilateral hemodynamic measurements. Pigs were terminated directly after RDN or were followed for 3 weeks or 3 months after the procedure. After termination, both treated and control arteries were prepared for histology to evaluate vascular damage and nerve damage. Directly after RDN, resting renal blood flow tended to increase by 29±67% (P = 0.01). In contrast, renal resistance reserve increased from 1.74 (1.28) to 1.88 (1.17) (P = 0.02) during follow-up. Vascular histopathology showed that most nerves around the treated arteries were located outside the lesion areas (8±7 out of 55±25 (14%) nerves per pig were observed within a lesion area). Subsequently, a correlation was noted between a more impaired adventitia and a reduction in renal resistance reserve (β: -0.33; P = 0.05) at three weeks of follow-up. Conclusion Only a small minority of renal nerves was targeted after RDN. Furthermore, more severe adventitial damage was related to a reduction in renal resistance in the treated arteries at follow-up. These hemodynamic and histological observations may indicate that RDN did not sufficiently target the renal nerves. Potentially, this may explain the significant spread in the response after RDN. PMID:26587981

  13. Abnormal patterns of the renal veins

    PubMed Central

    Azari, Hassan; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the renal vascular anatomy may greatly contribute to the success of surgical, invasive and radiological procedures of the retroperitoneal region. Here, morphometric and histological studies of a human cadaveric specimen presented a complex, anomalous pattern of renal veins. The left renal vein had an oblique retro-aortic course and received two lumbar veins. It bifurcated near its drainage point into the inferior vena cava. The right renal vein received the right testicular vein. In addition, the left kidney was located at a low position. The spleen was enlarged. The present case is unique and provides information that may help surgeons or angiologists to apply safer interventions. PMID:22536553

  14. Acute renal haemodynamic and renin-angiotensin system responses to graded renal artery stenosis in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, W P; Johnston, C I; Korner, P I

    1979-01-01

    1. The acute renal haemodynamic and renin-angiotensin system responses to graded renal artery stenosis were studied in chronically instrumented, unanaesthetized dogs. 2. Stenosis was induced over 30 sec by inflation of a cuff around the renal artery to lower distal pressure to 60, 40 or 20 mmHg, with stenosis maintained for 1 hr. This resulted in an immediate fall in renal vascular resistance, but over the next 5--30 min both resistance and renal artery pressure were restored back towards prestenosis values. Only transient increases in systemic arterial blood pressure and plasma renin and angiotensin levels were seen with the two milder stenoses. Despite restoration of renal artery pressure, renal blood flow remained reduced at all grades of stenosis. 3. Pre-treatment with angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor or sarosine1, isoleucone8 angiotensin II greatly attenuated or abolished the restoration of renal artery pressure and renal vascular resistance after stenosis, and plasma renin and angiotensin II levels remained high. Renal dilatation was indefinitely maintained, but the normal restoration of resistance and pressure could be simulated by infusing angiotensin II into the renal artery. 4. The effective resistance to blood flow by the stenosis did not remain constant but varied with changes in the renal vascular resistance. PMID:219182

  15. Taurine and the renal system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Taurine participates in a number of different physiologic and biologic processes in the kidney, often reflected by urinary excretion patterns. The kidney is key to aspects of taurine body pool size and homeostasis. This review will examine the renal-taurine interactions relative to ion reabsorption; renal blood flow and renal vascular endothelial function; antioxidant properties, especially in the glomerulus; and the role of taurine in ischemia and reperfusion injury. In addition, taurine plays a role in the renal cell cycle and apoptosis, and functions as an osmolyte during the stress response. The role of the kidney in adaptation to variations in dietary taurine intake and the regulation of taurine body pool size are described. Finally, the protective function of taurine against several kidney diseases is reviewed. PMID:20804616

  16. Peripheral arterial disease in diabetic patients with renal insufficiency: a review.

    PubMed

    Lepäntalo, Mauri; Fiengo, Leslie; Biancari, Fausto

    2012-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is common among diabetic patients with renal insufficiency, and most of the diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have peripheral arterial disease. Ischaemia is probably overrepresented as an etiological factor for a diabetic foot ulcer in this group of patients compared with other diabetic patients. ESRD is a strong risk factor for both ulceration and amputation in diabetic patients. It increases the risk of nonhealing of ulcers and major amputation with an OR of 2.5-3. Renal disease is a more important predictor of poor outcome after revascularizations than commonly expected. Preoperative vascular imaging is also affected by a number of limitations, mostly related to side effects of contrast agents poorly eliminated because of kidney dysfunction. Patients with renal failure have high perioperative morbidity and mortality. Persistent ischaemia, extensive infection, forefoot and heel gangrene, poor run-off, poor cardiac function, and the length of dialysis-dependent renal failure all affect the outcome adversely. Despite dismal overall outcome, recent data indicate that by proper selection, favourable results can be obtained even in ESRD patients, with the majority of studies reporting 1-year limb salvage rates of 65-75% after revascularization among survivors. High 1-year mortality of 38% reported in a recent review has to be taken into consideration, though. The preferential use of endovascular-first approach is attractive in this vulnerable multimorbid group of patients, but the evidence for endovascular treatment is very scarce. The need for complete revascularization of the foot may be even more important than in other patients with ischaemic ulcerated diabetic foot because there are a number of factors counteracting healing in these patients. Typically, half of the patients are reported to lose their legs despite open bypass. To control tissue damage and improve chances of ulcer healing, one should understand that

  17. Acute kidney injury, long-term renal function and mortality in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Joana; Neves, Joana Briosa; Rodrigues, Natacha; Bekerman, Catarina; Melo, Maria João; Pereira, Marta; Teixeira, Catarina; Mendes, Inês; Jorge, Sofia; Rosa, Rosário; Lopes, José António

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent during hospitalization and may contribute to adverse consequences. We aimed to evaluate long-term adverse renal function and mortality after postoperative AKI in a cohort of patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of adult patients who underwent major non-vascular abdominal surgery between January 2010 and February 2011 at the Department of Surgery II of Hospital de Santa Maria–Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, Portugal. Exclusion criteria were as follows: chronic kidney disease on renal replacement therapy, undergoing renal replacement therapy the week before surgery, death before discharge and loss to follow-up through January 2014. Patients were categorized according to the development of postoperative AKI in the first 48 h after surgery using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes classification. AKI was defined by an increase in absolute serum creatinine (SCr) ≥0.3 mg/dL or by a percentage increase in SCr ≥50% and/or by a decrease in urine output to <0.5 mL/kg/h for >6 h. Adverse renal outcomes (need for long-term dialysis and/or a 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate after hospital discharge) and mortality after discharge were evaluated. Cumulative mortality was analysed with the Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test and outcome predictive factors with the Cox regression. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results Of 390 selected patients, 72 (18.5%) developed postoperative AKI. The median follow-up was 38 months. Adverse renal outcomes and death after hospital discharge were more frequent among AKI patients (47.2 versus 22.0%, P < 0.0001; and 47.2 versus 20.5%, P < 0.0001, respectively). The 4 year cumulative probability of death was 44.4% for AKI patients, while it was 19.8% for patients with no AKI (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, AKI was a risk factor for adverse renal outcomes (adjusted hazard ratio 1.6, P

  18. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  19. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  20. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  1. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease. PMID:20822331

  2. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  3. New insights into precursors of renal endothelium.

    PubMed

    Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Torban, Elena

    2016-08-01

    The kidney vasculature is extremely complex, yet, despite recent progress, our understanding of how the renal vascular system develops is limited. By using advanced tissue engineering techniques and in vivo and in vitro depletion of specific populations of endothelial cell precursors, Halt et al. have identified a CD146-expressing precursor as an important player in the development of the renal vasculature. PMID:27418087

  4. Cortical necrosis in a renal transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhardt, R.; Growcock, G.; Lasher, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    The /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA renogram is a well extabished noninvasive method for evaluating and following transplanted kidneys. The examination is useful in distinguishing rejection from acute tubular necrosis as well as demonstrating several less common complications such as vascular occlusion, urinary extravasation, obstruction, and lymphocele. A previously unreported condition involving a transplant kidney (i.e., renal cortical necrosis) is described which was diagnosed with renal scintigraphy in combination with sonography.

  5. A Review on Renal Toxicity Profile of Common Abusive Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varun Parkash; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse has become a major social problem of the modern world and majority of these abusive drugs or their metabolites are excreted through the kidneys and, thus, the renal complications of these drugs are very common. Morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine and alcohol are the most commonly abused drugs, and their use is associated with various types of renal toxicity. The renal complications include a wide range of glomerular, interstitial and vascular diseases leading to acute or chronic renal failure. The present review discusses the renal toxicity profile and possible mechanisms of commonly abused drugs including morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine, caffeine and alcohol. PMID:23946695

  6. [Renal elastography].

    PubMed

    Correas, Jean-Michel; Anglicheau, Dany; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-04-01

    Renal elastography has become available with the development of noninvasive quantitative techniques (including shear-wave elastography), following the rapidly growing field of diagnosis and quantification of liver fibrosis, which has a demonstrated major clinical impact. Ultrasound or even magnetic resonance techniques are leaving the pure research area to reach the routine clinical use. With the increased incidence of chronic kidney disease and its specific morbidity and mortality, the noninvasive diagnosis of renal fibrosis can be of critical value. However, it is difficult to simply extend the application from one organ to the other due to a large number of anatomical and technical issues. Indeed, the kidney exhibits various features that make stiffness assessment more complex, such as the presence of various tissue types (cortex, medulla), high spatial orientation (anisotropy), local blood flow, fatty sinus with variable volume and echotexture, perirenal space with variable fatty content, and the variable depth of the organ. Furthermore, the stiffness changes of the renal parenchyma are not exclusively related to fibrosis, as renal perfusion or hydronephrosis will impact the local elasticity. Renal elastography might be able to diagnose acute or chronic obstruction, or to renal tumor or pseudotumor characterization. Today, renal elastography appears as a promising application that still requires optimization and validation, which is the contrary for liver stiffness assessment. PMID:26976058

  7. Renal P2 receptors and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Menzies, R I; Unwin, R J; Bailey, M A

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume is a key component of blood pressure homeostasis. Long-term blood pressure is stabilized by the acute pressure natriuresis response by which changes in renal perfusion pressure evoke corresponding changes in renal sodium excretion. A wealth of experimental evidence suggests that a defect in the pressure natriuresis response contributes to the development and maintenance of hypertension. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion are incompletely understood. Increased blood flow through the vasa recta increases renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure, thereby reducing the driving force for transepithelial sodium reabsorption. Paracrine signalling also contributes to the overall natriuretic response by inhibiting tubular sodium reabsorption in several nephron segments. In this brief review, we discuss the role of purinergic signalling in the renal control of blood pressure. ATP is released from renal tubule and vascular cells in response to increased flow and can activate P2 receptor subtypes expressed in both epithelial and vascular endothelial/smooth muscle cells. In concert, these effects integrate the vascular and tubular responses to increased perfusion pressure and targeting P2 receptors, particularly P2X7, may prove beneficial for treatment of hypertension. PMID:25345692

  8. The Acute and Long-Term Adverse Effects of Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has proven to be a highly effective treatment for the removal of kidney stones. Shock waves (SW’s) can be used to break most stone types, and because lithotripsy is the only non-invasive treatment for urinary stones SWL is particularly attractive. On the downside SWL can cause vascular trauma to the kidney and surrounding organs. This acute SW damage can be severe, can lead to scarring with a permanent loss of functional renal volume, and has been linked to potentially serious long-term adverse effects. A recent retrospective study linking lithotripsy to the development of diabetes mellitus has further focused attention on the possibility that SWL may lead to life-altering chronic effects 1. Thus, it appears that what was once considered to be an entirely safe means to eliminate renal stones can elicit potentially severe unintended consequences. The purpose of this review is to put these findings in perspective. The goal is to explain the factors that influence the severity of SWL injury, update current understanding of the long-term consequences of SW damage, describe the physical mechanisms thought to cause SWL injury, and introduce treatment protocols to improve stone breakage and reduce tissue damage. PMID:18359401

  9. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients' clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the "Tower of Babel" of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  10. Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  11. Imaging patients with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Mahan; Weinreb, Jeffrey C

    2016-06-01

    Imaging with intravascular contrast media is generally considered safe, particularly in patients without renal failure. However, as renal function deteriorates, the potential risk of nonallergic-type adverse events increases. This presents a unique challenge, particularly when the use of intravenous contrast media is deemed essential for diagnostic purposes. Following a discussion regarding the definition and epidemiology of kidney injury, this review focuses on the evolving understanding of both contrast-induced nephropathy and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and discusses preventative strategies aimed at minimizing the risk of developing these entities. Alternative non-contrast imaging techniques are also discussed. PMID:27015867

  12. Selection of renal background for quantitative 131I-hippurate relative renal function studies.

    PubMed

    Rosenthall, L; Damtew, B; Kloiber, R

    1981-01-01

    In a series of 100 patients with a full range of normal to poor renal function it was found, using 99mTC--albumin, that the zone between the superior poles of the kidneys best approximates the vascular pool in the renal areas. It is therefore possible to perform sufficiently accurate background-corrected relative renal function studies with 131I-hippurate alone. It is most valid in monitoring renal function in follow-up examinations. Both the accumulated 1- to 2-min count and 0- to 3-min count of the estimated net 131I-hippurate renogram were compared to a standard 99mTc-albumin corrected 131I-hippurate renogram for relative renal function measurements and they correlated very well (r = 0.91). The integrated 0- to 3-min count is preferred to the integrated 1- to 2-min count as the former yields better counting statistics, particularly in renal failure. PMID:7261857

  13. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure. PMID:26798459

  14. [Update in continuous renal replacement techniques].

    PubMed

    Romero-García, M; de la Cueva-Ariza, L; Delgado-Hito, P

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure affects 25% of patients hospitalized in intensive care units. Despite technological advances, the mortality of these patients is still high due to its associated complications. Continuous renal replacement techniques are one of the treatments for acute renal failure because they make it possible to treat the complications and decrease mortality. The nurse's knowledge and skills regarding these techniques will be decisive for the success of the therapy. Consequently, the nurse's experience and training are key components. The objective of this article is to update the knowledge on continuous renal replacement techniques. Keeping this in mind, a review has been made of the physical and chemical principles such as diffusion and convection, among others. A description of the different continuous renal replacement techniques, a presentation of the main vascular access, and a description of the nursing cares and complications related to techniques used have also been provided. PMID:23498371

  15. Fibromuscular Dysplasia-Related Renal Artery Stenosis Associated with Aneurysm: Successive Endovascular Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Serter, Selim Oran, Ismail; Parildar, Mustafa; Memis, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease. FMD of the renal arteries is one of the leading causes of curable hypertension. The simultaneous occurrence of FMD and renal artery aneurysm has been described previously. In this case, we present a fibrodysplastic lesion and an aneurysm in a renal artery treated with a percutanous transluminal angioplasty and coil embolization.

  16. Sickle cell disease: renal manifestations and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Karl A.; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) substantially alters renal structure and function, and causes various renal syndromes and diseases. Such diverse renal outcomes reflect the uniquely complex vascular pathobiology of SCD and the propensity of red blood cells to sickle in the renal medulla because of its hypoxic, acidotic, and hyperosmolar conditions. Renal complications and involvement in sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) include altered haemodynamics, hypertrophy, assorted glomerulopathies, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, impaired urinary concentrating ability, distal nephron dysfunction, haematuria, and increased risks of urinary tract infections and renal medullary carcinoma. SCN largely reflects an underlying vasculopathy characterized by cortical hyperperfusion, medullary hypoperfusion, and an increased, stress-induced vasoconstrictive response. Renal involvement is usually more severe in homozygous disease (sickle cell anaemia, HbSS) than in compound heterozygous types of SCD (for example HbSC and HbSβ+-thalassaemia), and is typically mild, albeit prevalent, in the heterozygous state (sickle cell trait, HbAS). Renal involvement contributes substantially to the diminished life expectancy of patients with SCD, accounting for 16–18% of mortality. As improved clinical care promotes survival into adulthood, SCN imposes a growing burden on both individual health and health system costs. This Review addresses the renal manifestations of SCD and focuses on their underlying mechanisms. PMID:25668001

  17. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Critchley speculated that multiple vascular lesions of the basal ganglia must have an etiological connection to the symptoms of so-called vascular parkinsonism (VP), but without neuropathological confirmation. Some had doubts about its existence because of the lack of the pathologically confirmed case with adequate clinical correlation. At present, VP is characterized clinically by the short-stepped or frozen gait, lead-pipe rigidity, the symmetry of findings, absence of resting tremor, and negative response to levodopa in elderly patients with cerebrovascular lesions on CT/MRI. Pseudobulbar palsies, pyramidal tract findings, and/or multi-infarct dementia coexist in some of the cases. Most of clinically suspected VP patients have cerebral white matter lesions as well as basal ganglia lesions. PMID:9014431

  18. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Pitale, Shailesh; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagha

    2011-01-01

    Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke). It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD). These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ‘Barker's Hypothesis’. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological. PMID:22145131

  19. Testosterone and Vascular Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Rhéure A. M.; Neves, Karla B.; Carneiro, Fernando S.; Tostes, Rita C.

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptors are widely distributed in several tissues, including vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Through classic cytosolic androgen receptors or membrane receptors, testosterone induces genomic and non-genomic effects, respectively. Testosterone interferes with the vascular function by increasing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and arterial thickness. Experimental evidence indicates that sex steroid hormones, such as testosterone modulate the synthesis and bioavailability of NO and, consequently, endothelial function, which is key for a healthy vasculature. Of interest, aging itself is accompanied by endothelial and vascular smooth muscle dysfunction. Aging-associated decline of testosterone levels is accompanied by age-related diseases, such as metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, indicating that very low levels of androgens may contribute to cardiovascular dysfunction observed in these age-related disorders or, in other words, that testosterone may have beneficial effects in the cardiovascular system. However, testosterone seems to play a negative role in the severity of renal disease. In this mini-review, we briefly comment on the interplay between aging and testosterone levels, the vascular actions of testosterone and its implications for vascular aging. Renal effects of testosterone and the use of testosterone to prevent vascular dysfunction in elderly are also addressed. PMID:22514541

  20. Mesalazine-induced renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsson, Henrik; Eriksen, Jaran; Karlén, Per

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 32 Final Diagnosis: Renal colic Symptoms: Acute colic pain • macrohematuria Medication: Mesalazine Clinical Procedure: CT scan of urinary tract • cystoscopy • gynecological consultation • stone analysis Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology • Clinical Pharmacology Objective: Unexpected drug reaction Background: Mesalazine, a 5-aminosalicylic acid compound, is one of the cornerstones in modern treatment regimens of ulcerative colitis. It is generally well tolerated, although adverse reactions such as nephrotoxicity, perimyocarditis, and pancreatitis have been reported. Case Report: We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with colitis who developed recurrent episodes of renal colic after introduction of mesalazine to her treatment. Biochemical analysis of the stones showed that they were composed of crystalized drug material. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the first report of mesalazine precipitation in the urinary tract. We believe that it is vital for physicians to recognize this potentially severe adverse effect in the use of this treatment. PMID:24478817

  1. Adverse events in 50 cats with allergic dermatitis receiving ciclosporin.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Nicole A; McKeever, Patrick J; Eisenschenk, Melissa C

    2011-12-01

    Ciclosporin is an immunosuppressive drug that has been used to treat allergies and other immune-mediated diseases in cats, dogs and humans. Information about the adverse effects of ciclosporin in cats has been limited to smaller studies and case reports. Adverse effects in dogs are mainly gastrointestinal in nature, but humans can also experience hypertension and altered renal function. The aim of this retrospective case series study was to document the occurrence and clinical appearance of adverse events in cats receiving ciclosporin to treat allergic skin disease. The medical records of 50 cats with allergic dermatitis treated with oral ciclosporin (1.9-7.3 mg/kg/day) were reviewed. Adverse events occurred in 66% (33 cats). Adverse events likely to be associated with ciclosporin included the following: vomiting or diarrhoea within 1-8 weeks of receiving ciclosporin (24%), weight loss (16%), anorexia and subsequent hepatic lipidosis (2%) and gingival hyperplasia (2%). Other adverse events less likely to be associated with ciclosporin therapy included the following: weight gain (14%), dental tartar and gingivitis (10%), otitis (4%), chronic diarrhoea (4%), inflammatory bowel disease with indolent gastrointestinal lymphoma (2%), urinary tract infection (2%), cataract (2%), elevated liver enzymes (2%), hyperthyroidism and renal failure (2%) and transient inappropriate urination (2%). Some cats experienced multiple adverse events. Case-control studies are needed to prove cause and effect of ciclosporin with regard to these adverse events. PMID:21545660

  2. The Renal Renin-Angiotensin System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of sodium balance, extracellular fluid volume, vascular resistance, and, ultimately, arterial blood pressure. In the kidney, angiotensin II exerts its effects to conserve salt and water through a combination of the hemodynamic control of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and…

  3. Does Aldosterone Play a Significant Role for Regulation of Vascular Tone?

    PubMed

    Lyngsø, Kristina S; Assersen, Kasper; Dalgaard, Emil G; Skott, Ole; Jensen, Boye L; Hansen, Pernille B L

    2016-07-01

    Besides the well-known renal effects of aldosterone, the hormone is now known to have direct vascular effects. Clinical observations underline substantial adverse effects of aldosterone on cardiovascular function. The source of systemic circulating aldosterone is the adrenal gland zona glomerulosa cells through stimulus-secretion coupling involving depolarization, opening of L- and T-type calcium channels and aldosterone synthase activation. Local formation and release in peripheral tissues such as perivascular fat is recognized. Where does aldosterone affect the vasculature? Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) are present in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, and MR-independent pathways are also involved. The vascular effects of aldosterone are complex, both concentration and temporal and spatial aspects are relevant. The acute response includes vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide formation and vasoconstrictor effects through endothelial-contracting cyclooxygenase-derived factors and a changed calcium handling. The response to aldosterone can change within the same blood vessels depending on the exposure time and status of the endothelium. Chronic responses involve changed levels of reactive oxygen radicals, endothelial Na-influx and smooth muscle calcium channel expression. Furthermore, perivascular cells for example mast cells have also been suggested to participate in the chronic response. Moreover, the vascular effect of aldosterone depends on the status of the endothelium which is likely the cause of the very different responses to aldosterone and MR treatment observed in human studies going from increased to decreased flow depending on whether the patient had prior cardiovascular disease with endothelial dysfunction or not. A preponderance of constrictor versus dilator responses to aldosterone could therefore be involved in the detrimental vascular actions of the hormone in the setting of endothelial dysfunction and contribute to explain

  4. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  5. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  6. [Renal colic].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, J M

    1999-01-01

    The appropriate approach to renal colic, which should be known by the family doctor, is presented. The incidence of this condition in the emergency department of a large general hospital is described as well as the physiopathology of pain, its clinical aspects and the therapeutic attitudes. Renal colic is frequent, it is often possible to diagnose the clinical aspects and general practitioners have the competence for treatment. The use of analgesic drugs, in the correct dosage, is enough to relieve pain and suffering in most of the patients. PMID:10423866

  7. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  8. Relationship between Kidney Dysfunction and Ischemic Stroke Outcomes: Albuminuria, but Not Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate, Is Associated with the Risk of Further Vascular Events and Mortality after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria are known to be associated with ischemic stroke outcomes. In this study, we investigated the longitudinal relationships of the two markers with mortality, vascular events and functional outcomes in a stroke cohort. Methods A total of 295 patients with acute ischemic stroke were prospectively recruited in a single center between May 2012 and February 2015. Renal dysfunction was defined as a decreased eGFR (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2) or albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g). Good functional outcome at 6 months was defined as a modified Rankin scale score ≤ 2, and the occurrence of major vascular events (stroke, acute coronary syndrome or peripheral artery occlusion) or death was monitored. The associations between renal dysfunction and mortality, major vascular events, and 6-month functional outcome were evaluated by the Cox proportional hazards model and logistic regression analysis. Unadjusted and adjusted hazards ratios (HRs), odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained. A Kaplan–Meier survival curve for composite adverse events (major vascular events or death) was also computed according to the presence or absence of albuminuria. Results Albuminuria, not eGFR, was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.028; HR 2.15; 95% CI 1.09–4.25) and major vascular events (P = 0.044; HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.02–4.94) in the multivariate Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, alcohol history, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and eGFR. In addition, albuminuria was negatively associated with 6-month functional outcome in the multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, alcohol history and eGFR (P = 0.001; OR 0.36; 95% CI 0

  9. Safety of Eplerenone for Kidney-Transplant Recipients with Impaired Renal Function and Receiving Cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Coralie; Lavaud, Sylvie; Toupance, Olivier; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Jaisser, Frederic; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Animal studies have highlighted the role of vascular mineralocorticoid receptor during Cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists could improve kidney survival but are not commonly used during renal impairment and in association with several immunosuppressive drugs due to a supposed higher risk of adverse events. We tested the tolerance of eplerenone according to its expected adverse events: hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, acute kidney failure, or any other adverse event. Methods We conducted a single-center, prospective, open-label study in 31 kidney-transplant recipients with impaired renal function (30 and 50 mL/min/1.73m2) and receiving cyclosporine A. All patients received eplerenone 25 mg/d for 8 weeks. Serum potassium, renal function and expected adverse events were closely monitored. Results Eight patients experienced mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L), one moderate hyperkalemia (>5.5 mmol/L) and had to receive potassium-exchange resin. No severe hyperkalemia (>6 mmol/L) occurred. One acute kidney failure was observed, secondary to diarrhea. Basal serum potassium and bicarbonate were independently associated with a higher risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L) under treatment (OR 6.5, p = 0.003 and 0.7, p = 0.007, respectively). A cut-off value of 4.35 mmol/L for basal serum potassium was the best factor to predict the risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L). Conclusions Until eGFR falls to 30 mL/min/1.73m2, eplerenone could be safely given to kidney-transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine A, if kalemia is closely monitored. When renal function is impaired and if basal kalemia is >4.35 mmol/L, then clinicians should properly balance risk and benefit of eplerenone use and offer dietary advice. An adequately powered prospective randomized study is now needed to test its efficiency (and safety) in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01834768 PMID:27088859

  10. Impaired renal endothelial nitric oxide synthase and reticulocyte production as modulators of hypertension induced by rHuEPO in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sandra; Garrido, Patrícia; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Costa, Elísio; Belo, Luís; Reis, Flávio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2016-04-15

    Our aim was to study the effect of a broad range of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) doses on hematological and biochemical parameters, blood pressure (BP), renal function and damage in the rat, focusing on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Male Wistar rats were divided in 5 groups receiving different doses of rHuEPO (100, 200, 400 and 600IU/kg body weight (BW)/week) and saline solution (control), during 3weeks. Blood and 24h urine were collected to perform hematological and biochemical analysis. BP was measured by the tail-cuff method. Kidney tissue was collected to mRNA and protein expression assays and to characterize renal lesions. A dose-dependent increase in red blood cells count, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels was found with rHuEPO therapy, in rHuEPO200, rHuEPO400 and rHuEPO600 groups. Increased reticulocyte count was found in rHuEPO400 and rHuEPO600 groups. BP raised in all groups receiving rHuEPO. The rHuEPO200 and rHuEPO600 groups presented increased kidney protein levels of HIF2α, a reduction in kidney protein levels of eNOS, and the highest grade of vascular and tubular renal lesions. Our study showed that rHuEPO-induced hypertension is present before significant hematological changes occur and, therefore, might involve direct (renal) and indirect (hematological) effects, which varies according to the dose used. The presence of renal hypoxia reduces eNOS activity. Excessive erythrocytosis increases blood hyperviscosity, which can be modulated by an increase in reticulocytes. Hypertension leads to early renal damage without alterations in traditional markers of renal function, thus underestimating the serious adverse effects and risks. PMID:26924494

  11. Increasing or stabilizing renal epoxyeicosatrienoic acid production attenuates abnormal renal function and hypertension in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Morisseau, Christophe; Wang, JingFeng; Yang, Tianxin; Falck, John R; Hammock, Bruce D; Wang, Mong-Heng

    2007-07-01

    Since epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) affect sodium reabsorption in renal tubules and dilate the renal vasculature, we have examined their effects on renal hemodynamics and sodium balance in male rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet by fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) agonist and an inducer of cytochrome P-450 (CYP) epoxygenases; by N-methanesulfonyl-6-(2-proparyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MSPPOH), a selective EET biosynthesis inhibitor; and by 12-(3-adamantane-1-yl-ureido)dodecanoic acid (AUDA), a selective inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase. In rats treated with fenofibrate (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) ig) or AUDA (50 mg/l in drinking water) for 2 wk, mean arterial pressure, renal vascular resistance, and glomerular filtration rate were lower but renal blood flow was higher than in vehicle-treated control rats. In addition, fenofibrate and AUDA decreased cumulative sodium balance in the HF rats. Treatment with MSPPOH (20 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) iv) + fenofibrate for 2 wk reversed renal hemodynamics and sodium balance to the levels in control HF rats. Moreover, fenofibrate caused a threefold increase in renal cortical CYP epoxygenase activity, whereas the fenofibrate-induced elevation of this activity was attenuated by MSPPOH. Western blot analysis showed that fenofibrate induced the expression of CYP epoxygenases in renal cortex and microvessels and that the induction effect of fenofibrate was blocked by MSPPOH. These results demonstrate that the fenofibrate-induced increase of CYP epoxygenase expression and the AUDA-induced stabilization of EET production in the kidneys cause renal vascular dilation and reduce sodium retention, contributing to the improvement of abnormal renal hemodynamics and hypertension in HF rats. PMID:17442729

  12. Accelerated Vascular Aging as a Paradigm for Hypertensive Vascular Disease: Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias; Husmann, Marc; Meyer, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Aging is considered the most important nonmodifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death after age 28 years. Because of demographic changes the world population is expected to increase to 9 billion by the year 2050 and up to 12 billion by 2100, with several-fold increases among those 65 years of age and older. Healthy aging and prevention of aging-related diseases and associated health costs have become part of political agendas of governments around the world. Atherosclerotic vascular burden increases with age; accordingly, patients with progeria (premature aging) syndromes die from myocardial infarctions or stroke as teenagers or young adults. The incidence and prevalence of arterial hypertension also increases with age. Arterial hypertension-like diabetes and chronic renal failure-shares numerous pathologies and underlying mechanisms with the vascular aging process. In this article, we review how arterial hypertension resembles premature vascular aging, including the mechanisms by which arterial hypertension (as well as other risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, or chronic renal failure) accelerates the vascular aging process. We will also address the importance of cardiovascular risk factor control-including antihypertensive therapy-as a powerful intervention to interfere with premature vascular aging to reduce the age-associated prevalence of diseases such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertensive nephropathy, and vascular dementia due to cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we will discuss the implementation of endothelial therapy, which aims at active patient participation to improve primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27118295

  13. Cefepime-induced encephalopathy with normal renal function

    PubMed Central

    Meillier, Andrew; Rahimian, David

    2016-01-01

    Cefepime is a fourth-generation cephalosporin that is frequently used in a wide array of infections. Since approval for use, concerns have been raised due to adverse effects including seizures, encephalopathy and myoclonus especially if renal dysfunction is present. Despite having appropriate renal dose adjustments, cases have been found with adverse neurological effects. On this occasion, we present a case of a patient with normal renal function that had demonstrated cefepime-induced encephalopathy with full resolution of symptoms following discontinuation of the medication. PMID:27274853

  14. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  15. Exercise hypertension: an adverse prognosis?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan G; Rubin, Stanley A; Ellestad, Myrvin H

    2009-01-01

    We sought to clarify the prognostic importance of an "exaggerated" or "hypertensive" systolic blood pressure response to exercise during an exercise test. Studies evaluating the prognosis for cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality in those with hypertension during exercise testing were systematically reviewed. Fourteen studies were identified. Six studies were of healthy volunteers or hypertensives. Eight studies were in subjects with known or suspected heart disease. Without established heart disease, exercise hypertension predicted cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. However, two of the six studies included a multivariate analysis; both demonstrated no independent association. Studies in subjects with known or suspected heart disease demonstrated that exercise hypertension predicted fewer cardiac events and lesser mortality or, after multivariate adjustment, no associated risk. In a healthy population, a higher exercise blood pressure may indicate hypertension or prehypertension, instead of normal vascular function, and an associated long-term adverse prognosis. In a population with a high burden of heart disease, the highest risk subjects with the most extensive cardiac disease may not be capable of generating pressure or workload to allow the manifestation of exercise systolic hypertension. By comparison, therefore, those with exercise hypertension have a better prognosis. PMID:20409979

  16. Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeisberg, Michael; Maeshima, Yohei; Mosterman, Barbara; Kalluri, Raghu

    2002-01-01

    During progression of chronic renal disease, qualitative and quantitative changes in the composition of tubular basement membranes (TBMs) and interstitial matrix occur. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated activation of tubular epithelial cells (TECs) is speculated to be a key contributor to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. To further understand the pathogenesis associated with renal fibrosis, we developed an in vitro Boyden chamber system using renal basement membranes that partially mimics in vivo conditions of TECs during health and disease. Direct stimulation of TECs with TGF-β1/epithelial growth factor results in an increased migratory capacity across bovine TBM preparations. This is associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9. Indirect chemotactic stimulation by TGF-β1/EGF or collagen type I was insufficient in inducing migration of untreated TECs across bovine TBM preparation, suggesting that basement membrane integrity and composition play an important role in protecting TECs from interstitial fibrotic stimuli. Additionally, neutralization of MMPs by COL-3 inhibitor dramatically decreases the capacity of TGF-β1-stimulated TECs to migrate through bovine TBM preparation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that basement membrane structure, integrity, and composition play an important role in determining interstitial influences on TECs and subsequent impact on potential aberrant cell-matrix interactions. PMID:12057905

  17. Renal Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal calculi is reviewed in general terms followed by the results of investigation of 439 patients with renal calculi studied by the author at Toronto General Hospital over a 13-year period. Abnormalities of probable pathogenetic significance were encountered in 76% of patients. Idiopathic hypercalciuria was encountered in 42% of patients, primary hyperparathyroidism in 11%, urinary infection in 8% and miscellaneous disorders in 8%. The incidence of uric acid stones and cystinuria was 5% and 2% respectively. In the remaining 24% of patients in whom no definite abnormalities were encountered the mean urinary magnesium excretion was less than normal. Of 180 patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria, only 24 were females. In the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism, the importance of detecting minimal degrees of hypercalcemia is stressed; attention is also drawn to the new observation that the upper limit of normal for serum calcium is slightly lower in females than in males. The efficacy of various measures advocated for the prevention of renal calculi is also reviewed. In the author's experience the administration of thiazides has been particularly effective in the prevention of calcium stones. Thiazides cause a sustained reduction in urinary calcium excretion and increase in urinary magnesium excretion. These agents also appear to affect the skeleton by diminishing bone resorption and slowing down bone turnover. PMID:5438766

  18. Abdominopelvic vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Sriussadaporn, S

    2000-01-01

    The clinical records of 25 patients with 32 abdominopelvic vascular injuries were reviewed. Sixty per cent of patients sustained blunt trauma and 40 per cent sustained penetrating trauma. Nineteen patients (76%) were in shock on arrival, 2 of them underwent ER thoracotomy when they first arrived in the emergency room. Nine patients (36%) had signs of lower extremity ischemia. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 16-50, mean 29 +/- 10.0. Nineteen patients (76%) had 35 associated injuries. Of the 32 injured vessels; 8 were external iliac artery, 5 were renal vein, 4 were abdominal aorta, 3 were common iliac artery, common iliac vein, external iliac vein and inferior vena cava, and 1 was superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein and median sacral artery. Treatments included: 13 lateral repair, 4 prosthetic grafting, 4 nephrectomy, 3 ligation, 3 reversed saphenous vein grafting, 2 end to end anastomosis, 1 internal iliac artery grafting, 1 intravascular shunt and packing and 1 perihepatic packing. Nine patients (36%) died. High mortality was observed in injuries to the abdominal aorta (75%), inferior vena cava (66.7%), common iliac vein (66.7%) and associated major pelvic fractures (50%). Factors significantly associated with mortality were the presence of shock on arrival, associated injuries and high Injury Severity Score. The author concludes that short prehospital time, effective resuscitation and proper surgical decision making are important for survival in these critically injured patients. PMID:10710864

  19. Abnormalities of endothelial function in patients with predialysis renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Thambyrajah, J; Landray, M; McGlynn, F; Jones, H; Wheeler, D; Townend, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the development of atherosclerotic vascular disease, which is the leading cause of mortality in patients with chronic renal failure.
OBJECTIVE—To examine the relation between predialysis renal failure and endothelial function.
DESIGN—Two groups were studied: 80 patients with non-diabetic chronic renal failure and 26 healthy controls, with similar age and sex distributions. Two indices of endothelial function were assessed: high resolution ultrasonography to measure flow mediated endothelium dependent dilatation of the brachial artery following reactive hyperaemia, and plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor. Endothelium independent dilatation was also assessed following sublingual glyceryl trinitrate. The patients were divided into those with and without overt atherosclerotic vascular disease.
RESULTS—Although patients with chronic renal failure had significantly impaired endothelium dependent dilatation compared with controls (median (interquartile range), 2.6% (0.7% to 4.8%) v 6.5% (4.8% to 8.3%); p < 0.001) and increased von Willebrand factor (254 (207 to 294) v 106 (87 to 138) iu/dl; p < 0.001), there was no difference between renal failure patients with and without atherosclerotic vascular disease. Within the chronic renal failure group, endothelium dependent dilatation and von Willebrand factor were similar in patients in the upper and lower quartiles of glomerular filtration rate (2.7% (0.7% to 6.7%) v 2.8% (1.1% to 5.0%); and 255 (205 to 291) v 254 (209 to 292) iu/dl, respectively). Endothelium independent dilatation did not differ between the renal failure or control groups and was also similar in patients with renal failure irrespective of the degree of renal failure or the presence of atherosclerotic vascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Endothelial function is abnormal in chronic renal failure, even in patients with mild renal insufficiency and those without

  20. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  1. Tubular Overexpression of Angiopoietin-1 Attenuates Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heedoo; Kim, Yeawon; Liu, Tuoen; Guo, Qiusha; Geminiani, Julio J.; Austin, Paul F.; Chen, Ying Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has highlighted the pivotal role of microvasculature injury in the development and progression of renal fibrosis. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) is a secreted vascular growth factor that binds to the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor. Ang-1/Tie2 signaling is critical for regulating blood vessel development and modulating vascular response after injury, but is dispensable in mature, quiescent vessels. Although dysregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling has been well studied in renal pathologies, much less is known about the role of the Ang-1/Tie2 pathway in renal interstitial fibrosis. Previous studies have shown contradicting effects of overexpressing Ang-1 systemically on renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis when different engineered forms of Ang-1 are used. Here, we investigated the impact of site-directed expression of native Ang-1 on the renal fibrogenic process and peritubular capillary network by exploiting a conditional transgenic mouse system [Pax8-rtTA/(TetO)7 Ang-1] that allows increased tubular Ang-1 production in adult mice. Using a murine unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) fibrosis model, we demonstrate that targeted Ang-1 overexpression attenuates myofibroblast activation and interstitial collagen I accumulation, inhibits the upregulation of transforming growth factor β1 and subsequent phosphorylation of Smad 2/3, dampens renal inflammation, and stimulates the growth of peritubular capillaries in the obstructed kidney. Our results suggest that Ang-1 is a potential therapeutic agent for targeting microvasculature injury in renal fibrosis without compromising the physiologically normal vasculature in humans. PMID:27454431

  2. Tubular Overexpression of Angiopoietin-1 Attenuates Renal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir; Manson, Scott R; Lee, Heedoo; Kim, Yeawon; Liu, Tuoen; Guo, Qiusha; Geminiani, Julio J; Austin, Paul F; Chen, Ying Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has highlighted the pivotal role of microvasculature injury in the development and progression of renal fibrosis. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) is a secreted vascular growth factor that binds to the endothelial-specific Tie2 receptor. Ang-1/Tie2 signaling is critical for regulating blood vessel development and modulating vascular response after injury, but is dispensable in mature, quiescent vessels. Although dysregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling has been well studied in renal pathologies, much less is known about the role of the Ang-1/Tie2 pathway in renal interstitial fibrosis. Previous studies have shown contradicting effects of overexpressing Ang-1 systemically on renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis when different engineered forms of Ang-1 are used. Here, we investigated the impact of site-directed expression of native Ang-1 on the renal fibrogenic process and peritubular capillary network by exploiting a conditional transgenic mouse system [Pax8-rtTA/(TetO)7 Ang-1] that allows increased tubular Ang-1 production in adult mice. Using a murine unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) fibrosis model, we demonstrate that targeted Ang-1 overexpression attenuates myofibroblast activation and interstitial collagen I accumulation, inhibits the upregulation of transforming growth factor β1 and subsequent phosphorylation of Smad 2/3, dampens renal inflammation, and stimulates the growth of peritubular capillaries in the obstructed kidney. Our results suggest that Ang-1 is a potential therapeutic agent for targeting microvasculature injury in renal fibrosis without compromising the physiologically normal vasculature in humans. PMID:27454431

  3. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  4. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Renal tubular acidosis - proximal; Type II RTA; RTA - proximal; Renal tubular acidosis type II ... by alkaline substances, mainly bicarbonate. Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Type II RTA) occurs when bicarbonate is not ...

  5. Update in the classification and treatment of complex renal injuries.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Kim, Fernando J; Moore, Ernest E; Hirano, Elcio Shiyoiti; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira; Nascimento, Barto; Rizoli, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    The "Evidence-Based Telemedicine - Trauma and Acute Care Surgery" (EBT-TACS) Journal Club performed a critical review of the literature and selected three up-to-date articles on the management of renal trauma defined as American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) injury grade III-V. The first paper was the proposal for the AAST grade 4renal injury substratification into grades 4a (Low Risk) and 4b (High Risk). The second paper was a revision of the current AAST renal injury grading system, expanding to include segmental vascular injuries and to establish a more rigorous definition of severe grade IV and V renal injuries.The last article analyses the diagnostic angiography and angioembolization in the acute management of renal trauma using a national data set in the USA. The EBT-TACS Journal Club elaborated conclusions and recommendations for the management of high-grade renal trauma. PMID:24173488

  6. [Renal stone ileus in xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Schieroni, R; Dogliani, M; Acanfora, F; Gandini, G; Poy, F; Borello, G; Sancipriano, G

    2002-10-01

    A peculiar case of intestinal occlusion caused by a renal stone in a patient with nephroduodenal fistula due to previous xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is reported. Only few cases of nephroduodenal fistula are described in the literature, generally as a single case report or in small series. A nephroduodenal fistula as a result of chronic renal inflammatory disease such as xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, is usually associated with renal stones, recurrent urinary tract infections or endocrine disorders. Finally, renal stone as a cause of ileus is an event rarely described in the literature. In the case described, a correct preoperative diagnosis was possible with computerized tomography. During the operation a big renal stone was found and removed from the small bowel, but a limited resection was necessary because of the vascular impairment of the tract. At 8-month follow-up from operation, the patient was in good health, and no symptoms of renal or intestinal diseases were found. PMID:12370672

  7. Vascular Complications of Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Alan C; Touyz, Rhian M; Lang, Ninian N

    2016-07-01

    Development of new anticancer drugs has resulted in improved mortality rates and 5-year survival rates in patients with cancer. However, many of the modern chemotherapies are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that increase cardiovascular risk in cancer patients, including hypertension, thrombosis, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. These limitations restrict treatment options and might negatively affect the management of cancer. The cardiotoxic effects of older chemotherapeutic drugs such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, and anticancer antibiotics have been known for a while. The newer agents, such as the antiangiogenic drugs that inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor signalling are also associated with cardiovascular pathology, especially hypertension, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and proteinuria. Exact mechanisms by which vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors cause these complications are unclear but impaired endothelial function, vascular and renal damage, oxidative stress, and thrombosis might be important. With increasing use of modern chemotherapies and prolonged survival of cancer patients, the incidence of cardiovascular disease in this patient population will continue to increase. Accordingly, careful assessment and management of cardiovascular risk factors in cancer patients by oncologists and cardiologists working together is essential for optimal care so that prolonged cancer survival is not at the expense of increased cardiovascular events. PMID:26968393

  8. Renal Dysfunction in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Woo

    2011-01-01

    During treatment of acute heart failure (AHF), worsening renal function is often complicated and results in a complex clinical course. Furthermore, renal dysfunction is a strong independent predictor of long-term adverse outcomes in patients with AHF. Traditionally, the predominant cause of renal dysfunction has been attributed to impairment of cardiac output and relative underfilling of arterial perfusion. Recently, emerging data have led to the importance of venous congestion and elevated intra-abdominal pressure rather than confining it to impaired forward cardiac output as the primary driver of renal impairment. Relief of congestion is a major objective of AHF treatment but therapy is still based on the administration of loop diuretics. The results of the recently performed controlled studies for the assessment of new treatments to overcome resistance to diuretic treatment to protect kidneys from untoward effects have been mostly neutral. Better treatment of congestion in heart failure remains a major problem. PMID:22125554

  9. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  10. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Hung; Wang, Chuang-Wei; Dao, Ro-Lan

    2016-07-01

    The clinical manifestations of drug eruptions can range from mild maculopapular exanthema to severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCAR), including drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) which are rare but occasionally fatal. Some pathogens may induce skin reactions mimicking SCAR. There are several models to explain the interaction of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), drug and T-cell receptor (TCR): (i) the "hapten/prohapten" theory; (ii) the "p-i concept"; (iii) the "altered peptide repertoire"; and (iv) the "altered TCR repertoire". The checkpoints of molecular mechanisms of SCAR include specific drug antigens interacting with the specific HLA loci (e.g. HLA-B*15:02 for carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN and HLA-B*58:01 for allopurinol-induced SCAR), involvement of specific TCR, induction of T-cell-mediated responses (e.g. granulysin, Fas ligand, perforin/granzyme B and T-helper 1/2-associated cytokines) and cell death mechanism (e.g. miR-18a-5p-induced apoptosis; annexin A1 and formyl peptide receptor 1-induced necroptosis in keratinocytes). In addition to immune mechanism, metabolism has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of SCAR, such as recent findings of strong association of CYP2C9*3 with phenytoin-induced SCAR and impaired renal function with allopurinol SCAR. With a better understanding of the mechanisms, effective therapeutics and prevention for SCAR can be improved. PMID:27154258

  11. The AMPLATZER Vascular Plug 4: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Petrocelli, Francesco; Seitun, Sara

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this communication is to describe our preliminary experience with the AMPLATZER Vascular Plug 4 (AVP 4) in peripheral vascular embolization. The AVP 4 was used for peripheral vascular embolization in five patients with renal pseudoaneurysm (n = 2), postsurgical peritoneal bleeding (n = 1), posttraumatic gluteal hemorrhage (n = 1), and intercostal pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). Occlusion time was recorded. Patients were followed up clinically and by imaging for 1 month after the procedure. All treated vessels or vascular abnormalities were successfully occluded within 3 min for low-flow circulation and over 8 min for high-flow circulation. At 1-month follow-up, all patients were symptom-free. All deployed devices remained in the original locations and desirable configurations. In conclusion, the AVP 4 seems to be safe and effective for occluding peripheral vessels and vascular abnormalities. Because of its compatibility with 0.038-in. catheters, it can be deployed through a diagnostic catheter following angiography without exchanging a sheath or guiding catheter. Compared with the previous generation of vascular plugs, the AVP 4 allows for faster procedure times and decreased exposure to radiation.

  12. Radiocontrast-induced renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Misson, R.T.; Cutler, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretical advantages over the presently used agents. 58 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  13. Effects of opioid peptides on neural control of renal function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1990-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists on the renal vascular (renal blood flow) and tubular (urinary sodium excretion) responses to renal nerve stimulation and norepinephrine in anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Graded frequency renal nerve stimulation (0.5-4.0 Hz) and doses of norepinephrine (10-80 ng/kg) produced frequency and dose-dependent decreases in renal blood flow. The renal vasoconstrictor responses were not altered by intravenous infusion of the opioid receptor agonists methionine enkephalin (mu and delta, 75 micrograms/kg/min) or U-50488H (kappa, 20 micrograms/kg/min) or administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg/kg i.v.). The antinatriuretic response to low frequency (less than 1.0 Hz) electrical renal nerve stimulation was prevented by naloxone but not affected by methionine enkephalin administration without changes in glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow. These studies suggest that endogenous opioid receptor mechanisms are involved in the increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption response to low frequency renal nerve stimulation but not in the renal vasoconstrictor response to either renal nerve stimulation or norepinephrine. This might occur by facilitation of the renal nerve terminal release, the direct renal tubular action, or both, of norepinephrine to influence renal tubular sodium reabsorption. PMID:2351429

  14. Elevated Plasma Homocysteine Level in Vascular Dementia Reflects the Vascular Disease Process

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Karin; Gustafson, Lars; Hultberg, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with vascular dementia (VaD) exhibit particularly elevated levels of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) compared to patients with other psychogeriatric diseases. Methods We investigated the main determinants (age, renal impairment, cobalamin/folate status and presence of extracerebral vascular disease) of plasma tHcy in 525 patients with VaD. Furthermore, 270 patients with depression were used as a reference group to reveal the potential specificity of elevated plasma tHcy in patients with VaD. Results Elevated plasma tHcy levels in patients with VaD could only partly be attributed to cobalamin/folate deficiency or renal impairment. Plasma tHcy might also be related to the vascular disease process since patients with depression and vascular disease exhibited similar plasma tHcy levels to patients with VaD. Conclusion Our findings suggest that elevated plasma tHcy might be a sensitive marker for the vascular disease process in patients with VaD and that the level also is a reflection of changes in the other main determinants of plasma tHcy. PMID:23569455

  15. Ouabain protects against adverse developmental programming of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Khodus, Georgiy R; Kruusmägi, Markus; Kamali-Zare, Padideh; Liu, Xiao-Li; Eklöf, Ann-Christine; Zelenin, Sergey; Brismar, Hjalmar; Aperia, Anita

    2010-01-01

    The kidney is extraordinarily sensitive to adverse fetal programming. Malnutrition, the most common form of developmental challenge, retards the formation of functional units, the nephrons. The resulting low nephron endowment increases susceptibility to renal injury and disease. Using explanted rat embryonic kidneys, we found that ouabain, the Na,K-ATPase ligand, triggers a calcium-nuclear factor-κB signal, which protects kidney development from adverse effects of malnutrition. To mimic malnutrition, kidneys were serum deprived for 24 h. This resulted in severe retardation of nephron formation and a robust increase in apoptosis. In ouabain-exposed kidneys, no adverse effects of serum deprivation were observed. Proof of principle that ouabain rescues development of embryonic kidneys exposed to malnutrition was obtained from studies on pregnant rats given a low-protein diet and treated with ouabain or vehicle throughout pregnancy. Thus, we have identified a survival signal and a feasible therapeutic tool to prevent adverse programming of kidney development. PMID:20975704

  16. Adverse effects of human immunoglobulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E Richard

    2013-07-01

    Human immunoglobulin (IG) is used for IgG replacement therapy in primary and secondary immunodeficiency, for prevention and treatment of certain infections, and as an immunomodulatory agent for autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. IG has a wide spectrum of antibodies to microbial and human antigens. Several high-titered IGs are also available enriched in antibodies to specific viruses or bacterial toxins. IG can be given intravenously (IGIV), intramuscularly (IGIM) or by subcutaneous infusions (SCIG). Local adverse reactions such as persistent pain, bruising, swelling and erythema are rare with IGIV infusions but common (75%) with SCIG infusions. By contrast, adverse systemic reactions are rare with SCIG infusions but common with IGIV infusions, occurring as often as 20% to 50% of patients and 5% to 15% of all IGIV infusions. Systemic adverse reactions can be immediate (60% of reactions) occurring within 6 hours of an infusion, delayed (40% of reactions) occurring 6 hours-1 week after an infusion, and late (less than 1% of reactions), occurring weeks and months after an infusion. Immediate systemic reactions such as head and body aches, chills and fever are usually mild and readily treatable. Immediate anaphylactic and anaphylactoid reactions are uncommon. The most common delayed systemic reaction is persistent headache. Less common but more serious delayed reactions include aseptic meningitis, renal failure, thromboembolism, and hemolytic reactions. Late reactions are uncommon but often severe, and include lung disease, enteritis, dermatologic disorders and infectious diseases. The types, incidence, causes, prevention, and management of these reactions are discussed. PMID:23835249

  17. Effects of long-term caffeine consumption on renal function in spontaneously hypertensive heart failure prone rats.

    PubMed

    Tofovic, S P; Jackson, E K

    1999-03-01

    Our previous studies supported the hypothesis that prolonged administration of caffeine to animals with high-renin hypertension causes progressive deterioration of renal function. However, thus far this hypothesis has been tested with only a few animal models of hypertension. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis further by investigating the effects of long-term caffeine consumption on renal function in adult spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF/Mcc-fa(cp)) rats, another model of high-renin hypertension. Lean, male, 9-month-old SHHF/Mcc-fa(cp) rats were randomized to receive either normal drinking water (control group) or drinking water containing 0.1% caffeine (caffeine group) for 20 weeks. No changes in body weight, food and fluid intake, urine volume, and sodium and potassium excretion were found in conscious SHHF/Mcc-fa(cp) rats after 10 or 20 weeks of caffeine treatment. However, caffeine treatment accelerated the time-related decline in renal function and augmented urinary protein excretion. Ten weeks into the protocol, creatinine clearance was 3.6+/-0.4 and 5.7+/-0.9 L/kg/day in the caffeine group and control group, respectively (p<0.02), whereas 20 weeks into the study, creatinine clearance was similarly diminished in both groups. Proteinuria was greater in the caffeine group compared with the control group at both 10 (928+/-131 vs. 439+/-21 mg/kg/day, respectively; p<0.02) and 20 weeks (1,202+/-196 vs. 603+/-30 mg/kg/day, respectively; p<0.01) into the protocol. After 20 weeks, all animals were anesthetized and instrumented. Caffeine treatment for 20 weeks had no effects on blood pressure, heart rate, or vascular resistance in four examined vascular beds (abdominal aorta and renal, carotid, and mesenteric arteries). No changes in renal hemodynamics and electrolyte excretion were found, whereas significantly lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR; inulin clearance) and creatinine clearance (p<0.05) were observed in caffeine

  18. Overall survival and final efficacy and safety results from a Japanese phase II study of axitinib in cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eto, Masatoshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Kamei, Yoichi; Fujii, Yosuke; Umeyama, Yoshiko; Ozono, Seiichiro; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    In an open-label, multicenter phase II study of Japanese patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib showed substantial antitumor activity with an acceptable safety profile. Here, we report overall survival and updated efficacy and safety results. Sixty-four Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma following prior therapy with cytokines were treated with axitinib at a starting dose of 5 mg b.i.d. Following median treatment duration of 14.2 months, median overall survival was 37.3 months (95% CI, 28.6–49.9). The objective response rate, the primary endpoint of the study, was 51.6% (95% CI, 38.7–64.2); the median duration of response, 11.1 months (95% CI, 8.2–13.7); and the median progression-free survival was 11.0 months (95% CI, 9.2–12.0), assessed by the independent review committee. Common treatment-related all-grade adverse events were hypertension (88%), hand-foot syndrome (75%), diarrhea (66%), proteinuria (63%), fatigue (55%) and dysphonia (53%). In an exploratory analysis, median overall survival was found to be significantly longer in patients who had greater decreases in plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during the first cycle of treatment. In conclusion, the present study showed axitinib to be effective, and toxicities with long-term treatment were generally controllable with axitinib dose modification and/or standard medications in these Japanese patients. Some frequently reported adverse events warrant close monitoring and management. Changes in the plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 may be used as a prognostic factor for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma following axitinib treatment. This study is registered at http://ClinicalTrial.gov (identifier NCT00569946). PMID:25283266

  19. Overall survival and final efficacy and safety results from a Japanese phase II study of axitinib in cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Eto, Masatoshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Kamei, Yoichi; Fujii, Yosuke; Umeyama, Yoshiko; Ozono, Seiichiro; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-12-01

    In an open-label, multicenter phase II study of Japanese patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib showed substantial antitumor activity with an acceptable safety profile. Here, we report overall survival and updated efficacy and safety results. Sixty-four Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma following prior therapy with cytokines were treated with axitinib at a starting dose of 5 mg b.i.d. Following median treatment duration of 14.2 months, median overall survival was 37.3 months (95% CI, 28.6-49.9). The objective response rate, the primary endpoint of the study, was 51.6% (95% CI, 38.7-64.2); the median duration of response, 11.1 months (95% CI, 8.2-13.7); and the median progression-free survival was 11.0 months (95% CI, 9.2-12.0), assessed by the independent review committee. Common treatment-related all-grade adverse events were hypertension (88%), hand-foot syndrome (75%), diarrhea (66%), proteinuria (63%), fatigue (55%) and dysphonia (53%). In an exploratory analysis, median overall survival was found to be significantly longer in patients who had greater decreases in plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during the first cycle of treatment. In conclusion, the present study showed axitinib to be effective, and toxicities with long-term treatment were generally controllable with axitinib dose modification and/or standard medications in these Japanese patients. Some frequently reported adverse events warrant close monitoring and management. Changes in the plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 may be used as a prognostic factor for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma following axitinib treatment. This study is registered at ClinicalTrial.gov (identifier NCT00569946). PMID:25283266

  20. Aortic intimal sarcoma masquerading as bilateral renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Supreet; Pothineni, Naga Krishna; Syal, Gaurav; Ali, Syed Mujtaba; Krause, Michelle W

    2013-01-01

    Aortic intimal sarcoma is a rare tumor with poor prognosis. The most common manifestations are thromboembolic phenomena and vascular obstruction. We present a case of aortic intimal sarcoma causing bilateral renal artery stenosis which manifested as resistant hypertension and acute kidney inury. Multiple attempts to stent the renal arteries were unsuccessful. Eventually the patient developed acute limb ischemia and oliguric kidney failure as complications of the primary tumor. PMID:24052470

  1. Computed radionuclide urogram for assessing acute renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, J.U.; Lang, E.K.

    1980-05-01

    The computed radionuclide urogram is advocated as a noninvasive diagnostic method for differentiation of the most common prerenal, renal, and postrenal causes of acute renal failure. On the basis of characteristic changes in the effective renal plasma flow rate, the calculated filtration fraction, and the calculated glomerular filtration rate, prerenal conditions such as renal artery stenosis or thrombosis, renal conditions such as acute rejection or acute tubular necrosis, and postrenal conditions such as obstruction or leakage, which are the most common causes of acute renal failure, can be differentiated. In conjunction with morphologic criteria derived from sonograms, a diagnosis with acceptable confidence can be rendered in most instances. Both the computed radionuclide urogram and sonogram are noninvasive and can be used without adverse effects in the presence of azotemia and even anuria. This also makes feasible reexamination at intervals to assess effect of therapy and offer prognostic information.

  2. Use of prostaglandin I2 in three small children at high risk of early renal graft thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Aufricht, C; Kitzmüller, E; Wandl-Vergesslich, K A; Lothaller, M A; Müller, T; Balzar, E

    1996-02-01

    We report the use of prostaglandin I.2. (PGI2) in three small children weighing less than 15 kg at high risk of graft thrombosis after cadaveric renal transplantation complicated by acute tubular necrosis. PGI2 was started at a dose of 5 ng/kg per min within the first 6 h after transplantation, and was continued for 12-15 days. Before and during PGI2 infusion, color-coded and pulsed Doppler sonography was performed. We found immediate restoration of diastolic flow, consistent with a decrease in vascular resistance. During the subsequent days, the sonographically assessed flow pattern and clinical graft function improved gradually. None of the three consecutively treated children developed graft thrombosis or lost his graft; no clinically relevant bleeding or adverse hemodynamic or pulmonary effects were seen. PMID:8611368

  3. Distal Embolic Protection for Renal Arterial Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Dubel, Gregory J. Murphy, Timothy P.

    2008-01-15

    Distal or embolic protection has intuitive appeal for its potential to prevent embolization of materials generated during interventional procedures. Distal protection devices (DPDs) have been most widely used in the coronary and carotid vascular beds, where they have demonstrated the ability to trap embolic materials and, in some cases, to reduce complications. Given the frequency of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal artery stenosis undergoing stent placement, it is reasonable to propose that these devices may play an important role in limiting distal embolization in the renal vasculature. Careful review of the literature reveals that atheroembolization does occur during renal arterial interventions, although it often goes undetected. Early experience with DPDs in the renal arteries in patients with suitable anatomy suggests retrieval of embolic materials in approximately 71% of cases and renal functional improvement/stabilization in 98% of cases. The combination of platelet inhibition and a DPD may provide even greater benefit. Given the critical importance of renal functional preservation, it follows that everything that can be done to prevent atheroembolism should be undertaken including the use of DPDs when anatomically feasible. The data available at this time support a beneficial role for these devices.

  4. Pulmonary manifestations of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Sahni, Sonu; Iftikhar, Asma; Talwar, Arunabh

    2015-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for majority of all primary renal neoplasms. Classic manifestations of RCC include the triad of flank pain, hematuria and a palpable renal mass. Patients with RCC can develop various extra renal manifestations including involvements of the lungs, inferior vena cava, liver and the bones. The pulmonary manifestations of renal cell carcinoma include metastatic disease including endobronchial, pleural, parenchymal or lymph node metastasis, pleural effusion or hemothorax. Pulmonary embolism and tumor embolism is another common manifestation of renal cell carcinoma. RCC is a highly vascular tumor and can cause pulmonary arterio-venous fistulas leading to high output failure. Rarely, RCC can also present with paraneoplastic presentations including cough or bilateral diaphragm paralysis. Drugs used to treat RCC have been associated with drug related pneumonitis and form an important differential diagnosis in patients with RCC on therapy presenting with shortness of breath. In this review we discuss the various pulmonary manifestations of RCC. A high index of suspicion with these presentations can lead to an early diagnosis and assist in instituting an appropriate intervention. PMID:26525375

  5. Duplex scan sonography of renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Rabbia, C; Valpreda, S

    2003-06-01

    Renal artery stenosis is the most common cause of potentially remediable secondary hypertension. The most common causes include atherosclerosis and fibromuscular dysplasia. Particularly the atherosclerotic form is a progressive disease that may lead to gradual and silent loss of renal functional tissue. Thus, early diagnosis of renal artery stenosis is an important clinical objective since interventional therapy may improve or cure hypertension and preserve renal function. Screening for renal artery stenosis is indicated in the suspicion of renovascular hypertension or ischemic nephropathy in order to identify patients in which an endoluminal or a surgical revascularization is advisable. In the recent years many noninvasive tests have been proposed and evaluated in the clinical practice, in alternative to arteriography. These include nuclear scan, color Doppler sonography, CT angiography and MR angiography. Sonography is usually the first diagnostic modality for the non invasive evaluation of renal vascular disease with 95% sensitivity and 90% specificity when performed in dedicated laboratories. Despite sonography is highly affected by operator dependence, and it takes a lot of time to train good operators, actually is the best screening test because it is not expensive, non invasive and accurate. When a discrepancy exists between the clinical data and the results of US, other tests are mandatory. PMID:12865875

  6. Renal Transplantation by Automatic Anastomotic Device in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio; Damiano, Giuseppe; Palumbo, Vincenzo Davide; Spinelli, Gabriele; Buscemi, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Automatic vascular staplers for vascular anastomoses in kidney transplantation may dramatically reduce the operative time and, in particular, warm ischemia time, thus increasing the outcome of transplantation. Ten pigs underwent kidney auto-transplantation by automatic anastomotic device. Kidneys were collected by laparotomy with selective ligations at the renal hilum and perfused with cold storage solution. To overcome the shortage in length of renal hilum, a tract of the internal jugular vein was harvested to increase the length of the vessels. The anastomoses were totally performed by the use of the anastomotic device. On 10 kidney transplants, nine were successful and no complications occurred. Renal resistive indexes showed a slight increase in the immediate postoperative period returning normal at 10 days of follow-up. We demonstrated the possibility to perform renal vascular anastomoses by means of an automatic anastomotic device. This instrument developed for coronary bypass surgery by virtue of the small caliber of the vessels could be adopted on a larger scale for renal transplantation. The reduced warm ischemia time needed for anastomosis may help to achieve a better outcome for the graft and expand the pool of marginal donors in renal transplantation. PMID:25900063

  7. Early atherosclerosis aggravates renal microvascular loss and fibrosis in swine renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong; Eirin, Alfonso; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2016-04-01

    Renal function in patients with atherosclerosis and renal artery stenosis (ARAS) deteriorates more frequently than in nonatherosclerotic RAS. We hypothesized that ARAS aggravates stenotic-kidney micro vascular loss compared to RAS. Domestic pigs were randomized to normal, RAS, and ARAS (RAS fed a high-cholesterol diet) groups (n = 7 each). Ten weeks later stenotic-kidney oxygenation, renal blood flow, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were evaluated in vivo, and micro vascular density by micro-computed tomography. Blood pressure in both RAS and ARAS was elevated; and stenotic-kidney renal blood flow and GFR similarly decreased. RAS decreased the density of small-size cortical microvessels (<200 μm), whereas ARAS extended the decrease to medium-sized microvessels (200-300 μm). Cortical hypoxia and interstitial fibrosis increased in both RAS and ARAS but correlated inversely with micro vascular density only in RAS. Atherosclerosis aggravates loss of stenotic-kidney microvessels, yet additional determinants likely contribute to cortical hypoxia and fibrosis in swine ARAS. PMID:26879682

  8. Can pre-implantation biopsies predict renal allograft function in pediatric renal transplant recipients?

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Jameela A.; Ma, Alison L.; Dufek, Stephanie; Mohamed, Ismail; Mamode, Nizam; Sebire, Neil J.; Marks, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the utility of pre-implantation renal biopsy (PIB) to predict renal allograft outcomes. Methods: This is a retrospective review of all patients that underwent PIB from January 2003 to December 2011 at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, United Kingdom. Thirty-two male patients (56%) aged 1.5-16 years (median: 10.2) at the time of transplantation were included in the study and followed-up for 33 (6-78) months. The results were compared with 33 controls. Results: The PIB showed normal histopathological findings in 13 patients (41%), mild chronic vascular changes in 8 (25%), focal tubular atrophy in one, moderate to severe chronic vascular change in 3, mild to moderate acute tubular damage in 6, and tissue was inadequate in one subject. Delayed graft function (DGF) was observed in 3 patients; 2 with vascular changes in PIB, and one with normal histopathological findings. Two subjects with PIB changes lost their grafts. The estimated glomerular filtration rate at 3-, and 6-months post-transplantation was lower in children with abnormal PIB changes compared with those with normal PIB. There was one case of DGF in the control group, and 4 children lost their grafts including the one with DGF. Conclusion: Pre-implantation renal biopsy can provide important baseline information of the graft with implications on subsequent medical treatment for pediatric renal transplant recipients. PMID:26593162

  9. [Renal physiology].

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Deray, Gilbert; Isnard-Bagnis, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    The kidneys are responsible for the urinary excretion of uremic toxins and the regulation of several body systems such as intra and extracellular volume status, acid-base status, calcium and phosphate metabolism or erythropoiesis. They adapt quantitative and qualitative composition of the urine to keep these systems in balance. The flow of plasma is filtered in the range of 120 mL/min, and depends on the systemic and renal hemodynamics which is subject to self-regulation. The original urine will then be modified in successive segments of the nephron. The proximal nephron is to lead the massive reabsorption of water and essential elements such as sodium, bicarbonates, amino-acids and glucose. The distal nephron includes the distal convoluted tubule, the connector tube and the collecting duct. Its role is to adapt the quality composition of urine to the needs of the body. PMID:22157516

  10. [Adverse reaction of pseudoephedrine].

    PubMed

    López Lois, G; Gómez Carrasco, J A; García de Frías, E

    2005-04-01

    We present a case of a 7 years old girl who developed an episode of myoclonic movements and tremors after being medicated with a not well quantified amount of a pseudoephedrine/antihistamine combination. We want to highlight the potential toxicity of pseudoephedrine, usually administered as part of cold-syrup preparations which are used for symptomatic treatment of upper respiratory tract cough and congestion associated with the common cold and allergic rhinitis. Although these products are generally considered to be safe either by physicians and parents, we can't underestimate the potential adverse events and toxic effects that can occur when administering these medications. PMID:15826569

  11. A biphasic parameter estimation method for quantitative analysis of dynamic renal scintigraphic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, T. S.; Zhang, Jeff L.; Ong, C. K.; Shuter, B.

    2006-06-01

    Dynamic renal scintigraphy is an established method in nuclear medicine, commonly used for the assessment of renal function. In this paper, a biphasic model fitting method is proposed for simultaneous estimation of both vascular and parenchymal parameters from renal scintigraphic data. These parameters include the renal plasma flow, vascular and parenchymal mean transit times, and the glomerular extraction rate. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the stability and confidence of the parameter estimates obtained by the proposed biphasic method, before applying the method on actual patient study cases to compare with the conventional fitting approach and other established renal indices. The various parameter estimates obtained using the proposed method were found to be consistent with the respective pathologies of the study cases. The renal plasma flow and extraction rate estimated by the proposed method were in good agreement with those previously obtained using dynamic computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Atar, Yavuz; Topaloglu, Ilhan; Ozcan, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinuses can be misdiagnosed as primary malignant or benign diseases. A 33-year-old male attended our outpatient clinic complaining of difficulty breathing through the nose, bloody nasal discharge, postnasal drop, snoring, and discharge of phlegm. Endoscopic nasopharyngeal examination showed a vascularized nasopharyngeal mass. Under general anesthesia, multiple punch biopsies were taken from the nasopharynx. Pathologically, the tumor cells had clear cytoplasm and were arranged in a trabecular pattern lined by a layer of endothelial cells. After the initial pathological examination, the pathologist requested more information about the patient's clinical status. A careful history revealed that the patient had undergone left a nephrectomy for a kidney mass diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma 3 years earlier. Subsequently, nasopharyngeal metastatic renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining with CD10 and vimentin. Radiotherapy was recommended for treatment. PMID:23924557

  13. Screening for adverse events.

    PubMed

    Karson, A S; Bates, D W

    1999-02-01

    Adverse events (AEs) in medical patients are common, costly, and often preventable. Development of quality improvement programs to decrease the number and impact of AEs demands effective methods for screening for AEs on a routine basis. Here we describe the impact, types, and potential causes of AEs and review various techniques for identifying AEs. We evaluate the use of generic screening criteria in detail and describe a recent study of the sensitivity and specificity of individual generic screening criteria and combinations of these criteria. In general, the most sensitive screens were the least specific and no small sub-set of screens identified a large percentage of adverse events. Combinations of screens that were limited to administrative data were the least expensive, but none were particularly sensitive, although in practice they might be effective since routine screening is currently rarely done. As computer systems increase in sophistication sensitivity will improve. We also discuss recent studies that suggest that programs that screen for and identify AEs can be useful in reducing AE rates. While tools for identifying AEs have strengths and weaknesses, they can play an important role in organizations' quality improvement portfolios. PMID:10468381

  14. Cabozantinib versus everolimus in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choueiri, Toni K.; Escudier, Bernard; Powles, Thomas; Mainwaring, Paul; Rini, Brian I.; Donskov, Frede; Hammers, Hans; Hutson, Thomas E.; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Peltola, Katriina; Roth, Bruce J.; Bjarnason, Georg A.; Géczi, Lajos; Keam, Bhumsuk; Moroto, Pablo; Heng, Daniel Y. C.; Schmidinger, Manuela; Kantoff, Philip W.; Borgman, Anne; Hessel, Colin; Scheffold, Christian; Schwab, Gisela M.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Motzer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cabozantinib is an oral small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) as well as MET and AXL; each has been implicated in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathobiology or development of resistance to antiangiogenic drugs. This randomized open-label phase 3 trial evaluated the efficacy of cabozantinib compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. Methods The trial randomized 658 patients to receive cabozantinib at a dose of 60 mg daily, or everolimus at a dose of 10 mg daily. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Secondary efficacy endpoints were overall survival and objective response rate. Results Median progression-free survival was 7.4 months with cabozantinib and 3.8 months with everolimus. The risk of progression or death was 42% lower with cabozantinib compared to everolimus (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45 to 0.75; P < 0.001). Objective response rates were 21% with cabozantinib and 5% with everolimus (P < 0.001). A planned interim analysis showed that overall survival was improved with cabozantinib (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.89; P = 0.005) but did not cross the significance boundary. Adverse events (grade 3 or 4, regardless of causality) were reported in 74% of cabozantinib patients and 65% of everolimus patients. Discontinuation of study treatment for adverse events occurred in 9.1% of cabozantinib patients and 10% of everolimus patients. Conclusions Cabozantinib improved progression-free survival compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. PMID:26406150

  15. Renal Interstitial Arteriosclerotic Lesions in Lupus Nephritis Patients: A Cohort Study from China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Dan-dan; Wu, Li-hua; Song, Yan; Yu, Feng; Wang, Su-xia; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate renal arteriosclerotic lesions in patients with lupus nephritis and investigate their associations with clinical and pathological characteristics, especially cardio-vascular features. Design A retrospective cohort study. Participants Seventy-nine patients with renal biopsy-proven lupus nephritis, diagnosed between January 2000 and June 2008 from Peking University First Hospital. Results In clinico-pathological data, patients with arteriosclerosis had higher ratio of hypertension and more severe renal injury indices compared with patients with no renal vascular lesions. More importantly, patients with renal arteriosclerosis had worse cardiac structure and function under transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Patients with renal arteriosclerosis tend to have higher ratios of combined endpoints compared with those of no renal vascular lesions, although the difference didn’t reach statistical meanings (P = 0.104). Conclusion Renal arteriosclerotic lesion was common and associated with vascular immune complex deposits in lupus nephritis. It might have a certain degree of association with poor outcomes and cardiovascular events, which needs further explorations. PMID:26544865

  16. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero G in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Four rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast, five of the seven remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted and their urinary flow rate. Potassium excretion increased. End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause in the rat a decrease in distal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis. The adequacy of other nonatrial volume control mechanisms in regulating renal salt and water conservation in opposition to the studied atrial-renal (Henry-Gauer) reflex of thoracic vascular distension is confirmed.

  17. Menstruation. A hazard in radionuclide renal transplant evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Jaffers, G.J.

    1986-06-01

    Serial Tc-99m DTPA studies were performed to evaluate renal transplant blood flow and function in a 34-year-old woman. A hypervascular pelvic mass with increased blood pool activity was intermittently identified. This hypervascular lesion suggested a pathologic condition of the pelvis, and its blood pool simulated bladder activity, confusing interpretation of renal function. This perplexing vascular lesion was the uterus, with varying degrees of blood flow and blood pool activity depending on the timing of the renal study in relation to the menstrual cycle.

  18. Renal hyalin

    PubMed Central

    Lendrum, A. C.; Slidders, W.; Fraser, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    This describes the sodium sulphate-Alcian Blue (SAB) method for staining amyloid in paraffin sections. Its value lies in the possibility of subsequent counterstaining and thus of revealing the structural relationships of amyloid. In the kidney the topical disposition of amyloid closely resembles the disposition of fibrin in the kidney of diabetics; this suggests that upset in vascular permeability plays a part in determining the site of the amyloid deposits. Furthermore, an aging process in amyloid can now be envisaged resembling the aging of extraluminal fibrin. Both materials proceed to a hyalin material that, staining like collagen, merits the name pseudo-collagen. This term we apply to a hyalin, staining like collagen, for which, we can postulate a specific precursor. Images PMID:4114696

  19. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  20. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... branch of medicine that focuses on the cardiovascular system. ... Circulatory system; Vascular system; Cardiovascular system ... to diagnose, monitor or treat diseases of the circulatory and vascular system include: Cardiac CT for calcium scoring Cardiac MRI ...

  1. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Meeting Events Calendar Vascular Medicine Events Job Bank Professional Practice Position Statements PAD Awareness Vascular Related ... for a new job? Try the SVM Job Bank . Browse the jobs or sign up for job ...

  2. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/007459.htm Heart and vascular services To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood vessels (arteries and veins). Heart and vascular services refers to the branch of medicine that focuses ...

  3. Prostaglandin control of renal circulation in the unanesthetized dog and baboon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, J. A.; Vatner, S. F.; Heyndrickx, G. R.; Boettcher, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of indomethacin and meclofenamate, inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis, were evaluated in the regulation of renal blood flow in conscious and anesthetized dogs and in tranquilized baboons, instrumented with arterial pressure catheters and renal blood flow probes. Indomethacin, 10 mg/kg, did not alter renal blood flow or resistance significantly in the conscious dog. In the anesthetized dog, however, indomethacin caused a reduction in renal blood flow and an elevation of renal vascular resistance. Meclofenamate, 4 mg/kg, reduced renal flow and increased renal vascular resistance in conscious dogs. In conscious dogs and tranquilized primates, indomethacin and meclofenamate reduced the reactive hyperemia in the renal bed. Methoxamine and angiotensin II infused in graded doses induced significantly greater renal vasoconstriction in conscious dogs in the presence of indomethacin. Thus, in the conscious animal, prostaglandins appear to play only a minor part in the control of renal circulation at rest, but they are of greater importance in mediating the renal responses to reactive hyperemia and to vasoconstriction.

  4. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access. PMID:25751545

  5. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  6. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  7. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  8. Tissue-engineered vascular grafts: autologous off-the-shelf vascular access?

    PubMed

    Manson, Roberto J; Unger, Joshua M; Ali, Aamna; Gage, Shawn M; Lawson, Jeffrey H

    2012-11-01

    Dialysis grafts have provided reliable access for millions of patients in need of renal replacement therapy. However, regardless of the material used for artificial dialysis grafts their mean patency remains generally poor and infection rates are greater than native arteriovenous fistulas. The need for superior alternatives to conventional synthetic materials used for vascular access has been an area of investigation for more than 25 years and recently there has been a great deal of progress in the field of tissue-engineered vascular grafts. Many of these technologies are either commercially available or are now entering early phases of clinical trials. This review briefly covers the history, potential advantages, and disadvantages of these technologies, which are likely to create an impact in the field of vascular access surgery. PMID:23217339

  9. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  10. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  11. Vascular Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Hera; Goldie, Lauren C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of human stem and progenitor cells is critically important for the development and optimization of regenerative medicine strategies. For vascular regeneration studies, specifically, a true “vascular stem cell” population has not yet been identified. However, a number of cell types that exist endogenously, or can be generated or propagated ex vivo, function as vascular precursor cells and can participate in and/or promote vascular regeneration. Herein, we provide an overview of what is known about the regulation of their differentiation specifically toward a vascular endothelial cell phenotype. PMID:22866199

  12. Angiotensin antagonists with increased specificity for the renal vasculature.

    PubMed Central

    Taub, K J; Caldicott, W J; Hollenberg, N K

    1977-01-01

    This study was designed to ascertain whether renal vascular angiotensin receptors differ from other systemic angiotensin receptors and whether, on that basis, antagonists with greater specificity for the renal vasculature can be defined. Femoral and renal blood flow and their responses to angiotensin II (AII) and its heptapeptide analogue, 1-des Asp AII (AIII), were measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter in 26 dogs. For the kidney, the threshold doses of AII and AIII were identical (2.5+/-0.27 vs. 2.3+/-0.35 pmol/100 ml renal blood flow, with similar dose-response curves. In contrast, AII had a greater pressor effect (P less than 0.001) and produced more femoral vasoconstriction (P less than 0.001) than AIII. All four antagonists studied (1-Sar, 8-Ala AII [P113]; 8-Ala AII; 1-des Asp, 8-Ala AII; 1-des Asp, 8-Ile AII) induced parallel shifts in the renal blood flow response to AII and AIII. P113 induced greater blockade than 8-Ala AII (P less than 0.001) which, in turn, was more effective than 1-des Asp, 8-Ala AII (P less than 0.001). 1-des Asp, 8-Ile AII was as effective as P113. Each analogue induced an identical inhibition of the renal vascular response to AII and AIII. In addition, AII and AIII induced cross-tachyphylaxis. All lines of evidence suggested that AII and AIII act on a single receptor in the kidney, which differs at least functionally from other systemic vascular receptors. The possibility that heptapeptide analogues represent angiotensin antagonists with greater specificity for the renal vasculature was pursued in a model in which the renin-angiotensin system is activated. Acute, partial thoracic inferior vena caval occlusion was induced in an additional 16 dogs. P113 induced progressive, dose-related hypotension and a limited increase in renal blood flow in this model. The 1-des Asp, 8-Ile AII analogue, conversely, induced a consistent, larger, dose-related renal blood flow increase, with significantly less hypotension over a wide dose range

  13. Contrast induced nephropathy in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, G T C; Lee, E Y P; Irwin, M G

    2016-09-01

    Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) is traditionally associated with outpatient imaging studies. More recently, patients afflicted with vascular pathologies are increasingly undergoing endovascular treatments that require the use of iodinated contrast media (CM) agents, thus placing them as risk of developing CIN. As perioperative physicians, anaesthetists should be aware of the risk factors and measures that might minimize acute kidney injury caused by CM. This review evaluates recent data regarding preventive measures against CIN and where possible, places the evidence in the context of the patient receiving endovascular surgical treatment. Measures including the use of peri-procedural hydration, N-acetylcysteine, statins, remote ischaemic preconditioning, renal vasodilators and renal replacement therapy and the use of alternatives to iodinated contrast agents are discussed. It should be noted that most of the available data regarding CIN are from non-surgical patients. PMID:27566809

  14. Adverse antibiotic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bint, A J; Burtt, I

    1980-07-01

    There is enormous potential for drug interactions in patients who, today, often receive many drugs. Antibiotics are prominent amongst the groups of drugs commonly prescribed. Many interactions take place at the absorption stage. Antacids and antidiarrhoeal preparations, in particular, can delay and reduce the absorption of antibiotics such as tetracyclines and clindamycin, by combining with them in the gastrointestinal tract to form chelates or complexes. Other drugs can affect gastric motility, which in turn often controls the rate at which antibiotics are absorbed. Some broad spectrum antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora of the gut which may be related to malabsorption states. The potentiation of toxic side effects of one drug by another is a common type of interaction. Antibiotics which are implicated in this type of interaction are those which themselves possess some toxicity such as aminoglycosides, some cephalosporins, tetracyclines and colistin. Some of the most important adverse interactions with antibiotics are those which involve other drugs which have a low toxicity/efficacy ratio. These include anticoagulants such as warfarin, anticonvulsants such as phenytoin and phenobarbitone and oral antidiabetic drugs like tolbutamide. Risk of interaction arises when the metabolism of these drugs is inhibited by liver microsomal enzyme inhibitors such as some sulphonamides and chloramphenicol, or is enhanced by enzyme inducers such as rifampicin. PMID:6995091

  15. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  16. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  17. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  18. Angiotensin and thromboxane in the enhanced renal adrenergic nerve sensitivity of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Robinette, J B; Conger, J D

    1990-01-01

    The roles of intrarenal angiotensin (A) and thromboxane (TX) in the vascular hypersensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS) and paradoxical vasoconstriction to renal perfusion pressure (RPP) reduction in the autoregulatory range in 1 wk norepinephrine (NE)-induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats were investigated. Renal blood flow (RBF) responses were determined before and during intrarenal infusion of an AII and TXA2 antagonist. Saralasin or SQ29548 alone partially corrected the slopes of RBF to RNS and RPP reduction in NE-ARF rats (P less than 0.02). Saralasin + SQ29548 normalized the RBF response to RNS. While combined saralasin + SQ29548 eliminated the vasoconstriction to RPP reduction, similar to the effect of renal denervation, appropriate vasodilatation was not restored. Renal vein norepinephrine efflux during RNS was disproportionately increased in NE-ARF (P less than 0.001) and was suppressed by saralasin + SQ29548 infusion (P less than 0.005). It is concluded that the enhanced sensitivity to RNS and paradoxical vasoconstriction to RPP reduction in 1 wk NE-ARF kidneys are the result of intrarenal TX and AII acceleration of neurotransmitter release to adrenergic nerve activity. PMID:2243129

  19. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  20. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  1. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal papillary necrosis, especially after taking over-the-counter pain medicines ... diabetes or sickle cell anemia may reduce your risk. To prevent renal ... over-the-counter pain relievers. Do not take more than the ...

  2. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  3. Hemodynamic and Biologic Determinates of Arteriovenous Fistula Outcomes in Renal Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis depends on a functioning vascular access. Although a variety of access options are available, the arteriovenous fistula remains the best vascular access. Unfortunately the success rate of mature fistula use remains poor. The creation of an arteriovenous fistula is followed by altered hemodynamic and biological changes that may result in neointimal hyperplasia and eventual venous stenosis. This review provides an overview of these changes and the needed research to provide a long lasting vascular access and hence improve outcomes for patients with end-stage renal disease. PMID:26495286

  4. Hemodialysis: an appropriate therapy in myeloma-induced renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sharland, A; Snowdon, L; Joshua, D E; Gibson, J; Tiller, D J

    1997-12-01

    To determine whether vigorous treatment with dialysis is of benefit to patients with myeloma-induced renal failure at presentation, we retrospectively reviewed outcomes in a group of patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma between January 1986 and September 1993. Increased age (P = 0.003), presence of renal impairment (P = 0.006), and failure to enter plateau phase (P < 0.001) were independently associated with shortened survival. However, there was no difference in outcome between patients with severe renal failure, those treated with dialysis, and those with milder renal impairment (median survival, 22 months in both groups), nor was reversibility of renal failure associated with any survival advantage. The lack of correlation between severity or reversibility of the renal failure and survival suggests that there may be characteristics of some patients or their underlying myeloma that are responsible both for renal impairment and for adverse prognosis. In this study, neither age, clinical stage, labeling index, nor response to treatment was able to account for the difference in outcome between patients with and without renal failure. The prolongation of life achieved in the dialysis patients such that their median survival was identical with that of the group with milder renal impairment was considered to represent a significant benefit to these patients and to justify the offer of dialysis to all patients requiring it. PMID:9398122

  5. Evidence-based medicine in renal artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Rabbia, C; Pini, R

    2010-10-01

    Atherosclerotic renovascular disease is an increasingly recognized cause of severe hypertension and declining kidney function. Patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease have been demonstrated to have an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Over the course of the last two decades renal artery revascularization for treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) has gained great increase via percutaneous techniques. However the efficacy of contemporary revascularization therapies in the treatment of renal artery stenosis is unproven and controversial. The indication for renal artery stenting is widely questioned due to a not yet proven benefit of renal revascularization compared to best medical therapy. Many authors question the efficacy of percutaneous renal revascularization on clinical outcome parameters, such as preservation of renal function and blood pressure control. None of the so far published randomized controlled trials could prove a beneficial outcome of RAS revascularization compared with medical management. Currently accepted indications for revascularization are significant RAS with progressive or acute deterioration of renal function and/or severe uncontrollable hypertension, renal function decline with the use of agents blocking the renin-angiotensin system and recurrent flash pulmonary edema. The key point for success is the correct selection of the patient. This article summarizes the background and the limitations of the so far published and still ongoing controlled trials. PMID:20924335

  6. End-stage renal disease and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander; Limperger, Verena; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2016-05-10

    Chronic kidney disease is an established risk factor for arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE). Whereas the overall risk of TE in moderately decreased kidney function is approximately 2.5-fold higher compared to patients with normal renal function, the risk increase is 5.5-fold in patients with severe renal dysfunction. In patients with renal dysfunction and arterial thrombosis (OR: 4.9), malignancy (OR: 5.8) surgery (OR: 14.0) or thrombophilia (OR: 4.3) the risk to suffer from venous TE is higher compared to the risk associated to the baseline renal dysfunction alone. The treatment options for end-stage renal diseases include hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and kidney transplantation. During all treatment modalities thrombotic complications have been described, namely catheter malfunction and shunt thrombosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis in up to 25% of patients, and TE, pulmonary embolism or graft vessel thrombosis in approximately 8% of patients. The reported incidence of reno-vascular thrombosis following renal transplantation leading to hemorrhagic infarction with organ rejection or organ loss varied between 2-12%. Keeping in mind the multifactorial etiology of TE in patients with kidney dysfunction a general screening for thrombophilia in this patient group is not indicated. Selected screening on an individual patient basis should be discussed if the family history for TE is positive or the patient itself had suffered one thrombosis before the onset of the renal disease or multiple TEs during hemodialysis or post kidney transplantation in patients waiting for living donor kidney transplantation. PMID:25639843

  7. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  8. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  9. Late evaluation of the relationship between morphological and functional renal changes and hypertension after non-operative treatment of high-grade renal injuries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anatomical and functional renal alterations and the association with post-traumatic arterial hypertension. Methods The studied population included patients who sustained high grades renal injury (grades III to V) successfully non-operative management after staging by computed tomography over a 16-year period. Beyond the review of medical records, these patients were invited to the following protocol: clinical and laboratory evaluation, abdominal computed tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, DMSA renal scintigraphy, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The hypertensive patients also were submitted to dynamic renal scintigraphy (99mTc EC), using captopril stimulation to verify renal vascular etiology. Results Of the 31 patients, there were thirteen grade III, sixteen grade IV (nine lacerations, and seven vascular lesions), and two grade V injuries. All the patients were asymptomatic and an average follow up post-injury of 6.4 years. None had abnormal BUN or seric creatinine. The percentage of renal volume reduction correlates with the severity as defined by OIS. There was no evidence of renal artery stenosis in Magnetic Resonance angiography (MRA). DMSA scanning demonstrated a decline in percentage of total renal function corresponding to injury severity (42.2 ± 5.5% for grade III, 35.3 ± 12.8% for grade IV, 13.5 ± 19.1 for grade V). Six patients (19.4%) had severe compromised function (< 30%). There was statistically significant difference in the decrease in renal function between parenchymal and vascular causes for grade IV injuries (p < 0.001). The 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring detected nine patients (29%) with post-traumatic hypertension. All the patients were male, mean 35.6 years, 77.8 % had a familial history of arterial hypertension, 66.7% had grade III renal injury, and average post-injury time was 7.8 years. Seven patients had negative captopril renography. Conclusions Late

  10. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in renal transplantation: should ABPM be routinely performed in renal transplant patients?

    PubMed

    Covic, Adrian; Segall, Liviu; Goldsmith, David J A

    2003-12-15

    In renal transplant recipients, hypertension is common and associated with increased cardiovascular and allograft rejection risks. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is required for its accurate diagnosis and adequate treatment, as it clearly offers several advantages over office or casual blood pressure measurements. First, it correlates better with target-organ damage and with cardiovascular mortality. Second, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can eliminate "white coat" hypertension. Most important is the identification of nocturnal hypertension, an independent cardiovascular risk factor. A circadian nondipping pattern is often found in renal transplant recipients, most probably resulting from cyclosporine A and persistent fluid overload in the early posttransplant phase (approximately 70% prevalence), but reflecting an underlying renal (parenchymal or vascular) allograft disease when persistent (approximately 25% prevalence) beyond the first year posttransplant. PMID:14702541

  11. [ANEURYSMAL TYPE RENAL ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA WITH GIANT VENOUS ANEURYSM, MIMICKING RENAL CELL CARCINOMA: A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Nagumo, Yoshiyuki; Komori, Hiroka; Rii, Jyunryo; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Suzuki, Koichiro; Shiga, Naoki; Ota, Tomonori

    2015-04-01

    A 39-year-old man was referred to our clinic for a 7 cm tumor in the right kidney, found by simple CT scan. It was suspected as renal cell carcinoma accompanying tumor emboli in the inferior vena cava by enhanced CT scan. For further evaluation of the tumor emboli, color Doppler ultrasound and enhanced MRI was performed. They showed a large cystic lesion with high velocity turbulent flow and flow voids in T2-weighted imaging, it seemed as giant venous aneurysm of the right renal vein. Subsequently, angiography revealed aneurysmal type renal arteriovenous fistula (AVF), transarterial embolization (TAE) of the arterial feeder with coils was performed on the same day. After 6 months from embolization, there was no recurrences or reinterventions. Color Doppler ultrasound and MRI are beneficial in distinguishing vascular disease from neoplastic disease which may sometimes mimick in other diagnostic imaging studies. In addition TAE seems to be an effective treatment for the AVF. PMID:26415363

  12. Current MRI Techniques for the Assessment of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takamune; Wang, Feng; Quarles, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the past decade a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods have been developed and applied to many kidney diseases. These MRI techniques show great promise, enabling the noninvasive assessment of renal structure, function, and injury in individual subjects. This review will highlight current applications of functional MRI techniques for the assessment of renal disease and discuss future directions. Recent findings Many pathological (functional and structural) changes or factors in renal disease can be assessed by advanced MRI techniques. These include renal vascular structure and function (contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labeling), tissue oxygenation (blood oxygen level-dependent MRI), renal tissue injury and fibrosis (diffusion or magnetization transfer imaging, MR elastography), renal metabolism (chemical exchange saturation transfer, spectroscopic imaging), nephron endowment (cationic-contrast imaging), sodium concentration (23Na-MRI), and molecular events (targeted-contrast imaging). Summary Current advances in MRI techniques have enabled the non-invasive investigation of renal disease. Further development, evaluation, and application of the MRI techniques should facilitate better understanding and assessment of renal disease and the development of new imaging biomarkers, enabling the intensified treatment to high-risk populations and a more rapid interrogation of novel therapeutic agents and protocols. PMID:26066472

  13. 75 FR 13562 - Revised Draft Guidance for Industry on Pharmacokinetics in Patients With Impaired Renal Function...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... 15, 1998 (63 FR 27094), FDA announced the availability of a guidance entitled ``Pharmacokinetics in... its metabolites, changes in renal metabolism can also occur. Renal impairment can also adversely affect some pathways of hepatic and/or gut drug metabolism and has been associated with other...

  14. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  15. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  16. Spontaneous rupture of the kidney in the patients with synchronous renal hemangioma and nephrogenic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Memmedoğlu, Akif; Musayev, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Most renal neoplasms in adults are epithelial in origin and mesenchymal tumors are rarely encountered. Vascular tumors and tumor-like lesions account for a very small subset. Hemangioma of the kidney is a rarely seen benign vascular neoplasm that probably arises from angioblastic cells. Its general sign is macroscopic hematuria with or without pain. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult or impossible. Previously, spontaneous rupture of the kidney caused by renal hemangioma was not reported in the English literature. In this study, two cases with a history of nephrogenic hypertension who presented with spontaneous renal rupture are presented. There wasn’t any trauma history in the background of our patients. A long-standing nephrogenic hypertension was present in both patients. Patients underwent radical nephrectomy due to rupture of the renal tumor. In histopathological examination, capillary hemangioma was detected in the renal medulla in both cases. Patients didn’t need antihypertensive therapy during the postoperative period. PMID:26623154

  17. ROLE OF ATP IN REGULATING RENAL MICROVASCULAR FUNCTION AND IN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhengrong; Inscho, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an essential energy substrate for cellular metabolism but it can also influence many biological processes when released into the extracellular milieu. Research has established that extracellular ATP acts as an autocrine/paracrine factor that regulates many physiological functions. Alternatively, excessive extracellular ATP levels contribute to pathophysiological processes such as inflammation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and atherosclerosis. Renal P2 receptors are widely distributed throughout glomeruli, vasculature and tubular segments, and participate in controlling renal vascular resistance, mediating renal autoregulation, and regulating tubular transport function. This review will focus on the role of ATP-P2 receptor signaling in regulating renal microvascular function and autoregulation, recent advances on the role of ATP-P2 signaling in hypertension-associated renal vascular injury, and emerging new directions. PMID:21768526

  18. The role of renal denervation in the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sobotka, Paul A; Krum, Henry; Böhm, Michael; Francis, Darrel P; Schlaich, Markus P

    2012-06-01

    The heart and kidney interact in terms of hemodynamics and neurohumoral regulatory mechanisms, and this helps to maintain circulatory homeostasis under normal conditions. However, the normal regulatory mechanisms become inappropriate in the setting of congestive heart failure (CHF), and significant renal dysfunction often develops in CHF patients. Activation of renal sympathetic efferent nerves causes renin release, sodium and water retention, and reduced renal blood flow, all hallmarks of the renal manifestations of CHF. An increase in plasma levels of angiotensin II that is mediated in part by renal sympathetic activation has an effect on the central nervous system to further increase global sympathetic tone. Renal sympathetic activity can be assessed clinically by renal norepinephrine spillover, and an increase in renal norepinephrine spillover in CHF predicts reduced survival. In addition to efferent sympathetic activation, activation of renal sensory nerves in CHF may cause a reflex increase in sympathetic tone that contributes to elevated peripheral vascular resistance and vascular remodeling as well as left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction. In animal models of heart failure, surgical renal denervation has been shown to improve both renal and ventricular function. Although surgical renal denervation has long been known to lower blood pressure and improve survival in patients with hypertension, the invasive nature of this approach and its associated complications has limited its appeal. However, a novel catheter-based device has recently been introduced that specifically interrupts both efferent and afferent renal nerves, and there is significant interest in the use of this device to treat both hypertension and CHF. Several ongoing clinical trials are investigating the safety and efficacy of renal denervation in patients with CHF. PMID:22392370

  19. Medical Grand Rounds: refractory hypertension and renal insufficiency in a patient with renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Huot, S. J.; Scoutt, L. M.; Meier, G. H.

    1996-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis has become increasingly common as a cause of refractory hypertension and renal insufficiency. There is a high prevalence of bilateral disease and the lesions tend to progress over time. Newer, less invasive, imaging modalities such as doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance angiography, and spiral CT scanning are evolving technologies in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. Advances in surgical technique, particularly the development of extra-anatomical procedures such as spleno-renal and hepato-renal by pass, have significantly lowered surgical morbidity and mortality and provides revascularization options for patients with complex vascular disease that would previously not have been considered because of their high surgical risk. Improvements in angioplasty technique and the use of stents are broadening the types of lesions that can be successfully approached with these techniques and may be particularly helpful for patients with more severe cardiac or cerebrovascular disease. The benefits of revascularization may be even greater for preservation of renal function than for control of blood pressure in properly selected patients. It is difficult to predict which patients will benefit from surgical revascularization versus medical management of RAS. Knowledge of the progressive nature of RAS, the high prevalence of bilateral disease, and the clinical characteristics that correlate with progression (e.g., decreasing renal size) are helpful in guiding clinical decisions regarding intervention. Additional studies to determine the predictive value of non-invasive tests such as CRS, doppler ultrasound before and after administration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and other tests, are needed to assist the clinician in identifying who will benefit most from revascularization both in terms of renal function and blood pressure control. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9381740

  20. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  1. Nitric Oxide Modulates Vascular Disease in the Remnant Kidney Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Duk-Hee; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Feng, Lili; Johnson, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    A loss of the microvascular endothelium occurs in the remnant kidney model of renal disease and may play an important role in progression (Kang et al, J Am Soc Nephrol, 12:1434, 2001). Given that nitric oxide (NO) is a potent endothelial cell survival factor, we hypothesized that stimulating (with l-arginine) or blocking (with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, (l-NAME)) NO synthesis could modulate the integrity of the microvasculature and hence affect progression of renal disease. Rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (RK) and then were randomized at 4 weeks to receive vehicle, l-NAME, or l-arginine for 4 weeks. Systolic blood pressure and renal function was measured, and tissues were collected at 8 weeks for histological and molecular analyses. The effect of modulation of NO on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and mouse medullary thick ascending limb tubular epithelial cells (mTAL) was also studied. Inhibition of NO with l-NAME was associated with more rapid progression compared to RK alone, with worse blood pressure, proteinuria, renal function, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The injury was also associated with more glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cell loss in association with an impaired endothelial proliferative response. Interestingly, the preglomerular endothelium remained intact or was occasionally hyperplastic, and this was associated with a pronounced proliferation of the vascular SMCs with de novo expression of VEGF. Cell culture studies confirmed a divergent effect of NO inhibition on VEGF expression, with inhibition of VEGF synthesis in mTAL cells and stimulation of VEGF in vascular SMC. In contrast to the effects of NO inhibition, stimulation of NO with l-arginine had minimal effects in this rat model of progressive renal disease. These studies confirm that blockade of NO synthesis accelerates progression of renal disease in the remnant kidney model, and

  2. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology. PMID:26036792

  3. Use of functional mass in renal scintigraphy to detect segmental arterial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Stibolt, T.B. Jr.; Bacher, J.D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Lock, A.; Jones, A.E.; Bailey, J.J.

    1982-04-01

    Renography using a gamma camera, a minicomputer, (/sup 123/I)orthoiodohippurate ((/sup 123/I)OIH), and a canine model was employed to evaluate computer-generated maps of regional renal function. Renograms were obtained before and after ligations of the right renal arterial branch in four dogs, with subsequent angiographic and histologic confirmation of the lesions. Postoperative time-activity curves were normal. Washout and persistence index in three of four right kidneys showed regional abnormality. Functional renal mapping may provide a clinical technique for evaluating human renal vascular hypertension.

  4. International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing of renal services in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tricia; Roderick, Paul

    2007-12-01

    In England and Wales, the quantity and quality of renal services have improved significantly in the last decade. While acceptance rates for renal replacement therapy appear low by international standards, they are now commensurate with many other northern European countries. The major growth in renal services has been in hemodialysis, especially at satellite units. Health care is predominantly publicly funded through a tax-based National Health Service, and such funding has increased in the last 10 years. Improvements in health outcomes in England and Wales are expected to continue due to the recent implementation of standards, initiatives, and monitoring mechanisms for renal transplantation, vascular access, and patient transport. PMID:17653861

  5. Clinical pharmacology and vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Silvestrelli, G; Corea, F; Micheli, S; Lanari, A

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment and several drugs of abuse have been associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). However, there is a paucity of data on the independent risk of vascular disease (VD) associated with pharmacological treatment and no controlled trials demonstrating a reduction in risk with abstinence. Information about IHD and CVD-related drug abuse is mainly limited to epidemiological studies focused on urban populations. The potential link between some pharmacological treatments (estrogen, some oncologic drugs and some atypical antipsychotics) and cerebrovascular adverse events was analyzed, but disagreement about an association persists. Drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamines and heroin, have been associated with an increased vascular risk. These drugs can cause abrupt changes in blood pressure, vasculitic-type changes, lead to embolization caused by infective endocarditis, and hemostatic and hematologic abnormalities that can result in increased blood viscosity and platelet aggregation. Long-term treatment strategies based on medication, psychological support, and outreach programs play an important role in treatment of drug dependency. In these last years public interest in risk factors for VD has been constantly increasing and the successful identification and management of pharmacological treatment and drug abuse can be challenging. One of the major public health issues for the future will be to focus more on new vascular risk factor recognition and management. The objective of this chapter is to review the relevance of IHD and CVD associated with various pharmacological treatments and drug abuse with focusing on ischemic disease. This chapter reports the clinical evidence of this association and analyzes the experimental role of new drugs as a growing risk factor of VD with the hypothetical new association. In conclusion, in this chapter great attention is paid to evaluating the scientific and real

  6. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  7. Contrast-enhanced three-dimensional fast-spoiled gradient magnetic resonance angiography of the renal arteries for potential living renal transplant donors: a comparative study with digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Al-Saeed, O; Ismail, M; Sheikh, M; Al-Moosawi, M; Al-Khawari, H

    2005-06-01

    Preoperative assessment of the arterial anatomy of prospective renal donors is essential. Various non-invasive techniques are used for such evaluation. We conducted this study using contrast-enhanced 3-D fast-spoiled gradient (CE 3-D FSPGR) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) on a 1.0 Tesla magnet, for preoperative definition of the renal arteries. Forty-five preoperative living renal donors underwent CE 3-D FSPGR MRA of the renal vessels and the results were compared with conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The renal vascular anatomy, both normal and with variations, was satisfactorily defined in all 45 cases with CE 3-D FSPGR MRA. Fifteen cases showed an accessory or aberrant arterial supply. A small aneurysm was shown in one case. All cases compared well with conventional DSA. Our study revealed that CE 3-D FSPGR MRA on a lower field strength magnet is accurate in defining the renal vascular anatomy and its variations. PMID:15932463

  8. Beneficial effect of simvastatin and pravastatin treatment on adverse cardiac remodelling and glomeruli loss in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Daniele G; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of different effects of the hydrophobic statin simvastatin and the hydrophilic statin pravastatin on the remodelling process in the overloaded left ventricle and renal cortex of SHRs (spontaneously hypertensive rats). Fifteen SHRs were treated for 40 days with simvastatin, pravastatin or placebo (water) via orogastric administration. Left ventricle and renal cortex were examined by light microscopy and stereology. LV (left ventricular) cardiomyocyte nuclei (N[cmn]) and glomeruli (N[gl]) numbers were estimated by the dissector method. BP (blood pressure) and serum triacylglycerols (triglycerides) were lower in the statin-treated groups than in the untreated control group. The volume density of the interstitial connective tissue was smaller and length density of the intramyocardial arteries, as well as the arteries/cardiomyocyte ratio, was greater in the statin-treated groups than in the control group. No difference was observed between the two statin-treated groups. The cross-sectional cardiomyocyte area was significantly smaller in the simvastatin-treated group than in the control or pravastatin-treated groups, and it was smaller in the pravastatin-treated group than in the control group. N[cmn] and N[gl] were greater in the two statin-treated groups than in the control group, but no significant difference was observed between the two statin-treated groups. In conclusion, administration of the statins simvastatin and pravastatin to SHRs effectively prevented the elevation in BP and serum triaclyglycerols, and also attenuated adverse cardiac and kidney remodelling by preventing LV hypertrophy, enhancing myocardial vascularization with the decrease in interstitial fibrosis and attenuating cardiomyocyte and glomerular loss. PMID:15610072

  9. Renal Failure Prevalence in Poisoned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arefi, Mohammad; Taghaddosinejad, Fakhroddin; Salamaty, Peyman; Soroosh, Davood; Ashraf, Hami; Ebrahimi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Renal failure is an important adverse effect of drug poisoning. Determining the prevalence and etiology of this serious side effect could help us find appropriate strategies for the prevention of renal failure in most affected patients. Objectives: The present study is aimed to identify drugs that induce renal failure and also to find the prevalence of renal failure in patients referred to emergency departments with the chief complaint of drug poisoning, in order to plan better therapeutic strategies to minimize the mortality associated with drug poisoning induced renal failure. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study surveyed 1500 poisoned patients referred to the Emergency Department of Baharloo Hospital in Tehran during 2010. Demographic data including age and gender as well as clinical data including type of medication, duration of hospital stay, and presence of renal failure were recorded. Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared statistics were used to analyze the results. Results: A total number of 435 patients were poisoned with several drugs, 118 patients were intoxicated with sedative-hypnotic drugs, 279 patients were exposed to opium, and 478 patients were administered to other drugs. The method of intoxication included oral 84.3%, injective 9%, inhalation 4.3% and finally a combination of methods 2.3%. Laboratory results revealed that 134 cases had renal failure and 242 had rhabdomyolysis. The incidence of rhabdomyolysis and renal failure increased significantly with age, and also with time of admission to the hospital. Renal failure was reported in 25.1% of patients exposed to opium, vs. 18.2% of patients poisoned with aluminum phosphide, 16.7% of those with organophosphate, 8% with multiple drugs, 6.7% with alcohol, heavy metals and acids, and 1.7% with sedative hypnotics. Conclusions: Based on the findings of this study, there is a high probability of renal failure for patients poisoned with drugs such as opium, aluminum phosphide

  10. [Late presentation of an extrarenal pseudoaneurysm in a renal transplant patient: CT and color Doppler US findings (case report)].

    PubMed

    Düşünceli, Ebru; Atasoy, Cetin; Fitoz, Suat; Yağci, Cemil

    2004-12-01

    Vascular complications associated with renal transplants are a significant cause of graft dysfunction or failure. The most common complications are arterial and venous stenoses/thromboses, intrarenal and extrarenal arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms. In this case report, an extremely rare complication following renal transplantation, an extrarenal pseudoaneurysm, is presented with CT, gray scale, and color Doppler US findings. PMID:15611918

  11. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal autoregulatory mechanisms maintain renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) independent of renal perfusion pressure (RPP) over a defined range (80–180 mmHg). Such autoregulation is mediated largely by the myogenic and the macula densa-tubuloglomerular feedback (MD-TGF) responses that regulate preglomerular vasomotor tone primarily of the afferent arteriole. Differences in response times allow separation of these mechanisms in the time and frequency domains. Mechanotransduction initiating the myogenic response requires a sensing mechanism activated by stretch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and coupled to intracellular signaling pathways eliciting plasma membrane depolarization and a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Proposed mechanosensors include epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), integrins, and/or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Increased [Ca2+]i occurs predominantly by Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC). Increased [Ca2+]i activates inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) to mobilize Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Myogenic vasoconstriction is sustained by increased Ca2+ sensitivity, mediated by protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase that favors a positive balance between myosin light-chain kinase and phosphatase. Increased RPP activates MD-TGF by transducing a signal of epithelial MD salt reabsorption to adjust afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. A combination of vascular and tubular mechanisms, novel to the kidney, provides for high autoregulatory efficiency that maintains RBF and GFR, stabilizes sodium excretion, and buffers transmission of RPP to sensitive glomerular capillaries, thereby protecting against hypertensive barotrauma. A unique aspect of the myogenic response in the renal vasculature is modulation of its strength and speed by the MD-TGF and by a connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CT-GF) mechanism

  12. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor.

  13. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation. PMID:26597554

  14. Stromal β-catenin overexpression contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Felix J; Sarin, Sanjay; Dabas, Pari; Karolak, Michele; Oxburgh, Leif; Bridgewater, Darren

    2016-06-01

    Renal dysplasia, the leading cause of renal failure in children, is characterized by disrupted branching of the collecting ducts and primitive tubules, with an expansion of the stroma, yet a role for the renal stroma in the genesis of renal dysplasia is not known. Here, we demonstrate that expression of β-catenin, a key transcriptional co-activator in renal development, is markedly increased in the expanded stroma in human dysplastic tissue. To understand its contribution to the genesis of renal dysplasia, we generated a mouse model that overexpresses β-catenin specifically in stromal progenitors, termed β-cat(GOF-S) . Histopathological analysis of β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed a marked expansion of fibroblast cells surrounding primitive ducts and tubules, similar to defects observed in human dysplastic kidneys. Characterization of the renal stroma in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed altered stromal cell differentiation in the expanded renal stroma demonstrating that this is not renal stroma but instead a population of stroma-like cells. These cells overexpress ectopic Wnt4 and Bmp4, factors necessary for endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Characterization of the renal vasculature demonstrated disrupted endothelial cell migration, organization, and vascular morphogenesis in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice. Analysis of human dysplastic tissue demonstrated a remarkably similar phenotype to that observed in our mouse model, including altered stromal cell differentiation, ectopic Wnt4 expression in the stroma-like cells, and disrupted endothelial cell migration and vessel formation. Our findings demonstrate that the overexpression of β-catenin in stromal cells is sufficient to cause renal dysplasia. Further, the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is one of disrupted stromal differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time the contribution of stromal β-catenin overexpression to the genesis of renal

  15. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  16. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  17. An update of the effect of far infrared therapy on arteriovenous access in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Fan; Yang, Wu-Chang; Lin, Chih-Ching

    2016-07-12

    The life qualities of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients rely largely on adequate dialysis, and a well-functioning vascular access is indispensable for high quality hemodialysis. Despite the advancement of surgical skills and the optimal maintenance of arteriovenous fistula (AVF), malfunction of AVF is still frequently encountered and has great impact on the life of ESRD patients. Several medical, mechanical and genetic prognostic factors are documented to affect the patency of AVF and arteriovenous graft (AVG). Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is one of the genetic factors reported to play a role in cardiovascular disease and the patency of vascular access. Far infrared (FIR), a novel therapeutic modality, can not only conduct heat energy to AVF but also stimulate the non-thermal reactions mediated by HO-1. The use of FIR therapy significantly enhances the primary patency rate and maturation of AVF with fewer unfavorable adverse effects, and also achieves higher post-angioplasty patency rate for AVG. The only limitation in proving the effectiveness of FIR therapy in enhancing patency of AVF is that all the studies were conducted in Chinese people in Taiwan and thus, there is a lack of evidence and experience in people of other ethnicities. PMID:27312759

  18. Preoperative optimization of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Henry T; Purcell, Seth T; Bush, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that patients who suffer from peripheral (noncardiac) vascular disease often have coexisting atherosclerotic diseases of the heart. This may leave the patients susceptible to major adverse cardiac events, including death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and pulmonary edema, during the perioperative time period, in addition to the many other complications they may sustain as they undergo vascular surgery procedures, regardless of whether the procedure is performed as an open or endovascular modality. As these patients are at particularly high risk, up to 16% in published studies, for postoperative cardiac complications, many proposals and algorithms for perioperative optimization have been suggested and studied in the literature. Moreover, in patients with recent coronary stents, the risk of non-cardiac surgery on adverse cardiac events is incremental in the first 6 months following stent implantation. Just as postoperative management of patients is vital to the outcome of a patient, preoperative assessment and optimization may reduce, and possibly completely alleviate, the risks of major postoperative complications, as well as assist in the decision-making process regarding the appropriate surgical and anesthetic management. This review article addresses several tools and therapies that treating physicians may employ to medically optimize a patient before they undergo noncardiac vascular surgery. PMID:26170688

  19. Renal effects of continuous negative pressure breathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1975-01-01

    Continuous negative pressure breathing (CNPB) was utilized to simulate the thoracic vascular distension of zero g or space, in 11 anesthetized rats. The animals underwent renal clearance and micropuncture renal nephron studies before, during, and after CNPB. Rats were pretreated with a high salt diet and I-M desoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess. None of these rats diuresed with CNPB. In contrast 5 of the 7 remaining rats increased the fraction of the filtered sodium excreted (C sub Na/GFR, p .05) and their urinary flow rate (V, p .05). Potassium excretion increased (U sub k V, p .05). End proximal tubular fluid specimen's TF/P inulin ratios were unchanged. Whole kidney and single nephron glomerular filtration rates fell 10%. CNPB, a mechanism for atrial distension, appears to cause, in rats, a decrease in distal tubular sodium, water and potassium reabsorption. Exogenous mineral-corticoid prevents the diuresis, saluresis, and kaluresis.

  20. Human vascular smooth muscle cells express a urate transporter.

    PubMed

    Price, Karen L; Sautin, Yuri Y; Long, David A; Zhang, Li; Miyazaki, Hiroki; Mu, Wei; Endou, Hitoshi; Johnson, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    An elevated serum uric acid is associated with the development of hypertension and renal disease. Renal regulation of urate excretion is largely controlled by URAT1 (SLC22A12), a member of the organic anion transporter superfamily. This study reports the specific expression of URAT1 on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. Expression of URAT1 was localized to the cell membrane. Evidence that the URAT1 transporter was functional was provided by the finding that uptake of 14C-urate was significantly inhibited in the presence of probenecid, an organic anion transporter inhibitor. It is proposed that URAT1 may provide a mechanism by which uric acid enters the human vascular smooth muscle cell, a finding that may be relevant to the role of uric acid in cardiovascular disease. PMID:16775029

  1. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Renal Imaging in Adults.

    PubMed

    Keramida, Georgia; James, Jacqueline M; Prescott, Mary C; Peters, Adrien Michael

    2015-09-01

    To understand pitfalls and limitations in adult renography, it is necessary to understand firstly the physiology of the kidney, especially the magnitude and control of renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate and tubular fluid flow rate, and secondly the pharmacokinetics and renal handling of the three most often used tracers, Tc-99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), Tc-99m-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Tc-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The kidneys may be imaged dynamically with Tc-99m-MAG3 or Tc-99m-DTPA, with or without diuretic challenge, or by static imaging with Tc-99m-DMSA. Protocols are different according to whether the kidney is native or transplanted. Quantitative analysis of dynamic data includes measurement of renal vascularity (important for the transplanted kidney), absolute tracer clearance rates, differential renal function (DRF) and response to diuretic challenge. Static image reveals functional renal parenchymal damage, both focal and global, is useful in the clinical management of obstructive uropathy, renal stone disease and hypertension (under angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition), and is the preferred technique for determining DRF. Diagnosis based on morphological appearances is important in transplant management. Even though nuclear medicine is now in the era of hybrid imaging, renal imaging remains an important subspecialty in nuclear medicine and requires a sound basing in applied physiology, the classical supporting discipline of nuclear medicine. PMID:26278854

  2. Renal cystic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of renal cystic disease and a presentation of simple renal cysts. Subsequent chapters cover cystic disease in association with renal neoplasms and medullary sponge kidney. The chapters addressing autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease discuss and differentiate the infantile and adult forms of the disease. There are also separate discussions of medullary cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and cysts of the renarenal sinus.

  3. Calcified renal oncocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, N.F.; Ewing, S.L.

    1983-10-01

    Renal oncocytoma, a neoplasm thought to derive from cells of the proximal convoluted tubules, exhibits benign clinical features. Its preoperative distinction from typical renal cell carcinoma would enable the surgeon to perform a more limited procedure. In a patient who is a poor operative candidate, surgery might be deferred. However, preoperative diagnosis has been elusive. A rare case of bilateral renal oncocytoma is reported. One of these tumors represents the first reported oncocytoma showing radiologically demonstrable calcification.

  4. Successful Embolization of a Renal Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Arteriovenous Fistula and Extravasations Using Onyx After Partial Nephrectomy for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Sopilko, Igor; Svihra, Jan; Kliment, Jan

    2009-01-15

    Partial nephrectomy can be associated with vascular complications. Computed tomography (CT) with CT angiography is ideal for noninvasive imaging of this process. The treatment of choice is selective embolization. Successful transcatheter embolization of right renal subsegmental artery pseudoaneurysm with arteriovenous fistula and extravasations using Onyx was performed in a 66-year-old woman with macrohematuria 12 days after partial nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma.

  5. Angiography in the Isolated Perfused Kidney: Radiological Evaluation of Vascular Protection in Tissue Ablation by Nonthermal Irreversible Electroporation

    SciTech Connect

    Wendler, Johann Jakob; Pech, Maciej; Blaschke, Simon; Porsch, Markus; Janitzky, Andreas; Ulrich, Matthias; Dudeck, Oliver; Ricke, Jens; Liehr, Uwe-Bernd

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a novel nonthermal tissue ablation technique by local application of high-voltage current within microseconds leading to a delayed apoptosis. The purpose of this experimental study was the first angiographic evaluation of the acute damage of renal vascular structure in NTIRE. Methods: Results of conventional dynamic digital substraction angiography (DSA) and visualization of the terminal vascular bed of renal parenchyma by high-resolution X-ray in mammography technique were evaluated before, during, and after NTIRE of three isolated perfused porcine ex vivo kidneys. Results: In the dedicated investigation, no acute vascular destruction of the renal parenchyma and no dysfunction of the kidney perfusion model were observed during or after NTIRE. Conspicuous were concentric wave-like fluctuations of the DSA contrast agent simultaneous to the NTIRE pulses resulting from NTIRE pulse shock wave. Conclusion: The NTIRE offers an ablation method with no acute collateral vascular damage in angiographic evaluation.

  6. Adverse possession of subsurface minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, P.N.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts applicable to adverse possession of subsurface minerals are generally the same as those that apply to adverse possession of all real estate. However, special requirements must be satisfied in order to perfect title to subsurface minerals by adverse possession, particularly when there has been a severance of the true title between surface and subsurface minerals. In those jurisdictions where senior and junior grants came from the state or commonwealth covering the same or some of the same land and in those areas where descriptions of land were vague or not carefully drawn, adverse possession serves to solidify land and mineral ownership. There may be some public, social, and economic justification in rewarding, with good title, those who take possession and use real estate for its intended use, including the extraction of subsurface minerals. 96 refernces.

  7. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  8. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  9. Arginase and vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Lakshmi; Christianson, David W.; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular and associated ventricular stiffness is one of the hallmarks of the aging cardiovascular system. Both an increase in reactive oxygen species production and a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability contribute to the endothelial dysfunction that underlies this vascular stiffness, independent of other age-related vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. The activation/upregulation of arginase appears to be an important contributor to age-related endothelial dysfunction by a mechanism that involves substrate (l-arginine) limitation for NO synthase (NOS) 3 and therefore NO synthesis. Not only does this lead to impaired NO production but also it contributes to the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species by NOS. Although arginase abundance is increased in vascular aging models, it appears that posttranslational modification by S-nitrosylation of the enzyme enhances its activity as well. The S-nitrosylation is mediated by the induction of NOS2 in the endothelium. Furthermore, arginase activation contributes to aging-related vascular changes by mechanisms that are not directly related to changes in NO signaling, including polyamine-dependent vascular smooth muscle proliferation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, arginase may represent an as yet elusive target for the modification of age-related vascular and ventricular stiffness contributing to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:18719233

  10. [Hereditary renal cell carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Stöhr, C G; Junker, K

    2010-10-01

    Renal cell carcinomas occur in several hereditary tumor syndromes. These renal tumors frequently have a specific histopathological appearance which can be a sign for a hereditary cause of the disease. The genetic alterations responsible for most of these tumor syndromes were identified in recent years. Interestingly, renal cell carcinomas show specific histopathological features in each of the hereditary renal cancer syndromes. Clear cell and often cystic renal cell carcinomas occur in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), while oncocytomas and chromophobe renal cell carcinomas are found in the Birt-Hugg-Dube syndrome, often also as hybrid tumors. Well differentiated papillary carcinomas (Type 1 according to the WHO) are found in the hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma (HPRC). In contrast, poorly diffentiated papillary renal cell carcinomas (Type 2 according to the WHO) occur in combination with leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas of the skin and uterus in hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome (HLRCC). The various genetic causes for these hereditary tumor syndromes open up new therapeutic possibilities, some of which are already being investigated in clinical studies. PMID:20960197

  11. The John F. Maher Award Recipient Lecture 2006. The continuum of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease: challenges and opportunities for chronic peritoneal dialysis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2007-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing renal replacement therapy have a high mortality rate and suffer from considerable morbidity. Degree of nutritional decline, disordered mineral metabolism, and vascular calcification are some of the abnormalities that predict an adverse outcome for ESRD patients. All these abnormalities begin early during the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD), long before the need for maintenance dialysis. Thus, CKD represents a continuum of metabolic and vascular abnormalities. Treatment of these abnormalities early during the course of CKD and a timely initiation of dialysis have the potential of improving patient outcomes. However, the thesis that successful management of these abnormalities will favorably modify the outcomes of dialysis patients remains untested. The proportion of incident USA ESRD patients starting chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) has historically been low. Limited physician training and inadequate predialysis patient education appear to underlie the low CPD take-on in the USA. Furthermore, two key changes have occurred in the USA: steep decline in CPD take-on and progressive increase in the use of automated peritoneal dialysis. The decline in CPD take-on has afflicted virtually every subgroup examined and has occurred, paradoxically, when the CPD outcomes in the country have improved. Understanding the reasons for historically low CPD take-on and recent steep declines in utilization may allow the development of plans to reverse these trends. PMID:17299144

  12. Human antibodies to vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, K. J.; Osterland, C. K.

    1971-01-01

    Certain human sera were found to produce specific staining of vascular endothelium by the immunofluorescent technique. The antibody nature of this reaction was confirmed by using fluorescein-conjugated antisera specific for human immunoglobulins and the component of complement, and by physicochemical characterization of isolated immunoglobulins giving this reaction. This activity was present in sera from patients with a wide variety of diseases (17·8%). The highest incidence was found in chronic pulmonary tuberculosis (26·6%). An incidence of 14% was found in presumably normal blood donors. The stimulus for the production of these antibodies is unknown. The antigen is fairly widely distributed among different species, since tissues from a variety of animals could be used as substrate in the reaction. Experiments have shown that neither the classic Forssman antigen nor ABO blood groups are involved. The possible role of these antibodies in human disease remains to be elucidated. The finding of anti-endothelial activity in two recipients of renal transplants may be significant. PMID:4945736

  13. Vascular Inflammatory Cells in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.; Marvar, Paul J.; Titze, Jens M.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients, and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease. PMID:22586409

  14. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  15. Renal hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to urapidil in hypertensive man

    SciTech Connect

    de Leeuw, P.W.; van Es, P.N.; de Bruyn, H.A.; Birkenhaeger, W.H.D.

    1988-01-01

    In order to evaluate the acute effects of urapidil on renal vascular tone and on pressor systems we performed a randomized placebo-controlled crossover study in 8 patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension. Each subject received, on two separate days one week apart, an intravenous injection of either placebo or urapidil (25 mg, to be increased to 50 mg if blood pressure did not fall within 5 minutes). Before and following this injection we measured blood pressure and heart rate (Dinamap), renal plasma flow (/sup 125/I-hippuran), renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and catecholamines. The results show that urapidil, when compared to placebo, significantly reduced blood pressure, while increasing heart rate, renal blood flow, noradrenaline and adrenaline. Dopamine levels, on the other hand, were suppressed. While renin and angiotensin II were only mildly stimulated, aldosterone levels increased markedly. It is concluded that urapidil, given intravenously, has an immediate blood pressure lowering effect associated with a fall in renal vascular tone and an increase in renal perfusion. As a consequence both the sympathetic system and the renin-angiotensin system are stimulated, although the latter only to a mild degree. The rise in aldosterone may be related to withdrawal of dopaminergic tone.

  16. Cigarette smoking: an important renal risk factor – far beyond carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Orth, SR

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that smoking has a negative impact on renal function, being one of the most important remediable renal risk factors. It has been clearly shown that the risk for high-normal urinary albumin excretion and microalbuminuria is increased in smoking compared to non-smoking subjects of the general population. Data from the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT) indicate that at least in males, smoking increases the risk to reach end-stage renal failure. Smoking is particularly "nephrotoxic" in older subjects, subjects with essential hypertension and patients with preexisting renal disease. Of interest, the magnitude of the adverse renal effect of smoking seems to be independent of the underlying renal disease. Death-censored renal graft survival is decreased in smokers, indicating that smoking also damages the renal transplant. Cessation of smoking has been show to reduce the rate of progression of renal failure both in patients with renal disease or a renal transplant. The mechanisms of smoking-induced renal damage are only partly understood and comprise acute hemodynamic (e.g., increase in blood pressure and presumably intraglomerular pressure) and chronic effects (e.g., endothelial cell dysfunction). Renal failure per se leads to an increased cardiovascular risk. The latter is further aggravated by smoking. Particularly survival of smokers with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is abysmal. In the present review article the current state of knowledge about the renal risks of smoking is reviewed. It is the aim of the article to point out that smoking not only increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma or uroepithelial cell carcinoma, but also the risk of a faster decline of renal function. The latter is a relatively new negative aspect which has not been widely recognized. PMID:19570254

  17. Cigarette smoking: an important renal risk factor – far beyond carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Orth, SR

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that smoking has a negative impact on renal function, being one of the most important remediable renal risk factors. It has been clearly shown that the risk for high-normal urinary albumin excretion and microalbuminuria is increased in smoking compared to non-smoking subjects of the general population. Data from the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT) indicate that at least in males, smoking increases the risk to reach end-stage renal failure. Smoking is particularly "nephrotoxic" in older subjects, subjects with essential hypertension and patients with preexisting renal disease. Of interest, the magnitude of the adverse renal effect of smoking seems to be independent of the underlying renal disease. Death-censored renal graft survival is decreased in smokers, indicating that smoking also damages the renal transplant. Cessation of smoking has been show to reduce the rate of progression of renal failure both in patients with renal disease or a renal transplant. The mechanisms of smoking-induced renal damage are only partly understood and comprise acute hemodynamic (e.g., increase in blood pressure and presumably intraglomerular pressure) and chronic effects (e.g., endothelial cell dysfunction). Renal failure per se leads to an increased cardiovascular risk. The latter is further aggravated by smoking. Particularly survival of smokers with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is abysmal. In the present review article the current state of knowledge about the renal risks of smoking is reviewed. It is the aim of the article to point out that smoking not only increases the risk of renal cell carcinoma or uroepithelial cell carcinoma, but also the risk of a faster decline of renal function. The latter is a relatively new negative aspect which has not been widely recognized.

  18. Efferent Pathways in Sodium Overload-Induced Renal Vasodilation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Nathalia O.; de Oliveira, Thiago S.; Naves, Lara M.; Filgueira, Fernando P.; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L.; Schoorlemmer, Gerard H. M.; de Castro, Carlos H.; Freiria-Oliveira, André H.; Xavier, Carlos H.; Colugnati, Diego B.; Rosa, Daniel A.; Blanch, Graziela T.; Borges, Clayton L.; Soares, Célia M. A.; Reis, Angela A. S.; Cravo, Sergio L.; Pedrino, Gustavo R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia stimulates the secretion of oxytocin (OT), but the physiological role of OT remains unclear. The present study sought to determine the involvement of OT and renal nerves in the renal responses to an intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline. Male Wistar rats (280–350 g) were anesthetized with sodium thiopental (40 mg. kg−1, i.v.). A bladder cannula was implanted for collection of urine. Animals were also instrumented for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal blood flow (RBF). Renal vascular conductance (RVC) was calculated as the ratio of RBF by MAP. In anesthetized rats (n = 6), OT infusion (0.03 µg • kg−1, i.v.) induced renal vasodilation. Consistent with this result, ex vivo experiments demonstrated that OT caused renal artery relaxation. Blockade of OT receptors (OXTR) reduced these responses to OT, indicating a direct effect of this peptide on OXTR on this artery. Hypertonic saline (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml • kg−1 b.wt., i.v.) was infused over 60 s. In sham rats (n = 6), hypertonic saline induced renal vasodilation. The OXTR antagonist (AT; atosiban, 40 µg • kg−1 • h−1, i.v.; n = 7) and renal denervation (RX) reduced the renal vasodilation induced by hypernatremia. The combination of atosiban and renal denervation (RX+AT; n = 7) completely abolished the renal vasodilation induced by sodium overload. Intact rats excreted 51% of the injected sodium within 90 min. Natriuresis was slightly blunted by atosiban and renal denervation (42% and 39% of load, respectively), whereas atosiban with renal denervation reduced sodium excretion to 16% of the load. These results suggest that OT and renal nerves are involved in renal vasodilation and natriuresis induced by acute plasma hypernatremia. PMID:25279805

  19. Efferent pathways in sodium overload-induced renal vasodilation in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Nathalia O; de Oliveira, Thiago S; Naves, Lara M; Filgueira, Fernando P; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L; Schoorlemmer, Gerard H M; de Castro, Carlos H; Freiria-Oliveira, André H; Xavier, Carlos H; Colugnati, Diego B; Rosa, Daniel A; Blanch, Graziela T; Borges, Clayton L; Soares, Célia M A; Reis, Angela A S; Cravo, Sergio L; Pedrino, Gustavo R

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia stimulates the secretion of oxytocin (OT), but the physiological role of OT remains unclear. The present study sought to determine the involvement of OT and renal nerves in the renal responses to an intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline. Male Wistar rats (280-350 g) were anesthetized with sodium thiopental (40 mg. kg(-1), i.v.). A bladder cannula was implanted for collection of urine. Animals were also instrumented for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal blood flow (RBF). Renal vascular conductance (RVC) was calculated as the ratio of RBF by MAP. In anesthetized rats (n = 6), OT infusion (0.03 µg • kg(-1), i.v.) induced renal vasodilation. Consistent with this result, ex vivo experiments demonstrated that OT caused renal artery relaxation. Blockade of OT receptors (OXTR) reduced these responses to OT, indicating a direct effect of this peptide on OXTR on this artery. Hypertonic saline (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml • kg(-1) b.wt., i.v.) was infused over 60 s. In sham rats (n = 6), hypertonic saline induced renal vasodilation. The OXTR antagonist (AT; atosiban, 40 µg • kg(-1) • h(-1), i.v.; n = 7) and renal denervation (RX) reduced the renal vasodilation induced by hypernatremia. The combination of atosiban and renal denervation (RX+AT; n = 7) completely abolished the renal vasodilation induced by sodium overload. Intact rats excreted 51% of the injected sodium within 90 min. Natriuresis was slightly blunted by atosiban and renal denervation (42% and 39% of load, respectively), whereas atosiban with renal denervation reduced sodium excretion to 16% of the load. These results suggest that OT and renal nerves are involved in renal vasodilation and natriuresis induced by acute plasma hypernatremia. PMID:25279805

  20. Residential Proximity to Environmental Hazards and Adverse Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Maantay, Juliana A.; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2011-01-01

    How living near environmental hazards contributes to poorer health and disproportionate health outcomes is an ongoing concern. We conducted a substantive review and critique of the literature regarding residential proximity to environmental hazards and adverse pregnancy outcomes, childhood cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses, end-stage renal disease, and diabetes. Several studies have found that living near hazardous wastes sites, industrial sites, cropland with pesticide applications, highly trafficked roads, nuclear power plants, and gas stations or repair shops is related to an increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Government agencies should consider these findings in establishing rules and permitting and enforcement procedures to reduce pollution from environmentally burdensome facilities and land uses. PMID:22028451

  1. The adverse effects of sorafenib in patients with advanced cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Gao, Zu-Hua; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Sorafenib is the first multi-kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular cancer (HCC) and metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) and is increasingly being used to treat patients with well-differentiated radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer (DTC). Sorafenib demonstrates targeted activity on several families of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases that are involved in angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastatic progression of cancer. Sorafenib treatment results in long-term efficacy and low incidence of life-threatening toxicities. Although sorafenib has demonstrated many benefits in patients, the adverse effects cannot be ignored. The most common treatment-related toxicities include diarrhoea, fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction and hypertension. Most of these toxicities are considered mild to moderate and manageable to varying degrees; however, cardiovascular events might lead to death. In this MiniReview, we summarize the adverse effects of sorafenib that commonly occur in patients with advanced cancers. PMID:25495944

  2. Adverse effects of IgG therapy.

    PubMed

    Berger, Melvin

    2013-01-01

    IgG is widely used for patients with immune deficiencies and in a broad range of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Up to 40% of intravenous infusions of IgG may be associated with adverse effects (AEs), which are mostly uncomfortable or unpleasant but often are not serious. The most common infusion-related AE is headache. More serious reactions, including true anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, occur less frequently. Most reactions are related to the rate of infusion and can be prevented or treated just by slowing the infusion rate. Medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antihistamines, or corticosteroids also may be helpful in preventing or treating these common AEs. IgA deficiency with the potential of IgG or IgE antibodies against IgA increases the risk of some AEs but should not be viewed as a contraindication if IgG therapy is needed. Potentially serious AEs include renal dysfunction and/or failure, thromboembolic events, and acute hemolysis. These events usually are multifactorial, related to combinations of constituents in the IgG product as well as risk factors for the recipient. Awareness of these factors should allow minimization of the risks and consequences of these AEs. Subcutaneous IgG is absorbed more slowly into the circulation and has a lower incidence of AEs, but awareness and diligence are necessary whenever IgG is administered. PMID:24565701

  3. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley P.; Hulbert, John C.; Bissler, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Although not as common as other genetic renal diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, patients with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have significant renal involvement. Recent revelations in the cell biology of these renal disease manifestations as well as effective therapies for tuberous sclerosis complex-related renal issues have heralded hope of improved renal survival and improved quality of life for the TSC patient. This review specifically addresses some of the major renal manifestations of this disease. PMID:21071977

  4. The renal response to electrical stimulation of renal efferent sympathetic nerves in the anaesthetized greyhound.

    PubMed

    Poucher, S M; Karim, F

    1991-03-01

    1. The effect of direct electrical stimulation of the renal efferent nerves upon renal haemodynamics and function was studied in greyhounds anaesthetized with chloralose and artificially ventilated. The left kidney was neurally and vascularly isolated, and perfused with blood from one of the femoral arteries at a constant pressure of 99 +/- 1 mmHg. Renal blood flow was measured with a cannulating electromagnetic flow probe placed in the perfusion circuit, glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance, urinary sodium excretion by flame photometry and solute excretion by osmometry. Beta-Adrenergic receptor activation was blocked by the infusion of dl-propranolol (17 micrograms kg-1 min-1). The peripheral ends of the ligated renal nerves were stimulated at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Hz. 2. At 0.5 Hz frequency only osmolar excretion was significantly reduced (10.3 +/- 3.2%, P less than 0.05, n = 6). Reductions in sodium excretion (53.6 +/- 8.5%, P less than 0.01, n = 6) and water excretion (26.9 +/- 8.0%, P less than 0.05, n = 6) and further reductions of osmolar excretion (20.7 +/- 3.7%, P less than 0.01, n = 6) were observed at 1.0 Hz; however, these were observed in the absence of significant changes in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Significant reductions were observed in glomerular filtration rate at 1.5 Hz (16.3 +/- 4.1%, P less than 0.02, n = 5) and in renal blood flow at 2.0 Hz (13.1 +/- 4.0%, P less than 0.05, n = 5). Further reductions in urine flow and sodium excretion were also observed at these higher frequencies. 3. These results clearly show that significant changes in renal tubular function can occur in the absence of changes in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate when the renal nerves are stimulated electrically from a zero baseline activity up to a frequency of 1.5 Hz. Higher frequencies caused significant changes in both renal haemodynamics and function. PMID:2023113

  5. From anatomy to function: diagnosis of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Odudu, Aghogho; Vassallo, Diana; Kalra, Philip A

    2015-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) affects 7% of the over 65 s and will be increasingly common with an ageing population. ARAS obstructs normal renal perfusion with adverse renal and cardiovascular consequences. Drug therapy is directed at reducing atherosclerotic risk. Two recent major trials of revascularization for ARAS showed that clinical outcomes were not improved beyond those offered by optimal drug therapy in most patients. This reflects experimental data showing that restoration of blood flow alone may not attenuate a cascade of tissue injury. A shift from anatomic to functional imaging of ARAS coupled to novel therapies might improve clinical outcomes in selected patients. This review outlines the case for separately assessing hemodynamic significance of arterial stenosis and functional reserve of renal parenchymal tissue. The authors consider current and emerging diagnostic techniques for ARAS and their potential to allow individualized and functionally directed treatments. PMID:26480218

  6. Synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis resulting in rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Argamany, Jacqueline R; Reveles, Kelly R; Duhon, Bryson

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid usage has increased in the past decade. Concurrently, emergency management of associated adverse effects due to synthetic cannabinoid usage has also risen. Reported toxicities include psychosis, seizures, cardiotoxicity, acute kidney injury, and death. While cannabis was first described as a cause of acute hyperemesis in 2004, a more recent case series also describes the association between cannabinoid hyperemesis and risk of acute renal failure. Synthetic cannabinoids have also been reported to cause acute hyperemesis and acute renal failure; however, the risk of rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure has yet to be elucidated. In this article, we report the first known case of synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. PMID:26422191

  7. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-03-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  8. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  9. Reversible vascular calcifications associated with hypervitaminosis D.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Massimo; Bilancio, Giancarlo; Cirillo, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    A 64-year-old man was hospitalized in 2002 with symptoms of stupor, weakness, and renal colic. The clinical examination indicated borderline hypertension, small masses in the glutei, and polyuria. Laboratory tests evidenced high serum concentrations of creatinine, calcium, and phosphate. Imaging assessments disclosed widespread vascular calcifications, gluteal calcifications, and pelvic ectasia. Subsequent lab tests indicated suppressed serum parathyroid hormone, extremely high serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D, and normal serum 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. Treatment was started with intravenous infusion of saline and furosemide due to the evidence of hypercalcemia. Prednisone and omeprazole were added given the evidence of hypervitaminosis D. The treatment improved serum calcium, kidney function, and consciousness. The medical history disclosed recent treatment with exceptionally high doses of slow-release intra-muscular cholecalciferol and the recent excretion of urinary stones. The patient was discharged when it was possible to stop the intravenous treatment. The post-discharge treatment included oral hydration, furosemide, prednisone and omeprazole for approximately 6 months up to complete resolution of the hypercalcemia. The patient came back 12 years later because of microhematuria. Lab tests were normal for calcium/phosphorus homeostasis and kidney function. Imaging tests indicated only minor vascular calcifications. This is the first evidence of reversible vascular calcifications secondary to hypervitaminosis D. PMID:26318020

  10. Everolimus in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y

    2010-08-01

    Everolimus (also known as RAD-001; Afinitor®) is an orally active inhibitor of the intracellular protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency recently approved everolimus for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) on the basis of the results of a randomized phase III clinical trial. In the trial, 10 mg daily everolimus was effective and well tolerated by patients with advanced RCC, whose disease had progressed while under the treatment with sunitinib and/or sorafenib. Everolimus treatment led to 36% of 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate and 31% of 3-month PFS rate. Most of the adverse events were mild to moderate (grade 1-2) in severity. The most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events were stomatitis, fatigue, pneumonitis and infections. Clinical trials on everolimus in combination with sunitinib, sorafenib, imatinib and vatalanib for the treatment of RCC are ongoing. PMID:20830316

  11. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  12. Vascular Access for Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... short-term use. [ Top ] What is an arteriovenous fistula? An AV fistula is a connection, made by a vascular surgeon, ... vessel surgery. The surgeon usually places an AV fistula in the forearm or upper arm. An AV ...

  13. Women and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Women and Vascular Disease Early Warning Symptom for ... major public health issue, the Society of Interventional Radiology recommends greater screening efforts by the medical community ...

  14. Diversity in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Karen; Kalata, Emily A; Hingorani, Anil P

    2012-12-01

    A growing body of literature in vascular surgery demonstrates disparities in the type of health care that racial/ethnic minorities receive in the United States. Numerous recommendations, including those of the Institute of Medicine, have been set forth, which identify increasing the number of minority health professionals as a key strategy to eliminating health disparities. The purpose of this study is to compare the racial/ethnic distribution of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) membership, the SVS leadership, vascular surgery trainees, and medical students. The results demonstrate that the racial/ethnic distribution of the SVS membership reflects a considerable lack of diversity with a paucity of diversity among the SVS leadership. An increasing rate of racial/ethnic diversity among vascular surgery trainees may indicate that the SVS will see an improvement in diversity in the future. PMID:23182481

  15. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  16. Renal Denervation in Moderate to Severe CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Dagmara; Mahfoud, Felix; Walton, Antony S.; Krum, Henry; Lambert, Gavin W.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Sobotka, Paul A.; Böhm, Michael; Cremers, Bodo; Esler, Murray D.

    2012-01-01

    Sympathetic activation contributes to the progression of CKD and is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Ablation of renal sympathetic nerves reduces sympathetic nerve activity and BP in patients with resistant hypertension and preserved renal function, but whether this approach is safe and effective in patients with an estimated GFR (eGFR) < 45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 is unknown. We performed bilateral renal denervation in 15 patients with resistant hypertension and stage 3–4 CKD (mean eGFR, 31 ml/min per 1.73 m2). We used CO2 angiography in six patients to minimize exposure to contrast agents. Estimated GFR remained unchanged after the procedure, irrespective of the use of CO2 angiography. Mean baseline BP ± SD was 174±22/91±16 mmHg despite the use of 5.6±1.3 antihypertensive drugs. Mean changes in office systolic and diastolic BP at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months were −34/−14, −25/−11, −32/−15, and −33/−19 mmHg, respectively. Night-time ambulatory BP significantly decreased (P<0.05), restoring a more physiologic dipping pattern. In conclusion, this study suggests a favorable short-term safety profile and beneficial BP effects of catheter-based renal nerve ablation in patients with stage 3–4 CKD and resistant hypertension. PMID:22595301

  17. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  18. Vascular Effects of Histamine.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, Anthony B; Talabi, Olufunke O

    2014-01-01

    Four subtypes of receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4) mediate the actions of histamine. In the vascular wall, the effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype located on presynaptic neurones. Alterations in vascular responses to histamine are associated with experimental as well as a human form of hypertension, suggesting a role for histanine in cardiovascular regulation. PMID:26196559

  19. [Zaidemberg's vascularized radial graft].

    PubMed

    Saint-Cast, Y

    2010-12-01

    In 1991, Carlos Zaidemberg described a new technique to repair scaphoid non-unions with a vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process. An anatomic study based on 30 dissections after colorized latex injection established the constancy of the radial styloid process's artery, while showing that its origin, course and length were subject to variations. In a retrospective series of 38 cases over a period of 10 years, the vascularized bone graft was indicated for: (1) scaphoid non-union with the presence of avascular changes of the proximal fragment (23 cases); (2) failed prior reconstruction with bone graft and internal fixation (nine cases); (3) degenerative styloid-scaphoid arthritis (three cases); (4) fracture on Preiser dystrophy (three cases). The five steps of the simplified operative technique without dissection of the vascular pedicle include: (1) longitudinal dorso-radial approach, identification of the periosteal portion of the radial styloid process artery; (2) incision of the first and second compartments, longitudinal arthrotomy under the second compartment; (3) styloidectomy and transversal resection of the scaphoid non-union and sclerotic bone; (4) elevation of the vascularized bone graft; (5) transversal and radial insertion of the vascularized bone graft, osteosynthesis by two or three K-wire touching the scaphoid's radial edge. Scaphoid union was obtained in 33 cases out of 38. The only postoperative complications were two transient radial paresthesia. The standardized surgical procedure using vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process provides an efficient scaphoid reconstruction. PMID:21087882

  20. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Faldaprevir in Patients with Renal Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Moschetti, Viktoria; Lang, Benjamin; Halabi, Atef; Petersen-Sylla, Marc; Yong, Chan-Loi; Elgadi, Mabrouk

    2014-01-01

    Faldaprevir is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor with negligible urinary excretion. We assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single oral dose of faldaprevir (480 mg) in 32 HCV-negative subjects with renal impairment or normal renal function. Compared with subjects with normal renal function, the adjusted geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals in parentheses) for overall exposure area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) were 113.6% (41.6 to 310.2%), 178.3% (85.2 to 373.0%), and 169.2% (73.2 to 391.2%) for subjects with mild, moderate, and severe renal impairment, respectively. Overall, 5/8 (63%) subjects with normal renal function and 20/24 (83%) subjects with renal impairment reported adverse events, with gastrointestinal events being the most common. No severe or serious adverse events or deaths were reported. These results suggest that moderate or severe renal impairment can result in a modest increase in faldaprevir exposure. The increase in exposure may be related to decrease in the activity of the liver uptake transporter OATP1B1 as a result of renal impairment. Given this relatively slight increase in exposure, a dose adjustment in HCV patients with renal impairment is not warranted. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01957657.) PMID:25348520

  1. Vascular tracers alter hemodynamics and airway pressure in anesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-11-01

    The technique of vascular labeling was developed to mark sites of increased microvascular permeability. We used the vascular labeling technique in anesthetized sheep and found that hemodynamics and airway pressure were adversely affected by intraarterial infusions of two vascular tracers. Monastral blue (nine sheep) immediately caused systemic arterial hypotension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and bronchoconstriction. All three physiological responses were partially blocked by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) but not by an H1-antihistamine (chlorpheniramine). Colloidal gold (nine sheep) caused immediate, but less dramatic, pulmonary arterial hypertension which was not attenuated by the blocking agents. We conclude that these two vascular tracers caused detrimental physiological side effects in sheep at the usual doses used to label injured microvessels in other species.

  2. The Spectrum of Renal Involvement in Patients With Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Couvrat-Desvergnes, Grégoire; Masseau, Agathe; Benveniste, Olivier; Bruel, Alexandra; Hervier, Baptiste; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Buob, David; Hachulla, Eric; Rémy, Philippe; Azar, Raymond; Namara, Evelyne Mac; MacGregor, Brigitte; Daniel, Laurent; Lacraz, Adeline; Broucker, Thomas De; Rouvier, Philippe; Carli, Philippe; Laville, Maurice; Dantan, Etienne; Hamidou, Mohamed; Moreau, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding the incidence and outcome of renal involvement in patients with inflammatory myopathies (IM) remain scarce. We assessed the incidence and causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 150 patients with dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and antisynthetase syndrome followed in 3 French referral centers. Renal involvement occurred in 35 (23.3%) patients: AKI in 16 (10.7%), and CKD in 31 (20.7%) patients. The main cause of AKI was drug or myoglobinuria-induced acute tubular necrosis. Male sex, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac involvement, and initial proteinuria >0.3 g/d were associated with the occurrence of AKI. The outcome of patients with AKI was poor: 13 (81%) progressed to CKD and 2 (12.5%) reached end-stage renal disease. In multivariate survival analysis, age at IM onset, male sex, a history of cardiovascular events, and a previous episode of AKI were associated with the risk of CKD. We also identified 14 IM patients who underwent a kidney biopsy in 10 nephrology centers. Renal pathology disclosed a wide range of renal disorders, mainly immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We identified in 5 patients a peculiar pattern of severe acute renal vascular damage consisting mainly of edematous thickening of the intima of arterioles. We found that AKI and CKD are frequent in patients with IM. Prevention of AKI is crucial in these patients, as AKI is a major contributor to their relatively high risk of CKD. A peculiar pattern of acute vascular damage is part of the spectrum of renal diseases associated with IM. PMID:24378741

  3. Role of angiotensin II in renal wrap hypertension.

    PubMed

    Denton, K M; Anderson, W P

    1985-01-01

    The role of angiotensin II in the development of renal wrap hypertension was studied in rabbits that underwent either bilateral renal cellophane wrap or sham operation. In half the rabbits, angiotensin II production was blocked by continuous administration of enalapril. Four weeks after renal wrapping, mean arterial pressure had risen by 48 +/- 5 mm Hg in untreated rabbits, but by only 25 +/- 4 mm Hg in enalapril-treated rabbits (p less than 0.01). Similar differences were also measured 6 weeks after wrapping. In untreated rabbits, plasma renin activity had increased fourfold 4 and 6 weeks after renal wrapping. There were no significant changes in blood pressure or plasma renin activity following sham operation. Compared with that in sham-operated rabbits, renal blood flow was reduced by 60% in the untreated rabbits 4 weeks after wrapping but by only 30% in the enalapril-treated wrapped rabbits (p less than 0.05). Renal vascular resistances were 5.5 +/- 1.7 mm Hg . ml-1 . min-1 and 1.2 +/- 0.1 mm Hg . min . ml-1 in the untreated wrapped and sham-operated rabbits respectively and 1.9 +/- 0.4 mm Hg . min . ml-1 and 0.8 +/- 1 mm Hg . min . ml-1 in the enalapril-treated wrapped and sham-operated rabbits. Renal wrapping did not alter filtration fraction in untreated rabbits, but markedly reduced it in enalapril-treated rabbits. These results suggest that angiotensin II had two major effects in rabbits after bilateral renal wrapping: it contributed substantially to the increase in blood pressure and caused renal vasoconstriction, primarily at a postglomerular site. PMID:3000937

  4. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    an appropriate MHT dose, route of administration, and estrogen/progestin combination could maximize the vascular benefits of MHT and minimize other adverse effects, especially if given within a reasonably short time after menopause to women that seek MHT for the relief of menopausal symptoms. PMID:21864249

  5. Biologics in dermatology: adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2015-12-01

    Biologics are a group of drugs that precisely affect certain specific steps in the immune response and are an extremely useful group when used in an appropriate setting. However, their use can often be a double-edged sword. Careful patient selection and thorough knowledge of adverse effects is a key to their successful use in various disorders. The initial enthusiasm has gradually given way to a more cautious approach wherein a balance is sought between clinical usefulness and expected side effects. The adverse effects of the biologics most commonly used in dermatology have been carefully listed for ready reference. The plausible causes of the adverse reactions are succinctly outlined along with their incriminating factor(s). Besides, in brief, the attention has been focused on their management. The content should provide an essential didactic content for educating the practitioner. PMID:26147909

  6. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context. PMID:25787721

  7. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and diabetic vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2005-02-01

    Diabetic vascular complication is a leading cause of acquired blindness, end-stage renal failure, a variety of neuropathies and accelerated atherosclerosis, which could account for disabilities and high mortality rates in patients with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia is essentially involved in the development and progression of diabetic micro- and macroangiopathy. Among various metabolic derangements implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complication, advanced glycation end product (AGE) hypothesis is most compatible with the theory of 'hyperglycemic memory'. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of diabetic vascular complication, specially focusing on AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) system. Several types of AGE inhibitors and their therapeutic implications in this devastating disorder are also discussed here. PMID:18220586

  8. Improved automatic separation of renal parenchyma and pelvis in dynamic renal scintigraphy using fuzzy regions of interest.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, H; Dworak, E; König, B; Mostbeck, A; Sámal, M

    1999-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the physiological relevance of factors produced by a modified procedure for factor analysis of dynamic renal studies. Factor analysis has been applied locally to subsets of dynamic renal data which were well defined in both space and time domains. Optimised factor images resulting from different subsets were used as fuzzy regions of interest (ROIs) for the extraction of time-activity curves corresponding to renal parenchyma, renal pelvis, vascular and spatially homogeneous background. The original procedure employed the factor images of renal parenchyma and pelvis resulting from an analysis of the interval between the peaks of parenchymal and pelvic curves. In an attempt to improve the separation of renal parenchyma and pelvis, new fuzzy ROIs were used. They correspond to the factor image of renal uptake obtained from the analysis of the early phase of the study, and to the factor image of the renal pelvis obtained from the outflow phase. The curves generated with the new fuzzy ROIs were compared with those of the original procedure and tested for the presence of known artefacts inconsistent with the expected physiological behaviour. Unlike with the original procedure, no such artefacts were found. The most striking difference was that the pelvic factor curves did not start from zero time of the study but exhibited a physiologically correct initial horizontal zero segment the length of which correlated closely with the minimum parenchymal transit time (r=0.79, n=46, P<0.001). The new method permits easy and reliable application of factor analysis to dynamic renal studies. Problems which remain to be solved are user-independent identification of the optimum factors and suboptimal performance of the method under extreme conditions. Our results provide additional evidence that factor analysis can extract physiologically relevant information quantitatively from dynamic scintigraphic data. PMID:10436196

  9. Renovascular acute renal failure precipitated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for pancreatic stones

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Nicolas; Goffette, Pierre; Deprez, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic stones is considered a safe and efficient method to facilitate fragmentation and stone removal. We describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with a solitary functioning kidney who presented an acute-onset anuria and renovascular renal failure the day after ESWL. We speculate that vascular calcifications in the area targeted by shock waves played a critical role in renal artery obstruction in the present case. PMID:26251710

  10. [Volume Homeostasis and Renal Function in Rats Exposed to Simulated and Actual Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Bryan J.

    1993-01-01

    This project has investigated mechanisms that influence alterations in compartmental fluid and electrolyte balance in microgravity and evaluates countermeasures to control renal fluid and electrolyte losses. Determining the alterations due to space flight in fluid compartments and renal function is an important component in understanding long term adaptation to spaceflight and the contribution to post-flight orthostatic intolerance. Four definition phase studies and two studies examining neuro-humoral and vascular mechanisms have been completed.

  11. [Conservative management of renal haemangioma: value of a synergistic combination of flexible ureteroscopy and CT angiography].

    PubMed

    Mallet, Richard; Game, Xavier; Lefi, Mounir; Mouzin, Marc; Malavaud, Bernard; Otal, Philippe; Joffre, Francis; Rischmann, Pascal

    2007-02-01

    Renal haemangioma (RH) is a rare congenital vascular lesion that is frequently responsible for macroscopic haematuria. This lesion is difficult to diagnose preoperatively despite progress in imaging techniques. These diagnostic difficulties account for the high rate of radical treatment (nephrectomy or nephro-ureterectomy) due to a suspicion of renal carcinoma or upper urinary tract tumour. However, conservative diagnostic and therapeutic management can be performed by a combination of CT angiography, flexible ureteroscopy and selective embolization. PMID:17373249

  12. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies. PMID:26585821

  13. Molecular mechanisms for vascular complications of targeted cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Srila; Miller, Kenneth B; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2016-10-01

    Molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment by improving both quality of life and survival in cancer patients. However, many of these drugs are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that are sometimes dose-limiting. Moreover, the long-term cardiovascular consequences of these drugs, some of which are used chronically, are not yet known. Although the scope and mechanisms of the cardiac toxicities are better defined, the mechanisms for vascular toxicities are only beginning to be elucidated. This review summarizes what is known about the vascular adverse events associated with three classes of novel anti-cancer therapies: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, breakpoint cluster-Abelson (BCR-ABL) kinase inhibitors used to treat chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) and immunomodulatory agents (IMiDs) used in myeloma therapeutics. Three of the best described vascular toxicities are reviewed including hypertension, increased risk of acute cardiovascular ischaemic events and arteriovenous thrombosis. The available data regarding the mechanism by which each therapy causes vascular complication are summarized. When data are limited, potential mechanisms are inferred from the known effects of inhibiting each target on vascular cell function and disease. Enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms of vascular side effects of targeted cancer therapy is necessary to effectively manage cancer patients and to design safer targeted cancer therapies for the future. PMID:27612952

  14. The Effects of Catheter-Based Radiofrequency Renal Denervation on Renal Function and Renal Artery Structure in Patients With Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Kan; Jiang, Feng-Lin; Zeng, Li-Xiong; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are no clinical studies on the effects of catheter-based radiofrequency renal denervation (RDN) on renal artery structure using 64-detector computed tomography (CT). A total of 39 patients with resistant hypertension received RDN and 38 patients received drug treatment. Mean systolic pressure and diastolic pressure in the RDN group decreased after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of procedure (P<.05) and urinary protein level significantly decreased after 6 and 12 months (P<.05). The diameter, length, and sectional area of the renal artery; number of cases of atherosclerosis; and plaque burden of 64-detector CT renal arteriography did not change at 12 months of follow-up (P<.05), whereas the plaque burden increased significantly in the control group (P<.05). RDN significantly and persistently reduced blood pressure and decreased urinary protein excretion rate in patients with resistant hypertension and did not exhibit any adverse effect on renal function and renal artery structure. PMID:25039997

  15. Renal flow studies after abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy and axillo-bifemoral bypass graft: case report

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Yussen, P.S.

    1988-03-01

    Vascular disorders affecting the kidneys are either acquired or congenital. Included in this category are common multiplicity of renal arteries, the rare arteriovenous malformation, stresses due to fibromuscular disease or atherosclerosis including abdominal aortic aneurysms, arterial thrombosis, venous thrombosis, and infarction. In contrast to the group of cystic and neoplastic kidneys where scintigraphic or pathologic are not diagnostic, scintigraphic or pathologic anatomy in vascular disease is often diagnostic by nuclear medicine techniques. The authors present an interesting case of evaluation of acute renal failure in a patient abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy and axillo-bifemoral bypass graft.

  16. [Pulmonary-renal crosstalk in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Donoso F, Alejandro; Arriagada S, Daniela; Cruces R, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of renal replacement therapy, mortality of acute renal failure remains high, especially when occurring simultaneously with distant organic failure as it is in the case of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this update, birideccional deleterious relationship between lung and kidney on the setting of organ dysfunction is reviewed, which presents important clinical aspects of knowing. Specifically, the renal effects of acute respiratory distress syndrome and the use of positive-pressure mechanical ventilation are discussed, being ventilator induced lung injury one of the most common models for studying the lung-kidney crosstalk. The role of renal failure induced by mechanical ventilation (ventilator-induced kidney injury) in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure is emphasized. We also analyze the impact of the acute renal failure in the lung, recognizing an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability, inflammation, and alteration of sodium and water channels in the alveolar epithelial. This conceptual model can be the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies to use in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. PMID:26338439

  17. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  18. Adversity and advancing nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Reed, Pamela G

    2008-04-01

    This column reports the theme of adversity addressed in reference to theoretical and metatheoretical considerations for advancing nursing knowledge. The development and content of three classic nursing theories are presented by Neuman representatives, and by theorists King and Roy. Topics for continued dialogue are identified as derived from the interface between philosophy of science issues and these theories. PMID:18378823

  19. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  20. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  1. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  2. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  3. Placental Features of Late-Onset Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Lucy E.; Wareing, Mark; Greenwood, Susan L.; Jones, Rebecca L.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Heazell, Alexander E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Currently, no investigations reliably identify placental dysfunction in late pregnancy. To facilitate the development of such investigations we aimed to identify placental features that differ between normal and adverse outcome in late pregnancy in a group of pregnancies with reduced fetal movement. Methods Following third trimester presentation with reduced fetal movement (N = 100), placental structure ex vivo was measured. Placental function was then assessed in terms of (i) chorionic plate artery agonist responses and length-tension characteristics using wire myography and (ii) production and release of placentally derived hormones (by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbant assay of villous tissue and explant conditioned culture medium). Results Placentas from pregnancies ending in adverse outcome (N = 23) were ~25% smaller in weight, volume, length, width and disc area (all p<0.0001) compared with those from normal outcome pregnancies. Villous and trophoblast areas were unchanged, but villous vascularity was reduced (median (interquartile range): adverse outcome 10 (10–12) vessels/mm2 vs. normal outcome 13 (12–15), p = 0.002). Adverse outcome pregnancy placental arteries were relatively insensitive to nitric oxide donated by sodium nitroprusside compared to normal outcome pregnancy placental arteries (50% Effective Concentration 30 (19–50) nM vs. 12 (6–24), p = 0.02). Adverse outcome pregnancy placental tissue contained less human chorionic gonadotrophin (20 (11–50) vs. 55 (24–102) mIU/mg, p = 0.007) and human placental lactogen (11 (6–14) vs. 27 (9–50) mg/mg, p = 0.006) and released more soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (21 (13–29) vs. 5 (2–15) ng/mg, p = 0.01) compared with normal outcome pregnancy placental tissue. Conclusion These data provide a description of the placental phenotype of adverse outcome in late pregnancy. Antenatal tests that accurately reflect elements of this phenotype may

  4. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M; Wang, Ping Z; Bai, Xue F

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  5. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M.; Wang, Ping Z.; Bai, Xue F.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  6. Digital processing of histopathological aspects in renal transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Albuquerque Araujo, Arnaldo; de Andrade, Marcos C.; Bambirra, Eduardo A.; dos Santos, A. M. M.

    1993-07-01

    We describe here our initial experience with the digital image processing of histopathological aspects from multiple renal biopsies of transplanted kidney in a patient treated with Cyclosporine (CsA), a powerful immunosupressor drug whose use has improved the chances of a successful vascularized organ transplantation (Tx). Unfortunately, CsA promotes morphological alterations to the glomerular structure of the kidneys. To characterize this process, glomeruli, tufts, and lumen areas distributions are measured. The results are presented in form of graphics.

  7. Multicystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, V P; Ratnakar, K S

    2001-07-01

    Multicystic renal dysplasia, the most common form of cystic renal disease in the newborn period, is a clinically important consequence of abnormal nephrogenesis. It usually presents as an abdominal mass. The dysplasias are usually unilateral, but it can be bilateral, segmental or focal. The clinical presentation usually depends on the extent of the dysplastic involvement and the degree of the associated urinary obstruction. Here, we present a case of histologically multicystic renal dysplasia, which is ?bilateral. The left kidney showed typical radiological, gross and histopathological features of multicystic dysplasia, but the right kidney showed only radiological features of dysplastic cystic kidney. PMID:11479648

  8. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Ricci, Zaccaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a cornerstone in the clinical management of patients with acute kidney injury. Results from different studies agree that early renal support therapy (aimed to support the residual kidney function during early phases of organ dysfunction) may reduce mortality with respect to late RRT (aimed to substitute the complete loss of function during the advanced kidney insufficiency). Although it seems plausible that a timely initiation of RRT may be associated with improved renal and nonrenal outcomes in these patients, there is scarce evidence in literature to exactly identify the most adequate onset timing for RRT. PMID:26410148

  9. Incretin-Based Therapy for Prevention of Diabetic Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic vascular complications are the most common cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with numbers of affected individuals steadily increasing. Diabetic vascular complications can be divided into two categories: macrovascular andmicrovascular complications. Macrovascular complications include coronary artery diseaseand cerebrovascular disease, while microvascular complications include retinopathy and chronic kidney disease. These complications result from metabolic abnormalities, including hyperglycemia, elevated levels of free fatty acids, and insulin resistance. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to mediate the adverse effects of these metabolic disorders on vascular tissues, including stimulation of protein kinase C signaling and activation of the polyol pathway by oxidative stress and inflammation. Additionally, the loss of tissue-specific insulin signaling induced by hyperglycemia and toxic metabolites can induce cellular dysfunction and both macro- and microvascular complications characteristic of diabetes. Despite these insights, few therapeutic methods are available for the management of diabetic complications. Recently, incretin-based therapeutic agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, have been reported to elicit vasotropic actions, suggesting a potential for effecting an actual reduction in diabetic vascular complications. The present review will summarize the relationship between multiple adverse biological mechanisms in diabetes and putative incretin-based therapeutic interventions intended to prevent diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26881236

  10. Complex renal cysts associated with crizotinib treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Patrick; Bartlett, Cynthia H; Solomon, Benjamin J; Tassell, Vanessa; Shaw, Alice T; de Pas, Tommaso; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Geon Kook; Tanaka, Kaoru; Tan, Weiwei; Tang, Yiyun; Wilner, Keith D; Safferman, Allan; Han, Ji-Youn

    2015-01-01

    An apparent causal association between crizotinib treatment and renal cyst development emerged during clinical trials in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Serious adverse event (SAE) reports of renal cysts from a safety database of 1375 patients from four clinical trials were reviewed. A blinded, retrospective, independent radiologic review (IRR) was performed using scans from patients on study for ≥6 months in three clinical trials; risk factors for renal cyst development were assessed. Among 17 patients with renal cysts reported as SAEs, evidence of invasion into adjacent structures was noted in seven patients, with no evidence of malignancy found. These patients generally did not require dose reductions, none required permanent crizotinib discontinuation due to this AE, and most continued treatment with clinical benefit. In the blinded IRR, among 255 crizotinib-treated patients, 22%, 3%, and 2% had preexisting simple cysts, complex cysts, or both, respectively. At the 6-month tumor assessment, 9% of all patients had acquired new cysts, and 2% of patients with preexisting cysts had developed new cysts and enlargements (>50%) of preexisting simple cysts. Asians appeared to have an increased risk of developing new cysts on treatment; Koreans in particular had 5.18 times higher odds of developing cysts than non-Asians (95% confidence interval, 1.51–17.78; P = 0.05). Crizotinib treatment appears to be associated with an increased risk of development and progression of renal cysts in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. While close monitoring is recommended, dosing modification was not generally necessary, allowing patients to remain on crizotinib treatment. PMID:25756473

  11. Obesity augments vasoconstrictor reactivity to angiotensin II in the renal circulation of the Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Stepp, David W; Boesen, Erika I; Sullivan, Jennifer C; Mintz, James D; Hair, Clark D; Pollock, David M

    2007-10-01

    Obesity is an emerging risk factor for renal dysfunction, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Obese patients show heightened renal vasodilation to blockade of the renin-angiotensin system, suggesting deficits in vascular responses to angiotensin II (ANG II). This study tested the hypothesis that obesity augments renal vasoconstriction to ANG II. Lean (LZR), prediabetic obese (OZR), and nonobese fructose-fed Zucker rats (FF-LZR) were studied to determine the effects of obesity and insulin resistance on reactivity of blood pressure and renal blood flow to vasoconstrictors. OZR showed enlargement of the kidneys, elevated urine output, increased sodium intake, and decreased plasma renin activity (PRA) vs. LZR, and renal vasoconstriction to ANG II was augmented in OZR. Renal reactivity to norepinephrine and mesenteric vascular reactivity to ANG II were similar between LZR and OZR. Insulin-resistant FF-LZR had normal reactivity to ANG II, indicating the insulin resistance was an unlikely explanation for the changes observed in OZR. Four weeks on a low-sodium diet (0.08%) to raise PRA reduced reactivity to ANG II in OZR back to normal levels without effect on LZR. From these data, we conclude that in the prediabetic stages of obesity, a decrease in PRA is observed in Zucker rats that may lead to increased renal vascular reactivity to ANG II. This increased reactivity to ANG II may explain the elevated renal vasodilator effects observed in obese humans and provide insight into early changes in renal function that predispose to nephropathy in later stages of the disease. PMID:17693541

  12. Challenges in renal transplantation in Yemen.

    PubMed

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H

    2015-01-01

    Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in Yemen in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in Yemen in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports. PMID:25683097

  13. Unwrapping the origins and roles of the renal endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Donna Beer; Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2014-01-01

    The renal vasculature, like all vessels, is lined by simple squamous epithelium, called an endothelium. These endothelial-lined vessels can be subdivided into four major compartments: arteries, veins, capillaries and lymphatics. The renal vasculature is a highly integrated network that forms through the active processes of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The precise contribution of these two processes and the molecular signaling that governs the differentiation, specification and maturation of these critical cell populations is an actively evolving field. Though much of the focus has concentrated on the origin of the glomerular capillaries, this review extends the investigation to the origins of the endothelial cells throughout the entire kidney and the signaling events that cause their distinct functional and molecular profiles. A thorough understanding of endothelial cell biology may play a critical role in better understanding renal vascular diseases. PMID:24633402

  14. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-10-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental-social cues and physiological-behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time-dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  15. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental–social cues and physiological–behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time–dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  16. Adverse reactions to new anticonvulsant drugs.

    PubMed

    Wong, I C; Lhatoo, S D

    2000-07-01

    A lack of systematic pharmacoepidemiological studies investigating adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to anticonvulsants makes it difficult to assess accurately the incidence of anticonvulsant-related ADRs. Most of the available information in this regard stems from clinical trial experience, case reports and postmarketing surveillance, sources that are not, by any means, structured to provide precise data on adverse event epidemiology. For various ethical, statistical and logistical reasons, the organisation of structured clinical trials that are likely to provide substantial data on ADRs is extremely difficult. This review concentrates on current literature concerning serious and life-threatening ADRs. As with the older anticonvulsants, the majority of ADRs to newer anticonvulsants are CNS-related, although there are several that are apparently unique to some of these new drugs. Gabapentin has been reported to cause aggravation of seizures, movement disorders and psychiatric disturbances. Felbamate should only be prescribed under close medical supervision because of aplastic anaemia and hepatotoxicity. Lamotrigine causes hypersensitivity reactions that range from simple morbilliform rashes to multi-organ failure. Psychiatric ADRs and deterioration of seizure control have also been reported with lamotrigine treatment. Oxcarbazepine has a safety profile similar to that of carbamazepine. Hyponatraemia associated with oxcarbazepine is also a problem; however, it is less likely to cause rash than carbamazepine. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus has been reported frequently with tiagabine, although there are insufficient data at present to identify risk factors for this ADR. Topiramate frequently causes cognitive ADRs and, in addition, also appears to cause word-finding difficulties, renal calculi and bodyweight loss. Vigabatrin has been reported to cause seizure aggravation, especially in myoclonic seizures. There have been rare reports of other neurological ADRs to

  17. Building Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hojae; Puranik, Amey S.; Gauvin, Robert; Edalat, Faramarz; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Only a few engineered tissues—skin, cartilage, bladder—have achieved clinical success, and biomaterials designed to replace more complex organs are still far from commercial availability. This gap exists in part because biomaterials lack a vascular network to transfer the oxygen and nutrients necessary for survival and integration after transplantation. Thus, generation of a functional vasculature is essential to the clinical success of engineered tissue constructs and remains a key challenge for regenerative medicine. In this Perspective, we discuss recent advances in vascularization of biomaterials through the use of biochemical modification, exogenous cells, or microengineering technology. PMID:23152325

  18. Abnormalities of vascular structure and function in pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Elaine M

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in adults. Measures of vascular structure and function, including increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and elevated arterial stiffness predict hard CV events in adulthood. Newer data suggest that abnormalities in target organ damage are occurring in adolescents and young adults with high blood pressure. In this review, we discuss the techniques for measuring vascular dysfunction in young people and the evidence linking blood pressure levels to this type of target organ damage. PMID:26275663

  19. Endothelium Expression of Bcl-2 Is Essential for Normal and Pathological Ocular Vascularization.

    PubMed

    Zaitoun, Ismail S; Johnson, Ryan P; Jamali, Nasim; Almomani, Reem; Wang, Shoujian; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Bcl-2 is an anti-apoptotic protein with important roles in vascular homeostasis and angiogenesis. Mice globally lacking Bcl-2 (Bcl-2 -/-) are small in stature and succumb to renal failure shortly after weaning as a result of renal hypoplasia/cystic dysplasia. We have shown that Bcl-2 -/- mice displayed attenuated retinal vascular development and neovascularization. In vitro studies indicated that in addition to modulating apoptosis, Bcl-2 expression also impacts endothelial and epithelial cell adhesion, migration and extracellular matrix production. However, studies delineating the cell autonomous role Bcl-2 expression plays in the endothelium during vascular development, pruning and remodeling, and neovascularization are lacking. Here we generated mice carrying a conditional Bcl-2 allele (Bcl-2Flox/Flox) and VE-cadherin-cre (Bcl-2EC mice). Bcl-2EC mice were of normal stature and lifespan and displayed some but not all of the retinal vascular defects previously observed in global Bcl-2 deficient mice. Bcl-2EC mice had decreased numbers of endothelial cells, decreased retinal arteries and premature primary branching of the retinal vasculature, but unlike the global knockout mice, spreading of the retinal superficial vascular layer proceeded normally. Choroidal neovascularization was attenuated in Bcl-2EC mice, although retinal neovascularization accompanying oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy was not. Thus, Bcl-2 expression in the endothelium plays a significant role during postnatal retinal vascularization, and pathological choroidal but not retinal neovascularization, suggesting vascular bed specific Bcl-2 function in the endothelium. PMID:26444547

  20. Vascular Multiplicity Should Not Be a Contra-Indication for Live Kidney Donation and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    van Bruggen, Mark; Kimenai, Hendrikus J. A. N.; Tran, Thi C. K.; Terkivatan, Türkan; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; IJzermans, Jan N. M.; Dor, Frank J. M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether vascular multiplicity should be considered as contraindication and therefore ‘extended donor criterion’ is still under debate. Methods Data from all live kidney donors from 2006–2013 (n = 951) was retrospectively reviewed. Vascular anatomy as imaged by MRA, CTA or other modalities was compared with intraoperative findings. Furthermore, the influence of vascular multiplicity on outcome of donors and recipients was studied. Results In 237 out of 951 donors (25%), vascular multiplicity was present. CTA had the highest accuracy levels regarding vascular anatomy assessment. Regarding outcome of donors with vascular multiplicity, warm ischemia time (WIT) and skin-to-skin time were significantly longer if arterial multiplicity (AM) was present (5.1 vs. 4.0 mins and 202 vs. 178 mins). Skin-to-skin time was significantly longer, and complication rates were higher in donors with venous multiplicity (203 vs. 180 mins and 17.2% vs. 8.4%). Outcome of renal transplant recipients showed a significantly increased WIT (30 vs. 26.7 minutes), higher rate of DGF (13.9% vs. 6.9%) and lower rate of BPAR (6.9% vs. 13.9%) in patients receiving a kidney with AM compared to kidneys with singular anatomy. Conclusions We conclude that vascular multiplicity should not be a contra-indication, since it has little impact on clinical outcome in the donor as well as in renal transplant recipients. PMID:27077904

  1. Endothelium Expression of Bcl-2 Is Essential for Normal and Pathological Ocular Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Zaitoun, Ismail S.; Johnson, Ryan P.; Jamali, Nasim; Almomani, Reem; Wang, Shoujian; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Bcl–2 is an anti-apoptotic protein with important roles in vascular homeostasis and angiogenesis. Mice globally lacking Bcl–2 (Bcl–2 -/-) are small in stature and succumb to renal failure shortly after weaning as a result of renal hypoplasia/cystic dysplasia. We have shown that Bcl–2 -/- mice displayed attenuated retinal vascular development and neovascularization. In vitro studies indicated that in addition to modulating apoptosis, Bcl–2 expression also impacts endothelial and epithelial cell adhesion, migration and extracellular matrix production. However, studies delineating the cell autonomous role Bcl–2 expression plays in the endothelium during vascular development, pruning and remodeling, and neovascularization are lacking. Here we generated mice carrying a conditional Bcl–2 allele (Bcl-2Flox/Flox) and VE-cadherin-cre (Bcl-2EC mice). Bcl-2EC mice were of normal stature and lifespan and displayed some but not all of the retinal vascular defects previously observed in global Bcl–2 deficient mice. Bcl-2EC mice had decreased numbers of endothelial cells, decreased retinal arteries and premature primary branching of the retinal vasculature, but unlike the global knockout mice, spreading of the retinal superficial vascular layer proceeded normally. Choroidal neovascularization was attenuated in Bcl-2EC mice, although retinal neovascularization accompanying oxygen-induced ischemic retinopathy was not. Thus, Bcl–2 expression in the endothelium plays a significant role during postnatal retinal vascularization, and pathological choroidal but not retinal neovascularization, suggesting vascular bed specific Bcl–2 function in the endothelium. PMID:26444547

  2. Renal Mitochondrial Cytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNALEU mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized. PMID:21811680

  3. Surgical treatment of an aneurysm of a distal branch of the renal artery.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Solafah; Pierret, Charles; Ba, Bakar; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier; Houlgatte, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysms of the renal artery and its branches are rare, but are associated with significant morbimortality due to the absence of clinical symptoms and hemorrhagic risk in the event of rupture. We report the case of a patient with an aneurysm of a distal branch of the right renal artery that measured 25 mm in diameter. The diagnosis and localization were obtained using selective arteriography. Treatment consisted of resection of the aneurysmal sac associated with closure with a saphenous vein patch rather than an endovascular treatment in order to preserve the nephronic capital. Right renal parenchymatous vascularization was satisfactory on arterial echo-Doppler and angioscanner assessment at 1 year. PMID:24120233

  4. [Renal angiomyolipoma rupture as a cause of lumbar pain: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Melissa; Calleja, Félix; Hola, José; Daviú, Antonio; Jara, Danilo; Vallejos, Humberto

    2008-08-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor formed by smooth muscle, adipose tissue and blood vessels. It is commonly found incidentally and its clinical manifestations are pain and abdominal mass or spontaneous tumor rupture with retroperitoneal bleeding. The clinical presentation of a hemorrhagic shock secondary to a retroperitoneal hematoma is uncommon. We report a 40 year-old male who presented to the emergency room with lumbar pain and deterioration of hemodynamic parameters. The CT scan showed a left renal injury associated to an expansive retroperitoneal process. The abdominal exploration, vascular control of the renal pedicle and nephrectomy allowed a successful outcome. PMID:18949188

  5. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  6. Disappearing renal calculus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Helen; Thomas, Johanna; Kumar, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a renal calculus treated solely with antibiotics which has not been previously reported in the literature. A man with a 17 mm lower pole renal calculus and concurrent Escherichia coli urine infection was being worked up to undergo percutaneous nephrolithotomy. However, after a course of preoperative antibiotics the stone was no longer seen on retrograde pyelography or CT imaging. PMID:23580676

  7. Differential Expression of Specific Dermatan Sulfate Domains in Renal Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lensen, Joost F. M.; van der Vlag, Johan; Versteeg, Elly M. M.; Wetzels, Jack F. M.; van den Heuvel, Lambert P. W. J.; Berden, Jo H. M.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Rops, Angelique L. W. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS), also known as chondroitin sulfate (CS)-B, is a member of the linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The expression of CS/DS and DS proteoglycans is increased in several fibrotic renal diseases, including interstitial fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy, mesangial sclerosis and nephrosclerosis. Little, however, is known about structural alterations in DS in renal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the renal expression of two different DS domains in renal transplant rejection and glomerular pathologies. DS expression was evaluated in normal renal tissue and in kidney biopsies obtained from patients with acute interstitial or vascular renal allograft rejection, patients with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA), and from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), membranous glomerulopathy (MGP) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), using our unique specific anti-DS antibodies LKN1 and GD3A12. Expression of the 4/2,4-di-O-sulfated DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 was decreased in the interstitium of transplant kidneys with IF/TA, which was accompanied by an increased expression of type I collagen, decorin and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), while its expression was increased in the interstitium in FSGS, MGP and SLE. Importantly, all patients showed glomerular LKN1 staining in contrast to the controls. Expression of the IdoA-Gal-NAc4SDS domain recognized by GD3A12 was similar in controls and patients. Our data suggest a role for the DS domain recognized by antibody LKN1 in renal diseases with early fibrosis. Further research is required to delineate the exact role of different DS domains in renal fibrosis. PMID:26322947

  8. Predicting the effects of dietary manipulation in chronic renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    El Nahas, A.M.; Brady, S.A.; Masters-Thomas, A.; Wilkinson, V.; Hilson, A.J.W.; Moorhead, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that the progressive fall in renal function in some patients with CRF is due to hyperfusion of the remnant nephrons in response to the relatively high protein diet of modern life. The authors attempted to assess this and to see what was the shortest time in which any effect could be demonstrated. In the first phase, 39 patients with CRF had their renal function followed for 6 months on their normal diet and 6 months on a low-protein diet (LPD). The patients on LPD all showed an improvement in the rate of fall of renal function. This was marked in patients with mainly tubular disease, and poor in those with glomerular and vascular disease. In the second phase, 11 of these patients (and 1 other) were started on a high protein diet (HPD) for two weeks, and then switched back to a LPD for 2 weeks. There was no change in GFR during this period, but there were marked changes in ERPF, which correlated well with the changes in renal function in the first phase (r = 0.76, rho < 0.01); 4/4 patients with tubular disease showed a rise in ERPF on HPD and a fall on LPD, while only 4/8 with glomerular or vascular disease responded. In the third phase, they assessed the effect of a single high-protein meal in normal volunteers. This showed that there are major changes in hemodynamics following a meal, such that it is not possible to make any statement about renal function using the single-shot methods. The authors conclude that a 2-week period of HPD followed by LPD allows prediction of the possible beneficial response to diet in CRF; that this is best monitored by ERPF; and that a single meal may invalidate renal function measurement.

  9. Glucocorticoid excess induces superoxide production in vascular endothelial cells and elicits vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Takahiko; Akaike, Masashi; Mitsui, Takao; Ohshima, Yasushi; Shintani, Yasumi; Azuma, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2003-01-10

    Glucocorticoid (GC) excess often elicits serious adverse effects on the vascular system, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, and effective prophylaxis for these complications is limited. We sought to reveal the mechanism underlying GC-induced vascular complications. Responses in forearm blood flow to reactive hyperemia in 20 GC-treated patients were significantly decreased to 43+/-8.9% (mean+/-SEM) from the values obtained before GC therapy (130+/-14%). An administration of vitamin C almost normalized blood flow responses. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), production of hydrogen peroxide was increased up to 166.5+/-3.3% of control values by 10(-7) mol/L dexamethasone (DEX) treatment (P<0.01). Concomitant with DEX-induced hydrogen peroxide production, intracellular amounts of peroxynitrite significantly increased and those of nitric oxide (NO) decreased, respectively (P<0.01). Immunoblotting analysis using anti-nitrotyrosine antibody showed that peroxynitrite formation was increased in DEX-treated HUVECs. Using inhibitors against metabolic pathways for generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we identified that the major production sources of ROS by DEX treatment were mitochondrial electron transport chain, NAD(P)H oxidase, and xanthine oxidase. These findings suggest that GC excess causes overproduction of ROS and thereby perturbs NO availability in the vascular endothelium, leading to vascular complications in patients with GC excess. PMID:12522124

  10. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  11. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty of Dysplastic Stenoses of the Renal Artery: Results on 70 Adults

    SciTech Connect

    Fraissinette, Bruno de; Garcier, Jean Marc; Dieu, Valerie; Mofid, Reza; Ravel, Anne; Boire, Jean Yves; Boyer, Louis

    2003-02-15

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of the dilatation (PTRA) of renal arterial dysplastic stenosis (RADS). Methods: Seventy patients suffering from hypertension (87RADS) were treated at our institution for medial (83%) or non-classified fibrodysplasias (17%). Four patients suffered from renal insufficiency. Two endoprostheses were implanted. We evaluated blood pressure with the USCSRH criteria and renal insufficiency with the Martin criteria. Results: Ninety-five percent technical success and 87.9% clinical success for blood pressure were obtained, with worse results for patients older than 57 years or with a history of hypertension greater than 9 years. Results were better when the RADS was responsible for an ipsilateral renal atrophy or for poorly controlled hypertension. No renal insufficiency worsened during the follow-up. Conclusion: PTRA is a first-line treatment for renovascular hypertension caused by RADS. The results were encouraging despite a high average age of the subjects and frequent associated extrarenal vascular lesions.

  12. Ipsilateral leg swelling after renal transplantation as an alarming sign of Iliac vein stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Hyeon; Bae, Seong Man; Park, Su-Kil

    2014-01-01

    Iliac vein stenosis is a rare vascular complication of renal transplantation that may compromise allograft function if not recognized and corrected in a timely fashion. Because chronic venous stenosis may remain undiagnosed for several years, a high index of suspicion should be maintained until diagnosing this rare disease. A 56-year-old renal transplant recipient presented with unilateral leg swelling and renal dysfunction 16 years after transplantation. Computed tomography excluded deep vein thrombosis and revealed tight iliac vein stenosis on the side of the renal transplant. Following angiographic confirmation of the stenosis, endovascular treatment was successfully performed with a purposefully designed, self-expanding, venous stent. Ipsilateral leg swelling is an alarming sign for the diagnosis of iliac vein stenosis after renal transplantation. Percutaneous intervention with venous stent placement seems to be a safe and effective treatment of this rare condition. PMID:26885480

  13. Cardiovascular adverse effects of phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Guldiken, B; Rémi, J; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-05-01

    Phenytoin is an established drug in the treatment of acute repetitive seizures and status epilepticus. One of its main advantages over benzodiazepines is the less sedative effect. However, the possibility of cardiovascular adverse effects with the intravenous use of phenytoin cause a reluctance to its usage, and this has lead to a search for safer anticonvulsant drugs. In this study, we aimed to review the studies which evaluated the safety of phenytoin with respect to cardiovascular adverse effects. The original clinical trials and case reports listed in PUBMED in English language between the years of 1946-2014 were evaluated. As the key words, "phenytoin, diphenylhydantoin, epilepsy, seizure, cardiac toxicity, asystole, arrhythmia, respiratory arrest, hypotension, death" were used. Thirty-two clinical trials and ten case reports were identified. In the case reports, a rapid infusion rate (>50 mg/min) of phenytoin appeared as the major cause of increased mortality. In contrast, no serious cardiovascular adverse effects leading to death were met in the clinical trials which applied the recommended infusion rate and dosages. An infusion rate of 50 mg/min was reported to be safe for young patients. For old patients and patients with a cardiovascular co-morbidity, a slower infusion rate was recommended with a careful follow-up of heart rhythm and blood pressure. No cardiovascular adverse effect was reported in oral phenytoin overdoses except one case with a very high serum phenytoin level and hypoalbuminemia. Phenytoin is an effective and well tolerated drug in the treatment of epilepsy. Intravenous phenytoin is safe when given at recommended infusion rates and doses. PMID:26645393

  14. [Adverse events of psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Koichiro; Kikuchi, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The authors discuss adverse events which are often missed but clinicians should pay attention to in order to preserve patients'quality of life(QOL). Among mood stabilizers, lithium may cause a urinary volume increase, hyperparathyroidism, and serum calcium elevation; sodium valproate possibly increases androgenic hormone levels and the risk of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as well as hypothyroidism. Moreover, in addition to teratogenesis, it has been reported that fetal exposure to a higher dose of valproate is associated with a lower intelligence quotient and higher incidence of autism spectrum disorders in children. Antidepressants with a higher affinity for serotonin transporters might induce gastrointestinal bleeding, and some antidepressants cause sexual dysfunction more frequently than others. Activation syndrome is still a key side effect which should be noted. Regarding the adverse events of antipsychotics, subjective side effects unpleasant to patients such as dysphoria and a lower subjective well-being should not be overlooked. We clinicians have to cope with adverse events worsening the QOL of patients with psychiatric disorders and, therefore, we need to adopt appropriate counter-measures. PMID:24864567

  15. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  16. Methodological Standardization for the Preclinical Evaluation of Renal Sympathetic Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sakakura, Kenichi; Ladich, Elena; Edelman, Elazer R.; Markham, Peter; Stanley, James R.L.; Keating, John; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Joner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter ablation of renal autonomic nerves is a viable option for the treatment of resistent arterial hypertension; however, structured preclinical evaluation with standardization of analytical procedures remains a clear gap in this field. Here we discuss the topics relevant to the preclinical model for the evaluation of renal denervation (RDN) devices and report methodologies and criteria towards standardization of the safety and efficacy assessment, including histopathological evaluations of the renal artery, peri-arterial nerves, and associated peri-adventitial tissues. The preclinical swine renal artery model can be used effectively to assess both the safety and efficacy of RDN technologies. Assessment of the efficacy of RDN modalities primarily focuses on the determination of the depth of penetration of treatment-related injury (eg, necrosis) of the peri-arterial tissues and its relationship (ie, location and distance) and affect on the associated renal nerves and the correlation thereof with proxy biomarkers including renal norepinephrine concentrations and nerve-specific immunohistochemical stains (eg, tyrosine hydroxylase). The safety evaluation of RDN technologies involves assessing for adverse effects on tissues local to the site of treatment (ie, on the arterial wall) as well as tissues at a distance (eg, soft tissue, veins, arterial branches, skeletal muscle, adrenal gland, ureters). Increasing experience will help to create a standardized means of examining all arterial beds subject to ablative energy and in doing so enable us to proceed to optimize development and assessment of these emerging technologies. PMID:25240550

  17. Renal effects of nabumetone, a COX-2 antagonist: impairment of function in isolated perfused rat kidneys contrasts with preserved renal function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Reichman, J; Cohen, S; Goldfarb, M; Shina, A; Rosen, S; Brezis, M; Karmeli, F; Heyman, S N

    2001-01-01

    The constitutive cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 enzyme has been considered the physiologically important isoform for prostaglandin synthesis in the normal kidney. It has, therefore, been suggested that selective inhibitors of the 'inducible' isoform (COX-2) may be free from renal adverse effects. We studied the renal effects of the predominantly COX-2 antagonist nabumetone in isolated perfused kidneys. As compared with controls, kidneys removed after in vivo administration of oral nabumetone (15 mg/kg) disclosed altered renal function with reduced glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction, and urine volume and enhanced hypoxic outer medullary tubular damage. By contrast, renal function and morphology were not affected in vivo by nabumetone or its active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid. The latter agent (10-20 mg/kg i.v.) did not significantly alter renal microcirculation, as opposed to a selective substantial reduction in medullary blood flow noted with the nonselective COX inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.v.). In a rat model of acute renal failure, induced by concomitant administration of radiocontrast, nitric oxide synthase, and COX inhibitors, the decline in kidney function and the extent of hypoxic medullary damage with oral nabumetone (80 mg/kg) were comparable to a control group, and significantly less than those induced by indomethacin. In rats subjected to daily oral nabumetone for 3 consecutive weeks, renal function and morphology were preserved as well. Both nabumetone and 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid reduced renal parenchymal prostaglandin E2 to the same extent as indomethacin. It is concluded that while nabumetone adversely affects renal function and may intensify hypoxic medullary damage ex vivo, rat kidneys are not affected by this agent in vivo, both in acute and chronic studies. COX selectivity may not explain the renal safety of nabumetone. PMID:11701998

  18. Oblique Retro-Aortic Left Renal Vein and its Clinical Importance.

    PubMed

    Bhagavath, P; Nayak, B S; Monteiro, N Pf; Kumar, G P

    2015-01-01

    Kidneys are the organs that remove the waste products of the metabolic activities. A smooth blood flow to the kidneys is essential to maintain their function. Abnormalities of the renal vasculature may result not only in impairing the renal function but can lead to conditions like varicocele. During an autopsy of an adult male, we observed renal vascular variations. The left renal vein had a retro-aortic course before its termination into the inferior vena cava. It was joined with the inferior vena cava at the level of inferior mesenteric artery with an acute angle. The left testicular vein joined the left renal vein with an acute angle. The right kidney was supplied by two renal arteries. The knowledge about retro-aortic course of the left renal vein may be important during renal transplantation. The oblique course of left renal vein and the termination of left testicular vein into it with an acute angle may increase the chances of left sided varicocele. PMID:27423291

  19. Smaller caliber renal arteries are a novel feature of uromodulin-associated kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Prejbisz, Aleksander; Sellin, Lorenz; Szwench-Pietrasz, Elżbieta; Woznowski, Magdalena; Michałowska, Ilona; Blondin, Dirk; Sajnaga, Dariusz; Epplen, Jorg T; Litwin, Mieczysław; Dekomien, Gabriele; Januszewicz, Magdalena; Helmchen, Udo; Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Adamczak, Marcin; Więcek, Andrzej; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Rump, Lars C

    2015-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is very common in industrialized countries and known to promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Juvenile hyperuricemia is a hallmark of uromodulin-associated kidney disease characterized by progressive interstitial renal fibrosis leading to end-stage renal disease within decades. Here we describe a member of a Polish-German family with a history of familial background of chronic kidney disease, hyperuricemia, and gout. This patient had hypertension because of bilateral small renal arteries, hyperuricemia, and chronic kidney disease. Clinical and molecular studies were subsequently performed in 39 family members, which included a physical examination, Duplex ultrasound of the kidneys, laboratory tests for renal function, and urine analysis. In eight family members contrast-enhanced renal artery imaging by computed tomography-angiography or magnetic resonance imaging was conducted and showed that bilateral non-arteriosclerotic small caliber renal arteries were associated with hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease. Of the 26 family members who underwent genotyping, 11 possessed the P236R mutation (c.707C>G) of the uromodulin gene. All family members with a small caliber renal artery carried the uromodulin P236R mutation. Statistical analysis showed a strong correlation between reduced renal artery lumen and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate. Thus, bilateral small caliber renal arteries are a new clinical phenotype associated with an uromodulin mutation. PMID:25671765

  20. Initial Clinical Experience Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, David J.; Kessel, David O. Nicholson, Anthony A.; Patel, Jai V.; McPherson, Simon J.; Shaw, David R.

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP) is a self-expanding nitinol wire mesh vascular embolization device derived from the Amplatz septal occluder. We assessed the results of vascular embolization obtained using the AVP. Methods. A retrospective review was carried out of 23 consecutive cases of vascular embolization using the AVP in a variety of different clinical settings. The AVP was chosen to have a diameter approximately 30-50% greater than the target vessel. The device was delivered via an appropriately sized guide catheter and was released when satisfactorily positioned. Additional embolic agents were used in some cases. Results. All target vessels were successfully occluded with no device malpositioning or malfunction. In 14 (61%) patients the AVP was the sole embolic material. In the remaining patients additional agents were used, particularly in preoperative embolization of highly vascular renal tumors. The AVP does not cause instantaneous thrombosis and in high-flow situations thrombosis typically takes up to 15 min. Conclusion. The AVP is a safe, effective embolization device that provides a useful adjunct to the therapeutic armamentarium. It is particularly suited to the treatment of short high-flow vessels where coil migration and catheter dislodgment might occur. In the majority of cases no additional embolic agents are necessary but it may take up to 15 min for complete thrombosis to occur.

  1. Vascular calcification is dependent on plasma levels of pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lomashvili, Koba A; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, Jose L; O'Neill, W Charles

    2014-06-01

    Plasma levels of pyrophosphate, an endogenous inhibitor of vascular calcification, are reduced in end-stage renal disease and correlate inversely with arterial calcification. However, it is not known whether the low plasma levels are directly pathogenic or are merely a marker of reduced tissue levels. This was tested in an animal model in which aortas were transplanted between normal mice and Enpp1(-/-) mice lacking ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that synthesizes extracellular pyrophosphate. Enpp1(-/-) mice had very low plasma pyrophosphate and developed aortic calcification by 2 months that was greatly accelerated with a high-phosphate diet. Aortas of Enpp1(-/-) mice showed no further calcification after transplantation into wild-type mice fed a high-phosphate diet. Aorta allografts of wild-type mice calcified in Enpp1(-/-) mice but less so than the adjacent recipient Enpp1(-/-) aorta. Donor and recipient aortic calcium contents did not differ in transplants between wild-type and Enpp1(-/-) mice, demonstrating that transplantation per se did not affect calcification. Histology revealed medial calcification with no signs of rejection. Thus, normal levels of extracellular pyrophosphate are sufficient to prevent vascular calcification, and systemic Enpp1 deficiency is sufficient to produce vascular calcification despite normal vascular extracellular pyrophosphate production. This establishes an important role for circulating extracellular pyrophosphate in preventing vascular calcification. PMID:24717293

  2. Protective role of sulphoraphane against vascular complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Matsui, Takanori

    2016-10-01

    Context Diabetes is a global health challenge. Although large prospective clinical trials have shown that intensive control of blood glucose or blood pressure reduces the risk for development and progression of vascular complications in diabetes, a substantial number of diabetic patients still experience renal failure and cardiovascular events, which could account for disabilities and high mortality rate in these subjects. Objective Sulphoraphane is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in widely consumed cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts, and an inducer of phase II antioxidant and detoxification enzymes with anticancer properties. We reviewed here the protective role of sulphoraphane against diabetic vascular complications. Methods In this review, literature searches were undertaken in Medline and in CrossRef. Non-English language articles were excluded. Keywords [sulphoraphane and (diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic complications, vascular, cardiomyocytes, heart or glycation)] have been used to select the articles. Results There is accumulating evidence that sulphoraphane exerts beneficial effects on vascular damage in both cell culture and diabetic animal models via antioxidative properties. Furthermore, we have recently found that sulphoraphane inhibits in vitro formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), suppresses the AGE-induced inflammatory reactions in rat aorta by reducing receptor for AGEs (RAGE) expression and decreases serum levels of AGEs in humans. Conclusion These findings suggest that blockade of oxidative stress and/or the AGE-RAGE axis by sulphoraphane may be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:26841240

  3. Diffuse vascular damage in a transplanted kidney: an indication for nuclear magnetic resonance?

    PubMed

    Burdese, M; Consiglio, V; Mezza, E; Savio, D; Guarena, C; Rossetti, M; Messina, M; Soragna, G; Suriani, C; Rabbia, C; Segoloni, G P; Piccoli, G B

    2005-06-01

    Vascular lesions are an increasing challenge after renal transplantation due to the wider indications for recipients and acceptance criteria for donors. Diagnostic approach and prognostic interpretation are still matter of controversy. The case reported herein may summarize some of the issues in this regard. A 54-year-old woman, on renal replacement therapy since 1974, and a kidney graft recipient from 1975 to 1999, received a second graft in 2001. The donor age was 65 years (cold ischemia 22 hours; two mismatches). The early posttransplant follow-up was characterized by delayed graft function, hypertension, and diabetes. During the initial hypertension workup, renal graft ultrasound (US) Doppler demonstrated increased vascular resistances, stable over time (resistance index 0.74 to 0.77); renal scintiscan displayed homogeneously parenchymoa and angio-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an homogeneous parenchymal vascularization. Initial immunosuppression with tacrolimus and steroids was modulated by adding mycophenolate mofetil to taper tacrolimus (to reduce nephrotoxicity and hypertension). Despite this, kidney function slowly deteriorated; serum creatinine reached 3 to 3.5 mg/dL by the second year. After a severe hypertensive crisis with unchanged scintiscan and US doppler examinations, angio-MRI revealed the almost complete disappearance of parenchymal enhancement beyond the lobar arteries. A renal biopsy confirmed the severe vascular damage. The patient was switched to rapamycine and a low-dose of an angiotension converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. She did relatively well (serum creatinine 2.2 to 3 mg/dL) for 6 months, when rapid functional impairment forced her to restart hemodialysis. This case, almost paradigmatic of the problems occurring when the rigid vasculature of long-term dialysis patients is matched with "marginal kidneys," suggests that MRI may be a sensible good to define vascular damage in the grafted kidney. PMID:15964339

  4. Vascular calcification, bone and mineral metabolism after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    D’Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The development of end stage renal failure can be seen as a catastrophic health event and patients with this condition are considered at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease among any other patient groups and risk categories. Although kidney transplantation was hailed as an optimal solution to such devastating disease, many issues related to immune-suppressive drugs soon emerged and it became evident that cardiovascular disease would remain a vexing problem. Progression of chronic kidney disease is accompanied by profound alterations of mineral and bone metabolism that are believed to have an impact on the cardiovascular health of patients with advanced degrees of renal failure. Cardiovascular risk factors remain highly prevalent after kidney transplantation, some immune-suppression drugs worsen the risk profile of graft recipients and the alterations of mineral and bone metabolism seen in end stage renal failure are not completely resolved. Whether this complex situation promotes progression of vascular calcification, a hall-mark of advanced chronic kidney disease, and whether vascular calcifications contribute to the poor cardiovascular outcome of post-transplant patients is reviewed in this article. PMID:26722649

  5. [Hereditary renal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ortega, Julián; Olivier, Carlos; Pérez Segura, Pedro; Galante Romo, Isabel; San José Mansó, Luis; Saez, Mamen

    2009-02-01

    Kidney cancer is the tenth most common cause of cancer death. There are a growing number of genes known to be associated with an increased risk of specific types of kidney cancer. People with Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome have about a 40% risk of developing multiple bilateral clear cell kidney cancers. They can also develop retinal and brain hemangioblastoma, kidneys or pancreas cysts, pheochromocytoma and endolymphatic sac tumor. Four phenotypes with different renal cancer and pheocromocitoma risk have been described depending on the germline mutation. Hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma syndrome has type 1 papillary renal cell carcinomas associated with protooncogene c-MET germline mutations. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome has FLCN gene mutations associated with fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts with a high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax, and a 15% to 30% risk of kidney cancer (most classified as chromophobe carcinoma, oncocytoma or oncocytic hybrid, but clear cell and papillary kidney cancers have also been reported). Histopathological findings such as oncocytosis and oncocytic hybrids are very unusual outside the syndrome. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome shows mutations of Fumarate hydratase gene and cutaneous leiomyomata in 76% of affected individuals, uterine leiomyomata in 100% of females, and unilateral, solitary, and aggressive papillary renal cancer in 10 to 16% of patients. A specific histopathological change is eosinophilic prominent nucleoli with a perinucleolar halo. Tuberous sclerosis complex is one of the most prevalent (1/5.800) hereditary syndromes where renal disease is the second leading cause of death, associated with angiomyolipomas (70%), renal cysts, oncocytomas or clear cell cancer. PMID:19418834

  6. Pharmacokinetics in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, G

    1977-04-01

    The physiologic perturbations associated with renal disease can have a pronounced effect on the kinetics of elimination of drugs and their metabolites from the body. Drugs are ordinarily cleared from the body by a number of routes, each of which can be characterized by a clearance value. The sum of these clearances (renal, hepatic, etc.) is the total or body clearance which is inversely proportional to the steady-state plasma concentration produced by a given drug dosage regimen. The quantitative contribution of each route of elimination to the metabolic fate of a drug is proportional to the clearance value of that route relative to the body clearance. As a first approximation, the reduction in the renal clearance of a drug caused by renal disease is proportional to the reduction in the renal clearance of creatinine. The metabolic (biotransformation) clearance of many extensively plasma protein bound drugs is proportional to their free fraction (ratio of concentrations of free to total drug) in plasma. Since severe renal disease causes a reduction in the plasma protein binding of many drugs, the metabolic clearance of such drugs will be increased. The contribution of hemodialysis to the total clearance of a drug depends on the magnitude of the clearance obtained by hemodialysis relative to the magnitude of the body clearance of the drug on a day between dialyses. To compensate for the increased elimination of a drug during hemodialysis, the dosing rate (i.e., the dose per unit of time) must be increased by the factor (hemodialysis clearance and body clearance):body clearance, where body clearance is that during a day between dialyses. Further dosage compensation may be needed if body clearance is increased during hemodialysis due to decreased plasma protein binding of the drug. Under certain conditions, an increased accumulation of pharmacologically active drug metabolites during renal failure becomes a matter of serious concern. PMID:851113

  7. Detecting Adverse Events Using Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Bates, David W.; Evans, R. Scott; Murff, Harvey; Stetson, Peter D.; Pizziferri, Lisa; Hripcsak, George

    2003-01-01

    Context: Although patient safety is a major problem, most health care organizations rely on spontaneous reporting, which detects only a small minority of adverse events. As a result, problems with safety have remained hidden. Chart review can detect adverse events in research settings, but it is too expensive for routine use. Information technology techniques can detect some adverse events in a timely and cost-effective way, in some cases early enough to prevent patient harm. Objective: To review methodologies of detecting adverse events using information technology, reports of studies that used these techniques to detect adverse events, and study results for specific types of adverse events. Design: Structured review. Methodology: English-language studies that reported using information technology to detect adverse events were identified using standard techniques. Only studies that contained original data were included. Main Outcome Measures: Adverse events, with specific focus on nosocomial infections, adverse drug events, and injurious falls. Results: Tools such as event monitoring and natural language processing can inexpensively detect certain types of adverse events in clinical databases. These approaches already work well for some types of adverse events, including adverse drug events and nosocomial infections, and are in routine use in a few hospitals. In addition, it appears likely that these techniques will be adaptable in ways that allow detection of a broad array of adverse events, especially as more medical information becomes computerized. Conclusion: Computerized detection of adverse events will soon be practical on a widespread basis. PMID:12595401

  8. Preoperative assessment and planning of haemodialysis vascular access.

    PubMed

    Lomonte, Carlo; Basile, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Effective haemodialysis (HD) requires a reliable vascular access (VA). Clinical practice guidelines strongly recommend the arteriovenous fistula (AVF) as the preferred VA in HD patients. The creation of an AVF should be promoted in all eligible patients who choose HD, as it improves outcomes and reduces costs when compared with central venous catheters. Fistula eligibility is a 'work in progress'. Three steps in order to increase the pool of eligible patients can be individualized: (i) process of care, which includes three fundamental items: the VA team, early VA education and timely VA surgery referral; (ii) preoperative evaluation; (iii) surgical strategy. Nephrologists should be able to play a leading and coordinating role of the VA team. They should design a plan that identifies a sequence of options that can be used to provide adequate renal replacement therapy throughout the life span of every end-stage renal disease patient. The main points of this strategy are (i) early vascular education, in which a 'save the vein program' should always be implemented; (ii) timely VA surgery referral and preoperative evaluation: careful examination of arterial and venous beds is mandatory before VA placement; physical examination in addition to colour Doppler ultrasound mapping improves AVF outcomes; (iii) surgical strategy: a successful VA strategy must take into account vascular anatomy, clinical factors and prognosis. PMID:26034588

  9. Analysis of renal function during telaprevir-based triple therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    KOHJIMA, MOTOYUKI; KUROKAWA, MIHO; ENJOJI, MUNECHIKA; YOSHIMOTO, TSUYOSHI; NAKAMURA, TSUKASA; OHASHI, TOMOKO; FUKUIZUMI, KUNITAKA; HARADA, NAOHIKO; MURATA, YUSUKE; MATSUNAGA, KAZUHISA; KATO, MASAKI; KOTOH, KAZUHIRO; NAKAMUTA, MAKOTO

    2016-01-01

    Telaprevir (TVR) is used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in a combination therapy with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin. Although renal dysfunction is one of the critical adverse outcomes of this treatment, little is known regarding the mechanism of its onset. The present study assessed the association of renal function with TVR dose and viral response. Hematological, biochemical, urinary and virological parameters of renal function were examined during the TVR-based triple therapy of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b. Serum creatinine levels were increased and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was decreased in every patient during TVR administration, but these values recovered to normal levels following cessation of TVR. Fractional excretion of sodium was <1% at days 3 and 7, appearing similar regardless of baseline renal function. Urinary β2-microglobulin levels were elevated and were significantly higher in patients with renal dysfunction, as compared with those not exhibiting renal dysfunction (P<0.05). The reduction in renal function was milder in patients treated with a reduced TVR dose, and these patients had a significantly lower risk of developing renal dysfunction (P<0.05). Using a multivariate analysis, TVR dose and eGFR at the initiation of treatment were identified as significant contributory factors in the development of renal dysfunction. Reduction in TVR dose did not lead to a significant increase in the viral kinetics of HCV or detrimental effects on the sustained viral response (SVR) rate. It is hypothesized that renal dysfunction during TVR treatment is caused by damage of the renal tubule, in addition to pre-renal dysfunction, and that reduction in TVR dose reduces the rate of renal dysfunction without causing a significant decrease in the SVR rate. PMID:27168803

  10. Retrospective Analysis of the Safety and Efficacy of High-dose Interleukin-2 After Prior Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael K. K.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Redman, Bruce G.; Logan, Theodore; Gao, Dexiang; Flaig, Thomas W.; Lewis, Karl; Poust, Jamie; Monk, Paul; Jarkowski, Anthony; Sendilnathan, Arun; Bolden, Marcus; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Olencki, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are the most common first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, high-dose interleukin-2 (HD-IL2) remains the only agent that provides durable complete responses. The optimal sequence of these agents remains uncertain. This retrospective multi-institutional study examined the safety and efficacy of HD-IL2 following TKI therapy. After IRB approval at 7 HD-IL2 centers, data relating to patient, disease, and treatment characteristics among 40 consecutive patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who were treated with HD-IL2 after at least 1 prior TKI therapy were retrospectively collected. The most common cardiac adverse events were grade 3 hypotension and vascular leak syndrome. Six patients (15%) experienced other grade ≥3 cardiac adverse events. There were 2 treatment-related deaths due to congestive heart failure, occurring in 1 patient with short TKI to HD-IL2 interval and another patient with an abnormal baseline cardiac stress test. Best responses included 2 CRs (5%, duration 40+ and 62+ mo), 3 PRs (8%, duration 6, 11, and 24 mo), 13 SD (32%, median duration 12 mo), 20 PD (50%), and 2 not evaluable patients. Median overall survival was 22 months. Administration of HD-IL2 could be safe and effective after TKI therapy; however, careful selection of patients is critical. We recommend baseline cardiac risk factor assessment, screening with both cardiac stress test and echocardiogram, and allowing a TKI to HD-IL2 interval of at least 2 months. PMID:25075565

  11. Retrospective analysis of the safety and efficacy of high-dose interleukin-2 after prior tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Elaine T; Wong, Michael K K; Agarwal, Neeraj; Redman, Bruce G; Logan, Theodore; Gao, Dexiang; Flaig, Thomas W; Lewis, Karl; Poust, Jamie; Monk, Paul; Jarkowski, Anthony; Sendilnathan, Arun; Bolden, Marcus; Kuzel, Timothy M; Olencki, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are the most common first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, high-dose interleukin-2 (HD-IL2) remains the only agent that provides durable complete responses. The optimal sequence of these agents remains uncertain. This retrospective multi-institutional study examined the safety and efficacy of HD-IL2 following TKI therapy. After IRB approval at 7 HD-IL2 centers, data relating to patient, disease, and treatment characteristics among 40 consecutive patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who were treated with HD-IL2 after at least 1 prior TKI therapy were retrospectively collected. The most common cardiac adverse events were grade 3 hypotension and vascular leak syndrome. Six patients (15%) experienced other grade ≥3 cardiac adverse events. There were 2 treatment-related deaths due to congestive heart failure, occurring in 1 patient with short TKI to HD-IL2 interval and another patient with an abnormal baseline cardiac stress test. Best responses included 2 CRs (5%, duration 40+ and 62+ mo), 3 PRs (8%, duration 6, 11, and 24 mo), 13 SD (32%, median duration 12 mo), 20 PD (50%), and 2 not evaluable patients. Median overall survival was 22 months. Administration of HD-IL2 could be safe and effective after TKI therapy; however, careful selection of patients is critical. We recommend baseline cardiac risk factor assessment, screening with both cardiac stress test and echocardiogram, and allowing a TKI to HD-IL2 interval of at least 2 months. PMID:25075565

  12. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects. PMID:27357302

  13. Adverse Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Arumugham, Shyam Sundar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment commonly used for depression and other major psychiatric disorders. We discuss potential adverse effects (AEs) associated with ECT and strategies for their prevention and management. Common acute AEs include headache, nausea, myalgia, and confusion; these are self-limiting and are managed symptomatically. Serious but uncommon AEs include cardiovascular, pulmonary, and cerebrovascular events; these may be minimized with screening for risk factors and by physiologic monitoring. Although most cognitive AEs of ECT are short-lasting, troublesome retrograde amnesia may rarely persist. Modifications of and improvements in treatment techniques minimize cognitive and other AEs. PMID:27514303

  14. Oral and dental aspects of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R; Kumar, N; Stein, A; Moles, D; Porter, S

    2005-03-01

    The present article reviews, in detail, the current knowledge of the oral and dental aspects of chronic renal failure (CRF). Worldwide, increasing numbers of persons have CRF; thus, oral health care staffs are increasingly likely to provide care for patients with such disease. Chronic renal failure can give rise to a wide spectrum of oral manifestations, affecting the hard or soft tissues of the mouth. The majority of affected individuals have disease that does not complicate oral health care; nevertheless, the dental management of such individuals does require that the clinician understand the multiple systems that can be affected. The clinician should also consider the adverse side-effects of drug therapy and appropriate prescribing, in view of compromised renal clearance. PMID:15723858

  15. Acute renal failure and severe thrombocytopenia associated with metamizole.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Pachon, Maria Dolores; Enriquez, Ricardo; Sirvent, Ana Esther; Millan, Isabel; Romero, Alberto; Amorós, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Metamizole or dipyrone is a pyrazolone derivative that belongs to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Its main side-effect is hematological toxicity. Thrombocytopenia due to metamizole is rare and is usually associated with the involvement of the two other blood series. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia is more frequently related to immune mechanisms, and the diagnosis is still largely made by exclusion of other causes and by correlation of timing of thrombocytopenia with the administration of drug. Metamizole may cause acute renal failure due to hemodynamic renal failure/acute tubular necrosis and/or acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. We report a case of acute renal failure and severe thrombocytopenia after metamizole. As far as we know, this combination of adverse effects from this drug has not been reported previously. PMID:24434395

  16. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease. PMID:17162422

  17. Renal consequences of obesity.

    PubMed

    Naumnik, Beata; Myśliwiec, Michał

    2010-08-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity and its associated metabolic and cardiovascular disorders has risen dramatically within the past 2 decades. Our objective is to review the mechanisms that link obesity with altered kidney function. Current evidence suggests that excess weight gain may be responsible for 65-75% of the risk for arterial hypertension. Impaired renal pressure natriuresis, initially due to increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption, is a key factor linking obesity with hypertension. Obesity increases renal sodium reabsorption by activating the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems, and by altering intrarenal physical forces. Adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ, secreting hormones/cytokines (e.g., leptin) which may trigger sodium retention and hypertension. Additionally, excess visceral adipose tissue may physically compress the kidneys, increasing intrarenal pressures and tubular reabsorption. Eventually, sustained obesity via hyperinsulinemia, due to resistance to insulin, causes hyperfiltration, resulting in structural changes in the kidneys--glomerular hyperthrophy and occasionally focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The consequences of kidney injury are continuous loss of glomerular filtration rate, further increase of arterial pressure and escalation of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. There is a growing awareness of the renal consequences of obesity, and considerable progress is being made in understanding its pathophysiology. Weight reduction results in lowered proteinuria. Aside from low sodium diet and exercises, more widespread use of renoprotective therapy (e.g., ACE inhibitors and statins) in treatment of hypertension in obese subjects should be advocated. Renal protection should result in reducing the cardiovascular complications of obesity. PMID:20671624

  18. Activated protein C protects against renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury, independent of its anticoagulant properties.

    PubMed

    Lattenist, Lionel; Jansen, Marcel P B; Teske, Gwendoline; Claessen, Nike; Meijers, Joost C M; Rezaie, Alireza R; Esmon, Charles T; Florquin, Sandrine; Roelofs, Joris J T H

    2016-07-01

    Acute renal failure, a serious condition characterised by a drastic decline in renal function, often follows ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) episodes. I/R is characterised by necrosis, inflammation and activation of coagulation, in concert causing renal tissue damage. In this context, activated protein C (APC) might be of importance in the pathogenesis of renal I/R. APC is a serine protease which has anticoagulant but also several anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects such as protection of endothelial barrier function. It was our objective to study the role of cytoprotective and anticoagulant functions of APC during renal I/R. C57BL/6j mice subjected to renal I/R were treated with intraperitoneally injected exogenous human APC, or two mutant forms of APC (200 µg/kg) which specifically lack anticoagulant or signalling properties. In a different experiment mice received specific monoclonal antibodies (20 mg/kg) that block the cytoprotective and/or anticoagulant properties of endogenous APC. Treatment with APC reduced tubular injury and enhanced renal function without altering the inflammatory response and did reduce renal fibrin deposition. Administration of APC mutant lacking anticoagulant properties reduced renal damage and enhanced renal function. Blocking the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of endogenous APC resulted in elevated tubular damage and reduced tubular cell proliferation, however, without influencing renal function or the inflammatory response. Furthermore, blocking both the anticoagulant and cytoprotective effects of APC resulted in dramatic renal interstitial haemorrhage, indicative of impaired vascular integrity. Blocking only the anticoagulant function of APC did not result in interstitial bleeding. In conclusion, the renoprotective effect of APC during I/R is independent of its anticoagulant properties. PMID:27052416

  19. Renal Function Assessment During Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Belkis; Tuncel, Murat

    2016-09-01

    Theranostics labeled with Y-90 or Lu-177 are highly efficient therapeutic approaches for the systemic treatment of various cancers including neuroendocrine tumors and prostate cancer. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been used for many years for metastatic or inoperable neuroendocrine tumors. However, renal and hematopoietic toxicities are the major limitations for this therapeutic approach. Kidneys have been considered as the "critical organ" because of the predominant glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption by the proximal tubules, and interstitial retention of the tracers. Severe nephrotoxity, which has been classified as grade 4-5 based on the "Common Terminology Criteria on Adverse Events," was reported in the range from 0%-14%. There are several risk factors for renal toxicity; patient-related risk factors include older age, preexisting renal disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, previous nephrotoxic chemotherapy, metastatic lesions close to renal parenchyma, and single kidney. There are also treatment-related issues, such as choice of radionuclide, cumulative radiation dose to kidneys, renal radiation dose per cycle, activity administered, number of cycles, and time interval between cycles. In the literature, nephrotoxicity caused by PRRT was documented using different criteria and renal function tests, from serum creatinine level to more accurate and sophisticated methods. Generally, serum creatinine level was used as a measure of kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimation based on serum creatinine was preferred by several authors. Most commonly used formulas for estimation of GFR are "Modifications of Diet in Renal Disease" (MDRD) equation and "Cockcroft-Gault" formulas. However, more precise methods than creatinine or creatinine clearance are recommended to assess renal function, such as GFR measurements using Tc-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), Cr-51-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or

  20. Clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor or vorapaxar in patients with renal impairment: do we have a winner?

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Tomek, Ales; Pokov, Alex N; Kim, Moo Hyun

    2015-12-01

    The optimal utilization of antiplatelet therapy in patients with renal impairment (RI) following acute coronary syndromes (ACS) represents an urgent, unmet and yet unsolved need with regards to the choice of agents, duration of treatment and potential dose/regimen adjustment. The lack of any large randomized trials designed and powered specifically in such high-risk patients, absence of the uniformed efficacy and safety data reporting policy to the FDA and endless overoptimistic publications based on post hoc analyses of primary trials sometimes exaggerating benefits and hiding risks, clouds reality. In addition, triaging RI patients is problematic due to ongoing kidney deterioration and the fact that such patients are prone to both vascular occlusions and bleeding. The authors summarize available FDA-confirmed evidence from the latest trials with approved antiplatelet agents, namely clopidogrel (CAPRIE, CURE, CREDO, CLARITY, CHARISMA); prasugrel (TRITON, TRILOGY); ticagrelor (PLATO, and PEGASUS); and vorapaxar (TRACER and TRA2P) in RI patient cohorts on top of aspirin as part of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). We deliberately avoided any results unless they were verified by the FDA, with the exception of the recent PEGASUS, since Agency reviews are not yet available. Despite differences among the trials and DAPT choices, RI patients universally experience much higher (HR = 1.3-3.1) rates of primary endpoint events, and bleeding risks (HR = 1.7-3.6). However, only ticagrelor increases creatinine and uric acid levels above that of clopidogrel; has the worst incidence of serious adverse events, more adverse events, and inferior outcomes in patients with severe (eGFR <30 ml/min), especially in the lowest (eGFR <15 ml/min) RI subsets. Clopidogrel, prasugrel and vorapaxar appear safer. Moreover, less aggressive half dose (5 mg/daily) prasugrel and strict DAPT, are well justified in RI, but not predominantly triple strategies with vorapaxar as tested in TRA2P and

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Axitinib Versus Sorafenib in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Subgroup Analysis of Japanese Patients from the Global Randomized Phase 3 AXIS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Takeshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Tarazi, Jamal; Chen, Connie; Kim, Sinil; Ozono, Seiichiro; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Objective Axitinib is a potent and selective second-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2 and 3. The efficacy and safety of axitinib in Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma were evaluated. Methods A subgroup analysis was conducted in Japanese patients enrolled in the randomized Phase III trial of axitinib versus sorafenib after failure of one prior systemic therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Results Twenty-five (of 361) and 29 (of 362) patients randomized to the axitinib and sorafenib arms, respectively, were Japanese and included in this analysis. Median progression-free survival in Japanese patients was 12.1 months (95% confidence interval 8.6 to not estimable) for axitinib and 4.9 months (95% confidence interval 2.8–6.6) for sorafenib (hazard ratio 0.390; 95% confidence interval 0.130–1.173; stratified one-sided P = 0.0401). The objective response rate was 52.0% for axitinib and 3.4% for sorafenib (P = 0.0001). The common all-causality adverse events (all grades) in Japanese patients were dysphonia (68%), hypertension (64%), hand–foot syndrome (64%) and diarrhea (56%) for axitinib, and hand–foot syndrome (86%), hypertension (62%) and diarrhea (52%) for sorafenib. The safety profiles of axitinib and sorafenib in Japanese patients were generally similar to those observed in the overall population, with the exceptions of higher incidences of hypertension, dysphonia, hand–foot syndrome, hypothyroidism and stomatitis. Conclusions Axitinib is efficacious and well tolerated in Japanese patients with previously treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma, consistent with the results in the overall population, providing a new targeted therapy for these Japanese patients. PMID:23630366

  2. Pressure natriuresis and the renal control of arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, Jessica R; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume by renal sodium excretion lies at the centre of blood pressure homeostasis. Renal perfusion pressure can directly regulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This acute pressure natriuresis response is a uniquely powerful means of stabilizing long-term blood pressure around a set point. By logical extension, deviation from the set point can only be sustained if the pressure natriuresis mechanism is impaired, suggesting that hypertension is caused or sustained by a defect in the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion. Here we describe the role of pressure natriuresis in blood pressure control and outline the cascade of biophysical and paracrine events in the renal medulla that integrate the vascular and tubular response to altered perfusion pressure. Pressure natriuresis is impaired in hypertension and mechanistic insight into dysfunction comes from genetic analysis of blood pressure disorders. Transplantation studies in rats show that blood pressure is determined by the genotype of the kidney and Mendelian hypertension indicates that the distal nephron influences the overall natriuretic efficiency. These approaches and the outcomes of genome-wide-association studies broaden our view of blood pressure control, suggesting that renal sympathetic nerve activity and local inflammation can impair pressure natriuresis to cause hypertension. Understanding how these systems interact is necessary to tackle the global burden of hypertension. PMID:25107929

  3. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  4. Spiral CT: vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Rankin, S C

    1998-08-01

    Recent technical advances in CT have renewed interest in the development of CT angiography (CTA). CT angiography is a minimally invasive method of visualising the vascular system and is becoming an alternative to conventional arteriography in some situations. Spiral technology allows a volume of data to be obtained on a single breath-hold with no respiratory misregistration. Fast machines with second or subsecond acquisition times mean the images are obtained while there are high circulating levels of contrast medium giving peak vascular opacification from a peripheral intravenous injection. Accurate timing will ensure either the arterial or venous phase is imaged. Multiple overlapping axial images can be obtained from the data set with no increase in radiation dose to the patient and from these scans computer generated multiplanar and 3D images are obtained which can be viewed from numerous angles. CT angiography can be performed more quickly, less invasively and at reduced cost compared to conventional angiography. PMID:9717621

  5. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on. PMID:21502112

  6. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  7. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. PMID:27568153

  8. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term “hypersensitivity” is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as “hypersensitivities” while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  9. The Prognostic Importance of Changes in Renal Function during Treatment for Acute Heart Failure Depends on Admission Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Ryan; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Brown, Paul M.; McAlister, Finlay A.; Rowe, Brian H.; Braam, Branko

    2015-01-01

    Background Worsening and improving renal function during acute heart failure have been associated with adverse outcomes but few studies have considered the admission level of renal function upon which these changes are superimposed. Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate definitions that incorporate both admission renal function and change in renal function. Methods 696 patients with acute heart failure with calculable eGFR were classified by admission renal function (Reduced [R, eGFR<45 ml/min] or Preserved [P, eGFR≥45 ml/min]) and change over hospital admission (worsening [WRF]: eGFR ≥20% decline; stable [SRF]; and improving [IRF]: eGFR ≥20% increase). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. The prevalence of Pres and Red renal function was 47.8% and 52.2%. The frequency of R-WRF, R-SRF, and R-IRF was 11.4%, 28.7%, and 12.1%, respectively; the incidence of P-WRF, P-SRF, and P-IRF was 5.7%, 35.3%, and 6.8%, respectively. Survival was shorter for patients with R-WRF compared to R-IRF (median survival times 13.9 months (95%CI 7.7–24.9) and 32.5 months (95%CI 18.8–56.1), respectively), resulting in an acceleration factor of 2.3 (p = 0.016). Thus, an increase compared with a decrease in renal function was associated with greater than two times longer survival among patients with Reduced renal function. PMID:26380982

  10. The effects of nanoparticles on the renal system.

    PubMed

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Nordberg, Gunnar

    2016-07-01

    Through a process of translocation across biological barriers, nanoparticles can reach and deposit in secondary target organs where they may induce adverse biological reactions. Therefore, a correct assessment of nanoparticle-induced adverse effects should take into account the different aspects of toxicokinetics and tissues that may be targeted by nanoparticles. For this reason, a comprehensive evaluation of renal nanotoxicity is urgently needed as kidneys are particularly susceptible to xenobiotics and renal excretion is an expected and possible elimination route of nanoparticles in living organisms. On one hand, summarizing the findings of in vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the adverse effects of nanoparticles on the kidney, this review intends to provide a thorough insight into the nephrotoxicity of these substances. The evaluation of the in vitro studies revealed that different types of nanoparticles (carbon, metal and/or silica nanoparticles) are able to exert significant cytotoxic effects (i.e., decreased cell viability, induction of oxidative stress, mitochondrial or cytoskeleton dysfunction and cell membrane and DNA damage). On the other hand, in vivo studies demonstrated that nanoparticles exhibited an important nephrotoxic potential both at tubular (i.e., degeneration of tubular epithelial cell, cellular fragments and proteinaceous liquid in tubule lumen, renal interstitial fibrosis) and glomerular level (i.e., swollen glomeruli, changes in Bowman's space and proliferation of mesangial cells). Although the data currently available indicate that nanoparticles may adversely impact the renal system, further studies are needed in order to clarify all the potential molecular mechanisms of nephrotoxicity induced by these xenobiotics, in particular at glomerular level. PMID:27195425

  11. The Role of Vitamin D in Blood Pressure, Endothelial and Renal Function in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-Min; Woo, Jean; Wu, Sheng-Hui; Ho, Suzanne C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D is a pro-hormone that plays an essential role in the vasculature and in kidney function. Aims: To review the extra-skeletal effects of vitamin D on blood pressure, endothelial and renal function with emphasis on recent findings in postmenopausal women. Methods: Included in this review was a PubMed database search for English language articles through March 2013. This review discussed the physiology and definition of vitamin D deficiency, the recent evidence for the role vitamin D in blood pressure, vascular and renal function. Results: Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that vitamin D plays an important role in the vasculature and in kidney function. Low vitamin D concentrations appear to significantly associate with hypertension, endothelial and renal dysfunction. However, the results of clinical trials have generally been mixed. Studies specifically conducted among postmenopausal women are limited and findings are still inconsistent. Conclusions: Definitive studies are warranted to elucidate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on vascular and renal function and a more detailed work is needed to outline the route, duration and optimal dose of supplementation. It is premature to recommend vitamin D as a therapeutic option in the improvement of vascular and renal function at the current stage. PMID:23839167

  12. Update on Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Kalaria, Raj N; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a major contributor to the dementia syndrome and is described as having problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, and memory caused by impaired blood flow to the brain and damage to the blood vessels resulting from events such as stroke. There are a variety of etiologies that contribute to the development of vascular cognitive impairment and VaD, and these are often associated with other dementia-related pathologies such as Alzheimer disease. The diagnosis of VaD is difficult due to the number and types of lesions and their locations in the brain. Factors that increase the risk of vascular diseases such as stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking also raise the risk of VaD. Therefore, controlling these risk factors can help lower the chances of developing VaD. This update describes the subtypes of VaD, with details of their complex presentation, associated pathological lesions, and issues with diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27502303

  13. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  14. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  15. Adverse drug reactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, R E

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) - that is, unintended and harmful responses to medicines - are important to dermatologists because many present with cutaneous signs and because dermatological treatments can cause serious ADRs. The detection of ADRs to new drugs is often delayed because they have a long latency or are rare or unexpected. This means that ADRs to newer agents emerge only slowly after marketing. ADRs are part of the differential diagnosis of unusual rashes. A good drug history that includes details of drug dose, time-course of the reaction and factors that may make the patient more susceptible, will help. For example, Stevens-Johnson syndrome with abacavir is much commoner in patients with HLA-B*5701, and has a characteristic time course. Newer agents have brought newer reactions; for example, acneiform rashes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors such as erlotinib. Older systemic agents used to treat skin disease, including corticosteroids and methotrexate, cause important ADRs. The adverse effects of newer biological agents used in dermatology are becoming clearer; for example, hypersensitivity reactions or loss of efficacy from antibody formation and progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy due to reactivation of latent JC (John Cunningham) virus infections during efalizumab treatment. Unusual or serious harm from medicines, including ADRs, medication errors and overdose, should be reported. The UK Yellow Card scheme is online, and patients can report their own ADRs. PMID:25622648

  16. [Recipients adverse reactions: guidance supports].

    PubMed

    Bazin, A

    2010-12-01

    Since 1994, adverse effects of transfusion transmitted to the French haemovigilance network are registered on "e-fit", the database of the French agency for the safety of health products (Afssaps). In order to improve their analysis, guidance supports have been made by Afssaps working groups. Each support deals with a blood transfusion side effect and is composed of five parts including pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic criteria, management recommendations, etiologic investigations and rules of filing the notification form on e-fit. The major characteristics of sheets published or soon-to-be published are presented: transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection, non-haemolytic febrile reaction, allergic reaction, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, hypotensive transfusion reaction, alloimmunization, erythrocyte incompatibility reaction and hemosiderosis. These new supports give relevant guidelines allowing a better analysis and evaluation of recipients' adverse reactions, particularly their diagnosis, gravity and accountability. They could also initiate studies in European and international haemovigilance and transfusion networks. PMID:21051267

  17. Adverse effects of plasma transfusion.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suchitra; Vyas, Girish N

    2012-05-01

    Plasma utilization has increased over the past two decades, and there is a growing concern that many plasma transfusions are inappropriate. Plasma transfusion is not without risk, and certain complications are more likely with plasma than other blood components. Clinical and laboratory investigations of the patients suffering reactions after infusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) define the etiology and pathogenesis of the panoply of adverse effects. We review here the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of the risks associated with plasma transfusion. Risks commonly associated with FFP include: 1) transfusion-related acute lung injury, 2) transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and 3) allergic and/or anaphylactic reactions. Other less common risks include 1) transmission of infections, 2) febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions, 3) red blood cell alloimmunization, and 4) hemolytic transfusion reactions. The effects of pathogen inactivation or reduction methods on these risks are also discussed. Fortunately, a majority of the adverse effects are not lethal and are adequately treated in clinical practice. PMID:22578374

  18. Pharmacological management of renal colic in the older patient.

    PubMed

    Welk, Blayne K; Teichman, Joel M H

    2007-01-01

    Renal colic affects up to 12% of the population. Initial management of most patients is expectant. Acute symptom management of renal colic is best accomplished with a combination of parenteral opioids and NSAIDs. The elderly patient with a kidney stone should be screened for contraindications to NSAID therapy, such as renal failure or previous peptic ulcer disease. Use of parenteral opioids is often necessary during the acute setting, and downward-adjusted doses and monitoring are necessary to prevent associated confusion and respiratory depression. Novel therapy with desmopressin may also be effective for symptom control at the initial presentation, without the adverse effects of opioids or NSAIDs. However, use of desmopressin in the elderly must be undertaken cautiously, given the potential adverse effects of this agent. Many small, distal ureteral stones are treated initially with watchful waiting for the first 2-4 weeks after presentation. The patient should have effective, non-parenteral analgesics for use at home. Included in these agents are oral or suppository NSAIDs and oral opioids. Medical expulsion therapy with alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists or calcium channel antagonists is efficacious. alpha-Adrenoceptor antagonists such as the alpha(1A/)(1)(D)-selective tamsulosin are well tolerated in the elderly and increase the rate of spontaneous stone passage by approximately 50% for small distal stones. These agents also appear to decrease the severity of renal colic. Corticosteroids and calcium channel antagonists are also effective but their use in the elderly is not recommended as first-line therapy. PMID:17953457

  19. Renal Tumor Biopsy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Xue-Song; Zhou, Li-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review hot issues and future direction of renal tumor biopsy (RTB) technique. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including RTB technique in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on RTB technique in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Computed tomography and ultrasound were usually used for guiding RTB with respective advantages. Core biopsy is more preferred over fine needle aspiration because of superior accuracy. A minimum of two good-quality cores for a single renal tumor is generally accepted. The use of coaxial guide is recommended. For biopsy location, sampling different regions including central and peripheral biopsies are recommended. Conclusion: In spite of some limitations, RTB technique is relatively mature to help optimize the treatment of renal tumors. PMID:27174334

  20. Tofacitinab in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zand, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    Tofacitinib (tositinib, CP-690,550) is a small molecule inhibitor of Janus associated kinases, primarily JAK3 and JAK2, which inhibits cytokine signaling through the IL-2Rγ chain. In this article, we review the mechanism of action of tofacitinib, and pre-clinical and clinical data regarding its use in solid organ transplantation thus far. It is hoped that tofacitinib may form the basis for calcineurin-free immunosuppression, improving renal function while eliminating calcineurin inhibitor renal toxicity. Current studies suggest that tofacitinib is an effective immunosuppressive agent for renal transplantation, but it's use in current protocols carries an increased risk of CMV, BK, and EBV viral infection, anemia and leukopenia, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:23849222

  1. Low renal oximetry correlates with acute kidney injury after infant cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gabe E; King, Karen; Gurney, James G; Charpie, John R

    2011-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery during infancy. Standard methods for evaluating renal function are not particularly sensitive nor are proximate indicators of renal dysfunction that allow intervention in real time. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a newer noninvasive technology that continuously evaluates regional oximetry and may correlate with renal injury and adverse outcomes after cardiac surgery in infants. This prospective observational study enrolled 40 infants (age, <12 months) undergoing biventricular repair. Continuous renal oximetry data were collected for the first 48 postoperative hours and correlated with postoperative course, standard laboratory data, and the occurrence of acute renal injury. Subjects with low renal oximetry (below 50% for >2 h) had significantly higher postoperative peak creatinine levels by 48 h (0.8 ± 0.4 vs. 0.52 ± 0.2; p = 0.003) and a higher incidence of AKI (50 vs. 3.1%; p = 0.003) than those with normal renal oximetry. These subjects also required more ventilator days and greater vasoactive support, and they had elevated lactate levels. Prolonged low renal near-infrared oximetry appears to correlate with renal dysfunction, decreased systemic oxygen delivery, and the overall postoperative course in infants with congenital heart disease undergoing biventricular repair. PMID:21085945

  2. Role of Renal Oxidative Stress in the Pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giam, Beverly; Kaye, David M; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W

    2016-08-01

    Renal dysfunction and heart failure commonly co-exist; it is termed the cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). This combination of renal and cardiac impairment presents a substantial clinical challenge and is associated with adverse prognosis. The pathogenesis of the CRS is complex, including chronic activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and the sympathetic nervous system, together with reduced renal perfusion. Chronic activation of the RAAS can impair mitochondrial function, and increase mitochondrial derived oxidative stress which in turn can lead to renal injury and sodium and water retention. For example, it has been shown that exogenous Ang II augments renal mitochondrial oxidative stress, reduces GFR and induces albuminuria in rats with heart failure. Administration of Ang II also augmented renal mitochondrial dysfunction in aged mice. Current treatments for CRS, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, exert limited renal protection if any at all. Therefore, novel treatments particularly those that can target renal mechanisms downstream to chronic activation of the renal renin-angiotensin system are likely to exert renoprotection in the setting of CRS. PMID:27132623

  3. Pathophysiology and recent advances in the management of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Elder, Grahame

    2002-12-01

    Bone disease is observed in 75-100% of patients with chronic renal failure as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 60 ml/minute. Hyperparathyroid (high turnover) bone disease is found most frequently followed by mixed osteodystrophy, low-turnover bone disease, and osteomalacia. With advancing renal impairment, "skeletal resistance" to parathyroid hormone (PTH) occurs. To maintain bone turnover, intact PTH (iPTH) targets from two to four times the upper normal range have been suggested, but whole PTH(1-84) assays indicate that amino-terminally truncated fragments, which accumulate in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), account for up to one-half of the measured iPTH. PTH levels and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) provide some information on bone involvement but bone biopsy and histomorphometry remains the gold standard. Calcitriol and calcium salts can be used to suppress PTH and improve osteomalacia but there is growing concern that these agents predispose to the development of vascular calcification, cardiovascular morbidity, low-turnover bone disease and fracture. Newer therapeutic options include less calcemic vitamin D analogues, calcimimetics and bisphosphonates for hyperparathyroidism, and sevelamer for phosphate control. Calcitriol and hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) have been shown to maintain bone mineral density (BMD) in certain patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). After renal transplantation, renal osteodystrophy generally improves but BMD often worsens. Bisphosphonate therapy may be appropriate for some patients at risk of fracture. When renal bone disease is assessed using a combination of biochemical markers, histology and bone densitometry, early intervention and the careful use of an increasing number of effective therapies can reduce the morbidity associated with this common problem. PMID:12469904

  4. Contemporary Management of Renal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shoobridge, Jennifer J; Corcoran, Niall M; Martin, Katherine A; Koukounaras, Jim; Royce, Peter L; Bultitude, Matthew F

    2011-01-01

    In the management of renal trauma, surgical exploration inevitably leads to nephrectomy in all but a few specialized centers. With current management options, the majority of hemodynamically stable patients with renal injuries can be successfully managed nonoperatively. Improved radiographic techniques and the development of a validated renal injury scoring system have led to improved staging of injury severity that is relatively easy to monitor. This article reviews a multidisciplinary approach to facilitate the care of patients with renal injury. PMID:21941463

  5. Delayed onset renal failure in a patient on tenofovir based antiretroviral regimen.

    PubMed

    Krishna, M Murali; Subbalaxmi, M V S; Uppin, Megha; Radhika, S

    2014-01-01

    Tenofovir is recommended as one of the first line agents in combination with other antiretroviral drugs for management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is known to cause renal failure after exposure for a median duration of 5 months. We report tenofovir induced adverse drug reaction in a 56-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have HIV 1 infection since 10 years. The combination antiretroviral treatment included tenofovir, emtricitabine and ritonavir/lopinavir regimen since the last 6 years. She presented with recent onset renal failure and renal biopsy showed interstitial nephritis which could probably attributable to tenofovir. PMID:24741201

  6. "Adversative Conjunction": The Poetics of Linguistic Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    The general use of adversative conjunction in (primarily) English and U.S. poetry is outlined. The contention is that the adversative is not merely a grammatical convenience but sometimes a highly functional tool of rhetorical strategy. (36 references) (LB)

  7. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  8. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  9. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  10. Renal adaptation during hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernators periodically undergo profound physiological changes including dramatic reductions in metabolic, heart, and respiratory rates and core body temperature. This review discusses the effect of hypoperfusion and hypothermia observed during hibernation on glomerular filtration and renal plasma flow, as well as specific adaptations in renal architecture, vasculature, the renin-angiotensin system, and upregulation of possible protective mechanisms during the extreme conditions endured by hibernating mammals. Understanding the mechanisms of protection against organ injury during hibernation may provide insights into potential therapies for organ injury during cold storage and reimplantation during transplantation. PMID:24049148

  11. Autophagy in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    De Rechter, Stéphanie; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Ivanova, Ekaterina; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; De Smedt, Humbert; Levtchenko, Elena; Mekahli, Djalila

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is the cell biology process in which cytoplasmic components are degraded in lysosomes to maintain cellular homeostasis and energy production. In the healthy kidney, autophagy plays an important role in the homeostasis and viability of renal cells such as podocytes and tubular epithelial cells and of immune cells. Recently, evidence is mounting that (dys)regulation of autophagy is implicated in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases, and might be an attractive target for new renoprotective therapies. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and kidney diseases. PMID:26141928

  12. Physiology of the Renal Interstitium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long overlooked as the virtual compartment and then strictly characterized through descriptive morphologic analysis, the renal interstitium has finally been associated with function. With identification of interstitial renin- and erythropoietin-producing cells, the most prominent endocrine functions of the kidney have now been attributed to the renal interstitium. This article reviews the functional role of renal interstitium. PMID:25813241

  13. [Hyperhomocysteinemia as a vascular risk factor in chronic hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, Hernán; Young, Pablo; Díaz, María L; Schropp, Juan; Forrester, Mariano; Freixas, Emilio

    2005-01-01

    Homocysteine is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the general population. In addition, it plays a main role in the development of atherogenesis and thrombosis, particularly in end-stage renal disease patients. Therefore, hemodialysis patients are under the burden of homocysteine toxic effects, present in nearly 90% of dialysis patients. Our group found that folic acid is an efficient therapeutic approach to decrease homocysteine levels, and the addition of intravenous methylcobalamin potentiates this effect; however, methylcobalamin alone was unsuccessful to normalize homocysteine levels. With time a group of patients required a higher dose of folic acid to reduce hyperhomocysteinemia. Patients homozygous and, to a lesser extent heterozygous, to the C677T thermolabile variant of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) presented a reduced catalytic activity and required a higher folic acid dose. Vascular-access thrombotic events were similar in all patients according to the variants of the enzyme, suggesting that treating hyperhomocysteinemia was the key to lower the risk of thromboses. Noteworthy, hypohomocysteinemia, generally acompanying malnourishment, is associated to higher mortality. Albeit hyper-homocysteinemia is considered a vascular risk factor in renal failure patients, it has not yet been established in this population if its correction is associated with a decrease in the rate of vascular disease and thrombosis. However, given the mentioned evidence about the low risk and good tolerance of vitamin therapy, we believe it useful to know folate, cobalamin and homocysteine blood levels in chronic renal patients and start a prompt treatment, which may proof adequate to maintain homocysteine levels of 10 +/- 5 micromol/l. PMID:16433478

  14. Management of the adverse effects associated with intravenous bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Tanvetyanon, T; Stiff, P J

    2006-06-01

    Intravenous bisphosphonates are widely used to treat hypercalcemia and to reduce skeletal-related morbidity among cancer patients. However, serious complications, generally occurring in less than 2% of patients participated in phase III clinical trials, including acute systemic inflammatory reaction, ocular inflammation, renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, electrolyte imbalance, and osteonecrosis of the maxilla and mandible have all been increasingly reported. Yet, strategies to deal with these complications are becoming clear. Acute systemic inflammatory reaction is often self-limited and becomes less intense during subsequent treatments. For patients who develop ocular symptoms, prompt ophthalmologic evaluation is crucial to determine the safety of a subsequent bisphosphonate therapy. Patients who receive long-term pamidronate should be evaluated at intervals for early sign of nephritic syndrome as timely cessation of the agent may result in a full recovery. To reduce the risk of severe electrolyte abnormalities, particularly hypocalcemia, correcting any pre-treatment electrolyte abnormality and supplementing vitamin D and calcium may be helpful. Finally, to reduce the risk of osteonecrosis of the maxilla and mandible, obtaining a full dental evaluation before treatment and avoidance of invasive dental procedures is suggested. The three commonly used intravenous bisphosphonates (pamidronate, zoledronic acid, and ibandronate), are generally safe; ibandronate has to date been the least reported to be associated with renal side effects. As clinical indications of intravenous bisphosphonates continue to expand, prescribing clinicians should be familiar with these possible adverse effects and discuss them with patients before commencing or continuing on therapy. PMID:16547070

  15. Renal involvement in primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marcantoni, Carmelita; Emmanuele, Carmela; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis and/or pregnancy-related problems associated with persistently elevated levels of antiphospholipid antibodies. The kidney is a major target organ in both primary and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome. This review describes several aspects of the renal involvement in the primary form of the syndrome, in particular the histological pattern of the so-called antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN). APSN is a vascular nephropathy characterized by small vessel vaso-occlusive lesions associated with fibrous intimal hyperplasia of interlobular arteries, recanalizing thrombi in arteries and arterioles, and focal atrophy, a constellation of morphological lesions suggestive of primary antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:27198137

  16. Redox Control of Renal Function and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Loss of redox homeostasis and formation of excessive free radicals play an important role in the pathogenesis of kidney disease and hypertension. Free radicals such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) are necessary in physiologic processes. However, loss of redox homeostasis contributes to proinflammatory and profibrotic pathways in the kidney, which in turn lead to reduced vascular compliance and proteinuria. The kidney is susceptible to the influence of various extracellular and intracellular cues, including the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), hyperglycemia, lipid peroxidation, inflammatory cytokines, and growth factors. Redox control of kidney function is a dynamic process with reversible pro– and anti-free radical processes. The imbalance of redox homeostasis within the kidney is integral in hypertension and the progression of kidney disease. An emerging paradigm exists for renal redox contribution to hypertension. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2047–2089. PMID:18821850

  17. Renovascular disease, microcirculation, and the progression of renal injury: role of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chade, Alejandro R

    2011-04-01

    Emerging evidence supports the pivotal role of renal microvascular disease as a determinant of tubulo-interstitial and glomerular fibrosis in chronic kidney disease. An intact microcirculation is vital to restore blood flow to the injured tissues, which is a crucial step to achieve a successful repair response. The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact and mechanisms of the functional and structural changes of the renal microvascular network, as well as the role of these changes in the progression and irreversibility of renal injury. Damage of the renal microcirculation and deterioration of the angiogenic response may constitute early steps in the complex pathways involved in progressive renal injury. There is limited but provocative evidence that stimulation of vascular proliferation and repair may stabilize renal function and slow the progression of renal disease. The feasibility of novel potential therapeutic interventions for stabilizing the renal microvasculature is also discussed. Targeted interventions to enhance endogenous renoprotective mechanisms focused on the microcirculation, such as cell-based therapy or the use of angiogenic cytokines have shown promising results in some experimental and clinical settings. PMID:21307362

  18. Characterization of Renal Toxicity in Mice Administered the Marine Biotoxin Domoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jason A.; Janech, Michael G.; Dillon, Joshua C.; Bissler, John J.; Siroky, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA), an excitatory amino acid produced by diatoms belonging to the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, is a glutamate analog responsible for the neurologic condition referred to as amnesic shellfish poisoning. To date, the renal effects of DA have been underappreciated, although renal filtration is the primary route of systemic elimination and the kidney expresses ionotropic glutamate receptors. To characterize the renal effects of DA, we administered either a neurotoxic dose of DA or doses below the recognized limit of toxicity to adult Sv128/Black Swiss mice. DA preferentially accumulated in the kidney and elicited marked renal vascular and tubular damage consistent with acute tubular necrosis, apoptosis, and renal tubular cell desquamation, with toxic vacuolization and mitochondrial swelling as hallmarks of the cellular damage. Doses≥0.1 mg/kg DA elevated the renal injury biomarkers kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and doses≥0.005 mg/kg induced the early response genes c-fos and junb. Coadministration of DA with the broad spectrum excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid inhibited induction of c-fos, junb, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. These findings suggest that the kidney may be susceptible to excitotoxic agonists, and renal effects should be considered when examining glutamate receptor activation. Additionally, these results indicate that DA is a potent nephrotoxicant, and potential renal toxicity may require consideration when determining safe levels for human exposure. PMID:24511141

  19. Histones from Dying Renal Cells Aggravate Kidney Injury via TLR2 and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Scherbaum, Christina Rebecca; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Hägele, Holger; Lichtnekert, Julia; Hagemann, Jan Henrik; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Ryu, Mi; Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Uhl, Bernd; Reichel, Christoph A.; Krombach, Fritz; Monestier, Marc; Liapis, Helen; Moreth, Kristin; Schaefer, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    In AKI, dying renal cells release intracellular molecules that stimulate immune cells to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, which trigger leukocyte recruitment and renal inflammation. Whether the release of histones, specifically, from dying cells contributes to the inflammation of AKI is unknown. In this study, we found that dying tubular epithelial cells released histones into the extracellular space, which directly interacted with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 (TLR2) and TLR4 to induce MyD88, NF-κB, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Extracellular histones also had directly toxic effects on renal endothelial cells and tubular epithelial cells in vitro. In addition, direct injection of histones into the renal arteries of mice demonstrated that histones induce leukocyte recruitment, microvascular vascular leakage, renal inflammation, and structural features of AKI in a TLR2/TLR4-dependent manner. Antihistone IgG, which neutralizes the immunostimulatory effects of histones, suppressed intrarenal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and tubular cell necrosis and improved excretory renal function. In summary, the release of histones from dying cells aggravates AKI via both its direct toxicity to renal cells and its proinflammatory effects. Because the induction of proinflammatory cytokines in dendritic cells requires TLR2 and TLR4, these results support the concept that renal damage triggers an innate immune response, which contributes to the pathogenesis of AKI. PMID:22677551

  20. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal-García, Magdalena; García-Arroyo, Fernando E.; Arellano-Buendía, Abraham S.; Madero, Magdalena; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Zazueta, Cecilia; Johnson, Richard J.; Sánchez Lozada, Laura-Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks) and short-term (3 weeks) effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW), OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water), OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW), or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase) and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation) along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident. PMID:25918583

  1. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  2. Sodium sensitive hypertension: renal and adrenal non-modulation in its pathogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.; Williams, G. H.

    1988-01-01

    The thrust of this essay will be to organize a growing body of evidence which indicates that an abnormality of the kidney, and the adrenal, involving disordered regulation through the renin-angiotensin system, is responsible for the pathogenesis in about 45% of patients--a discrete subgroup that may be most common cause of hypertension. That fundamental abnormality leads to disordered renal sodium handling and sodium-sensitive hypertension, abnormalities in the renal vascular response to changes in sodium intake and to angiotensin II, blunted decrements of renin release in response to saline or angiotensin II, and an accentuated renal vasodilator response to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition. ACE inhibition not only increases renal blood flow substantially more in these patients than it does in normal subjects, ACE inhibition also restores to normal the renal vascular and adrenal response to angiotensin II, renin release in response to angiotensin II, renal sodium handling--and ultimately blood pressure. Finally, and perhaps most intriguing, similar abnormalities have been found in 50% of the normotensive offspring of patients with essential hypertension and evidence is accruing to indicate that the abnormality is inherited as a Mendelian dominant.

  3. Fiber optics in adverse environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lyous, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation effects in optical fibers are considered, taking into account recent progress in the investigation of radiation resistant optical fibers, radiation damage in optical fibers, radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers, X-ray-induced transient attenuation at low temperatures in polymer clad silica (PCS) fibers, optical fiber composition and radiation hardness, the response of irradiated optical waveguides at low temperatures, and the effect of ionizing radiation on fiber-optic waveguides. Other topics explored are related to environmental effects on components of fiber optic systems, and radiation detection systems using optical fibers. Fiber optic systems in adverse environments are also discussed, giving attention to the survivability of Army fiber optics systems, space application of fiber optics systems, fiber optic wavelength multiplexing for civil aviation applications, a new fiber optic data bus topology, fiber optics for aircraft engine/inlet control, and application of fiber optics in high voltage substations.

  4. [How Treatable is Vascular Dementia?].

    PubMed

    Mori, Etsuro

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia is an umbrella term, encompassing the pathological changes in the brain due to cerebrovascular disease that result in dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia, after Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, I outline the concept of vascular dementia, the key aspects of the disease that are yet to be clarified, and the current status of clinical trials. Assessing these factors, I discuss how treatable vascular dementia presently is. Use of the term'vascular dementia'is riddled with uncertainties regarding disease classification, and non-standardized diagnostic criteria. There are difficulties in determining the exact relationship between cerebrovascular pathology and cognitive impairment. The comorbid effects of Alzheimer's pathology in some individuals also present an obstacle to reliable clinical diagnosis, and hinder research into effective management approaches. Vascular dementia is preventable and treatable, as there are established primary and secondary prevention measures for the causative cerebrovascular diseases, such as vascular risk factor intervention, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulation, amongst others. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no established symptomatic treatments for vascular dementia. Clinical trials of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine indicate that they produce small cognitive benefits in patients with vascular dementia, though the exact clinical significance of these is uncertain. Data are insufficient to support the widespread use of these drugs in vascular dementia. Rehabilitation and physical and cognitive exercise may be beneficial, but evidence of cognitive benefit and relief of neuropsychiatric symptoms due to exercise is lacking. PMID:27056862

  5. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  6. Quantitative Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Vascular Dysfunction in Progressive Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ehling, Josef; Bábíčková, Janka; Gremse, Felix; Klinkhammer, Barbara M.; Baetke, Sarah; Knuechel, Ruth; Kiessling, Fabian; Floege, Jürgen; Lammers, Twan; Boor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Progressive kidney diseases and renal fibrosis are associated with endothelial injury and capillary rarefaction. However, our understanding of these processes has been hampered by the lack of tools enabling the quantitative and noninvasive monitoring of vessel functionality. Here, we used micro-computed tomography (μCT) for anatomical and functional imaging of vascular alterations in three murine models with distinct mechanisms of progressive kidney injury: ischemia-reperfusion (I/R, days 1–56), unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO, days 1–10), and Alport mice (6–8 weeks old). Contrast-enhanced in vivo μCT enabled robust, noninvasive, and longitudinal monitoring of vessel functionality and revealed a progressive decline of the renal relative blood volume in all models. This reduction ranged from −20% in early disease stages to −61% in late disease stages and preceded fibrosis. Upon Microfil perfusion, high-resolution ex vivo μCT allowed quantitative analyses of three-dimensional vascular networks in all three models. These analyses revealed significant and previously unrecognized alterations of preglomerular arteries: a reduction in vessel diameter, a prominent reduction in vessel branching, and increased vessel tortuosity. In summary, using μCT methodology, we revealed insights into macro-to-microvascular alterations in progressive renal disease and provide a platform that may serve as the basis to evaluate vascular therapeutics in renal disease. PMID:26195818

  7. Heterotaxy Polysplenia Syndrome In An Adult With Unique Vascular Anomalies: Case Report With Review Of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Gupta, Kanchan Kumar; Qasim, Muhammad; Gupta, Om Prakash

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of anatomical organization of the thoraco-abdominal visceral and vascular structures which is not the expected normal arrangement, is called as situs ambiguous or heterotaxy syndrome. Patients with heterotaxy syndrome exhibit a wide spectrum of anatomical variations involving thoraco-abdominal structures. We present here an incidental finding of heterotaxy syndrome associated with unique vascular anomalies in a 35 year old male patient evaluated initially for nephrolithiasis by ultrasonography, and intravenous pyelography. Further evaluation by multidetector row computed tomography showed bilateral bilobed lungs with hyparterial bronchi, cardiac apex to the left, five branches from left-sided aortic arch with retroesophageal right subclavian artery, interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation, left renal vein continuing as hemiazygos vein and replaced common hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. Other vascular anomalies include right internal iliac vein joining the left common iliac vein and precaval course of the single main right renal artery. Anomalies involving abdominal organs include right-sided stomach, midline liver, multiple splenules (polysplenia) in right upper quadrant of abdomen, short truncated pancreas, intestinal malrotation, inversion of superior mesenteric vessels and a preduodenal portal vein. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of association of left renal vein continuing as hemiazygos vein, precaval right renal artery and anomalous branching pattern of aortic arch with heterotaxy syndrome. PMID:26629295

  8. Heterotaxy Polysplenia Syndrome In An Adult With Unique Vascular Anomalies: Case Report With Review Of Literature.

    PubMed

    Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Gupta, Kanchan Kumar; Qasim, Muhammad; Gupta, Om Prakash

    2015-07-01

    The pattern of anatomical organization of the thoraco-abdominal visceral and vascular structures which is not the expected normal arrangement, is called as situs ambiguous or heterotaxy syndrome. Patients with heterotaxy syndrome exhibit a wide spectrum of anatomical variations involving thoraco-abdominal structures. We present here an incidental finding of heterotaxy syndrome associated with unique vascular anomalies in a 35 year old male patient evaluated initially for nephrolithiasis by ultrasonography, and intravenous pyelography. Further evaluation by multidetector row computed tomography showed bilateral bilobed lungs with hyparterial bronchi, cardiac apex to the left, five branches from left-sided aortic arch with retroesophageal right subclavian artery, interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation, left renal vein continuing as hemiazygos vein and replaced common hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. Other vascular anomalies include right internal iliac vein joining the left common iliac vein and precaval course of the single main right renal artery. Anomalies involving abdominal organs include right-sided stomach, midline liver, multiple splenules (polysplenia) in right upper quadrant of abdomen, short truncated pancreas, intestinal malrotation, inversion of superior mesenteric vessels and a preduodenal portal vein. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of association of left renal vein continuing as hemiazygos vein, precaval right renal artery and anomalous branching pattern of aortic arch with heterotaxy syndrome. PMID:26629295

  9. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters. PMID:9189257

  10. Malignancy after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Martin; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Wiesel, Manfred; Lehnert, Thomas; Ritz, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the long-term follow-up. The overall incidence of malignancy at this time is 3 to 5 times higher than in the general population. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse are additional risk factors. Malignancy may even be transplanted by the graft. Previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and postmalignancy screening. Finally, every dialysis patient on the waiting list should undergo a regular screening program before and after renal transplantation to detect a potentially malignant tumor in an early stage. In addition to specific oncological treatment, managing a malignancy after renal transplantation should include modification of immunosuppression. PMID:11774131

  11. Metabolomics and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Eugene P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent metabolomics studies of renal disease, outlining some of the limitations of the literature to date. Recent findings The application of metabolomics in nephrology research has expanded from initial analyses of uremia to include both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of earlier stages of kidney disease. Although these studies have nominated several potential markers of incident CKD and CKD progression, lack of overlap in metabolite coverage has limited the ability to synthesize results across groups. Further, direct examination of renal metabolite handling has underscored the substantial impact kidney function has on these potential markers (and many other circulating metabolites). In experimental studies, metabolomics has been used to identify a signature of decreased mitochondrial function in diabetic nephropathy and a preference for aerobic glucose metabolism in PKD; in each case, these studies have outlined novel therapeutic opportunities. Finally, as a complement to the longstanding interest in renal metabolite clearance, the microbiome has been increasingly recognized as the source of many plasma metabolites, including some with potential functional relevance to CKD and its complications. Summary The high-throughput, high-resolution phenotyping enabled by metabolomics technologies has begun to provide insight on renal disease in clinical, physiologic, and experimental contexts. PMID:26050125

  12. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  13. Renal Denervation in Heart Failure: A New Therapeutic Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Pramesh; Liu, Kan; Kozman, Hani; Carhart, Robert L; Villarreal, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure constitutes a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and its incidence and prevalence continue to grow, increasing its burden on the health care system. Renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure is common and has been associated with adverse clinical outcomes. This complex interaction is characterized by a pathophysiological disequilibrium between the heart and the kidney, in which cardiac malfunction promotes renal impairment, which in turn feeds back, resulting in further deterioration of cardiovascular function. Multiple neurohumoral and hemodynamic mechanisms are involved in this cardiorenal dyshomeostasis, including resistance to compensatory cardiac natriuretic peptides, leading to sodium retention, volume overload, and organ remodeling. Previous studies in animal models of heart failure have demonstrated that renal denervation promotes a robust natriuresis and diuresis as well as increased response of endogenous and exogenous natriuretic agents. With the recent development of minimally invasive renal denervation in humans, it is possible to suggest that this technique may become effective and important in the management of renal sodium and water metabolism in heart failure. PMID:26157338

  14. Sodium intake, RAAS-blockade and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    de Borst, Martin H; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers is the current standard treatment to prevent progressive renal function loss in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet in many patients the renal protective effect of RAAS-blockade is incomplete. Short-term clinical studies have demonstrated that dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS-blockade. More recently, it was shown that this effect is accompanied by a lower risk of end-stage renal disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The modulation of RAAS-blockade efficacy by sodium intake is likely multifactorial, and is mediated by effects of sodium on local tissue RAAS in kidney, vasculature and brain, and by effects on the immune system. Despite the evidence showing the beneficial effects of even a moderate sodium restriction (∼2.5g/d), it remains difficult to realize in clinical practice. In an analysis based on 24-h urinary sodium excretion data from more than 10,000 CKD patients and renal transplant recipients, we found that sodium intake in these patients is on average 3.8g/d, closely resembling the global general population (3.95g/d). Behavioral approaches including the use of online dietary coaching (ehealth) and feedback using data from 24-h urine collections may be useful to successfully lower dietary sodium intake, aiming to improve cardio-renal outcomes in patients with CKD. PMID:27041482

  15. Macrophages in Vascular Inflammation: Origins and Functions.

    PubMed

    Decano, Julius L; Mattson, Peter C; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages influence various processes of cardiovascular inflammation. Whether they are of embryonic or post-natal hematopoietic origin, their balance in differential activation may direct the course of inflammation. Accelerated macrophage activation and accumulation through a pro-inflammatory signaling pathway may result in extensive tissue damage, adverse repair, and worsened clinical outcomes. Attenuation of such a mechanism and/or promotion of the anti-inflammatory macrophage activation may lead to early resolution of inflammation. Elucidating multiple novel mechanisms of monocyte and macrophage activation leads to a better understanding of their roles in vascular inflammation. In turn, this begets better therapeutic target identification and biomarker discovery. Combined with increasingly sensitive and specific imaging techniques, we continue to push back early detection and monitoring to provide us with a greater window for disease modification. The potential success of cytokine-targeted therapy will be solid proof of the inflammatory hypothesis of atherothrombosis. PMID:27125207

  16. Inflammation and Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    The invited special lecture at the 76th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society focused on the central role of inflammation in vascular injury and repair. Early studies pioneered the concept that mechanical injury, such as balloon angioplasty and endovascular stent deployment, elicits an inflammatory response from the vessel wall. This hypothesis was developed and substantiated at a time when the prevailing dogma viewed restenosis following angioplasty as a primarily proliferative smooth muscle cell disease. Antibody targeting of Mac-1 reduced leukocyte accumulation and limited neointimal formation following balloon injury or stent implantation. Genetic absence of Mac-1 resulted in diminished leukocyte accumulation and neointimal thickening after carotid artery injury in mice. In the course of those studies, our laboratory made fundamental discoveries regarding the mechanism of leukocyte recruitment at sites of vascular injury and identified platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, a component of the GPIb-IX-V complex, as the previously unknown platelet counter-receptor for Mac-1. Follow-on studies have focused extensively on the structure, function, and signaling of the leukocyte integrin Mac-1. The binding site for GPIbα in Mac-1 has been mapped and subsequently showed that leukocyte engagement of platelet GPIbα via Mac-1 is critical not only for the biological response to vascular injury, but also for thrombosis, vasculitis, glomerulonephritis, and multiple sclerosis, thereby advancing the hypothesis that virtually all inflammation is platelet-dependent. Furthermore, ligand engagement of Mac-1 initiates a novel gene program that promotes inflammation by activating NFκB and downregulating the expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxp1 that controls monocyte differentiation. Small molecule inhibitors of Mac-1 function have been pursued, including targeting of Mac-1-GPIbα binding or the downstream tyrosine kinase spleen tyrosine kinase

  17. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    PubMed

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety. PMID:25078411

  18. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  19. Role of mitochondria in ischemic acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Burke, T J; Wilson, D R; Levi, M; Gordon, J A; Arnold, P E; Schrier, R W

    1983-01-01

    Ischemic ARF is characterized by progressive mitochondrial accumulation of Ca++ which is inversely correlated with the level of oxidative phosphorylation. At least two possibilities exist which would be compatible with these data 1) depressed respiration leads to Ca++ accumulation or 2) increased mitochondrial Ca++ leads to reduced mitochondrial respiration. We favor the latter hypothesis for the reasons outlined above; furthermore, this conclusion is supported by the observations of Lehninger, made some 20 years ago: first, that either oxidative phosphorylation or mitochondrial Ca++ accumulation can be accomplished by intact mitochondria but that these events cannot occur simultaneously and second, that Ca++ accumulation takes precedence over oxidative phosphorylation. Our observation made during post-ischemic reflow that mitochondrial Ca++ accumulation occurs to a significant degree, strongly suggest a potential role for mitochondrial Ca++ overload in the pathogenesis of ARF. Nevertheless, this is not an irreversible pathogenetic process. Clearly, impermeant solutes, vasodilators and Ca++ membrane blockers will alter the natural history of this injury and prevent the severity of the functional defect. A common mechanism of action may involve direct or indirect modification of cellular Ca++ overload in renal vascular and epithelial tissue. The vascular smooth muscle may then revert to a less constricted state with a subsequent more rapid recovery of renal blood flow and that the renal epithelial cell death may be minimized thereby reducing tubular obstruction. PMID:6883804

  20. Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland: Safe vascular access 2016.

    PubMed

    Bodenham Chair, A; Babu, S; Bennett, J; Binks, R; Fee, P; Fox, B; Johnston, A J; Klein, A A; Langton, J A; Mclure, H; Tighe, S Q M

    2016-05-01

    Safe vascular access is integral to anaesthetic and critical care practice, but procedures are a frequent source of patient adverse events. Ensuring safe and effective approaches to vascular catheter insertion should be a priority for all practitioners. New technology such as ultrasound and other imaging has increased the number of tools available. This guidance was created using review of current practice and literature, as well as expert opinion. The result is a consensus document which provides practical advice on the safe insertion and removal of vascular access devices. PMID:26888253

  1. Late biological effects of heavy charged particles: Cataracts, vascular injury and life shortening in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.; Jose, J. G.; Barker, M. E.; Alpen, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Risks associated with extended habitation in a space environment, particularly hazards to space workers that might result from exposure to high energy heavy ion particles (HZE), were studied. Biological effects of HZE were investigated in mice to assess their potential adverse health hazards. The potential effects of HZE particles on the crystalline lens of the eye and the carcinogenic effects and blood vessel (vascular) damage from radiation were evaluated by a risk assessment. Animal experiments to evaluate dose response relationships for tumor induction/promotion and for vascular injury were introduced. Cataract productions and preliminary results on cacinogenic and vascular effects are presented for perspective.

  2. Dyslipidemia Induced by Drugs Used for the Prevention and Treatment of Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2011-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major vascular risk factor. Interestingly, several agents used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases have an adverse effect on the lipid profile. In addition, agents belonging to the same class (e.g. beta blockers) can have significantly different actions on lipid levels. We summarize the effects of drugs used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases on the lipid profile. These effects should be considered when selecting a specific agent, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:21769302

  3. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  4. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  5. Renal oxidative stress, oxygenation, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Nordquist, Lina

    2011-11-01

    Hypertension is closely associated with progressive kidney dysfunction, manifested as glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, proteinuria, and eventually declining glomerular filtration. The postulated mechanism for development of glomerulosclerosis is barotrauma caused by increased capillary pressure, but the reason for development of interstitial fibrosis and the subsequently reduced kidney function is less clear. However, it has been hypothesized that tissue hypoxia induces fibrogenesis and progressive renal failure. This is very interesting, since recent reports highlight several different mechanisms resulting in altered oxygen handling and availability in the hypertensive kidney. Such mechanisms include decreased renal blood flow due to increased vascular tone induced by ANG II that limits oxygen delivery and increases oxidative stress, resulting in increased mitochondrial oxygen usage, increased oxygen usage for tubular electrolyte transport, and shunting of oxygen from arterial to venous blood in preglomerular vessels. It has been shown in several studies that interventions to prevent oxidative stress and to restore kidney tissue oxygenation prevent progression of kidney dysfunction. Furthermore, inhibition of ANG II activity, by either blocking ANG II type 1 receptors or angiotensin-converting enzyme, or by preventing oxidative stress by administration of antioxidants also results in improved blood pressure control. Therefore, it seems likely that tissue hypoxia in the hypertensive kidney contributes to progression of kidney damage, and perhaps also persistence the high blood pressure. PMID:21832206

  6. Acute renal dysfunction following hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Simon J; Berry, Olivia M B; Goddard, Jane; Keating, John F

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the incidence, risk factors and outcome of acute renal dysfunction (ARD) in patients with a fractured neck of femur. 170 consecutive patients were prospectively included in the Scottish Hip Fracture Audit database and retrospectively analysed. Historically, lack of consensus definition has hindered accurate reporting of ARD. ARD was defined using the 'RIFLE' criteria. 27 patients (16%) developed ARD. Risk factors were male sex, vascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and pre-morbid use of nephrotoxic medications (p<0.01). Inpatient, 30- and 120-day mortality was higher in the ARD group 19%, 22% and 41% respectively, versus 0%, 4% and 13% in the non-ARD group (p<0.01). Length of hospital stay was significantly longer in the ARD group. Pre- and post-operative complications were 12 and 5 times more frequent respectively in the ARD group (p<0.01). Awareness of risk factors and serial measurements of renal function allow early identification and focused monitoring of these patients. PMID:19729159

  7. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y C

    2016-04-15

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  8. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  9. Hyperphosphatemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Indridason, Olafur S; Quarles, L Darryl

    2002-07-01

    Hyperphosphatemia occurs universally in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) unless efforts are made to prevent positive phosphate balance. Positive phosphate balance results from the loss of renal elimination of phosphate and continued obligatory intestinal absorption of dietary phosphate. Increased efflux of phosphate from bone because of excess parathyroid hormone-mediated bone resorption can also contribute to increased serum phosphate concentrations in the setting of severe hyperparathyroidism. It is important to treat hyperphosphatemia because it contributes to the pathogenesis of hyperparathyroidism, vascular calcifications, and increased cardiovascular mortality in ESRD patients. Attaining a neutral phosphate balance, which is the key to the management of hyperphosphatemia in ESRD, is a challenge. Control of phosphorus depends on its removal during dialysis and the limitation of gastrointestinal absorption by dietary phosphate restriction and chelation of phosphate. Knowledge of the quantitative aspects of phosphate balance is useful in optimizing our use of phosphate binders, dialysis frequency, and vitamin D sterols. The development of new phosphate binders and efforts to find new ways to inhibit gastrointestinal absorption of phosphate will lead to improvements in the control of serum phosphate levels in ESRD. PMID:12203200

  10. Radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions: vascular lesions with endothelial cell atypia presenting in the radiation port of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Tschen, Jaime A; MacFarlane, Deborah F

    2014-01-01

    Atypical vascular lesions are an uncommon adverse sequela to the radiotherapy of tumors. Many characteristics are shared between atypical vascular lesions caused by radiation port and well-differentiated radiation-induced angiosarcomas. The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical literature using PubMed, searching the terms acquired, atypical, benign, lymphangioma, lymphangioendothelioma, lymphangiomatous, lesion, papules, progressive, and vascular. Patient reports and previous reviews of the subject were critically assessed and the salient features are presented. Atypical vascular lesions associated with the radiation port present as clinically innocuous flesh-colored to erythematous papules or plaques. The condition presents within the radiation field, approximately 3 years after initial treatment. While the exact me chanism remains to be elucidated, growing evidence supports an association between radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions and radiation-induced angiosarcomas. Atypical vascular lesions within a radiation port are suggested to be in a state of morphologic continuum, which may progress into the more aggressive, malignant angiosarcoma. The authors recommend consideration for biopsy of new skin lesions within or adjacent to radiation. While it is clear that atypical vascular lesions caused by radiation are not equivalent to angiosarcoma, growing evidence supports that radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions may progress to angiosarcoma in some patients; therefore, the authors recommend excision of the lesion with margins depending on clinical judgment and the lesion encountered. PMID:25823080

  11. MicroRNAs in vascular tissue engineering and post-ischemic neovascularization☆

    <